Science.gov

Sample records for mutation impairs trafficking

  1. Slitrk Missense Mutations Associated with Neuropsychiatric Disorders Distinctively Impair Slitrk Trafficking and Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyeyeon; Han, Kyung Ah; Won, Seoung Youn; Kim, Ho Min; Lee, Young-Ho; Ko, Jaewon; Um, Ji Won

    2016-01-01

    Slit- and Trk-like (Slitrks) are a six-member family of synapse organizers that control excitatory and inhibitory synapse formation by forming trans-synaptic adhesions with LAR receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Intriguingly, genetic mutations of Slitrks have been associated with a multitude of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, nothing is known about the neuronal and synaptic consequences of these mutations. Here, we report the structural and functional effects on synapses of various rare de novo mutations identified in patients with schizophrenia or Tourette syndrome. A number of single amino acid substitutions in Slitrk1 (N400I or T418S) or Slitrk4 (V206I or I578V) reduced their surface expression levels. These substitutions impaired glycosylation of Slitrks expressed in HEK293T cells, caused retention of Slitrks in the endoplasmic reticulum and cis-Golgi compartment in COS-7 cells and neurons, and abolished Slitrk binding to PTPδ. Furthermore, these substitutions eliminated the synapse-inducing activity of Slitrks, abolishing their functional effects on synapse density in cultured neurons. Strikingly, a valine-to-methionine mutation in Slitrk2 (V89M) compromised synapse formation activity in cultured neuron, without affecting surface transport, expression, or synapse-inducing activity in coculture assays. Similar deleterious effects were observed upon introduction of the corresponding valine-to-methionine mutation into Slitrk1 (V85M), suggesting that this conserved valine residue plays a key role in maintaining the synaptic functions of Slitrks. Collectively, these data indicate that inactivation of distinct cellular mechanisms caused by specific Slitrk dysfunctions may underlie Slitrk-associated neuropsychiatric disorders in humans, and provide a robust cellular readout for the development of knowledge-based therapies. PMID:27812321

  2. Slitrk Missense Mutations Associated with Neuropsychiatric Disorders Distinctively Impair Slitrk Trafficking and Synapse Formation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyeyeon; Han, Kyung Ah; Won, Seoung Youn; Kim, Ho Min; Lee, Young-Ho; Ko, Jaewon; Um, Ji Won

    2016-01-01

    Slit- and Trk-like (Slitrks) are a six-member family of synapse organizers that control excitatory and inhibitory synapse formation by forming trans-synaptic adhesions with LAR receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Intriguingly, genetic mutations of Slitrks have been associated with a multitude of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, nothing is known about the neuronal and synaptic consequences of these mutations. Here, we report the structural and functional effects on synapses of various rare de novo mutations identified in patients with schizophrenia or Tourette syndrome. A number of single amino acid substitutions in Slitrk1 (N400I or T418S) or Slitrk4 (V206I or I578V) reduced their surface expression levels. These substitutions impaired glycosylation of Slitrks expressed in HEK293T cells, caused retention of Slitrks in the endoplasmic reticulum and cis-Golgi compartment in COS-7 cells and neurons, and abolished Slitrk binding to PTPδ. Furthermore, these substitutions eliminated the synapse-inducing activity of Slitrks, abolishing their functional effects on synapse density in cultured neurons. Strikingly, a valine-to-methionine mutation in Slitrk2 (V89M) compromised synapse formation activity in cultured neuron, without affecting surface transport, expression, or synapse-inducing activity in coculture assays. Similar deleterious effects were observed upon introduction of the corresponding valine-to-methionine mutation into Slitrk1 (V85M), suggesting that this conserved valine residue plays a key role in maintaining the synaptic functions of Slitrks. Collectively, these data indicate that inactivation of distinct cellular mechanisms caused by specific Slitrk dysfunctions may underlie Slitrk-associated neuropsychiatric disorders in humans, and provide a robust cellular readout for the development of knowledge-based therapies.

  3. AP1S3 Mutations Are Associated with Pustular Psoriasis and Impaired Toll-like Receptor 3 Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Setta-Kaffetzi, Niovi; Simpson, Michael A.; Navarini, Alexander A.; Patel, Varsha M.; Lu, Hui-Chun; Allen, Michael H.; Duckworth, Michael; Bachelez, Hervé; Burden, A. David; Choon, Siew-Eng; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Kirby, Brian; Kolios, Antonios; Seyger, Marieke M.B.; Prins, Christa; Smahi, Asma; Trembath, Richard C.; Fraternali, Franca; Smith, Catherine H.; Barker, Jonathan N.; Capon, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) is an evolutionary conserved heterotetramer that promotes vesicular trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the endosomes. The knockout of most murine AP-1 complex subunits is embryonically lethal, so the identification of human disease-associated alleles has the unique potential to deliver insights into gene function. Here, we report two founder mutations (c.11T>G [p.Phe4Cys] and c.97C>T [p.Arg33Trp]) in AP1S3, the gene encoding AP-1 complex subunit σ1C, in 15 unrelated individuals with a severe autoinflammatory skin disorder known as pustular psoriasis. Because the variants are predicted to destabilize the 3D structure of the AP-1 complex, we generated AP1S3-knockdown cell lines to investigate the consequences of AP-1 deficiency in skin keratinocytes. We found that AP1S3 silencing disrupted the endosomal translocation of the innate pattern-recognition receptor TLR-3 (Toll-like receptor 3) and resulted in a marked inhibition of downstream signaling. These findings identify pustular psoriasis as an autoinflammatory phenotype caused by defects in vesicular trafficking and demonstrate a requirement of AP-1 for Toll-like receptor homeostasis. PMID:24791904

  4. Impaired intracellular trafficking defines early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hunn, Benjamin H M; Cragg, Stephanie J; Bolam, J Paul; Spillantini, Maria-Grazia; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an insidious and incurable neurodegenerative disease, and represents a significant cost to individuals, carers, and ageing societies. It is defined at post-mortem by the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra together with the presence of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. We examine here the role of α-synuclein and other cellular transport proteins implicated in PD and how their aberrant activity may be compounded by the unique anatomy of the dopaminergic neuron. This review uses multiple lines of evidence from genetic studies, human tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells, and refined animal models to argue that prodromal PD can be defined as a disease of impaired intracellular trafficking. Dysfunction of the dopaminergic synapse heralds trafficking impairment.

  5. Pharmacological rescue of trafficking-impaired ATP-sensitive potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory M.; Chen, Pei-Chun; Devaraneni, Prasanna; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2013-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels link cell metabolism to membrane excitability and are involved in a wide range of physiological processes including hormone secretion, control of vascular tone, and protection of cardiac and neuronal cells against ischemic injuries. In pancreatic β-cells, KATP channels play a key role in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and gain or loss of channel function results in neonatal diabetes or congenital hyperinsulinism, respectively. The β-cell KATP channel is formed by co-assembly of four Kir6.2 inwardly rectifying potassium channel subunits encoded by KCNJ11 and four sulfonylurea receptor 1 subunits encoded by ABCC8. Many mutations in ABCC8 or KCNJ11 cause loss of channel function, thus, congenital hyperinsulinism by hampering channel biogenesis and hence trafficking to the cell surface. The trafficking defects caused by a subset of these mutations can be corrected by sulfonylureas, KATP channel antagonists that have long been used to treat type 2 diabetes. More recently, carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant that is thought to target primarily voltage-gated sodium channels has been shown to correct KATP channel trafficking defects. This article reviews studies to date aimed at understanding the mechanisms by which mutations impair channel biogenesis and trafficking and the mechanisms by which pharmacological ligands overcome channel trafficking defects. Insight into channel structure-function relationships and therapeutic implications from these studies are discussed. PMID:24399968

  6. Carbamazepine as a novel small molecule corrector of trafficking-impaired ATP-sensitive potassium channels identified in congenital hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Chun; Olson, Erik M; Zhou, Qing; Kryukova, Yelena; Sampson, Heidi M; Thomas, David Y; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2013-07-19

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels consisting of sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) and the potassium channel Kir6.2 play a key role in insulin secretion by coupling metabolic signals to β-cell membrane potential. Mutations in SUR1 and Kir6.2 that impair channel trafficking to the cell surface lead to loss of channel function and congenital hyperinsulinism. We report that carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant, corrects the trafficking defects of mutant KATP channels previously identified in congenital hyperinsulinism. Strikingly, of the 19 SUR1 mutations examined, only those located in the first transmembrane domain of SUR1 responded to the drug. We show that unlike that reported for several other protein misfolding diseases, carbamazepine did not correct KATP channel trafficking defects by activating autophagy; rather, it directly improved the biogenesis efficiency of mutant channels along the secretory pathway. In addition to its effect on channel trafficking, carbamazepine also inhibited KATP channel activity. Upon subsequent removal of carbamazepine, however, the function of rescued channels was recovered. Importantly, combination of the KATP channel opener diazoxide and carbamazepine led to enhanced mutant channel function without carbamazepine washout. The corrector effect of carbamazepine on mutant KATP channels was also demonstrated in rat and human β-cells with an accompanying increase in channel activity. Our findings identify carbamazepine as a novel small molecule corrector that may be used to restore KATP channel expression and function in a subset of congenital hyperinsulinism patients.

  7. Carbamazepine as a Novel Small Molecule Corrector of Trafficking-impaired ATP-sensitive Potassium Channels Identified in Congenital Hyperinsulinism*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Chun; Olson, Erik M.; Zhou, Qing; Kryukova, Yelena; Sampson, Heidi M.; Thomas, David Y.; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2013-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels consisting of sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) and the potassium channel Kir6.2 play a key role in insulin secretion by coupling metabolic signals to β-cell membrane potential. Mutations in SUR1 and Kir6.2 that impair channel trafficking to the cell surface lead to loss of channel function and congenital hyperinsulinism. We report that carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant, corrects the trafficking defects of mutant KATP channels previously identified in congenital hyperinsulinism. Strikingly, of the 19 SUR1 mutations examined, only those located in the first transmembrane domain of SUR1 responded to the drug. We show that unlike that reported for several other protein misfolding diseases, carbamazepine did not correct KATP channel trafficking defects by activating autophagy; rather, it directly improved the biogenesis efficiency of mutant channels along the secretory pathway. In addition to its effect on channel trafficking, carbamazepine also inhibited KATP channel activity. Upon subsequent removal of carbamazepine, however, the function of rescued channels was recovered. Importantly, combination of the KATP channel opener diazoxide and carbamazepine led to enhanced mutant channel function without carbamazepine washout. The corrector effect of carbamazepine on mutant KATP channels was also demonstrated in rat and human β-cells with an accompanying increase in channel activity. Our findings identify carbamazepine as a novel small molecule corrector that may be used to restore KATP channel expression and function in a subset of congenital hyperinsulinism patients. PMID:23744072

  8. Mutant Huntingtin Impairs Axonal Trafficking in Mammalian Neurons In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Trushina, Eugenia; Dyer, Roy B.; Badger, John D.; Ure, Daren; Eide, Lars; Tran, David D.; Vrieze, Brent T.; Legendre-Guillemin, Valerie; McPherson, Peter S.; Mandavilli, Bhaskar S.; Van Houten, Bennett; Zeitlin, Scott; McNiven, Mark; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hayden, Michael; Parisi, Joseph E.; Seeberg, Erling; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Doyle, Kelly; Bender, Anna; Chacko, Celin; McMurray, Cynthia T.

    2004-01-01

    Recent data in invertebrates demonstrated that huntingtin (htt) is essential for fast axonal trafficking. Here, we provide direct and functional evidence that htt is involved in fast axonal trafficking in mammals. Moreover, expression of full-length mutant htt (mhtt) impairs vesicular and mitochondrial trafficking in mammalian neurons in vitro and in whole animals in vivo. Particularly, mitochondria become progressively immobilized and stop more frequently in neurons from transgenic animals. These defects occurred early in development prior to the onset of measurable neurological or mitochondrial abnormalities. Consistent with a progressive loss of function, wild-type htt, trafficking motors, and mitochondrial components were selectively sequestered by mhtt in human Huntington's disease-affected brain. Data provide a model for how loss of htt function causes toxicity; mhtt-mediated aggregation sequesters htt and components of trafficking machinery leading to loss of mitochondrial motility and eventual mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:15340079

  9. Altered trafficking of mutated growth factor receptors and their associated molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Nobuhide; Satake, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Ligand-stimulated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are phosphorylated/ubiquitinated, endocytosed and transported to the lysosomes via endosomes/multivesicular bodies, resulting in the attenuation of signal transmission. If this physiological mechanism of RTK signal downregulation is perturbed, signal transduction persists and may contribute to cellular transformation. This article presents several such examples. In some cases, endocytosis is impaired, and the activated RTK remains on the plasma membrane. In other cases, the activated RTK is endocytosed into endosomes/multivesicular bodies, but not subsequently sorted to the lysosomes for degradation. The latter cases indicate that even endocytosed RTKs can transmit signals. Transport of RTKs is accomplished via the formation and movement of membrane vesicles. Blockage or delay of endocytosis/trafficking can be caused by genetic alterations in the RTK itself or by mutations in CBL, Arf GAPs, or other components involved in internalization and vesicle transport. A survey of the literature indicates that, in some cases, even RTKs synthesized de novo can initiate signaling at the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi before reaching the plasma membrane. The spectrum of molecules targeted by the signal is likely to be different between cell surface- and endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi-localized RTKs. PMID:25210647

  10. M-CSF receptor mutations in hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids impair not only kinase activity but also surface expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hiyoshi, Masateru; Hashimoto, Michihiro; Yukihara, Mamiko; Bhuyan, Farzana; Suzu, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Many mutations were identified in Fms as a putative genetic cause of HDLS. •All of the mutations tested severely impair the kinase activity. •Most of the mutations also impair the trafficking to the cell surface. •These defects further suggest that HDLS is caused by a loss of Fms function. -- Abstract: The tyrosine kinase Fms, the cell surface receptor for M-CSF and IL-34, is critical for microglial proliferation and differentiation in the brain. Recently, a number of mutations have been identified in Fms as a putative genetic cause of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), implying an important role of microglial dysfunction in HDLS pathogenesis. In this study, we initially confirmed that 11 mutations, which reside within the ATP-binding or major tyrosine kinase domain, caused a severe impairment of ligand-induced Fms auto-phosphorylation. Intriguingly, we found that 10 of the 11 mutants also showed a weak cell surface expression, which was associated with a concomitant increase in the low molecular weight hypo-N-glycosylated immature gp130Fms-like species. Indeed, the mutant proteins heavily accumulated to the Golgi-like perinuclear regions. These results indicate that all of the Fms mutations tested severely impair the kinase activity and most of the mutations also impair the trafficking to the cell surface, further suggesting that HDLS is caused by the loss of Fms function.

  11. BIN1 is Reduced and Cav1.2 Trafficking is Impaired in Human Failing Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ting-Ting; Smyth, James W.; Chu, Kevin Y.; Vogan, Jacob M.; Fong, Tina S.; Jensen, Brian C.; Fang, Kun; Halushka, Marc K.; Russell, Stuart D.; Colecraft, Henry; Hoopes, Charles W.; Ocorr, Karen; Chi, Neil C.; Shaw, Robin M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a growing epidemic and a typical aspect of heart failure pathophysiology is altered calcium transients. Normal cardiac calcium transients are initiated by Cav1.2 channels at cardiac T-tubules. BIN1 is a membrane scaffolding protein that causes Cav1.2 to traffic to T-tubules in healthy hearts. The mechanisms of Cav1.2 trafficking in heart failure are not known. Objective To study BIN1 expression and its effect on Cav1.2 trafficking in failing hearts. Methods Intact myocardium and freshly isolated cardiomyocytes from non-failing and end-stage failing human hearts were used to study BIN1 expression and Cav1.2 localization. To confirm Cav1.2 surface expression dependence on BIN1, patch clamp recordings were performed of Cav1.2 current in cell lines with and without trafficking competent BIN1. Also, in adult mouse cardiomyocytes, surface Cav1.2 and calcium transients were studied after shRNA mediated knockdown of BIN1. For a functional readout in intact heart, calcium transients and cardiac contractility were analyzed in a zebrafish model with morpholino mediated knockdown of BIN1. Results BIN1 expression is significantly decreased in failing cardiomyocytes at both mRNA (30% down) and protein (36% down) levels. Peripheral Cav1.2 is reduced 42% by imaging and biochemical T-tubule fraction of Cav1.2 is reduced 68%. Total calcium current is reduced 41% in a cell line expressing non-trafficking BIN1 mutant. In mouse cardiomyocytes, BIN1 knockdown decreases surface Cav1.2 and impairs calcium transients. In zebrafish hearts, BIN1 knockdown causes a 75% reduction in calcium transients and severe ventricular contractile dysfunction. Conclusions The data indicate that BIN1 is significantly reduced in human heart failure, and this reduction impairs Cav1.2 trafficking, calcium transients, and contractility. PMID:22138472

  12. Impaired Leukocyte Trafficking and Skin Inflammatory Responses in Hamsters Lacking a Functional Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Brian J.; Cable, Erin J.; Patel, Priyesh N.; Pyter, Leah M.; Onishi, Kenneth G.; Stevenson, Tyler J.; Ruby, Norman F.; Bradley, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    The immune system is under strong circadian control, and circadian desynchrony is a risk factor for metabolic disorders, inflammatory responses and cancer. Signaling pathways that maintain circadian rhythms (CRs) in immune function in vivo, and the mechanisms by which circadian desynchrony impairs immune function, remain to be fully-identified. These experiments tested the hypothesis that the hypothalamic circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives CRs in the immune system, using a non-invasive model of SCN circadian arrhythmia. Robust CRs in blood leukocyte trafficking, with a peak during the early light phase (ZT4) and nadir in the early dark phase (ZT18), were absent in arrhythmic hamsters, as were CRs in spleen clock gene (per1, bmal1) expression, indicating that a functional pacemaker in the SCN is required for the generation of CRs in leukocyte trafficking and for driving peripheral clocks in secondary lymphoid organs. Pinealectomy was without effect on CRs in leukocyte trafficking, but abolished CRs in spleen clock gene expression, indicating that nocturnal melatonin secretion is necessary for communicating circadian time information to the spleen. CRs in trafficking of antigen presenting cells (CD11c+ dendritic cells) in the skin were abolished, and antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity skin inflammatory responses were markedly impaired in arrhythmic hamsters. The SCN drives robust CRs in leukocyte trafficking and lymphoid clock gene expression; the latter of which is not expressed in the absence of melatonin. Robust entrainment of the circadian pacemaker provides a signal critical to diurnal rhythms in immunosurveilliance and optimal memory T-cell dependent immune responses. PMID:23474187

  13. Astrocytic Pathological Calcium Homeostasis and Impaired Vesicle Trafficking in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vardjan, Nina; Verkhratsky, Alexej; Zorec, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Although the central nervous system (CNS) consists of highly heterogeneous populations of neurones and glial cells, clustered into diverse anatomical regions with specific functions, there are some conditions, including alertness, awareness and attention that require simultaneous, coordinated and spatially homogeneous activity within a large area of the brain. During such events, the brain, representing only about two percent of body mass, but consuming one fifth of body glucose at rest, needs additional energy to be produced. How simultaneous energy procurement in a relatively extended area of the brain takes place is poorly understood. This mechanism is likely to be impaired in neurodegeneration, for example in Alzheimer’s disease, the hallmark of which is brain hypometabolism. Astrocytes, the main neural cell type producing and storing glycogen, a form of energy in the brain, also hold the key to metabolic and homeostatic support in the central nervous system and are impaired in neurodegeneration, contributing to the slow decline of excitation-energy coupling in the brain. Many mechanisms are affected, including cell-to-cell signalling. An important question is how changes in cellular signalling, a process taking place in a rather short time domain, contribute to the neurodegeneration that develops over decades. In this review we focus initially on the slow dynamics of Alzheimer’s disease, and on the activity of locus coeruleus, a brainstem nucleus involved in arousal. Subsequently, we overview much faster processes of vesicle traffic and cytosolic calcium dynamics, both of which shape the signalling landscape of astrocyte-neurone communication in health and neurodegeneration. PMID:28208745

  14. Microglial beclin 1 regulates retromer trafficking and phagocytosis and is impaired in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lucin, Kurt M; O'Brien, Caitlin E; Bieri, Gregor; Czirr, Eva; Mosher, Kira I; Abbey, Rachelle J; Mastroeni, Diego F; Rogers, Joseph; Spencer, Brian; Masliah, Eliezer; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2013-09-04

    Phagocytosis controls CNS homeostasis by facilitating the removal of unwanted cellular debris. Accordingly, impairments in different receptors or proteins involved in phagocytosis result in enhanced inflammation and neurodegeneration. While various studies have identified extrinsic factors that modulate phagocytosis in health and disease, key intracellular regulators are less understood. Here we show that the autophagy protein beclin 1 is required for efficient phagocytosis in vitro and in mouse brains. Furthermore, we show that beclin 1-mediated impairments in phagocytosis are associated with dysfunctional recruitment of retromer to phagosomal membranes, reduced retromer levels, and impaired recycling of phagocytic receptors CD36 and Trem2. Interestingly, microglia isolated from human Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains show significantly reduced beclin 1 and retromer protein levels. These findings position beclin 1 as a link between autophagy, retromer trafficking, and receptor-mediated phagocytosis and provide insight into mechanisms by which phagocytosis is regulated and how it may become impaired in AD.

  15. The AQP2 mutation V71M causes nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in humans but does not impair the function of a bacterial homolog.

    PubMed

    Klein, Noreen; Kümmerer, Nadine; Hobernik, Dominika; Schneider, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Several point mutations have been identified in human aquaporins, but their effects on the function of the respective aquaporins are mostly enigmatic. We analyzed the impact of the aquaporin 2 mutation V71M, which causes nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in humans, on aquaporin structure and activity, using the bacterial aquaglyceroporin GlpF as a model. Importantly, the sequence and structure around the V71M mutation is highly conserved between aquaporin 2 and GlpF. The V71M mutation neither impairs substrate flux nor oligomerization of the aquaglyceroporin. Therefore, the human aquaporin 2 mutant V71M is most likely active, but cellular trafficking is probably impaired.

  16. Congenital hypothyroidism mutations affect common folding and trafficking in the α/β-hydrolase fold proteins.

    PubMed

    De Jaco, Antonella; Dubi, Noga; Camp, Shelley; Taylor, Palmer

    2012-12-01

    The α/β-hydrolase fold superfamily of proteins is composed of structurally related members that, despite great diversity in their catalytic, recognition, adhesion and chaperone functions, share a common fold governed by homologous residues and conserved disulfide bridges. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms within the α/β-hydrolase fold domain in various family members have been found for congenital endocrine, metabolic and nervous system disorders. By examining the amino acid sequence from the various proteins, mutations were found to be prevalent in conserved residues within the α/β-hydrolase fold of the homologous proteins. This is the case for the thyroglobulin mutations linked to congenital hypothyroidism. To address whether correct folding of the common domain is required for protein export, we inserted the thyroglobulin mutations at homologous positions in two correlated but simpler α/β-hydrolase fold proteins known to be exported to the cell surface: neuroligin3 and acetylcholinesterase. Here we show that these mutations in the cholinesterase homologous region alter the folding properties of the α/β-hydrolase fold domain, which are reflected in defects in protein trafficking, folding and function, and ultimately result in retention of the partially processed proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Accordingly, mutations at conserved residues may be transferred amongst homologous proteins to produce common processing defects despite disparate functions, protein complexity and tissue-specific expression of the homologous proteins. More importantly, a similar assembly of the α/β-hydrolase fold domain tertiary structure among homologous members of the superfamily is required for correct trafficking of the proteins to their final destination.

  17. A Novel Strategy Using Cardiac Sodium Channel Polymorphic Fragments to Rescue Trafficking Deficient SCN5A Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; Dudash, Lynn A.; Du, Xi X.; Heller, Lisa; Poelzing, Steven; Ficker, Eckhard; Deschênes, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Background Brugada Syndrome (BrS) is associated with mutations in the cardiac sodium channel (Nav1.5). We previously reported that the function of a trafficking-deficient BrS Nav1.5 mutation, R282H, could be restored by co-expression with the sodium channel polymorphism H558R. Here, we tested the hypothesis that peptide fragments from Nav1.5, spanning the H558R-polymorphism, can be used to restore trafficking of trafficking-deficient BrS sodium channel mutations. Methods and Results Whole-cell patch-clamping revealed that co-transfection in HEK293 cells of the R282H channel with either the 40 or 20 amino acid cDNA fragments of Nav1.5 containing the H558R polymorphism restored trafficking of this mutant channel. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) suggested that the trafficking-deficient R282H channel was misfolded and this was corrected upon co-expression with R558-containing peptides which restored trafficking of the R282H channel. Importantly, we also expressed the peptide spanning the H558R-polymorphism with 8 additional BrS Nav1.5 mutations with reduced currents, and demonstrated that the peptide was able to restore significant sodium currents in 4 of them. Conclusions In the present study, we demonstrated that small peptides, spanning the H558R-polymorphism, are sufficient to restore trafficking defect of BrS-associated Nav1.5 mutations. Our findings suggest that it might be possible to use short-cDNA constructs as a novel strategy that is tailored to specific disease-causing mutants of BrS. PMID:21840964

  18. GRIN1 mutation associated with intellectual disability alters NMDA receptor trafficking and function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjuan; Shieh, Christine; Swanger, Sharon A; Tankovic, Anel; Au, Margaret; McGuire, Marianne; Tagliati, Michele; Graham, John M; Madan-Khetarpal, Suneeta; Traynelis, Stephen F; Yuan, Hongjie; Pierson, Tyler Mark

    2017-02-23

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) play important roles in brain development and neurological disease. We report two individuals with similar dominant de novo GRIN1 mutations (c.1858 G>A and c.1858 G>C; both p.G620R). Both individuals presented at birth with developmental delay and hypotonia associated with behavioral abnormalities and stereotypical movements. Recombinant NMDARs containing the mutant GluN1-G620R together with either GluN2A or GluN2B were evaluated for changes in their trafficking to the plasma membrane and their electrophysiological properties. GluN1-G620R/GluN2A complexes showed a mild reduction in trafficking, a ~2-fold decrease in glutamate and glycine potency, a strong decrease in sensitivity to Mg(2+) block, and a significant reduction of current responses to a maximal effective concentration of agonists. GluN1-G620R/GluN2B complexes showed significantly reduced delivery of protein to the cell surface associated with similarly altered electrophysiology. These results indicate these individuals may have suffered neurodevelopmental deficits as a result of the decreased presence of GluN1-G620R/GluN2B complexes on the neuronal surface during embryonic brain development and reduced current responses of GluN1-G620R-containing NMDARs after birth. These cases emphasize the importance of comprehensive functional characterization of de novo mutations and illustrates how a combination of several distinct features of NMDAR expression, trafficking and function can be present and influence phenotype.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 23 February 2017; doi:10.1038/jhg.2017.19.

  19. Matrilin-3 mutations that cause chondrodysplasias interfere with protein trafficking while a mutation associated with hand osteoarthritis does not

    PubMed Central

    Otten, C; Wagener, R; Paulsson, M; Zaucke, F

    2005-01-01

    Several mutations in the extracellular matrix protein matrilin-3 cause a heterogeneous disease spectrum affecting skeletal tissues. We introduced three disease causing point mutations leading to single amino acid exchanges (R116W, T298M, C299S) in matrilin-3 and expressed the corresponding proteins in primary articular chondrocytes to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms at the cellular level. Expression levels, processing, and the secretion pattern of a mutation linked to hand osteoarthritis (T298M) were similar to the wildtype protein, whereas the two other mutants were poorly expressed and hardly detectable in supernatants of transiently transfected cells. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated that mutants R116W and C299S are retained and accumulate within the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). Their further trafficking to the Golgi compartment seems to be disturbed, whereas T298M is secreted normally. In cells transfected with the wildtype and T298M constructs, a matrilin-3 containing filamentous network was formed surrounding the cells, whereas in the case of R116W and C299S such structures were completely absent. These observations are similar to those for mutations in the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) leading to multiple epiphyseal dysplasia and pseudoachondroplasia suggesting that retention and accumulation of cartilage proteins in the ER might be a general mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of chondrodysplasias. PMID:16199550

  20. Congenital Hyperinsulinism–Associated ABCC8 Mutations That Cause Defective Trafficking of ATP-Sensitive K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei-Fei; Lin, Yu-Wen; MacMullen, Courtney; Ganguly, Arupa; Stanley, Charles A.; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is a disease characterized by persistent insulin secretion despite severe hypoglycemia. Mutations in the pancreatic ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel proteins sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) and Kir6.2, encoded by ABCC8 and KCNJ11, respectively, is the most common cause of the disease. Many mutations in SUR1 render the channel unable to traffic to the cell surface, thereby reducing channel function. Previous studies have shown that for some SUR1 trafficking mutants, the defects could be corrected by treating cells with sulfonylureas or diazoxide. The purpose of this study is to identify additional mutations that cause channel biogenesis/trafficking defects and those that are amenable to rescue by pharmacological chaperones. Fifteen previously uncharacterized CHI-associated missense SUR1 mutations were examined for their biogenesis/trafficking defects and responses to pharmacological chaperones, using a combination of immunological and functional assays. Twelve of the 15 mutations analyzed cause reduction in cell surface expression of KATP channels by >50%. Sulfonylureas rescued a subset of the trafficking mutants. By contrast, diazoxide failed to rescue any of the mutants. Strikingly, the mutations rescued by sulfonylureas are all located in the first transmembrane domain of SUR1, designated as TMD0. All TMD0 mutants rescued to the cell surface by the sulfonylurea tolbutamide could be subsequently activated by metabolic inhibition on tolbutamide removal. Our study identifies a group of CHI-causing SUR1 mutations for which the resulting KATP channel trafficking and expression defects may be corrected pharmacologically to restore channel function. PMID:17575084

  1. Mutations of Vasopressin Receptor 2 Including Novel L312S Have Differential Effects on Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Tiulpakov, Anatoly; White, Carl W.; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S.; See, Heng B.; Chan, Audrey S.; Seeber, Ruth M.; Heng, Julian I.; Dedov, Ivan; Pavlos, Nathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD) is a genetic disease first described in 2 unrelated male infants with severe symptomatic hyponatremia. Despite undetectable arginine vasopressin levels, patients have inappropriately concentrated urine resulting in hyponatremia, hypoosmolality, and natriuresis. Here, we describe and functionally characterize a novel vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R) gain-of-function mutation. An L312S substitution in the seventh transmembrane domain was identified in a boy presenting with water-induced hyponatremic seizures at the age of 5.8 years. We show that, compared with wild-type V2R, the L312S mutation results in the constitutive production of cAMP, indicative of the gain-of-function NSIAD profile. Interestingly, like the previously described F229V and I130N NSIAD-causing mutants, this appears to both occur in the absence of notable constitutive β-arrestin2 recruitment and can be reduced by the inverse agonist Tolvaptan. In addition, to understand the effect of various V2R substitutions on the full receptor “life-cycle,” we have used and further developed a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer intracellular localization assay using multiple localization markers validated with confocal microscopy. This allowed us to characterize differences in the constitutive and ligand-induced localization and trafficking profiles of the novel L312S mutation as well as for previously described V2R gain-of-function mutants (NSIAD; R137C and R137L), loss-of-function mutants (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; R137H, R181C, and M311V), and a putative silent V266A V2R polymorphism. In doing so, we describe differences in trafficking between unique V2R substitutions, even at the same amino acid position, therefore highlighting the value of full and thorough characterization of receptor function beyond simple signaling pathway analysis. PMID:27355191

  2. An Eye on Trafficking Genes: Identification of Four Eye Color Mutations in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Paaqua; Maga, Tara; Loshakov, Anna; Singhal, Rishi; Wali, Aminah; Nwankwo, Jennifer; Baron, Kaitlin; Johnson, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Genes that code for proteins involved in organelle biogenesis and intracellular trafficking produce products that are critical in normal cell function . Conserved orthologs of these are present in most or all eukaryotes, including Drosophila melanogaster. Some of these genes were originally identified as eye color mutants with decreases in both types of pigments found in the fly eye. These criteria were used for identification of such genes, four eye color mutations that are not annotated in the genome sequence: chocolate, maroon, mahogany, and red Malpighian tubules were molecularly mapped and their genome sequences have been evaluated. Mapping was performed using deletion analysis and complementation tests. chocolate is an allele of the VhaAC39-1 gene, which is an ortholog of the Vacuolar H+ ATPase AC39 subunit 1. maroon corresponds to the Vps16A gene and its product is part of the HOPS complex, which participates in transport and organelle fusion. red Malpighian tubule is the CG12207 gene, which encodes a protein of unknown function that includes a LysM domain. mahogany is the CG13646 gene, which is predicted to be an amino acid transporter. The strategy of identifying eye color genes based on perturbations in quantities of both types of eye color pigments has proven useful in identifying proteins involved in trafficking and biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles. Mutants of these genes can form the basis of valuable in vivo models to understand these processes. PMID:27558665

  3. An Eye on Trafficking Genes: Identification of Four Eye Color Mutations in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Grant, Paaqua; Maga, Tara; Loshakov, Anna; Singhal, Rishi; Wali, Aminah; Nwankwo, Jennifer; Baron, Kaitlin; Johnson, Diana

    2016-10-13

    Genes that code for proteins involved in organelle biogenesis and intracellular trafficking produce products that are critical in normal cell function . Conserved orthologs of these are present in most or all eukaryotes, including Drosophila melanogaster Some of these genes were originally identified as eye color mutants with decreases in both types of pigments found in the fly eye. These criteria were used for identification of such genes, four eye color mutations that are not annotated in the genome sequence: chocolate, maroon, mahogany, and red Malpighian tubules were molecularly mapped and their genome sequences have been evaluated. Mapping was performed using deletion analysis and complementation tests. chocolate is an allele of the VhaAC39-1 gene, which is an ortholog of the Vacuolar H(+) ATPase AC39 subunit 1. maroon corresponds to the Vps16A gene and its product is part of the HOPS complex, which participates in transport and organelle fusion. red Malpighian tubule is the CG12207 gene, which encodes a protein of unknown function that includes a LysM domain. mahogany is the CG13646 gene, which is predicted to be an amino acid transporter. The strategy of identifying eye color genes based on perturbations in quantities of both types of eye color pigments has proven useful in identifying proteins involved in trafficking and biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles. Mutants of these genes can form the basis of valuable in vivo models to understand these processes.

  4. Functional Rescue of Trafficking-Impaired ABCB4 Mutants by Chemical Chaperones.

    PubMed

    Gordo-Gilart, Raquel; Andueza, Sara; Hierro, Loreto; Jara, Paloma; Alvarez, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3, ABCB4) is a hepatocellular membrane protein that mediates biliary secretion of phosphatidylcholine. Null mutations in ABCB4 gene give rise to severe early-onset cholestatic liver disease. We have previously shown that the disease-associated mutations p.G68R, p.G228R, p.D459H, and p.A934T resulted in retention of ABCB4 in the endoplasmic reticulum, thus failing to target the plasma membrane. In the present study, we tested the ability of two compounds with chaperone-like activity, 4-phenylbutyrate and curcumin, to rescue these ABCB4 mutants by assessing their effects on subcellular localization, protein maturation, and phospholipid efflux capability. Incubation of transfected cells at a reduced temperature (30°C) or exposure to pharmacological doses of either 4-PBA or curcumin restored cell surface expression of mutants G228R and A934T. The delivery of these mutants to the plasma membrane was accompanied by a switch in the ratio of mature to inmature protein forms, leading to a predominant expression of the mature protein. This effect was due to an improvement in the maturation rate and not to the stabilization of the mature forms. Both mutants were also functionally rescued, displaying bile salt-dependent phospholipid efflux activity after addition of 4-PBA or curcumin. Drug-induced rescue was mutant specific, given neither 4-PBA nor curcumin had an effect on the ABCB4 mutants G68R and A934T. Collectively, these data indicate that the functionality of selected trafficking-defective ABCB4 mutants can be recovered by chemical chaperones through restoration of membrane localization, suggesting a potential treatment for patients carrying such mutations.

  5. Pathogenic Mechanism of an Autism-Associated Neuroligin Mutation Involves Altered AMPA-Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Soham; Aoto, Jason; Lee, Sung-Jin; Wernig, Marius; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that bind to presynaptic neurexins. Although the general synaptic role of neuroligins is undisputed, their specific functions at a synapse remain unclear, even controversial. Moreover, many neuroligin gene mutations were associated with autism, but the pathophysiological relevance of these mutations is often unknown, and their mechanisms of action uninvestigated. Here, we examine the synaptic effects of an autism-associated neuroligin-4 substitution (called R704C) which mutates a cytoplasmic arginine residue that is conserved in all neuroligins. We show that the R704C mutation, when introduced into neuroligin-3, enhances the interaction between neuroligin-3 and AMPA-receptors, increases AMPA-receptor internalization, and decreases postsynaptic AMPA-receptor levels. When introduced into neuroligin-4, conversely, the R704C mutation unexpectedly elevated AMPA-receptor mediated synaptic responses. These results suggest a general functional link between neuroligins and AMPA-receptors, indicate that both neuroligin-3 and -4 act at excitatory synapses but perform surprisingly distinct functions, and demonstrate that the R704C mutation significantly impairs the normal function of neuroligin-4, thereby validating its pathogenicity. PMID:25778475

  6. Prevalence of mitochondrial gene mutations among hearing impaired patients

    PubMed Central

    Usami, S.; Abe, S.; Akita, J.; Namba, A.; Shinkawa, H.; Ishii, M.; Iwasaki, S.; Hoshino, T.; Ito, J.; Doi, K.; Kubo, T.; Nakagawa, T.; Komiyama, S.; Tono, T.; Komune, S.

    2000-01-01

    The frequency of three mitochondrial point mutations, 1555A→G, 3243A→G, and 7445A→G, known to be associated with hearing impairment, was examined using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis in two Japanese groups: (1) 319 unrelated SNHL outpatients (including 21 with aminoglycoside antibiotic injection history), and (2) 140 cochlear implantation patients (including 22 with aminoglycoside induced hearing loss). Approximately 3% of the outpatients and 10% of the cochlear implantation patients had the 1555A→G mutation. The frequency was higher in the patients with a history of aminoglycoside injection (outpatient group 33%, cochlear implantation group 59%). One outpatient (0.314%) had the 3243A→G mutation, but no outpatients had the 7445A→G mutation and neither were found in the cochlear implantation group. The significance of the 1555A→G mutation, the most prevalent mitochondrial mutation found in this study of a hearing impaired population in Japan, among subjects with specific backgrounds, such as aminoglycoside induced hearing loss, is evident.


Keywords: mitochondria; point mutation; hearing impairment; frequencies PMID:10633132

  7. RCAN1 links impaired neurotrophin trafficking to aberrant development of the sympathetic nervous system in Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami; Yamashita, Naoya; Ascaño, Maria; Bodmer, Daniel; Boehm, Erica; Bodkin-Clarke, Chantal; Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Kuruvilla, Rejji

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder affecting the nervous system in humans. To date, investigations of neural anomalies in Down syndrome have focused on the central nervous system, although dysfunction of the peripheral nervous system is a common manifestation. The molecular and cellular bases underlying peripheral abnormalities have remained undefined. Here, we report the developmental loss of sympathetic innervation in human Down syndrome organs and in a mouse model. We show that excess regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1), an endogenous inhibitor of the calcineurin phosphatase that is triplicated in Down syndrome, impairs neurotrophic support of sympathetic neurons by inhibiting endocytosis of the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor, TrkA. Genetically correcting RCAN1 levels in Down syndrome mice markedly improves NGF-dependent receptor trafficking, neuronal survival and innervation. These results uncover a critical link between calcineurin signalling, impaired neurotrophin trafficking and neurodevelopmental deficits in the peripheral nervous system in Down syndrome. PMID:26658127

  8. The HIV-1 protein Vpr impairs phagosome maturation by controlling microtubule-dependent trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Audrey; Lê-Bury, Gabrielle; Marie-Anaïs, Florence; Herit, Floriane; Mazzolini, Julie; Guilbert, Thomas; Bourdoncle, Pierre; Russell, David G.; Benichou, Serge; Zahraoui, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) impairs major functions of macrophages but the molecular basis for this defect remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that macrophages infected with HIV-1 were unable to respond efficiently to phagocytic triggers and to clear bacteria. The maturation of phagosomes, defined by the presence of late endocytic markers, hydrolases, and reactive oxygen species, was perturbed in HIV-1–infected macrophages. We showed that maturation arrest occurred at the level of the EHD3/MICAL-L1 endosomal sorting machinery. Unexpectedly, we found that the regulatory viral protein (Vpr) was crucial to perturb phagosome maturation. Our data reveal that Vpr interacted with EB1, p150Glued, and dynein heavy chain and was sufficient to critically alter the microtubule plus end localization of EB1 and p150Glued, hence altering the centripetal movement of phagosomes and their maturation. Thus, we identify Vpr as a modulator of the microtubule-dependent endocytic trafficking in HIV-1–infected macrophages, leading to strong alterations in phagolysosome biogenesis. PMID:26504171

  9. Exome Sequence Data From Multigenerational Families Implicate AMPA Receptor Trafficking in Neurocognitive Impairment and Schizophrenia Risk.

    PubMed

    Kos, Mark Z; Carless, Melanie A; Peralta, Juan; Blackburn, August; Almeida, Marcio; Roalf, David; Pogue-Geile, Michael F; Prasad, Konasale; Gur, Ruben C; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Curran, Joanne E; Duggirala, Ravi; Glahn, David C; Blangero, John; Gur, Raquel E; Almasy, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterized by impairments in behavior, thought, and neurocognitive performance. We searched for susceptibility loci at a quantitative trait locus (QTL) previously reported for abstraction and mental flexibility (ABF), a cognitive function often compromised in schizophrenia patients and their unaffected relatives. Exome sequences were determined for 134 samples in 8 European American families from the original linkage study, including 25 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. At chromosome 5q32-35.3, we analyzed 407 protein-altering variants for association with ABF and schizophrenia status. For replication, significant, Bonferroni-corrected findings were tested against cognitive traits in Mexican American families (n = 959), as well as interrogated for schizophrenia risk using GWAS results from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). From the gene SYNPO, rs6579797 (MAF = 0.032) shows significant associations with ABF (P = .015) and schizophrenia (P = .040), as well as jointly (P = .0027). In the Mexican American pedigrees, rs6579797 exhibits significant associations with IQ (P = .011), indicating more global effects on neurocognition. From the PGC results, other SYNPO variants were identified with near significant effects on schizophrenia risk, with a local linkage disequilibrium block displaying signatures of positive selection. A second missense variant within the QTL, rs17551608 (MAF = 0.19) in the gene WWC1, also displays a significant effect on schizophrenia in our exome sequences (P = .038). Remarkably, the protein products of SYNPO and WWC1 are interaction partners involved in AMPA receptor trafficking, a brain process implicated in synaptic plasticity. Our study reveals variants in these genes with significant effects on neurocognition and schizophrenia risk, identifying a potential pathogenic mechanism for schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

  10. Exome Sequence Data From Multigenerational Families Implicate AMPA Receptor Trafficking in Neurocognitive Impairment and Schizophrenia Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Mark Z.; Carless, Melanie A.; Peralta, Juan; Blackburn, August; Almeida, Marcio; Roalf, David; Pogue-Geile, Michael F.; Prasad, Konasale; Gur, Ruben C.; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Curran, Joanne E.; Duggirala, Ravi; Glahn, David C.; Blangero, John; Gur, Raquel E.; Almasy, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterized by impairments in behavior, thought, and neurocognitive performance. We searched for susceptibility loci at a quantitative trait locus (QTL) previously reported for abstraction and mental flexibility (ABF), a cognitive function often compromised in schizophrenia patients and their unaffected relatives. Exome sequences were determined for 134 samples in 8 European American families from the original linkage study, including 25 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. At chromosome 5q32–35.3, we analyzed 407 protein-altering variants for association with ABF and schizophrenia status. For replication, significant, Bonferroni-corrected findings were tested against cognitive traits in Mexican American families (n = 959), as well as interrogated for schizophrenia risk using GWAS results from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). From the gene SYNPO, rs6579797 (MAF = 0.032) shows significant associations with ABF (P = .015) and schizophrenia (P = .040), as well as jointly (P = .0027). In the Mexican American pedigrees, rs6579797 exhibits significant associations with IQ (P = .011), indicating more global effects on neurocognition. From the PGC results, other SYNPO variants were identified with near significant effects on schizophrenia risk, with a local linkage disequilibrium block displaying signatures of positive selection. A second missense variant within the QTL, rs17551608 (MAF = 0.19) in the gene WWC1, also displays a significant effect on schizophrenia in our exome sequences (P = .038). Remarkably, the protein products of SYNPO and WWC1 are interaction partners involved in AMPA receptor trafficking, a brain process implicated in synaptic plasticity. Our study reveals variants in these genes with significant effects on neurocognition and schizophrenia risk, identifying a potential pathogenic mechanism for schizophrenia spectrum disorders. PMID:26405221

  11. An ancient founder mutation in PROKR2 impairs human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Avbelj Stefanija, Magdalena; Jeanpierre, Marc; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P; Young, Jacques; Quinton, Richard; Abreu, Ana Paula; Plummer, Lacey; Au, Margaret G; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Dwyer, Andrew A; Florez, Jose C; Cheetham, Timothy; Pearce, Simon H; Purushothaman, Radhika; Schinzel, Albert; Pugeat, Michel; Jacobson-Dickman, Elka E; Ten, Svetlana; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Gusella, James F; Dode, Catherine; Crowley, William F; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2012-10-01

    Congenital gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency manifests as absent or incomplete sexual maturation and infertility. Although the disease exhibits marked locus and allelic heterogeneity, with the causal mutations being both rare and private, one causal mutation in the prokineticin receptor, PROKR2 L173R, appears unusually prevalent among GnRH-deficient patients of diverse geographic and ethnic origins. To track the genetic ancestry of PROKR2 L173R, haplotype mapping was performed in 22 unrelated patients with GnRH deficiency carrying L173R and their 30 first-degree relatives. The mutation's age was estimated using a haplotype-decay model. Thirteen subjects were informative and in all of them the mutation was present on the same ~123 kb haplotype whose population frequency is ≤10%. Thus, PROKR2 L173R represents a founder mutation whose age is estimated at approximately 9000 years. Inheritance of PROKR2 L173R-associated GnRH deficiency was complex with highly variable penetrance among carriers, influenced by additional mutations in the other PROKR2 allele (recessive inheritance) or another gene (digenicity). The paradoxical identification of an ancient founder mutation that impairs reproduction has intriguing implications for the inheritance mechanisms of PROKR2 L173R-associated GnRH deficiency and for the relevant processes of evolutionary selection, including potential selective advantages of mutation carriers in genes affecting reproduction.

  12. Mutant Huntingtin Impairs Post-Golgi Trafficking to Lysosomes by Delocalizing Optineurin/Rab8 Complex from the Golgi Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    del Toro, Daniel; Alberch, Jordi; Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Martín-Ibáñez, Raquel; Xifró, Xavier; Egea, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Huntingtin regulates post-Golgi trafficking of secreted proteins. Here, we studied the mechanism by which mutant huntingtin impairs this process. Colocalization studies and Western blot analysis of isolated Golgi membranes showed a reduction of huntingtin in the Golgi apparatus of cells expressing mutant huntingtin. These findings correlated with a decrease in the levels of optineurin and Rab8 in the Golgi apparatus that can be reverted by overexpression of full-length wild-type huntingtin. In addition, immunoprecipitation studies showed reduced interaction between mutant huntingtin and optineurin/Rab8. Cells expressing mutant huntingtin produced both an accumulation of clathrin adaptor complex 1 at the Golgi and an increase of clathrin-coated vesicles in the vicinity of Golgi cisternae as revealed by electron microscopy. Furthermore, inverse fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis for lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 and mannose-6-phosphate receptor showed that the optineurin/Rab8-dependent post-Golgi trafficking to lysosomes was impaired in cells expressing mutant huntingtin or reducing huntingtin levels by small interfering RNA. Accordingly, these cells showed a lower content of cathepsin D in lysosomes, which led to an overall reduction of lysosomal activity. Together, our results indicate that mutant huntingtin perturbs post-Golgi trafficking to lysosomal compartments by delocalizing the optineurin/Rab8 complex, which, in turn, affects the lysosomal function. PMID:19144827

  13. Analysis of Trafficking, Stability and Function of Human Connexin 26 Gap Junction Channels with Deafness-Causing Mutations in the Fourth Transmembrane Helix

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Cinzia; Walker, Amy E.; DePriest, Adam D.; Cone, Angela C.; Lu, Connie; Badger, John; Skerrett, I. Martha; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2013-01-01

    Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins) can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons) by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26) that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P). Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S) only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels displayed an increased

  14. Analysis of trafficking, stability and function of human connexin 26 gap junction channels with deafness-causing mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Cinzia; Walker, Amy E; Depriest, Adam D; Cone, Angela C; Lu, Connie; Badger, John; Skerrett, I Martha; Sosinsky, Gina E

    2013-01-01

    Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins) can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons) by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26) that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P). Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S) only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels displayed an increased

  15. Inherited human sex reversal due to impaired nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of SRY defines a male transcriptional threshold.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Shan; Racca, Joseph D; Phillips, Nelson B; Weiss, Michael A

    2013-09-17

    Human testis determination is initiated by SRY (sex determining region on Y chromosome). Mutations in SRY cause gonadal dysgenesis with female somatic phenotype. Two subtle variants (V60L and I90M in the high-mobility group box) define inherited alleles shared by an XY sterile daughter and fertile father. Whereas specific DNA binding and bending are unaffected in a rat embryonic pre-Sertoli cell line, the variants exhibited selective defects in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling due to impaired nuclear import (V60L; mediated by Exportin-4) or export (I90M; mediated by chromosome region maintenance 1). Decreased shuttling limits nuclear accumulation of phosphorylated (activated) SRY, in turn reducing occupancy of DNA sites regulating Sertoli-cell differentiation [the testis-specific SRY-box 9 (Sox9) enhancer]. Despite distinct patterns of biochemical and cell-biological perturbations, V60L and I90M each attenuated Sox9 expression in transient transfection assays by twofold. Such attenuation was also observed in studies of V60A, a clinical variant associated with ovotestes and hence ambiguity between divergent cell fates. This shared twofold threshold is reminiscent of autosomal syndromes of transcription-factor haploinsufficiency, including XY sex reversal associated with mutations in SOX9. Our results demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SRY is necessary for robust initiation of testicular development. Although also characteristic of ungulate orthologs, such shuttling is not conserved among rodents wherein impaired nuclear export of the high-mobility group box and import-dependent phosphorylation are compensated by a microsatellite-associated transcriptional activation domain. Human sex reversal due to subtle defects in the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SRY suggests that its transcriptional activity lies near the edge of developmental ambiguity.

  16. Inherited human sex reversal due to impaired nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of SRY defines a male transcriptional threshold

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Shan; Racca, Joseph D.; Phillips, Nelson B.; Weiss, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Human testis determination is initiated by SRY (sex determining region on Y chromosome). Mutations in SRY cause gonadal dysgenesis with female somatic phenotype. Two subtle variants (V60L and I90M in the high-mobility group box) define inherited alleles shared by an XY sterile daughter and fertile father. Whereas specific DNA binding and bending are unaffected in a rat embryonic pre-Sertoli cell line, the variants exhibited selective defects in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling due to impaired nuclear import (V60L; mediated by Exportin-4) or export (I90M; mediated by chromosome region maintenance 1). Decreased shuttling limits nuclear accumulation of phosphorylated (activated) SRY, in turn reducing occupancy of DNA sites regulating Sertoli-cell differentiation [the testis-specific SRY-box 9 (Sox9) enhancer]. Despite distinct patterns of biochemical and cell-biological perturbations, V60L and I90M each attenuated Sox9 expression in transient transfection assays by twofold. Such attenuation was also observed in studies of V60A, a clinical variant associated with ovotestes and hence ambiguity between divergent cell fates. This shared twofold threshold is reminiscent of autosomal syndromes of transcription-factor haploinsufficiency, including XY sex reversal associated with mutations in SOX9. Our results demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SRY is necessary for robust initiation of testicular development. Although also characteristic of ungulate orthologs, such shuttling is not conserved among rodents wherein impaired nuclear export of the high-mobility group box and import-dependent phosphorylation are compensated by a microsatellite-associated transcriptional activation domain. Human sex reversal due to subtle defects in the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SRY suggests that its transcriptional activity lies near the edge of developmental ambiguity. PMID:24003159

  17. A vital region for human glycoprotein hormone trafficking revealed by an LHB mutation.

    PubMed

    Potorac, Iulia; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo; Trehan, Ashutosh; Kiełbus, Michał; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Pralong, Francois; Hafidi, Aicha; Thiry, Albert; Ménagé, Jean-Jacques; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Beckers, Albert; Daly, Adrian F

    2016-12-01

    Glycoprotein hormones are complex hormonally active macromolecules. Luteinizing hormone (LH) is essential for the postnatal development and maturation of the male gonad. Inactivating Luteinizing hormone beta (LHB) gene mutations are exceptionally rare and lead to hypogonadism that is particularly severe in males. We describe a family with selective LH deficiency and hypogonadism in two brothers. DNA sequencing of LHB was performed and the effects of genetic variants on hormone function and secretion were characterized by mutagenesis studies, confocal microscopy and functional assays. A 20-year-old male from a consanguineous family had pubertal delay, hypogonadism and undetectable LH. A homozygous c.118_120del (p.Lys40del) mutation was identified in the patient and his brother, who subsequently had the same phenotype. Treatment with hCG led to pubertal development, increased circulating testosterone and spermatogenesis. Experiments in HeLa cells revealed that the mutant LH is retained intracellularly and showed diffuse cytoplasmic distribution. The mutated LHB heterodimerizes with the common alpha-subunit and can activate its receptor. Deletion of flanking glutamic acid residues at positions 39 and 41 impair LH to a similar extent as deletion of Lys40. This region is functionally important across all heterodimeric glycoprotein hormones, because deletion of the corresponding residues in hCG, follicle-stimulating hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone beta-subunits also led to intracellular hormone retention. This novel LHB mutation results in hypogonadism due to intracellular sequestration of the hormone and reveals a discrete region in the protein that is crucial for normal secretion of all human glycoprotein hormones.

  18. A Novel Trafficking-defective HCN4 Mutation is Associated with Early-Onset Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Michael L.; Sinner, Moritz F.; Dolmatova, Elena V.; Tucker, Nathan R.; McLellan, Micheal; Shea, Marisa A.; Milan, David J.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia, and a recent genome-wide association study identified HCN4 as a novel AF susceptibility locus. HCN4 encodes for the cardiac pacemaker channel and HCN4 mutations are associated with familial sinus bradycardia and AF. Objective To determine whether novel variants in the coding region of HCN4 contribute to the susceptibility for AF. Methods We sequenced the coding region of HCN4 for novel variants from 527 cases with early-onset AF from the Massachusetts General Hospital AF Study and 443 referents from the Framingham Heart Study. We used site-directed mutagenesis, cellular electrophysiology, immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy to functionally characterize novel variants. Results We found the frequency of novel coding HCN4 variants was 2-fold greater for individuals with AF (seven variants) compared to the referents (three variants). We determined that one, (p.Pro257Ser, located in the amino-terminus adjacent to the first transmembrane spanning domain) of the seven novel HCN4 variants in our AF cases did not traffick to cell membrane while the remaining six were not functionally different from wild type. Also, the three novel variants in our referents did not alter function compared to wild type. Co-expression studies showed that the p.Pro257Ser mutant channel failed to co-localize with the wild type HCN4 channel on the cell membrane. Conclusion Our findings are consistent with HCN4 haploinsufficiency as the likely mechanism for early-onset AF in the p.Pro257Ser carrier. PMID:24607718

  19. Overexpression of EphB2 in hippocampus rescues impaired NMDA receptors trafficking and cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rui; Wei, Pan; Jin, Lu; Zheng, Teng; Chen, Wen-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Ya; Shi, Xiao-Dong; Hao, Jing-Ru; Sun, Nan; Gao, Can

    2017-03-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, which affects more and more people. But there is still no effective treatment for preventing or reversing the progression of the disease. Soluble amyloid-beta (Aβ) oligomers, also known as Aβ-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs) play an important role in AD. Synaptic activity and cognition critically depend on the function of glutamate receptors. Targeting N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors trafficking and its regulation is a new strategy for AD early treatment. EphB2 is a key regulator of synaptic localization of NMDA receptors. Aβ oligomers could bind to the fibronectin repeats domain of EphB2 and trigger EphB2 degradation in the proteasome. Here we identified that overexpression of EphB2 with lentiviral vectors in dorsal hippocampus improved impaired memory deficits and anxiety or depression-like behaviors in APPswe/PS1-dE9 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice. Phosphorylation and surface expression of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors were also improved. Overexpression of EphB2 also rescued the ADDLs-induced depletion of the expression of EphB2 and GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors trafficking in cultured hippocampal neurons. These results suggest that improving the decreased expression of EphB2 and subsequent GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors trafficking in hippocampus may be a promising strategy for AD treatment.

  20. Foxp2 mutations impair auditory-motor association learning.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Simone; Fisher, Simon E; Ehret, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the human FOXP2 transcription factor gene cause the best-described examples of monogenic speech and language disorders. Acquisition of proficient spoken language involves auditory-guided vocal learning, a specialized form of sensory-motor association learning. The impact of etiological Foxp2 mutations on learning of auditory-motor associations in mammals has not been determined yet. Here, we directly assess this type of learning using a newly developed conditioned avoidance paradigm in a shuttle-box for mice. We show striking deficits in mice heterozygous for either of two different Foxp2 mutations previously implicated in human speech disorders. Both mutations cause delays in acquiring new motor skills. The magnitude of impairments in association learning, however, depends on the nature of the mutation. Mice with a missense mutation in the DNA-binding domain are able to learn, but at a much slower rate than wild type animals, while mice carrying an early nonsense mutation learn very little. These results are consistent with expression of Foxp2 in distributed circuits of the cortex, striatum and cerebellum that are known to play key roles in acquisition of motor skills and sensory-motor association learning, and suggest differing in vivo effects for distinct variants of the Foxp2 protein. Given the importance of such networks for the acquisition of human spoken language, and the fact that similar mutations in human FOXP2 cause problems with speech development, this work opens up a new perspective on the use of mouse models for understanding pathways underlying speech and language disorders.

  1. Progesterone Impairs Human Ether-a-go-go-related Gene (HERG) Trafficking by Disruption of Intracellular Cholesterol Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhi-Yuan; Yu, De-Jie; Soong, Tuck Wah; Dawe, Gavin S.; Bian, Jin-Song

    2011-01-01

    The prolongation of QT intervals in both mothers and fetuses during the later period of pregnancy implies that higher levels of progesterone may regulate the function of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channel, a key ion channel responsible for controlling the length of QT intervals. Here, we studied the effect of progesterone on the expression, trafficking, and function of HERG channels and the underlying mechanism. Treatment with progesterone for 24 h decreased the abundance of the fully glycosylated form of the HERG channel in rat neonatal cardiac myocytes and HERG-HEK293 cells, a cell line stably expressing HERG channels. Progesterone also concentration-dependently decreased HERG current density, but had no effect on voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ and K+ channels. Immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis show that progesterone preferentially decreased HERG channel protein abundance in the plasma membrane, induced protein accumulation in the dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and increased the protein expression of C/EBP homologous protein, a hallmark of ER stress. Application of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (a sterol-binding agent) or overexpression of Rab9 rescued the progesterone-induced HERG trafficking defect and ER stress. Disruption of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis with simvastatin, imipramine, or exogenous application of cholesterol mimicked the effect of progesterone on HERG channel trafficking. Progesterone may impair HERG channel folding in the ER and/or block its trafficking to the Golgi complex by disrupting intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. Our findings may reveal a novel molecular mechanism to explain the QT prolongation and high risk of developing arrhythmias during late pregnancy. PMID:21525004

  2. Novel Mutations and Mutation Combinations of TMPRSS3 Cause Various Phenotypes in One Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Su, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hearing impairment with postlingual onset is rare. Exceptions are caused by mutations in the TMPRSS3 gene, which can lead to prelingual (DFNB10) as well as postlingual deafness (DFNB8). TMPRSS3 mutations can be classified as mild or severe, and the phenotype is dependent on the combination of TMPRSS3 mutations. The combination of two severe mutations leads to profound hearing impairment with a prelingual onset, whereas severe mutations in combination with milder TMPRSS3 mutations lead to a milder phenotype with postlingual onset. We characterized a Chinese family (number FH1523) with not only prelingual but also postlingual hearing impairment. Three mutations in TMPRSS3, one novel mutation c.36delC [p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12)], and two previously reported pathogenic mutations, c.916G>A (p.Ala306Thr) and c.316C>T (p.Arg106Cys), were identified. Compound heterozygous mutations of p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12) and p.Ala306Thr manifest as prelingual, profound hearing impairment in the patient (IV: 1), whereas the combination of p.Arg106Cys and p.Ala306Thr manifests as postlingual, milder hearing impairment in the patient (II: 2, II: 3, II: 5), suggesting that p.Arg106Cys mutation has a milder effect than p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12). We concluded that different combinations of TMPRSS3 mutations led to different hearing impairment phenotypes (DFNB8/DFNB10) in this family. PMID:28246597

  3. Catecholamine stress alters neutrophil trafficking and impairs wound healing by β2-adrenergic receptor-mediated upregulation of IL-6.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Gorouhi, Farzam; Ramirez, Sandra; Granick, Jennifer L; Byrne, Barbara A; Soulika, Athena M; Simon, Scott I; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2014-03-01

    Stress-induced hormones can alter the inflammatory response to tissue injury; however, the precise mechanism by which epinephrine influences inflammatory response and wound healing is not well defined. Here we demonstrate that epinephrine alters the neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN))-dependent inflammatory response to a cutaneous wound. Using noninvasive real-time imaging of genetically tagged PMNs in a murine skin wound, chronic, epinephrine-mediated stress was modeled by sustained delivery of epinephrine. Prolonged systemic exposure of epinephrine resulted in persistent PMN trafficking to the wound site via an IL-6-mediated mechanism, and this in turn impaired wound repair. Further, we demonstrate that β2-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation of proinflammatory macrophages is critical for epinephrine-mediated IL-6 production. This study expands our current understanding of stress hormone-mediated impairment of wound healing and provides an important mechanistic link to explain how epinephrine stress exacerbates inflammation via increased number and lifetime of PMNs.

  4. Visual impairment in FOXG1-mutated individuals and mice.

    PubMed

    Boggio, E M; Pancrazi, L; Gennaro, M; Lo Rizzo, C; Mari, F; Meloni, I; Ariani, F; Panighini, A; Novelli, E; Biagioni, M; Strettoi, E; Hayek, J; Rufa, A; Pizzorusso, T; Renieri, A; Costa, M

    2016-06-02

    The Forkead Box G1 (FOXG1 in humans, Foxg1 in mice) gene encodes for a DNA-binding transcription factor, essential for the development of the telencephalon in mammalian forebrain. Mutations in FOXG1 have been reported to be involved in the onset of Rett Syndrome, for which sequence alterations of MECP2 and CDKL5 are known. While visual alterations are not classical hallmarks of Rett syndrome, an increasing body of evidence shows visual impairment in patients and in MeCP2 and CDKL5 animal models. Herein we focused on the functional role of FOXG1 in the visual system of animal models (Foxg1(+/Cre) mice) and of a cohort of subjects carrying FOXG1 mutations or deletions. Visual physiology of Foxg1(+/Cre) mice was assessed by visually evoked potentials, which revealed a significant reduction in response amplitude and visual acuity with respect to wild-type littermates. Morphological investigation showed abnormalities in the organization of excitatory/inhibitory circuits in the visual cortex. No alterations were observed in retinal structure. By examining a cohort of FOXG1-mutated individuals with a panel of neuro-ophthalmological assessments, we found that all of them exhibited visual alterations compatible with high-level visual dysfunctions. In conclusion our data show that Foxg1 haploinsufficiency results in an impairment of mouse and human visual cortical function.

  5. MDMA impairs mitochondrial neuronal trafficking in a Tau- and Mitofusin2/Drp1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Daniel José; Serrat, Román; Mirra, Serena; Quevedo, Martí; Gómez de Barreda, Elena; Avila, Jesús; Fernandes, Eduarda; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Capela, João Paulo; Carvalho, Félix; Soriano, Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    Identification of the mechanisms by which drugs of abuse cause neuronal dysfunction is essential for understanding the biological bases of their acute and long-lasting effects in the brain. Here, we performed real-time functional experiments of axonal transport of mitochondria to explore the role of in situ mitochondrial dysfunction in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "ecstasy")-related brain actions. We showed that MDMA dramatically reduced mitochondrial trafficking in hippocampal neurons in a Tau-dependent manner, in which glycogen synthase kinase 3β activity was implicated. Furthermore, we found that these trafficking abnormalities were rescued by over-expression of Mitofusin2 and dynamin-related protein 1, but not of Miro1. Given the relevance of mitochondrial targeting for neuronal function and neurotransmission, our data underscore a novel mechanism of action of MDMA that may contribute to our understanding of how this drug of abuse alters neuronal functioning.

  6. Heterozygous MDR3 missense mutation associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy: evidence for a defect in protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Dixon, P H; Weerasekera, N; Linton, K J; Donaldson, O; Chambers, J; Egginton, E; Weaver, J; Nelson-Piercy, C; de Swiet, M; Warnes, G; Elias, E; Higgins, C F; Johnston, D G; McCarthy, M I; Williamson, C

    2000-05-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a liver disease of pregnancy with serious consequences for the mother and fetus. Two pedigrees have been reported with ICP in the mothers of children with a subtype of autosomal recessive progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) with raised serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT). Affected children have homozygous mutations in the MDR3 gene (also called ABCB4 ), and heterozygous mothers have ICP. More frequently, however, ICP occurs in women with no known family history of PFIC and the genetic basis of this disorder is unknown. We investigated eight women with ICP and raised serum gamma-GT, but with no known family history of PFIC. DNA sequence analysis revealed a C to A transversion in codon 546 in exon 14 of MDR3 in one patient, which results in the missense substitution of the wild-type alanine with an aspartic acid. We performed functional studies of this mutation introduced into MDR1, a closely related homologue of MDR3. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and western analysis indicated that this missense mutation causes disruption of protein trafficking with a subsequent lack of functional protein at the cell surface. The demonstration of a heterozygous missense mutation in the MDR3 gene in a patient with ICP with no known family history of PFIC, analysed by functional studies, is a novel finding. This shows that MDR3 mutations are responsible for the additional phenotype of ICP in a subgroup of women with raised gamma-GT.

  7. ATP7A trafficking and mechanisms underlying the distal motor neuropathy induced by mutations in ATP7A

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ling; Kaler, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Diverse mutations in the gene encoding the copper transporter ATP7A lead to X-linked recessive Menkes disease or occipital horn syndrome. Recently, two unique ATP7A mutations, T994I and P1386S, were shown to cause isolated adult-onset distal motor neuropathy. These mutations induce subtle defects in ATP7A intracellular trafficking resulting in preferential accumulation at the plasma membrane compared to wild-type ATP7A. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed abnormal interaction between ATP7AT994I and p97/VCP, a protein mutated in two autosomal dominant forms of motor neuron disease. Small-interfering RNA knockdown of p97/VCP corrected ATP7AT994I mislocalization. For ATP7AP1386S, flow cytometry documented that non-permeabilized fibroblasts bound a C-terminal ATP7A antibody, suggesting unstable insertion of the 8th transmembrane segment due to a helix-breaker effect of the amino acid substitution. This could sabotage interaction of ATP7AP1386S with adaptor protein complexes. These molecular events appear to selectively disturb normal motor neuron function and lead to neurologic illness that takes years and sometimes decades to develop. PMID:24754450

  8. Breast cancer-associated mutations in metalloprotease disintegrin ADAM12 interfere with the intracellular trafficking and processing of the protein.

    PubMed

    Dyczynska, Emilia; Syta, Emilia; Sun, Danqiong; Zolkiewska, Anna

    2008-06-01

    ADAM12 has recently emerged as a Candidate Cancer Gene in a comprehensive genetic analysis of human breast cancers. Three somatic mutations in ADAM12 were observed at significant frequencies in breast cancers: D301H, G479E and L792F. The first 2 of these mutations involve highly conserved residues in ADAM12, and our computational sequence analysis confirms that they may be cancer-related. We show that the corresponding mutations in mouse ADAM12 inhibit the proteolytic processing and activation of ADAM12 in NIH3T3, COS-7, CHO-K1 cells and in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The D/H and G/E ADAM12 mutants exert a dominant-negative effect on the processing of the wild-type ADAM12. Immunofluorescence analysis and cell surface biotinylation experiments demonstrate that the D/H and G/E mutants are retained inside the cell and are not transported to the cell surface. Consequently, the D/H and G/E mutants, unlike the wild-type ADAM12, are not capable of shedding Delta-like l, a ligand for Notch receptor, at the cell surface, or of stimulating cell migration. Our results suggest that the breast cancer-associated mutations interfere with the intracellular trafficking of ADAM12 and result in loss of the functional ADAM12 at the cell surface.

  9. Fast track, dynein-dependent nuclear targeting of human immunodeficiency virus Vpr protein; impaired trafficking in a clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Caly, Leon; Kassouf, Vicki T; Moseley, Gregory W; Diefenbach, Russell J; Cunningham, Anthony L; Jans, David A

    2016-02-12

    Nuclear import of the accessory protein Vpr is central to infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We previously identified the Vpr F72L mutation in a HIV-infected, long-term non-progressor, showing that it resulted in reduced Vpr nuclear accumulation and altered cytoplasmic localisation. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the effects of nuclear accumulation of the F72L mutation are due to impairment of microtubule-dependent-enhancement of Vpr nuclear import. We use high resolution imaging approaches including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and other approaches to document interaction between Vpr and the dynein light chain protein, DYNLT1, and impaired interaction of the F72L mutant with DYNLT1. The results implicate MTs/DYNLT1 as drivers of Vpr nuclear import and HIV infection, with important therapeutic implications.

  10. LMTK3 deficiency causes pronounced locomotor hyperactivity and impairs endocytic trafficking.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takeshi; Hoshina, Naosuke; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Kiyama, Yuji; Kobayashi, Shizuka; Abe, Takaya; Yamamoto, Toshifumi; Manabe, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2014-04-23

    LMTK3 belongs to the LMTK family of protein kinases that are predominantly expressed in the brain. Physiological functions of LMTK3 and other members of the LMTK family in the CNS remain unknown. In this study, we performed a battery of behavioral analyses using Lmtk3(-/-) mice and showed that these mice exhibit abnormal behaviors, including pronounced locomotor hyperactivity, reduced anxiety behavior, and decreased depression-like behavior. Concurrently, the dopamine metabolite levels and dopamine turnover rate are increased in the striata of Lmtk3(-/-) mice compared with wild-type controls. In addition, using cultured primary neurons from Lmtk3(-/-) mice, we found that LMTK3 is involved in the endocytic trafficking of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, a type of ionotropic glutamate receptor. Altered membrane traffic of the receptor in Lmtk3(-/-) neurons may underlie behavioral abnormalities in the mutant animals. Together, our data suggest that LMTK3 plays an important role in regulating locomotor behavior in mice.

  11. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies Novel Compound Heterozygous Lysosomal Trafficking Regulator Gene Mutations Associated with Autosomal Recessive Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yaqiong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Senfen; Chen, Feng; Gu, Yang; Hong, Enyu; Yu, Yongbo; Ni, Xin; Guo, Yongli; Shi, Tieliu; Xu, Zigang

    2017-01-01

    Chediak–Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by varying degrees of oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent infections, and a mild bleeding tendency, with late neurologic dysfunction. This syndrome is molecularly characterized by pathognomonic mutations in the LYST (lysosomal trafficking regulator). Using whole genome sequencing (WGS) we attempted to identify novel mutations of CHS based on a family of CHS with atypical symptoms. The two patients demonstrated a phenotypic constellation including partial oculocutaneous albinism, frequency upper respiratory infection or a marginal intelligence, without bleeding tendency and severe immunodeficiency. WGS revealed two compound LYST mutations including a maternally inherited chr1:235969126G > A (rs80338652) and a novel paternally inherited chr1: 235915327A > AT, associated with autosomal recessive CHS. These two variants fall in the coding regions of LYST, resulting in premature truncation of LYST due to R1104X/N2535KfsX2 induced incomplete translation. Notably, the heterozygous carriers (i.e. parents) were unaffected. Our finding also reveals decreased plasma serotonin levels in patients with CHS compared with unaffected individuals for the first time. The present study contributes to improved understanding of the causes of this disease and provides new ideas for possible treatments. PMID:28145517

  12. Trafficking Dynamics of PCSK9-Induced LDLR Degradation: Focus on Human PCSK9 Mutations and C-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Steve; Hamouda, Hocine Ait; Villeneuve, Louis; Demers, Annie; Mayer, Gaétan

    2016-01-01

    PCSK9 is a secreted ligand and negative post-translational regulator of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) in hepatocytes. Gain-of-function (GOF) or loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in PCSK9 are directly correlated with high or low plasma LDL-cholesterol levels, respectively. Therefore, PCSK9 is a prevailing lipid-lowering target to prevent coronary heart diseases and stroke. Herein, we fused monomeric fluorescent proteins to PCSK9 and LDLR to visualize their intra- and extracellular trafficking dynamics by live confocal microscopy. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) showed that PCSK9 LOF R46L mutant and GOF mutations S127R and D129G, but not the LDLR high-affinity mutant D374Y, significantly accelerate PCSK9 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Quantitative analysis of inverse FRAP revealed that only R46L presented a much slower trafficking from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane and a lower mobile fraction likely suggesting accumulation or delayed exit at the TGN as an underlying mechanism. While not primarily involved in LDLR binding, PCSK9 C-terminal domain (CTD) was found to be essential to induce LDLR degradation both upon its overexpression in cells or via the extracellular pathway. Our data revealed that PCSK9 CTD is required for the localization of PCSK9 at the TGN and increases its LDLR-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, intracellular lysosomal targeting of PCSK9-ΔCTD was able to rescue its capacity to induce LDLR degradation emphasizing a role of the CTD in the sorting of PCSK9-LDLR complex towards late endocytic compartments. Finally, we validated our dual fluorescence system as a cell based-assay by preventing PCSK9 internalization using a PCSK9-LDLR blocking antibody, which may be expended to identify protein, peptide or small molecule inhibitors of PCSK9.

  13. Trafficking Dynamics of PCSK9-Induced LDLR Degradation: Focus on Human PCSK9 Mutations and C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Louis; Demers, Annie; Mayer, Gaétan

    2016-01-01

    PCSK9 is a secreted ligand and negative post-translational regulator of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) in hepatocytes. Gain-of-function (GOF) or loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in PCSK9 are directly correlated with high or low plasma LDL-cholesterol levels, respectively. Therefore, PCSK9 is a prevailing lipid-lowering target to prevent coronary heart diseases and stroke. Herein, we fused monomeric fluorescent proteins to PCSK9 and LDLR to visualize their intra- and extracellular trafficking dynamics by live confocal microscopy. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) showed that PCSK9 LOF R46L mutant and GOF mutations S127R and D129G, but not the LDLR high-affinity mutant D374Y, significantly accelerate PCSK9 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Quantitative analysis of inverse FRAP revealed that only R46L presented a much slower trafficking from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane and a lower mobile fraction likely suggesting accumulation or delayed exit at the TGN as an underlying mechanism. While not primarily involved in LDLR binding, PCSK9 C-terminal domain (CTD) was found to be essential to induce LDLR degradation both upon its overexpression in cells or via the extracellular pathway. Our data revealed that PCSK9 CTD is required for the localization of PCSK9 at the TGN and increases its LDLR-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, intracellular lysosomal targeting of PCSK9-ΔCTD was able to rescue its capacity to induce LDLR degradation emphasizing a role of the CTD in the sorting of PCSK9-LDLR complex towards late endocytic compartments. Finally, we validated our dual fluorescence system as a cell based-assay by preventing PCSK9 internalization using a PCSK9-LDLR blocking antibody, which may be expended to identify protein, peptide or small molecule inhibitors of PCSK9. PMID:27280970

  14. Anticancer kinase inhibitors impair intracellular viral trafficking and exert broad-spectrum antiviral effects.

    PubMed

    Bekerman, Elena; Neveu, Gregory; Shulla, Ana; Brannan, Jennifer; Pu, Szu-Yuan; Wang, Stanley; Xiao, Fei; Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Bakken, Russell R; Mateo, Roberto; Govero, Jennifer; Nagamine, Claude M; Diamond, Michael S; De Jonghe, Steven; Herdewijn, Piet; Dye, John M; Randall, Glenn; Einav, Shirit

    2017-02-27

    Global health is threatened by emerging viral infections, which largely lack effective vaccines or therapies. Targeting host pathways that are exploited by multiple viruses could offer broad-spectrum solutions. We previously reported that AAK1 and GAK, kinase regulators of the host adaptor proteins AP1 and AP2, are essential for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but the underlying mechanism and relevance to other viruses or in vivo infections remained unknown. Here, we have discovered that AP1 and AP2 cotraffic with HCV particles in live cells. Moreover, we found that multiple viruses, including dengue and Ebola, exploit AAK1 and GAK during entry and infectious virus production. In cultured cells, treatment with sunitinib and erlotinib, approved anticancer drugs that inhibit AAK1 or GAK activity, or with more selective compounds inhibited intracellular trafficking of HCV and multiple unrelated RNA viruses with a high barrier to resistance. In murine models of dengue and Ebola infection, sunitinib/erlotinib combination protected against morbidity and mortality. We validated sunitinib- and erlotinib-mediated inhibition of AAK1 and GAK activity as an important mechanism of antiviral action. Additionally, we revealed potential roles for additional kinase targets. These findings advance our understanding of virus-host interactions and establish a proof of principle for a repurposed, host-targeted approach to combat emerging viruses.

  15. Electrophysiological and trafficking defects of the SCN5A T353I mutation in Brugada syndrome are rescued by alpha-allocryptopine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiancheng; Chen, Yu; Yang, Jie; Xu, Bin; Wen, Yi; Xiang, Guojian; Wei, Guoliang; Zhu, Chao; Xing, Yanwei; Li, Yang

    2015-01-05

    Brugada syndrome (BrS), which causes arrhythmias that lead to sudden cardiac death, is linked to loss-of-function mutations that affect sodium channels. Here, we investigate the rescue effect of alpha-allocryptopine (All) from Chinese herbal medicine in a T353I mutation of SCN5A, which combines trafficking abnormalities with Brugada syndrome. SCN5A-T353I expressed in HEK293 cells showed a small peak current (I(peak)) of only 59.6% of WT and an observably sustained current (I(sus)). We found that All strongly enhanced the I(peak) of the T353I channel by enhancing the plasma membrane (PM) expression of Nav1.5 and rescued defective trafficking after co-incubation with HEK293 cells that carry mutation channel 24 h. It is also beneficial to increase the I(peak) of the T353I mutation by All by prolonging the closed-state inactivation (CSI) process and shortening the recovery from inactivation of the T353I mutation. Interestingly, the I(sus) of T353I was significantly inhibited by All, which reduces the occurrence of LQT syndrome 3 (LQT3). We provide evidence that All can rescue the trafficking deficiencies and restore the cellular electrophysiological characteristics of SCN5A-T353I. This feature of All may benefit patients with the BrS-associated Nav1.5 channel and might have other potential therapeutic effects.

  16. A Mutation in the Vesicle-Trafficking Protein VAPB Causes Late-Onset Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Agnes L.; Mitne-Neto, Miguel; Silva, Helga C. A.; Richieri-Costa, Antônio; Middleton, Susan; Cascio, Duilio; Kok, Fernando; Oliveira, João R. M.; Gillingwater, Tom; Webb, Jeanette; Skehel, Paul; Zatz, Mayana

    2004-01-01

    Motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a group of neurodegenerative disorders with involvement of upper and/or lower motor neurons, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), progressive bulbar palsy, and primary lateral sclerosis. Recently, we have mapped a new locus for an atypical form of ALS/MND (atypical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [ALS8]) at 20q13.3 in a large white Brazilian family. Here, we report the finding of a novel missense mutation in the vesicle-associated membrane protein/synaptobrevin-associated membrane protein B (VAPB) gene in patients from this family. Subsequently, the same mutation was identified in patients from six additional kindreds but with different clinical courses, such as ALS8, late-onset SMA, and typical severe ALS with rapid progression. Although it was not possible to link all these families, haplotype analysis suggests a founder effect. Members of the vesicle-associated proteins are intracellular membrane proteins that can associate with microtubules and that have been shown to have a function in membrane transport. These data suggest that clinically variable MNDs may be caused by a dysfunction in intracellular membrane trafficking. PMID:15372378

  17. Methylglyoxal impairs GLUT4 trafficking and leads to increased glucose uptake in L6 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, B; Mattern, Y; Scheibler, S; Tschoepe, D; Gawlowski, T; Stratmann, B

    2014-02-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a highly reactive dicarbonyl compound derived mainly from glucose degradation pathways, but also from protein and fatty acid metabolism. MG modifies structure and function of different biomolecules and thus plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Hyperglycemia-associated accumulation of MG might be associated with generation of oxidative stress and subsequently insulin resistance. Therefore, the effects of MG on insulin signaling and on translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) were investigated in the rat skeletal muscle cell line L6-GLUT4myc stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4. Twenty four-hour MG treatment resulted in elevated GLUT4 presentation on the surface of L6 myoblasts and in an increased uptake of glucose even without insulin stimulation. Exogenously added MG neither effected IRS-1 expression nor IRS-1 phosphorylation. A decreased expression of Akt1 but not Akt2 and concomitantly increased apoptosis were detected following MG treatment. To exclude that oxidative stress caused by MG treatment leads to increased GLUT4 translocation, effects of pretreatment with 2 antioxidants were investigated. The antioxidant and MG scavenger NAC prevented the MG-induced GLUT4 translocation. In contrast, tiron, a well-known antioxidant that does not exert MG-scavenger function, had no impact on MG-induced GLUT4 translocation supporting the hypothesis of a direct effect of MG on GLUT4 trafficking. In conclusion, prolonged treatment with MG augments GLUT4 level on the surface of L6 myoblasts, at least in part through a higher translocation of GLUT4 from the intracellular compartment as well as a reduction of GLUT4 internalization, resulting in increased glucose uptake.

  18. Endolysosomal sorting of ubiquitylated caveolin-1 is regulated by VCP and UBXD1 and impaired by VCP disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Danilo; Vuk, Maja; Kirchner, Philipp; Bug, Monika; Schütz, Sabina; Hayer, Arnold; Bremer, Sebastian; Lusk, Caleb; Baloh, Robert H; Lee, Houkeun; Glatter, Timo; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Weihl, Conrad C; Meyer, Hemmo

    2011-08-07

    The AAA-ATPase VCP (also known as p97) cooperates with distinct cofactors to process ubiquitylated proteins in different cellular pathways. VCP missense mutations cause a systemic degenerative disease in humans, but the molecular pathogenesis is unclear. We used an unbiased mass spectrometry approach and identified a VCP complex with the UBXD1 cofactor, which binds to the plasma membrane protein caveolin-1 (CAV1) and whose formation is specifically disrupted by disease-associated mutations. We show that VCP-UBXD1 targets mono-ubiquitylated CAV1 in SDS-resistant high-molecular-weight complexes on endosomes, which are en route to degradation in endolysosomes. Expression of VCP mutant proteins, chemical inhibition of VCP, or siRNA-mediated depletion of UBXD1 leads to a block of CAV1 transport at the limiting membrane of enlarged endosomes in cultured cells. In patient muscle, muscle-specific caveolin-3 accumulates in sarcoplasmic pools and specifically delocalizes from the sarcolemma. These results extend the cellular functions of VCP to mediating sorting of ubiquitylated cargo in the endocytic pathway and indicate that impaired trafficking of caveolin may contribute to pathogenesis in individuals with VCP mutations.

  19. Trafficking of alpha4* nicotinic receptors revealed by superecliptic phluorin: effects of a beta4 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-associated mutation and chronic exposure to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher I; Srinivasan, Rahul; Xiao, Cheng; Mackey, Elisha D W; Miwa, Julie M; Lester, Henry A

    2011-09-09

    We employed a pH-sensitive GFP analog, superecliptic phluorin, to observe aspects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) trafficking to the plasma membrane (PM) in cultured mouse cortical neurons. The experiments exploit differences in the pH among endoplasmic reticulum (ER), trafficking vesicles, and the extracellular solution. The data confirm that few α4β4 nAChRs, but many α4β2 nAChRs, remain in neutral intracellular compartments, mostly the ER. We observed fusion events between nAChR-containing vesicles and PM; these could be quantified in the dendritic processes. We also studied the β4R348C polymorphism, linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This mutation depressed fusion rates of α4β4 receptor-containing vesicles with the PM by ∼2-fold, with only a small decrease in the number of nAChRs per vesicle. The mutation also decreased the number of ER exit sites, showing that the reduced receptor insertion results from a change at an early stage in trafficking. We confirm the previous report that the mutation leads to reduced agonist-induced currents; in the cortical neurons studied, the reduction amounts to 2-3-fold. Therefore, the reduced agonist-induced currents are caused by the reduced number of α4β4-containing vesicles reaching the membrane. Chronic nicotine exposure (0.2 μM) did not alter the PM insertion frequency or trafficking behavior of α4β4-laden vesicles. In contrast, chronic nicotine substantially increased the number of α4β2-containing vesicle fusions at the PM; this stage in α4β2 nAChR up-regulation is presumably downstream from increased ER exit. Superecliptic phluorin provides a tool to monitor trafficking dynamics of nAChRs in disease and addiction.

  20. New Hyperekplexia Mutations Provide Insight into Glycine Receptor Assembly, Trafficking, and Activation Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Anna; Wood, Sian-Elin; Mullins, Jonathan G. L.; Keramidas, Angelo; Cushion, Thomas D.; Thomas, Rhys H.; Pickrell, William O.; Drew, Cheney J. G.; Masri, Amira; Jones, Elizabeth A.; Vassallo, Grace; Born, Alfred P.; Alehan, Fusun; Aharoni, Sharon; Bannasch, Gerald; Bartsch, Marius; Kara, Bulent; Krause, Amanda; Karam, Elie G.; Matta, Stephanie; Jain, Vivek; Mandel, Hanna; Freilinger, Michael; Graham, Gail E.; Hobson, Emma; Chatfield, Sue; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Rahme, Jubran E.; Afawi, Zaid; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Howell, Owain W.; Vanbellinghen, Jean-François; Rees, Mark I.; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Lynch, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperekplexia is a syndrome of readily provoked startle responses, alongside episodic and generalized hypertonia, that presents within the first month of life. Inhibitory glycine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels with a definitive and clinically well stratified linkage to hyperekplexia. Most hyperekplexia cases are caused by mutations in the α1 subunit of the human glycine receptor (hGlyR) gene (GLRA1). Here we analyzed 68 new unrelated hyperekplexia probands for GLRA1 mutations and identified 19 mutations, of which 9 were novel. Electrophysiological analysis demonstrated that the dominant mutations p.Q226E, p.V280M, and p.R414H induced spontaneous channel activity, indicating that this is a recurring mechanism in hGlyR pathophysiology. p.Q226E, at the top of TM1, most likely induced tonic activation via an enhanced electrostatic attraction to p.R271 at the top of TM2, suggesting a structural mechanism for channel activation. Receptors incorporating p.P230S (which is heterozygous with p.R65W) desensitized much faster than wild type receptors and represent a new TM1 site capable of modulating desensitization. The recessive mutations p.R72C, p.R218W, p.L291P, p.D388A, and p.E375X precluded cell surface expression unless co-expressed with α1 wild type subunits. The recessive p.E375X mutation resulted in subunit truncation upstream of the TM4 domain. Surprisingly, on the basis of three independent assays, we were able to infer that p.E375X truncated subunits are incorporated into functional hGlyRs together with unmutated α1 or α1 plus β subunits. These aberrant receptors exhibit significantly reduced glycine sensitivity. To our knowledge, this is the first suggestion that subunits lacking TM4 domains might be incorporated into functional pentameric ligand-gated ion channel receptors. PMID:24108130

  1. Maternally inherited hearing impairment in a family with the mitochondrial DNA A7445G mutation.

    PubMed

    Hutchin, T P; Lench, N J; Arbuzova, S; Markham, A F; Mueller, R F

    2001-01-01

    Despite the increasing number of reports of families with hearing impairment and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, the frequency of these mutations as causes of non-syndromic sensorineural hearing impairment (NSSHI) remains unknown. Mutations such as A1555G, A7445G and 7472insC have been found in several unrelated families implying they are more frequent than initially thought. We describe a family with NSSHI due to the presence of the homoplasmic mtDNA A7445G mutation in the tRNASer(UCN) gene. This is the fourth such family described with this mutation, all of different genetic backgrounds. Our study also demonstrates the difficulties sometimes encountered in establishing mitochondrial inheritance of hearing impairment in some families.

  2. β-Amyloid (Aβ) Oligomers Impair Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Retrograde Trafficking by Down-regulating Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase, UCH-L1*

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Wayne W.; Carlos, Anthony J.; Aguilar, Brittany L.; Berchtold, Nicole C.; Kawano, Crystal K.; Zograbyan, Vahe; Yaopruke, Tim; Shelanski, Michael; Cotman, Carl W.

    2013-01-01

    We previously found that BDNF-dependent retrograde trafficking is impaired in AD transgenic mouse neurons. Utilizing a novel microfluidic culture chamber, we demonstrate that Aβ oligomers compromise BDNF-mediated retrograde transport by impairing endosomal vesicle velocities, resulting in impaired downstream signaling driven by BDNF/TrkB, including ERK5 activation, and CREB-dependent gene regulation. Our data suggest that a key mechanism mediating the deficit involves ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1), a deubiquitinating enzyme that functions to regulate cellular ubiquitin. Aβ-induced deficits in BDNF trafficking and signaling are mimicked by LDN (an inhibitor of UCH-L1) and can be reversed by increasing cellular UCH-L1 levels, demonstrated here using a transducible TAT-UCH-L1 strategy. Finally, our data reveal that UCH-L1 mRNA levels are decreased in the hippocampi of AD brains. Taken together, our data implicate that UCH-L1 is important for regulating neurotrophin receptor sorting to signaling endosomes and supporting retrograde transport. Further, our results support the idea that in AD, Aβ may down-regulate UCH-L1 in the AD brain, which in turn impairs BDNF/TrkB-mediated retrograde signaling, compromising synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. PMID:23599427

  3. β-Amyloid (Aβ) oligomers impair brain-derived neurotrophic factor retrograde trafficking by down-regulating ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase, UCH-L1.

    PubMed

    Poon, Wayne W; Carlos, Anthony J; Aguilar, Brittany L; Berchtold, Nicole C; Kawano, Crystal K; Zograbyan, Vahe; Yaopruke, Tim; Shelanski, Michael; Cotman, Carl W

    2013-06-07

    We previously found that BDNF-dependent retrograde trafficking is impaired in AD transgenic mouse neurons. Utilizing a novel microfluidic culture chamber, we demonstrate that Aβ oligomers compromise BDNF-mediated retrograde transport by impairing endosomal vesicle velocities, resulting in impaired downstream signaling driven by BDNF/TrkB, including ERK5 activation, and CREB-dependent gene regulation. Our data suggest that a key mechanism mediating the deficit involves ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1), a deubiquitinating enzyme that functions to regulate cellular ubiquitin. Aβ-induced deficits in BDNF trafficking and signaling are mimicked by LDN (an inhibitor of UCH-L1) and can be reversed by increasing cellular UCH-L1 levels, demonstrated here using a transducible TAT-UCH-L1 strategy. Finally, our data reveal that UCH-L1 mRNA levels are decreased in the hippocampi of AD brains. Taken together, our data implicate that UCH-L1 is important for regulating neurotrophin receptor sorting to signaling endosomes and supporting retrograde transport. Further, our results support the idea that in AD, Aβ may down-regulate UCH-L1 in the AD brain, which in turn impairs BDNF/TrkB-mediated retrograde signaling, compromising synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival.

  4. Missense mutations near the N-glycosylation site of the A2 domain lead to various intracellular trafficking defects in coagulation factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Zheng, Chunlei; Zhu, Min; Zhu, Xiaofan; Yang, Renchi; Misra, Saurav; Zhang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Missense mutation is the most common mutation type in hemophilia. However, the majority of missense mutations remain uncharacterized. Here we characterize how hemophilia mutations near the unused N-glycosylation site of the A2 domain (N582) of FVIII affect protein conformation and intracellular trafficking. N582 is located in the middle of a short 310-helical turn (D580-S584), in which most amino acids have multiple hemophilia mutations. All 14 missense mutations found in this 310-helix reduced secretion levels of the A2 domain and full-length FVIII. Secreted mutants have decreased activities relative to WT FVIII. Selected mutations also lead to partial glycosylation of N582, suggesting that rapid folding of local conformation prevents glycosylation of this site in wild-type FVIII. Protease sensitivity, stability and degradation of the A2 domain vary among mutants, and between non-glycosylated and glycosylated species of the same mutant. Most of the mutants interact with the ER chaperone BiP, while only mutants with aberrant glycosylation interact with calreticulin. Our results show that the short 310-helix from D580 to S584 is critical for proper biogenesis of the A2 domain and FVIII, and reveal a range of molecular mechanisms by which FVIII missense mutations lead to moderate to severe hemophilia A. PMID:28327546

  5. The Salih ataxia mutation impairs Rubicon endosomal localization.

    PubMed

    Assoum, M; Salih, M A; Drouot, N; Hnia, K; Martelli, A; Koenig, M

    2013-12-01

    We previously described a new form of recessive ataxia, Salih ataxia, in a large consanguineous Saudi Arabian family with three affected children carrying a new identified mutation in the KIAA0226 gene (c.2624delC; p.Ala875ValfsX146) coding for Rubicon. The pathogenicity of such mutation remains to be identified. Hence, we address the cellular impact of Rubicon p.Ala875ValfsX146 on endosomal/lysosomal machinery on cultured cells. We confirm that Rubicon colocalizes with the late endosome marker Rab7 and demonstrate that it also colocalizes with LampI at lysosomes. The Salih ataxia mutation leads to a diffuse cytosolic distribution and mislocalized protein from the late endosomes, indicating that deletion of the diacylglycerol binding-like motif in the mutant protein interferes with normal Rubicon subcellular localization and confirming the pathogenicity of the mutation.

  6. Homeostatic regulation of T cell trafficking by a B cell derived peptide is impaired in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Apta, Bonita; Kuravi, Sahithi J.; Yates, Clara M.; Kennedy, Amy; Odedra, Arjun; Alassiri, Mohammed; Harrison, Matthew; Martin, Ashley; Barone, Francesca; Nayar, Saba; Hitchcock, Jessica R.; Cunningham, Adam F.; Raza, Karim; Filer, Andrew; Copland, David A.; Dick, Andrew D.; Robinson, Joseph; Kalia, Neena; Walker, Lucy S. K.; Buckley, Christopher D.; Nash, Gerard B.; Narendran, Parth; Rainger, G. Ed.

    2015-01-01

    During an inflammatory response, lymphocyte recruitment into tissue must be tightly controlled because dysregulated trafficking contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic disease. Here we show that during inflammation and in response to adiponectin, B cells tonically inhibit T cell trafficking by secreting a peptide (PEPITEM) proteolytically derived from 14.3.3.ζδ protein. PEPITEM binds cadherin-15 on endothelial cells, promoting synthesis and release of sphingosine-1 phosphate, which inhibits trafficking of T cells without affecting recruitment of other leukocytes. Expression of adiponectin receptors on B cells and adiponectin induced PEPITEM secretion wanes with age, implying immune senescence of the pathway. Additionally, these changes are evident in individuals with type-1-diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis, and circulating PEPITEM in patient serum is reduced compared to healthy age matched donors. In both diseases, tonic inhibition of T cell trafficking across inflamed endothelium is lost. Importantly, control of patient T cell trafficking is re-established by exogenous PEPITEM. Moreover, in animal models of peritonitis, hepatic I/R injury, Salmonella infection, Uveitis and Sjögren’s Syndrome, PEPITEM could reduce T cell recruitment into inflamed tissues. PMID:25894827

  7. GATA2 germline mutations impair GATA2 transcription, causing haploinsufficiency: functional analysis of the p.Arg396Gln mutation.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Lavaud, Xabier; Landecho, Manuel F; Maicas, Miren; Urquiza, Leire; Merino, Juana; Moreno-Miralles, Isabel; Odero, María D

    2015-03-01

    Germline GATA2 mutations have been identified as the cause of familial syndromes with immunodeficiency and predisposition to myeloid malignancies. GATA2 mutations appear to cause loss of function of the mutated allele leading to haploinsufficiency; however, this postulate has not been experimentally validated as the basis of these syndromes. We hypothesized that mutations that are translated into abnormal proteins could affect the transcription of GATA2, triggering GATA2 deficiency. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays showed that the human GATA2 protein activates its own transcription through a specific region located at -2.4 kb, whereas the p.Thr354Met, p.Thr355del, and p.Arg396Gln germline mutations impair GATA2 promoter activation. Accordingly, GATA2 expression was decreased to ∼58% in a patient with p.Arg396Gln, compared with controls. p.Arg396Gln is the second most common mutation in these syndromes, and no previous functional analyses have been performed. We therefore analyzed p.Arg396Gln. Our data show that p.Arg396Gln is a loss-of-function mutation affecting DNA-binding ability and, as a consequence, it fails to maintain the immature characteristics of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, which could result in defects in this cell compartment. In conclusion, we show that human GATA2 binds to its own promoter, activating its transcription, and that the aforementioned mutations impair the transcription of GATA2. Our results indicate that they can affect other GATA2 target genes, which could partially explain the variability of symptoms in these diseases. Moreover, we show that p.Arg396Gln is a loss-of-function mutation, which is unable to retain the progenitor phenotype in cells where it is expressed.

  8. HLA-B27 Selects for Rare Escape Mutations that Significantly Impair Hepatitis C Virus Replication and Require Compensatory Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Neumann-Haefelin, Christoph; Oniangue-Ndza, Cesar; Kuntzen, Thomas; Schmidt, Julia; Nitschke, Katja; Sidney, John; Caillet-Saguy, Célia; Binder, Marco; Kersting, Nadine; Kemper, Michael W.; Power, Karen A.; Ingber, Susan; Reyor, Laura L.; Hills-Evans, Kelsey; Kim, Arthur Y.; Lauer, Georg M.; Lohmann, Volker; Sette, Alessandro; Henn, Matthew R.; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Thimme, Robert; Allen, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    HLA-B27 is associated with spontaneous viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Viral escape within the immunodominant HLA-B27 restricted HCV-specific CD8+ T cell epitope NS5B2841-2849 (ARMILMTHF) has been shown to be limited by viral fitness costs as well as broad T cell cross-recognition, suggesting a potential mechanism of protection by HLA-B27. Here, we studied the subdominant HLA-B27 restricted epitope NS5B2936-2944 (GRAAICGKY) in order to further define the mechanisms of protection by HLA-B27. We identified a unique pattern of escape mutations within this epitope in a large cohort of HCV genotype 1a infected patients. The predominant escape mutations represented conservative substitutions at the main HLA-B27 anchor residue or a T cell receptor contact site, neither of which impaired viral replication capacity as assessed in a subgenomic HCV replicon system. In contrast, however, in a subset of HLA-B27+ subjects rare escape mutations arose at the HLA-B27 anchor residue R2937, which nearly abolished viral replication. Notably, these rare mutations only occurred in conjunction with the selection of two equally rare, and structurally proximal, upstream mutations. Co-expression of these upstream mutations with the rare escape mutations dramatically restored viral replication capacity from <5% to ≥70% of wild-type levels. Conclusion The selection of rare CTL escape mutations in this HLA-B27 restricted epitope dramatically impairs viral replicative fitness unless properly compensated. These data support a role for the targeting of highly-constrained regions by HLA-B27 in its ability to assert immune control of HCV and other highly variable pathogens. PMID:22006856

  9. A centronuclear myopathy--dynamin 2 mutation impairs autophagy in mice.

    PubMed

    Durieux, Anne-Cécile; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Lainé, Jeanne; Fraysse, Bodvaël; Briñas, Laura; Prudhon, Bernard; Castells, Josiane; Freyssenet, Damien; Bonne, Gisèle; Guicheney, Pascale; Bitoun, Marc

    2012-06-01

    Dynamin 2 (Dnm2) is involved in endocytosis and intracellular membrane trafficking through its function in vesicle formation from distinct membrane compartments. Heterozygous (HTZ) mutations in the DNM2 gene cause dominant centronuclear myopathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. We generated a knock-in Dnm2R465W mouse model expressing the most frequent human mutation and recently reported that HTZ mice progressively developed a myopathy. We investigated here the cause of neonatal lethality occurring in homozygous (HMZ) mice. We show that HMZ mice present at birth with a reduced body weight, hypoglycemia, increased liver glycogen content and hepatomegaly, in agreement with a defect in neonatal autophagy. In vitro studies performed in HMZ embryonic fibroblasts point out to a decrease in the autophagy flux prior to degradation at the autolysosome. We show that starved HMZ cells have a higher number of immature autophagy-related structures probably due to a defect of acidification. Our results highlight the role of Dnm2 in the cross talk between endosomal and autophagic pathways and evidence a new role of Dnm2-dependent membrane trafficking in autophagy which may be relevant in DNM2-related human diseases.

  10. Hypomorphic, homozygous mutations in Phosphoglucomutase 3 impair immunity and increase serum IgE levels

    PubMed Central

    Sassi, Atfa; Lazaroski, Sandra; Wu, Gang; Haslam, Stuart M.; Fliegauf, Manfred; Mellouli, Fethi; Patiroglu, Turkan; Unal, Ekrem; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Jouhadi, Zineb; Khadir, Khadija; Ben-Khemis, Leila; Ben-Ali, Meriem; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Borchani, Lamia; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Jakob, Thilo; Khemiri, Monia; Asplund, A. Charlotta; Gustafsson, Manuela O.; Lundin, Karin E.; Falk-Sörqvist, Elin; Moens, Lotte N.; Gungor, Hatice Eke; Engelhardt, Karin R.; Dziadzio, Magdalena; Stauss, Hans; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Meier, Rebecca; Prayitno, Khairunnadiya; Maul-Pavicic, Andrea; Schaffer, Sandra; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Henneke, Philipp; Kraus, Helene; Eibel, Hermann; Kölsch, Uwe; Nadifi, Sellama; Nilsson, Mats; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Edvard Smith, C. I.; Dell, Anne; Barbouche, Mohamed-Ridha; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrent bacterial and fungal infections, eczema and elevated serum IgE levels characterize patients with the hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES). Known genetic causes for HIES are mutations in STAT3 and DOCK8, involved in signal transduction pathways. However, glycosylation defects have not been described in HIES. One crucial enzyme in the glycosylation pathway is Phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3), which catalyzes a key step in the synthesis of UDP-GlcNAc which is required for the biosynthesis of N-glycans. Objective To elucidate the genetic cause in HIES patients who do not carry mutations in STAT3 or DOCK8. Methods After establishing a linkage interval by SNP-chip genotyping and homozygosity mapping in two HIES families from Tunisia, mutational analysis was performed with selector-based, high-throughput sequencing. Protein expression was analyzed by Western blotting and glycosylation was profiled by mass spectrometry. Results Mutational analysis of candidate genes in a 11.9 Mb linkage region on chromosome 6 shared by two multiplex families identified two homozygous mutations in PGM3 which segregated with the disease status and followed a recessive inheritance trait. The mutations predict amino acid changes in Phosphoglucomutase-3; PGM3 (p.Glu340del and p.Leu83Ser). A third homozygous mutation (p.Asp502Tyr) and the p.Leu83Ser variant were identified in two other affected families, respectively. These hypomorphic mutations have impact on the biosynthetic reactions involving UDP-GlcNAc. Glycomic analysis revealed an aberrant glycosylation pattern in leukocytes demonstrated by a reduced level of tri-/tetra-antennary N-glycans. T cell proliferation and differentiation was impaired in patients. Most patients showed developmental delay and many had psychomotor retardation. Conclusion Impairment of PGM3 function leads to a novel primary (inborn) error of development and immunity, as biallelic hypomorphic mutations are associated with impaired glycosylation and a hyper

  11. Cancer-associated DDX3X mutations drive stress granule assembly and impair global translation

    PubMed Central

    Valentin-Vega, Yasmine A.; Wang, Yong-Dong; Parker, Matthew; Patmore, Deanna M.; Kanagaraj, Anderson; Moore, Jennifer; Rusch, Michael; Finkelstein, David; Ellison, David W.; Gilbertson, Richard J.; Zhang, Jinghui; Kim, Hong Joo; Taylor, J. Paul

    2016-01-01

    DDX3X is a DEAD-box RNA helicase that has been implicated in multiple aspects of RNA metabolism including translation initiation and the assembly of stress granules (SGs). Recent genomic studies have reported recurrent DDX3X mutations in numerous tumors including medulloblastoma (MB), but the physiological impact of these mutations is poorly understood. Here we show that a consistent feature of MB-associated mutations is SG hyper-assembly and concomitant translation impairment. We used CLIP-seq to obtain a comprehensive assessment of DDX3X binding targets and ribosome profiling for high-resolution assessment of global translation. Surprisingly, mutant DDX3X expression caused broad inhibition of translation that impacted DDX3X targeted and non-targeted mRNAs alike. Assessment of translation efficiency with single-cell resolution revealed that SG hyper-assembly correlated precisely with impaired global translation. SG hyper-assembly and translation impairment driven by mutant DDX3X were rescued by a genetic approach that limited SG assembly and by deletion of the N-terminal low complexity domain within DDX3X. Thus, in addition to a primary defect at the level of translation initiation caused by DDX3X mutation, SG assembly itself contributes to global translation inhibition. This work provides mechanistic insights into the consequences of cancer-related DDX3X mutations, suggesting that globally reduced translation may provide a context-dependent survival advantage that must be considered as a possible contributor to tumorigenesis. PMID:27180681

  12. The Dynamin Chemical Inhibitor Dynasore Impairs Cholesterol Trafficking and Sterol-Sensitive Genes Transcription in Human HeLa Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Emmanuelle; Paul, Jean Louis; Fournier, Natalie; Beaune, Philippe; Johannes, Ludger

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular transport of cholesterol contributes to the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis by mechanisms that are yet poorly defined. In this study, we characterized the impact of dynasore, a recently described drug that specifically inhibits the enzymatic activity of dynamin, a GTPase regulating receptor endocytosis and cholesterol trafficking. Dynasore strongly inhibited the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in HeLa cells, and to a lower extent in human macrophages. In both cell types, dynasore treatment led to the abnormal accumulation of LDL and free cholesterol (FC) within the endolysosomal network. The measure of cholesterol esters (CE) further showed that the delivery of regulatory cholesterol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was deficient. This resulted in the inhibition of the transcriptional control of the three major sterol-sensitive genes, sterol-regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2), 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-coenzymeA reductase (HMGCoAR), and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). The sequestration of cholesterol in the endolysosomal compartment impaired both the active and passive cholesterol efflux in HMDM. Our data further illustrate the importance of membrane trafficking in cholesterol homeostasis and validate dynasore as a new pharmacological tool to study the intracellular transport of cholesterol. PMID:22205993

  13. Rare Synaptogenesis-Impairing Mutations in SLITRK5 Are Associated with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Song, Minseok; Mathews, Carol A; Stewart, S Evelyn; Shmelkov, Sergey V; Mezey, Jason G; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L; Rasmussen, Steven A; Britton, Jennifer C; Oh, Yong-Seok; Walkup, John T; Lee, Francis S; Glatt, Charles E

    2017-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is substantially heritable, but few molecular genetic risk factors have been identified. Knockout mice lacking SLIT and NTRK-Like Family, Member 5 (SLITRK5) display OCD-like phenotypes including serotonin reuptake inhibitor-sensitive pathologic grooming, and corticostriatal dysfunction. Thus, mutations that impair SLITRK5 function may contribute to the genetic risk for OCD. We re-sequenced the protein-coding sequence of the human SLITRK5 gene (SLITRK5) in three hundred and seventy seven OCD subjects and compared rare non-synonymous mutations (RNMs) in that sample with similar mutations in the 1000 Genomes database. We also performed in silico assessments and in vitro functional synaptogenesis assays on the Slitrk5 mutations identified. We identified four RNM's among these OCD subjects. There were no significant differences in the prevalence or in silico effects of rare non-synonymous mutations in the OCD sample versus controls. Direct functional testing of recombinant SLITRK5 proteins found that all mutations identified in OCD subjects impaired synaptogenic activity whereas none of the pseudo-matched mutations identified in 1000 Genomes controls had significant effects on SLITRK5 function (Fisher's exact test P = 0.028). These results demonstrate that rare functional mutations in SLITRK5 contribute to the genetic risk for OCD in human populations. They also highlight the importance of biological characterization of allelic effects in understanding genotype-phenotype relationships as there were no statistical differences in overall prevalence or bioinformatically predicted effects of OCD case versus control mutations. Finally, these results converge with others to highlight the role of aberrant synaptic function in corticostriatal neurons in the pathophysiology of OCD.

  14. Rare Synaptogenesis-Impairing Mutations in SLITRK5 Are Associated with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Carol A.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Shmelkov, Sergey V.; Mezey, Jason G.; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L.; Rasmussen, Steven A.; Britton, Jennifer C.; Oh, Yong-Seok; Walkup, John T.; Lee, Francis S.; Glatt, Charles E.

    2017-01-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is substantially heritable, but few molecular genetic risk factors have been identified. Knockout mice lacking SLIT and NTRK-Like Family, Member 5 (SLITRK5) display OCD-like phenotypes including serotonin reuptake inhibitor-sensitive pathologic grooming, and corticostriatal dysfunction. Thus, mutations that impair SLITRK5 function may contribute to the genetic risk for OCD. We re-sequenced the protein-coding sequence of the human SLITRK5 gene (SLITRK5) in three hundred and seventy seven OCD subjects and compared rare non-synonymous mutations (RNMs) in that sample with similar mutations in the 1000 Genomes database. We also performed in silico assessments and in vitro functional synaptogenesis assays on the Slitrk5 mutations identified. We identified four RNM’s among these OCD subjects. There were no significant differences in the prevalence or in silico effects of rare non-synonymous mutations in the OCD sample versus controls. Direct functional testing of recombinant SLITRK5 proteins found that all mutations identified in OCD subjects impaired synaptogenic activity whereas none of the pseudo-matched mutations identified in 1000 Genomes controls had significant effects on SLITRK5 function (Fisher’s exact test P = 0.028). These results demonstrate that rare functional mutations in SLITRK5 contribute to the genetic risk for OCD in human populations. They also highlight the importance of biological characterization of allelic effects in understanding genotype-phenotype relationships as there were no statistical differences in overall prevalence or bioinformatically predicted effects of OCD case versus control mutations. Finally, these results converge with others to highlight the role of aberrant synaptic function in corticostriatal neurons in the pathophysiology of OCD. PMID:28085938

  15. Study of modifiers factors associated to mitochondrial mutations in individuals with hearing impairment

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa de Moraes, Vanessa Cristine; Alexandrino, Fabiana; Andrade, Paula Baloni; Camara, Marilia Fontenele; Sartorato, Edi Lucia

    2009-04-03

    Hearing impairment is the most prevalent sensorial deficit in the general population. Congenital deafness occurs in about 1 in 1000 live births, of which approximately 50% has hereditary cause in development countries. Non-syndromic deafness can be caused by mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Mutations in mtDNA have been associated with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic deafness in many families worldwide. However, the nuclear background influences the phenotypic expression of these pathogenic mutations. Indeed, it has been proposed that nuclear modifier genes modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the mitochondrial A1555G mutation in the MTRNR1 gene. The both putative nuclear modifiers genes TRMU and MTO1 encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial related to tRNA modification. It has been hypothesizes that human TRMU and also MTO1 nuclear genes may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of deafness-associated mitochondrial mutations. The aim of this work was to elucidate the contribution of mitochondrial mutations, nuclear modifier genes mutations and aminoglycoside exposure in the deafness phenotype. Our findings suggest that the genetic background of individuals may play an important role in the pathogenesis of deafness-associated with mitochondrial mutation and aminoglycoside-induced.

  16. Pharmacological correction of long QT-linked mutations in KCNH2 (hERG) increases the trafficking of Kv11.1 channels stored in the transitional endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer L; Reloj, Allison R; Nataraj, Parvathi S; Bartos, Daniel C; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Moss, Arthur J; Ohno, Seiko; Horie, Minoru; Anderson, Corey L; January, Craig T; Delisle, Brian P

    2013-11-01

    KCNH2 encodes Kv11.1 and underlies the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr) in the heart. Loss-of-function KCNH2 mutations cause the type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2), and most LQT2-linked missense mutations inhibit the trafficking of Kv11.1 channels. Drugs that bind to Kv11.1 and block IKr (e.g., E-4031) can act as pharmacological chaperones to increase the trafficking and functional expression for most LQT2 channels (pharmacological correction). We previously showed that LQT2 channels are selectively stored in a microtubule-dependent compartment within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We tested the hypothesis that pharmacological correction promotes the trafficking of LQT2 channels stored in this compartment. Confocal analyses of cells expressing the trafficking-deficient LQT2 channel G601S showed that the microtubule-dependent ER compartment is the transitional ER. Experiments with E-4031 and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide suggested that pharmacological correction promotes the trafficking of G601S stored in this compartment. Treating cells in E-4031 or ranolazine (a drug that blocks IKr and has a short half-life) for 30 min was sufficient to cause pharmacological correction. Moreover, the increased functional expression of G601S persisted 4-5 h after drug washout. Coexpression studies with a dominant-negative form of Rab11B, a small GTPase that regulates Kv11.1 trafficking, prevented the pharmacological correction of G601S trafficking from the transitional ER. These data suggest that pharmacological correction quickly increases the trafficking of LQT2 channels stored in the transitional ER via a Rab11B-dependent pathway, and we conclude that the pharmacological chaperone activity of drugs like ranolazine might have therapeutic potential.

  17. Trafficking defects and loss of ligand binding are the underlying causes of all reported DDR2 missense mutations found in SMED-SL patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Bassam R; Xu, Huifang; Akawi, Nadia A; John, Anne; Karuvantevida, Noushad S; Langer, Ruth; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Leitinger, Birgit

    2010-06-01

    Spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia (SMED) with short limbs and abnormal calcifications (SMED-SL) is a rare, autosomal recessive human growth disorder, characterized by disproportionate short stature, short limbs, short broad fingers, abnormal metaphyses and epiphyses, platyspondyly and premature calcifications. Recently, three missense mutations and one splice-site mutation in the DDR2 gene were identified as causative genetic defects for SMED-SL, but the underlying cellular and biochemical mechanisms were not explored. Here we report a novel DDR2 missense mutation, c.337G>A (p.E113K), that causes SMED-SL in two siblings in the United Arab Emirates. Another DDR2 missense mutation, c.2254C>T (p.R752C), matching one of the previously reported SMED-SL mutations, was found in a second affected family. DDR2 is a plasma membrane receptor tyrosine kinase that functions as a collagen receptor. We expressed DDR2 constructs with the identified point mutations in human cell lines and evaluated their localization and functional properties. We found that all SMED-SL missense mutants were defective in collagen-induced receptor activation and that the three previously reported mutants (p.T713I, p.I726R and p.R752C) were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. The novel mutant (p.E113K), in contrast, trafficked normally, like wild-type DDR2, but failed to bind collagen. This finding is in agreement with our recent structural data identifying Glu113 as an important amino acid in the DDR2 ligand-binding site. Our data thus demonstrate that SMED-SL can result from at least two different loss-of-function mechanisms: namely defects in DDR2 targeting to the plasma membrane or the loss of its ligand-binding activity.

  18. Loss of chloride channel ClC-5 impairs endocytosis by defective trafficking of megalin and cubilin in kidney proximal tubules.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Erik I; Devuyst, Olivier; Dom, Geneviève; Nielsen, Rikke; Van der Smissen, Patrick; Verroust, Pierre; Leruth, Michèle; Guggino, William B; Courtoy, Pierre J

    2003-07-08

    Loss of the renal endosome-associated chloride channel, ClC-5, in Dent's disease and knockout (KO) mice strongly inhibits endocytosis of filtered proteins by kidney proximal tubular cells (PTC). The underlying mechanism remains unknown. We therefore tested whether this endocytic failure could primarily reflect a loss of reabsorption by the multiligand receptors, megalin, and cubilin, caused by a trafficking defect. Impaired protein endocytosis in PTC of ClC-5 KO mice was demonstrated by (i) a major decreased uptake of injected 125I-beta 2-microglobulin, but not of the fluid-phase tracer, FITC-dextran, (ii) reduced labeling of endosomes by injected peroxidase and for the endogenous megalin/cubilin ligands, vitamin D- and retinol-binding proteins, and (iii) urinary appearance of low-molecular-weight proteins and the selective cubilin ligand, transferrin. Contrasting with preserved mRNA levels, megalin and cubilin abundance was significantly decreased in kidney extracts of KO mice. Percoll gradients resolving early and late endosomes (Rab5a, Rab7), brush border (villin, aminopeptidase M), and a dense peak comprising lysosomes (acid hydrolases) showed a disappearance of the brush border component for megalin and cubilin in KO mice. Quantitative ultrastructural immunogold labeling confirmed the overall decrease of megalin and cubilin in PTC and their selective loss at the brush border. In contrast, total contents of the rate-limiting endocytic catalysts, Rab5a and Rab7, were unaffected. Thus, impaired protein endocytosis caused by invalidation of ClC-5 primarily reflects a trafficking defect of megalin and cubilin in PTC.

  19. PLEKHM2 mutation leads to abnormal localization of lysosomes, impaired autophagy flux and associates with recessive dilated cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Emad; Levitas, Aviva; Singh, Sonia R.; Braiman, Alex; Ofir, Rivka; Etzion, Sharon; Sheffield, Val C.; Etzion, Yoram; Carrier, Lucie; Parvari, Ruti

    2015-01-01

    Gene mutations, mostly segregating with a dominant mode of inheritance, are important causes of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a disease characterized by enlarged ventricular dimensions, impaired cardiac function, heart failure and high risk of death. Another myocardial abnormality often linked to gene mutations is left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) characterized by a typical diffuse spongy appearance of the left ventricle. Here, we describe a large Bedouin family presenting with a severe recessive DCM and LVNC. Homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a single gene variant that segregated as expected and was neither reported in databases nor in Bedouin population controls. The PLEKHM2 cDNA2156_2157delAG variant causes the frameshift p.Lys645AlafsTer12 and/or the skipping of exon 11 that results in deletion of 30 highly conserved amino acids. PLEKHM2 is known to interact with several Rabs and with kinesin-1, affecting endosomal trafficking. Accordingly, patients' primary fibroblasts exhibited abnormal subcellular distribution of endosomes marked by Rab5, Rab7 and Rab9, as well as the Golgi apparatus. In addition, lysosomes appeared to be concentrated in the perinuclear region, and autophagy flux was impaired. Transfection of wild-type PLEKHM2 cDNA into patient's fibroblasts corrected the subcellular distribution of the lysosomes, supporting the causal effect of PLEKHM2 mutation. PLEKHM2 joins LAMP-2 and BAG3 as a disease gene altering autophagy resulting in an isolated cardiac phenotype. The association of PLEKHM2 mutation with DCM and LVNC supports the importance of autophagy for normal cardiac function. PMID:26464484

  20. Endolysosomal sorting of ubiquitinated caveolin-1 is regulated by VCP/p97 and UBXD1 and impaired by VCP disease mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Danilo; Vuk, Maja; Kirchner, Philipp; Bug, Monika; Schütz, Sabina; Hayer, Arnold; Bremer, Sebastian; Lusk, Caleb; Baloh, Robert H.; Lee, Houkeun; Glatter, Timo; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Weihl, Conrad C.; Meyer, Hemmo

    2011-01-01

    The AAA-ATPase VCP/p97 cooperates with distinct cofactors to process ubiquitinated proteins in different cellular pathways 1–3. VCP missense mutations cause a systemic degenerative disease in humans, but the molecular pathogenesis is unclear 4, 5. We used an unbiased mass spectrometry approach and identified a VCP complex with the UBXD1 cofactor, which binds the plasma membrane protein caveolin-1 (Cav1) and whose formation is specifically disrupted by disease-associated mutations. We show that VCP-UBXD1 targets mono-ubiquitinated Cav1 in SDS-resistant high molecular weight complexes on endosomes, which are en route to degradation in endolysosomes 6. Expression of VCP mutant proteins, chemical inhibition of VCP, or siRNA-mediated depletion of UBXD1 leads to a block of Cav1 transport at the limiting membrane of enlarged endosomes in cultured cells. In patient muscle, muscle-specific Caveolin-3 (Cav3) accumulates in sarcoplasmic pools and specifically delocalises from the sarcolemma. These results extend the cellular functions of VCP to mediating sorting of ubiquitinated cargo in the endocytic pathway and suggest that impaired trafficking of caveolin may contribute to the pathogenesis in individuals with VCP mutations. PMID:21822278

  1. A Novel Splice-Site Mutation in the GJB2 Gene Causing Mild Postlingual Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, Marta; del Castillo, Francisco J.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Francisco J.; Garrido, Gema; Villamar, Manuela; Calderón, Manuela; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A.; Moreno, Felipe; del Castillo, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The DFNB1 subtype of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, caused by mutations affecting the GJB2 (connection-26) gene, is highly prevalent in most populations worldwide. DFNB1 hearing impairment is mostly severe or profound and usually appears before the acquisition of speech (prelingual onset), though a small number of hypomorphic missense mutations result in mild or moderate deafness of postlingual onset. We identified a novel GJB2 splice-site mutation, c. -22-2A>C, in three siblings with mild postlingual hearing impairment that were compound heterozygous for c. -22-2A>C and c.35delG. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments performed on total RNA extracted from saliva samples from one of these siblings confirmed that c. -22-2A>C abolished the acceptor splice site of the single GJB2 intron, resulting in the absence of normally processed transcripts from this allele. However, we did isolate transcripts from the c. -22-2A>C allele that keep an intact GJB2 coding region and that were generated by use of an alternative acceptor splice site previously unknown. The residual expression of wild-type connection-26 encoded by these transcripts probably underlies the mild severity and late onset of the hearing impairment of these subjects. PMID:24039984

  2. A Neuroligin-4 Missense Mutation Associated With Autism Impairs Neuroligin-4 Folding and ER Export

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Milunsky, Jeff M.; Newton, Stephanie; Ko, Jaewon; Zhao, Geping; Maher, Tom A.; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Bolliger, Marc F.; S.Carter, Alice; Boucard, Antony; Powell, Craig M.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroligins (NLs) are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules essential for normal synapse function. Mutations in neuroligin-4 (NL4; gene symbol: NLGN4) have been reported in some patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other neurodevelopmental impairments. However, the low frequency of NL4 mutations, and the limited information about the affected patients and the functional consequences of their mutations, cast doubt on the causal role of NL4 mutations in these disorders. Here, we describe two brothers with classical ASD who carry a single amino acid substitution in NL4 (R87W). This substitution was absent from the brothers’ asymptomatic parents, suggesting that it arose in the maternal germline. R87 is conserved in all NL isoforms, and the R87W substitution is not observed in control individuals. At the protein level, the R87W-substitution impaired glycosylation processing of NL4 expressed in HEK293 and COS cells, destabilized NL4, caused NL4 retention in the endoplasmic reticulum in non-neuronal cells and neurons, and blocked NL4 transport to the cell-surface. As a result, the R87W-substitution inactivated the synapse-formation activity of NL4, and abolished the functional effect of NL4 on synapse strength. Viewed together, these observations suggest that a point mutation in NL4 can cause ASD by a loss-of-function mechanism. PMID:19726642

  3. Loss-of-Function Mutations of ILDR1 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment DFNB42

    PubMed Central

    Borck, Guntram; Rehman, Atteeq Ur; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Kakar, Naseebullah; von Ameln, Simon; Grillet, Nicolas; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Ansar, Muhammad; Basit, Sulman; Javed, Qamar; Morell, Robert J.; Nasreen, Nabilah; Shearer, A. Eliot; Ahmad, Adeel; Kahrizi, Kimia; Shaikh, Rehan S.; Ali, Rana A.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Goebel, Ingrid; Meyer, Nicole C.; Kimberling, William J.; Webster, Jennifer A.; Stephan, Dietrich A.; Schiller, Martin R.; Bahlo, Melanie; Najmabadi, Hossein; Gillespie, Peter G.; Nürnberg, Peter; Wollnik, Bernd; Riazuddin, Saima; Smith, Richard J.H.; Ahmad, Wasim; Müller, Ulrich; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Friedman, Thomas B.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Leal, Suzanne M.; Ahmad, Jamil; Kubisch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By using homozygosity mapping in a consanguineous Pakistani family, we detected linkage of nonsyndromic hearing loss to a 7.6 Mb region on chromosome 3q13.31-q21.1 within the previously reported DFNB42 locus. Subsequent candidate gene sequencing identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1135G>T [p.Glu379X]) in ILDR1 as the cause of hearing impairment. By analyzing additional consanguineous families with homozygosity at this locus, we detected ILDR1 mutations in the affected individuals of 10 more families from Pakistan and Iran. The identified ILDR1 variants include missense, nonsense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations as well as a start codon mutation in the family that originally defined the DFNB42 locus. ILDR1 encodes the evolutionarily conserved immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1, a putative transmembrane receptor of unknown function. In situ hybridization detected expression of Ildr1, the murine ortholog, early in development in the vestibule and in hair cells and supporting cells of the cochlea. Expression in hair cell- and supporting cell-containing neurosensory organs is conserved in the zebrafish, in which the ildr1 ortholog is prominently expressed in the developing ear and neuromasts of the lateral line. These data identify loss-of-function mutations of ILDR1, a gene with a conserved expression pattern pointing to a conserved function in hearing in vertebrates, as underlying nonsyndromic prelingual sensorineural hearing impairment. PMID:21255762

  4. A neuroligin-4 missense mutation associated with autism impairs neuroligin-4 folding and endoplasmic reticulum export.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Milunsky, Jeff M; Newton, Stephanie; Ko, Jaewon; Zhao, Geping; Maher, Tom A; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Bolliger, Marc F; Carter, Alice S; Boucard, Antony A; Powell, Craig M; Südhof, Thomas C

    2009-09-02

    Neuroligins (NLs) are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules essential for normal synapse function. Mutations in neuroligin-4 (NL4) (gene symbol: NLGN4) have been reported in some patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other neurodevelopmental impairments. However, the low frequency of NL4 mutations and the limited information about the affected patients and the functional consequences of their mutations cast doubt on the causal role of NL4 mutations in these disorders. Here, we describe two brothers with classical ASD who carry a single amino-acid substitution in NL4 (R87W). This substitution was absent from the brothers' asymptomatic parents, suggesting that it arose in the maternal germ line. R87 is conserved in all NL isoforms, and the R87W substitution is not observed in control individuals. At the protein level, the R87W substitution impaired glycosylation processing of NL4 expressed in HEK293 and COS cells, destabilized NL4, caused NL4 retention in the endoplasmic reticulum in non-neuronal cells and neurons, and blocked NL4 transport to the cell surface. As a result, the R87W substitution inactivated the synapse-formation activity of NL4 and abolished the functional effect of NL4 on synapse strength. Viewed together, these observations suggest that a point mutation in NL4 can cause ASD by a loss-of-function mechanism.

  5. De Novo Mutations in FOXP1 in Cases with Intellectual Disability, Autism, and Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Fadi F.; Daoud, Hussein; Rochefort, Daniel; Piton, Amélie; Gauthier, Julie; Langlois, Mathieu; Foomani, Gila; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Joober, Ridha; Lafrenière, Ronald G.; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Mottron, Laurent; Drapeau, Pierre; Beauchamp, Miriam H.; Phillips, Michael S.; Fombonne, Eric; Rouleau, Guy A.; Michaud, Jacques L.

    2010-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in FOXP2, which encodes a forkhead transcription factor, have been shown to cause developmental verbal dyspraxia and language impairment. FOXP2 and its closest homolog, FOXP1, are coexpressed in brain regions that are important for language and cooperatively regulate developmental processes, raising the possibility that FOXP1 may also be involved in developmental conditions that are associated with language impairment. In order to explore this possibility, we searched for mutations in FOXP1 in patients with intellectual disability (ID; mental retardation) and/or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We first performed array-based genomic hybridization on sporadic nonsyndromic ID (NSID) (n = 30) or ASD (n = 80) cases. We identified a de novo intragenic deletion encompassing exons 4–14 of FOXP1 in a patient with NSID and autistic features. In addition, sequencing of all coding exons of FOXP1 in sporadic NSID (n = 110) or ASD (n = 135) cases, as well as in 570 controls, revealed the presence of a de novo nonsense mutation (c.1573C>T [p.R525X]) in the conserved forkhead DNA-binding domain in a patient with NSID and autism. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the p.R525X alteration disrupts the activity of the protein. Formal assessments revealed that both patients with de novo mutations in FOXP1 also show severe language impairment, mood lability with physical aggressiveness, and specific obsessions and compulsions. In conclusion, both FOXP1 and FOXP2 are associated with language impairment, but decrease of the former has a more global impact on brain development than that of the latter. PMID:20950788

  6. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease. PMID:27570485

  7. Recessive mutations in POLR1C cause a leukodystrophy by impairing biogenesis of RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Thiffault, Isabelle; Wolf, Nicole I.; Forget, Diane; Guerrero, Kether; Tran, Luan T.; Choquet, Karine; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Poitras, Christian; Brais, Bernard; Yoon, Grace; Sztriha, Laszlo; Webster, Richard I.; Timmann, Dagmar; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Seeger, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Alíz; Máté, Adrienn; Goizet, Cyril; Fung, Eva; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Fribourg, Sébastien; Vanderver, Adeline; Simons, Cas; Taft, Ryan J.; Yates III, John R.; Coulombe, Benoit; Bernard, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    A small proportion of 4H (Hypomyelination, Hypodontia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism) or RNA polymerase III (POLR3)-related leukodystrophy cases are negative for mutations in the previously identified causative genes POLR3A and POLR3B. Here we report eight of these cases carrying recessive mutations in POLR1C, a gene encoding a shared POLR1 and POLR3 subunit, also mutated in some Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) cases. Using shotgun proteomics and ChIP sequencing, we demonstrate that leukodystrophy-causative mutations, but not TCS mutations, in POLR1C impair assembly and nuclear import of POLR3, but not POLR1, leading to decreased binding to POLR3 target genes. This study is the first to show that distinct mutations in a gene coding for a shared subunit of two RNA polymerases lead to selective modification of the enzymes' availability leading to two different clinical conditions and to shed some light on the pathophysiological mechanism of one of the most common hypomyelinating leukodystrophies, POLR3-related leukodystrophy. PMID:26151409

  8. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  9. A Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutation impairs the ORC1-nucleosome association.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Sankaran, Saumya; Gozani, Or; Song, Jikui

    2015-05-15

    Recent studies have identified several genetic mutations within the BAH domain of human Origin Recognition Complex subunit 1 (hORC1BAH), including the R105Q mutation, implicated in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome (MGS). However, the pathological role of the hORC1 R105Q mutation remains unclear. In this study, we have investigated the interactions of the hORC1BAH domain with histone H4K20me2, DNA, and the nucleosome core particle labeled with H4Kc20me2, a chemical analog of H4K20me2. Our study revealed a nucleosomal DNA binding site for hORC1BAH. The R105Q mutation reduces the hORC1BAH-DNA binding affinity, leading to impaired hORC1BAH-nucleosome interaction, which likely influences DNA replication initiation and MGS pathogenesis. This study provides an etiologic link between the hORC1 R105Q mutation and MGS.

  10. De Novo Mutations in CHAMP1 Cause Intellectual Disability with Severe Speech Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Maja; Cremer, Kirsten; Ockeloen, Charlotte W.; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D.; Herkert, Johanna C.; Denecke, Jonas; Haack, Tobias B.; Zink, Alexander M.; Becker, Jessica; Wohlleber, Eva; Johannsen, Jessika; Alhaddad, Bader; Pfundt, Rolph; Fuchs, Sigrid; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Strom, Tim M.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Kubisch, Christian; Engels, Hartmut; Lessel, Davor

    2015-01-01

    CHAMP1 encodes a protein with a function in kinetochore-microtubule attachment and in the regulation of chromosome segregation, both of which are known to be important for neurodevelopment. By trio whole-exome sequencing, we have identified de novo deleterious mutations in CHAMP1 in five unrelated individuals affected by intellectual disability with severe speech impairment, motor developmental delay, muscular hypotonia, and similar dysmorphic features including short philtrum and a tented upper and everted lover lip. In addition to two frameshift and one nonsense mutations, we found an identical nonsense mutation, c.1192C>T (p.Arg398∗), in two affected individuals. All mutations, if resulting in a stable protein, are predicted to lead to the loss of the functionally important zinc-finger domains in the C terminus of the protein, which regulate CHAMP1 localization to chromosomes and the mitotic spindle, thereby providing a mechanistic understanding for their pathogenicity. We thus establish deleterious de novo mutations in CHAMP1 as a cause of intellectual disability. PMID:26340335

  11. Biallelic mutations in IRF8 impair human NK cell maturation and function

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Emily M.; Gunesch, Justin T.; Chinn, Ivan K.; Angelo, Laura S.; Maisuria, Sheetal; Keller, Michael D.; Togi, Sumihito; Watkin, Levi B.; LaRosa, David F.; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep; Smith, Jansen B.; Hernández-Sanabria, Mayra; Le, Duy T.; Hogg, Graham D.; Cao, Tram N.; Freud, Aharon G.; Szymanski, Eva P.; Collin, Matthew; Cant, Andrew J.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Holland, Steven M.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Ozato, Keiko; Paust, Silke; Doody, Gina M.; Lupski, James R.; Orange, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cell deficiencies are rare yet result in severe and often fatal disease, particularly as a result of viral susceptibility. NK cells develop from hematopoietic stem cells, and few monogenic errors that specifically interrupt NK cell development have been reported. Here we have described biallelic mutations in IRF8, which encodes an interferon regulatory factor, as a cause of familial NK cell deficiency that results in fatal and severe viral disease. Compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations in IRF8 in 3 unrelated families resulted in a paucity of mature CD56dim NK cells and an increase in the frequency of the immature CD56bright NK cells, and this impairment in terminal maturation was also observed in Irf8–/–, but not Irf8+/–, mice. We then determined that impaired maturation was NK cell intrinsic, and gene expression analysis of human NK cell developmental subsets showed that multiple genes were dysregulated by IRF8 mutation. The phenotype was accompanied by deficient NK cell function and was stable over time. Together, these data indicate that human NK cells require IRF8 for development and functional maturation and that dysregulation of this function results in severe human disease, thereby emphasizing a critical role for NK cells in human antiviral defense. PMID:27893462

  12. Biallelic mutations in IRF8 impair human NK cell maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Mace, Emily M; Bigley, Venetia; Gunesch, Justin T; Chinn, Ivan K; Angelo, Laura S; Care, Matthew A; Maisuria, Sheetal; Keller, Michael D; Togi, Sumihito; Watkin, Levi B; LaRosa, David F; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep; Smith, Jansen B; Hernández-Sanabria, Mayra; Le, Duy T; Hogg, Graham D; Cao, Tram N; Freud, Aharon G; Szymanski, Eva P; Savic, Sinisa; Collin, Matthew; Cant, Andrew J; Gibbs, Richard A; Holland, Steven M; Caligiuri, Michael A; Ozato, Keiko; Paust, Silke; Doody, Gina M; Lupski, James R; Orange, Jordan S

    2017-01-03

    Human NK cell deficiencies are rare yet result in severe and often fatal disease, particularly as a result of viral susceptibility. NK cells develop from hematopoietic stem cells, and few monogenic errors that specifically interrupt NK cell development have been reported. Here we have described biallelic mutations in IRF8, which encodes an interferon regulatory factor, as a cause of familial NK cell deficiency that results in fatal and severe viral disease. Compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations in IRF8 in 3 unrelated families resulted in a paucity of mature CD56dim NK cells and an increase in the frequency of the immature CD56bright NK cells, and this impairment in terminal maturation was also observed in Irf8-/-, but not Irf8+/-, mice. We then determined that impaired maturation was NK cell intrinsic, and gene expression analysis of human NK cell developmental subsets showed that multiple genes were dysregulated by IRF8 mutation. The phenotype was accompanied by deficient NK cell function and was stable over time. Together, these data indicate that human NK cells require IRF8 for development and functional maturation and that dysregulation of this function results in severe human disease, thereby emphasizing a critical role for NK cells in human antiviral defense.

  13. A Novel Dominant Hyperekplexia Mutation Y705C Alters Trafficking and Biochemical Properties of the Presynaptic Glycine Transporter GlyT2*

    PubMed Central

    Giménez, Cecilio; Pérez-Siles, Gonzalo; Martínez-Villarreal, Jaime; Arribas-González, Esther; Jiménez, Esperanza; Núñez, Enrique; de Juan-Sanz, Jaime; Fernández-Sánchez, Enrique; García-Tardón, Noemí; Ibáñez, Ignacio; Romanelli, Valeria; Nevado, Julián; James, Victoria M.; Topf, Maya; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Thomas, Rhys H.; Desviat, Lourdes R.; Aragón, Carmen; Zafra, Francisco; Rees, Mark I.; Lapunzina, Pablo; Harvey, Robert J.; López-Corcuera, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Hyperekplexia or startle disease is characterized by an exaggerated startle response, evoked by tactile or auditory stimuli, producing hypertonia and apnea episodes. Although rare, this orphan disorder can have serious consequences, including sudden infant death. Dominant and recessive mutations in the human glycine receptor (GlyR) α1 gene (GLRA1) are the major cause of this disorder. However, recessive mutations in the presynaptic Na+/Cl−-dependent glycine transporter GlyT2 gene (SLC6A5) are rapidly emerging as a second major cause of startle disease. In this study, systematic DNA sequencing of SLC6A5 revealed a new dominant GlyT2 mutation: pY705C (c.2114A→G) in transmembrane domain 11, in eight individuals from Spain and the United Kingdom. Curiously, individuals harboring this mutation show significant variation in clinical presentation. In addition to classical hyperekplexia symptoms, some individuals had abnormal respiration, facial dysmorphism, delayed motor development, or intellectual disability. We functionally characterized this mutation using molecular modeling, electrophysiology, [3H]glycine transport, cell surface expression, and cysteine labeling assays. We found that the introduced cysteine interacts with the cysteine pair Cys-311–Cys-320 in the second external loop of GlyT2. This interaction impairs transporter maturation through the secretory pathway, reduces surface expression, and inhibits transport function. Additionally, Y705C presents altered H+ and Zn2+ dependence of glycine transport that may affect the function of glycinergic neurotransmission in vivo. PMID:22753417

  14. PRUNE is crucial for normal brain development and mutated in microcephaly with neurodevelopmental impairment.

    PubMed

    Zollo, Massimo; Ahmed, Mustafa; Ferrucci, Veronica; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Carotenuto, Marianeve; Maroofian, Reza; Al-Amri, Ahmed; Singh, Royana; Scognamiglio, Iolanda; Mojarrad, Majid; Musella, Luca; Duilio, Angela; Di Somma, Angela; Karaca, Ender; Rajab, Anna; Al-Khayat, Aisha; Mohan Mohapatra, Tribhuvan; Eslahi, Atieh; Ashrafzadeh, Farah; Rawlins, Lettie E; Prasad, Rajniti; Gupta, Rashmi; Kumari, Preeti; Srivastava, Mona; Cozzolino, Flora; Kumar Rai, Sunil; Monti, Maria; Harlalka, Gaurav V; Simpson, Michael A; Rich, Philip; Al-Salmi, Fatema; Patton, Michael A; Chioza, Barry A; Efthymiou, Stephanie; Granata, Francesca; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Wiethoff, Sarah; Borgione, Eugenia; Scuderi, Carmela; Mankad, Kshitij; Hanna, Michael G; Pucci, Piero; Houlden, Henry; Lupski, James R; Crosby, Andrew H; Baple, Emma L

    2017-02-28

    PRUNE is a member of the DHH (Asp-His-His) phosphoesterase protein superfamily of molecules important for cell motility, and implicated in cancer progression. Here we investigated multiple families from Oman, India, Iran and Italy with individuals affected by a new autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental and degenerative disorder in which the cardinal features include primary microcephaly and profound global developmental delay. Our genetic studies identified biallelic mutations of PRUNE1 as responsible. Our functional assays of disease-associated variant alleles revealed impaired microtubule polymerization, as well as cell migration and proliferation properties, of mutant PRUNE. Additionally, our studies also highlight a potential new role for PRUNE during microtubule polymerization, which is essential for the cytoskeletal rearrangements that occur during cellular division and proliferation. Together these studies define PRUNE as a molecule fundamental for normal human cortical development and define cellular and clinical consequences associated with PRUNE mutation.

  15. PRUNE is crucial for normal brain development and mutated in microcephaly with neurodevelopmental impairment

    PubMed Central

    Zollo, Massimo; Ahmed, Mustafa; Ferrucci, Veronica; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Carotenuto, Marianeve; Maroofian, Reza; Al-Amri, Ahmed; Singh, Royana; Scognamiglio, Iolanda; Mojarrad, Majid; Musella, Luca; Duilio, Angela; Di Somma, Angela; Karaca, Ender; Rajab, Anna; Al-Khayat, Aisha; Mohan Mohapatra, Tribhuvan; Eslahi, Atieh; Ashrafzadeh, Farah; Rawlins, Lettie E.; Prasad, Rajniti; Gupta, Rashmi; Kumari, Preeti; Srivastava, Mona; Cozzolino, Flora; Kumar Rai, Sunil; Monti, Maria; Harlalka, Gaurav V.; Simpson, Michael A.; Rich, Philip; Al-Salmi, Fatema; Patton, Michael A.; Chioza, Barry A.; Efthymiou, Stephanie; Granata, Francesca; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Wiethoff, Sarah; Borgione, Eugenia; Scuderi, Carmela; Mankad, Kshitij; Hanna, Michael G.; Pucci, Piero; Houlden, Henry; Lupski, James R.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract PRUNE is a member of the DHH (Asp-His-His) phosphoesterase protein superfamily of molecules important for cell motility, and implicated in cancer progression. Here we investigated multiple families from Oman, India, Iran and Italy with individuals affected by a new autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental and degenerative disorder in which the cardinal features include primary microcephaly and profound global developmental delay. Our genetic studies identified biallelic mutations of PRUNE1 as responsible. Our functional assays of disease-associated variant alleles revealed impaired microtubule polymerization, as well as cell migration and proliferation properties, of mutant PRUNE. Additionally, our studies also highlight a potential new role for PRUNE during microtubule polymerization, which is essential for the cytoskeletal rearrangements that occur during cellular division and proliferation. Together these studies define PRUNE as a molecule fundamental for normal human cortical development and define cellular and clinical consequences associated with PRUNE mutation. PMID:28334956

  16. GIGYF2 mutation in late-onset Parkinson's disease with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Martinez, Javier; Krebs, Catharine E; Makarov, Vladimir; Gorostidi, Ana; Martí-Massó, Jose Félix; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2015-10-01

    Although in the last two decades there has been considerable progress in understanding the genetic basis of Parkinson's disease (PD), the majority of PD is sporadic and its genetic causes are largely unknown. In an attempt to identify novel genetic causes of PD, whole-exome sequencing and subsequent analyses were performed in a family featuring late-onset PD with cognitive impairment. A novel genetic variant (p.Arg610Gly) in the GIGYF2 gene, previously known to be associated with PD, was identified as potential disease-causing mutation. The GIGYF2 p.Arg610Gly mutation situated in the GYF domain of the encoding protein was predicted to be pathogenic and to disrupt the GYF's ligand-binding abilities. Although further research is still required, this finding may shed light on the GIGYF2-associated mechanisms that lead to PD and suggests insulin dysregulation as a disease-specific mechanism for both PD and cognitive dysfunction.

  17. Hypomorphic mutation in mouse Nppc gene causes retarded bone growth due to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Takehito Kondo, Eri; Yasoda, Akihiro; Inamoto, Masataka; Kiyosu, Chiyo; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2008-11-07

    Long bone abnormality (lbab/lbab) is a spontaneous mutant mouse characterized by dwarfism with shorter long bones. A missense mutation was reported in the Nppc gene, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but it has not been confirmed whether this mutation is responsible for the dwarf phenotype. To verify that the mutation causes the dwarfism of lbab/lbab mice, we first investigated the effect of CNP in lbab/lbab mice. By transgenic rescue with chondrocyte-specific expression of CNP, the dwarf phenotype in lbab/lbab mice was completely compensated. Next, we revealed that CNP derived from the lbab allele retained only slight activity to induce cGMP production through its receptor. Histological analysis showed that both proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes in the growth plate of lbab/lbab mice were markedly reduced. Our results demonstrate that lbab/lbab mice have a hypomorphic mutation in the Nppc gene that is responsible for dwarfism caused by impaired endochondral ossification.

  18. Dynein mutations associated with hereditary motor neuropathies impair mitochondrial morphology and function with age.

    PubMed

    Eschbach, Judith; Sinniger, Jérôme; Bouitbir, Jamal; Fergani, Anissa; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard; René, Frédérique; Larmet, Yves; Marion, Vincent; Baloh, Robert H; Harms, Matthew B; Shy, Michael E; Messadeq, Nadia; Weydt, Patrick; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2013-10-01

    Mutations in the DYNC1H1 gene encoding for dynein heavy chain cause two closely related human motor neuropathies, dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED) and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, and lead to sensory neuropathy and striatal atrophy in mutant mice. Dynein is the molecular motor carrying mitochondria retrogradely on microtubules, yet the consequences of dynein mutations on mitochondrial physiology have not been explored. Here, we show that mouse fibroblasts bearing heterozygous or homozygous point mutation in Dync1h1, similar to human mutations, show profoundly abnormal mitochondrial morphology associated with the loss of mitofusin 1. Furthermore, heterozygous Dync1h1 mutant mice display progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in muscle and mitochondria progressively increase in size and invade sarcomeres. As a likely consequence of systemic mitochondrial dysfunction, Dync1h1 mutant mice develop hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia and progress to glucose intolerance with age. Similar defects in mitochondrial morphology and mitofusin levels are observed in fibroblasts from patients with SMA-LED. Last, we show that Dync1h1 mutant fibroblasts show impaired perinuclear clustering of mitochondria in response to mitochondrial uncoupling. Our results show that dynein function is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and function with aging and suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to dynein-dependent neurological diseases, such as SMA-LED.

  19. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Taylor, S. Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A.; Scambler, Peter J.; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M.; Beales, Philip L.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Witman, George B.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Asimit, Jennifer; Ayub, Mohammad; Barrett, Jeff; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Brion, Marie-Jo; Brown, Andrew; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Cirak, Sebhattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Collier, David; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Daly, Allan; Danecek, Petr; Smith, George Davey; Day-Williams, Aaron; Day, Ian; Durbin, Richard; Edkins, Sarah; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fitzpatrick, David; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gaunt, Tom; Geschwind, Daniel; Greenwood, Celia; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey; Holmans, Peter; Huang, Jie; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Hysi, Pirro; Jackson, David; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jewell, David; Chris, Joyce; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lee, Irene; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Ryan, Liu; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Margarida; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Massimo, Mangino; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; McCarthy, Shane; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew; McKechanie, Andrew; McQuillin, Andrew; Memari, Yasin; Metrustry, Sarah; Min, Josine; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Brent Richards, J.; Ring, Sue; Ritchie, Graham R S; Savage, David B.; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Shihab, Hashem; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin; Smee, Carol; Soler, Artigas María; Soranzo, Nicole; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Tim; St Pourcain, Beate; St. Clair, David; Stalker, Jim; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tian, Jing; Timpson, Nic; Tobin, Martin; Valdes, Ana; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Wain, Louise; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Jun; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Ellie; Whittall, Ros; Williams, Hywel; Williamson, Kathy; Wilson, Scott G.; Wong, Kim; Whyte, Tamieka; ChangJiang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Hou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  20. TMEM240 mutations cause spinocerebellar ataxia 21 with mental retardation and severe cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Delplanque, Jérôme; Devos, David; Huin, Vincent; Genet, Alexandre; Sand, Olivier; Moreau, Caroline; Goizet, Cyril; Charles, Perrine; Anheim, Mathieu; Monin, Marie Lorraine; Buée, Luc; Destée, Alain; Grolez, Guillaume; Delmaire, Christine; Dujardin, Kathy; Dellacherie, Delphine; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Strubi-Vuillaume, Isabelle; Dürr, Alexandra; Sablonnière, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia corresponds to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that primarily affect the cerebellum. Here, we report the identification of the causative gene in spinocerebellar ataxia 21, an autosomal-dominant disorder previously mapped to chromosome 7p21.3-p15.1. This ataxia was firstly characterized in a large French family with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, accompanied by severe cognitive impairment and mental retardation in two young children. Following the recruitment of 12 additional young family members, linkage analysis enabled us to definitively map the disease locus to chromosome 1p36.33-p36.32. The causative mutation, (c.509C>T/p.P170L) in the transmembrane protein gene TMEM240, was identified by whole exome sequencing and then was confirmed by Sanger sequencing and co-segregation analyses. Index cases from 368 French families with autosomal-dominant cerebellar ataxia were also screened for mutations. In seven cases, we identified a range of missense mutations (c.509C>T/p.P170L, c.239C>T/p.T80M, c.346C>T/p.R116C, c.445G>A/p.E149K, c.511C>T/p.R171W), and a stop mutation (c.489C>G/p.Y163*) in the same gene. TMEM240 is a small, strongly conserved transmembrane protein of unknown function present in cerebellum and brain. Spinocerebellar ataxia 21 may be a particular early-onset disease associated with severe cognitive impairment.

  1. COPA mutations impair ER-Golgi transport causing hereditary autoimmune-mediated lung disease and arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Watkin, Levi B.; Jessen, Birthe; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Vece, Timothy; Jan, Max; Sha, Youbao; Thamsen, Maike; Santos-Cortez, Regie L. P.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Gambin, Tomasz; Forbes, Lisa; Law, Christopher S.; Stray-Petersen, Asbjørg; Cheng, Mickie H.; Mace, Emily M.; Anderson, Mark S.; Liu, Dongfang; Tang, Ling Fung; Nicholas, Sarah K.; Nahmod, Karen; Makedonas, George; Canter, Debra; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Hicks, John; Jones, Kirk D.; Penney, Samantha; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Rosenblum, Michael D.; Dell, Sharon D.; Waterfield, Michael R.; Papa, Feroz R.; Muzny, Donna M.; Zaitlen, Noah; Leal, Suzanne M.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Boerwinkle, Eric; Eissa, N. Tony; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Orange, Jordan S.; Shum, Anthony K.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in genomics have allowed unbiased genetic studies of human disease with unexpected insights into the molecular mechanisms of cellular immunity and autoimmunity1. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) and targeted sequencing in patients with an apparent Mendelian syndrome of autoimmune disease characterized by high-titer autoantibodies, inflammatory arthritis and interstitial lung disease (ILD). In five families, we identified four unique deleterious variants in the Coatomer subunit alpha (COPA) gene all located within the same functional domain. We hypothesized that mutant COPA leads to a defect in intracellular transport mediated by coat protein complex I (COPI)2–4. We show that COPA variants impair binding of proteins targeted for retrograde Golgi to ER transport and demonstrate that expression of mutant COPA leads to ER stress and the upregulation of Th17 priming cytokines. Consistent with this pattern of cytokine expression, patients demonstrated a significant skewing of CD4+ T cells toward a T helper 17 (Th17) phenotype, an effector T cell population implicated in autoimmunity5,6. Our findings uncover an unexpected molecular link between a vesicular transport protein and a syndrome of autoimmunity manifested by lung and joint disease. These findings provide a unique opportunity to understand how alterations in cellular homeostasis caused by a defect in the intracellular trafficking pathway leads to the generation of human autoimmune disease. PMID:25894502

  2. Mutation in E1, the ubiquitin activating enzyme, reduces Drosophila lifespan and results in motor impairment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiu-Yu; Pfleger, Cathie M

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases cause tremendous suffering for those afflicted and their families. Many of these diseases involve accumulation of mis-folded or aggregated proteins thought to play a causal role in disease pathology. Ubiquitinated proteins are often found in these protein aggregates, and the aggregates themselves have been shown to inhibit the activity of the proteasome. These and other alterations in the Ubiquitin Pathway observed in neurodegenerative diseases have led to the question of whether impairment of the Ubiquitin Pathway on its own can increase mortality or if ongoing neurodegeneration alters Ubiquitin Pathway function as a side-effect. To address the role of the Ubiquitin Pathway in vivo, we studied loss-of-function mutations in the Drosophila Ubiquitin Activating Enzyme, Uba1 or E1, the most upstream enzyme in the Ubiquitin Pathway. Loss of only one functional copy of E1 caused a significant reduction in adult lifespan. Rare homozygous hypomorphic E1 mutants reached adulthood. These mutants exhibited further reduced lifespan and showed inappropriate Ras activation in the brain. Removing just one functional copy of Ras restored the lifespan of heterozygous E1 mutants to that of wild-type flies and increased the survival of homozygous E1 mutants. E1 homozygous mutants also showed severe motor impairment. Our findings suggest that processes that impair the Ubiquitin Pathway are sufficient to cause early mortality. Reduced lifespan and motor impairment are seen in the human disease X-linked Infantile Spinal Muscular Atrophy, which is associated with mutation in human E1 warranting further analysis of these mutants as a potential animal model for study of this disease.

  3. PX-RICS-deficient mice mimic autism spectrum disorder in Jacobsen syndrome through impaired GABAA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Arima-Yoshida, Fumiko; Sakaue, Fumika; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Matsuura, Ken; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Mattson, Sarah N; Grossfeld, Paul D; Manabe, Toshiya; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2016-03-16

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare congenital disorder caused by a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. A subset of patients exhibit social behavioural problems that meet the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. PX-RICS is located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in JBS patients with autistic-like behaviour. Here we report that PX-RICS-deficient mice exhibit ASD-like social behaviours and ASD-related comorbidities. PX-RICS-deficient neurons show reduced surface γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) levels and impaired GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission. PX-RICS, GABARAP and 14-3-3ζ/θ form an adaptor complex that interconnects GABAAR and dynein/dynactin, thereby facilitating GABAAR surface expression. ASD-like behavioural abnormalities in PX-RICS-deficient mice are ameliorated by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission with a GABAAR agonist. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of PX-RICS in cognition and suggest a causal link between PX-RICS deletion and ASD-like behaviour in JBS patients.

  4. PX-RICS-deficient mice mimic autism spectrum disorder in Jacobsen syndrome through impaired GABAA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Arima-Yoshida, Fumiko; Sakaue, Fumika; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Matsuura, Ken; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Mattson, Sarah N.; Grossfeld, Paul D.; Manabe, Toshiya; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare congenital disorder caused by a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. A subset of patients exhibit social behavioural problems that meet the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. PX-RICS is located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in JBS patients with autistic-like behaviour. Here we report that PX-RICS-deficient mice exhibit ASD-like social behaviours and ASD-related comorbidities. PX-RICS-deficient neurons show reduced surface γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) levels and impaired GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission. PX-RICS, GABARAP and 14-3-3ζ/θ form an adaptor complex that interconnects GABAAR and dynein/dynactin, thereby facilitating GABAAR surface expression. ASD-like behavioural abnormalities in PX-RICS-deficient mice are ameliorated by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission with a GABAAR agonist. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of PX-RICS in cognition and suggest a causal link between PX-RICS deletion and ASD-like behaviour in JBS patients. PMID:26979507

  5. RNASEH1 Mutations Impair mtDNA Replication and Cause Adult-Onset Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Aurelio; Melchionda, Laura; Nasca, Alessia; Carrara, Franco; Lamantea, Eleonora; Zanolini, Alice; Lamperti, Costanza; Fang, Mingyan; Zhang, Jianguo; Ronchi, Dario; Bonato, Sara; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Moggio, Maurizio; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is common in mitochondrial disorders and is frequently associated with multiple mtDNA deletions. The onset is typically in adulthood, and affected subjects can also present with general muscle weakness. The underlying genetic defects comprise autosomal-dominant or recessive mutations in several nuclear genes, most of which play a role in mtDNA replication. Next-generation sequencing led to the identification of compound-heterozygous RNASEH1 mutations in two singleton subjects and a homozygous mutation in four siblings. RNASEH1, encoding ribonuclease H1 (RNase H1), is an endonuclease that is present in both the nucleus and mitochondria and digests the RNA component of RNA-DNA hybrids. Unlike mitochondria, the nucleus harbors a second ribonuclease (RNase H2). All affected individuals first presented with CPEO and exercise intolerance in their twenties, and these were followed by muscle weakness, dysphagia, and spino-cerebellar signs with impaired gait coordination, dysmetria, and dysarthria. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers, together with impaired activity of various mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, were observed in muscle biopsies of affected subjects. Western blot analysis showed the virtual absence of RNase H1 in total lysate from mutant fibroblasts. By an in vitro assay, we demonstrated that altered RNase H1 has a reduced capability to remove the RNA from RNA-DNA hybrids, confirming their pathogenic role. Given that an increasing amount of evidence indicates the presence of RNA primers during mtDNA replication, this result might also explain the accumulation of mtDNA deletions and underscores the importance of RNase H1 for mtDNA maintenance. PMID:26094573

  6. Tyrosinase processing and intracellular trafficking is disrupted in mouse primary melanocytes carrying the underwhite (uw) mutation. A model for oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) type 4.

    PubMed

    Costin, Gertrude-E; Valencia, Julio C; Vieira, Wilfred D; Lamoreux, M Lynn; Hearing, Vincent J

    2003-08-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) type 4 is a newly identified human autosomal recessive hypopigmentary disorder that disrupts pigmentation in the skin, hair and eyes. Three other forms of OCA have been previously characterized, each resulting from the aberrant processing and/or sorting of tyrosinase, the enzyme critical to pigment production in mammals. The disruption of tyrosinase trafficking occurs at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in OCA1 and OCA3, but at the post-Golgi level in OCA2. The gene responsible for OCA4 is the human homologue of the mouse underwhite (uw) gene, which encodes the membrane-associated transporter protein (MATP). To characterize OCA4, we investigated the processing and sorting of melanogenic proteins in primary melanocytes derived from uw/uw mice and from wild-type mice. OCA4 melanocytes were found to be constantly secreted into the medium dark vesicles that contain tyrosinase and two other melanogenic enzymes, Tyrp1 (tyrosinase-related protein 1) and Dct (DOPAchrome tautomerase); this secretory process is not seen in wild-type melanocytes. Although tyrosinase was synthesized at comparable rates in wild-type and in uw-mutant melanocytes, tyrosinase activity in uw-mutant melanocytes was only about 20% of that found in wild-type melanocytes, and was enriched only about threefold in melanosomes compared with the ninefold enrichment in wild-type melanocytes. OCA4 melanocytes showed a marked difference from wild-type melanocytes in that tyrosinase was abnormally secreted from the cells, a process similar to that seen in OCA2 melanocytes, which results from a mutation of the pink-eyed dilution (P) gene. The P protein and MATP have 12 transmembrane regions and are predicted to function as transporters. Ultrastructural analysis shows that the vesicles secreted from OCA4 melanocytes are mostly early stage melanosomes. Taken together, our results show that in OCA4 melanocytes, tyrosinase processing and intracellular trafficking to the

  7. Prevalence and audiological profiles of GJB2 mutations in a large collective of hearing impaired patients.

    PubMed

    Burke, W F; Warnecke, A; Schöner-Heinisch, A; Lesinski-Schiedat, A; Maier, H; Lenarz, T

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene are known to represent the commonest cause of hereditary and congenital hearing loss. In this study, a complete sequencing of the GJB2 gene in a cohort of 506 patients from a single, large cochlear implant program in Europe was performed. Audiological testing for those patients who could actively participate was performed using pure tone audiometry (PTA). Those unable to undergo PTA were measured using click-auditory brainstem response (ABR). Data analysis was performed to determine genotype-phenotype correlations of the mutational status vs. audiological profiles and vs. age at the time of presentation. An overall prevalence of biallelic mutations of 13.4% was found for the total collective. When subsets of younger patients were examined, the prevalence increased to 27% of those up to age 18 and 35% of those up to age 5 at the time of testing, respectively. This increase was found to be highly significant (p < 0.001). Analysis of the mean PTA thresholds revealed a strong correlation between allele combination status and mean PTA (p = 0.021). The prevalence of simple heterozygotes was found to be approximately 10.1%, which is around 3.3 times the value expected in the general population. As GJB2 follows a recessive pattern of inheritance, the question arises as to why such a large fraction of simple heterozygotes was observed among the hearing impaired patients included in this study.

  8. Biallelic mutations in CAD, impair de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis and decrease glycosylation precursors

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Bobby G.; Wolfe, Lynne A.; Ichikawa, Mie; Markello, Thomas; He, Miao; Tifft, Cynthia J.; Gahl, William A.; Freeze, Hudson H.

    2015-01-01

    In mitochondria, carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 1 activity produces carbamoyl phosphate for urea synthesis, and deficiency results in hyperammonemia. Cytoplasmic carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, however, is part of a tri-functional enzyme encoded by CAD; no human disease has been attributed to this gene. The tri-functional enzyme contains carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2 (CPS2), aspartate transcarbamylase (ATCase) and dihydroorotase (DHOase) activities, which comprise the first three of six reactions required for de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Here we characterize an individual who is compound heterozygous for mutations in different domains of CAD. One mutation, c.1843-1G>A, results in an in-frame deletion of exon 13. The other, c.6071G>A, causes a missense mutation (p.Arg2024Gln) in a highly conserved residue that is essential for carbamoyl-phosphate binding. Metabolic flux studies showed impaired aspartate incorporation into RNA and DNA through the de novo synthesis pathway. In addition, CTP, UTP and nearly all UDP-activated sugars that serve as donors for glycosylation were decreased. Uridine supplementation rescued these abnormalities, suggesting a potential therapy for this new glycosylation disorder. PMID:25678555

  9. The effect of nanoparticle size and NLS density on nuclear targeting in cancer and normal cells; impaired nuclear import and aberrant nanoparticle intracellular trafficking in glioma.

    PubMed

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Lamprecht, Alf

    2017-02-27

    The cell nucleus is an interesting target in many diseases with particular interest in cancer. Previously, nuclear targeted small and large chitosan nanoparticles (S-NPs≈25nm, and L-NPs≈150nm respectively), modified with low, intermediate and high densities of NLS (L-NLS, I-NLS and H-NLS) were developed and assessed in L929 fibroblasts. However, to evade apoptosis and stimulate tumor growth cancer cells are capable of manipulating the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport on many levels, making NPs that are capable of nuclear targeting in normal cells incapable of doing so in cancer. For such reason, here, the nuclear delivery efficiency of S-NPs and L-NPs was assessed as a function of their NLS density in cancer and non-cancer cells. For S-NPs, in all cells tested, NLS was unnecessary for nuclear delivery; unmodified S-NPs showed higher nuclear delivery than NLS-S-NPs due to their ability to gain nuclear entry in a passive manner. For L-NPs, L-NLS-L-NPs showed ≈ 8.5, 33, 1.8 and 7.2 fold higher nuclear deliveries than H-NLS-L-NPs in L929 fibroblasts, primary human fibroblasts, HEK 293 and lung cancer cells, respectively. In glioma however, unmodified L-NPs showed highest nuclear delivery, whereas NLS-L-NPs were retained in the cytoplasm. Experiments conducted in the presence of inhibitors of the classical nuclear import pathway indicated that due to overexpression of importin α, classical nuclear import in glioma is impaired leading to aberrant NP intracellular trafficking and nuclear import.

  10. Expression and Dendritic Trafficking of BDNF-6 Splice Variant are Impaired in Knock-In Mice Carrying Human BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Baj, Gabriele; Ieraci, Alessandro; Corna, Stefano; Musazzi, Laura; Lee, Francis S.; Tongiorgi, Enrico; Popoli, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Background: The human Val66Met polymorphism in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key factor in neuroplasticity, synaptic function, and cognition, has been implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. BDNF is encoded by multiple transcripts with distinct regulation and localization, but the impact of the Val66Met polymorphism on BDNF regulation remains unclear. Methods: In BDNF Val66Met knock-in mice, which recapitulate the phenotypic hallmarks of individuals carrying the BDNFMet allele, we measured expression levels, epigenetic changes at promoters, and dendritic trafficking of distinct BDNF transcripts using quantitative PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and in situ hybridization. Results: BDNF-4 and BDNF-6 transcripts were reduced in BDNFMet/Met mice, compared with BDNFVal/Val mice. ChIP for acetyl-histone H3, a marker of active gene transcription, and trimethyl-histone-H3-Lys27 (H3K27me3), a marker of gene repression, showed higher H3K27me3 binding to exon 5, 6, and 8 promoters in BDNFMet/Met. The H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is involved in epigenetic regulation of BDNF expression, because in neuroblastoma cells BDNF expression was increased both by short interference RNA for EZH2 and incubation with 3-deazaneplanocin A, an inhibitor of EZH2. In situ hybridization for BDNF-2, BDNF-4, and BDNF-6 after pilocarpine treatment showed that BDNF-6 transcript was virtually absent from distal dendrites of the CA1 and CA3 regions in BDNFMet/Met mice, while no changes were found for BDNF-2 and BDNF-4. Conclusions: Impaired BDNF expression and dendritic targeting in BDNFMet/Met mice may contribute to reduced regulated secretion of BDNF at synapses, and may be a specific correlate of pathology in individuals carrying the Met allele. PMID:26108221

  11. Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutations in Bad Response to Refrigeration 2 (Brr2) Impair ATPase and Helicase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, Sarah; Guthrie, Christine

    2016-06-03

    Brr2 is an RNA-dependent ATPase required to unwind the U4/U6 snRNA duplex during spliceosome assembly. Mutations within the ratchet helix of the Brr2 RNA binding channel result in a form of degenerative human blindness known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The biochemical consequences of these mutations on Brr2's RNA binding, helicase, and ATPase activity have not yet been characterized. Therefore, we identified the largest construct of Brr2 that is soluble in vitro, which truncates the first 247 amino acids of the N terminus (Δ247-Brr2), to characterize the effects of the RP mutations on Brr2 activity. The Δ247-Brr2 RP mutants exhibit a gradient of severity of weakened RNA binding, reduced helicase activity, and reduced ATPase activity compared with wild type Δ247-Brr2. The globular C-terminal Jab1/Mpn1-like domain of Prp8 increases the ability of Δ247-Brr2 to bind the U4/U6 snRNA duplex at high pH and increases Δ247-Brr2's RNA-dependent ATPase activity and the extent of RNA unwinding. However, this domain of Prp8 does not differentially affect the Δ247-Brr2 RP mutants compared with the wild type Δ247-Brr2. When stimulated by Prp8, wild type Δ247-Brr2 is able to unwind long stable duplexes in vitro, and even the RP mutants capable of binding RNA with tight affinity are incapable of fully unwinding short duplex RNAs. Our data suggest that the RP mutations within the ratchet helix impair Brr2 translocation through RNA helices.

  12. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hermkens, Dorien; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene haploinsufficiency. While the mechanisms underlying the cytopenia phenotype of patients with these mutations are not completely understood, it is believed that stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor protein may induce apoptosis in the progenitor cells. In stark contrast, tumor cells from zebrafish with RP gene haploinsufficiency are unable to stabilize p53 even when exposed to acute DNA damage despite transcribing wild type p53 normally. In this work we demonstrate that p53 has a limited role in eliciting the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA. In fact, we find that RP-deficient embryos exhibit the same normal p53 transcription, absence of p53 protein, and impaired p53 response to DNA damage as RP haploinsufficient tumor cells. Recently we reported that RP mutations suppress activity of the AKT pathway, and we show here that this suppression results in proteasomal degradation of p53. By re-activating the AKT pathway or by inhibiting GSK-3, a downstream modifier that normally represses AKT signaling, we are able to restore the stabilization of p53. Our work indicates that the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA is dependent on factors other than p53, and may hold clinical significance for both DBA and the increasing number of cancers revealing spontaneous mutations in RP genes. PMID:26132763

  13. Rare compound heterozygosity involving dominant and recessive mutations of GJB2 gene in an assortative mating hearing impaired Indian family.

    PubMed

    Pavithra, Amritkumar; Chandru, Jayasankaran; Jeffrey, Justin Margret; Karthikeyen, N P; Srisailapathy, C R Srikumari

    2017-01-01

    Connexin 26 (Cx-26), a gap junction protein coded by GJB2 gene, plays a very important role in recycling of potassium ions, one of the vital steps in the mechanotransduction process of hearing. Mutations in the GJB2 gene have been associated with both autosomal recessive as well as dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss. As Cx-26 is linked with skin homeostasis, mutations in this gene are sometimes associated with syndromic forms of hearing loss showing skin anomalies. We report here a non consanguineous assortatively mating hearing impaired family with one of the hearing impaired partners, their hearing impaired sibling and hearing impaired offspring showing compound heterozygosity in the GJB2 gene, involving a dominant mutation p.R184Q and two recessive mutations p.Q124X and c.IVS 1+1G>A in a unique triallelic combination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report from India on p.R184Q mutation in the GJB2 gene associated with rare compound heterozygosity showing nonsyndromic presentation.

  14. Munc18-1 mutations that strongly impair SNARE-complex binding support normal synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Marieke; Burkhardt, Pawel; de Wit, Heidi; Toonen, Ruud F; Fasshauer, Dirk; Verhage, Matthijs

    2012-05-02

    Synaptic transmission depends critically on the Sec1p/Munc18 protein Munc18-1, but it is unclear whether Munc18-1 primarily operates as a integral part of the fusion machinery or has a more upstream role in fusion complex assembly. Here, we show that point mutations in Munc18-1 that interfere with binding to the free Syntaxin1a N-terminus and strongly impair binding to assembled SNARE complexes all support normal docking, priming and fusion of synaptic vesicles, and normal synaptic plasticity in munc18-1 null mutant neurons. These data support a prevailing role of Munc18-1 before/during SNARE-complex assembly, while its continued association to assembled SNARE complexes is dispensable for synaptic transmission.

  15. Munc18-1 mutations that strongly impair SNARE-complex binding support normal synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Marieke; Burkhardt, Pawel; de Wit, Heidi; Toonen, Ruud F; Fasshauer, Dirk; Verhage, Matthijs

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic transmission depends critically on the Sec1p/Munc18 protein Munc18-1, but it is unclear whether Munc18-1 primarily operates as a integral part of the fusion machinery or has a more upstream role in fusion complex assembly. Here, we show that point mutations in Munc18-1 that interfere with binding to the free Syntaxin1a N-terminus and strongly impair binding to assembled SNARE complexes all support normal docking, priming and fusion of synaptic vesicles, and normal synaptic plasticity in munc18-1 null mutant neurons. These data support a prevailing role of Munc18-1 before/during SNARE-complex assembly, while its continued association to assembled SNARE complexes is dispensable for synaptic transmission. PMID:22446389

  16. Impairment of immunity to Candida and Mycobacterium in humans with bi-allelic RORC mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Halwani, Rabih; Ma, Cindy S.; Wong, Natalie; Soudais, Claire; Henderson, Lauren A.; Marzouqa, Hiyam; Shamma, Jamal; Gonzalez, Marcela; Martinez-Barricarte, Rubén; Okada, Chizuru; Avery, Danielle T.; Latorre, Daniela; Deswarte, Caroline; Jabot-Hanin, Fabienne; Torrado, Egidio; Fountain, Jeffrey; Belkadi, Aziz; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Migaud, Mélanie; Arlehamn, Cecilia S. Lindestam; Sette, Alessandro; Breton, Sylvain; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Moshous, Despina; Hambleton, Sophie; Latour, Sylvain; Arkwright, Peter D.; Picard, Capucine; Lantz, Olivier; Engelhard, Dan; Kobayashi, Masao; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Human inborn errors of immunity mediated by the cytokines interleukin (IL)-17A/F underlie mucocutaneous candidiasis, whereas inborn errors of interferon (IFN)-γ immunity underlie mycobacterial disease. We report the discovery of bi-allelic RORC loss-of-function mutations in seven individuals from three kindreds of different ethnic origins with both candidiasis and mycobacteriosis. The lack of functional RORγ and RORγT isoforms resulted in the absence of IL-17A/F-producing T cells in these individuals, probably accounting for their chronic candidiasis. Unexpectedly, leukocytes from RORγ- and RORγT-deficient individuals also displayed an impaired IFN-γ response to Mycobacterium. This principally reflected profoundly defective IFN-γ production by circulating γδ T cells and CD4+CCR6+ CXCR3+ αβ T cells. In humans, both mucocutaneous immunity to Candida and systemic immunity to Mycobacterium require RORγ, or RORγT, or both. PMID:26160376

  17. Identification of a point mutation impairing the binding between aquaporin-4 and neuromyelitis optica autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Simone, Laura; Rosito, Stefania; Alberga, Domenico; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Nicolotti, Orazio; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria; Nicchia, Grazia Paola

    2014-10-31

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is characterized by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies (NMO-IgGs) against supra-molecular assemblies of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), known as orthogonal array of particles (OAPs). NMO-IgGs have a polyclonal origin and recognize different conformational epitopes involving extracellular AQP4 loops A, C, and E. Here we hypothesize a pivotal role for AQP4 transmembrane regions (TMs) in epitope assembly. On the basis of multialignment analysis, mutagenesis, NMO-IgG binding, and cytotoxicity assay, we have disclosed the key role of aspartate 69 (Asp(69)) of TM2 for NMO-IgG epitope assembly. Mutation of Asp(69) to histidine severely impairs NMO-IgG binding for 85.7% of the NMO patient sera analyzed here. Although Blue Native-PAGE, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and water transport assays indicate that the OAP Asp(69) mutant is similar in structure and function to the wild type, molecular dynamic simulations have revealed that the D(69)H mutation has the effect of altering the structural rearrangements of extracellular loop A. In conclusion, Asp(69) is crucial for the spatial control of loop A, the particular molecular conformation of which enables the assembly of NMO-IgG epitopes. These findings provide additional clues for new strategies for NMO treatment and a wealth of information to better approach NMO pathogenesis.

  18. Identification of a Point Mutation Impairing the Binding between Aquaporin-4 and Neuromyelitis Optica Autoantibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Simone, Laura; Rosito, Stefania; Alberga, Domenico; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Nicolotti, Orazio; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria; Nicchia, Grazia Paola

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is characterized by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies (NMO-IgGs) against supra-molecular assemblies of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), known as orthogonal array of particles (OAPs). NMO-IgGs have a polyclonal origin and recognize different conformational epitopes involving extracellular AQP4 loops A, C, and E. Here we hypothesize a pivotal role for AQP4 transmembrane regions (TMs) in epitope assembly. On the basis of multialignment analysis, mutagenesis, NMO-IgG binding, and cytotoxicity assay, we have disclosed the key role of aspartate 69 (Asp69) of TM2 for NMO-IgG epitope assembly. Mutation of Asp69 to histidine severely impairs NMO-IgG binding for 85.7% of the NMO patient sera analyzed here. Although Blue Native-PAGE, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and water transport assays indicate that the OAP Asp69 mutant is similar in structure and function to the wild type, molecular dynamic simulations have revealed that the D69H mutation has the effect of altering the structural rearrangements of extracellular loop A. In conclusion, Asp69 is crucial for the spatial control of loop A, the particular molecular conformation of which enables the assembly of NMO-IgG epitopes. These findings provide additional clues for new strategies for NMO treatment and a wealth of information to better approach NMO pathogenesis. PMID:25239624

  19. Spontaneous mutation 7B-1 in tomato impairs blue light-induced stomatal opening.

    PubMed

    Hlavinka, Jan; Nauš, Jan; Fellner, Martin

    2013-08-01

    It was reported earlier that 7B-1 mutant in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), an ABA overproducer, is defective in blue light (BL) signaling leading to BL-specific resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this work, we examine responses of stomata to blue, red and white lights, fusicoccin, anion channel blockers (anthracene-9-carboxylic acid; 9-AC and niflumic acid; NIF) and ABA. Our results showed that the aperture of 7B-1 stomata does not increase in BL, suggesting that 7B-1 mutation impairs an element of BL signaling pathway involved in stomatal opening. Similar stomatal responses of 7B-1 and wild type (WT) to fusicoccin or 9-AC points out that activity of H(+)-ATPase and 9-AC-sensitive anion channels per se is not likely affected by the mutation. Since 9-AC restored stomatal opening of 7B-1 in BL, it seems that 9-AC and BL could block similar type of anion channels. The stomata of both genotypes did not respond to NIF neither in darkness nor in any light conditions tested. In light, 9-AC but not NIF restored stomatal opening inhibited by ABA in WT and 7B-1. We suggest that in comparison to WT, the activity of S-type anion channels in 7B-1 is more promoted by increased ABA content, and less reduced by BL, because of the mutant resistance to BL.

  20. ECEL1 mutation implicates impaired axonal arborization of motor nerves in the pathogenesis of distal arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kenichi; Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Tamada, Hiromi; Okuyama-Uchimura, Fumi; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Saido, Takaomi C

    2016-07-01

    The membrane-bound metalloprotease endothelin-converting enzyme-like 1 (ECEL1) has been newly identified as a causal gene of a specific type of distal arthrogryposis (DA). In contrast to most causal genes of DA, ECEL1 is predominantly expressed in neuronal cells, suggesting a unique neurogenic pathogenesis in a subset of DA patients with ECEL1 mutation. The present study analyzed developmental motor innervation and neuromuscular junction formation in limbs of the rodent homologue damage-induced neuronal endopeptidase (DINE)-deficient mouse. Whole-mount immunostaining was performed in DINE-deficient limbs expressing motoneuron-specific GFP to visualize motor innervation throughout the limb. Although DINE-deficient motor nerves displayed normal trajectory patterns from the spinal cord to skeletal muscles, they indicated impaired axonal arborization in skeletal muscles in the forelimbs and hindlimbs. Systematic examination of motor innervation in over 10 different hindlimb muscles provided evidence that DINE gene disruption leads to insufficient arborization of motor nerves after arriving at the skeletal muscle. Interestingly, the axonal arborization defect in foot muscles appeared more severe than in other hindlimb muscles, which was partially consistent with the proximal-distal phenotypic discordance observed in DA patients. Additionally, the number of innervated neuromuscular junction was significantly reduced in the severely affected DINE-deficient muscle. Furthermore, we generated a DINE knock-in (KI) mouse model with a pathogenic mutation, which was recently identified in DA patients. Axonal arborization defects were clearly detected in motor nerves of the DINE KI limb, which was identical to the DINE-deficient limb. Given that the encoded sequences, as well as ECEL1 and DINE expression profiles, are highly conserved between mouse and human, abnormal arborization of motor axons and subsequent failure of NMJ formation could be a primary cause of DA with ECEL1

  1. A novel de novo dominant negative mutation in DNM1L impairs mitochondrial fission and presents as childhood epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Fahrner, Jill A; Liu, Raymond; Perry, Michael Scott; Klein, Jessica; Chan, David C

    2016-08-01

    DNM1L encodes dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1/DLP1), a key component of the mitochondrial fission machinery that is essential for proper functioning of the mammalian brain. Previously reported probands with de novo missense mutations in DNM1L presented in the first year of life with severe encephalopathy and refractory epilepsy, with several dying within the first several weeks after birth. In contrast, we report identical novel missense mutations in DNM1L in two unrelated probands who experienced normal development for several years before presenting with refractory focal status epilepticus and subsequent rapid neurological decline. We expand the phenotype of DNM1L-related mitochondrial fission defects, reveal common unique clinical characteristics and imaging findings, and compare the cellular impact of this novel mutation to the previously reported A395D lethal variant. We demonstrate that our R403C mutation, which resides in the assembly region of DRP1, acts by a dominant-negative mechanism and reduces oligomerization, mitochondrial fission activity, and mitochondrial recruitment of DRP1, but to a lesser extent compared to the A395D mutation. In contrast to the initial report of neonatal lethality resulting from DNM1L mutation and DRP1 dysfunction, our results show that milder DRP1 impairment is compatible with normal early development and subsequently results in a distinct set of neurological findings. In addition, we identify a common pathogenic mechanism whereby DNM1L mutations impair mitochondrial fission. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A novel biallelic splice site mutation of TECTA causes moderate to severe hearing impairment in an Algerian family.

    PubMed

    Behlouli, Asma; Bonnet, Crystel; Abdi, Samia; Hasbellaoui, Mokhtar; Boudjenah, Farid; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Ammar-Khodja, Fatima; Zenati, Akila; Petit, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Congenital deafness is certainly one of the most common monogenic diseases in humans, but it is also one of the most genetically heterogeneous, which makes molecular diagnosis challenging in most cases. Whole-exome sequencing in two out of three Algerian siblings affected by recessively-inherited, moderate to severe sensorineural deafness allowed us to identify a novel splice donor site mutation (c.5272+1G > A) in the gene encoding α-tectorin, a major component of the cochlear tectorial membrane. The mutation was present at the homozygous state in the three affected siblings, and at the heterozygous state in their unaffected, consanguineous parents. To our knowledge, this is the first reported TECTA mutation leading to the DFNB21 form of hearing impairment among Maghrebian individuals suffering from congenital hearing impairment, which further illustrates the diversity of the genes involved in congenital deafness in the Maghreb.

  3. Regulation of polycystin-1 ciliary trafficking by motifs at its C-terminus and polycystin-2 but not by cleavage at the GPS site.

    PubMed

    Su, Xuefeng; Wu, Maoqing; Yao, Gang; El-Jouni, Wassim; Luo, Chong; Tabari, Azadeh; Zhou, Jing

    2015-11-15

    Failure to localize membrane proteins to the primary cilium causes a group of diseases collectively named ciliopathies. Polycystin-1 (PC1, also known as PKD1) is a large ciliary membrane protein defective in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Here, we developed a large set of PC1 expression constructs and identified multiple sequences, including a coiled-coil motif in the C-terminal tail of PC1, regulating full-length PC1 trafficking to the primary cilium. Ciliary trafficking of wild-type and mutant PC1 depends on the dose of polycystin-2 (PC2, also known as PKD2), and the formation of a PC1-PC2 complex. Modulation of the ciliary trafficking module mediated by the VxP ciliary-targeting sequence and Arf4 and Asap1 does not affect the ciliary localization of full-length PC1. PC1 also promotes PC2 ciliary trafficking. PC2 mutations truncating its C-terminal tail but not those changing the VxP sequence to AxA or impairing the pore of the channel, leading to a dead channel, affect PC1 ciliary trafficking. Cleavage at the GPCR proteolytic site (GPS) of PC1 is not required for PC1 trafficking to cilia. We propose a mutually dependent model for the ciliary trafficking of PC1 and PC2, and that PC1 ciliary trafficking is regulated by multiple cis-acting elements. As all pathogenic PC1 mutations tested here are defective in ciliary trafficking, ciliary trafficking might serve as a functional read-out for ADPKD.

  4. A novel mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(UCN)) gene in a family with non-syndromic sensorineural hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Hutchin, T P; Parker, M J; Young, I D; Davis, A C; Pulleyn, L J; Deeble, J; Lench, N J; Markham, A F; Mueller, R F

    2000-09-01

    We describe a family with non-syndromic sensorineural hearing impairment inherited in a manner consistent with maternal transmission. Affected members were found to have a novel heteroplasmic mtDNA mutation, T7510C, in the tRNA(Ser(UCN)) gene. This mutation was not found in 661 controls, is well conserved between species, and disrupts base pairing in the acceptor stem of the tRNA, making it the probable cause of hearing impairment in this family. Sequencing of the other mitochondrial tRNA genes did not show any other pathogenic mutations. Four other mutations causing hearing impairment have been reported in the tRNA(Ser(UCN)) gene, two having been shown to affect tRNA(Ser(UCN)) levels. With increasing numbers of reports of mtDNA mutations causing hearing impairment, screening for such mutations should be considered in all cases unless mitochondrial inheritance can be excluded for certain.

  5. Mutations Affecting the SAND Domain of DEAF1 Cause Intellectual Disability with Severe Speech Impairment and Behavioral Problems

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Rajamanickam, Shivakumar; Jensik, Philip J.; Vergult, Sarah; de Rocker, Nina; Newhall, Kathryn J.; Raghavan, Ramya; Reardon, Sara N.; Jarrett, Kelsey; McIntyre, Tara; Bulinski, Joseph; Ownby, Stacy L.; Huggenvik, Jodi I.; McKnight, G. Stanley; Rose, Gregory M.; Cai, Xiang; Willaert, Andy; Zweier, Christiane; Endele, Sabine; de Ligt, Joep; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Lugtenberg, Dorien; de Vries, Petra F.; Veltman, Joris A.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Brunner, Han G.; Rauch, Anita; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Hoischen, Alexander; Mefford, Heather C.; Eichler, Evan E.; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Menten, Björn; Collard, Michael W.; de Vries, Bert B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we identified in two individuals with intellectual disability (ID) different de novo mutations in DEAF1, which encodes a transcription factor with an important role in embryonic development. To ascertain whether these mutations in DEAF1 are causative for the ID phenotype, we performed targeted resequencing of DEAF1 in an additional cohort of over 2,300 individuals with unexplained ID and identified two additional individuals with de novo mutations in this gene. All four individuals had severe ID with severely affected speech development, and three showed severe behavioral problems. DEAF1 is highly expressed in the CNS, especially during early embryonic development. All four mutations were missense mutations affecting the SAND domain of DEAF1. Altered DEAF1 harboring any of the four amino acid changes showed impaired transcriptional regulation of the DEAF1 promoter. Moreover, behavioral studies in mice with a conditional knockout of Deaf1 in the brain showed memory deficits and increased anxiety-like behavior. Our results demonstrate that mutations in DEAF1 cause ID and behavioral problems, most likely as a result of impaired transcriptional regulation by DEAF1. PMID:24726472

  6. Mutations affecting the SAND domain of DEAF1 cause intellectual disability with severe speech impairment and behavioral problems.

    PubMed

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Rajamanickam, Shivakumar; Jensik, Philip J; Vergult, Sarah; de Rocker, Nina; Newhall, Kathryn J; Raghavan, Ramya; Reardon, Sara N; Jarrett, Kelsey; McIntyre, Tara; Bulinski, Joseph; Ownby, Stacy L; Huggenvik, Jodi I; McKnight, G Stanley; Rose, Gregory M; Cai, Xiang; Willaert, Andy; Zweier, Christiane; Endele, Sabine; de Ligt, Joep; van Bon, Bregje W M; Lugtenberg, Dorien; de Vries, Petra F; Veltman, Joris A; van Bokhoven, Hans; Brunner, Han G; Rauch, Anita; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Carvill, Gemma L; Hoischen, Alexander; Mefford, Heather C; Eichler, Evan E; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Menten, Björn; Collard, Michael W; de Vries, Bert B A

    2014-05-01

    Recently, we identified in two individuals with intellectual disability (ID) different de novo mutations in DEAF1, which encodes a transcription factor with an important role in embryonic development. To ascertain whether these mutations in DEAF1 are causative for the ID phenotype, we performed targeted resequencing of DEAF1 in an additional cohort of over 2,300 individuals with unexplained ID and identified two additional individuals with de novo mutations in this gene. All four individuals had severe ID with severely affected speech development, and three showed severe behavioral problems. DEAF1 is highly expressed in the CNS, especially during early embryonic development. All four mutations were missense mutations affecting the SAND domain of DEAF1. Altered DEAF1 harboring any of the four amino acid changes showed impaired transcriptional regulation of the DEAF1 promoter. Moreover, behavioral studies in mice with a conditional knockout of Deaf1 in the brain showed memory deficits and increased anxiety-like behavior. Our results demonstrate that mutations in DEAF1 cause ID and behavioral problems, most likely as a result of impaired transcriptional regulation by DEAF1.

  7. Secretion-Positive LGI1 Mutations Linked to Lateral Temporal Epilepsy Impair Binding to ADAM22 and ADAM23 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Belluzzi, Elisa; Malacrida, Sandro; Vitiello, Libero; Greggio, Elisa; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADTLE) is a focal epilepsy syndrome caused by mutations in the LGI1 gene, which encodes a secreted protein. Most ADLTE-causing mutations inhibit LGI1 protein secretion, and only a few secretion-positive missense mutations have been reported. Here we describe the effects of four disease-causing nonsynonymous LGI1 mutations, T380A, R407C, S473L, and R474Q, on protein secretion and extracellular interactions. Expression of LGI1 mutant proteins in cultured cells shows that these mutations do not inhibit protein secretion. This finding likely results from the lack of effects of these mutations on LGI1 protein folding, as suggested by 3D protein modelling. In addition, immunofluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that all four mutations significantly impair interaction of LGI1 with the ADAM22 and ADAM23 receptors on the cell surface. These results support the existence of a second mechanism, alternative to inhibition of protein secretion, by which ADLTE-causing LGI1 mutations exert their loss-of-function effect extracellularly, and suggest that interactions of LGI1 with both ADAM22 and ADAM23 play an important role in the molecular mechanisms leading to ADLTE. PMID:27760137

  8. RUNX2 Mutation Impairs 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 mediated Osteoclastogenesis in Dental Follicle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X. Z.; Sun, X. Y.; Zhang, C. Y.; Yang, X.; Yan, W. J.; Ge, L. H.; Zheng, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD), a skeletal disorder characterized by delayed permanent tooth eruption and other dental abnormalities, is caused by heterozygous RUNX2 mutations. As an osteoblast-specific transcription factor, RUNX2 plays a role in bone remodeling, tooth formation and tooth eruption. To investigate the crosstalk between RUNX2 and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25-(OH)2D3) in human dental follicle cells (hDFCs) during osteoclast formation, we established a co-culture system of hDFCs from CCD patient and healthy donors with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Expression of the osteoclast-associated genes and the number of TRAP+ cells were reduced in CCD hDFCs, indicating its suppressed osteoclast-inductive ability, which was reflected by the downregulated RANKL/OPG ratio. In addition, 1α,25-(OH)2D3-stimulation elevated the expression of osteoclast-related genes, as well as RANKL mRNA levels and RANKL/OPG ratios in control hDFCs. Conversely, RUNX2 mutation abolished this 1α,25-(OH)2D3-induced RANKL gene activation and osteoclast formation in CCD hDFCs. Therefore, RUNX2 haploinsufficiency impairs dental follicle-induced osteoclast formation capacity through RANKL/OPG signaling, which may be partially responsible for delayed permanent tooth eruption in CCD patients. Furthermore, this abnormality was not rescued by 1α,25-(OH)2D3 application because 1α,25-(OH)2D3-induced RANKL activation in hDFCs is mediated principally via the RUNX2-dependent pathway. PMID:27068678

  9. Association between idiopathic hearing loss and mitochondrial DNA mutations: A study on 169 hearing-impaired subjects

    PubMed Central

    GUARAN, VALERIA; ASTOLFI, LAURA; CASTIGLIONE, ALESSANDRO; SIMONI, EDI; OLIVETTO, ELENA; GALASSO, MARCO; TREVISI, PATRIZIA; BUSI, MICOL; VOLINIA, STEFANO; MARTINI, ALESSANDRO

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been shown to be an important cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). In this study, we performed a clinical and genetic analysis of 169 hearing-impaired patients and some of their relatives suffering from idiopathic SNHL, both familial and sporadic. The analysis of four fragments of their mtDNA identified several polymorphisms, the well known pathogenic mutation, A1555G, and some novel mutations in different genes, implying changes in the aminoacidic sequence. A novel sporadic mutation in 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1), not previously reported in the literature, was found in a case of possible aminoglycoside-induced progressive deafness. PMID:23969527

  10. Registered report: IDH mutation impairs histone demethylation and results in a block to cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Richarson, Adam D; Scott, David A; Zagnitko, Olga; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Russler-Germain, David A

    2016-03-11

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from "IDH mutation impairs histone demethylation and results in a block to cell differentiation" by Lu and colleagues, published in Nature in 2012 (Lu et al., 2012). The experiments that will be replicated are those reported in Figures 1B, 2A, 2B, 2D and 4D. Lu and colleagues demonstrated that expression of mutant forms of IDH1 or IDH2 caused global increases in histone methylation and increased levels of 2 hydroxyglutarate (Figure 1B). This was correlated with a block in differentiation (Figures 2A, B and D). This effect appeared to be mediated by the histone demethylase KDM4C (Figure 4D). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Scienceand Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by eLife.

  11. IMMUNODEFICIENCIES. Impairment of immunity to Candida and Mycobacterium in humans with bi-allelic RORC mutations.

    PubMed

    Okada, Satoshi; Markle, Janet G; Deenick, Elissa K; Mele, Federico; Averbuch, Dina; Lagos, Macarena; Alzahrani, Mohammed; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Halwani, Rabih; Ma, Cindy S; Wong, Natalie; Soudais, Claire; Henderson, Lauren A; Marzouqa, Hiyam; Shamma, Jamal; Gonzalez, Marcela; Martinez-Barricarte, Rubén; Okada, Chizuru; Avery, Danielle T; Latorre, Daniela; Deswarte, Caroline; Jabot-Hanin, Fabienne; Torrado, Egidio; Fountain, Jeffrey; Belkadi, Aziz; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Migaud, Mélanie; Arlehamn, Cecilia S Lindestam; Sette, Alessandro; Breton, Sylvain; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Moshous, Despina; Hambleton, Sophie; Latour, Sylvain; Arkwright, Peter D; Picard, Capucine; Lantz, Olivier; Engelhard, Dan; Kobayashi, Masao; Abel, Laurent; Cooper, Andrea M; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Puel, Anne; Sallusto, Federica; Bustamante, Jacinta; Tangye, Stuart G; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-08-07

    Human inborn errors of immunity mediated by the cytokines interleukin-17A and interleukin-17F (IL-17A/F) underlie mucocutaneous candidiasis, whereas inborn errors of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) immunity underlie mycobacterial disease. We report the discovery of bi-allelic RORC loss-of-function mutations in seven individuals from three kindreds of different ethnic origins with both candidiasis and mycobacteriosis. The lack of functional RORγ and RORγT isoforms resulted in the absence of IL-17A/F-producing T cells in these individuals, probably accounting for their chronic candidiasis. Unexpectedly, leukocytes from RORγ- and RORγT-deficient individuals also displayed an impaired IFN-γ response to Mycobacterium. This principally reflected profoundly defective IFN-γ production by circulating γδ T cells and CD4(+)CCR6(+)CXCR3(+) αβ T cells. In humans, both mucocutaneous immunity to Candida and systemic immunity to Mycobacterium require RORγ, RORγT, or both.

  12. Meta-analysis of SHANK Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Gradient of Severity in Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Leblond, Claire S.; Nava, Caroline; Polge, Anne; Gauthier, Julie; Huguet, Guillaume; Lumbroso, Serge; Giuliano, Fabienne; Stordeur, Coline; Depienne, Christel; Mouzat, Kevin; Pinto, Dalila; Howe, Jennifer; Lemière, Nathalie; Durand, Christelle M.; Guibert, Jessica; Ey, Elodie; Toro, Roberto; Peyre, Hugo; Mathieu, Alexandre; Amsellem, Frédérique; Rastam, Maria; Gillberg, I. Carina; Rappold, Gudrun A.; Holt, Richard; Monaco, Anthony P.; Maestrini, Elena; Galan, Pilar; Heron, Delphine; Jacquette, Aurélia; Afenjar, Alexandra; Rastetter, Agnès; Brice, Alexis; Devillard, Françoise; Assouline, Brigitte; Laffargue, Fanny; Lespinasse, James; Chiesa, Jean; Rivier, François; Bonneau, Dominique; Regnault, Beatrice; Zelenika, Diana; Delepine, Marc; Lathrop, Mark; Sanlaville, Damien; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Edery, Patrick; Perrin, Laurence; Tabet, Anne Claude; Schmeisser, Michael J.; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Coleman, Mary; Sato, Daisuke; Szatmari, Peter; Scherer, Stephen W.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Betancur, Catalina; Leboyer, Marion; Gillberg, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    SHANK genes code for scaffold proteins located at the post-synaptic density of glutamatergic synapses. In neurons, SHANK2 and SHANK3 have a positive effect on the induction and maturation of dendritic spines, whereas SHANK1 induces the enlargement of spine heads. Mutations in SHANK genes have been associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but their prevalence and clinical relevance remain to be determined. Here, we performed a new screen and a meta-analysis of SHANK copy-number and coding-sequence variants in ASD. Copy-number variants were analyzed in 5,657 patients and 19,163 controls, coding-sequence variants were ascertained in 760 to 2,147 patients and 492 to 1,090 controls (depending on the gene), and, individuals carrying de novo or truncating SHANK mutations underwent an extensive clinical investigation. Copy-number variants and truncating mutations in SHANK genes were present in ∼1% of patients with ASD: mutations in SHANK1 were rare (0.04%) and present in males with normal IQ and autism; mutations in SHANK2 were present in 0.17% of patients with ASD and mild intellectual disability; mutations in SHANK3 were present in 0.69% of patients with ASD and up to 2.12% of the cases with moderate to profound intellectual disability. In summary, mutations of the SHANK genes were detected in the whole spectrum of autism with a gradient of severity in cognitive impairment. Given the rare frequency of SHANK1 and SHANK2 deleterious mutations, the clinical relevance of these genes remains to be ascertained. In contrast, the frequency and the penetrance of SHANK3 mutations in individuals with ASD and intellectual disability—more than 1 in 50—warrant its consideration for mutation screening in clinical practice. PMID:25188300

  13. Meta-analysis of SHANK Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorders: a gradient of severity in cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Leblond, Claire S; Nava, Caroline; Polge, Anne; Gauthier, Julie; Huguet, Guillaume; Lumbroso, Serge; Giuliano, Fabienne; Stordeur, Coline; Depienne, Christel; Mouzat, Kevin; Pinto, Dalila; Howe, Jennifer; Lemière, Nathalie; Durand, Christelle M; Guibert, Jessica; Ey, Elodie; Toro, Roberto; Peyre, Hugo; Mathieu, Alexandre; Amsellem, Frédérique; Rastam, Maria; Gillberg, I Carina; Rappold, Gudrun A; Holt, Richard; Monaco, Anthony P; Maestrini, Elena; Galan, Pilar; Heron, Delphine; Jacquette, Aurélia; Afenjar, Alexandra; Rastetter, Agnès; Brice, Alexis; Devillard, Françoise; Assouline, Brigitte; Laffargue, Fanny; Lespinasse, James; Chiesa, Jean; Rivier, François; Bonneau, Dominique; Regnault, Beatrice; Zelenika, Diana; Delepine, Marc; Lathrop, Mark; Sanlaville, Damien; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Edery, Patrick; Perrin, Laurence; Tabet, Anne Claude; Schmeisser, Michael J; Boeckers, Tobias M; Coleman, Mary; Sato, Daisuke; Szatmari, Peter; Scherer, Stephen W; Rouleau, Guy A; Betancur, Catalina; Leboyer, Marion; Gillberg, Christopher; Delorme, Richard; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    SHANK genes code for scaffold proteins located at the post-synaptic density of glutamatergic synapses. In neurons, SHANK2 and SHANK3 have a positive effect on the induction and maturation of dendritic spines, whereas SHANK1 induces the enlargement of spine heads. Mutations in SHANK genes have been associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but their prevalence and clinical relevance remain to be determined. Here, we performed a new screen and a meta-analysis of SHANK copy-number and coding-sequence variants in ASD. Copy-number variants were analyzed in 5,657 patients and 19,163 controls, coding-sequence variants were ascertained in 760 to 2,147 patients and 492 to 1,090 controls (depending on the gene), and, individuals carrying de novo or truncating SHANK mutations underwent an extensive clinical investigation. Copy-number variants and truncating mutations in SHANK genes were present in ∼1% of patients with ASD: mutations in SHANK1 were rare (0.04%) and present in males with normal IQ and autism; mutations in SHANK2 were present in 0.17% of patients with ASD and mild intellectual disability; mutations in SHANK3 were present in 0.69% of patients with ASD and up to 2.12% of the cases with moderate to profound intellectual disability. In summary, mutations of the SHANK genes were detected in the whole spectrum of autism with a gradient of severity in cognitive impairment. Given the rare frequency of SHANK1 and SHANK2 deleterious mutations, the clinical relevance of these genes remains to be ascertained. In contrast, the frequency and the penetrance of SHANK3 mutations in individuals with ASD and intellectual disability-more than 1 in 50-warrant its consideration for mutation screening in clinical practice.

  14. Functional analysis of human CNGA3 mutations associated with colour blindness suggests impaired surface expression of channel mutants A3(R427C) and A3(R563C).

    PubMed

    Koeppen, Katja; Reuter, Peggy; Kohl, Susanne; Baumann, Britta; Ladewig, Thomas; Wissinger, Bernd

    2008-05-01

    Mutations in the CNGA3 gene have been associated with complete and incomplete forms of total colour blindness (achromatopsia), a disorder characterized by reduced visual acuity, lack of colour discrimination, photophobia and nystagmus. CNGA3 encodes the A-subunit of the cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel, an essential component of the phototransduction cascade. Here we report the identification of three new CNGA3 mutations in patients with achromatopsia. To assess the pathogenicity of these newly identified and four previously reported mutations, mutant CNGA3 channels were heterologously expressed in a human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293 cells) and functionally analysed using calcium imaging. Channels with the mutations R427C and R563C showed a response in imaging experiments and were subsequently characterized in-depth with the patch-clamp technique. The mutant channels were analysed as homooligomers and also as heterooligomers with the wild-type B-subunit present in native channels. Overall, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) maximum currents of mutant channels were profoundly reduced in homo- and heteromers. Treatment with the chemical chaperone glycerol effectively increased macroscopic currents, presumably by enhancing surface expression of mutant channels as confirmed by immunocytochemistry. These results suggest decreased channel density in the cell membrane due to impaired folding or trafficking of the channel protein as the main pathogenic effect of the mutations R427C and R563C. Moreover, A3(R427C) homomers showed distinctly increased cGMP and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) sensitivities as well as cAMP fractional currents that were raised to over 90% of cGMP maximum currents. Co-expression of A3(R427C) with the B3 subunit compensated for most of these aberrant properties, apart from the reduced cGMP maximum currents.

  15. Economics of human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  16. Mutations of the gene encoding otogelin are a cause of autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic moderate hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Schraders, Margit; Ruiz-Palmero, Laura; Kalay, Ersan; Oostrik, Jaap; del Castillo, Francisco J; Sezgin, Orhan; Beynon, Andy J; Strom, Tim M; Pennings, Ronald J E; Zazo Seco, Celia; Oonk, Anne M M; Kunst, Henricus P M; Domínguez-Ruiz, María; García-Arumi, Ana M; del Campo, Miguel; Villamar, Manuela; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Moreno, Felipe; Admiraal, Ronald J C; del Castillo, Ignacio; Kremer, Hannie

    2012-11-02

    Already 40 genes have been identified for autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI); however, many more genes are still to be identified. In a Dutch family segregating arNSHI, homozygosity mapping revealed a 2.4 Mb homozygous region on chromosome 11 in p15.1-15.2, which partially overlapped with the previously described DFNB18 locus. However, no putative pathogenic variants were found in USH1C, the gene mutated in DFNB18 hearing impairment. The homozygous region contained 12 additional annotated genes including OTOG, the gene encoding otogelin, a component of the tectorial membrane. It is thought that otogelin contributes to the stability and strength of this membrane through interaction or stabilization of its constituent fibers. The murine orthologous gene was already known to cause hearing loss when defective. Analysis of OTOG in the Dutch family revealed a homozygous 1 bp deletion, c.5508delC, which leads to a shift in the reading frame and a premature stop codon, p.Ala1838ProfsX31. Further screening of 60 unrelated probands from Spanish arNSHI families detected compound heterozygous OTOG mutations in one family, c.6347C>T (p.Pro2116Leu) and c. 6559C>T (p.Arg2187X). The missense mutation p.Pro2116Leu affects a highly conserved residue in the fourth von Willebrand factor type D domain of otogelin. The subjects with OTOG mutations have a moderate hearing impairment, which can be associated with vestibular dysfunction. The flat to shallow "U" or slightly downsloping shaped audiograms closely resembled audiograms of individuals with recessive mutations in the gene encoding α-tectorin, another component of the tectorial membrane. This distinctive phenotype may represent a clue to orientate the molecular diagnosis.

  17. Mutational analysis of the intramembranous H10 loop of yeast Nhx1 reveals a critical role in ion homoeostasis and vesicle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kallay, Laura; Brett, Christopher L; Rao, Rajini

    2006-08-15

    Yeast Nhx1 [Na+(K+)/H+ exchanger 1] is an intracellular Na+(K+)/H+ exchanger, localizing to the late endosome where it is important for ion homoeostasis and vesicle trafficking. Phylogenetic analysis of NHE (Na+/H+ exchanger) sequences has identified orthologous proteins, including HsNHE6 (human NHE6), HsNHE7 and HsNHE9 of unknown physiological role. These appear distinct from well-studied mammalian plasma membrane isoforms (NHE1-NHE5). To explore the differences between plasma membrane and intracellular NHEs and understand the link between ion homoeostasis and vesicle trafficking, we examined the consequence of replacing residues in the intramembranous H10 loop of Nhx1 between transmembrane segments 9 and 10. The critical role for the carboxy group of Glu355 in ion transport is consistent with the invariance of this residue in all NHEs. Surprisingly, residues specifically conserved in the intracellular isoforms (such as Phe357 and Tyr361) could not be replaced with closely similar residues (leucine and phenylalanine) found in the plasma membrane isoforms without loss of function, revealing unexpected side chain specificity. The trafficking phenotypes of all Nhx1 mutants, including hygromycin-sensitivity and missorting of carboxypeptidase Y, were found to directly correlate with pH homoeostasis defects and could be proportionately corrected by titration with weak base. The present study demonstrates the importance of the H10 loop of the NHE family, highlights the differences between plasma membrane and intracellular isoforms and shows that trafficking defects are tightly coupled with pH homoeostasis.

  18. Germline mitochondrial DNA mutations aggravate ageing and can impair brain development.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jaime M; Stewart, James B; Hagström, Erik; Brené, Stefan; Mourier, Arnaud; Coppotelli, Giuseppe; Freyer, Christoph; Lagouge, Marie; Hoffer, Barry J; Olson, Lars; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2013-09-19

    Ageing is due to an accumulation of various types of damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction has long been considered to be important in this process. There is substantial sequence variation in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and the high mutation rate is counteracted by different mechanisms that decrease maternal transmission of mutated mtDNA. Despite these protective mechanisms, it is becoming increasingly clear that low-level mtDNA heteroplasmy is quite common and often inherited in humans. We designed a series of mouse mutants to investigate the extent to which inherited mtDNA mutations can contribute to ageing. Here we report that maternally transmitted mtDNA mutations can induce mild ageing phenotypes in mice with a wild-type nuclear genome. Furthermore, maternally transmitted mtDNA mutations lead to anticipation of reduced fertility in mice that are heterozygous for the mtDNA mutator allele (PolgA(wt/mut)) and aggravate premature ageing phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice (PolgA(mut/mut)). Unexpectedly, a combination of maternally transmitted and somatic mtDNA mutations also leads to stochastic brain malformations. Our findings show that a pre-existing mutation load will not only allow somatic mutagenesis to create a critically high total mtDNA mutation load sooner but will also increase clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations to enhance the normally occurring mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in ageing tissues. Our findings suggest that maternally transmitted mtDNA mutations may have a similar role in aggravating aspects of normal human ageing.

  19. COL4A2 mutations impair COL4A1 and COL4A2 secretion and cause hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Jeanne, Marion; Labelle-Dumais, Cassandre; Jorgensen, Jeff; Kauffman, W Berkeley; Mancini, Grazia M; Favor, Jack; Valant, Valerie; Greenberg, Steven M; Rosand, Jonathan; Gould, Douglas B

    2012-01-13

    Collagen, type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1) and alpha 2 (COL4A2) form heterotrimers and are abundant components of basement membranes, including those of the cerebral vasculature. COL4A1 mutations are an increasingly recognized cause of multisystem disorders, including highly penetrant cerebrovascular disease and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Because COL4A1 and COL4A2 are structurally and functionally associated, we hypothesized that variants in COL4A2 would also cause ICH. We sequence COL4A2 in 96 patients with ICH and identify three rare, nonsynonymous coding variants in four patients that are not present in a cohort of 144 ICH-free individuals. All three variants change evolutionarily conserved amino acids. Using a cellular assay, we show that these putative mutations cause intracellular accumulation of COL4A1 and COL4A2 at the expense of their secretion, which supports their pathogenecity. Furthermore, we show that Col4a2 mutant mice also have completely penetrant ICH and that mutations in mouse and human lead to retention of COL4A1 and COL4A2 within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Importantly, two of the three putative mutations found in patients trigger ER stress and activate the unfolded protein response. The identification of putative COL4A2 mutations that might contribute to ICH in human patients provides insight into the pathogenic mechanisms of this disease. Our data suggest that COL4A2 mutations impair COL4A1 and COL4A2 secretion and can also result in cytotoxicity. Finally, our findings suggest that, collectively, mutations in COL4A1 and COL4A2 contribute to sporadic cases of ICH.

  20. Trafficking-Competent KCNQ1 Variably Influences the Function of HERG Long QT Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kenshi; Shuai, Wen; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Higashida, Haruhiro; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Kupershmidt, Sabina

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in the KCNQ1 and HERG genes cause the Long QT Syndromes, LQTS1 and LQTS2, due to reductions in the cardiac repolarizing IKs and IKr currents, respectively. It was previously reported that KCNQ1 co-expression modulates HERG function by enhancing membrane expression of HERG, and that the two proteins co-immunoprecipitate, and co-localize in myocytes. In vivo studies in genetically modified rabbits also support a HERG-KCNQ1 interaction. Objective We sought to determine whether KCNQ1 influences the current characteristics of HERG genetic variants. Methods Expression of HERG and KCNQ1 wild type (WT) and mutant channels in heterologous systems, combined with whole cell patch clamp analysis and biochemistry. Results Supporting the notion that KCNQ1 needs to be trafficking competent to influence HERG function, we found that although the tail current density of HERG expressed in CHO cells was approximately doubled by WT KCNQ1 co-expression, it was not altered in the presence of the trafficking-defective KCNQ1T587M variant. Activation and deactivation kinetics of HERG variants were not altered. The HERGM124T variant, previously shown to be mildly impaired functionally, was restored to WT levels by KCNQ1-WT but not KCNQ1T587M co-expression. The tail current densities of the severely trafficking-impaired HERGG601S and HERGF805C variants were only slightly improved by KCNQ1 co-expression. The trafficking competent, but incompletely processed HERGN598Q, and a mutation in the selectivity filter, HERGG628S, were not improved by KCNQ1 co-expression. Conclusions These findings suggest a functional co-dependence of HERG on KCNQ1 during channel biogenesis. Moreover, KCNQ1 variably modulates LQTS2 mutations with distinct underlying pathologies. PMID:20348026

  1. Adult-onset focal expression of mutated human tau in the hippocampus impairs spatial working memory of rats.

    PubMed

    Mustroph, Martina L; King, Michael A; Klein, Ronald L; Ramirez, Julio J

    2012-07-15

    Tauopathy in the hippocampus is one of the earliest cardinal features of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a condition characterized by progressive memory impairments. In fact, density of tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the hippocampus strongly correlates with severity of cognitive impairments in AD. In the present study, we employed a somatic cell gene transfer technique to create a rodent model of tauopathy by injecting a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector with a mutated human tau gene (P301L) into the hippocampus of adult rats. The P301L mutation is causal for frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17 (FTDP-17), but it has been used for studying memory effects characteristic of AD in transgenic mice. To ascertain if P301L-induced mnemonic deficits are persistent, animals were tested for 6 months. It was hypothesized that adult-onset, spatially restricted tau expression in the hippocampus would produce progressive spatial working memory deficits on a learned alternation task. Rats injected with the tau vector exhibited persistent impairments on the hippocampal-dependent task beginning at about 6 weeks post-transduction compared to rats injected with a green fluorescent protein vector. Histological analysis of brains for expression of human tau revealed hyperphosphorylated human tau and NFTs in the hippocampus in experimental animals only. Thus, adult-onset, vector-induced tauopathy spatially restricted to the hippocampus progressively impaired spatial working memory in rats. We conclude that the model faithfully reproduces histological and behavioral findings characteristic of dementing tauopathies. The rapid onset of sustained memory impairment establishes a preclinical model particularly suited to the development of potential tauopathy therapeutics.

  2. Impairment of autophagosome-lysosome fusion in the buff mutant mice with the VPS33AD251E mutation

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Yuanli; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting) complex functions in endocytic and autophagic pathways in both lower eukaryotes and mammalian cells through its involvement in fusion events between endosomes and lysosomes or autophagosomes and lysosomes. However, the differential molecular mechanisms underlying these fusion processes are largely unknown. Buff (bf) is a mouse mutant that carries an Asp251-to-Glu point mutation (D251E) in the VPS33A protein, a tethering protein and a core subunit of the HOPS complex. Bf mice showed impaired spontaneous locomotor activity, motor learning, and autophagic activity. Although the gross anatomy of the brain was apparently normal, the number of Purkinje cells was significantly reduced. Furthermore, we found that fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes was defective in bf cells without compromising the endocytic pathway. The direct association of mutant VPS33AD251E with the autophagic SNARE complex, STX17 (syntaxin 17)-VAMP8-SNAP29, was enhanced. In addition, the VPS33AD251E mutation enhanced interactions with other HOPS subunits, namely VPS41, VPS39, VPS18, and VPS11, except for VPS16. Reduction of the interactions between VPS33AY440D and several other HOPS subunits led to decreased association with STX17. These results suggest that the VPS33AD251E mutation plays dual roles by increasing the HOPS complex assembly and its association with the autophagic SNARE complex, which selectively affects the autophagosome-lysosome fusion that impairs basal autophagic activity and induces Purkinje cell loss. PMID:26259518

  3. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and decreased fatigue resistance followed by severe muscle weakness in skeletal muscle of mitochondrial DNA mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takashi; Ivarsson, Niklas; Hernández, Andrés; Fahlström, Andreas; Cheng, Arthur J; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Bruton, Joseph D; Ulfhake, Brun; Westerblad, Håkan

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction can drastically impair muscle function, with weakness and exercise intolerance as key symptoms. Here we examine the time course of development of muscle dysfunction in a mouse model of premature ageing induced by defective proofreading function of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase (mtDNA mutator mouse). Isolated fast-twitch muscles and single muscle fibres from young (3-5 months) and end-stage (11 months) mtDNA mutator mice were compared to age-matched control mice. Force and free myoplasmic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) were measured under resting conditions and during fatigue induced by repeated tetani. Muscles of young mtDNA mutator mice displayed no weakness in the rested state, but had lower force and [Ca(2+)](i) than control mice during induction of fatigue. Muscles of young mtDNA mutator mice showed decreased activities of citrate synthase and β-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, reduced expression of cytochrome c oxidase, and decreased expression of triggers of mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α, PPARα, AMPK). Muscles from end-stage mtDNA mutator mice showed weakness under resting conditions with markedly decreased tetanic [Ca(2+)](i), force per cross-sectional area and protein expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump (SERCA1). In conclusion, fast-twitch muscles of prematurely ageing mtDNA mutator mice display a sequence of deleterious mitochondrial-to-nucleus signalling with an initial decrease in oxidative capacity, which was not counteracted by activation of signalling to increase mitochondrial biogenesis. This was followed by severe muscle weakness in the end stage. These results have implication for normal ageing and suggest that decreased mitochondrial oxidative capacity due to a sedentary lifestyle may predispose towards muscle weakness developing later in life.

  4. Aggregate-prone desmin mutations impair mitochondrial calcium uptake in primary myotubes.

    PubMed

    Smolina, Natalia; Bruton, Joseph; Sjoberg, Gunnar; Kostareva, Anna; Sejersen, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Desmin, being a major intermediate filament of mature muscle cell, interacts with mitochondria within the cell and participates in mitochondria proper localization. The goal of the present study was to assess the effect of aggregate-prone and non-aggregate-prone desmin mutations on mitochondrial calcium uptake. Primary murine satellite cells were transduced with lentiviruses carrying desmin in wild type or mutant form, and were induced to differentiate into myotubes. Four mutations resulting in different degree of desmin aggregates formation were analyzed. Tail domain mutation Asp399Tyr has the mildest impact on desmin filament polymerization, rod domain mutation Ala357Pro causes formation of large aggregates composed of filamentous material, and Leu345Pro and Leu370Pro are considered to be the most severest in their impact on desmin polymerization and structure. For mitochondrial calcium measurement cells were loaded with rhod 2-AM. We found that aggregate-prone mutations significantly decreased [Ca(2+)]mit, whereas non-aggregate-prone mutations did not decrease [Ca(2+)]mit. Moreover aggregate-prone desmin mutations resulted in increased resting cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. However this increase was not accompanied by any alterations in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release. We suggest that the observed decline in [Ca(2+)]mit was due to desmin aggregate accumulation resulting in the loss of desmin mitochondria interactions.

  5. CHCHD10 mutations promote loss of mitochondrial cristae junctions with impaired mitochondrial genome maintenance and inhibition of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Genin, Emmanuelle C; Plutino, Morgane; Bannwarth, Sylvie; Villa, Elodie; Cisneros-Barroso, Eugenia; Roy, Madhuparna; Ortega-Vila, Bernardo; Fragaki, Konstantina; Lespinasse, Françoise; Pinero-Martos, Estefania; Augé, Gaëlle; Moore, David; Burté, Florence; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Kageyama, Yusuke; Itoh, Kie; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Sesaki, Hiromi; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Vives-Bauza, Cristofol; Paquis-Flucklinger, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    CHCHD10-related diseases include mitochondrial DNA instability disorder, frontotemporal dementia-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FTD-ALS) clinical spectrum, late-onset spinal motor neuropathy (SMAJ), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Here, we show that CHCHD10 resides with mitofilin, CHCHD3 and CHCHD6 within the "mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system" (MICOS) complex. CHCHD10 mutations lead to MICOS complex disassembly and loss of mitochondrial cristae with a decrease in nucleoid number and nucleoid disorganization. Repair of the mitochondrial genome after oxidative stress is impaired in CHCHD10 mutant fibroblasts and this likely explains the accumulation of deleted mtDNA molecules in patient muscle. CHCHD10 mutant fibroblasts are not defective in the delivery of mitochondria to lysosomes suggesting that impaired mitophagy does not contribute to mtDNA instability. Interestingly, the expression of CHCHD10 mutant alleles inhibits apoptosis by preventing cytochrome c release.

  6. The ER-Membrane Transport System Is Critical for Intercellular Trafficking of the NSm Movement Protein and Tomato Spotted Wilt Tospovirus

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhike; Xue, Fan; Xu, Min; Chen, Xiaojiao; Zhao, Wenyang; Garcia-Murria, Maria J.; Mingarro, Ismael; Liu, Yong; Huang, Ying; Jiang, Lei; Zhu, Min; Tao, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses move through plasmodesmata to infect new cells. The plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is interconnected among cells via the ER desmotubule in the plasmodesma across the cell wall, forming a continuous ER network throughout the entire plant. This ER continuity is unique to plants and has been postulated to serve as a platform for the intercellular trafficking of macromolecules. In the present study, the contribution of the plant ER membrane transport system to the intercellular trafficking of the NSm movement protein and Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) is investigated. We showed that TSWV NSm is physically associated with the ER membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. An NSm-GFP fusion protein transiently expressed in single leaf cells was trafficked into neighboring cells. Mutations in NSm that impaired its association with the ER or caused its mis-localization to other subcellular sites inhibited cell-to-cell trafficking. Pharmacological disruption of the ER network severely inhibited NSm-GFP trafficking but not GFP diffusion. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant rhd3 with an impaired ER network, NSm-GFP trafficking was significantly reduced, whereas GFP diffusion was not affected. We also showed that the ER-to-Golgi secretion pathway and the cytoskeleton transport systems were not involved in the intercellular trafficking of TSWV NSm. Importantly, TSWV cell-to-cell spread was delayed in the ER-defective rhd3 mutant, and this reduced viral infection was not due to reduced replication. On the basis of robust biochemical, cellular and genetic analysis, we established that the ER membrane transport system serves as an important direct route for intercellular trafficking of NSm and TSWV. PMID:26863622

  7. The cross-talk of LDL-cholesterol with cell motility: Insights from the Niemann Pick Type C1 mutation and altered integrin trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Monira; Rentero, Carles; Conway, James R; Murray, Rachael Z; Timpson, Paul; Enrich, Carlos; Grewal, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is considered indispensible for the recruitment and functioning of integrins in focal adhesions for cell migration. However, the physiological cholesterol pools that control integrin trafficking and focal adhesion assembly remain unclear. Using Niemann Pick Type C1 (NPC) mutant cells, which accumulate Low Density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol in late endosomes (LE), several recent studies indicate that LDL-cholesterol has multiple roles in regulating focal adhesion dynamics. Firstly, targeting of endocytosed LDL-cholesterol from LE to focal adhesions controls their formation at the leading edge of migrating cells. Other newly emerging literature suggests that this may be coupled to vesicular transport of integrins, Src kinase and metalloproteases from the LE compartment to focal adhesions. Secondly, our recent work identified LDL-cholesterol as a key factor that determines the distribution and ability of several Soluble NSF Attachment Protein (SNAP) Receptor (SNARE) proteins, key players in vesicle transport, to control integrin trafficking to the cell surface and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion. Collectively, dietary, genetic and pathological changes in cholesterol metabolism may link with efficiency and speed of integrin and ECM cell surface delivery in metastatic cancer cells. This commentary will summarize how direct and indirect pathways enable LDL-cholesterol to modulate cell motility. PMID:26366834

  8. Pathogenic SYNGAP1 mutations impair cognitive development by disrupting maturation of dendritic spine synapses.

    PubMed

    Clement, James P; Aceti, Massimiliano; Creson, Thomas K; Ozkan, Emin D; Shi, Yulin; Reish, Nicholas J; Almonte, Antoine G; Miller, Brooke H; Wiltgen, Brian J; Miller, Courtney A; Xu, Xiangmin; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2012-11-09

    Mutations that cause intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are commonly found in genes that encode for synaptic proteins. However, it remains unclear how mutations that disrupt synapse function impact intellectual ability. In the SYNGAP1 mouse model of ID/ASD, we found that dendritic spine synapses develop prematurely during the early postnatal period. Premature spine maturation dramatically enhanced excitability in the developing hippocampus, which corresponded with the emergence of behavioral abnormalities. Inducing SYNGAP1 mutations after critical developmental windows closed had minimal impact on spine synapse function, whereas repairing these pathogenic mutations in adulthood did not improve behavior and cognition. These data demonstrate that SynGAP protein acts as a critical developmental repressor of neural excitability that promotes the development of life-long cognitive abilities. We propose that the pace of dendritic spine synapse maturation in early life is a critical determinant of normal intellectual development.

  9. A novel missense mutation in ACTG1 causes dominant deafness in a Norwegian DFNA20/26 family, but ACTG1 mutations are not frequent among families with hereditary hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Rendtorff, Nanna D; Zhu, Mei; Fagerheim, Toril; Antal, Torben L; Jones, MaryPat; Teslovich, Tanya M; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Barmada, Michael; Teig, Erik; Trent, Jeffrey M; Friderici, Karen H; Stephan, Dietrich A; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth

    2006-10-01

    The gamma-actin gene (ACTG1) encodes a major cytoskeletal protein of the sensory hair cells of the cochlea. Recently, mutations in ACTG1 were found to cause autosomal dominant, progressive, sensorineural hearing impairment linked to the DFNA20/26 locus on chromosome 17q25.3 in four American families and in one Dutch family. We report here the linkage of autosomal dominant, progressive, sensorineural hearing impairment in a large Norwegian family to the DFNA20/26 locus. Sequencing of ACTG1 identified a novel missense mutation (c.1109T>C; p.V370A) segregating with the hearing loss. Functional analysis in yeast showed that the p.V370A mutation restricts cell growth at elevated temperature or under hyperosmolar stress. Molecular modelling suggested that the p.V370A mutation modestly alters a site for protein-protein interaction in gamma-actin and thereby modestly alters gamma-actin-based cytoskeletal structures. Nineteen Norwegian and Danish families with autosomal, dominant hearing impairment were analyzed for mutations in ACTG1 by sequencing, but no disease-associated mutations were identified. Finally, a long-term follow-up of the hearing loss progression associated with the p.V370A mutation in ACTG1 is provided. The present study expands our understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationship of this deafness gene and provides a sensitive and simple functional assay for missense mutations in this gene, which may assist future molecular diagnosis of autosomal-dominant hearing impairment. Finally, the present results do not indicate that mutations in ACTG1 are a frequent cause of autosomal-dominant postlingual sensorineural hearing impairment in Norway nor Denmark.

  10. From Function to Phenotype: Impaired DNA Binding and Clustering Correlates with Clinical Severity in Males with Missense Mutations in MECP2

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Taimoor I.; Ausió, Juan; Faghfoury, Hannah; Silver, Josh; Lane, Jane B.; Eubanks, James H.; MacLeod, Patrick; Percy, Alan K.; Vincent, John B.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT). MeCP2 binds to chromocentric DNA through its methyl CpG-binding domain (MBD) to regulate gene expression. In heterozygous females the variable phenotypic severity is modulated by non-random X-inactivation, thus making genotype-phenotype comparisons unreliable. However, genotype-phenotype correlations in males with hemizygousMECP2 mutations can provide more accurate insights in to the true biological effect of specific mutations. Here, we compared chromatin organization and binding dynamics for twelve MeCP2 missense mutations (including two novel and the five most common MBD missense RTT mutations) and identifiedacorrelation with phenotype in hemizygous males. We observed impaired interaction of MeCP2-DNA for mutations around the MBD-DNA binding interface, and defective chromatin clustering for distal MBD mutations. Furthermore, binding and mobility dynamics show a gradient of impairment depending on the amino acid properties and tertiary structure within the MBD. Interestingly, a wide range of phenotypic/clinical severity, ranging from neonatal encephalopathy to mild psychiatric abnormalities were observed and all are consistent with our functional/molecular results. Overall, clinical severity showed a direct correlation with the functional impairment of MeCP2. These mechanistic and phenotypic correlations of MeCP2 mutations will enable improved and individualized diagnostics, and may lead to personalized therapeutic interventions. PMID:27929079

  11. Golgi-localized STELLO proteins regulate the assembly and trafficking of cellulose synthase complexes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Nikolovski, Nino; Sorieul, Mathias; Vellosillo, Tamara; McFarlane, Heather E.; Dupree, Ray; Kesten, Christopher; Schneider, René; Driemeier, Carlos; Lathe, Rahul; Lampugnani, Edwin; Yu, Xiaolan; Ivakov, Alexander; Doblin, Monika S.; Mortimer, Jenny C.; Brown, Steven P.; Persson, Staffan; Dupree, Paul

    2016-01-01

    As the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, cellulose is a key structural component of the plant cell wall. Cellulose is produced at the plasma membrane by cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes (CSCs), which are assembled in the endomembrane system and trafficked to the plasma membrane. While several proteins that affect CesA activity have been identified, components that regulate CSC assembly and trafficking remain unknown. Here we show that STELLO1 and 2 are Golgi-localized proteins that can interact with CesAs and control cellulose quantity. In the absence of STELLO function, the spatial distribution within the Golgi, secretion and activity of the CSCs are impaired indicating a central role of the STELLO proteins in CSC assembly. Point mutations in the predicted catalytic domains of the STELLO proteins indicate that they are glycosyltransferases facing the Golgi lumen. Hence, we have uncovered proteins that regulate CSC assembly in the plant Golgi apparatus. PMID:27277162

  12. Golgi-localized STELLO proteins regulate the assembly and trafficking of cellulose synthase complexes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Nikolovski, Nino; Sorieul, Mathias; Vellosillo, Tamara; McFarlane, Heather E; Dupree, Ray; Kesten, Christopher; Schneider, René; Driemeier, Carlos; Lathe, Rahul; Lampugnani, Edwin; Yu, Xiaolan; Ivakov, Alexander; Doblin, Monika S; Mortimer, Jenny C; Brown, Steven P; Persson, Staffan; Dupree, Paul

    2016-06-09

    As the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, cellulose is a key structural component of the plant cell wall. Cellulose is produced at the plasma membrane by cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes (CSCs), which are assembled in the endomembrane system and trafficked to the plasma membrane. While several proteins that affect CesA activity have been identified, components that regulate CSC assembly and trafficking remain unknown. Here we show that STELLO1 and 2 are Golgi-localized proteins that can interact with CesAs and control cellulose quantity. In the absence of STELLO function, the spatial distribution within the Golgi, secretion and activity of the CSCs are impaired indicating a central role of the STELLO proteins in CSC assembly. Point mutations in the predicted catalytic domains of the STELLO proteins indicate that they are glycosyltransferases facing the Golgi lumen. Hence, we have uncovered proteins that regulate CSC assembly in the plant Golgi apparatus.

  13. The deubiquitinating enzyme USP8 promotes trafficking and degradation of the chemokine receptor 4 at the sorting endosome.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Ilana; Higginbotham, Katherine M; Dise, Rebecca S; Sierra, Maria I; Nash, Piers D

    2010-11-26

    Reversible ubiquitination orchestrated by the opposition of ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinating enzymes mediates endocytic trafficking of cell surface receptors for lysosomal degradation. Ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8) has previously been implicated in endocytosis of several receptors by virtue of their deubiquitination. The present study explores an indirect role for USP8 in cargo trafficking through its regulation of the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). Contrary to the effects of USP8 loss on enhanced green fluorescent protein, we find that USP8 depletion stabilizes CXCR4 on the cell surface and attenuates receptor degradation without affecting its ubiquitination status. In the presence of ligand, diminished CXCR4 turnover is accompanied by receptor accumulation on enlarged early endosomes and leads to enhancement of phospho-ERK signaling. Perturbation in CXCR4 trafficking, resulting from USP8 inactivation, occurs at the ESCRT-0 checkpoint, and catalytic mutation of USP8 specifically targeted to the ESCRT-0 complex impairs the spatial and temporal organization of the sorting endosome. USP8 functionally opposes the ubiquitin ligase AIP4 with respect to ESCRT-0 ubiquitination, thereby promoting trafficking of CXCR4. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a functional cooperation between USP8, AIP4, and the ESCRT-0 machinery at the early sorting phase of CXCR4 and underscore the versatility of USP8 in shaping trafficking events at the early-to-late endosome transition.

  14. Autism-Associated Insertion Mutation (InsG) of Shank3 Exon 21 Causes Impaired Synaptic Transmission and Behavioral Deficits.

    PubMed

    Speed, Haley E; Kouser, Mehreen; Xuan, Zhong; Reimers, Jeremy M; Ochoa, Christine F; Gupta, Natasha; Liu, Shunan; Powell, Craig M

    2015-07-01

    SHANK3 (also known as PROSAP2) is a postsynaptic scaffolding protein at excitatory synapses in which mutations and deletions have been implicated in patients with idiopathic autism, Phelan-McDermid (aka 22q13 microdeletion) syndrome, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study, we have created a novel mouse model of human autism caused by the insertion of a single guanine nucleotide into exon 21 (Shank3(G)). The resulting frameshift causes a premature STOP codon and loss of major higher molecular weight Shank3 isoforms at the synapse. Shank3(G/G) mice exhibit deficits in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning, impaired motor coordination, altered response to novelty, and sensory processing deficits. At the cellular level, Shank3(G/G) mice also exhibit impaired hippocampal excitatory transmission and plasticity as well as changes in baseline NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses. This work identifies clear alterations in synaptic function and behavior in a novel, genetically accurate mouse model of autism mimicking an autism-associated insertion mutation. Furthermore, these findings lay the foundation for future studies aimed to validate and study region-selective and temporally selective genetic reversal studies in the Shank3(G/G) mouse that was engineered with such future experiments in mind.

  15. Autism-Associated Insertion Mutation (InsG) of Shank3 Exon 21 Causes Impaired Synaptic Transmission and Behavioral Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Speed, Haley E.; Kouser, Mehreen; Xuan, Zhong; Reimers, Jeremy M.; Ochoa, Christine F.; Gupta, Natasha; Liu, Shunan

    2015-01-01

    SHANK3 (also known as PROSAP2) is a postsynaptic scaffolding protein at excitatory synapses in which mutations and deletions have been implicated in patients with idiopathic autism, Phelan–McDermid (aka 22q13 microdeletion) syndrome, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study, we have created a novel mouse model of human autism caused by the insertion of a single guanine nucleotide into exon 21 (Shank3G). The resulting frameshift causes a premature STOP codon and loss of major higher molecular weight Shank3 isoforms at the synapse. Shank3G/G mice exhibit deficits in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning, impaired motor coordination, altered response to novelty, and sensory processing deficits. At the cellular level, Shank3G/G mice also exhibit impaired hippocampal excitatory transmission and plasticity as well as changes in baseline NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses. This work identifies clear alterations in synaptic function and behavior in a novel, genetically accurate mouse model of autism mimicking an autism-associated insertion mutation. Furthermore, these findings lay the foundation for future studies aimed to validate and study region-selective and temporally selective genetic reversal studies in the Shank3G/G mouse that was engineered with such future experiments in mind. PMID:26134648

  16. The Sorting Receptor SorCS1 Regulates Trafficking of Neurexin and AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Jeffrey N.; Ribeiro, Luís F.; Wierda, Keimpe D.; Wright, Rebecca; DeNardo, Laura A.; Rice, Heather C.; Chamma, Ingrid; Wang, Yi-Zhi; Zemla, Roland; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Vennekens, Kristel M.; O'Sullivan, Matthew L.; Antonios, Joseph K.; Hall, Elizabeth A.; Thoumine, Olivier; Attie, Alan D.; Ghosh, Anirvan; Yates, John R.; de Wit, Joris

    2015-01-01

    The formation, function, and plasticity of synapses require dynamic changes in synaptic receptor composition. Here we identify the sorting receptor SorCS1 as a key regulator of synaptic receptor trafficking. Four independent proteomic analyses identify the synaptic adhesion molecule neurexin and the AMPA glutamate receptor (AMPAR) as major proteins sorted by SorCS1. SorCS1 localizes to early and recycling endosomes and regulates neurexin and AMPAR surface trafficking. Surface proteome analysis of SorCS1-deficient neurons shows decreased surface levels of these, and additional, receptors. Quantitative in vivo analysis of SorCS1 knockout synaptic proteomes identifies SorCS1 as a global trafficking regulator and reveals decreased levels of receptors regulating adhesion and neurotransmission, including neurexins and AMPARs. Consequently, glutamatergic transmission at SorCS1–deficient synapses is reduced due to impaired AMPAR surface expression. SORCS1 mutations have been associated with autism and Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that perturbed receptor trafficking contributes to defects in synaptic composition and function underlying synaptopathies. PMID:26291160

  17. Mitochondrial impairment observed in fibroblasts from South African Parkinson's disease patients with parkin mutations.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Swart, Chrisna; Kinnear, Craig; Henning, Franclo; van der Merwe, Lize; Pillay, Komala; Muller, Nolan; Zaharie, Dan; Engelbrecht, Lize; Carr, Jonathan; Bardien, Soraya

    2014-05-02

    Parkinson's disease (PD), defined as a neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive, early-onset PD. Parkin has been implicated in the maintenance of healthy mitochondria, although previous studies show conflicting findings regarding mitochondrial abnormalities in fibroblasts from patients harboring parkin-null mutations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether South African PD patients with parkin mutations exhibit evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Fibroblasts were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from three patients with homozygous parkin-null mutations, two heterozygous mutation carriers and two wild-type controls. Muscle biopsies were obtained from two of the patients. The muscle fibers showed subtle abnormalities such as slightly swollen mitochondria in focal areas of the fibers and some folding of the sarcolemma. Although no differences in the degree of mitochondrial network branching were found in the fibroblasts, ultrastructural abnormalities were observed including the presence of electron-dense vacuoles. Moreover, decreased ATP levels which are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction were observed in the patients' fibroblasts compared to controls. Remarkably, these defects did not manifest in one patient, which may be due to possible compensatory mechanisms. These results suggest that parkin-null patients exhibit features of mitochondrial dysfunction. Involvement of mitochondria as a key role player in PD pathogenesis will have important implications for the design of new and more effective therapies.

  18. A Mutation in SNAP29, Coding for a SNARE Protein Involved in Intracellular Trafficking, Causes a Novel Neurocutaneous Syndrome Characterized by Cerebral Dysgenesis, Neuropathy, Ichthyosis, and Palmoplantar Keratoderma

    PubMed Central

    Sprecher, Eli; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Mizrahi-Koren, Mordechai; Rapaport, Debora; Goldsher, Dorit; Indelman, Margarita; Topaz, Orit; Chefetz, Ilana; Keren, Hanni; O’Brien, Timothy J.; Bercovich, Dani; Shalev, Stavit; Geiger, Dan; Bergman, Reuven; Horowitz, Mia; Mandel, Hanna

    2005-01-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes represent a vast, largely heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by neurological and dermatological manifestations, reflecting the common embryonic origin of epidermal and neural tissues. In the present report, we describe a novel neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by cerebral dysgenesis, neuropathy, ichthyosis, and keratoderma (CEDNIK syndrome). Using homozygosity mapping in two large families, we localized the disease gene to 22q11.2 and identified, in all patients, a 1-bp deletion in SNAP29, which codes for a SNARE protein involved in vesicle fusion. SNAP29 expression was decreased in the skin of the patients, resulting in abnormal maturation of lamellar granules and, as a consequence, in mislocation of epidermal lipids and proteases. These data underscore the importance of vesicle trafficking regulatory mechanisms for proper neuroectodermal differentiation. PMID:15968592

  19. Progressive hereditary hearing impairment caused by a MYO6 mutation resembles presbyacusis.

    PubMed

    Oonk, A M M; Leijendeckers, J M; Lammers, E M; Weegerink, N J D; Oostrik, J; Beynon, A J; Huygen, P L M; Kunst, H P M; Kremer, H; Snik, A F M; Pennings, R J E

    2013-05-01

    Since deafness is the most common sensorineural disorder in humans, better understanding of the underlying causes is necessary to improve counseling and rehabilitation. A Dutch family with autosomal dominantly inherited sensorineural hearing loss was clinically and genetically assessed. The MYO6 gene was selected to be sequenced because of similarities with other, previously described DFNA22 phenotypes and a pathogenic c.3610C > T (p.R1204W) mutation was found to co-segregate with the disease. This missense mutation results in a flat configured audiogram with a mild hearing loss, which becomes severe to profound and gently to steeply downsloping later in life. The age-related typical audiograms (ARTA) constructed for this family resemble presbyacusis. Speech audiometry and results of loudness scaling support the hypothesis that the phenotype of this specific MYO6 mutation mimics presbyacusis.

  20. Mutations in the passenger polypeptide can affect its partitioning between mitochondria and cytoplasm: mutations can impair the mitochondrial import of DsRed.

    PubMed

    Pastukh, Viktoriya; Shokolenko, Inna N; Wilson, Glenn L; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we report that the partitioning between mitochondria and cytoplasm of two variants, mCherry and DsRed Express (DRE), of the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, fused to one of the six matrix targeting sequences (MTSs) can be affected by both MTS and amino acid substitutions in DsRed. Of the six MTSs tested, MTSs from superoxide dismutase and DNA polymerase gamma failed to direct mCherry, but not DRE to mitochondria. By evaluating a series of chimeras between mCherry and DRE fused to the MTS of superoxide dismutase, we attribute the differences in the mitochondrial partitioning to differences in the primary amino acid sequence of the passenger polypeptide. The impairment of mitochondrial partitioning closely parallels the number of mCherry-specific mutations, and is not specific to mutations located in any particular region of the polypeptide. These observations suggest that both MTS and the passenger polypeptide affect the efficiency of mitochondrial import and provide a rationale for the observed diversity in the primary amino acid sequences of natural MTSs.

  1. Putative Breast Cancer Driver Mutations in TBX3 Cause Impaired Transcriptional Repression

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kathrin; Pflugfelder, Gert O.

    2015-01-01

    The closely related T-box transcription factors TBX2 and TBX3 are frequently overexpressed in melanoma and various types of human cancers, in particular, breast cancer. The overexpression of TBX2 and TBX3 can have several cellular effects, among them suppression of senescence, promotion of epithelial–mesenchymal transition, and invasive cell motility. In contrast, loss of function of TBX3 and most other human T-box genes causes developmental haploinsufficiency syndromes. Stephens and colleagues (1), by exome sequencing of breast tumor samples, identified five different mutations in TBX3, all affecting the DNA-binding T-domain. One in-frame deletion of a single amino acid, p.N212delN, was observed twice. Due to the clustering of these mutations to the T-domain and for statistical reasons, TBX3 was inferred to be a driver gene in breast cancer. Since mutations in the T-domain generally cause loss of function and because the tumorigenic action of TBX3 has generally been attributed to overexpression, we determined whether the putative driver mutations had loss- or gain-of-function properties. We tested two in-frame deletions, one missense, and one frameshift mutant protein for DNA-binding in vitro, and for target gene repression in cell culture. In addition, we performed an in silico analysis of somatic TBX mutations in breast cancer, collected in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Both the experimental and the in silico analysis indicate that the observed mutations predominantly cause loss of TBX3 function. PMID:26579496

  2. Mitochondrial impairment observed in fibroblasts from South African Parkinson’s disease patients with parkin mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Merwe, Celia van der; Loos, Ben; Swart, Chrisna; Kinnear, Craig; Merwe, Lize van der; Pillay, Komala; Muller, Nolan; Zaharie, Dan; Engelbrecht, Lize; Carr, Jonathan; and others

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Mitochondrial dysfunction observed in patients with parkin-null mutations. • Mitochondrial ATP levels were decreased. • Electron-dense vacuoles were observed in the patients. • Mitochondria from muscle biopsies appeared within normal limits. • One patient did not show these defects possibly due to compensatory mechanisms. - Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD), defined as a neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive, early-onset PD. Parkin has been implicated in the maintenance of healthy mitochondria, although previous studies show conflicting findings regarding mitochondrial abnormalities in fibroblasts from patients harboring parkin-null mutations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether South African PD patients with parkin mutations exhibit evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Fibroblasts were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from three patients with homozygous parkin-null mutations, two heterozygous mutation carriers and two wild-type controls. Muscle biopsies were obtained from two of the patients. The muscle fibers showed subtle abnormalities such as slightly swollen mitochondria in focal areas of the fibers and some folding of the sarcolemma. Although no differences in the degree of mitochondrial network branching were found in the fibroblasts, ultrastructural abnormalities were observed including the presence of electron-dense vacuoles. Moreover, decreased ATP levels which are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction were observed in the patients’ fibroblasts compared to controls. Remarkably, these defects did not manifest in one patient, which may be due to possible compensatory mechanisms. These results suggest that parkin-null patients exhibit features of mitochondrial dysfunction. Involvement of mitochondria as a key role player in PD

  3. [Hereditary sensorineural hearing impairment and macrothrombocytopenia: a rare MYH9 gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Böttcher, A; Knecht, R; Busch, C-J; Lörincz, B B; Dalchow, C V

    2013-02-01

    We report on a rare case of an exon 16 mutation of the MYH9 gene in a 23-year-old woman. This gene encodes for non-muscular myosin IIA, which acts as a cytoskeletal contractile protein in diverse cell types. This disorder led to sensorineural hearing loss, macrothrombocytopenia, and proteinuria. MYH9 gene mutation can lead to diverse organ manifestation like pre-senile cataract or renal failure which are progressive in course. Due to the current lack of causal treatment, diagnostic steps, advice for follow-up examinations and symptomatic therapy approaches are presented.

  4. A deleterious Nav1.1 mutation selectively impairs telencephalic inhibitory neurons derived from Dravet Syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yishan; Paşca, Sergiu P; Portmann, Thomas; Goold, Carleton; Worringer, Kathleen A; Guan, Wendy; Chan, Karen C; Gai, Hui; Vogt, Daniel; Chen, Ying-Jiun J; Mao, Rong; Chan, Karrie; Rubenstein, John LR; Madison, Daniel V; Hallmayer, Joachim; Froehlich-Santino, Wendy M; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Dolmetsch, Ricardo E

    2016-01-01

    Dravet Syndrome is an intractable form of childhood epilepsy associated with deleterious mutations in SCN1A, the gene encoding neuronal sodium channel Nav1.1. Earlier studies using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have produced mixed results regarding the importance of Nav1.1 in human inhibitory versus excitatory neurons. We studied a Nav1.1 mutation (p.S1328P) identified in a pair of twins with Dravet Syndrome and generated iPSC-derived neurons from these patients. Characterization of the mutant channel revealed a decrease in current amplitude and hypersensitivity to steady-state inactivation. We then differentiated Dravet-Syndrome and control iPSCs into telencephalic excitatory neurons or medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-like inhibitory neurons. Dravet inhibitory neurons showed deficits in sodium currents and action potential firing, which were rescued by a Nav1.1 transgene, whereas Dravet excitatory neurons were normal. Our study identifies biophysical impairments underlying a deleterious Nav1.1 mutation and supports the hypothesis that Dravet Syndrome arises from defective inhibitory neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13073.001 PMID:27458797

  5. Opinions of hearing parents about the causes of hearing impairment of their children with biallelic GJB2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Aisen V; Dzhemileva, Lilya U; Posukh, Olga L; Barashkov, Nikolay A; Bady-Khoo, Marita S; Lobov, Semen L; Popova, Natalya Yu; Romanov, Georgii P; Sazonov, Nikolay N; Bondar, Alexander A; Morozov, Igor V; Tomsky, Mikhail I; Fedorova, Sardana A; Khusnutdinova, Elza K

    2017-03-21

    Hereditary hearing impairment (HI) caused by recessive GJB2 mutations is a frequent sensory disorder. The results of the molecular-based studies of HI are widely used in various genetic test systems. However, the ethical aspects are less described than the genetic aspects. The concerns expressed by individuals from groups with genetic risks must be included in the counseling of patients and their families. For evaluation of subjective opinions of hearing parents about the presumed causes of HI of their children, we analyze the cohort of parents having children with confirmed hereditary HI caused by biallelic recessive GJB2 mutations (in a homozygous or a compound heterozygous state). This study included 70 deaf children with HI due to mutations in the GJB2 gene and 91 questionnaires about the presumed causes of their deafness filled by their parents. Most of the parents at 78% (CI 68.4-85.4%) attributed their children's HI to "non-hereditary" causes and 22% (CI 14.7-31.6%) to "hereditary" causes (p < 0.05). Therefore, the prior opinions of the parents did not correspond to positive GJB2 genetic testing results. The subjective opinions of parents are probably partly based on family history, since respondents with deaf relatives in their pedigree more likely supposed hereditary causes for HI in their children than the respondents without deaf relatives (p < 0.001).

  6. VCP is essential for mitochondrial quality control by PINK1/Parkin and this function is impaired by VCP mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Chul; Tresse, Emilie; Kolaitis, Regina M.; Molliex, Amandine; Thomas, Ruth E.; Alami, Nael H.; Wang, Bo; Joshi, Aashish; Smith, Rebecca B.; Ritson, Gillian P.; Winborn, Brett J.; Moore, Jennifer; Lee, Joo-Yong; Yao, Tso-Pang; Pallanck, Leo; Kundu, Mondira; Taylor, J. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in VCP cause multisystem degeneration impacting the nervous system, muscle, and/or bone. Patients may present with ALS, Parkinsonism, frontotemporal dementia, myopathy, Paget’s disease or a combination of these. The disease mechanism is unknown. We developed a Drosophila model of VCP mutation-dependent degeneration. The phenotype is reminiscent of PINK1 and parkin mutants, including a pronounced mitochondrial defect. Indeed, VCP interacts genetically with the PINK1/parkin pathway in vivo. Paradoxically, VCP complements PINK1 deficiency but not parkin deficiency. The basis of this paradox is resolved by mechanistic studies in vitro showing that VCP recruitment to damaged mitochondria requires Parkin-mediated ubiquitination of mitochondrial targets. VCP recruitment coincides temporally with mitochondrial fission, and VCP is required for proteasome-dependent degradation of Mitofusins in vitro and in vivo. Further, VCP and its adaptor Npl4/Ufd1 are required for clearance of damaged mitochondria via the PINK1/Parkin pathway, and this is impaired by pathogenic mutations in VCP. PMID:23498974

  7. NADP(+)-IDH Mutations Promote Hypersuccinylation that Impairs Mitochondria Respiration and Induces Apoptosis Resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; He, Xiadi; Ye, Dingwei; Lin, Yan; Yu, Hongxiu; Yao, Cuifang; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Jianong; Wang, Fang; Xu, Sha; Wu, Xiaohui; Liu, Lixia; Yang, Chen; Shi, Jiaqi; He, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jie; Qu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Fushen; Zhao, Jianyuan; Xu, Wei; Zhao, Shimin

    2015-11-19

    Elucidating the tumorigenic mechanism of R-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG) is critical for determining how NADP(+)-IDH mutations cause cancer. Here we report that R-2HG induces cancerous metabolism and apoptosis resistance through promoting hypersuccinylation. By competitive inhibition of the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), R-2HG preferentially induced succinyl-CoA accumulation and hypersuccinylation in the mitochondria. IDH1 mutation-bearing glioma samples and cells were hypersuccinylated in the mitochondria. IDH1 mutation or SDH inactivation resulted in hypersuccinylation, causing respiration inhibition and inducing cancerous metabolism and mitochondrial depolarization. These mitochondrial dysfunctions induced BCL-2 accumulation at the mitochondrial membrane, leading to apoptosis resistance of hypersuccinylated cells. Relief of hypersuccinylation by overexpressing the desuccinylase SIRT5 or supplementing glycine rescued mitochondrial dysfunctions, reversed BCL-2 accumulation, and slowed the oncogenic growth of hypersuccinylated IDH1(R132C)-harboring HT1080 cells. Thus, R-2HG-induced hypersuccinylation contributes to the tumorigenicity of NADP(+)-IDH mutations, suggesting the potential of hypersuccinylation inhibition as an intervention for hypersuccinylation-related tumors.

  8. adPEO mutations in ANT1 impair ADP-ATP translocation in muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Hibiki; Tiranti, Valeria; Magrané, Jordi; Chinopoulos, Christos; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2011-08-01

    Mutations in the heart and muscle isoform of adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) are associated with autosomal-dominant progressive external opthalmoplegia (adPEO) clinically characterized by exercise intolerance, ptosis and muscle weakness. The pathogenic mechanisms underlying the mitochondrial myopathy caused by ANT1 mutations remain largely unknown. In yeast, expression of ANT1 carrying mutations corresponding to the human adPEO ones causes a wide range of mitochondrial abnormalities. However, functional studies of ANT1 mutations in mammalian cells are lacking, because they have been hindered by the fact that ANT1 expression leads to apoptotic cell death in commonly utilized replicating cell lines. Here, we successfully express functional ANT1 in differentiated mouse myotubes, which naturally contain high levels of ANT1, without causing cell death. We demonstrate, for the first time in these disease-relevant mammalian cells, that mutant human ANT1 causes dominant mitochondrial defects characterized by decreased ADP-ATP exchange function and abnormal translocator reversal potential. These abnormalities are not due to ANT1 loss of function, because knocking down Ant1 in myotubes causes functional changes different from ANT1 mutants. Under certain physiological conditions, mitochondria consume ATP to maintain membrane potential by reversing the ADP-ATP transport. The modified properties of mutant ANT1 can be responsible for disease pathogenesis in adPEO, because exchange reversal occurring at higher than normal membrane potential can cause excessive energy depletion and nucleotide imbalance in ANT1 mutant muscle cells.

  9. D184E mutation in aquaporin-4 gene impairs water permeability and links to deafness.

    PubMed

    Nicchia, G P; Ficarella, R; Rossi, A; Giangreco, I; Nicolotti, O; Carotti, A; Pisani, F; Estivill, X; Gasparini, P; Svelto, M; Frigeri, A

    2011-12-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) play a physiological role in several organs and tissues, and their alteration is associated with disorders of water regulation. The identification of molecular interactions, which are crucial in determining the rate of water flux through the channel, is of pivotal role for the discovery of molecules able to target those interactions and therefore to be used for pathologies ascribable to an altered AQP-dependent water balance. In the present study, a mutational screening of human aquaporin-4 (AQP4) gene was performed on subjects with variable degrees of hearing loss. One heterozygous missense mutation was identified in a Spanish sporadic case, leading to an Asp/Glu amino acid substitution at position 184 (D184E). A BLAST analysis revealed that the amino acid D184 is conserved across species, consistently with a crucial role in the structure/function of AQP4 water channels. The mutation induces a significant reduction in water permeability as measured by the Xenopus laevis oocytes swelling assay and by the use of mammalian cells by total internal reflection microscopy. By Western blot, immunofluorescence and 2D Blue Native/SDS-PAGE we show that the reduction in water permeability is not ascribable to a reduced expression of AQP4 mutant protein or to its incorrect plasma membrane targeting and aggregation into orthogonal arrays of particles. Molecular dynamics simulation provided a molecular explanation of the mechanism whereby the mutation induces a loss of function of the channel. Substituting glutamate for aspartate affects the mobility of the D loop, which acquires a higher propensity to equilibrate in a "closed conformation", thus affecting the rate of water flux. We speculate that this mutation, combined with other genetic defects or concurrently with certain environmental stimuli, could confer a higher susceptibility to deafness.

  10. Novel IL1RAPL1 mutations associated with intellectual disability impair synaptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Brossier, Mariana; Montani, Caterina; Lebrun, Nicolas; Gritti, Laura; Martin, Christelle; Seminatore-Nole, Christine; Toussaint, Aurelie; Moreno, Sarah; Poirier, Karine; Dorseuil, Olivier; Chelly, Jamel; Hackett, Anna; Gecz, Jozef; Bieth, Eric; Faudet, Anne; Heron, Delphine; Kooy, Frank; Loeys, Bart; Humeau, Yann; Sala, Carlo; Billuart, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein like 1 (IL1RAPL1) gene have been associated with non-syndromic intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. This protein interacts with synaptic partners like PSD-95 and PTPδ, regulating the formation and function of excitatory synapses. The aim of this work is to characterize the synaptic consequences of three IL1RAPL1 mutations, two novel causing the deletion of exon 6 (Δex6) and one point mutation (C31R), identified in patients with intellectual disability. Using immunofluorescence and electrophysiological recordings we examined the effects of IL1RAPL1 mutants over-expression on synapse formation and function in cultured rodent hippocampal neurons. Δex6 but not C31R mutation leads to IL1RAPL1 protein instability and mislocalization within dendrites. Analysis of different markers of excitatory synapses and sEPSC recording revealed that both mutants fail to induce pre- and post-synaptic differentiation, contrary to WT IL1RAPL1 protein. Cell aggregation and immunoprecipitation assays in HEK293 cells showed a reduction of the interaction between IL1RAPL1 mutants and PTPδ that could explain the observed synaptogenic defect in neurons. However, these mutants do not affect all cellular signaling since their over-expression still activates JNK pathway. We conclude that both mutations described in this study lead to a partial loss of function of the IL1RAPL1 protein through different mechanisms. Our work highlights the important function of the trans-synaptic PTPδ/ IL1RAPL1 interaction in synaptogenesis and as such, in intellectual disability in the patients. PMID:25305082

  11. Novel IL1RAPL1 mutations associated with intellectual disability impair synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Brossier, Mariana; Montani, Caterina; Lebrun, Nicolas; Gritti, Laura; Martin, Christelle; Seminatore-Nole, Christine; Toussaint, Aurelie; Moreno, Sarah; Poirier, Karine; Dorseuil, Olivier; Chelly, Jamel; Hackett, Anna; Gecz, Jozef; Bieth, Eric; Faudet, Anne; Heron, Delphine; Frank Kooy, R; Loeys, Bart; Humeau, Yann; Sala, Carlo; Billuart, Pierre

    2015-02-15

    Mutations in interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein like 1 (IL1RAPL1) gene have been associated with non-syndromic intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorder. This protein interacts with synaptic partners like PSD-95 and PTPδ, regulating the formation and function of excitatory synapses. The aim of this work was to characterize the synaptic consequences of three IL1RAPL1 mutations, two novel causing the deletion of exon 6 (Δex6) and one point mutation (C31R), identified in patients with ID. Using immunofluorescence and electrophysiological recordings, we examined the effects of IL1RAPL1 mutant over-expression on synapse formation and function in cultured rodent hippocampal neurons. Δex6 but not C31R mutation leads to IL1RAPL1 protein instability and mislocalization within dendrites. Analysis of different markers of excitatory synapses and sEPSC recording revealed that both mutants fail to induce pre- and post-synaptic differentiation, contrary to WT IL1RAPL1 protein. Cell aggregation and immunoprecipitation assays in HEK293 cells showed a reduction of the interaction between IL1RAPL1 mutants and PTPδ that could explain the observed synaptogenic defect in neurons. However, these mutants do not affect all cellular signaling because their over-expression still activates JNK pathway. We conclude that both mutations described in this study lead to a partial loss of function of the IL1RAPL1 protein through different mechanisms. Our work highlights the important function of the trans-synaptic PTPδ/IL1RAPL1 interaction in synaptogenesis and as such in ID in the patients.

  12. Dravet Syndrome and "SCN1A" Gene Mutation Related-Epilepsies: Cognitive Impairment and Its Determinants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerrini, Renzo; Falchi, Melania

    2011-01-01

    Some studies have demonstrated that cognitive decline occurs in Dravet syndrome, starting shortly after the onset of seizures, rapidly progressing and then plateauing within a few years. It is unclear whether children that develop the syndrome had entirely normal cognitive skills before seizure onset, since subtle impairment easily escapes…

  13. Germline Mutations in FAN1 Cause Hereditary Colorectal Cancer by Impairing DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Seguí, Nuria; Mina, Leonardo B; Lázaro, Conxi; Sanz-Pamplona, Rebeca; Pons, Tirso; Navarro, Matilde; Bellido, Fernando; López-Doriga, Adriana; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Pineda, Marta; Guinó, Elisabet; Vidal, August; Soto, José Luís; Caldés, Trinidad; Durán, Mercedes; Urioste, Miguel; Rueda, Daniel; Brunet, Joan; Balbín, Milagros; Blay, Pilar; Iglesias, Silvia; Garré, Pilar; Lastra, Enrique; Sánchez-Heras, Ana Beatriz; Valencia, Alfonso; Moreno, Victor; Pujana, Miguel Ángel; Villanueva, Alberto; Blanco, Ignacio; Capellá, Gabriel; Surrallés, Jordi; Puente, Xose S; Valle, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Identification of genes associated with hereditary cancers facilitates management of patients with family histories of cancer. We performed exome sequencing of DNA from 3 individuals from a family with colorectal cancer who met the Amsterdam criteria for risk of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. These individuals had mismatch repair-proficient tumors and each carried nonsense variant in the FANCD2/FANCI-associated nuclease 1 gene (FAN1), which encodes a nuclease involved in DNA inter-strand cross-link repair. We sequenced FAN1 in 176 additional families with histories of colorectal cancer and performed in vitro functional analyses of the mutant forms of FAN1 identified. We detected FAN1 mutations in approximately 3% of families who met the Amsterdam criteria and had mismatch repair-proficient cancers with no previously associated mutations. These findings link colorectal cancer predisposition to the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway, supporting the connection between genome integrity and cancer risk.

  14. ATP2C1 gene mutations in Hailey–Hailey disease and possible roles of SPCA1 isoforms in membrane trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Micaroni, M; Giacchetti, G; Plebani, R; Xiao, G G; Federici, L

    2016-01-01

    ATP2C1 gene codes for the secretory pathway Ca2+/Mn2+-ATPase pump type 1 (SPCA1) localizing at the golgi apparatus. Mutations on the human ATP2C1 gene, causing decreased levels of the SPCA1 expression, have been identified as the cause of the Hailey–Hailey disease, a rare skin disorder. In the last few years, several mutations have been described, and here we summarize how they are distributed along the gene and how missense mutations affect protein expression. SPCA1 is expressed in four different isoforms through alternative splicing of the ATP2C1 gene and none of these isoforms is differentially affected by any of these mutations. However, a better understanding of the tissue specific expression of the isoforms, their localization along the secretory pathway, their specific binding partners and the role of the C-terminal tail making isoforms different from each other, will be future goals of the research in this field. PMID:27277681

  15. A mutation in FRIZZLED2 impairs Wnt signaling and causes autosomal dominant omodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Saal, Howard M.; Prows, Cynthia A.; Guerreiro, Iris; Donlin, Milene; Knudson, Luke; Sund, Kristen L.; Chang, Ching-Fang; Brugmann, Samantha A.; Stottmann, Rolf W.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant omodysplasia is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by short humeri, radial head dislocation, short first metacarpals, facial dysmorphism and genitourinary anomalies. We performed next-generation whole-exome sequencing and comparative analysis of a proband with omodysplasia, her unaffected parents and her affected daughter. We identified a de novo mutation in FRIZZLED2 (FZD2) in the proband and her daughter that was not found in unaffected family members. The FZD2 mutation (c.1644G>A) changes a tryptophan residue at amino acid 548 to a premature stop (p.Trp548*). This altered protein is still produced in vitro, but we show reduced ability of this mutant form of FZD2 to interact with its downstream target DISHEVELLED. Furthermore, expressing the mutant form of FZD2 in vitro is not able to facilitate the cellular response to canonical Wnt signaling like wild-type FZD2. We therefore conclude that the FRIZZLED2 mutation is a de novo, novel cause for autosomal dominant omodysplasia. PMID:25759469

  16. SLC30A10 Is a Cell Surface-Localized Manganese Efflux Transporter, and Parkinsonism-Causing Mutations Block Its Intracellular Trafficking and Efflux Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leyva-Illades, Dinorah; Chen, Pan; Zogzas, Charles E.; Hutchens, Steven; Mercado, Jonathan M.; Swaim, Caleb D.; Morrisett, Richard A.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal, but elevated cellular levels are toxic and may lead to the development of an irreversible parkinsonian-like syndrome that has no treatment. Mn-induced parkinsonism generally occurs as a result of exposure to elevated Mn levels in occupational or environmental settings. Additionally, patients with compromised liver function attributable to diseases, such as cirrhosis, fail to excrete Mn and may develop Mn-induced parkinsonism in the absence of exposure to elevated Mn. Recently, a new form of familial parkinsonism was reported to occur as a result of mutations in SLC30A10. The cellular function of SLC30A10 and the mechanisms by which mutations in this protein cause parkinsonism are unclear. Here, using a combination of mechanistic and functional studies in cell culture, Caenorhabditis elegans, and primary midbrain neurons, we show that SLC30A10 is a cell surface-localized Mn efflux transporter that reduces cellular Mn levels and protects against Mn-induced toxicity. Importantly, mutations in SLC30A10 that cause familial parkinsonism blocked the ability of the transporter to traffic to the cell surface and to mediate Mn efflux. Although expression of disease-causing SLC30A10 mutations were not deleterious by themselves, neurons and worms expressing these mutants exhibited enhanced sensitivity to Mn toxicity. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms involved in the onset of a familial form of parkinsonism and highlight the possibility of using enhanced Mn efflux as a therapeutic strategy for the potential management of Mn-induced parkinsonism, including that occurring as a result of mutations in SLC30A10. PMID:25319704

  17. Bordetella parapertussis Survives the Innate Interaction with Human Neutrophils by Impairing Bactericidal Trafficking inside the Cell through a Lipid Raft-Dependent Mechanism Mediated by the Lipopolysaccharide O Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Gorgojo, Juan; Lamberti, Yanina; Valdez, Hugo; Harvill, Eric T.

    2012-01-01

    Whooping cough is a reemerging disease caused by two closely related pathogens, Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis. The incidence of B. parapertussis in whooping cough cases has been increasing since the introduction of acellular pertussis vaccines containing purified antigens that are common to both strains. Recently published results demonstrated that these vaccines do not protect against B. parapertussis due to the presence of the O antigen on the bacterial surface that impairs antibody access to shared antigens. We have investigated the effect of the lack of opsonization of B. parapertussis on the outcome of its interaction with human neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]). In the absence of opsonic antibodies, PMN interaction with B. parapertussis resulted in nonbactericidal trafficking upon phagocytosis. A high percentage of nonopsonized B. parapertussis was found in nonacidic lysosome marker (lysosome-associated membrane protein [LAMP])-negative phagosomes with access to the host cell-recycling pathway of external nutrients, allowing bacterial survival as determined by intracellular CFU counts. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O antigen was found to be involved in directing B. parapertussis to PMN lipid rafts, eventually determining the nonbactericidal fate inside the PMN. IgG opsonization of B. parapertussis drastically changed this interaction by not only inducing efficient PMN phagocytosis but also promoting PMN bacterial killing. These data provide new insights into the immune mechanisms of hosts against B. parapertussis and document the crucial importance of opsonic antibodies in immunity to this pathogen. PMID:23027528

  18. Impaired neuronal KCC2 function by biallelic SLC12A5 mutations in migrating focal seizures and severe developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Saitsu, Hirotomo; Watanabe, Miho; Akita, Tenpei; Ohba, Chihiro; Sugai, Kenji; Ong, Winnie Peitee; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Yuasa, Shota; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Beng, Khoo Teik; Saitoh, Shinji; Miyatake, Satoko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Fukuda, Atsuo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS) is one of the early-onset epileptic syndromes characterized by migrating polymorphous focal seizures. Whole exome sequencing (WES) in ten sporadic and one familial case of EIMFS revealed compound heterozygous SLC12A5 (encoding the neuronal K+-Cl− co-transporter KCC2) mutations in two families: c.279 + 1G > C causing skipping of exon 3 in the transcript (p.E50_Q93del) and c.572 C >T (p.A191V) in individuals 1 and 2, and c.967T > C (p.S323P) and c.1243 A > G (p.M415V) in individual 3. Another patient (individual 4) with migrating multifocal seizures and compound heterozygous mutations [c.953G > C (p.W318S) and c.2242_2244del (p.S748del)] was identified by searching WES data from 526 patients and SLC12A5-targeted resequencing data from 141 patients with infantile epilepsy. Gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp analysis demonstrated strongly suppressed Cl− extrusion function of E50_Q93del and M415V mutants, with mildly impaired function of A191V and S323P mutants. Cell surface expression levels of these KCC2 mutants were similar to wildtype KCC2. Heterologous expression of two KCC2 mutants, mimicking the patient status, produced a significantly greater intracellular Cl− level than with wildtype KCC2, but less than without KCC2. These data clearly demonstrated that partially disrupted neuronal Cl− extrusion, mediated by two types of differentially impaired KCC2 mutant in an individual, causes EIMFS. PMID:27436767

  19. Muscular Dystrophy Mutations Impair the Nuclear Envelope Emerin Self-assembly Properties.

    PubMed

    Herrada, Isaline; Samson, Camille; Velours, Christophe; Renault, Louis; Östlund, Cecilia; Chervy, Pierre; Puchkov, Dmytro; Worman, Howard J; Buendia, Brigitte; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2015-12-18

    More than 100 genetic mutations causing X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy have been identified in the gene encoding the integral inner nuclear membrane protein emerin. Most mutations are nonsense or frameshift mutations that lead to the absence of emerin in cells. Only very few cases are due to missense or short in-frame deletions. Molecular mechanisms explaining the corresponding emerin variants' loss of function are particularly difficult to identify because of the mostly intrinsically disordered state of the emerin nucleoplasmic region. We now demonstrate that this EmN region can be produced as a disordered monomer, as revealed by nuclear magnetic resonance, but rapidly self-assembles in vitro. Increases in concentration and temperature favor the formation of long curvilinear filaments with diameters of approximately 10 nm, as observed by electron microscopy. Assembly of these filaments can be followed by fluorescence through Thioflavin-T binding and by Fourier-transform Infrared spectrometry through formation of β-structures. Analysis of the assembly properties of five EmN variants reveals that del95-99 and Q133H impact filament assembly capacities. In cells, these variants are located at the nuclear envelope, but the corresponding quantities of emerin-emerin and emerin-lamin proximities are decreased compared to wild-type protein. Furthermore, variant P183H favors EmN aggregation in vitro, and variant P183T provokes emerin accumulation in cytoplasmic foci in cells. Substitution of residue Pro183 might systematically favor oligomerization, leading to emerin aggregation and mislocalization in cells. Our results suggest that emerin self-assembly is necessary for its proper function and that a loss of either the protein itself or its ability to self-assemble causes muscular dystrophy.

  20. R4496C RyR2 mutation impairs atrial and ventricular contractility

    PubMed Central

    Coppini, Raffaele; Scellini, Beatrice; Ferrara, Claudia; Pioner, Josè Manuel; Mazzoni, Luca; Priori, Silvia; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Tesi, Chiara; Poggesi, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    Ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is the major Ca2+ channel of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and plays a crucial role in the generation of myocardial force. Changes in RyR2 gating properties and resulting increases in its open probability (Po) are associated with Ca2+ leakage from the SR and arrhythmias; however, the effects of RyR2 dysfunction on myocardial contractility are unknown. Here, we investigated the possibility that a RyR2 mutation associated with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, R4496C, affects the contractile function of atrial and ventricular myocardium. We measured isometric twitch tension in left ventricular and atrial trabeculae from wild-type mice and heterozygous transgenic mice carrying the R4496C RyR2 mutation and found that twitch force was comparable under baseline conditions (30°C, 2 mM [Ca2+]o, 1 Hz). However, the positive inotropic responses to high stimulation frequency, 0.1 µM isoproterenol, and 5 mM [Ca2+]o were decreased in R4496C trabeculae, as was post-rest potentiation. We investigated the mechanisms underlying inotropic insufficiency in R4496C muscles in single ventricular myocytes. Under baseline conditions, the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient was normal, despite the reduced SR Ca2+ content. Under inotropic challenge, however, R4496C myocytes were unable to boost the amplitude of Ca2+ transients because they are incapable of properly increasing the amount of Ca2+ stored in the SR because of a larger SR Ca2+ leakage. Recovery of force in response to premature stimuli was faster in R4496C myocardium, despite the unchanged rates of recovery of L-type Ca2+ channel current (ICa-L) and SR Ca2+ content in single myocytes. A faster recovery from inactivation of the mutant R4496C channels could explain this behavior. In conclusion, changes in RyR2 channel gating associated with the R4496C mutation could be directly responsible for the alterations in both ventricular and atrial contractility. The increased RyR2 Po

  1. Mutations in the NB-ARC Domain of I-2 That Impair ATP Hydrolysis Cause Autoactivation1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Tameling, Wladimir I.L.; Vossen, Jack H.; Albrecht, Mario; Lengauer, Thomas; Berden, Jan A.; Haring, Michel A.; Cornelissen, Ben J.C.; Takken, Frank L.W.

    2006-01-01

    Resistance (R) proteins in plants confer specificity to the innate immune system. Most R proteins have a centrally located NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding adaptor shared by APAF-1, R proteins, and CED-4) domain. For two tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) R proteins, I-2 and Mi-1, we have previously shown that this domain acts as an ATPase module that can hydrolyze ATP in vitro. To investigate the role of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis for the function of I-2 in planta, specific mutations were introduced in conserved motifs of the NB-ARC domain. Two mutations resulted in autoactivating proteins that induce a pathogen-independent hypersensitive response upon expression in planta. These mutant forms of I-2 were found to be impaired in ATP hydrolysis, but not in ATP binding, suggesting that the ATP- rather than the ADP-bound state of I-2 is the active form that triggers defense signaling. In addition, upon ADP binding, the protein displayed an increased affinity for ADP suggestive of a change of conformation. Based on these data, we propose that the NB-ARC domain of I-2, and likely of related R proteins, functions as a molecular switch whose state (on/off) depends on the nucleotide bound (ATP/ADP). PMID:16489136

  2. Mutations Impairing GSK3-Mediated MAF Phosphorylation Cause Cataract, Deafness, Intellectual Disability, Seizures, and a Down Syndrome-like Facies

    PubMed Central

    Niceta, Marcello; Stellacci, Emilia; Gripp, Karen W.; Zampino, Giuseppe; Kousi, Maria; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Traversa, Alice; Ciolfi, Andrea; Stabley, Deborah; Bruselles, Alessandro; Caputo, Viviana; Cecchetti, Serena; Prudente, Sabrina; Fiorenza, Maria T.; Boitani, Carla; Philip, Nicole; Niyazov, Dmitriy; Leoni, Chiara; Nakane, Takaya; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim; Braddock, Stephen R.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Palleschi, Antonio; Campeau, Philippe M.; Lee, Brendan H.L.; Pouponnot, Celio; Stella, Lorenzo; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Katsanis, Nicholas; Sol-Church, Katia; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors operate in developmental processes to mediate inductive events and cell competence, and perturbation of their function or regulation can dramatically affect morphogenesis, organogenesis, and growth. We report that a narrow spectrum of amino-acid substitutions within the transactivation domain of the v-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog (MAF), a leucine zipper-containing transcription factor of the AP1 superfamily, profoundly affect development. Seven different de novo missense mutations involving conserved residues of the four GSK3 phosphorylation motifs were identified in eight unrelated individuals. The distinctive clinical phenotype, for which we propose the eponym Aymé-Gripp syndrome, is not limited to lens and eye defects as previously reported for MAF/Maf loss of function but includes sensorineural deafness, intellectual disability, seizures, brachycephaly, distinctive flat facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, mammary gland hypoplasia, and reduced growth. Disease-causing mutations were demonstrated to impair proper MAF phosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, perturbed gene expression in primary skin fibroblasts, and induced neurodevelopmental defects in an in vivo model. Our findings nosologically and clinically delineate a previously poorly understood recognizable multisystem disorder, provide evidence for MAF governing a wider range of developmental programs than previously appreciated, and describe a novel instance of protein dosage effect severely perturbing development. PMID:25865493

  3. An ALS disease mutation in Cdc48/p97 impairs 20S proteasome binding and proteolytic communication.

    PubMed

    Barthelme, Dominik; Jauregui, Ruben; Sauer, Robert T

    2015-09-01

    Cdc48 (also known as p97 or VCP) is an essential and highly abundant, double-ring AAA+ ATPase, which is ubiquitous in archaea and eukaryotes. In archaea, Cdc48 ring hexamers play a direct role in quality control by unfolding and translocating protein substrates into the degradation chamber of the 20S proteasome. Whether Cdc48 and 20S cooperate directly in protein degradation in eukaryotic cells is unclear. Two regions of Cdc48 are important for 20S binding, the pore-2 loop at the bottom of the D2 AAA+ ring and a C-terminal tripeptide. Here, we identify an aspartic acid in the pore-2 loop as an important element in 20S recognition. Importantly, mutation of this aspartate in human Cdc48 has been linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In archaeal or human Cdc48 variants, we find that mutation of this pore-2 residue impairs 20S binding and proteolytic communication but does not affect the stability of the hexamer or rates of ATP hydrolysis and protein unfolding. These results suggest that human Cdc48 interacts functionally with the 20S proteasome.

  4. Homozygous NOTCH3 null mutation and impaired NOTCH3 signaling in recessive early-onset arteriopathy and cavitating leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pippucci, Tommaso; Maresca, Alessandra; Magini, Pamela; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Donadio, Vincenzo; Palombo, Flavia; Papa, Valentina; Incensi, Alex; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Preziuso, Carmela; Pisano, Annalinda; Ragno, Michele; Liguori, Rocco; Giordano, Carla; Tonon, Caterina; Lodi, Raffaele; Parmeggiani, Antonia; Carelli, Valerio; Seri, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling is essential for vascular physiology. Neomorphic heterozygous mutations in NOTCH3, one of the four human NOTCH receptors, cause cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). Hypomorphic heterozygous alleles have been occasionally described in association with a spectrum of cerebrovascular phenotypes overlapping CADASIL, but their pathogenic potential is unclear. We describe a patient with childhood-onset arteriopathy, cavitating leukoencephalopathy with cerebral white matter abnormalities presented as diffuse cavitations, multiple lacunar infarctions and disseminated microbleeds. We identified a novel homozygous c.C2898A (p.C966*) null mutation in NOTCH3 abolishing NOTCH3 expression and causing NOTCH3 signaling impairment. NOTCH3 targets acting in the regulation of arterial tone (KCNA5) or expressed in the vasculature (CDH6) were downregulated. Patient's vessels were characterized by smooth muscle degeneration as in CADASIL, but without deposition of granular osmiophilic material (GOM), the CADASIL hallmark. The heterozygous parents displayed similar but less dramatic trends in decrease in the expression of NOTCH3 and its targets, as well as in vessel degeneration. This study suggests a functional link between NOTCH3 deficiency and pathogenesis of vascular leukoencephalopathies. PMID:25870235

  5. Mutations Impairing GSK3-Mediated MAF Phosphorylation Cause Cataract, Deafness, Intellectual Disability, Seizures, and a Down Syndrome-like Facies.

    PubMed

    Niceta, Marcello; Stellacci, Emilia; Gripp, Karen W; Zampino, Giuseppe; Kousi, Maria; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Traversa, Alice; Ciolfi, Andrea; Stabley, Deborah; Bruselles, Alessandro; Caputo, Viviana; Cecchetti, Serena; Prudente, Sabrina; Fiorenza, Maria T; Boitani, Carla; Philip, Nicole; Niyazov, Dmitriy; Leoni, Chiara; Nakane, Takaya; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim; Braddock, Stephen R; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Palleschi, Antonio; Campeau, Philippe M; Lee, Brendan H L; Pouponnot, Celio; Stella, Lorenzo; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Katsanis, Nicholas; Sol-Church, Katia; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-05-07

    Transcription factors operate in developmental processes to mediate inductive events and cell competence, and perturbation of their function or regulation can dramatically affect morphogenesis, organogenesis, and growth. We report that a narrow spectrum of amino-acid substitutions within the transactivation domain of the v-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog (MAF), a leucine zipper-containing transcription factor of the AP1 superfamily, profoundly affect development. Seven different de novo missense mutations involving conserved residues of the four GSK3 phosphorylation motifs were identified in eight unrelated individuals. The distinctive clinical phenotype, for which we propose the eponym Aymé-Gripp syndrome, is not limited to lens and eye defects as previously reported for MAF/Maf loss of function but includes sensorineural deafness, intellectual disability, seizures, brachycephaly, distinctive flat facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, mammary gland hypoplasia, and reduced growth. Disease-causing mutations were demonstrated to impair proper MAF phosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, perturbed gene expression in primary skin fibroblasts, and induced neurodevelopmental defects in an in vivo model. Our findings nosologically and clinically delineate a previously poorly understood recognizable multisystem disorder, provide evidence for MAF governing a wider range of developmental programs than previously appreciated, and describe a novel instance of protein dosage effect severely perturbing development.

  6. A targeted mutation at the known collagenase cleavage site in mouse type I collagen impairs tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Degradation of type I collagen, the most abundant collagen, is initiated by collagenase cleavage at a highly conserved site between Gly775 and Ile776 of the alpha 1 (I) chain. Mutations at or around this site render type I collagen resistant to collagenase digestion in vitro. We show here that mice carrying a collagenase-resistant mutant Col1a-1 transgene die late in embryo-genesis, ascribable to overexpression of the transgene, since the same mutation introduced into the endogenous Col1a-1 gene by gene targeting permitted normal development of mutant mice to young adulthood. With increasing age, animals carrying the targeted mutation developed marked fibrosis of the dermis similar to that in human scleroderma. Postpartum involution of the uterus in the mutant mice was also impaired, with persistence of collagenous nodules in the uterine wall. Although type I collagen from the homozygous mutant mice was resistant to cleavage by human or rat fibroblast collagenases at the helical site, only the rat collagenase cleaved collagen trimers at an additional, novel site in the nonhelical N-telopeptide domain. Our results suggest that cleavage by murine collagenase at the N-telopeptide site could account for resorption of type I collagen during embryonic and early adult life. During intense collagen resorption, however, such as in the immediate postpartum uterus and in the dermis later in life, cleavage at the helical site is essential for normal collagen turnover. Thus, type I collagen is degraded by at least two differentially controlled mechanisms involving collagenases with distinct, but overlapping, substrate specificities. PMID:7790374

  7. Mutations in PGAP3 impair GPI-anchor maturation, causing a subtype of hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Malcolm F; Murakami, Yoshiko; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Daumer-Haas, Cornelia; Fischer, Björn; Hecht, Jochen; Keays, David A; Knight, Samantha J L; Kölsch, Uwe; Krüger, Ulrike; Leiz, Steffen; Maeda, Yusuke; Mitchell, Daphne; Mundlos, Stefan; Phillips, John A; Robinson, Peter N; Kini, Usha; Taylor, Jenny C; Horn, Denise; Kinoshita, Taroh; Krawitz, Peter M

    2014-02-06

    Glycosylphophatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins play important roles in many biological processes, and mutations affecting proteins involved in the synthesis of the GPI anchor are reported to cause a wide spectrum of intellectual disabilities (IDs) with characteristic additional phenotypic features. Here, we describe a total of five individuals (from three unrelated families) in whom we identified mutations in PGAP3, encoding a protein that is involved in GPI-anchor maturation. Three siblings in a consanguineous Pakistani family presented with profound developmental delay, severe ID, no speech, psychomotor delay, and postnatal microcephaly. A combination of autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a 13.8 Mb region harboring a homozygous c.275G>A (p.Gly92Asp) variant in PGAP3 region 17q11.2-q21.32. Subsequent testing showed elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a GPI-anchored enzyme, in all three affected children. In two unrelated individuals in a cohort with developmental delay, ID, and elevated ALP, we identified compound-heterozygous variants c.439dupC (p.Leu147Profs(∗)16) and c.914A>G (p.Asp305Gly) and homozygous variant c.314C>G (p.Pro105Arg). The 1 bp duplication causes a frameshift and nonsense-mediated decay. Further evidence supporting pathogenicity of the missense mutations c.275G>A, c.314C>G, and c.914A>G was provided by the absence of the variants from ethnically matched controls, phylogenetic conservation, and functional studies on Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. Taken together with recent data on PGAP2, these results confirm the importance of the later GPI-anchor remodelling steps for normal neuronal development. Impairment of PGAP3 causes a subtype of hyperphosphatasia with ID, a congenital disorder of glycosylation that is also referred to as Mabry syndrome.

  8. Calmodulin is essential for cardiac IKS channel gating and assembly: impaired function in long-QT mutations.

    PubMed

    Shamgar, Liora; Ma, Lijuan; Schmitt, Nicole; Haitin, Yoni; Peretz, Asher; Wiener, Reuven; Hirsch, Joel; Pongs, Olaf; Attali, Bernard

    2006-04-28

    The slow IKS K+ channel plays a major role in repolarizing the cardiac action potential and consists of the assembly of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes produce the long-QT syndrome, a life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia. Here, we show that long-QT mutations located in the KCNQ1 C terminus impair calmodulin (CaM) binding, which affects both channel gating and assembly. The mutations produce a voltage-dependent macroscopic inactivation and dramatically alter channel assembly. KCNE1 forms a ternary complex with wild-type KCNQ1 and Ca(2+)-CaM that prevents inactivation, facilitates channel assembly, and mediates a Ca(2+)-sensitive increase of IKS-current, with a considerable Ca(2+)-dependent left-shift of the voltage-dependence of activation. Coexpression of KCNQ1 or IKS channels with a Ca(2+)-insensitive CaM mutant markedly suppresses the currents and produces a right shift in the voltage-dependence of channel activation. KCNE1 association to KCNQ1 long-QT mutants significantly improves mutant channel expression and prevents macroscopic inactivation. However, the marked right shift in channel activation and the subsequent decrease in current amplitude cannot restore normal levels of IKS channel activity. Our data indicate that in healthy individuals, CaM binding to KCNQ1 is essential for correct channel folding and assembly and for conferring Ca(2+)-sensitive IKS-current stimulation, which increases the cardiac repolarization reserve and hence prevents the risk of ventricular arrhythmias.

  9. Simultaneous impairment of neuronal and metabolic function of mutated gephyrin in a patient with epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dejanovic, Borislav; Djémié, Tania; Grünewald, Nora; Suls, Arvid; Kress, Vanessa; Hetsch, Florian; Craiu, Dana; Zemel, Matthew; Gormley, Padhraig; Lal, Dennis; Myers, Candace T; Mefford, Heather C; Palotie, Aarno; Helbig, Ingo; Meier, Jochen C; De Jonghe, Peter; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Schwarz, Guenter

    2015-12-01

    Synaptic inhibition is essential for shaping the dynamics of neuronal networks, and aberrant inhibition plays an important role in neurological disorders. Gephyrin is a central player at inhibitory postsynapses, directly binds and organizes GABAA and glycine receptors (GABAARs and GlyRs), and is thereby indispensable for normal inhibitory neurotransmission. Additionally, gephyrin catalyzes the synthesis of the molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) in peripheral tissue. We identified a de novo missense mutation (G375D) in the gephyrin gene (GPHN) in a patient with epileptic encephalopathy resembling Dravet syndrome. Although stably expressed and correctly folded, gephyrin-G375D was non-synaptically localized in neurons and acted dominant-negatively on the clustering of wild-type gephyrin leading to a marked decrease in GABAAR surface expression and GABAergic signaling. We identified a decreased binding affinity between gephyrin-G375D and the receptors, suggesting that Gly375 is essential for gephyrin-receptor complex formation. Surprisingly, gephyrin-G375D was also unable to synthesize MoCo and activate MoCo-dependent enzymes. Thus, we describe a missense mutation that affects both functions of gephyrin and suggest that the identified defect at GABAergic synapses is the mechanism underlying the patient's severe phenotype.

  10. Violacein induces death of RAS-mutated metastatic melanoma by impairing autophagy process.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Paola R; Rocha-Brito, Karin J P; Fernandes, Maruska R N; Abrantes, Julia L; Durán, Nelson; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen V

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of metastatic melanoma still remains a challenge, since in advanced stage it is refractory to conventional treatments. Most patients with melanoma have either B-RAF or N-RAS mutations, and these oncogenes lead to activation of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK and AKT signal pathway, keeping active the proliferation and survival pathways in the cell. Therefore, the identification of small molecules that block metastatic cell proliferation and induce cell death is needed. Violacein, a pigment produced by Chromobacterium violaceum found in Amazon River, has been used by our group as a biotool for scrutinizing signaling pathways associated with proliferation, survival, aggressiveness, and resistance of cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that violacein diminished the viability of RAS- and RAF-mutated melanoma cells (IC50 value ∼500 nM), and more important, this effect was not abolished after treatment medium removal. Furthermore, violacein was able to reduce significantly the invasion capacity of metastatic melanoma cells in 3D culture. In the molecular context, we have shown for the first time that violacein causes a strong drop on histone deacetylase 6 expression, a proliferating activator, in melanoma cells. Besides, an inhibition of AXL and AKT was detected. All these molecular events propitiate an inhibition of autophagy, and consequently, melanoma cell death by apoptosis.

  11. Point mutation impairs centromeric CENH3 loading and induces haploid plants

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Ashtiyani, Raheleh; Ishii, Takayoshi; Niessen, Markus; Stein, Nils; Heckmann, Stefan; Gurushidze, Maia; Banaei-Moghaddam, Ali Mohammad; Fuchs, Jörg; Schubert, Veit; Koch, Kerstin; Weiss, Oda; Demidov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Klaus; Kumlehn, Jochen; Houben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal position of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENH3 (also called “CENP-A”) is the assembly site for the kinetochore complex of active centromeres. Any error in transcription, translation, modification, or incorporation can affect the ability to assemble intact CENH3 chromatin and can cause centromere inactivation [Allshire RC, Karpen GH (2008) Nat Rev Genet 9 (12):923–937]. Here we show that a single-point amino acid exchange in the centromere-targeting domain of CENH3 leads to reduced centromere loading of CENH3 in barley, sugar beet, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Haploids were obtained after cenh3 L130F-complemented cenh3-null mutant plants were crossed with wild-type A. thaliana. In contrast, in a noncompeting situation (i.e., centromeres possessing only mutated or only wild-type CENH3), no uniparental chromosome elimination occurs during early embryogenesis. The high degree of evolutionary conservation of the identified mutation site offers promising opportunities for application in a wide range of crop species in which haploid technology is of interest. PMID:26294252

  12. Point mutation impairs centromeric CENH3 loading and induces haploid plants.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Ashtiyani, Raheleh; Ishii, Takayoshi; Niessen, Markus; Stein, Nils; Heckmann, Stefan; Gurushidze, Maia; Banaei-Moghaddam, Ali Mohammad; Fuchs, Jörg; Schubert, Veit; Koch, Kerstin; Weiss, Oda; Demidov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Klaus; Kumlehn, Jochen; Houben, Andreas

    2015-09-08

    The chromosomal position of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENH3 (also called "CENP-A") is the assembly site for the kinetochore complex of active centromeres. Any error in transcription, translation, modification, or incorporation can affect the ability to assemble intact CENH3 chromatin and can cause centromere inactivation [Allshire RC, Karpen GH (2008) Nat Rev Genet 9 (12):923-937]. Here we show that a single-point amino acid exchange in the centromere-targeting domain of CENH3 leads to reduced centromere loading of CENH3 in barley, sugar beet, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Haploids were obtained after cenh3 L130F-complemented cenh3-null mutant plants were crossed with wild-type A. thaliana. In contrast, in a noncompeting situation (i.e., centromeres possessing only mutated or only wild-type CENH3), no uniparental chromosome elimination occurs during early embryogenesis. The high degree of evolutionary conservation of the identified mutation site offers promising opportunities for application in a wide range of crop species in which haploid technology is of interest.

  13. Mutations that impair a posttranscriptional step in expression of HLA-A and -B antigens.

    PubMed Central

    DeMars, R; Rudersdorf, R; Chang, C; Petersen, J; Strandtmann, J; Korn, N; Sidwell, B; Orr, H T

    1985-01-01

    Mutations can interfere with posttranscriptional expression of the HLA-A and -B genes. B-lymphoblastoid cells that contain one copy of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) were subjected to mutagenesis and immunoselection for MHC antigen-loss mutants. Some mutations partially reduced surface expression of HLA-A and eliminated HLA-B expression concurrently, although the HLA-A and -B genes were present and transcribed. Antigen expression was fully restored in hybrids of these mutants with other B-lymphoblastoid cells. Therefore, normal cell surface expression of the HLA-A and -B antigens on B lymphoblasts requires (i) execution of at least one trans-active step in the production of the antigens after transcription of the HLA-A and -B genes or (ii) association of the class I antigens with other molecules. DNA analysis of one mutant suggests the possibility that a locus required for the normal expression of the HLA-A and -B antigens is located between the MHC complement genes and the HLA-DP alpha II locus. Images PMID:3906658

  14. Tau proteins harboring neurodegeneration-linked mutations impair kinesin translocation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dezhi; LaPointe, Nichole E; Guzman, Elmer; Pessino, Veronica; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C; Valentine, Megan T

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that mutant tau proteins that cause neurodegeneration and dementia differentially alter kinesin translocation along microtubules (MTs) relative to normal tau in vitro. We employed complementary in vitro motility assays using purified recombinant kinesin, purified recombinant tau, and purified bovine brain α:β tubulin to isolate interactions among these components without any contribution by cellular regulatory mechanisms. We found that kinesin translocates slower along MTs assembled by any of three independent tau mutants (4-repeat P301L tau, 4-repeat ΔN296 tau, and 4-repeat R406W tau) relative to its translocation rate along MTs assembled by normal, 4-repeat wild type (WT) tau. Moreover, the R406W mutation exhibited isoform specific effects; while kinesin translocation along 4-repeat R406W tau assembled MTs is slower than along MTs assembled by 4-repeat WT tau, the R406W mutation had no effect in the 3-repeat tau context. These data provide strong support for the notion that aberrant modulation of kinesin translocation is a component of tau-mediated neuronal cell death and dementia. Finally, we showed that assembling MTs with taxol before coating them with mutant tau obscured effects of the mutant tau that were readily apparent using more physiologically relevant MTs assembled with tau alone, raising important issues regarding the use of taxol as an experimental reagent and novel insights into therapeutic mechanisms of taxol action.

  15. Asp120Asn mutation impairs the catalytic activity of NDM-1 metallo-β-lactamase: experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiao; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Tong; Zhou, Dandan; Zhang, Fang; Lao, Xingzhen; Zheng, Heng

    2014-04-14

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) has attracted extensive attention in recent years for its high activity for hydrolyzing almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Like other metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs), NDM-1 features an invariant Asp120 that ligates the zinc ion (ZN2) in the active site. Previous studies showed that substitutions of Asp120 with residues such as Ala, Ser, Asn and Glu dramatically impaired the MβL (BcII, IMP-1, L1) activity, but no consensus about the exact role of Asp120 has reached. Here we constructed D120N mutant of NDM-1 by site-directed mutagenesis. The replacement of Asp120 with Asn, which has much weaker metal ligating capabilities than Asp, severely impaired the lactamase activity without abolishing the ZN2 site. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the ZN1-ZN2 distance increased because of mutation, leading to a rearrangement of the active site, including the bridging OH(-). Thereby, the Mulliken charges of ZN1 and ZN2 redistributed, especially for ZN2, which might be the major cause of the impaired activity. Reducing the point charges of Asp120 carboxyl oxygens weakened the ionic interactions between Asp120 and ZN2, and the positions of the zinc ions were also changed as a result. It is proposed that Asp120 acts as a strong ZN2 ligand, positioning ZN2 for catalytically important interactions with the substrate, stabilizing the negatively charged amide nitrogen of the hydrolyzed intermediate, and more importantly, orienting the ZN-bound OH(-) for nucleophilic attacks and protonation. These functions are of general importance for catalyzing β-lactam antibiotics by NDM-1 as well as other MβLs.

  16. The murine equivalent of the A181E TACI mutation associated with common variable immunodeficiency severely impairs B-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John J.; Rauter, Ingrid; Garibyan, Lilit; Ozcan, Esra; Sannikova, Tatyana; Dillon, Stacey R.; Cruz, Anthony C.; Siegel, Richard M.; Bram, Richard; Jabara, Haifa

    2009-01-01

    TNFRSF13B, which encodes TACI (transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor), is mutated in 10% of patients with common variable immune deficiency (CVID). One of the 2 most common TACI mutations in CVID, A181E, introduces a negative charge into the transmembrane domain. To define the consequence of the A181E mutation on TACI function, we studied the effect of its murine equivalent, mTACI A144E, on TACI signaling in transfected cells and on TACI function in transgenic mice. The mTACI A144E mutant, like its human TACI A181E counterpart, was expressed on the surface of 293T transfectants and was able to bind ligand, but exhibited impaired constitutive and ligand-induced NFκB signaling. In addition, constitutive and ligand-induced clustering of the intracellular domain was deficient for A144E as measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Transgenic mice expressing the A144E mutant on TACI−/− background had low serum IgA levels and significantly impaired antibody responses to the type II T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll. B cells from A144E transgenic mice were impaired in their capacity to proliferate and secrete IgG1 and IgA in response to TACI ligation. These results suggest that mTACI A144E mutation and its human counterpart, A181E, disrupt TACI signaling and impair TACI-dependent B-cell functions. PMID:19605846

  17. IDH mutation impairs histone demethylation and results in a block to cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; Ward, Patrick S; Kapoor, Gurpreet S; Rohle, Dan; Turcan, Sevin; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Edwards, Christopher R; Khanin, Raya; Figueroa, Maria E; Melnick, Ari; Wellen, Kathryn E; O'Rourke, Donald M; Berger, Shelley L; Chan, Timothy A; Levine, Ross L; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Thompson, Craig B

    2012-02-15

    Recurrent mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 have been identified in gliomas, acute myeloid leukaemias (AML) and chondrosarcomas, and share a novel enzymatic property of producing 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) from α-ketoglutarate. Here we report that 2HG-producing IDH mutants can prevent the histone demethylation that is required for lineage-specific progenitor cells to differentiate into terminally differentiated cells. In tumour samples from glioma patients, IDH mutations were associated with a distinct gene expression profile enriched for genes expressed in neural progenitor cells, and this was associated with increased histone methylation. To test whether the ability of IDH mutants to promote histone methylation contributes to a block in cell differentiation in non-transformed cells, we tested the effect of neomorphic IDH mutants on adipocyte differentiation in vitro. Introduction of either mutant IDH or cell-permeable 2HG was associated with repression of the inducible expression of lineage-specific differentiation genes and a block to differentiation. This correlated with a significant increase in repressive histone methylation marks without observable changes in promoter DNA methylation. Gliomas were found to have elevated levels of similar histone repressive marks. Stable transfection of a 2HG-producing mutant IDH into immortalized astrocytes resulted in progressive accumulation of histone methylation. Of the marks examined, increased H3K9 methylation reproducibly preceded a rise in DNA methylation as cells were passaged in culture. Furthermore, we found that the 2HG-inhibitable H3K9 demethylase KDM4C was induced during adipocyte differentiation, and that RNA-interference suppression of KDM4C was sufficient to block differentiation. Together these data demonstrate that 2HG can inhibit histone demethylation and that inhibition of histone demethylation can be sufficient to block the differentiation of non-transformed cells.

  18. Prevalence and Evolutionary Origins of the del(GJB6-D13S1830) Mutation in the DFNB1 Locus in Hearing-Impaired Subjects: a Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Ignacio; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A.; del Castillo, Francisco J.; Brownstein, Zippora; Marlin, Sandrine; Adina, Quint; Cockburn, David J.; Pandya, Arti; Siemering, Kirby R.; Chamberlin, G. Parker; Ballana, Ester; Wuyts, Wim; Maciel-Guerra, Andréa Trevas; Álvarez, Araceli; Villamar, Manuela; Shohat, Mordechai; Abeliovich, Dvorah; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; Estivill, Xavier; Gasparini, Paolo; Hutchin, Tim; Nance, Walter E.; Sartorato, Edi L.; Smith, Richard J. H.; Van Camp, Guy; Avraham, Karen B.; Petit, Christine; Moreno, Felipe

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in GJB2, the gene encoding connexin-26 at the DFNB1 locus on 13q12, are found in as many as 50% of subjects with autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic prelingual hearing impairment. However, genetic diagnosis is complicated by the fact that 10%–50% of affected subjects with GJB2 mutations carry only one mutant allele. Recently, a deletion truncating the GJB6 gene (encoding connexin-30), near GJB2 on 13q12, was shown to be the accompanying mutation in ∼50% of these deaf GJB2 heterozygotes in a cohort of Spanish patients, thus becoming second only to 35delG at GJB2 as the most frequent mutation causing prelingual hearing impairment in Spain. Here, we present data from a multicenter study in nine countries that shows that the deletion is present in most of the screened populations, with higher frequencies in France, Spain, and Israel, where the percentages of unexplained GJB2 heterozygotes fell to 16.0%–20.9% after screening for the del(GJB6-D13S1830) mutation. Our results also suggest that additional mutations remain to be identified, either in DFNB1 or in other unlinked genes involved in epistatic interactions with GJB2. Analysis of haplotypes associated with the deletion revealed a founder effect in Ashkenazi Jews and also suggested a common founder for countries in Western Europe. These results have important implications for the diagnosis and counseling of families with DFNB1 deafness. PMID:14571368

  19. Mutations of Cytosolic Loop Residues Impair Assembly and Maturation of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Jayanta; Kuryatov, Alexander; Moss, Stephen J.; Lindstrom, Jon M.; Anand, Rene

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate early events in the biogenesis of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 AChR) are not well understood. Data presented here show that single amino acid mutations in the cytoplasmic loop of the α7 AChR, between position 335 and 343, abolish or attenuate expression of mature pentameric α7 AChRs in both human embryonic kidney tsA201 (HEK) and neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Although the number of mature α7 AChRs is increased significantly in the presence of the chaperone protein RIC-3 in HEK cells, sucrose gradient sedimentation reveals that the vast majority of α7 subunits are aggregated or improperly assembled. Transfection of α7 AChRs in SH-SY5Y cells, which endogenously express the α7 AChR, results in a much larger fraction of subunits assembled into mature AChRs. Thus, efficient assembly of α7 AChRs is influenced by several regions of the large cytoplasmic domain, as well perhaps by other parts of its structure, and requires as yet unknown factors not required by other AChR subtypes. PMID:19627445

  20. Impaired p32 regulation caused by the lymphoma-prone RECQ4 mutation drives mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiin-Tarng; Xu, Xiaohua; Alontaga, Aileen Y.; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Yilun

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes genes important for ATP biogenesis. Therefore, changes in mtDNA copy number will have profound consequences on cell survival and proliferation. RECQ4 DNA helicase plays important roles in both nuclear and mtDNA synthesis. However, the mechanism that balances the distribution of RECQ4 in the nucleus and mitochondria is unknown. Here, we show that RECQ4 forms protein complexes with Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A), nucleophosmin (NPM) and mitochondrial p32 in different cellular compartments. Critically, the interaction with p32 negatively controls the transport of both RECQ4 and its chromatin-associated replication factor MCM10 from the nucleus to mitochondria. Amino acids (Ala420-Ala463), which are deleted in the most common cancer-induced RECQ4 mutation, are required for the interaction with p32. Hence, this RECQ4 mutant, which is no longer regulated by p32 and is enriched in the mitochondria, interacts with the mitochondrial replication helicase PEO1 and induces abnormally high levels of mtDNA synthesis. PMID:24746816

  1. Prosaposin facilitates sortilin-independent lysosomal trafficking of progranulin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolai; Sun, Lirong; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco; Qi, Xiaoyang; Brown, William J; Smolka, Marcus B; Sun, Ying; Hu, Fenghua

    2015-09-14

    Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene have been linked to two distinct neurodegenerative diseases, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Accumulating evidence suggests a critical role of PGRN in lysosomes. However, how PGRN is trafficked to lysosomes is still not clear. Here we report a novel pathway for lysosomal delivery of PGRN. We found that prosaposin (PSAP) interacts with PGRN and facilitates its lysosomal targeting in both biosynthetic and endocytic pathways via the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor and low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1. PSAP deficiency in mice leads to severe PGRN trafficking defects and a drastic increase in serum PGRN levels. We further showed that this PSAP pathway is independent of, but complementary to, the previously identified PGRN lysosomal trafficking mediated by sortilin. Collectively, our results provide new understanding on PGRN trafficking and shed light on the molecular mechanisms behind FTLD and NCL caused by PGRN mutations.

  2. Homozygosity for the V37I GJB2 mutation in fifteen probands with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing impairment: further confirmation of pathogenicity and haplotype analysis in Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Emily; Francey, Lauren; Tsai, Ellen A; Berman, Micah; Zhao, Yaru; Fetting, Heather; Kaur, Maninder; Deardorff, Matthew A; Wilkens, Alisha; Clark, Dinah; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rehm, Heidi L; Krantz, Ian D

    2013-09-01

    Hearing impairment affects 1 in 650 newborns, making it the most common congenital sensory impairment. Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing impairment (ARNSHI) comprises 80% of familial hearing impairment cases. Mutations in GJB2 account for a significant number of ARNSHI (and up to 50% of documented recessive (e.g., more than 1 affected sibling) hearing impairment in some populations). Mutations in the GJB2 gene are amongst the most common causes of hearing impairment in populations of various ethnic backgrounds. Two mutations of this gene, 35delG and 167delT, account for the majority of reported mutations in Caucasian populations, especially those of Mediterranean and Ashkenazi Jewish background. The 235delC mutation is most prevalent in East Asian populations. Some mutations are of less well-characterized significance. The V37I missense mutation, common in Asian populations, was initially described as a polymorphism and later as a potentially pathogenic mutation. We report here on 15 unrelated individuals with ARNSHI and homozygosity for the V37I GJB2 missense mutation. Nine individuals are of Chinese ancestry, two are of unspecified Asian descent, one is of Japanese descent, one individual is of Vietnamese ancestry, one of Philippine background and one of Italian and Cuban/Caucasian background. Homozygosity for the V37I GJB2 mutation may be a more common pathogenic missense mutation in Asian populations, resulting in mild to moderate sensorineural hearing impairment. We report a presumed haplotype block specific to East Asian individuals with the V37I mutation encompassing the GJB2 gene that may account for the high prevalence in East Asian populations.

  3. [The mutation spectrum of the GJB2 gene in Belarussian patients with hearing loss. Results of pilot genetic screening of hearing impairment in newborns].

    PubMed

    Bliznets, E A; Marcul', D N; Khorov, O G; Markova, T G; Poliakov, A V

    2014-02-01

    A total of 111 unrelated probands and their 8 sibs from Grodno oblast (Belarus) with bilateral isolated sensorineural hearing impairment were studied for the presence of mutations in the connexin 26--GJB2gene. Mutations were detected in 51 probands (46% of the sample). A significantly higher frequency of the GJB2gene mutations was observed in familial cases of the disease with the autosomal recessive type of inheritance (in 78% of families). Detected peculiarities of the GJB2 gene mutation spectrum demonstrated that use of the algorithm, which was developed for Russian patients, is optimal for the molecular study of patients from Be- larus. In the sample of patients with hearing loss, the highest (among other similar samples studied in the world) allele frequency of c.313_326de114 mutation (7% out of all pathological GJB2 alleles) was registered; Polish origin of this deletion was suggested. It was demonstrated that detection of the GJB2 gene mutation on only one patient's chromosome is insufficient to confirm a molecular genetic diagnosis of hearing loss of the DFNB1 genetic type (autosomal recessive hearing loss caused by the GJB2 gene mutations). Pilot screening in the presence of GJB2 gene mutations in newborns from Grodno oblast was conducted. The material from 235 children was studied during the screening; nine heterozygous carriers of the mutation were found. The c.35delG mutation was detected in a homozygous state in a single newborn (hearing loss of moderate severity was subsequently audiologically confirmed in this child).

  4. Correspondence regarding Ballana et al., "Mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations affect RNA secondary structure and lead to variable penetrance in hearing impairment".

    PubMed

    Abreu-Silva, R S; Batissoco, A C; Lezirovitz, K; Romanos, J; Rincon, D; Auricchio, M T B M; Otto, P A; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2006-05-12

    Ballana et al. [E. Ballana, E. Morales, R. Rabionet, B. Montserrat, M. Ventayol, O. Bravo, P. Gasparini, X. Estivill, Mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations affect RNA secondary structure and lead to variable penetrance in hearing impairment, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 341 (2006) 950-957] detected a T1291C mutation segregating in a Cuban pedigree with hearing impairment. They interpreted it as probably pathogenic, based on family history, RNA conformation prediction and its absence in a control group of 95 Spanish subjects. We screened a sample of 203 deaf subjects and 300 hearing controls (110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians") for the mitochondrial mutations A1555G and T1291C. Five deaf subjects had the T1291C substitution, three isolated cases and two familial cases. In the latter, deafness was paternally inherited or segregated with the A1555G mutation. This doesn't support the hypothesis of T1291C mutation being pathogenic. Two "African-Brazilian" controls also had the T1291C substitution. Six of the seven T1291C-carriers (five deaf and two controls) had mitochondrial DNA of African origin, belonging to macrohaplogroup L1/L2. Therefore, these data point to T1291C substitution as most probably an African non-pathogenic polymorphism.

  5. Disease-associated missense mutations in the EVH1 domain disrupt intrinsic WASp function causing dysregulated actin dynamics and impaired dendritic cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Metelo, Joao; Bouma, Gerben; Moulding, Dale; Fritzsche, Marco; Vernay, Bertrand; Charras, Guillaume; Cory, Giles O. C.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Burns, Siobhan O.

    2013-01-01

    Wiskott Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-linked immunodeficiency, results from loss-of-function mutations in the human hematopoietic cytoskeletal regulator gene WAS. Many missense mutations in the Ena Vasp homology1 (EVH1) domain preserve low-level WAS protein (WASp) expression and confer a milder clinical phenotype. Although disrupted binding to WASp-interacting protein (WIP) leads to enhanced WASp degradation in vivo, the intrinsic function of EVH1-mutated WASp is poorly understood. In the present study, we show that, despite mediating enhanced actin polymerization compared with wild-type WASp in vitro, EVH1 missense mutated proteins did not support full biologic function in cells, even when levels were restored by forced overexpression. Podosome assembly was aberrant and associated with dysregulated lamellipodia formation and impaired persistence of migration. At sites of residual podosome-associated actin polymerization, localization of EVH1-mutated proteins was preserved even after deletion of the entire domain, implying that WIP-WASp complex formation is not absolutely required for WASp localization. However, retention of mutant proteins in podosomes was significantly impaired and associated with reduced levels of WASp tyrosine phosphorylation. Our results indicate that the EVH1 domain is important not only for WASp stability, but also for intrinsic biologic activity in vivo. PMID:23160469

  6. The iodide-transport-defect-causing mutation R124H: a δ-amino group at position 124 is critical for maturation and trafficking of the Na+/I- symporter.

    PubMed

    Paroder, Viktoriya; Nicola, Juan P; Ginter, Christopher S; Carrasco, Nancy

    2013-08-01

    Na(+)/I(-) symporter (NIS)-mediated active accumulation of I(-) in thyrocytes is a key step in the biosynthesis of the iodine-containing thyroid hormones T3 and T4. Several NIS mutants have been identified as a cause of congenital I(-) transport defect (ITD), and their investigation has yielded valuable mechanistic information on NIS. Here we report novel findings derived from the thorough characterization of the ITD-causing mutation R124H, located in the second intracellular loop (IL-2). R124H NIS is incompletely glycosylated and colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein markers. As a result, R124H NIS is not targeted to the plasma membrane and therefore does not mediate any I(-) transport in transfected COS-7 cells. Strikingly, however, the mutant is intrinsically active, as revealed by its ability to mediate I(-) transport in membrane vesicles. Of all the amino acid substitutions we carried out at position 124 (K, D, E, A, W, N and Q), only Gln restored targeting of NIS to the plasma membrane and NIS activity, suggesting a key structural role for the δ-amino group of R124 in the transporter's maturation and cell surface targeting. Using our NIS homology model based on the structure of the Vibrio parahaemolyticus Na(+)/galactose symporter, we propose an interaction between the δ-amino group of either R or Q124 and the thiol group of C440, located in IL-6. We conclude that the interaction between IL-2 and IL-6 is critical for the local folding required for NIS maturation and plasma membrane trafficking.

  7. Disrupting vesicular trafficking at the endosome attenuates transcriptional activation by Gcn4.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Gaur, Naseem A; Hasek, Jiri; Kim, Soon-ja; Qiu, Hongfang; Swanson, Mark J; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2008-11-01

    The late endosome (MVB) plays a key role in coordinating vesicular transport of proteins between the Golgi complex, vacuole/lysosome, and plasma membrane. We found that deleting multiple genes involved in vesicle fusion at the MVB (class C/D vps mutations) impairs transcriptional activation by Gcn4, a global regulator of amino acid biosynthetic genes, by decreasing the ability of chromatin-bound Gcn4 to stimulate preinitiation complex assembly at the promoter. The functions of hybrid activators with Gal4 or VP16 activation domains are diminished in class D mutants as well, suggesting a broader defect in activation. Class E vps mutations, which impair protein sorting at the MVB, also decrease activation by Gcn4, provided they elicit rapid proteolysis of MVB cargo proteins in the aberrant late endosome. By contrast, specifically impairing endocytic trafficking from the plasma membrane, or vesicular transport to the vacuole, has a smaller effect on Gcn4 function. Thus, it appears that decreasing cargo proteins in the MVB through impaired delivery or enhanced degradation, and not merely the failure to transport cargo properly to the vacuole or downregulate plasma membrane proteins by endocytosis, is required to attenuate substantially transcriptional activation by Gcn4.

  8. ESCRT-III-Associated Protein ALIX Mediates High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Trafficking to Maintain Phosphate Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-López, Ximena; Cuyas, Laura; Marín, Elena; Irigoyen, María Luisa; Gil, Erica; Puga, María Isabel; Bligny, Richard; Nussaume, Laurent; Geldner, Niko; Paz-Ares, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the release of their cargoes into the vacuolar lumen, sorting endosomes mature into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) through the action of ENDOSOMAL COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT) protein complexes. MVB-mediated sorting of high-affinity phosphate transporters (PHT1) to the vacuole limits their plasma membrane levels under phosphate-sufficient conditions, a process that allows plants to maintain phosphate homeostasis. Here, we describe ALIX, a cytosolic protein that associates with MVB by interacting with ESCRT-III subunit SNF7 and mediates PHT1;1 trafficking to the vacuole in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that the partial loss-of-function mutant alix-1 displays reduced vacuolar degradation of PHT1;1. ALIX derivatives containing the alix-1 mutation showed reduced interaction with SNF7, providing a simple molecular explanation for impaired cargo trafficking in alix-1 mutants. In fact, the alix-1 mutation also hampered vacuolar sorting of the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1. We also show that alix-1 displays altered vacuole morphogenesis, implying a new role for ALIX proteins in vacuolar biogenesis, likely acting as part of ESCRT-III complexes. In line with a presumed broad target spectrum, the alix-1 mutation is pleiotropic, leading to reduced plant growth and late flowering, with stronger alix mutations being lethal, indicating that ALIX participates in diverse processes in plants essential for their life. PMID:26342016

  9. Mutation of histidine residues in CP47 leads to destabilization of the photosystem II complex and to impairment of light energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Shen, G; Eaton-Rye, J J; Vermaas, W F

    1993-05-18

    Site-directed mutagenesis has been used to change conserved histidine residues in hydrophobic regions of the photosystem II chlorophyll-binding protein CP47 in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Nine mutants with one, four mutants with two, and four mutants with three His mutations in CP47 have been generated and characterized. Mutation of any one of seven different His residues to Tyr leads to slower photoautotrophic growth and apparent destabilization of the PS II complex. Mutations introduced into multiple His residues in one mutant exhibited a cumulative effect. Replacing His by Asn leads to a much smaller effect than observed upon mutation to Tyr. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the mutated His residues are chlorophyll ligands: Asn can substitute as chlorophyll ligand, whereas Tyr cannot. Further evidence supporting a role of the mutated His residues in chlorophyll binding comes from measurements of the light intensity needed to half-saturate oxygen evolution. All His mutants with impaired PS II function needed higher light intensities for half-saturation than wild type. A possible explanation for this decrease in antenna efficiency in the mutants is a loss of the Mg in the chlorophyll due to a loss of the fifth ligand, and thus the formation of a pheophytin molecule in the antenna. We conclude that conserved His residues in hydrophobic regions of CP47 indeed are chlorophyll ligands and that these ligands are important for PS II stability as well as efficient antenna function.

  10. Effects of hemochromatosis and transferrin gene mutations on peripheral iron dyshomeostasis in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, S.; Ventriglia, M.; Simonelli, I.; Spalletta, G.; Bucossi, S.; Siotto, M.; Assogna, F.; Melgari, J. M.; Vernieri, F.; Squitti, R.

    2013-01-01

    Deregulation of iron metabolism has been observed in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. We have carried out a molecular analysis investigating the interaction between iron specific gene variants [transferrin (TF, P589S), hemochromatosis (HFE) C282Y and (H63D)], iron biochemical variables [iron, Tf, ceruloplasmin (Cp), Cp:Tf ratio and % of Tf saturation (% Tf-sat)] and apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene variants in 139 Alzheimer's disease (AD), 27 Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), 78 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and 139 healthy controls to investigate mechanisms of iron regulation or toxicity. No difference in genetic variant distributions between patients and controls was found in our Italian sample, but the stratification for the APOEε4 allele revealed that among the APOEε4 carriers was higher the frequency of those carriers of at least a mutated TF P589S allele. Decreased Tf in both AD and MCI and increased Cp:Tf ratio in AD vs. controls were detected. A multinomial logistic regression model revealed that increased iron and Cp:Tf ratio and being man instead of woman increased the risk of having PD, that increased values of Cp:Tf ratio corresponded to a 4-fold increase of the relative risk of having MCI, while higher Cp levels were protective for PD and MCI. Our study has some limitations: the small size of the samples, one ethnic group considered, the rarity of some alleles which prevent the statistical power of some genetic analysis. Even though they need confirmation in larger cohorts, our data suggest the hypothesis that deregulation of iron metabolism, in addition to other factors, has some effect on the PD disease risk. PMID:23935582

  11. Postnatal microcephaly and pain insensitivity due to a de novo heterozygous DNM1L mutation causing impaired mitochondrial fission and function.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, Ruth; Douiev, Liza; Edvardson, Simon; Shaag, Avraham; Tamimi, Khaled; Soiferman, Devorah; Meiner, Vardiella; Saada, Ann

    2016-06-01

    An emerging class of mitochondrial disorders is caused by mutations in nuclear genes affecting mitochondrial dynamics and function. One of these is the DNM1L gene encoding the dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), which is pivotal in the mitochondrial fission process. Here, we describe a patient with a novel dominant-negative, de novo DNM1L mutation, which expands the clinical spectrum. The patient reported here exhibits a chronic neurological disorder, characterized by postnatal microcephaly, developmental delay, and pain insensitivity. Muscle biopsy disclosed decreased respiratory chain complex IV activity. Exome sequencing showed a de novo heterozygous c.1084G>A (p.G362S) mutation. Subsequent studies of patient skin fibroblasts showed markedly impaired mitochondrial fission and a partial respiratory chain defect while peroxisomal morphology remained intact. Human foreskin fibroblasts over-expressing the mutant DNM1L gene displayed aberrant mitochondrial morphology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A selective histone deacetylase-6 inhibitor improves BDNF trafficking in hippocampal neurons from Mecp2 knockout mice: implications for Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the transcriptional modulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). One of the most prominent gene targets of MeCP2 is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf), a potent modulator of activity-dependent synaptic development, function and plasticity. Dysfunctional BDNF signaling has been demonstrated in several pathophysiological mechanisms of RTT disease progression. To evaluate whether the dynamics of BDNF trafficking is affected by Mecp2 deletion, we analyzed movements of BDNF tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in cultured hippocampal neurons by time-lapse fluorescence imaging. We found that both anterograde and retrograde vesicular trafficking of BDNF-YFP are significantly impaired in Mecp2 knockout hippocampal neurons. Selective inhibitors of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) show neuroprotective effects in neurodegenerative diseases and stimulate microtubule-dependent vesicular trafficking of BDNF-containing dense core vesicles. Here, we show that the selective HDAC6 inhibitor Tubastatin-A increased the velocity of BDNF-YFP vesicles in Mecp2 knockout neurons in both directions by increasing α–tubulin acetylation. Tubastatin-A also restored activity-dependent BDNF release from Mecp2 knockout neurons to levels comparable to those shown by wildtype neurons. These findings demonstrate that a selective HDAC6 inhibitor is a potential pharmacological strategy to reverse cellular and synaptic impairments in RTT resulting from impaired BDNF signaling. PMID:24639629

  13. Mutations in the amino-terminal domain of the human androgen receptor may be associated with partial androgen insensitivity and impaired transactivation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Holterhus, P-M; Werner, R; Struve, D; Hauffa, B P; Schroeder, C; Hiort, O

    2005-09-01

    The majority of genetic variations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene are point mutations leading to impairment of the DNA- or hormone-binding domains. The N-terminus encoded by the first exon of the AR-gene usually harbors disruptive mutations associated with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) while missense mutations related with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) are seemingly rare. We present a 46,XY male with scrotal hypospadias in whom we detected a S432 F point mutation within the N-terminus. Transient transfections of an AR expression plasmid carrying the S432 F mutation using Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells revealed a significant partial reduction in transactivation of the co-transfected androgen responsive (ARE) (2)TATA luciferase reporter gene thus confirming PAIS. In two further 46, XY patients with slight to moderate virilization defects, we detected an S411 N mutation, and a 9 base pair deletion leading to the loss of amino acids 409 to 411 (L-A-S), respectively. These mutations did not compromise AR-function under the chosen experimental settings. The S432 F-patient supports particular significance of the AR-N-terminus for mild forms of AIS while the functional role of the two further mutations remains unclear. The N-terminus is a species-specific AR-domain possibly also involved in contributing to target tissue selectivity of AR-actions via mediating co-regulator interactions. Therefore, mild molecular defects of the AR-N-terminus may not necessarily inhibit general transactivation properties using currently established reporter gene models.

  14. Prevalence of the A1555G (12S rRNA) and tRNASer(UCN) mitochondrial mutations in hearing-impaired Brazilian patients.

    PubMed

    Abreu-Silva, R S; Lezirovitz, K; Braga, M C C; Spinelli, M; Pirana, S; Della-Rosa, V A; Otto, P A; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2006-02-01

    Mitochondrial mutations are responsible for at least 1% of the cases of hereditary deafness, but the contribution of each mutation has not yet been defined in African-derived or native American genetic backgrounds. A total of 203 unselected hearing-impaired patients were screened for the presence of the mitochondrial mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene and mutations in the tRNASer(UCN) gene in order to assess their frequency in the ethnically admixed Brazilian population. We found four individuals with A1555G mutation (2%), which is a frequency similar to those reported for European-derived populations in unselected samples. On the other hand, complete sequencing of the tRNASer(UCN) did not reveal reported pathogenic substitutions, namely A7445G, 7472insC, T7510C, or T7511C. Instead, other rare substitutions were found such as T1291C, A7569G, and G7444A. To evaluate the significance of these findings, 110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians" unrelated hearing controls were screened. The T1291C, A7569G and G7444A substitutions were each found in about 1% (2/190) of individuals of African ancestry, suggesting that they are probably polymorphic. Our results indicate that screening for the A1555G mutation is recommended among all Brazilian deaf patients, while testing for mutations in the tRNASer(UCN) gene should be considered only when other frequent deafness-causing mutations have been excluded or in the presence of a maternal transmission pattern.

  15. A mutation in the insulin receptor gene that impairs transport of the receptor to the plasma membrane and causes insulin-resistant diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Accili, D; Frapier, C; Mosthaf, L; McKeon, C; Elbein, S C; Permutt, M A; Ramos, E; Lander, E; Ullrich, A; Taylor, S I

    1989-01-01

    Insulin binds to a receptor on the cell surface, thereby triggering a biological response within the target cell. Mutations in the insulin receptor gene can render the cell resistant to the biological action of insulin. We have studied a family in which two sisters have a genetic form of insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus. The technique of homozygosity mapping has been used to demonstrate that the mutation causing diabetes in this consanguineous family is genetically linked to the insulin receptor gene. The two insulin-resistant sisters are homozygous for a mutation encoding substitution of valine for phenylalanine at position 382 in the alpha-subunit of the insulin receptor. Transfection of mutant insulin receptor cDNA into NIH3T3 cells demonstrated that the Val382 mutation impaired post-translational processing and retarded transport of the insulin receptor to the plasma membrane. Thus, the mutation causes insulin resistance by decreasing the number of insulin receptors on the surface of the patients' cells. Images PMID:2573522

  16. Sex Trafficking of Minors.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jessica L; Kaplan, Dana M; Barron, Christine E

    2017-04-01

    Sex trafficking is an increasingly recognized global health crisis affecting every country and region in the world. Domestic minor sex trafficking is a subset of commercial sexual exploitation of children, defined as engagement of minors (<18 years of age) in sexual acts for items of value (eg, food, shelter, drugs, money) involving children victimized within US borders. These involved youth are at risk for serious immediate and long-term physical and mental health consequences. Continued efforts are needed to improve preventive efforts, identification, screening, appropriate interventions, and subsequent resource provision for victimized and high-risk youth.

  17. The Startle Disease Mutation E103K Impairs Activation of Human Homomeric α1 Glycine Receptors by Disrupting an Intersubunit Salt Bridge across the Agonist Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Safar, Fatemah; Hurdiss, Elliot; Erotocritou, Marios; Greiner, Timo; Irvine, Mark W.; Fang, Guangyu; Jane, David; Yu, Rilei; Dämgen, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyR) belong to the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) superfamily and mediate fast inhibitory transmission in the vertebrate CNS. Disruption of glycinergic transmission by inherited mutations produces startle disease in man. Many startle mutations are in GlyRs and provide useful clues to the function of the channel domains. E103K is one of few startle mutations found in the extracellular agonist binding site of the channel, in loop A of the principal side of the subunit interface. Homology modeling shows that the side chain of Glu-103 is close to that of Arg-131, in loop E of the complementary side of the binding site, and may form a salt bridge at the back of the binding site, constraining its size. We investigated this hypothesis in recombinant human α1 GlyR by site-directed mutagenesis and functional measurements of agonist efficacy and potency by whole cell patch clamp and single channel recording. Despite its position near the binding site, E103K causes hyperekplexia by impairing the efficacy of glycine, its ability to gate the channel once bound, which is very high in wild type GlyR. Mutating Glu-103 and Arg-131 caused various degrees of loss-of-function in the action of glycine, whereas mutations in Arg-131 enhanced the efficacy of the slightly bigger partial agonist sarcosine (N-methylglycine). The effects of the single charge-swapping mutations of these two residues were largely rescued in the double mutant, supporting the possibility that they interact via a salt bridge that normally constrains the efficacy of larger agonist molecules. PMID:28174298

  18. AIP mutations impair AhR signaling in pituitary adenoma patients fibroblasts and in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Viengchareun, Say; Hage, Mirella; Bouligand, Jérôme; Young, Jacques; Boutron, Audrey; Zizzari, Philippe; Lombès, Marc; Chanson, Philippe; Kamenický, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene predispose humans to pituitary adenomas through unknown molecular mechanisms. The best-known interacting partner of AIP is the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a transcription factor that mediates the effects of xenobiotics implicated in carcinogenesis. As 75% of AIP mutations disrupt the physical and/or functional interaction with AhR, we postulated that the tumorigenic potential of AIP mutations might result from altered AhR signaling. We evaluated the impact of AIP mutations on the AhR signaling pathway, first in fibroblasts from AIP-mutated patients with pituitary adenomas, by comparison with fibroblasts from healthy subjects, then in transfected pituitary GH3 cells. The AIP protein level in mutated fibroblasts was about half of that in cells from healthy subjects, but AhR expression was unaffected. Gene expression analyses showed significant modifications in the expression of the AhR target genes CYP1B1 and AHRR in AIP-mutated fibroblasts, both before and after stimulation with the endogenous AhR ligand kynurenine. Kynurenine increased Cyp1b1 expression to a greater extent in GH3 cells overexpressing wild type compared with cells expressing mutant AIP Knockdown of endogenous Aip in these cells attenuated Cyp1b1 induction by the AhR ligand. Both mutant AIP expression and knockdown of endogenous Aip affected the kynurenine-dependent GH secretion of GH3 cells. This study of human fibroblasts bearing endogenous heterozygous AIP mutations and transfected pituitary GH3 cells shows that AIP mutations affect the AIP protein level and alter AhR transcriptional activity in a gene- and tissue-dependent manner.

  19. Impaired mechanical response of an EDMD mutation leads to motility phenotypes that are repaired by loss of prenylation.

    PubMed

    Zuela, Noam; Zwerger, Monika; Levin, Tal; Medalia, Ohad; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-05-01

    There are roughly 14 distinct heritable autosomal dominant diseases associated with mutations in lamins A/C, including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD). The mechanical model proposes that the lamin mutations change the mechanical properties of muscle nuclei, leading to cell death and tissue deterioration. Here, we developed an experimental protocol that analyzes the effect of disease-linked lamin mutations on the response of nuclei to mechanical strain in living Caenorhabditis elegans We found that the EDMD mutation L535P disrupts the nuclear mechanical response specifically in muscle nuclei. Inhibiting lamin prenylation rescued the mechanical response of the EDMD nuclei, reversed the muscle phenotypes and led to normal motility. The LINC complex and emerin were also required to regulate the mechanical response of C. elegans nuclei. This study provides evidence to support the mechanical model and offers a potential future therapeutic approach towards curing EDMD.

  20. C-Terminal Di-leucine Motif of Dopamine D1 Receptor Plays an Important Role in Its Plasma Membrane Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Jose, Pedro A.

    2011-01-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor (D1R), a G protein-coupled receptor, plays a critical role in regulating blood pressure through its actions on renal hemodynamics and epithelial ion transport, which are highly linked to its intracellular trafficking. In this study, we generated a series of C-terminal mutants of D1R that were tagged with or without enhanced yellow fluorescent protein, and analyzed the consequences of these mutants on the plasma membrane trafficking of D1R and cyclic AMP response to D1R stimulation. D1R with mutations within the endocytic recycling signal (amino acid residues 360–382) continued to be functional, albeit decreased relative to wild-type D1R. Mutation of the palmitoylation site (347C>S) of D1R did not impair its trafficking to the plasma membrane, but abolished its ability to increase cyclic AMP accumulation. In contrast, replacement of di-leucines (344–345L>A) by alanines resulted in the retention of D1R in the early endosome, decreased its glycosylation, and prevented its targeting to the plasma membrane. Our studies suggest that di-L motif at the C-terminus of D1R is critical for the glycosylation and cell surface targeting of D1R. PMID:22206002

  1. Impairment of mitochonrial tRNAIle processing by a novel mutation associated with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, A; Desetty, R; Hahn, D; Jackson, C B; Nuoffer, J-M; Gallati, S; Levinger, L

    2011-01-01

    We report a sporadic case of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia associated with ragged red fibers. The patient presented with enlarged mitochondria with deranged internal architecture and crystalline inclusions. Biochemical studies showed reduced activities of complex I, III and IV in skeletal muscle. Molecular genetic analysis of all mitochondrial tRNAs revealed a G to A transition at nt 4308; the G is a highly conserved nucleotide that participates in a GC base-pair in the T-stem of mammalian mitochondrial tRNAIle. The mutation was detected at a high level (approx. 50%) in muscle but not in blood. The mutation co-segregated with the phenotype, as the mutation was absent from blood and muscle in the patient’s healthy mother. Functional characterisation of the mutation revealed a six-fold reduced rate of tRNAIle precursor 3’ end maturation in vitro by tRNAse Z. Furthermore, the mutated tRNAIle displays local structural differences from wild-type. These results suggest that structural perturbations reduce efficiency of tRNAIle precursor 3’ end processing and contribute to the molecular pathomechanism of this mutation. PMID:21292040

  2. The Arrhythmogenic Calmodulin p.Phe142Leu Mutation Impairs C-domain Ca2+ Binding but Not Calmodulin-dependent Inhibition of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingjie; Larsen, Kamilla Taunsig; Nani, Alma; Tian, Xixi; Holt, Christian; Wang, Ruiwu; Fill, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A number of point mutations in the intracellular Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) are arrhythmogenic, yet their underlying mechanisms are not clear. These mutations generally decrease Ca2+ binding to CaM and impair inhibition of CaM-regulated Ca2+ channels like the cardiac Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR2), and it appears that attenuated CaM Ca2+ binding correlates with impaired CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Here, we investigated the RyR2 inhibitory action of the CaM p.Phe142Leu mutation (F142L; numbered including the start-Met), which markedly reduces CaM Ca2+ binding. Surprisingly, CaM-F142L had little to no aberrant effect on RyR2-mediated store overload-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells compared with CaM-WT. Furthermore, CaM-F142L enhanced CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition at the single channel level compared with CaM-WT. This is in stark contrast to the actions of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations N54I, D96V, N98S, and D130G, which all diminish CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Thermodynamic analysis showed that apoCaM-F142L converts an endothermal interaction between CaM and the CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) of RyR2 into an exothermal one. Moreover, NMR spectra revealed that the CaM-F142L-CaMBD interaction is structurally different from that of CaM-WT at low Ca2+. These data indicate a distinct interaction between CaM-F142L and the RyR2 CaMBD, which may explain the stronger CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition by CaM-F142L, despite its reduced Ca2+ binding. Collectively, these results add to our understanding of CaM-dependent regulation of RyR2 as well as the mechanistic effects of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations. The unique properties of the CaM-F142L mutation may provide novel clues on how to suppress excessive RyR2 Ca2+ release by manipulating the CaM-RyR2 interaction. PMID:27927985

  3. Proliferation and ovarian hormone signaling are impaired in normal breast tissues from women with BRCA1 mutations: benefit of a progesterone receptor modulator treatment as a breast cancer preventive strategy in women with inherited BRCA1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Communal, Laudine; Courtin, Aurélie; Mourra, Najat; Lahlou, Najiba; Le Guillou, Morwenna; de Jotemps, Muriel Perrault; Chauvet, Marie-Pierre; Chaouat, Marc; Pujol, Pascal; Feunteun, Jean; Delaloge, Suzette; Forgez, Patricia; Gompel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Women with inherited BRCA1 mutations have an elevated risk (40-80%) for developing breast and ovarian cancers. Reproductive history has been reported to alter this risk, suggesting a relationship between ovarian hormone signaling and BRCA1-related tumor development. BRCA1 interactions with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) signaling were previously described in human breast cancer cell lines and mouse models. However, few studies have examined the effect of ovarian hormone regulation in normal human breast tissues bearing a heterozygous BRCA1 mutation. This study compares the proliferation level (Ki67) and the expression of ER, PR, and of the PR target gene, fatty acid synthase (FASN), in histologically normal breast tissues from women with BRCA1 mutations (BRCA1+/mut, n=23) or without BRCA1 mutations (BRCA1+/+, n=28). BRCA1+/mut tissues showed an increased proliferation and impaired hormone receptor expression with a marked loss of the PR isoform, PR-B. Responses to estradiol and progesterone treatments in BRCA1+/mut and BRCA1+/+ breast tissues were studied in a mouse xenograft model, and showed that PR and FASN expression were deregulated in BRCA1+/mut breast tissues. Progesterone added to estradiol treatment increased the proliferation in a subset of BRCA1+/mut breast tissues. The PR inhibitor, ulipristal acetate (UPA), was able to reverse this aberrant progesterone-induced proliferation. This study suggests that a subset of women with BRCA1 mutations could be candidates for a UPA treatment as a preventive breast cancer strategy. PMID:27246982

  4. Arms Trafficking and Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    September 20, 2000. 8Bedoya Lima , Jineth, “La Autopista De Las Farc En Plena Selva," El Espectador, April 27, 2001. Although the authors could not...are simply augmenting the normal “trickle” pattern as their operations, and therefore their demand, grow. For example, Lima La Republica reported that...Trafficking,” Lima La Republica, September 21, 2000. 11See the appendix. Interestingly, some reports claim that the criminal working with the AUC then

  5. Trafficking in Persons Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    causes retardation, blindness, kidney damage, and tremors. To a lesser extent, child mine laborers are also exposed to cyanide and sulfur. A 2006 Harvard...Medical School study found that children in gold mining communities in Ecuador showed neurological abnormalities resulting from mercury and cyanide ...trafficked for the purposes of commercial sexual exploitation and forced labor, including domestic servitude and forced labor in the tobacco , cotton

  6. Impaired Acid Catalysis by Mutation of a Protein Loop Hinge Residue in a YopH Mutant Revealed by Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Brandao, T.; Robinson, H; Johnson, S; Hengge, A

    2009-01-01

    Catalysis by the Yersinia protein-tyrosine phosphatase YopH is significantly impaired by the mutation of the conserved Trp354 residue to Phe. Though not a catalytic residue, this Trp is a hinge residue in a conserved flexible loop (the WPD-loop) that must close during catalysis. To learn why this seemingly conservative mutation reduces catalysis by 2 orders of magnitude, we have solved high-resolution crystal structures for the W354F YopH in the absence and in the presence of tungstate and vanadate. Oxyanion binding to the P-loop in W354F is analogous to that observed in the native enzyme. However, the WPD-loop in the presence of oxyanions assumes a half-closed conformation, in contrast to the fully closed state observed in structures of the native enzyme. This observation provides an explanation for the impaired general acid catalysis observed in kinetic experiments with Trp mutants. A 1.4 Angstroms structure of the W354F mutant obtained in the presence of vanadate reveals an unusual divanadate species with a cyclic [VO]2 core, which has precedent in small molecules but has not been previously reported in a protein crystal structure.

  7. Ras trafficking, localization and compartmentalized signalling.

    PubMed

    Prior, Ian A; Hancock, John F

    2012-04-01

    Ras proteins are proto-oncogenes that are frequently mutated in human cancers. Three closely related isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are expressed in all cells and have overlapping but distinctive functions. Recent work has revealed how differences between the Ras isoforms in their trafficking, localization and protein-membrane orientation enable signalling specificity to be determined. We review the various strategies used to characterize compartmentalized Ras localization and signalling. Localization is an important contextual modifier of signalling networks and insights from the Ras system are of widespread relevance for researchers interested in signalling initiated from membranes.

  8. Identification of cancer-associated missense mutations in hace1 that impair cell growth control and Rac1 ubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    Andrio, Emilie; Lotte, Romain; Hamaoui, Daniel; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Doye, Anne; Daugaard, Mads; Sorensen, Poul H.; Bost, Frédéric; Ruimy, Raymond; Mettouchi, Amel; Lemichez, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase HACE1 is a potent tumor suppressor that controls cell proliferation and ubiquitylates the small GTPase Rac1 to target it to proteasomal degradation. Whether and how the activity of HACE1 is regulated by the N-terminal ankyrin (ANK) and the middle (MID) domains is ill defined. Here, we identified in the version 64 of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) 13 missense mutations of hace1 located outside the HECT domain, and found that all lead to defective control of cell proliferation. In addition, several mutations located in the ankyrin domain displayed a dramatic reduction in Rac1 ubiquitylation associated with a decrease of colony formation in soft agar. 3D structure modelling of the 7 ankyrin-repeats coupled to functional analysis identified a surface epitope centered on one of the mutated residue, Gly-175, which is critical for controlling Rac1 binding and ubiquitylation. We also identified a role for the MID domain in conferring the specificity of association of HACE1 to the active form of Rac1. Our study of the functional interplay between HACE1 and Rac1 in cancer thus sheds a new light on the molecular mechanism of Rac1 ubiquitylation by HACE1 and the impact of its cancer-associated mutations in cell proliferation. PMID:28317937

  9. Age-Related Hearing Impairment (ARHI) associated with GJB2 single mutation IVS1+1G>A in the Yakut population isolate in Eastern Siberia.

    PubMed

    Barashkov, Nikolay A; Teryutin, Fedor M; Pshennikova, Vera G; Solovyev, Aisen V; Klarov, Leonid A; Solovyeva, Natalya A; Kozhevnikov, Andrei A; Vasilyeva, Lena M; Fedotova, Elvira E; Pak, Maria V; Lekhanova, Sargylana N; Zakharova, Elena V; Savvinova, Kyunney E; Gotovtsev, Nyurgun N; Rafailo, Adyum M; Luginov, Nikolay V; Alexeev, Anatoliy N; Posukh, Olga L; Dzhemileva, Lilya U; Khusnutdinova, Elza K; Fedorova, Sardana A

    2014-01-01

    Age-Related Hearing Impairment (ARHI) is one of the frequent sensory disorders registered in 50% of individuals over 80 years. ARHI is a multifactorial disorder due to environmental and poor-known genetic components. In this study, we present the data on age-related hearing impairment of 48 heterozygous carriers of mutation IVS1+1G>A (GJB2 gene) and 97 subjects with GJB2 genotype wt/wt in the Republic of Sakha/Yakutia (Eastern Siberia, Russia). This subarctic territory was found as the region with the most extensive accumulation of mutation IVS1+1G>A in the world as a result of founder effect in the unique Yakut population isolate. The GJB2 gene resequencing and detailed audiological analysis in the frequency range 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0 kHz were performed in all examined subjects that allowed to investigate genotype-phenotype correlations between the presence of single mutation IVS1+1G>A and hearing of subjects from examined groups. We revealed the linear correlation between increase of average hearing thresholds at speech frequencies (PTA0.5,1.0,2.0,4.0 kHz) and age of individuals with GJB2 genotype IVS1+1G>A/wt (rs = 0.499, p = 0.006860 for males and rs = 0.427, p = 0.000277 for females). Moreover, the average hearing thresholds on high frequency (8.0 kHz) in individuals with genotype IVS1+1G>A/wt (both sexes) were significantly worse than in individuals with genotype wt/wt (p<0.05). Age of hearing loss manifestation in individuals with genotype IVS1+1G>A/wt was estimated to be ∼40 years (rs = 0.504, p = 0.003). These findings demonstrate that the single IVS1+1G>A mutation (GJB2) is associated with age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) of the IVS1+1G>A carriers in the Yakuts.

  10. Age-Related Hearing Impairment (ARHI) Associated with GJB2 Single Mutation IVS1+1G>A in the Yakut Population Isolate in Eastern Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Pshennikova, Vera G.; Solovyev, Aisen V.; Klarov, Leonid A.; Solovyeva, Natalya A.; Kozhevnikov, Andrei A.; Vasilyeva, Lena M.; Fedotova, Elvira E.; Pak, Maria V.; Lekhanova, Sargylana N.; Zakharova, Elena V.; Savvinova, Kyunney E.; Gotovtsev, Nyurgun N.; Rafailo, Adyum M.; Luginov, Nikolay V.; Alexeev, Anatoliy N.; Posukh, Olga L.; Dzhemileva, Lilya U.; Khusnutdinova, Elza K.; Fedorova, Sardana A.

    2014-01-01

    Age-Related Hearing Impairment (ARHI) is one of the frequent sensory disorders registered in 50% of individuals over 80 years. ARHI is a multifactorial disorder due to environmental and poor-known genetic components. In this study, we present the data on age-related hearing impairment of 48 heterozygous carriers of mutation IVS1+1G>A (GJB2 gene) and 97 subjects with GJB2 genotype wt/wt in the Republic of Sakha/Yakutia (Eastern Siberia, Russia). This subarctic territory was found as the region with the most extensive accumulation of mutation IVS1+1G>A in the world as a result of founder effect in the unique Yakut population isolate. The GJB2 gene resequencing and detailed audiological analysis in the frequency range 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0 kHz were performed in all examined subjects that allowed to investigate genotype-phenotype correlations between the presence of single mutation IVS1+1G>A and hearing of subjects from examined groups. We revealed the linear correlation between increase of average hearing thresholds at speech frequencies (PTA0.5,1.0,2.0,4.0 kHz) and age of individuals with GJB2 genotype IVS1+1G>A/wt (rs = 0.499, p = 0.006860 for males and rs = 0.427, p = 0.000277 for females). Moreover, the average hearing thresholds on high frequency (8.0 kHz) in individuals with genotype IVS1+1G>A/wt (both sexes) were significantly worse than in individuals with genotype wt/wt (p<0.05). Age of hearing loss manifestation in individuals with genotype IVS1+1G>A/wt was estimated to be ∼40 years (rs = 0.504, p = 0.003). These findings demonstrate that the single IVS1+1G>A mutation (GJB2) is associated with age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) of the IVS1+1G>A carriers in the Yakuts. PMID:24959830

  11. NPC1, intracellular cholesterol trafficking and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Hua; Jiang, Na; Yao, Ping-Bo; Zheng, Xi-Long; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-02-15

    Post-lysosomal cholesterol trafficking is an important, but poorly understood process that is essential to maintain lipid homeostasis. Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1), an integral membrane protein on the limiting membrane of late endosome/lysosome (LE/LY), is known to accept cholesterol from NPC2 and then mediate cholesterol transport from LE/LY to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plasma membrane in a vesicle- or oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-related protein 5 (ORP5)-dependent manner. Mutations in the NPC1 gene can be found in the majority of NPC patients, who accumulate massive amounts of cholesterol and other lipids in the LE/LY due to a defect in intracellular lipid trafficking. Liver X receptor (LXR) is the major positive regulator of NPC1 expression. Atherosclerosis is the pathological basis of coronary heart disease, one of the major causes of death worldwide. NPC1 has been shown to play a critical role in the atherosclerotic progression. In this review, we have summarized the role of NPC1 in regulating intracellular cholesterol trafficking and atherosclerosis.

  12. Engineered mutations in fibrillin-1 leading to Marfan syndrome act at the protein, cellular and organismal levels.

    PubMed

    Zeyer, Karina A; Reinhardt, Dieter P

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are the major components of microfibrils in the extracellular matrix of elastic and non-elastic tissues. They are multi-domain proteins, containing primarily calcium binding epidermal growth factor-like (cbEGF) domains and 8-cysteine/transforming growth factor-beta binding protein-like (TB) domains. Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene give rise to Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder with clinical complications in the cardiovascular, skeletal, ocular and other organ systems. Here, we review the consequences of engineered Marfan syndrome mutations in fibrillin-1 at the protein, cellular and organismal levels. Representative point mutations associated with Marfan syndrome in affected individuals have been introduced and analyzed in recombinant fibrillin-1 fragments. Those mutations affect fibrillin-1 on a structural and functional level. Mutations which impair folding of cbEGF domains can affect protein trafficking. Protein folding disrupted by some mutations can lead to defective secretion in mutant fibrillin-1 fragments, whereas fragments with other Marfan mutations are secreted normally. Many Marfan mutations render fibrillin-1 more susceptible to proteolysis. There is also evidence that some mutations affect heparin binding. Few mutations have been further analyzed in mouse models. An extensively studied mouse model of Marfan syndrome expresses mouse fibrillin-1 with a missense mutation (p.C1039G). The mice display similar characteristics to human patients with Marfan syndrome. Overall, the analyses of engineered mutations leading to Marfan syndrome provide important insights into the pathogenic molecular mechanisms exerted by mutated fibrillin-1.

  13. Microcephaly, intellectual impairment, bilateral vesicoureteral reflux, distichiasis, and glomuvenous malformations associated with a 16q24.3 contiguous gene deletion and a Glomulin mutation.

    PubMed

    Butler, Matthew G; Dagenais, Susan L; Garcia-Perez, José L; Brouillard, Pascal; Vikkula, Miikka; Strouse, Peter; Innis, Jeffrey W; Glover, Thomas W

    2012-04-01

    Two hereditary syndromes, lymphedema-distichiasis (LD) syndrome and blepharo-chelio-dontic (BCD) syndrome include the aberrant growth of eyelashes from the meibomian glands, known as distichiasis. LD is an autosomal dominant syndrome primarily characterized by distichiasis and the onset of lymphedema usually during puberty. Mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXC2 are the only known cause of LD. BCD syndrome consists of autosomal dominant abnormalities of the eyelid, lip, and teeth, and the etiology remains unknown. In this report, we describe a proband that presented with distichiasis, microcephaly, bilateral grade IV vesicoureteral reflux requiring ureteral re-implantation, mild intellectual impairment and apparent glomuvenous malformations (GVM). Distichiasis was present in three generations of the proband's maternal side of the family. The GVMs were severe in the proband, and maternal family members exhibited lower extremity varicosities of variable degree. A GLMN (glomulin) gene mutation was identified in the proband that accounts for the observed GVMs; no other family member could be tested. TIE2 sequencing revealed no mutations. In the proband, an additional submicroscopic 265 kb contiguous gene deletion was identified in 16q24.3, located 609 kb distal to the FOXC2 locus, which was inherited from the proband's mother. The deletion includes the C16ORF95, FBXO31, MAP1LC3B, and ZCCHC14 loci and 115 kb of a gene desert distal to FOXC2 and FOXL1. Thus, it is likely that the microcephaly, distichiasis, vesicoureteral, and intellectual impairment in this family may be caused by the deletion of one or more of these genes and/or deletion of distant cis-regulatory elements of FOXC2 expression.

  14. Microcephaly, Intellectual Impairment, Bilateral Vesicoureteral Reflux, Distichiasis and Glomuvenous Malformations Associated with a 16q24.3 Contiguous Gene Deletion and a Glomulin Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Matthew G.; Dagenais, Susan L.; Garcia-Perez, José L.; Brouillard, Pascal; Vikkula, Miikka; Strouse, Peter; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Glover, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Two hereditary syndromes, lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LD) and blepharo-chelio-dontic (BCD) syndrome include the aberrant growth of eyelashes from the meibomian glands, known as distichiasis. LD is an autosomal dominant syndrome primarily characterized by distichiasis and the onset of lymphedema usually during puberty. Mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXC2 are the only known cause of LD. BCD syndrome consists of autosomal dominant abnormalities of the eyelid, lip, and teeth, and the etiology remains unknown. In this report, we describe a proband that presented with distichiasis, microcephaly, bilateral grade IV vesicoureteral reflux requiring ureteral re-implantation, mild intellectual impairment and apparent glomuvenous malformations. Distichiasis was present in three generations of the proband’s maternal side of the family. The glomuvenous malformations were severe in the proband, and maternal family members exhibited lower extremity varicosities of variable degree. A GLMN (glomulin) gene mutation was identified in the proband that accounts for the observed glomuvenous malformations; no other family member could be tested. TIE2 sequencing revealed no mutations. In the proband, an additional submicroscopic 265 kb contiguous gene deletion was identified in 16q24.3, located 609 kb distal to the FOXC2 locus, which was inherited from the proband’s mother. The deletion includes the C16ORF95, FBXO31, MAP1LC3B, and ZCCHC14 loci and 115 kb of a gene desert distal to FOXC2 and FOXL1. Thus, it is likely that the microcephaly, distichiasis, vesicoureteral and intellectual impairment in this family may be caused by the deletion of one or more of these genes and/or deletion of distant cis-regulatory elements of FOXC2 expression. PMID:22407726

  15. ALS/FTD Mutation-Induced Phase Transition of FUS Liquid Droplets and Reversible Hydrogels into Irreversible Hydrogels Impairs RNP Granule Function

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Tetsuro; Qamar, Seema; Lin, Julie Qiaojin; Schierle, Gabriele S. Kaminski; Rees, Eric; Miyashita, Akinori; Costa, Ana R.; Dodd, Roger B.; Chan, Fiona T.S.; Michel, Claire H.; Kronenberg-Versteeg, Deborah; Li, Yi; Yang, Seung-Pil; Wakutani, Yosuke; Meadows, William; Ferry, Rodylyn Rose; Dong, Liang; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Favrin, Giorgio; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dickson, Dennis W.; Zhen, Mei; Ron, David; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Fraser, Paul E.; Shneider, Neil A.; Holt, Christine; Vendruscolo, Michele; Kaminski, Clemens F.; St George-Hyslop, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms by which mutations in FUS and other RNA binding proteins cause ALS and FTD remain controversial. We propose a model in which low-complexity (LC) domains of FUS drive its physiologically reversible assembly into membrane-free, liquid droplet and hydrogel-like structures. ALS/FTD mutations in LC or non-LC domains induce further phase transition into poorly soluble fibrillar hydrogels distinct from conventional amyloids. These assemblies are necessary and sufficient for neurotoxicity in a C. elegans model of FUS-dependent neurodegeneration. They trap other ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granule components and disrupt RNP granule function. One consequence is impairment of new protein synthesis by cytoplasmic RNP granules in axon terminals, where RNP granules regulate local RNA metabolism and translation. Nuclear FUS granules may be similarly affected. Inhibiting formation of these fibrillar hydrogel assemblies mitigates neurotoxicity and suggests a potential therapeutic strategy that may also be applicable to ALS/FTD associated with mutations in other RNA binding proteins. PMID:26526393

  16. ALS/FTD Mutation-Induced Phase Transition of FUS Liquid Droplets and Reversible Hydrogels into Irreversible Hydrogels Impairs RNP Granule Function.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tetsuro; Qamar, Seema; Lin, Julie Qiaojin; Schierle, Gabriele S Kaminski; Rees, Eric; Miyashita, Akinori; Costa, Ana R; Dodd, Roger B; Chan, Fiona T S; Michel, Claire H; Kronenberg-Versteeg, Deborah; Li, Yi; Yang, Seung-Pil; Wakutani, Yosuke; Meadows, William; Ferry, Rodylyn Rose; Dong, Liang; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Favrin, Giorgio; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dickson, Dennis W; Zhen, Mei; Ron, David; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Fraser, Paul E; Shneider, Neil A; Holt, Christine; Vendruscolo, Michele; Kaminski, Clemens F; St George-Hyslop, Peter

    2015-11-18

    The mechanisms by which mutations in FUS and other RNA binding proteins cause ALS and FTD remain controversial. We propose a model in which low-complexity (LC) domains of FUS drive its physiologically reversible assembly into membrane-free, liquid droplet and hydrogel-like structures. ALS/FTD mutations in LC or non-LC domains induce further phase transition into poorly soluble fibrillar hydrogels distinct from conventional amyloids. These assemblies are necessary and sufficient for neurotoxicity in a C. elegans model of FUS-dependent neurodegeneration. They trap other ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granule components and disrupt RNP granule function. One consequence is impairment of new protein synthesis by cytoplasmic RNP granules in axon terminals, where RNP granules regulate local RNA metabolism and translation. Nuclear FUS granules may be similarly affected. Inhibiting formation of these fibrillar hydrogel assemblies mitigates neurotoxicity and suggests a potential therapeutic strategy that may also be applicable to ALS/FTD associated with mutations in other RNA binding proteins.

  17. Drug resistance-related mutations T369V/I in the connection subdomain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase severely impair viral fitness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Junli; Li, Fan; Ji, Xiaolin; Liao, Lingjie; Ma, Liying; Xing, Hui; Feng, Yi; Li, Dan; Shao, Yiming

    2017-03-06

    Fitness is a key parameter in the measurement of transmission capacity of individual drug-resistant HIV. Drug-resistance related mutations (DRMs) T369V/I and A371V in the connection subdomain (CN) of reverse transcriptase (RT) occur at higher frequencies in the individuals experiencing antiretroviral therapy failure. Here, we evaluated the effects of T369V/I and A371V on viral fitness, in the presence or in the absence of thymidine analogue resistance-associated mutations (TAMs) and assessed the effect of potential RT structure-related mechanism on change in viral fitness. Mutations T369V/I, A371V, alone or in combination with TAMs were introduced into a modified HIV-1 infectious clone AT1 by site-directed mutagenesis. Then, experiments on mutant and wild-type virus AT2 were performed separately using a growth-competition assay, and then the relative fitness was calculated. Structural analysis of RT was conducted using Pymol software. Results showed that T369V/I severely impaired the relative virus fitness, and A371V compensated for the viral fitness reduction caused by TAMs. Structural modeling of RT suggests that T369V/I substitutions disrupt powerful hydrogen bonds formed by T369 and V365 in p51 and p66. This study indicates that the secondary DRMs within CN might efficiently damage viral fitness, and provides valuable information for clinical surveillance and prevention of HIV-1 strains carrying these DRMs.

  18. Health implications of human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Richards, Tiffany A

    2014-01-01

    Freedom is arguably the most cherished right in the United States. But each year, approximately 14,500 to 17,500 women, men and children are trafficked into the United States for the purposes of forced labor or sexual exploitation. Human trafficking has significant effects on both physical and mental health. This article describes the features of human trafficking, its physical and mental health effects and the vital role nurses can play in providing care to this vulnerable population.

  19. Impairment of Cargo Transportation Caused by gbf1 Mutation Disrupts Vascular Integrity and Causes Hemorrhage in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Wu, Xiaotong; Yao, Likun; Yan, Lu; Zhang, Lin; Qiu, Juhui; Liu, Xingfeng; Jia, Shunji; Meng, Anming

    2017-02-10

    ADP-ribosylation factor GTPases are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors including Gbf1 (Golgi brefeldin A-resistant factor 1) and play important roles in regulating organelle structure and cargo-selective vesicle trafficking. However, the developmental role of Gbf1 in vertebrates remains elusive. In this study, we report the zebrafish mutant line tsu3994 that arises from N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mediated mutagenesis and is characterized by prominent intracerebral and trunk hemorrhage. The mutant embryos develop hemorrhage accompanied by fewer pigments and shorter caudal fin at day 2 of development. The hemorrhage phenotype is caused by vascular breakage in a cell autonomous fashion. Positional cloning identifies a T → G nucleotide substitution in the 23rd exon of the gbf1 locus, resulting in a leucine → arginine substitution (L1246R) in the HDS2 domain. The mutant phenotype is mimicked by gbf1 knockouts and morphants, suggesting a nature of loss of function. Experimental results in mammalian cells show that the mutant form Gbf1(L1246R) is unable to be recruited to the Golgi apparatus and fails to activate Arf1 for recruiting COPI complex. The hemorrhage in tsu3994 mutants can be prevented partially and temporally by treating with the endoplasmic reticulum stress/apoptosis inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid or by knocking down the proapoptotic gene baxb Therefore, endothelial endoplasmic reticulum stress and subsequent apoptosis induced by gbf1 deficiency may account for the vascular collapse and hemorrhage.

  20. Amino-terminal cysteine residues differentially influence RGS4 protein plasma membrane targeting, intracellular trafficking, and function.

    PubMed

    Bastin, Guillaume; Singh, Kevin; Dissanayake, Kaveesh; Mighiu, Alexandra S; Nurmohamed, Aliya; Heximer, Scott P

    2012-08-17

    Regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins are potent inhibitors of heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. RGS4 attenuates G-protein activity in several tissues. Previous work demonstrated that cysteine palmitoylation on residues in the amino-terminal (Cys-2 and Cys-12) and core domains (Cys-95) of RGS4 is important for protein stability, plasma membrane targeting, and GTPase activating function. To date Cys-2 has been the priority target for RGS4 regulation by palmitoylation based on its putative role in stabilizing the RGS4 protein. Here, we investigate differences in the contribution of Cys-2 and Cys-12 to the intracellular localization and function of RGS4. Inhibition of RGS4 palmitoylation with 2-bromopalmitate dramatically reduced its localization to the plasma membrane. Similarly, mutation of the RGS4 amphipathic helix (L23D) prevented membrane localization and its G(q) inhibitory function. Together, these data suggest that both RGS4 palmitoylation and the amphipathic helix domain are required for optimal plasma membrane targeting and function of RGS4. Mutation of Cys-12 decreased RGS4 membrane targeting to a similar extent as 2-bromopalmitate, resulting in complete loss of its G(q) inhibitory function. Mutation of Cys-2 did not impair plasma membrane targeting but did partially impair its function as a G(q) inhibitor. Comparison of the endosomal distribution pattern of wild type and mutant RGS4 proteins with TGN38 indicated that palmitoylation of these two cysteines contributes differentially to the intracellular trafficking of RGS4. These data show for the first time that Cys-2 and Cys-12 play markedly different roles in the regulation of RGS4 membrane localization, intracellular trafficking, and G(q) inhibitory function via mechanisms that are unrelated to RGS4 protein stabilization.

  1. ZC4H2 mutations are associated with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita and intellectual disability through impairment of central and peripheral synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiromi; Nanda, Indrajit; van Riesen, Anne; McMichael, Gai; Hu, Hao; Hambrock, Melanie; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Fischer, Ute; Marouillat, Sylviane; Ding, Can; Alirol, Servane; Bienek, Melanie; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Grimme, Astrid; Seelow, Dominik; Webster, Richard; Haan, Eric; MacLennan, Alastair; Stenzel, Werner; Yap, Tzu Ying; Gardner, Alison; Nguyen, Lam Son; Shaw, Marie; Lebrun, Nicolas; Haas, Stefan A; Kress, Wolfram; Haaf, Thomas; Schellenberger, Elke; Chelly, Jamel; Viot, Géraldine; Shaffer, Lisa G; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Kramer, Nancy; Falk, Rena; El-Khechen, Dima; Escobar, Luis F; Hennekam, Raoul; Wieacker, Peter; Hübner, Christoph; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Gecz, Jozef; Schuelke, Markus; Laumonnier, Frédéric; Kalscheuer, Vera M

    2013-05-02

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is caused by heterogeneous pathologies leading to multiple antenatal joint contractures through fetal akinesia. Understanding the pathophysiology of this disorder is important for clinical care of the affected individuals and genetic counseling of the families. We thus aimed to establish the genetic basis of an AMC subtype that is associated with multiple dysmorphic features and intellectual disability (ID). We used haplotype analysis, next-generation sequencing, array comparative genomic hybridization, and chromosome breakpoint mapping to identify the pathogenic mutations in families and simplex cases. Suspected disease variants were verified by cosegregation analysis. We identified disease-causing mutations in the zinc-finger gene ZC4H2 in four families affected by X-linked AMC plus ID and one family affected by cerebral palsy. Several heterozygous females were also affected, but to a lesser degree. Furthermore, we found two ZC4H2 deletions and one rearrangement in two female and one male unrelated simplex cases, respectively. In mouse primary hippocampal neurons, transiently produced ZC4H2 localized to the postsynaptic compartment of excitatory synapses, and the altered protein influenced dendritic spine density. In zebrafish, antisense-morpholino-mediated zc4h2 knockdown caused abnormal swimming and impaired α-motoneuron development. All missense mutations identified herein failed to rescue the swimming defect of zebrafish morphants. We conclude that ZC4H2 point mutations, rearrangements, and small deletions cause a clinically variable broad-spectrum neurodevelopmental disorder of the central and peripheral nervous systems in both familial and simplex cases of both sexes. Our results highlight the importance of ZC4H2 for genetic testing of individuals presenting with ID plus muscle weakness and minor or major forms of AMC.

  2. Depolarized inactivation overcomes impaired activation to produce DRG neuron hyperexcitability in a Nav1.7 mutation in a patient with distal limb pain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianying; Yang, Yang; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; van Es, Michael; Zhao, Peng; Salomon, Jody; Drenth, Joost P H; Waxman, Stephen G

    2014-09-10

    Sodium channel Nav1.7, encoded by SCN9A, is expressed in DRG neurons and regulates their excitability. Genetic and functional studies have established a critical contribution of Nav1.7 to human pain disorders. We have now characterized a novel Nav1.7 mutation (R1279P) from a female human subject with distal limb pain, in which depolarized fast inactivation overrides impaired activation to produce hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing in DRG neurons. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells demonstrated that R1279P significantly depolarizes steady-state fast-, slow-, and closed-state inactivation. It accelerates deactivation, decelerates inactivation, and facilitates repriming. The mutation increases ramp currents in response to slow depolarizations. Our voltage-clamp analysis showed that R1279P depolarizes channel activation, a change that was supported by our multistate structural modeling. Because this mutation confers both gain-of-function and loss-of-function attributes on the Nav1.7 channel, we tested the impact of R1279P expression on DRG neuron excitability. Current-clamp studies reveal that R1279P depolarizes resting membrane potential, decreases current threshold, and increases firing frequency of evoked action potentials within small DRG neurons. The populations of spontaneously firing and repetitively firing neurons were increased by expressing R1279P. These observations indicate that the dominant proexcitatory gating changes associated with this mutation, including depolarized steady-state fast-, slow-, and closed-state inactivation, faster repriming, and larger ramp currents, override the depolarizing shift of activation, to produce hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of nociceptive neurons that underlie pain.

  3. Role of adaptor proteins and clathrin in the trafficking of human kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Junking, Mutita; Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Duangtum, Natapol; Cheunsuchon, Boonyarit; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2014-07-01

    Kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) plays an important role in acid-base homeostasis by mediating chloride/bicarbornate (Cl-/HCO3-) exchange at the basolateral membrane of α-intercalated cells in the distal nephron. Impaired intracellular trafficking of kAE1 caused by mutations of SLC4A1 encoding kAE1 results in kidney disease - distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). However, it is not known how the intracellular sorting and trafficking of kAE1 from trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the basolateral membrane occurs. Here, we studied the role of basolateral-related sorting proteins, including the mu1 subunit of adaptor protein (AP) complexes, clathrin and protein kinase D, on kAE1 trafficking in polarized and non-polarized kidney cells. By using RNA interference, co-immunoprecipitation, yellow fluorescent protein-based protein fragment complementation assays and immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated that AP-1 mu1A, AP-3 mu1, AP-4 mu1 and clathrin (but not AP-1 mu1B, PKD1 or PKD2) play crucial roles in intracellular sorting and trafficking of kAE1. We also demonstrated colocalization of kAE1 and basolateral-related sorting proteins in human kidney tissues by double immunofluorescence staining. These findings indicate that AP-1 mu1A, AP-3 mu1, AP-4 mu1 and clathrin are required for kAE1 sorting and trafficking from TGN to the basolateral membrane of acid-secreting α-intercalated cells.

  4. A Homozygous [Cys25]PTH(1-84) Mutation That Impairs PTH/PTHrP Receptor Activation Defines a Novel Form of Hypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sihoon; Mannstadt, Michael; Guo, Jun; Kim, Seul Min; Yi, Hyon-Seung; Khatri, Ashok; Dean, Thomas; Okazaki, Makoto; Gardella, Thomas J; Jüppner, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia are encountered in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (IHP) and pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP1B). In contrast to PHP1B, which is caused by resistance toward parathyroid hormone (PTH), the genetic defects leading to IHP impair production of this important regulator of mineral ion homeostasis. So far, only five PTH mutations were shown to cause IHP, each of which is located in the hormone’s pre-pro leader segment and thus impair hormone secretion. In three siblings affected by IHP, we now identified a homozygous arginine-to-cysteine mutation at position 25 (R25C) of the mature PTH(1-84) polypeptide; heterozygous family members are healthy. Depending on the assay used for evaluating these patients, plasma PTH levels were either low or profoundly elevated, thus leading to ambiguities regarding the underlying diagnosis, namely IHP or PHP1B. Consistent with increased PTH levels, recombinant [Cys25]PTH(1-84) and wild-type PTH(1-84) were secreted equally well by transfected COS-7 cells. However, synthetic [Cys25]PTH(1-34) was found to have a lower binding affinity for the PTH receptor type-1 (PTH1R) than PTH(1-34) and consequently a lower efficiency for stimulating cAMP formation in cells expressing this receptor. Consistent with these in vitro findings, long-term infusion of [Cys25]PTH(1-34) resulted only in minimal calcemic and phosphaturic responses, despite readily detectable levels of [Cys25]PTH(1-34) in plasma. The mineral ion abnormalities observed in the three IHP patients are thus most likely caused by the inherited homozygous missense PTH mutation, which reduces bioactivity of the secreted hormone. Based on these findings, screening for PTH(1-84) mutations should be considered when clinical and laboratory findings are consistent with PHP1B, but GNAS methylation changes have been excluded. Differentiating between IHP and PHP1B has considerable implications for genetic counseling, therapy, and long-term outcome because

  5. SLC6A3 coding variant Ala559Val found in two autism probands alters dopamine transporter function and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bowton, E; Saunders, C; Reddy, I A; Campbell, N G; Hamilton, P J; Henry, L K; Coon, H; Sakrikar, D; Veenstra-VanderWeele, J M; Blakely, R D; Sutcliffe, J; Matthies, H J G; Erreger, K; Galli, A

    2014-10-14

    Emerging evidence associates dysfunction in the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) with the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The human DAT (hDAT; SLC6A3) rare variant with an Ala to Val substitution at amino acid 559 (hDAT A559V) was previously reported in individuals with bipolar disorder or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have demonstrated that this variant is hyper-phosphorylated at the amino (N)-terminal serine (Ser) residues and promotes an anomalous DA efflux phenotype. Here, we report the novel identification of hDAT A559V in two unrelated ASD subjects and provide the first mechanistic description of its impaired trafficking phenotype. DAT surface expression is dynamically regulated by DAT substrates including the psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH), which causes hDAT trafficking away from the plasma membrane. The integrity of DAT trafficking directly impacts DA transport capacity and therefore dopaminergic neurotransmission. Here, we show that hDAT A559V is resistant to AMPH-induced cell surface redistribution. This unique trafficking phenotype is conferred by altered protein kinase C β (PKCβ) activity. Cells expressing hDAT A559V exhibit constitutively elevated PKCβ activity, inhibition of which restores the AMPH-induced hDAT A559V membrane redistribution. Mechanistically, we link the inability of hDAT A559V to traffic in response to AMPH to the phosphorylation of the five most distal DAT N-terminal Ser. Mutation of these N-terminal Ser to Ala restores AMPH-induced trafficking. Furthermore, hDAT A559V has a diminished ability to transport AMPH, and therefore lacks AMPH-induced DA efflux. Pharmacological inhibition of PKCβ or Ser to Ala substitution in the hDAT A559V background restores AMPH-induced DA efflux while promoting intracellular AMPH accumulation. Although hDAT A559V is a rare variant, it has been found in multiple probands with neuropsychiatric disorders associated with imbalances in DA neurotransmission

  6. Impaired hematopoietic differentiation of RUNX1-mutated induced pluripotent stem cells derived from FPD/AML patients.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, M; Kunimoto, H; Watanabe, N; Fukuchi, Y; Yuasa, S; Yamazaki, S; Nishimura, T; Sadahira, K; Fukuda, K; Okano, H; Nakauchi, H; Morita, Y; Matsumura, I; Kudo, K; Ito, E; Ebihara, Y; Tsuji, K; Harada, Y; Harada, H; Okamoto, S; Nakajima, H

    2014-12-01

    Somatic mutation of RUNX1 is implicated in various hematological malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and previous studies using mouse models disclosed its critical roles in hematopoiesis. However, the role of RUNX1 in human hematopoiesis has never been tested in experimental settings. Familial platelet disorder (FPD)/AML is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by germline mutation of RUNX1, marked by thrombocytopenia and propensity to acute leukemia. To investigate the physiological function of RUNX1 in human hematopoiesis and pathophysiology of FPD/AML, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from three distinct FPD/AML pedigrees (FPD-iPSCs) and examined their defects in hematopoietic differentiation. By in vitro differentiation assays, FPD-iPSCs were clearly defective in the emergence of hematopoietic progenitors and differentiation of megakaryocytes, and overexpression of wild-type (WT)-RUNX1 reversed most of these phenotypes. We further demonstrated that overexpression of mutant-RUNX1 in WT-iPSCs did not recapitulate the phenotype of FPD-iPSCs, showing that the mutations were of loss-of-function type. Taken together, this study demonstrated that haploinsufficient RUNX1 allele imposed cell-intrinsic defects on hematopoietic differentiation in human experimental settings and revealed differential impacts of RUNX1 dosage on human and murine megakaryopoiesis. FPD-iPSCs will be a useful tool to investigate mutant RUNX1-mediated molecular processes in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis.

  7. Ceramidase Regulates Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbough, Jeffrey; Rushton, Emma; Palanker, Laura; Woodruff, Elvin; Matthies, Heinrich J. G.; Acharya, Usha; Acharya, Jairaj K.; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    A screen for Drosophila synaptic dysfunction mutants identified slug-a-bed (slab). The slab gene encodes ceramidase, a central enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism and regulation. Sphingolipids are major constituents of lipid rafts, membrane domains with roles in vesicle trafficking, and signaling pathways. Null slab mutants arrest as fully developed embryos with severely reduced movement. The SLAB protein is widely expressed in different tissues but enriched in neurons at all stages of development. Targeted neuronal expression of slab rescues mutant lethality, demonstrating the essential neuronal function of the protein. C5-ceramide applied to living preparations is rapidly accumulated at neuromuscular junction (NMJ) synapses dependent on the SLAB expression level, indicating that synaptic sphingolipid trafficking and distribution is regulated by SLAB function. Evoked synaptic currents at slab mutant NMJs are reduced by 50–70%, whereas postsynaptic glutamate-gated currents are normal, demonstrating a specific presynaptic impairment. Hypertonic saline-evoked synaptic vesicle fusion is similarly impaired by 50–70%, demonstrating a loss of readily releasable vesicles. In addition, FM1-43 dye uptake is reduced in slab mutant presynaptic terminals, indicating a smaller cycling vesicle pool. Ultrastructural analyses of mutants reveal a normal vesicle distribution clustered and docked at active zones, but fewer vesicles in reserve regions, and a twofold to threefold increased incidence of vesicles linked together and tethered at the plasma membrane. These results indicate that SLAB ceramidase function controls presynaptic terminal sphingolipid composition to regulate vesicle fusion and trafficking, and thus the strength and reliability of synaptic transmission. PMID:15356190

  8. Structure of Human B12 Trafficking Protein CblD Reveals Molecular Mimicry and Identifies a New Subfamily of Nitro-FMN Reductases.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Gherasim, Carmen; Banerjee, Ruma; Koutmos, Markos

    2015-12-04

    In mammals, B12 (or cobalamin) is an essential cofactor required by methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. A complex intracellular pathway supports the assimilation of cobalamin into its active cofactor forms and delivery to its target enzymes. MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D protein), commonly referred to as CblD, is a key chaperone involved in intracellular cobalamin trafficking, and mutations in CblD cause methylmalonic aciduria and/or homocystinuria. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of the globular C-terminal domain of human CblD, which is sufficient for its interaction with MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein), or CblC, and for supporting the cytoplasmic cobalamin trafficking pathway. CblD contains an α+β fold that is structurally reminiscent of the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. Two of the closest structural relatives of CblD are CblC, a multifunctional enzyme important for cobalamin trafficking, and the activation domain of methionine synthase. CblD, CblC, and the activation domain of methionine synthase share several distinguishing features and, together with two recently described corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenases, constitute a new subclass within the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. We demonstrate that CblD enhances oxidation of cob(II)alamin bound to CblC and that disease-causing mutations in CblD impair the kinetics of this reaction. The striking structural similarity of CblD to CblC, believed to be contiguous in the cobalamin trafficking pathway, suggests the co-option of molecular mimicry as a strategy for achieving its function.

  9. Structure of Human B12 Trafficking Protein CblD Reveals Molecular Mimicry and Identifies a New Subfamily of Nitro-FMN Reductases*

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Gherasim, Carmen; Banerjee, Ruma; Koutmos, Markos

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, B12 (or cobalamin) is an essential cofactor required by methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. A complex intracellular pathway supports the assimilation of cobalamin into its active cofactor forms and delivery to its target enzymes. MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D protein), commonly referred to as CblD, is a key chaperone involved in intracellular cobalamin trafficking, and mutations in CblD cause methylmalonic aciduria and/or homocystinuria. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of the globular C-terminal domain of human CblD, which is sufficient for its interaction with MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein), or CblC, and for supporting the cytoplasmic cobalamin trafficking pathway. CblD contains an α+β fold that is structurally reminiscent of the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. Two of the closest structural relatives of CblD are CblC, a multifunctional enzyme important for cobalamin trafficking, and the activation domain of methionine synthase. CblD, CblC, and the activation domain of methionine synthase share several distinguishing features and, together with two recently described corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenases, constitute a new subclass within the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. We demonstrate that CblD enhances oxidation of cob(II)alamin bound to CblC and that disease-causing mutations in CblD impair the kinetics of this reaction. The striking structural similarity of CblD to CblC, believed to be contiguous in the cobalamin trafficking pathway, suggests the co-option of molecular mimicry as a strategy for achieving its function. PMID:26364851

  10. Alteration of the proteostasis network of plant cells promotes the post-endoplasmic reticulum trafficking of recombinant mutant (L444P) human β-glucocerebrosidase

    PubMed Central

    Babajani, Gholamreza; Kermode, Allison R

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a prevalent lysosomal storage disease characterized by a deficiency in the activity of lysosomal acid β-glucosidase (glucocerebrosidase, GCase, EC 3.2.1.45). One of the most prevalent disease-causing mutations in humans is a L444P missense mutation in the GCase protein, which results in its disrupted folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and impaired post-ER trafficking. To determine whether the post-ER trafficking of this severely malfolded protein can be restored, we expressed the mutant L444P GCase as a recombinant protein in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow 2 [BY2]) cells, in which the GCase variant was equipped with a plant signal peptide to allow for secretion upon rescued trafficking out of the ER. The recombinant L444P mutant GCase was retained in the plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Kifunensine and Eeyarestatin I, both inhibitors of ER-associated degradation (ERAD), and the proteostasis regulators, celastrol and MG-132, increased the steady-state levels of the mutant protein inside the plant cells and further promoted the post-ER trafficking of L444P GCase, as indicated by endoglycosidase-H sensitivity- and secretion- analyses. Transcript profiling of genes encoding ER-molecular chaperones, ER stress responsive proteins, and cytoplasmic heat shock response proteins, revealed insignificant or only very modest changes in response to the ERAD inhibitors and proteostasis regulators. An exception was the marked response to celastrol which reduced the steady-state levels of cytoplasmic HSP90 transcripts and protein. As HSP90 participates in the targeting of misfolded proteins to the proteasome pathway, its down-modulation in response to celastrol may partly account for the mechanism of improved homeostasis of L444P GCase mediated by this triterpene. PMID:24713615

  11. Rab 11 regulates constitutive dopamine transporter trafficking and function in N2A neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Furman, Cheryse A; Lo, Charles B; Stokes, Stephanie; Esteban, Jose A; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2009-09-29

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a crucial regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission which undergoes constitutive and substrate-mediated trafficking to and from the membrane. Although, considerable research has been done to elucidate the regulation of substrate-stimulated DAT trafficking, less is known about which trafficking proteins are involved in constitutive DAT trafficking. Rab proteins are GTPases known to regulate the trafficking of proteins to and from specific endocytic compartments. Rabs 8 and 11, in particular, are involved in trafficking proteins from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane. In this study, we sought to determine whether Rabs 8 and 11 would modulate DAT activity and trafficking in N2A neuroblastoma cells. We used Rab mutations known to confer constitutively active or dominant negative activity of these proteins to investigate the role of Rab activity in constitutive DAT trafficking and function. We found that constitutively active Rab 11 upregulates DAT function and surface expression while neither the constitutively active nor the dominant negative mutant of Rab 8 had any effect on DA uptake. Furthermore, immunofluorescence experiments revealed that dominant negative Rab 11 overexpression results in decreased surface DAT indicating a necessary function of Rab 11 in DAT trafficking to the plasma membrane. These data show for the first time a functional role of Rab proteins in the constitutive recycling of DAT to the plasma membrane.

  12. A mutation in the Proteosomal Regulatory Particle AAA-ATPase-3 in Arabidopsis impairs the light-specific hypocotyl elongation response elicited by a glutamate receptor agonist, BMAA.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Eric D; Feinberg, Philip; Runko, Suzan; Coruzzi, Gloria M

    2009-07-01

    BMAA is a cycad-derived glutamate receptor agonist that causes a two- to three-fold increase in hypocotyl elongation on Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the light. To probe the role of plant glutamate receptors and their downstream mediators, we utilized a previously described genetic screen to identify a novel, BMAA insensitive morphology (bim) mutant, bim409. The normal BMAA-induced hypocotyl elongation response observed on wild-type seedlings grown in the light is impaired in the bim409 mutant. This BMAA-induced phenotype is light-specific, as the bim409 mutant exhibits normal hypocotyl elongation in etiolated (dark grown) plants (+ or - BMAA). The mutation in bim409 was identified to be in a gene encoding the Proteosomal Regulatory Particle AAA-ATPase-3 (RPT3). Possible roles of the proteosome in Glu-mediated signaling in plants is discussed.

  13. Cysteine34 of the cytoplasmic tail of the cation-dependent mannose 6- phosphate receptor is reversibly palmitoylated and required for normal trafficking and lysosomal enzyme sorting

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have examined whether the two cysteine residues (Cys30 and Cys34) in the cytoplasmic tail of the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor are palmitoylated via thioesters and whether these residues influence the biologic function of the receptor. To do this, mouse L cells expressing wild-type and mutant receptors were analyzed by metabolic labeling with [3H]palmitate, immunoprecipitation, and SDS- PAGE. Both Cys30 and Cys34 were found to be sites of palmitoylation and together they accounted for the total palmitoylation of the receptor. The palmitate rapidly turned over with a half-life of approximately 2 h compared to a half-life of greater than 40 h for the protein. Mutation of Cys34 to Ala resulted in the gradual accumulation of the receptor in dense lysosomes and the total loss of cathepsin D sorting function in the Golgi. A Cys30 to Ala mutation had no biologic consequences, showing the importance of Cys34. Mutation of amino acids 35-39 to alanines impaired palmitoylation of Cys30 and Cys34 and resulted in abnormal receptor trafficking to lysosomes and loss of cathepsin D sorting. These data suggest that palmitoylation of Cys30 and Cys34 leads to anchoring of this region of the cytoplasmic tail to the lipid bilayer. Anchoring via Cys34 is essential for the normal trafficking and lysosomal enzyme sorting function of the receptor. PMID:8647889

  14. The Parkinson's Disease-Associated Mutation LRRK2-G2019S Impairs Synaptic Plasticity in Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Eric S.; Saunier-Rebori, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a major movement disorder characterized by the loss of dopamine neurons and formation of Lewy bodies. Clinical and pathological evidence indicates that multiple brain regions are affected in PD in a spatiotemporal manner and are associated with a variety of motor and nonmotor symptoms, including disturbances in mood, executive function, and memory. The common PD-associated gene for leucine-rich repeat kinase, leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), is highly expressed in brain regions that are involved with nonmotor functions, including the neocortex and hippocampus, but whether mutant LRRK2 contributes to neuronal dysfunction in these regions is unknown. Here, we use bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mouse models of LRRK2 to explore potential nonmotor mechanisms of PD. Through electrophysiological analysis of the Schaffer collateral–CA1 synapse in dorsal hippocampus, we find that overexpression of LRRK2-G2019S increases basal synaptic efficiency through a postsynaptic mechanism, and disrupts long-term depression. Furthermore, these effects of the G2019S mutation are age dependent and can be normalized by acute inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type LRRK2 has no effect under the same conditions, suggesting a specific phenotype for the G2019S mutation. These results identify a pathogenic function of LRRK2 in the hippocampus that may contribute to nonmotor symptoms of PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease (PD) is among the most common neurological diseases and is best known for its adverse effects on brain regions that control motor function, resulting in tremor, rigidity, and gait abnormalities. Less well appreciated are the psychiatric symptoms experienced by many PD patients, including depression and memory loss, which do not respond well to currently available treatments for PD. Here, we describe functional effects of a common PD-linked mutation of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 in

  15. A novel ENU-induced ankyrin-1 mutation impairs parasite invasion and increases erythrocyte clearance during malaria infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong Ming; Bauer, Denis C.; Lelliott, Patrick M.; Greth, Andreas; McMorran, Brendan J.; Foote, Simon J.; Burgio, Gaetan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic defects in various red blood cell (RBC) cytoskeletal proteins have been long associated with changes in susceptibility towards malaria infection. In particular, while ankyrin (Ank-1) mutations account for approximately 50% of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) cases, an association with malaria is not well-established, and conflicting evidence has been reported. We describe a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced ankyrin mutation MRI61689 that gives rise to two different ankyrin transcripts: one with an introduced splice acceptor site resulting a frameshift, the other with a skipped exon. Ank-1(MRI61689/+) mice exhibit an HS-like phenotype including reduction in mean corpuscular volume (MCV), increased osmotic fragility and reduced RBC deformability. They were also found to be resistant to rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi infection. Parasites in Ank-1(MRI61689/+) erythrocytes grew normally, but red cells showed resistance to merozoite invasion. Uninfected Ank-1(MRI61689/+) erythrocytes were also more likely to be cleared from circulation during infection; the “bystander effect”. This increased clearance is a novel resistance mechanism which was not observed in previous ankyrin mouse models. We propose that this bystander effect is due to reduced deformability of Ank-1(MRI61689/+) erythrocytes. This paper highlights the complex roles ankyrin plays in mediating malaria resistance. PMID:27848995

  16. Parkinson Sac Domain Mutation in Synaptojanin 1 Impairs Clathrin Uncoating at Synapses and Triggers Dystrophic Changes in Dopaminergic Axons.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mian; Wu, Yumei; Ashrafi, Ghazaleh; McCartney, Amber J; Wheeler, Heather; Bushong, Eric A; Boassa, Daniela; Ellisman, Mark H; Ryan, Timothy A; De Camilli, Pietro

    2017-02-22

    Synaptojanin 1 (SJ1) is a major presynaptic phosphatase that couples synaptic vesicle endocytosis to the dephosphorylation of PI(4,5)P2, a reaction needed for the shedding of endocytic factors from their membranes. While the role of SJ1's 5-phosphatase module in this process is well recognized, the contribution of its Sac phosphatase domain, whose preferred substrate is PI4P, remains unclear. Recently a homozygous mutation in its Sac domain was identified in early-onset parkinsonism patients. We show that mice carrying this mutation developed neurological manifestations similar to those of human patients. Synapses of these mice displayed endocytic defects and a striking accumulation of clathrin-coated intermediates, strongly implicating Sac domain's activity in endocytic protein dynamics. Mutant brains had elevated auxilin (PARK19) and parkin (PARK2) levels. Moreover, dystrophic axonal terminal changes were selectively observed in dopaminergic axons in the dorsal striatum. These results strengthen evidence for a link between synaptic endocytic dysfunction and Parkinson's disease.

  17. Mutation in PNPT1, which encodes a polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase, impairs RNA import into mitochondria and causes respiratory-chain deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vedrenne, Vanessa; Gowher, Ali; De Lonlay, Pascale; Nitschke, Patrick; Serre, Valérie; Boddaert, Nathalie; Altuzarra, Cecilia; Mager-Heckel, Anne-Marie; Chretien, Florence; Entelis, Nina; Munnich, Arnold; Tarassov, Ivan; Rötig, Agnès

    2012-11-02

    Multiple-respiratory-chain deficiency represents an important cause of mitochondrial disorders. Hitherto, however, mutations in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance and translation machinery only account for a fraction of cases. Exome sequencing in two siblings, born to consanguineous parents, with severe encephalomyopathy, choreoathetotic movements, and combined respiratory-chain defects allowed us to identify a homozygous PNPT1 missense mutation (c.1160A>G) that encodes the mitochondrial polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that no PNPase complex could be detected in subject fibroblasts, confirming that the substitution encoded by c.1160A>G disrupts the trimerization of the protein. PNPase is predominantly localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is implicated in RNA targeting to human mitochondria. Mammalian mitochondria import several small noncoding nuclear RNAs (5S rRNA, MRP RNA, some tRNAs, and miRNAs). By RNA hybridization experiments, we observed a significant decrease in 5S rRNA and MRP-related RNA import into mitochondria in fibroblasts of affected subject 1. Moreover, we found a reproducible decrease in the rate of mitochondrial translation in her fibroblasts. Finally, overexpression of the wild-type PNPT1 cDNA in fibroblasts of subject 1 induced an increase in 5S rRNA import in mitochondria and rescued the mitochondrial-translation deficiency. In conclusion, we report here abnormal RNA import into mitochondria as a cause of respiratory-chain deficiency.

  18. Modulation of dendritic spine development and plasticity by BDNF and vesicular trafficking: fundamental roles in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with mental retardation and autism.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, Christopher A; Larimore, Jennifer L; Theibert, Anne; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2009-09-01

    The process of axonal and dendritic development establishes the synaptic circuitry of the central nervous system (CNS) and is the result of interactions between intrinsic molecular factors and the external environment. One growth factor that has a compelling function in neuronal development is the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF participates in axonal and dendritic differentiation during embryonic stages of neuronal development, as well as in the formation and maturation of dendritic spines during postnatal development. Recent studies have also implicated vesicular trafficking of BDNF via secretory vesicles, and both secretory and endosomal trafficking of vesicles containing synaptic proteins, such as neurotransmitter and neurotrophin receptors, in the regulation of axonal and dendritic differentiation, and in dendritic spine morphogenesis. Several genes that are either mutated or deregulated in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with mental retardation have now been identified, and several mouse models of these disorders have been generated and characterized. Interestingly, abnormalities in dendritic and synaptic structure are consistently observed in human neurodevelopmental disorders associated with mental retardation, and in mouse models of these disorders as well. Abnormalities in dendritic and synaptic differentiation are thought to underlie altered synaptic function and network connectivity, thus contributing to the clinical outcome. Here, we review the roles of BDNF and vesicular trafficking in axonal and dendritic differentiation in the context of dendritic and axonal morphological impairments commonly observed in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with mental retardation.

  19. 31 CFR 536.311 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 536.311 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.311 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any activity...

  20. 31 CFR 536.311 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 536.311... OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.311 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any...

  1. 31 CFR 536.311 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 536.311 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.311 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any activity...

  2. 31 CFR 536.311 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 536.311 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.311 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any activity...

  3. 31 CFR 536.311 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 536.311 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.311 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any activity...

  4. The DNA Ligase IV Syndrome R278H Mutation Impairs B Lymphopoiesis via Error-Prone Nonhomologous End-Joining.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihye; Welner, Robert S; Chan, Mei-Yee; Troppito, Logan; Staber, Philipp B; Tenen, Daniel G; Yan, Catherine T

    2016-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations in the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA repair protein DNA ligase IV (LIG4) lead to immunodeficiency with varying severity. In this study, using a murine knock-in model, we investigated the mechanisms underlying abnormalities in class switch recombination (CSR) associated with the human homozygous Lig4 R278H mutation. Previously, we found that despite the near absence of Lig4 end-ligation activity and severely reduced mature B cell numbers, Lig4(R278H/R278H) (Lig4(R/R)) mice exhibit only a partial CSR block, producing near normal IgG1 and IgE but substantially reduced IgG3, IgG2b, and IgA serum levels. In this study, to address the cause of these abnormalities, we assayed CSR in Lig4(R/R) B cells generated via preassembled IgH and IgK V region exons (HL). This revealed that Lig4(R278H) protein levels while intact exhibited a higher turnover rate during activation of switching to IgG3 and IgG2b, as well as delays in CSR kinetics associated with defective proliferation during activation of switching to IgG1 and IgE. Activated Lig4(R/R)HL B cells consistently accumulated high frequencies of activation-induced cytidine deaminase-dependent IgH locus chromosomal breaks and translocations and were more prone to apoptosis, effects that appeared to be p53-independent, as p53 deficiency did not markedly influence these events. Importantly, NHEJ instead of alternative end-joining (A-EJ) was revealed as the predominant mechanism catalyzing robust CSR. Defective CSR was linked to failed NHEJ and residual A-EJ access to unrepaired double-strand breaks. These data firmly demonstrate that Lig4(R278H) activity renders NHEJ to be more error-prone, and they predict increased error-prone NHEJ activity and A-EJ suppression as the cause of the defective B lymphopoiesis in Lig4 patients.

  5. A dominant mutation in the light-oxygen and voltage2 domain vicinity impairs phototropin1 signaling in tomato.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sulabha; Kharshiing, Eros; Srinivas, Ankanagari; Zikihara, Kazunori; Tokutomi, Satoru; Nagatani, Akira; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Bodanapu, Reddaiah; Behera, Rajendra K; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2014-04-01

    In higher plants, blue light (BL) phototropism is primarily controlled by the phototropins, which are also involved in stomatal movement and chloroplast relocation. These photoresponses are mediated by two phototropins, phot1 and phot2. Phot1 mediates responses with higher sensitivity than phot2, and phot2 specifically mediates chloroplast avoidance and dark positioning responses. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a Nonphototropic seedling1 (Nps1) mutant of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The mutant is impaired in low-fluence BL responses, including chloroplast accumulation and stomatal opening. Genetic analyses show that the mutant locus is dominant negative in nature. In dark-grown seedlings of the Nps1 mutant, phot1 protein accumulates at a highly reduced level relative to the wild type and lacks BL-induced autophosphorylation. The mutant harbors a single glycine-1484-to-alanine transition in the Hinge1 region of a phot1 homolog, resulting in an arginine-to-histidine substitution (R495H) in a highly conserved A'α helix proximal to the light-oxygen and voltage2 domain of the translated gene product. Significantly, the R495H substitution occurring in the Hinge1 region of PHOT1 abolishes its regulatory activity in Nps1 seedlings, thereby highlighting the functional significance of the A'α helix region in phototropic signaling of tomato.

  6. COPA mutations impair ER-Golgi transport and cause hereditary autoimmune-mediated lung disease and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Watkin, Levi B; Jessen, Birthe; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Vece, Timothy J; Jan, Max; Sha, Youbao; Thamsen, Maike; Santos-Cortez, Regie L P; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Gambin, Tomasz; Forbes, Lisa R; Law, Christopher S; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Cheng, Mickie H; Mace, Emily M; Anderson, Mark S; Liu, Dongfang; Tang, Ling Fung; Nicholas, Sarah K; Nahmod, Karen; Makedonas, George; Canter, Debra L; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Hicks, John; Jones, Kirk D; Penney, Samantha; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Rosenblum, Michael D; Dell, Sharon D; Waterfield, Michael R; Papa, Feroz R; Muzny, Donna M; Zaitlen, Noah; Leal, Suzanne M; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Boerwinkle, Eric; Eissa, N Tony; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Orange, Jordan S; Shum, Anthony K

    2015-06-01

    Unbiased genetic studies have uncovered surprising molecular mechanisms in human cellular immunity and autoimmunity. We performed whole-exome sequencing and targeted sequencing in five families with an apparent mendelian syndrome of autoimmunity characterized by high-titer autoantibodies, inflammatory arthritis and interstitial lung disease. We identified four unique deleterious variants in the COPA gene (encoding coatomer subunit α) affecting the same functional domain. Hypothesizing that mutant COPA leads to defective intracellular transport via coat protein complex I (COPI), we show that COPA variants impair binding to proteins targeted for retrograde Golgi-to-ER transport. Additionally, expression of mutant COPA results in ER stress and the upregulation of cytokines priming for a T helper type 17 (TH17) response. Patient-derived CD4(+) T cells also demonstrate significant skewing toward a TH17 phenotype that is implicated in autoimmunity. Our findings uncover an unexpected molecular link between a vesicular transport protein and a syndrome of autoimmunity manifested by lung and joint disease.

  7. Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Steinhäusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-08-01

    Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (<20% U 235) or highly enriched uranium (>20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces.

  8. Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Steinhaeusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-08-07

    Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (<20% U 235) or highly enriched uranium (>20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces.

  9. Sex trafficking in South Asia.

    PubMed

    Huda, S

    2006-09-01

    Economic and social inequalities and political conflicts have led to the movement of persons within each country and across the borders in South Asia. Globalization has encouraged free mobility of capital, technology, experts and sex tourism. Illiteracy, dependency, violence, social stigma, cultural stereotypes, gender disparity and endemic poverty, among other factors, place women and children in powerless, non-negotiable situations that have contributed to the emergence and breeding of the cavernous problem of sex trafficking in the entire region. This alarming spread of sex trafficking has fuelled the spread of HIV infection in South Asia, posing a unique and serious threat to community health, poverty alleviation and other crucial aspects of human development. Although the SAARC (South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation) Convention on Trafficking in Women and Children has been an important breakthrough, most of the countries in the region do not have anti-trafficking legislation or means to protect the victims. Countries of the region should make a concerted effort to treat trafficking victims as "victims" of human rights violations in all anti-trafficking strategies and actions.

  10. Intracellular mannose binding lectin mediates subcellular trafficking of HIV-1 gp120 in neurons.

    PubMed

    Teodorof, C; Divakar, S; Soontornniyomkij, B; Achim, C L; Kaul, M; Singh, K K

    2014-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enters the brain early during infection and leads to severe neuronal damage and central nervous system impairment. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), a neurotoxin, undergoes intracellular trafficking and transport across neurons; however mechanisms of gp120 trafficking in neurons are unclear. Our results show that mannose binding lectin (MBL) that binds to the N-linked mannose residues on gp120, participates in intravesicular packaging of gp120 in neuronal subcellular organelles and also in subcellular trafficking of these vesicles in neuronal cells. Perinuclear MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes were observed and MBL facilitated the subcellular trafficking of gp120 via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi vesicles. The functional carbohydrate recognition domain of MBL was required for perinuclear organization, distribution and subcellular trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes. Nocodazole, an agent that depolymerizes the microtubule network, abolished the trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicles, suggesting that these vesicular complexes were transported along the microtubule network. Live cell imaging confirmed the association of the MBL:gp120 complexes with dynamic subcellular vesicles that underwent trafficking in neuronal soma and along the neurites. Thus, our findings suggest that intracellular MBL mediates subcellular trafficking and transport of viral glycoproteins in a microtubule-dependent mechanism in the neurons.

  11. Intracellular Mannose Binding Lectin Mediates Subcellular Trafficking of HIV-1 gp120 in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Teodorof, C; Divakar, S; Soontornniyomkij, B; Achim, CL; Kaul, M; Singh, KK

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus -1 (HIV-1) enters the brain early during infection and leads to severe neuronal damage and central nervous system impairment. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), a neurotoxin, undergoes intracellular trafficking and transport across neurons; however mechanisms of gp120 trafficking in neurons are unclear. Our results show that mannose binding lectin (MBL) that binds to the N-linked mannose residues on gp120, participates in intravesicular packaging of gp120 in neuronal subcellular organelles and also in subcellular trafficking of these vesicles in neuronal cells. Perinuclear MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes were observed and MBL facilitated the subcellular trafficking of gp120 via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi vesicles. The functional carbohydrate recognition domain of MBL was required for perinuclear organization, distribution and subcellular trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes. Nocodazole, an agent that depolymerizes the microtubule network, abolished the trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicles, suggesting that these vesicular complexes were transported along the microtubule network. Live cell imaging confirmed the association of the MBL:gp120 complexes with dynamic subcellular vesicles that underwent trafficking in neuronal soma and along the neurites. Thus, our findings suggest that intracellular MBL mediates subcellular trafficking and transport of viral glycoproteins in a microtubule-dependent mechanism in the neurons. PMID:24825317

  12. The 3' addition of CCA to mitochondrial tRNASer(AGY) is specifically impaired in patients with mutations in the tRNA nucleotidyl transferase TRNT1.

    PubMed

    Sasarman, Florin; Thiffault, Isabelle; Weraarpachai, Woranontee; Salomon, Steven; Maftei, Catalina; Gauthier, Julie; Ellazam, Benjamin; Webb, Neil; Antonicka, Hana; Janer, Alexandre; Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Elpeleg, Orly; Mitchell, Grant; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2015-05-15

    Addition of the trinucleotide cytosine/cytosine/adenine (CCA) to the 3' end of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) is essential for translation and is catalyzed by the enzyme TRNT1 (tRNA nucleotidyl transferase), which functions in both the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Exome sequencing revealed TRNT1 mutations in two unrelated subjects with different clinical features. The first presented with acute lactic acidosis at 3 weeks of age and developed severe developmental delay, hypotonia, microcephaly, seizures, progressive cortical atrophy, neurosensorial deafness, sideroblastic anemia and renal Fanconi syndrome, dying at 21 months. The second presented at 3.5 years with gait ataxia, dysarthria, gross motor regression, hypotonia, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia and had abnormal signals in brainstem and dentate nucleus. In subject 1, muscle biopsy showed combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects, but there was no OXPHOS deficiency in fibroblasts from either subject, despite a 10-fold-reduction in TRNT1 protein levels in fibroblasts of the first subject. Furthermore, in normal controls, TRNT1 protein levels are 10-fold lower in muscle than in fibroblasts. High resolution northern blots of subject fibroblast RNA suggested incomplete CCA addition to the non-canonical mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(AGY)), but no obvious qualitative differences in other mitochondrial or cytoplasmic tRNAs. Complete knockdown of TRNT1 in patient fibroblasts rendered mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(AGY)) undetectable, and markedly reduced mitochondrial translation, except polypeptides lacking Ser(AGY) codons. These data suggest that the clinical phenotypes associated with TRNT1 mutations are largely due to impaired mitochondrial translation, resulting from defective CCA addition to mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(AGY)), and that the severity of this biochemical phenotype determines the severity and tissue distribution of clinical features.

  13. To discuss illicit nuclear trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Balatsky, Galya I; Severe, William R; Wallace, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    The Illicit nuclear trafficking panel was conducted at the 4th Annual INMM workshop on Reducing the Risk from Radioactive and Nuclear Materials on February 2-3, 2010 in Washington DC. While the workshop occurred prior to the Nuclear Security Summit, April 12-13 2010 in Washington DC, some of the summit issues were raised during the workshop. The Communique of the Washington Nuclear Security Summit stated that 'Nuclear terrorism is one of the most challenging threats to international security, and strong nuclear security measures are the most effective means to prevent terrorists, criminals, or other unauthorized actors from acquiring nuclear materials.' The Illicit Trafficking panel is one means to strengthen nuclear security and cooperation at bilateral, regional and multilateral levels. Such a panel promotes nuclear security culture through technology development, human resources development, education and training. It is a tool which stresses the importance of international cooperation and coordination of assistance to improve efforts to prevent and respond to incidents of illicit nuclear trafficking. Illicit trafficking panel included representatives from US government, an international organization (IAEA), private industry and a non-governmental organization to discuss illicit nuclear trafficking issues. The focus of discussions was on best practices and challenges for addressing illicit nuclear trafficking. Terrorism connection. Workshop discussions pointed out the identification of terrorist connections with several trafficking incidents. Several trafficking cases involved real buyers (as opposed to undercover law enforcement agents) and there have been reports identifying individuals associated with terrorist organizations as prospective plutonium buyers. Some specific groups have been identified that consistently search for materials to buy on the black market, but no criminal groups were identified that specialize in nuclear materials or isotope smuggling

  14. Mutation of SPOTTED LEAF3 (SPL3) impairs abscisic acid-responsive signalling and delays leaf senescence in rice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Seung-Hyun; Lim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Sook; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Yoo, Soo-Cheul; Koh, Hee-Jong; Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-01-01

    Lesion mimic mutants commonly display spontaneous cell death in pre-senescent green leaves under normal conditions, without pathogen attack. Despite molecular and phenotypic characterization of several lesion mimic mutants, the mechanisms of the spontaneous formation of cell death lesions remain largely unknown. Here, the rice lesion mimic mutant spotted leaf3 (spl3) was examined. When grown under a light/dark cycle, the spl3 mutant appeared similar to wild-type at early developmental stages, but lesions gradually appeared in the mature leaves close to heading stage. By contrast, in spl3 mutants grown under continuous light, severe cell death lesions formed in developing leaves, even at the seedling stage. Histochemical analysis showed that hydrogen peroxide accumulated in the mutant, likely causing the cell death phenotype. By map-based cloning and complementation, it was shown that a 1-bp deletion in the first exon of Oryza sativa Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase1 (OsMAPKKK1)/OsEDR1/OsACDR1 causes the spl3 mutant phenotype. The spl3 mutant was found to be insensitive to abscisic acid (ABA), showing normal root growth in ABA-containing media and delayed leaf yellowing during dark-induced and natural senescence. Expression of ABA signalling-associated genes was also less responsive to ABA treatment in the mutant. Furthermore, the spl3 mutant had lower transcript levels and activities of catalases, which scavenge hydrogen peroxide, probably due to impairment of ABA-responsive signalling. Finally, a possible molecular mechanism of lesion formation in the mature leaves of spl3 mutant is discussed. PMID:26276867

  15. A lysine-to-arginine mutation on NEDD8 markedly reduces the activity of cullin RING E3 ligase through the impairment of neddylation cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Yiyan; Liu, Yaobin; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-06-12

    Neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8) is a ubiquitin-like modifier, which forms covalent conjugates on lysines of its substrates. This post-translational modification, neddylation, plays important roles in tumor cell proliferation and viability. Ubiquitin can form diverse polyubiquitin chains, on its seven lysines, which play important functions in various biological processes. However, the roles of lysines in NEDD8 have not been explored. Here, we generated nine NEDD8 point mutants, each with one lysine replaced by an arginine, to study the putative function of lysines in NEDD8. Our experiments discover that Lys27 in NEDD8 is a critical residue for protein neddylation. Replacement of this residue with arginine almost completely eliminates the conjugation of NEDD8 to its substrates. Furthermore, we find that the K27R mutant impairs NEDD8 conjugation to the E2 enzyme, which normally forms thioester bonds for further transferring NEDD8 to its ligases and substrates. Therefore, this mutation completely inhibits global protein neddylation, including neddylation of cullin family proteins, resulting in decreased activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases. This work sheds new light on the roles of NEDD8 lysines on neddylation cascades and provides a dominant negative mutant for the study of neddylation and its biological functions. - Highlights: • Lys27 in NEDD8 is critical for protein neddylation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant impairs the NEDD8 conjugation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant significantly reduces the activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases.

  16. DNAJC13 mutations in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Rajput, Alex; Milnerwood, Austen J; Shah, Brinda; Szu-Tu, Chelsea; Trinh, Joanne; Yu, Irene; Encarnacion, Mary; Munsie, Lise N; Tapia, Lucia; Gustavsson, Emil K; Chou, Patrick; Tatarnikov, Igor; Evans, Daniel M; Pishotta, Frederick T; Volta, Mattia; Beccano-Kelly, Dayne; Thompson, Christina; Lin, Michelle K; Sherman, Holly E; Han, Heather J; Guenther, Bruce L; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Bernard, Virginie; Ross, Colin J; Appel-Cresswell, Silke; Stoessl, A Jon; Robinson, Christopher A; Dickson, Dennis W; Ross, Owen A; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Aasly, Jan O; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Hentati, Faycal; Gibson, Rachel A; McPherson, Peter S; Girard, Martine; Rajput, Michele; Rajput, Ali H; Farrer, Matthew J

    2014-04-01

    A Saskatchewan multi-incident family was clinically characterized with Parkinson disease (PD) and Lewy body pathology. PD segregates as an autosomal-dominant trait, which could not be ascribed to any known mutation. DNA from three affected members was subjected to exome sequencing. Genome alignment, variant annotation and comparative analyses were used to identify shared coding mutations. Sanger sequencing was performed within the extended family and ethnically matched controls. Subsequent genotyping was performed in a multi-ethnic case-control series consisting of 2928 patients and 2676 control subjects from Canada, Norway, Taiwan, Tunisia, and the USA. A novel mutation in receptor-mediated endocytosis 8/RME-8 (DNAJC13 p.Asn855Ser) was found to segregate with disease. Screening of cases and controls identified four additional patients with the mutation, of which two had familial parkinsonism. All carriers shared an ancestral DNAJC13 p.Asn855Ser haplotype and claimed Dutch-German-Russian Mennonite heritage. DNAJC13 regulates the dynamics of clathrin coats on early endosomes. Cellular analysis shows that the mutation confers a toxic gain-of-function and impairs endosomal transport. DNAJC13 immunoreactivity was also noted within Lewy body inclusions. In late-onset disease which is most reminiscent of idiopathic PD subtle deficits in endosomal receptor-sorting/recycling are highlighted by the discovery of pathogenic mutations VPS35, LRRK2 and now DNAJC13. With this latest discovery, and from a neuronal perspective, a temporal and functional ecology is emerging that connects synaptic exo- and endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, endosomal recycling and the endo-lysosomal degradative pathway. Molecular deficits in these processes are genetically linked to the phenotypic spectrum of parkinsonism associated with Lewy body pathology.

  17. Gene structure and mutations of glutaryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase: Impaired association of enzyme subunits that is due to an A421V substitution causes glutaric acidemia type I in the Amish

    SciTech Connect

    Biery, B.J.; Stein, D.E.; Goodman, S.I.

    1996-11-01

    The structure of the human glutaryl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (GCD) gene was determined to contain 11 exons and to span {approximately}7 kb. Fibroblast DNA from 64 unrelated glutaric academia type I (GA1) patients was screened for mutations by PCR amplification and analysis of SSCP. Fragments with altered electrophoretic mobility were subcloned and sequenced to detect mutations that caused GA1. This report describes the structure of the GCD gene, as well as point mutations and polymorphisms found in 7 of its 11 exons. Several mutations were found in more than one patient, but no one prevalent mutation was detected in the general population. As expected from pedigree analysis, a single mutant allele causes GA1 in the Old Order Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Several mutations have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and all produce diminished enzyme activity. Reduced activity in GCD encoded by the A421V mutation in the Amish may be due to impaired association of enzyme subunits. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. pARIS-htt: an optimised expression platform to study huntingtin reveals functional domains required for vesicular trafficking

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Huntingtin (htt) is a multi-domain protein of 350 kDa that is mutated in Huntington's disease (HD) but whose function is yet to be fully understood. This absence of information is due in part to the difficulty of manipulating large DNA fragments by using conventional molecular cloning techniques. Consequently, few studies have addressed the cellular function(s) of full-length htt and its dysfunction(s) associated with the disease. Results We describe a flexible synthetic vector encoding full-length htt called pARIS-htt (Adaptable, RNAi Insensitive &Synthetic). It includes synthetic cDNA coding for full-length human htt modified so that: 1) it is improved for codon usage, 2) it is insensitive to four different siRNAs allowing gene replacement studies, 3) it contains unique restriction sites (URSs) dispersed throughout the entire sequence without modifying the translated amino acid sequence, 4) it contains multiple cloning sites at the N and C-ter ends and 5) it is Gateway compatible. These modifications facilitate mutagenesis, tagging and cloning into diverse expression plasmids. Htt regulates dynein/dynactin-dependent trafficking of vesicles, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-containing vesicles, and of organelles, including reforming and maintenance of the Golgi near the cell centre. We used tests of these trafficking functions to validate various pARIS-htt constructs. We demonstrated, after silencing of endogenous htt, that full-length htt expressed from pARIS-htt rescues Golgi apparatus reformation following reversible microtubule disruption. A mutant form of htt that contains a 100Q expansion and a htt form devoid of either HAP1 or dynein interaction domains are both unable to rescue loss of endogenous htt. These mutants have also an impaired capacity to promote BDNF vesicular trafficking in neuronal cells. Conclusion We report the validation of a synthetic gene encoding full-length htt protein that will facilitate analyses of its

  19. [Progress in research on defective protein trafficking and functional restoration in HERG-associated long QT syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fang, Peiliang; Lian, Jiangfang

    2016-02-01

    The human ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) encodes the α -subunit of the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K(+) channel, which is essential for the third repolarization of the action potential of human myocardial cells. Mutations of the HERG gene can cause type II hereditary long QT syndrome (LQT2), characterized by prolongation of the QT interval, abnormal T wave, torsade de pointes, syncope and sudden cardiac death. So far more than 300 HERG mutations have been identified, the majority of which can cause LQT2 due to HERG protein trafficking defect. It has been reported that certain drugs can induce acquired long QT syndrome through directly blocking the pore and/or affecting the HERG trafficking. The trafficking defects and K(+) currents can be restored with low temperature and certain drugs. However, the mechanisms underlying defective trafficking caused by HERG mutations and the inhibition/restoration of HERG trafficking by drugs are still unknown. This review summarizes the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms including HERG trafficking under physiological and pathological conditions, and the effects of drugs on the HERG trafficking, in order to provide theoretical evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of long QT syndrome.

  20. Localization and Trafficking of Amyloid-β Protein Precursor and Secretases: Impact on Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Agostinho, Paula; Pliássova, Anna; Oliveira, Catarina R; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects almost 35 million people worldwide. One of the neuropathological features of AD is the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques, which are mainly composed of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. These peptides derive from the amyloidogenic proteolytic processing of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), through the sequential action of β- and γ-secretases. However, AβPP can also be cleaved by a non-amyloidogenic pathway, involving an α-secretase, and in this case the Aβ formation is precluded. The production of Aβ and of other AβPP catabolites depends on the spatial and temporal co-localization of AβPP with α- or β-secretases and γ-secretase, which traffic through the secretory pathway in a highly regulated manner. Disturbances on AβPP and secretases intracellular trafficking and, consequently, in their localization may affect dynamic interactions between these proteins with consequences in the AD pathogenesis. In this article, we critically review the recent knowledge about the trafficking and co-localization of AβPP and related secretases in the brain under physiological and AD conditions. A particular focus is given to data concerning the distribution of AβPP and secretases in different types of synapses relatively to other neuronal or glial localizations. Furthermore, we discuss some possible signals that govern the dynamic encounter of AβPP with each group of secretases, such as AβPP mutations, estrogen deprivation, chronic stress, metabolic impairment, and alterations in sleep pattern-associated with aging. The knowledge of key signals that are responsible for the shifting of AβPP processing away from α-secretases and toward the β-secretases might be useful to develop AD therapeutic strategies.

  1. Understanding human trafficking in the United States.

    PubMed

    Logan, T K; Walker, Robert; Hunt, Gretchen

    2009-01-01

    The topic of modern-day slavery or human trafficking has received increased media and national attention. However, to date there has been limited research on the nature and scope of human trafficking in the United States. This article describes and synthesizes nine reports that assess the U.S. service organizations' legal representative knowledge of, and experience with, human trafficking cases, as well as information from actual cases and media reports. This article has five main goals: (a) to define what human trafficking is, and is not; (b) to describe factors identified as contributing to vulnerability to being trafficked and keeping a person entrapped in the situation; (c) to examine how the crime of human trafficking differs from other kinds of crimes in the United States; (d) to explore how human trafficking victims are identified; and, (e) to provide recommendations to better address human trafficking in the United States.

  2. ECHIDNA-mediated post-Golgi trafficking of auxin carriers for differential cell elongation.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Yohann; Jonsson, Kristoffer; McFarlane, Heather E; Johnson, Errin; Gendre, Delphine; Swarup, Ranjan; Friml, Jirí; Samuels, Lacey; Robert, Stéphanie; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P

    2013-10-01

    The plant hormone indole-acetic acid (auxin) is essential for many aspects of plant development. Auxin-mediated growth regulation typically involves the establishment of an auxin concentration gradient mediated by polarly localized auxin transporters. The localization of auxin carriers and their amount at the plasma membrane are controlled by membrane trafficking processes such as secretion, endocytosis, and recycling. In contrast to endocytosis or recycling, how the secretory pathway mediates the localization of auxin carriers is not well understood. In this study we have used the differential cell elongation process during apical hook development to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the post-Golgi trafficking of auxin carriers in Arabidopsis. We show that differential cell elongation during apical hook development is defective in Arabidopsis mutant echidna (ech). ECH protein is required for the trans-Golgi network (TGN)-mediated trafficking of the auxin influx carrier AUX1 to the plasma membrane. In contrast, ech mutation only marginally perturbs the trafficking of the highly related auxin influx carrier LIKE-AUX1-3 or the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED-3, both also involved in hook development. Electron tomography reveals that the trafficking defects in ech mutant are associated with the perturbation of secretory vesicle genesis from the TGN. Our results identify differential mechanisms for the post-Golgi trafficking of de novo-synthesized auxin carriers to plasma membrane from the TGN and reveal how trafficking of auxin influx carriers mediates the control of differential cell elongation in apical hook development.

  3. The golgin GMAP-210 is required for efficient membrane trafficking in the early secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Roboti, Peristera; Sato, Keisuke; Lowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Golgins are coiled-coil proteins that participate in membrane-tethering events at the Golgi complex. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular trafficking and Golgi organization. However, the degree to which individual golgins contribute to these processes is poorly defined, and it has been proposed that golgins act in a largely redundant manner. Previous studies on the golgin GMAP-210 (also known as TRIP11), which is mutated in the rare skeletal disorder achondrogenesis type 1A, have yielded conflicting results regarding its involvement in trafficking. Here, we re-investigated the trafficking role of GMAP-210, and found that it is indeed required for efficient trafficking in the secretory pathway. GMAP-210 acts at both the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) and Golgi complex during anterograde trafficking, and is also required for retrograde trafficking to the ER. Using co-depletion experiments, we also found that GMAP-210 acts in a partially redundant manner with the golgin GM130 to ensure efficient anterograde cargo delivery to the cis-Golgi. In summary, our results indicate a role for GMAP-210 in several trafficking steps at the ER–Golgi interface, some of which are partially redundant with another golgin, namely GM130 (also known as GOLGA2). PMID:25717001

  4. Pro-metastatic NEDD9 regulates individual cell migration via caveolin-1-dependent trafficking of integrins

    PubMed Central

    Kozyulina, Polina Y.; Loskutov, Yuriy V.; Kozyreva, Varvara K.; Rajulapati, Anuradha; Ice, Ryan J.; Jones, Brandon. C.; Pugacheva, Elena N.

    2014-01-01

    The dissemination of tumor cells relies on efficient cell adhesion and migration, which in turn depends upon endocytic trafficking of integrins. In the current work, it was found that depletion of pro-metastatic protein, NEDD9, in breast cancer (BC) cells results in a significant decrease in individual cell migration due to impaired trafficking of ligand-bound integrins. NEDD9 deficiency does not affect the expression or internalization of integrins but heightens caveolae-dependent trafficking of ligand-bound integrins to early endosomes. Increase in mobility of ligand-bound integrins is concomitant with an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin-1 (CAV1) and volume of CAV1-vesicles. NEDD9 directly binds to CAV1 and co-localizes within CAV1 vesicles. In the absence of NEDD9, the trafficking of ligand-bound integrins from early to late endosomes is impaired, resulting in a significant decrease in degradation of ligand/integrin complexes and an increase in recycling of ligand-bound integrins from early endosomes back to the plasma membrane without ligand disengagement, thus leading to low adhesion and migration. Re-expression of NEDD9 or decrease in the amount of active, tyrosine 14 phosphorylated (Tyr14) CAV1 in NEDD9 depleted cells rescues the integrin trafficking deficiency and restores cellular adhesion and migration capacity. Collectively, these findings indicate that NEDD9 orchestrates trafficking of ligand-bound integrins through the attenuation of CAV1 activity. PMID:25319010

  5. 31 CFR 598.310 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 598.310 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.310 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any illicit activity...

  6. 31 CFR 598.310 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 598.310 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.310 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any illicit activity...

  7. 31 CFR 598.310 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 598.310 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.310 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any illicit activity...

  8. 31 CFR 598.310 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 598.310 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.310 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any illicit activity...

  9. 31 CFR 598.310 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 598.310... OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.310 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any...

  10. Barriers to Combating Human Trafficking in Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    EFFORTS ..............25 A. THE COLOMBIAN LEGAL FRAMEWORK AGAINST HUMAN TRAFFICKING...severe forms of trafficking in persons.”20 The second and third standards deal exclusively with the legal status of human trafficking in, requiring...problems involving definitions and victim identification; quantifying the problem; victimization factors; the legal system; and demand, corruption, and

  11. Carriers of Loss-of-Function Mutations in EXT Display Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Reserve Due to Smaller Pancreas Volume

    PubMed Central

    Hassing, H . Carlijne; Kruit, Janine K.; Witjes, Julia J.; van de Sande, Michiel A. J.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Xu, Ding; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2014-01-01

    Exotosin (EXT) proteins are involved in the chain elongation step of heparan sulfate (HS) biosynthesis, which is intricately involved in organ development. Loss of function mutations (LOF) in EXT1 and EXT2 result in hereditary exostoses (HME). Interestingly, HS plays a role in pancreas development and beta-cell function, and genetic variations in EXT2 are associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We hypothesized that loss of function of EXT1 or EXT2 in subjects with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) affects pancreatic insulin secretion capacity and development. We performed an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) followed by hyperglycemic clamps to investigate first-phase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in HME patients and age and gender matched non-affected relatives. Pancreas volume was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). OGTT did not reveal significant differences in glucose disposal, but there was a markedly lower GSIS in HME subjects during hyperglycemic clamp (iAUC HME: 0.72 [0.46–1.16] vs. controls 1.53 [0.69–3.36] nmol·l−1·min−1, p<0.05). Maximal insulin response following arginine challenge was also significantly attenuated (iAUC HME: 7.14 [4.22–10.5] vs. controls 10.2 [7.91–12.70] nmol·l−1·min−1 p<0.05), indicative of an impaired beta-cell reserve. MRI revealed a significantly smaller pancreatic volume in HME subjects (HME: 72.0±15.8 vs. controls 96.5±26.0 cm3 p = 0.04). In conclusion, loss of function of EXT proteins may affect beta-cell mass and insulin secretion capacity in humans, and render subjects at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes when exposed to environmental risk factors. PMID:25541963

  12. POPDC1S201F causes muscular dystrophy and arrhythmia by affecting protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Roland F.R.; Scotton, Chiara; Zhang, Jianguo; Passarelli, Chiara; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; Simrick, Subreena; Schwerte, Thorsten; Poon, Kar-Lai; Fang, Mingyan; Rinné, Susanne; Froese, Alexander; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Grunert, Christiane; Müller, Thomas; Tasca, Giorgio; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Drago, Fabrizio; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Di Raimo, Francesca Romana; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Gualandi, Francesca; Fattori, Fabiana; Pietrangelo, Antonello; Li, Wenyan; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Xun; Bertini, Enrico; Decher, Niels; Wang, Jun; Brand, Thomas; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The Popeye domain–containing 1 (POPDC1) gene encodes a plasma membrane–localized cAMP-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in striated muscle. In animal models, POPDC1 is an essential regulator of structure and function of cardiac and skeletal muscle; however, POPDC1 mutations have not been associated with human cardiac and muscular diseases. Here, we have described a homozygous missense variant (c.602C>T, p.S201F) in POPDC1, identified by whole-exome sequencing, in a family of 4 with cardiac arrhythmia and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). This allele was absent in known databases and segregated with the pathological phenotype in this family. We did not find the allele in a further screen of 104 patients with a similar phenotype, suggesting this mutation to be family specific. Compared with WT protein, POPDC1S201F displayed a 50% reduction in cAMP affinity, and in skeletal muscle from patients, both POPDC1S201F and WT POPDC2 displayed impaired membrane trafficking. Forced expression of POPDC1S201F in a murine cardiac muscle cell line (HL-1) increased hyperpolarization and upstroke velocity of the action potential. In zebrafish, expression of the homologous mutation (popdc1S191F) caused heart and skeletal muscle phenotypes that resembled those observed in patients. Our study therefore identifies POPDC1 as a disease gene causing a very rare autosomal recessive cardiac arrhythmia and LGMD, expanding the genetic causes of this heterogeneous group of inherited rare diseases. PMID:26642364

  13. Impaired Mitochondrial Energy Production Causes Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration Independent of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Manish; Haelterman, Nele A; Sandoval, Hector; Xiong, Bo; Donti, Taraka; Kalsotra, Auinash; Yamamoto, Shinya; Cooper, Thomas A; Graham, Brett H; Bellen, Hugo J

    2015-07-01

    Two insults often underlie a variety of eye diseases including glaucoma, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration--defects in mitochondrial function and aberrant Rhodopsin trafficking. Although mitochondrial defects are often associated with oxidative stress, they have not been linked to Rhodopsin trafficking. In an unbiased forward genetic screen designed to isolate mutations that cause photoreceptor degeneration, we identified mutations in a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene, ppr, a homolog of human LRPPRC. We found that ppr is required for protection against light-induced degeneration. Its function is essential to maintain membrane depolarization of the photoreceptors upon repetitive light exposure, and an impaired phototransduction cascade in ppr mutants results in excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis. Moreover, loss of ppr results in a reduction in mitochondrial RNAs, reduced electron transport chain activity, and reduced ATP levels. Oxidative stress, however, is not induced. We propose that the reduced ATP level in ppr mutants underlies the phototransduction defect, leading to increased Rhodopsin1 endocytosis during light exposure, causing photoreceptor degeneration independent of oxidative stress. This hypothesis is bolstered by characterization of two other genes isolated in the screen, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Their loss also causes a light-induced degeneration, excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis and reduced ATP without concurrent oxidative stress, unlike many other mutations in mitochondrial genes that are associated with elevated oxidative stress and light-independent photoreceptor demise.

  14. Human Liver Cell Trafficking Mutants: Characterization and Whole Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fei; Snapp, Erik L.; Novikoff, Phyllis M.; Suadicani, Sylvia O.; Spray, David C.; Potvin, Barry; Wolkoff, Allan W.; Stanley, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α’’. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype. PMID:24466322

  15. Human liver cell trafficking mutants: characterization and whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fei; Snapp, Erik L; Novikoff, Phyllis M; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Spray, David C; Potvin, Barry; Wolkoff, Allan W; Stanley, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α''. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype.

  16. Diacylglycerol kinases in membrane trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) belong to a family of cytosolic kinases that regulate the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DAG), converting it into phosphatidic acid (PA). There are 10 known mammalian DGK isoforms, each with a different tissue distribution and substrate specificity. These differences allow regulation of cellular responses by fine-tuning the delicate balance of cellular DAG and PA. DGK isoforms are best characterized as mediators of signal transduction and immune function. However, since recent studies reveal that DAG and PA are also involved in the regulation of endocytic trafficking, it is therefore anticipated that DGKs also plays an important role in membrane trafficking. In this review, we summarize the literature discussing the role of DGK isoforms at different stages of endocytic trafficking, including endocytosis, exocytosis, endocytic recycling, and transport from/to the Golgi apparatus. Overall, these studies contribute to our understanding of the involvement of PA and DAG in endocytic trafficking, an area of research that is drawing increasing attention in recent years. PMID:27057419

  17. N-linked glycosylation of human SLC1A5 (ASCT2) transporter is critical for trafficking to membrane.

    PubMed

    Console, Lara; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Tarmakova, Zlatina; Coe, Imogen R; Indiveri, Cesare

    2015-07-01

    The human amino acid transporter SLC1A5 (ASCT2) contains two N-glycosylation sites (N163 and N212) located in the large extracellular loop. In the homology structural model of ASCT2 these Asn residues are extracellularly exposed. Mutants of the two Asn exhibited altered electrophoretic mobility. N163Q and N212Q displayed multiple bands with apparent molecular masses from 80kDa to 50kDa. N163/212Q displayed a single band of 50kDa corresponding to the unglycosylated protein. The presence in membrane of WT and mutants was evaluated by protein biotinylation assay followed by immunoblotting. The double mutation significantly impaired the presence of the protein in membrane, without impairment in protein synthesis. [(3)H]glutamine transport was measured in cells transiently transfected with the WT or mutants. N163/212Q exhibited a strongly reduced transport activity correlating with reduced surface expression. The same proteins extracted from cells and reconstituted in liposomes showed comparable transport activities demonstrating that the intrinsic transport function of the mutants was not affected. The rate of endocytosis of ASCT2 was assayed by a reversible biotinylation strategy. N212Q and N163/212Q showed strongly increased rates of endocytosis respect to WT. ASCT2 stability was determined using cycloheximide. N163Q or N163/212Q showed a slightly or significantly lower stability with respect to WT. To assess trafficking to the membrane, a brefeldin-based assay, which caused retention of proteins in ER, was performed. One hour after brefeldin removal WT protein was localized to the plasma membrane while the double mutant was localized in the cytosol. The results demonstrate that N-glycosylation is critical for trafficking.

  18. Impaired motoneuronal retrograde transport in two models of SBMA implicates two sites of androgen action.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Michael Q; Poort, Jessica L; Baqri, Rehan M; Lieberman, Andrew P; Breedlove, S Marc; Miller, Kyle E; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2011-11-15

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) impairs motor function in men and is linked to a CAG repeat mutation in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Defects in motoneuronal retrograde axonal transport may critically mediate motor dysfunction in SBMA, but the site(s) where AR disrupts transport is unknown. We find deficits in retrograde labeling of spinal motoneurons in both a knock-in (KI) and a myogenic transgenic (TG) mouse model of SBMA. Likewise, live imaging of endosomal trafficking in sciatic nerve axons reveals disease-induced deficits in the flux and run length of retrogradely transported endosomes in both KI and TG males, demonstrating that disease triggered in muscle can impair retrograde transport of cargo in motoneuron axons, possibly via defective retrograde signaling. Supporting the idea of impaired retrograde signaling, we find that vascular endothelial growth factor treatment of diseased muscles reverses the transport/trafficking deficit. Transport velocity is also affected in KI males, suggesting a neurogenic component. These results demonstrate that androgens could act via both cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms to disrupt axonal transport in motoneurons affected by SBMA.

  19. Ena/VASP proteins regulate activated T-cell trafficking by promoting diapedesis during transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Estin, Miriam L; Thompson, Scott B; Traxinger, Brianna; Fisher, Marlie H; Friedman, Rachel S; Jacobelli, Jordan

    2017-04-04

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and Ena-VASP-like (EVL) are cytoskeletal effector proteins implicated in regulating cell morphology, adhesion, and migration in various cell types. However, the role of these proteins in T-cell motility, adhesion, and in vivo trafficking remains poorly understood. This study identifies a specific role for EVL and VASP in T-cell diapedesis and trafficking. We demonstrate that EVL and VASP are selectively required for activated T-cell trafficking but are not required for normal T-cell development or for naïve T-cell trafficking to lymph nodes and spleen. Using a model of multiple sclerosis, we show an impairment in trafficking of EVL/VASP-deficient activated T cells to the inflamed central nervous system of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additionally, we found a defect in trafficking of EVL/VASP double-knockout (dKO) T cells to the inflamed skin and secondary lymphoid organs. Deletion of EVL and VASP resulted in the impairment in α4 integrin (CD49d) expression and function. Unexpectedly, EVL/VASP dKO T cells did not exhibit alterations in shear-resistant adhesion to, or in crawling on, primary endothelial cells under physiologic shear forces. Instead, deletion of EVL and VASP impaired T-cell diapedesis. Furthermore, T-cell diapedesis became equivalent between control and EVL/VASP dKO T cells upon α4 integrin blockade. Overall, EVL and VASP selectively mediate activated T-cell trafficking by promoting the diapedesis step of transendothelial migration in a α4 integrin-dependent manner.

  20. Human trafficking and the healthcare professional.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Jeffrey; Finger, Reginald

    2008-05-01

    Despite the legislation passed in the 19th century outlawing human slavery, it is more widespread today than at the conclusion of the civil war. Modern human slavery, termed human trafficking, comes in several forms. The most common type of human trafficking is sex trafficking, the sale of women and children into prostitution. Labor trafficking is the sale of men, women, and children into hard labor for which they receive little or no compensation. Other forms of trafficking include child soldiering, war brides, and organ removal. Healthcare professionals play a critical role in both finding victims of human trafficking while they are still in captivity, as well as caring for their mental and physical needs upon release. Those working in the healthcare profession need to be educated regarding how a trafficking victim may present, as well as their unique healthcare needs.

  1. Identification of p.A684V missense mutation in the WFS1 gene as a frequent cause of autosomal dominant optic atrophy and hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rendtorff, Nanna D.; Lodahl, Marianne; Boulahbel, Houda; Johansen, Ida R.; Pandya, Arti; Welch, Katherine O.; Norris, Virginia W.; Arnos, Kathleen S.; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Emery, Sarah B.; Mets, Marilyn B.; Fagerheim, Toril; Eriksson, Kristina; Hansen, Lars; Bruhn, Helene; Möller, Claes; Lindholm, Sture; Ensgård, Stefan; Lesperance, Marci M.; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    Optic atrophy (OA) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) are key abnormalities in several syndromes, including the recessively inherited Wolfram syndrome, caused by mutations in WFS1. In contrast, the association of autosomal dominant OA and SNHL without other phenotypic abnormalities is rare, and almost exclusively attributed to mutations in the Optic Atrophy-1 gene (OPA1), most commonly the p.R445H mutation. We present eight probands and their families from the US, Sweden, and UK with OA and SNHL, whom we analyzed for mutations in OPA1 and WFS1. Among these families, we found three heterozygous missense mutations in WFS1 segregating with OA and SNHL: p.A684V (six families), and two novel mutations, p.G780S and p.D797Y, all involving evolutionarily conserved amino acids and absent from 298 control chromosomes. Importantly, none of these families harbored the OPA1 p.R445H mutation. No mitochondrial DNA deletions were detected in muscle from one p.A684V patient analyzed. Finally, wolframin p.A684V mutant ectopically expressed in HEK cells showed reduced protein levels compared to wild-type wolframin, strongly indicating that the mutation is disease-causing. Our data support OA and SNHL as a phenotype caused by dominant mutations in WFS1 in these additional eight families. Importantly, our data provide the first evidence that a single, recurrent mutation in WFS1, p.A684V, may be a common cause of ADOA and SNHL, similar to the role played by the p.R445H mutation in OPA1. Our findings suggest that patients who are heterozygous for WFS1 missense mutations should be carefully clinically examined for OA and other manifestations of Wolfram syndrome. PMID:21538838

  2. Novel mutations in the ferritin-L iron-responsive element that only mildly impair IRP binding cause hereditary hyperferritinaemia cataract syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hereditary Hyperferritinaemia Cataract Syndrome (HHCS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by increased serum ferritin levels and early onset of bilateral cataract. The disease is caused by mutations in the Iron-Responsive Element (IRE) located in the 5′ untranslated region of L-Ferritin (FTL) mRNA, which post-transcriptionally regulates ferritin expression. Methods We describe two families presenting high serum ferritin levels and juvenile cataract with novel mutations in the L-ferritin IRE. The mutations were further characterized by in vitro functional studies. Results We have identified two novel mutations in the IRE of L-Ferritin causing HHCS: the Badalona +36C > U and the Heidelberg +52 G > C mutation. Both mutations conferred reduced binding affinity on recombinant Iron Regulatory Proteins (IPRs) in EMSA experiments. Interestingly, the Badalona +36C > U mutation was found not only in heterozygosity, as expected for an autosomal dominant disease, but also in the homozygous state in some affected subjects. Additionally we report an update of all mutations identified so far to cause HHCS. Conclusions The Badalona +36C > U and Heidelberg +52 G > C mutations within the L-ferritin IRE only mildly alter the binding capacity of the Iron Regulatory Proteins but are still causative for the disease. PMID:23421845

  3. NDRG1 functions in LDL receptor trafficking by regulating endosomal recycling and degradation.

    PubMed

    Pietiäinen, Vilja; Vassilev, Boris; Blom, Tomas; Wang, Wei; Nelson, Jessica; Bittman, Robert; Bäck, Nils; Zelcer, Noam; Ikonen, Elina

    2013-09-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) mutations cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D (CMT4D). However, the cellular function of NDRG1 and how it causes CMT4D are poorly understood. We report that NDRG1 silencing in epithelial cells results in decreased uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) due to reduced LDL receptor (LDLR) abundance at the plasma membrane. This is accompanied by the accumulation of LDLR in enlarged EEA1-positive endosomes that contain numerous intraluminal vesicles and sequester ceramide. Concomitantly, LDLR ubiquitylation is increased but its degradation is reduced and ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) proteins are downregulated. Co-depletion of IDOL (inducible degrader of the LDLR), which ubiquitylates the LDLR and promotes its degradation, rescues plasma membrane LDLR levels and LDL uptake. In murine oligodendrocytes, Ndrg1 silencing not only results in reduced LDL uptake but also in downregulation of the oligodendrocyte differentiation factor Olig2. Both phenotypes are rescued by co-silencing of Idol, suggesting that ligand uptake through LDLR family members controls oligodendrocyte differentiation. These findings identify NDRG1 as a novel regulator of multivesicular body formation and endosomal LDLR trafficking. The deficiency of functional NDRG1 in CMT4D might impair lipid processing and differentiation of myelinating cells.

  4. Biopolitical management, economic calculation and "trafficked women".

    PubMed

    Berman, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Narratives surrounding human trafficking, especially trafficking in women for sex work, employ gendered and racialized tropes that have among their effects, a shrouding of women's economic decision-making and state collusion in benefiting from their labour. This paper explores the operation of these narratives in order to understand the ways in which they mask the economics of trafficking by sensationalizing the sexual and criminal aspects of it, which in turn allows the state to pursue political projects under the guise of a benevolent concern for trafficked women and/or protection of its own citizens. This paper will explore one national example: Article 18 of Italian Law 40 (1998). I argue that its passage has led to an increase in cooperation with criminal prosecution of traffickers largely because it approaches trafficked women as capable of making decisions about how and what they themselves want to do. This paper will also consider a more global approach to trafficking embedded in the concept of "migration management", an International Organization for Migration (IOM) framework that is now shaping EU, US and other national immigration laws and policies that impact trafficking. It will also examine the inherent limitations of both the national and global approach as an occasion to unpack how Article 18 and Migration Management function as forms of biopolitical management that participate in the production of "trafficking victims" into a massified population to be managed, rather than engender a more engaged discussion of what constitutes trafficking and how to redress it.

  5. Protein trafficking in kinetoplastid protozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, C; Häusler, T; Blattner, J

    1995-01-01

    The kinetoplastid protozoa infect hosts ranging from invertebrates to plants and mammals, causing diseases of medical and economic importance. They are the earliest-branching organisms in eucaryotic evolution to have either mitochondria or peroxisome-like microbodies. Investigation of their protein trafficking enables us to identify characteristics that have been conserved throughout eucaryotic evolution and also reveals how far variations, or alternative mechanisms, are possible. Protein trafficking in kinetoplastids is in many respects similar to that in higher eucaryotes, including mammals and yeasts. Differences in signal sequence specificities exist, however, for all subcellular locations so far examined in detail--microbodies, mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum--with signals being more degenerate, or shorter, than those of their higher eucaryotic counterparts. Some components of the normal array of trafficking mechanisms may be missing in most (if not all) kinetoplastids: examples are clathrin-coated vesicles, recycling receptors, and mannose 6-phosphate-mediated lysosomal targeting. Other aspects and structures are unique to the kinetoplastids or are as yet unexplained. Some of these peculiarities may eventually prove to be weak points that can be used as targets for chemotherapy; others may turn out to be much more widespread than currently suspected. PMID:7565409

  6. Viral Subversion of Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Yarbrough, Melanie L.; Mata, Miguel A.; Sakthivel, Ramanavelan; Fontoura, Beatriz M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Trafficking of proteins and RNA into and out of the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Due to its critical function in many cellular processes, the NPC and transport factors are common targets of several viruses that disrupt key constituents of the machinery to facilitate viral replication. Many viruses such as poliovirus and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus inhibit protein import into the nucleus, while viruses such as influenza A virus target and disrupt host mRNA nuclear export. Current evidence indicates that these viruses may employ such strategies to avert the host immune response. Conversely, many viruses co-opt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to facilitate transport of viral RNAs. Since viral proteins interact with key regulators of the host nuclear transport machinery, viruses have served as invaluable tools of discovery that led to the identification of novel constituents of nuclear transport pathways. In addition, this review explores the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to viral pathogenesis as these studies revealed new antiviral therapeutic strategies and exposed previously unknown cellular mechanisms. Further understanding of nuclear transport pathways will determine whether such therapeutics will be useful treatments for important human pathogens. PMID:24289861

  7. CLIC4 regulates apical exocytosis and renal tube luminogenesis through retromer- and actin-mediated endocytic trafficking.

    PubMed

    Chou, Szu-Yi; Hsu, Kuo-Shun; Otsu, Wataru; Hsu, Ya-Chu; Luo, Yun-Cin; Yeh, Celine; Shehab, Syed S; Chen, Jie; Shieh, Vincent; He, Guo-an; Marean, Michael B; Felsen, Diane; Ding, Aihao; Poppas, Dix P; Chuang, Jen-Zen; Sung, Ching-Hwa

    2016-01-20

    Chloride intracellular channel 4 (CLIC4) is a mammalian homologue of EXC-4 whose mutation is associated with cystic excretory canals in nematodes. Here we show that CLIC4-null mouse embryos exhibit impaired renal tubulogenesis. In both developing and developed kidneys, CLIC4 is specifically enriched in the proximal tubule epithelial cells, in which CLIC4 is important for luminal delivery, microvillus morphogenesis, and endolysosomal biogenesis. Adult CLIC4-null proximal tubules display aberrant dilation. In MDCK 3D cultures, CLIC4 is expressed on early endosome, recycling endosome and apical transport carriers before reaching its steady-state apical membrane localization in mature lumen. CLIC4 suppression causes impaired apical vesicle coalescence and central lumen formation, a phenotype that can be rescued by Rab8 and Cdc42. Furthermore, we show that retromer- and branched actin-mediated trafficking on early endosome regulates apical delivery during early luminogenesis. CLIC4 selectively modulates retromer-mediated apical transport by negatively regulating the formation of branched actin on early endosomes.

  8. CLIC4 regulates apical exocytosis and renal tube luminogenesis through retromer- and actin-mediated endocytic trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Szu-Yi; Hsu, Kuo-Shun; Otsu, Wataru; Hsu, Ya-Chu; Luo, Yun-Cin; Yeh, Celine; Shehab, Syed S.; Chen, Jie; Shieh, Vincent; He, Guo-an; Marean, Michael B.; Felsen, Diane; Ding, Aihao; Poppas, Dix P.; Chuang, Jen-Zen; Sung, Ching-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel 4 (CLIC4) is a mammalian homologue of EXC-4 whose mutation is associated with cystic excretory canals in nematodes. Here we show that CLIC4-null mouse embryos exhibit impaired renal tubulogenesis. In both developing and developed kidneys, CLIC4 is specifically enriched in the proximal tubule epithelial cells, in which CLIC4 is important for luminal delivery, microvillus morphogenesis, and endolysosomal biogenesis. Adult CLIC4-null proximal tubules display aberrant dilation. In MDCK 3D cultures, CLIC4 is expressed on early endosome, recycling endosome and apical transport carriers before reaching its steady-state apical membrane localization in mature lumen. CLIC4 suppression causes impaired apical vesicle coalescence and central lumen formation, a phenotype that can be rescued by Rab8 and Cdc42. Furthermore, we show that retromer- and branched actin-mediated trafficking on early endosome regulates apical delivery during early luminogenesis. CLIC4 selectively modulates retromer-mediated apical transport by negatively regulating the formation of branched actin on early endosomes. PMID:26786190

  9. Identifying functional defects in patients with immune dysregulation due to LRBA and CTLA-4 mutations.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tie Zheng; Verma, Nisha; Wanders, Jennifer; Kennedy, Alan; Soskic, Blagoje; Janman, Daniel; Halliday, Neil; Rowshanravan, Behzad; Worth, Austen; Qasim, Waseem; Baxendale, Helen; Stauss, Hans; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Neth, Olaf; Olbrich, Peter; Hambleton, Sophie; Arkwright, Peter D; Burns, Siobhan O; Walker, Lucy S K; Sansom, David M

    2017-03-16

    Heterozygous CTLA-4 deficiency has been reported as a monogenic cause of common variable immune deficiency with features of immune dysregulation. Direct mutation in CTLA-4 leads to defective regulatory T-cell (Treg) function associated with impaired ability to control levels of the CTLA-4 ligands, CD80 and CD86. However, additional mutations affecting the CTLA-4 pathway, such as those recently reported for LRBA, indirectly affect CTLA-4 expression, resulting in clinically similar disorders. Robust phenotyping approaches sensitive to defects in the CTLA-4 pathway are therefore required to inform understanding of such immune dysregulation syndromes. Here, we describe assays capable of distinguishing a variety of defects in the CTLA-4 pathway. Assessing total CTLA-4 expression levels was found to be optimal when restricting analysis to the CD45RA(-)Foxp3(+) fraction. CTLA-4 induction following stimulation, and the use of lysosomal-blocking compounds, distinguished CTLA-4 from LRBA mutations. Short-term T-cell stimulation improved the capacity for discriminating the Foxp3(+) Treg compartment, clearly revealing Treg expansions in these disorders. Finally, we developed a functionally orientated assay to measure ligand uptake by CTLA-4, which is sensitive to ligand-binding or -trafficking mutations, that would otherwise be difficult to detect and that is appropriate for testing novel mutations in CTLA-4 pathway genes. These approaches are likely to be of value in interpreting the functional significance of mutations in the CTLA-4 pathway identified by gene-sequencing approaches.

  10. LKB1/AMPK and PKA control ABCB11 trafficking and polarization in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Homolya, László; Fu, Dong; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Jarnik, Michal; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Vitale-Cross, Lynn; Gutkind, J Silvio; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Arias, Irwin M

    2014-01-01

    Polarization of hepatocytes is manifested by bile canalicular network formation and activation of LKB1 and AMPK, which control cellular energy metabolism. The bile acid, taurocholate, also regulates development of the canalicular network through activation of AMPK. In the present study, we used collagen sandwich hepatocyte cultures from control and liver-specific LKB1 knockout mice to examine the role of LKB1 in trafficking of ABCB11, the canalicular bile acid transporter. In polarized hepatocytes, ABCB11 traffics from Golgi to the apical plasma membrane and endogenously cycles through the rab 11a-myosin Vb recycling endosomal system. LKB1 knockout mice were jaundiced, lost weight and manifested impaired bile canalicular formation and intracellular trafficking of ABCB11, and died within three weeks. Using live cell imaging, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), particle tracking, and biochemistry, we found that LKB1 activity is required for microtubule-dependent trafficking of ABCB11 to the canalicular membrane. In control hepatocytes, ABCB11 trafficking was accelerated by taurocholate and cAMP; however, in LKB1 knockout hepatocytes, ABCB11 trafficking to the apical membrane was greatly reduced and restored only by cAMP, but not taurocholate. cAMP acted through a PKA-mediated pathway which did not activate AMPK. Our studies establish a regulatory role for LKB1 in ABCB11 trafficking to the canalicular membrane, hepatocyte polarization, and canalicular network formation.

  11. Dynein-mediated trafficking negatively regulates LET-23 EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Skorobogata, Olga; Meng, Jassy; Gauthier, Kimberley; Rocheleau, Christian E.

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is essential for animal development, and increased signaling underlies many human cancers. Identifying the genes and cellular processes that regulate EGFR signaling in vivo will help to elucidate how this pathway can become inappropriately activated. Caenorhabditis elegans vulva development provides an in vivo model to genetically dissect EGFR signaling. Here we identified a mutation in dhc-1, the heavy chain of the cytoplasmic dynein minus end–directed microtubule motor, in a genetic screen for regulators of EGFR signaling. Despite the many cellular functions of dynein, DHC-1 is a strong negative regulator of EGFR signaling during vulva induction. DHC-1 is required in the signal-receiving cell and genetically functions upstream or in parallel to LET-23 EGFR. LET-23 EGFR accumulates in cytoplasmic foci in dhc-1 mutants, consistent with mammalian cell studies in which dynein is shown to regulate late endosome trafficking of EGFR with the Rab7 GTPase. However, we found different distributions of LET-23 EGFR foci in rab-7 versus dhc-1 mutants, suggesting that dynein functions at an earlier step of LET-23 EGFR trafficking to the lysosome than RAB-7. Our results demonstrate an in vivo role for dynein in limiting LET-23 EGFR signaling via endosomal trafficking. PMID:27654944

  12. REEP6 mediates trafficking of a subset of Clathrin-coated vesicles and is critical for rod photoreceptor function and survival.

    PubMed

    Veleri, Shobi; Nellissery, Jacob; Mishra, Bibhudatta; Manjunath, Souparnika H; Brooks, Matthew J; Dong, Lijin; Nagashima, Kunio; Qian, Haohua; Gao, Chun; Sergeev, Yuri V; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Qu, Jia; Lu, Fan; Cideciyan, Artur V; Li, Tiansen; Jin, Zi-Bing; Fariss, Robert N; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Jacobson, Samuel G; Swaroop, Anand

    2017-03-23

    In retinal photoreceptors, vectorial transport of cargo is critical for transduction of visual signals, and defects in intracellular trafficking can lead to photoreceptor degeneration and vision impairment. Molecular signatures associated with routing of transport vesicles in photoreceptors are poorly understood. We previously reported the identification of a novel rod photoreceptor specific isoform of Receptor Expression Enhancing Protein (REEP) 6, which belongs to a family of proteins involved in intracellular transport of receptors to the plasma membrane. Here we show that loss of REEP6 in mice (Reep6-/-) results in progressive retinal degeneration. Rod photoreceptor dysfunction is observed in Reep6-/- mice as early as one month of age and associated with aberrant accumulation of vacuole-like structures at the apical inner segment and reduction in selected rod phototransduction proteins. We demonstrate that REEP6 is detected in a subset of Clathrin-coated vesicles and interacts with the t-SNARE, Syntaxin3. In concordance with the rod degeneration phenotype in Reep6-/- mice, whole exome sequencing identified homozygous REEP6-E75K mutation in two retinitis pigmentosa families of different ethnicities. Our studies suggest a critical function of REEP6 in trafficking of cargo via a subset of Clathrin-coated vesicles to selected membrane sites in retinal rod photoreceptors.

  13. Decreasing Human Trafficking through Sex Work Decriminalization.

    PubMed

    Albright, Erin; D'Adamo, Kate

    2017-01-01

    In order to decrease human trafficking, health care workers should support the full decriminalization of prostitution. Similar to trafficking in other forms of labor, preventing trafficking in the sex trade requires addressing the different forms of marginalization that create vulnerable communities. By removing punitive laws that prevent reporting of exploitation and abuse, decriminalization allows sex workers to work more safely, thereby reducing marginalization and vulnerability. Decriminalization can also help destigmatize sex work and help resist political, social, and cultural marginalization of sex workers.

  14. Illicit Trafficking Challenges: Fighting the Good Fight Against Illicit Trafficking Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    2012 U.S. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL • CENTER ON CONTEMPORARY CONFLICT PASCC REPORT NUMBER 2012 012 ILLICIT TRAFFICKING CHALLENGES FIGHTING THE...GOOD FIGHT AGAINST ILLICIT TRAFFICKING NETWORKS Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection... Trafficking Challenges: Fighting the Good Fight Against Illicit Trafficking Networks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  15. Telomerase trafficking and assembly in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhu-Hong; Tomlinson, Rebecca L.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    The core components of telomerase are telomerase RNA (TR) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). In vertebrate cells, TR and TERT have been reported to associate with intranuclear structures, including Cajal bodies and nucleoli as well as telomeres. Here, we examined the time course of both TR localization and assembly of TR with TERT in Xenopus oocytes. The major trafficking pathway for microinjected TR is through Cajal bodies into the nucleoplasm, with a fraction of TR found in nucleoli at later time points. Telomerase assembly precedes nucleolar localization of TR, and TR mutants that do not localize to nucleoli form active enzyme, indicating that localization of TR to nucleoli is not required for assembly with TERT. Assembly of telomerase coincides with Cajal-body localization; however, assembly is also unaffected by a CAB-box mutation (which significantly reduces association with Cajal bodies), suggesting that Cajal-body localization is not important for assembly. Our results suggest that assembly of TR with TERT occurs in the nucleoplasm. Unexpectedly, however, our experiments reveal that disruption of the CAB box does not eliminate early targeting to Cajal bodies, indicating that a role for Cajal bodies in telomerase assembly cannot be excluded on the basis of existing knowledge. PMID:20592184

  16. Mutations in the Tight-Junction Gene Claudin 19 (CLDN19) Are Associated with Renal Magnesium Wasting, Renal Failure, and Severe Ocular Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Martin; Schaller, André; Seelow, Dominik; Pandey, Amit V.; Waldegger, Siegfried; Lesslauer, Annegret; Vitzthum, Helga; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Luk, John M.; Becker, Christian; Schlingmann, Karl P.; Schmid, Marcel; Rodriguez-Soriano, Juan; Ariceta, Gema; Cano, Francisco; Enriquez, Ricardo; Jüppner, Harald; Bakkaloglu, Sevcan A.; Hediger, Matthias A.; Gallati, Sabina; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.; Nürnberg, Peter; Weber, Stefanie

    2006-01-01

    Claudins are major components of tight junctions and contribute to the epithelial-barrier function by restricting free diffusion of solutes through the paracellular pathway. We have mapped a new locus for recessive renal magnesium loss on chromosome 1p34.2 and have identified mutations in CLDN19, a member of the claudin multigene family, in patients affected by hypomagnesemia, renal failure, and severe ocular abnormalities. CLDN19 encodes the tight-junction protein claudin-19, and we demonstrate high expression of CLDN19 in renal tubules and the retina. The identified mutations interfere severely with either cell-membrane trafficking or the assembly of the claudin-19 protein. The identification of CLDN19 mutations in patients with chronic renal failure and severe visual impairment supports the fundamental role of claudin-19 for normal renal tubular function and undisturbed organization and development of the retina. PMID:17033971

  17. Vacuolar Protein Sorting Genes in Parkinson's Disease: A Re-appraisal of Mutations Detection Rate and Neurobiology of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gambardella, Stefano; Biagioni, Francesca; Ferese, Rosangela; Busceti, Carla L.; Frati, Alessandro; Novelli, Giuseppe; Ruggieri, Stefano; Fornai, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian retromers play a critical role in protein trans-membrane sorting from endosome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recently, retromer alterations have been related to the onset of Parkinson's Disease (PD) since the variant p.Asp620Asn in VPS35 (Vacuolar Protein Sorting 35) was identified as a cause of late onset PD. This variant causes a primary defect in endosomal trafficking and retromers formation. Other mutations in VPS genes have been reported in both sporadic and familial PD. These mutations are less defined. Understanding the specific prevalence of all VPS gene mutations is key to understand the relevance of retromers impairment in the onset of PD. A number of PD-related mutations despite affecting different biochemical systems (autophagy, mitophagy, proteasome, endosomes, protein folding), all converge in producing an impairment in cell clearance. This may explain how genetic predispositions to PD may derive from slightly deleterious VPS mutations when combined with environmental agents overwhelming the clearance of the cell. This manuscript reviews genetic data produced in the last 5 years to re-define the actual prevalence of VPS gene mutations in the onset of PD. The prevalence of p.Asp620Asn mutation in VPS35 is 0.286 of familial PD. This increases up to 0.548 when considering mutations affecting all VPS genes. This configures mutations in VPS genes as the second most frequent autosomal dominant PD genotype. This high prevalence, joined with increased awareness of the role played by retromers in the neurobiology of PD, suggests environmentally-induced VPS alterations as crucial in the genesis of PD. PMID:27932943

  18. Vacuolar Protein Sorting Genes in Parkinson's Disease: A Re-appraisal of Mutations Detection Rate and Neurobiology of Disease.

    PubMed

    Gambardella, Stefano; Biagioni, Francesca; Ferese, Rosangela; Busceti, Carla L; Frati, Alessandro; Novelli, Giuseppe; Ruggieri, Stefano; Fornai, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian retromers play a critical role in protein trans-membrane sorting from endosome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recently, retromer alterations have been related to the onset of Parkinson's Disease (PD) since the variant p.Asp620Asn in VPS35 (Vacuolar Protein Sorting 35) was identified as a cause of late onset PD. This variant causes a primary defect in endosomal trafficking and retromers formation. Other mutations in VPS genes have been reported in both sporadic and familial PD. These mutations are less defined. Understanding the specific prevalence of all VPS gene mutations is key to understand the relevance of retromers impairment in the onset of PD. A number of PD-related mutations despite affecting different biochemical systems (autophagy, mitophagy, proteasome, endosomes, protein folding), all converge in producing an impairment in cell clearance. This may explain how genetic predispositions to PD may derive from slightly deleterious VPS mutations when combined with environmental agents overwhelming the clearance of the cell. This manuscript reviews genetic data produced in the last 5 years to re-define the actual prevalence of VPS gene mutations in the onset of PD. The prevalence of p.Asp620Asn mutation in VPS35 is 0.286 of familial PD. This increases up to 0.548 when considering mutations affecting all VPS genes. This configures mutations in VPS genes as the second most frequent autosomal dominant PD genotype. This high prevalence, joined with increased awareness of the role played by retromers in the neurobiology of PD, suggests environmentally-induced VPS alterations as crucial in the genesis of PD.

  19. A mutation in VPS15 (PIK3R4) causes a ciliopathy and affects IFT20 release from the cis-Golgi

    PubMed Central

    Stoetzel, Corinne; Bär, Séverine; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Scheidecker, Sophie; Etard, Christelle; Chicher, Johana; Reck, Jennifer R.; Perrault, Isabelle; Geoffroy, Véronique; Chennen, Kirsley; Strähle, Uwe; Hammann, Philippe; Friant, Sylvie; Dollfus, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are a group of diseases that affect kidney and retina among other organs. Here, we identify a missense mutation in PIK3R4 (phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulatory subunit 4, named VPS15) in a family with a ciliopathy phenotype. Besides being required for trafficking and autophagy, we show that VPS15 regulates primary cilium length in human fibroblasts, as well as ciliary processes in zebrafish. Furthermore, we demonstrate its interaction with the golgin GM130 and its localization to the Golgi. The VPS15-R998Q patient mutation impairs Golgi trafficking functions in humanized yeast cells. Moreover, in VPS15-R998Q patient fibroblasts, the intraflagellar transport protein IFT20 is not localized to vesicles trafficking to the cilium but is restricted to the Golgi. Our findings suggest that at the Golgi, VPS15 and GM130 form a protein complex devoid of VPS34 to ensure the IFT20-dependent sorting and transport of membrane proteins from the cis-Golgi to the primary cilium. PMID:27882921

  20. Optical Control of Peroxisomal Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The blue-light-responsive LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin1 (AsLOV2) has been used to regulate activity and binding of diverse protein targets with light. Here, we used AsLOV2 to photocage a peroxisomal targeting sequence, allowing light regulation of peroxisomal protein import. We generated a protein tag, LOV-PTS1, that can be appended to proteins of interest to direct their import to the peroxisome with light. This method provides a means to inducibly trigger peroxisomal protein trafficking in specific cells at user-defined times. PMID:26513473

  1. Preliminary Validation of the Sex Trafficking Attitudes Scale.

    PubMed

    Houston-Kolnik, Jaclyn D; Todd, Nathan R; Wilson, Midge

    2016-09-01

    This study presents the Sex Trafficking Attitudes Scale (STAS), assessing cognitive, behavioral, and affective attitudes toward the sex trafficking of women and girls. Across two studies, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed and confirmed six subscales: (a) Knowledge About Sex Trafficking, (b) Awareness of Sex Trafficking, (c) Attitudes Toward Ability to Leave Sex Trafficking, (d) Attitudes Toward Helping Survivors, (e) Empathic Reactions Toward Sex Trafficking, and (f) Efficacy to Reduce Sex Trafficking. Results showed support for convergent validity as the subscales were associated with related measures. The STAS holds promise to expand research and inform efforts to support trafficking survivors.

  2. The intracellular distal tail of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 is intrinsically disordered: implications for NHE1 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Nørholm, Ann-Beth; Hendus-Altenburger, Ruth; Bjerre, Gabriel; Kjaergaard, Magnus; Pedersen, Stine F; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2011-05-03

    Intrinsic disorder is important for protein regulation, yet its role in regulation of ion transport proteins is essentially uninvestigated. The ubiquitous plasma membrane carrier protein Na(+)/H(+) Exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) plays pivotal roles in cellular pH and volume homeostasis, and its dysfunction is implicated in several clinically important diseases. This study shows, for the first time for any carrier protein, that the distal part of the C-terminal intracellular tail (the cdt, residues V686-Q815) from human (h) NHE1 is intrinsically disordered. Further, we experimentally demonstrated the presence of a similar region of intrinsic disorder (ID) in NHE1 from the teleost fish Pleuronectes americanus (paNHE1), and bioinformatic analysis suggested ID to be conserved in the NHE1 family. The sequential variation in structure propensity as determined by NMR, but not the amplitude, was largely conserved between the h- and paNHE1cdt. This suggests that both proteins contain molecular recognition features (MoRFs), i.e., local, transiently formed structures within an ID region. The functional relevance of the most conserved MoRF was investigated by introducing a point mutation that significantly disrupted the putative binding feature. When this mutant NHE1 was expressed in full length NHE1 in AP1 cells, it exhibited impaired trafficking to the plasma membrane. This study demonstrated that the distal regulatory domain of NHE1 is intrinsically disordered yet contains conserved regions of transient structure. We suggest that normal NHE1 function depends on a protein recognition element within the ID region that may be linked to NHE1 trafficking via an acidic ER export motif.

  3. A Novel Heterozygous Mutation in the STAT1 SH2 Domain Causes Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis, Atypically Diverse Infections, Autoimmunity, and Impaired Cytokine Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Meesilpavikkai, Kornvalee; Dik, Willem A.; Schrijver, Benjamin; Nagtzaam, Nicole M. A.; van Rijswijk, Angelique; Driessen, Gertjan J.; van der Spek, Peter J.; van Hagen, P. Martin; Dalm, Virgil A. S. H.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by persistent or recurrent skin and mucosal surface infections with Candida species. Different gene mutations leading to CMC have been identified. These include various heterozygous gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) that are not only associated with infections but also with autoimmune manifestations. Recently, two STAT1 GOF mutations involving the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain have been reported, while so far, over 50 mutations have been described mainly in the coiled coil and the DNA-binding domains. Here, we present two members of a Dutch family with a novel STAT1 mutation located in the SH2 domain. T lymphocytes of these patients revealed STAT1 hyperphosphorylation and higher expression of STAT1 target genes. The clinical picture of CMC in our patients could be explained by diminished production of interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-22, cytokines important in the protection against fungal infections. PMID:28348565

  4. IKBKG (nuclear factor-κB essential modulator) mutation can be associated with opportunistic infection without impairing Toll-like receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Salt, Bryn H.; Niemela, Julie E.; Pandey, Rahul; Hanson, Eric P.; Deering, Raquel P.; Quinones, Ralph; Jain, Ashish; Orange, Jordan S.; Gelfand, Erwin W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with hypomorphic nuclear factor-κB essential modulator (NEMO) mutations have extensive phenotypic variability that can include atypical infectious susceptibility. Objective This study may provide important insight into immunologic mechanisms of host defense. Methods Immunologic evaluation, including studies of Toll-like receptor (TLR) function, was performed in a 6-month-old boy with normal ectodermal development who was diagnosed with Pneumocystis pneumonia and cytomegalovirus sepsis. Results Genomic and cDNA sequencing demonstrated a novel NEMO missense mutation, 337G->A, predicted to cause a D113N (aspartic acid to asparagine) substitution in the first coiled-coil region of the NEMO protein. Quantitative serum immunoglobulins, lymphocyte subset numbers, and mitogeninduced lymphocyte proliferation were essentially normal. The PBMC responses to TLR ligands were also surprisingly normal, whereas natural killer cell cytolytic activity, T-cell proliferative responses to specific antigens, and T-cell receptor–induced NF-κB activation were diminished. Conclusion Unlike the unique NEMO mutation described here, the most commonly reported mutations are clustered at the 3′ end in the tenth exon, which encodes a zinc finger domain. Because specific hypomorphic variants of NEMO are associated with distinctive phenotypes, this particular NEMO mutation highlights a dispensability of the region including amino acid 113 for TLR signaling and ectodysplasin A receptor function. This region is required for certain immunoreceptor functions as demonstrated by his susceptibility to infections as well as natural killer cell and T-cell defects. PMID:18179816

  5. Spectrum of genetic changes in patients with non-syndromic hearing impairment and extremely high carrier frequency of 35delG GJB2 mutation in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Danilenko, Nina; Merkulava, Elena; Siniauskaya, Marina; Olejnik, Olga; Levaya-Smaliak, Anastasia; Kushniarevich, Alena; Shymkevich, Andrey; Davydenko, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    The genetic nature of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) has so far been studied for many ethnic groups in various parts of the world. The single-nucleotide guanine deletion (35delG) of the GJB2 gene coding for connexin 26 was shown to be the main genetic cause of autosomal recessive deafness among Europeans. Here we present the results of the first study of GJB2 and three mitochondrial mutations among two groups of Belarusian inhabitants: native people with normal hearing (757 persons) and 391 young patients with non-syndromic SNHL. We have found an extremely high carrier frequency of 35delG GJB2 mutation in Belarus -5.7%. This point deletion has also been detected in 53% of the patients with SNHL. The 312del14 GJB2 was the second most common mutation in the Belarus patient cohort. Mitochondrial A1555G mt-RNR1 substitution was found in two SNHL patients (0.55%) but none were found in the population cohort. No individuals carried the A7445G mutation of mitochondrial mt-TS1. G7444A as well as T961G substitutions were detected in mitochondrial mt-RNR1 at a rate of about 1% both in the patient and population cohorts. A possible reason for Belarusians having the highest mutation carrier frequency in Europe 35delG is discussed.

  6. Human Trafficking. Ministering to The 'Invisible' Victim.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Colleen; Krausa, Laura

    2016-07-01

    Human trafficking is modern-day slavery - an insidious, criminal industry that gener- ates billions of dollars in labor trafficking alone. It knows no boundary of continent, country, race or class; it is a shattering, impartial predator that robs individuals of their basic human dignity.

  7. Disturbed vesicular trafficking of membrane proteins in prion disease.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Keiji; Miyata, Hironori; Sakaguchi, Suehiro

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenic mechanism of prion diseases remains unknown. We recently reported that prion infection disturbs post-Golgi trafficking of certain types of membrane proteins to the cell surface, resulting in reduced surface expression of membrane proteins and abrogating the signal from the proteins. The surface expression of the membrane proteins was reduced in the brains of mice inoculated with prions, well before abnormal symptoms became evident. Prions or pathogenic prion proteins were mainly detected in endosomal compartments, being particularly abundant in recycling endosomes. Some newly synthesized membrane proteins are delivered to the surface from the Golgi apparatus through recycling endosomes, and some endocytosed membrane proteins are delivered back to the surface through recycling endosomes. These results suggest that prions might cause neuronal dysfunctions and cell loss by disturbing post-Golgi trafficking of membrane proteins via accumulation in recycling endosomes. Interestingly, it was recently shown that delivery of a calcium channel protein to the cell surface was impaired and its function was abrogated in a mouse model of hereditary prion disease. Taken together, these results suggest that impaired delivery of membrane proteins to the cell surface is a common pathogenic event in acquired and hereditary prion diseases.

  8. Neuron membrane trafficking and protein kinases involved in autism and ADHD.

    PubMed

    Kitagishi, Yasuko; Minami, Akari; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Ogura, Yasunori; Matsuda, Satoru

    2015-01-30

    A brain-enriched multi-domain scaffolding protein, neurobeachin has been identified as a candidate gene for autism patients. Mutations in the synaptic adhesion protein cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) are also associated with autism spectrum disorder, a neurodevelopmental disorder of uncertain molecular origin. Potential roles of neurobeachin and CADM1 have been suggested to a function of vesicle transport in endosomal trafficking. It seems that protein kinase B (AKT) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) have key roles in the neuron membrane trafficking involved in the pathogenesis of autism. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is documented to dopaminergic insufficiencies, which is attributed to synaptic dysfunction of dopamine transporter (DAT). AKT is also essential for the DAT cell-surface redistribution. In the present paper, we summarize and discuss the importance of several protein kinases that regulate the membrane trafficking involved in autism and ADHD, suggesting new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  9. Examining the Risk of Nuclear Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Balatsky, Galya; Severe, William R; Schoeneck, Jeffery

    2009-01-01

    The need to stop illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials around the world is undeniable and urgent. This issue is particularly evident due to the highly dangerous consequences of the risks involved, the known interest of terrorist groups in acquiring such materials and the vulnerability of theft and diversion of such materials. Yet the phenomenon of nuclear trafficking remains a subject where the unknown dominates what is known on the subject. The trafficking panel at the Institute for Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) Workshop on Reducing the Risk of Radioactive and Nuclear Materials that took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 10-11, 2009, dealt with some of the issues associated with nuclear trafficking. Different points of view on how to better address trafficking and thwart perpetrator efforts were discussed. This paper presents some of these views and addresses practical measures that should be considered to improve the situation.

  10. A novel missense mutation in the C2C domain of otoferlin causes profound hearing impairment in an Omani family with auditory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wardy, Nadia M.; Al-Kindi, Mohammed N.; Al-Khabouri, Mazin J.; Tamimi, Yahya; van Camp, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify genetic defects in an Omani family diagnosed with deafness. Methods: A cross-sectional association study was conducted at the Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Al-Khoud, Oman and the Centre of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium between August 2010 and September 2014. Microsatellites markers for nine non-syndromic genes were used to genotype the defective locus using the extracted DNA from family members. Sanger sequencing method was used to identify the disease causative mutation. Eazy linkage 5.05 was used to calculate the logarithm of odds score. Lasergene suite was used to detect the mutation position, and Phyre2, SMART, Rasmol, and GOR IV were used to predict the effects of the defect on protein structure and function. Results: The disease was linked to markers located on chromosome-2 and covering the OTOF (DFNB9) gene. A novel missense mutation that changed nucleotide C to G at position c.1469 and consequently the amino acid Proline to Arginine (P490R) on exon 15 was detected. Protein modeling analysis revealed the impact of the mutation on protein structure and the relevant C2C domain. The mutation seems to create a new protein isoform homologous to the complement component C1q. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the mutation found in C2C domain of the OTOF gene is likely to cause deafness in the studied family reflecting the importance of C2 domains of otoferlin in hearing loss. PMID:27652356

  11. Prospective mutation screening of three common deafness genes in a large Taiwanese Cohort with idiopathic bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment reveals a difference in the results between families from hospitals and those from rehabilitation facilities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Chi; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chiu, Yu-Hsun; Lu, Ying-Chang; Wu, Ming-Chueh; Hsu, Chuan-Jen

    2008-01-01

    Accurate epidemiological data on common deafness genes are essential to improve the efficiency and to reduce the cost of molecular diagnosis. They may depend on several factors, including a clear delineation of the source of patients being studied. In the present study, we hypothesize that patients with idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss recruited from different sources might reveal discrepancies in the epidemiological results of genetic screening, because patients from different sources might demonstrate distinct clinical or audiologic features and thus result in biased selection of subjects. To elucidate the relative importance of common deafness genes in Taiwanese and to verify our hypothesis, we conducted a prospective project screening mutations in GJB2, SLC26A4 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in a total of 420 Taiwanese families with idiopathic bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, of which 325 families were recruited from hospitals and 95 from hearing rehabilitation facilities. Allele frequencies of common mutations in these three genes and distributions of the corresponding genotypes were then compared between the two groups. The allele frequencies of mutations in SLC26A4, GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA in the probands of the 420 families were 14.4, 21.7 and 3.8%, respectively. The allele frequency of SLC26A4 mutations in the hospital group was significantly higher than that in the rehabilitation facility group (16.2 vs. 8.4%, chi(2)-test, p < 0.05), whereas no difference in the frequencies of GJB2 mutations and mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations was found between the two groups. Distributions of probands classified by SLC26A4 genotypes were also different between the two groups (chi(2)-test, p < 0.05). Accordingly, a discrepancy in the genetic screening results might exist between different sources of idiopathic hearing-impaired patients. Further analysis of audiological results and construction of a logistic regression model showed that different

  12. Direct Measurement of Trafficking of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to the Cell Surface and Binding to a Chemical Chaperone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihui; Baksh, Michael M; Finn, M G; Heidary, David K; Richards, Christopher I

    2017-01-10

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) result in the disease cystic fibrosis. Deletion of Phe508, the most prevalent mutation associated with this disease, disrupts trafficking of the protein. Small molecule correctors yield moderate improvements in the trafficking of ΔF508-CFTR to the plasma membrane. It is currently not known if correctors increase the level of trafficking through improved cargo loading of transport vesicles or through direct binding to CFTR. Real-time measurements of trafficking were utilized to identify the mechanistic details of chemical, biochemical, and thermal factors that impact CFTR correction, using the corrector molecule VX-809, a secondary mutation (I539T), and low-temperature conditions. Each individually improved trafficking of ΔF508-CFTR to approximately 10% of wild-type levels. The combination of VX-809 with either low temperature or the I539T mutation increased the amount of CFTR on the plasma membrane to nearly 40%, indicating synergistic activity. The number of vesicles reaching the surface was significantly altered; however, the amount of channel in each vesicle remained the same. Direct binding measurements of VX-809 in native membranes using backscattering interferometry indicate tight binding to CFTR, which occurred in a manner independent of mutation. The similar values obtained for all forms of the channel indicate that the binding site is not compromised or enhanced by these mutations.

  13. The R215W mutation in NBS1 impairs {gamma}-H2AX binding and affects DNA repair: molecular bases for the severe phenotype of 657del5/R215W Nijmegen breakage syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Masi, Alessandra di Viganotti, Mara; Polticelli, Fabio; Ascenzi, Paolo; Tanzarella, Caterina; Antoccia, Antonio

    2008-05-09

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a genetic disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to ionising radiation. Compound heterozygous 657del5/R215W NBS patients display a clinical phenotype more severe than the majority of NBS patients homozygous for the 657del5 mutation. The NBS1 protein, mutated in NBS patients, contains a FHA/BRCT domain necessary for the DNA-double strand break (DSB) damage response. Recently, a second BRCT domain has been identified, however, its role is still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the R215W mutation in NBS1 impairs histone {gamma}-H2AX binding after induction of DNA damage, leading to a delay in DNA-DSB rejoining. Molecular modelling reveals that the 215 residue of NBS1 is located between the two BRCT domains, affecting their relative orientation that appears critical for {gamma}-H2AX binding. Present data represent the first evidence for the role of NBS1 tandem BRCT domains in {gamma}-H2AX recognition, and could explain the severe phenotype observed in 657del5/R215W NBS patients.

  14. A Founder Mutation in VPS11 Causes an Autosomal Recessive Leukoencephalopathy Linked to Autophagic Defects

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, Adam; Fedick, Anastasia; Kaye, Lauren E.; Liao, Jun; Yachelevich, Naomi; Chu, Mary-Lynn; Boles, Richard G.; Moran, Ellen; Tokita, Mari; Gorman, Elizabeth; Zhang, Wei; Xia, Fan; Leduc, Magalie; Yang, Yaping; Eng, Christine; Wong, Lee-Jun; Schiffmann, Raphael; Diaz, George A.; Kornreich, Ruth; Thummel, Ryan; Wasserstein, Melissa; Yue, Zhenyu; Edelmann, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Genetic leukoencephalopathies (gLEs) are a group of heterogeneous disorders with white matter abnormalities affecting the central nervous system (CNS). The causative mutation in ~50% of gLEs is unknown. Using whole exome sequencing (WES), we identified homozygosity for a missense variant, VPS11: c.2536T>G (p.C846G), as the genetic cause of a leukoencephalopathy syndrome in five individuals from three unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) families. All five patients exhibited highly concordant disease progression characterized by infantile onset leukoencephalopathy with brain white matter abnormalities, severe motor impairment, cortical blindness, intellectual disability, and seizures. The carrier frequency of the VPS11: c.2536T>G variant is 1:250 in the AJ population (n = 2,026). VPS11 protein is a core component of HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting) and CORVET (class C core vacuole/endosome tethering) protein complexes involved in membrane trafficking and fusion of the lysosomes and endosomes. The cysteine 846 resides in an evolutionarily conserved cysteine-rich RING-H2 domain in carboxyl terminal regions of VPS11 proteins. Our data shows that the C846G mutation causes aberrant ubiquitination and accelerated turnover of VPS11 protein as well as compromised VPS11-VPS18 complex assembly, suggesting a loss of function in the mutant protein. Reduced VPS11 expression leads to an impaired autophagic activity in human cells. Importantly, zebrafish harboring a vps11 mutation with truncated RING-H2 domain demonstrated a significant reduction in CNS myelination following extensive neuronal death in the hindbrain and midbrain. Thus, our study reveals a defect in VPS11 as the underlying etiology for an autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy disorder associated with a dysfunctional autophagy-lysosome trafficking pathway. PMID:27120463

  15. A Founder Mutation in VPS11 Causes an Autosomal Recessive Leukoencephalopathy Linked to Autophagic Defects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinglan; Lachance, Véronik; Schaffner, Adam; Li, Xianting; Fedick, Anastasia; Kaye, Lauren E; Liao, Jun; Rosenfeld, Jill; Yachelevich, Naomi; Chu, Mary-Lynn; Mitchell, Wendy G; Boles, Richard G; Moran, Ellen; Tokita, Mari; Gorman, Elizabeth; Bagley, Kaytee; Zhang, Wei; Xia, Fan; Leduc, Magalie; Yang, Yaping; Eng, Christine; Wong, Lee-Jun; Schiffmann, Raphael; Diaz, George A; Kornreich, Ruth; Thummel, Ryan; Wasserstein, Melissa; Yue, Zhenyu; Edelmann, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Genetic leukoencephalopathies (gLEs) are a group of heterogeneous disorders with white matter abnormalities affecting the central nervous system (CNS). The causative mutation in ~50% of gLEs is unknown. Using whole exome sequencing (WES), we identified homozygosity for a missense variant, VPS11: c.2536T>G (p.C846G), as the genetic cause of a leukoencephalopathy syndrome in five individuals from three unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) families. All five patients exhibited highly concordant disease progression characterized by infantile onset leukoencephalopathy with brain white matter abnormalities, severe motor impairment, cortical blindness, intellectual disability, and seizures. The carrier frequency of the VPS11: c.2536T>G variant is 1:250 in the AJ population (n = 2,026). VPS11 protein is a core component of HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting) and CORVET (class C core vacuole/endosome tethering) protein complexes involved in membrane trafficking and fusion of the lysosomes and endosomes. The cysteine 846 resides in an evolutionarily conserved cysteine-rich RING-H2 domain in carboxyl terminal regions of VPS11 proteins. Our data shows that the C846G mutation causes aberrant ubiquitination and accelerated turnover of VPS11 protein as well as compromised VPS11-VPS18 complex assembly, suggesting a loss of function in the mutant protein. Reduced VPS11 expression leads to an impaired autophagic activity in human cells. Importantly, zebrafish harboring a vps11 mutation with truncated RING-H2 domain demonstrated a significant reduction in CNS myelination following extensive neuronal death in the hindbrain and midbrain. Thus, our study reveals a defect in VPS11 as the underlying etiology for an autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy disorder associated with a dysfunctional autophagy-lysosome trafficking pathway.

  16. Pathogenic Mutations in Retinitis Pigmentosa 2 Predominantly Result in Loss of RP2 Protein Stability in Human and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Qin, Yayun; Yu, Shanshan; Soares, Dinesh C; Yang, Lifang; Weng, Jun; Li, Chang; Gao, Meng; Lu, Zhaojing; Hu, Xuebin; Liu, Xiliang; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Jing Y; Shu, Xinhua; Tang, Zhaohui; Liu, Mugen

    2017-02-16

    Mutations in retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2) account for 10-20% of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP) cases. The encoded RP2 protein is implicated in ciliary trafficking of myristoylated and prenylated proteins in photoreceptor cells. To date, over 70 mutations in RP2 have been identified. How these mutations disrupt the function of RP2 is not fully understood. Here, we report a novel in-frame 12-bp deletion (c.357_368del, p.Pro120_Gly123del) in zebrafish rp2 The mutant zebrafish shows reduced rod phototransduction proteins and progressive retinal degeneration. Interestingly, the protein level of mutant Rp2 is almost undetectable, while its mRNA level is near normal, indicating a possible post-translational effect of the mutation. Consistent with this hypothesis, the equivalent 12-bp deletion in human RP2 markedly impairs RP2 protein stability and reduces its protein level. Furthermore, we found that a majority of the RP2 pathogenic mutations (including missense, single-residue deletion and C-terminal truncation mutations) severely destabilize the RP2 protein. The destabilized RP2 mutant proteins are degraded via the proteasome pathway, resulting in dramatically decreased protein levels. The remaining non-destabilizing mutations T87I, R118H/G/L/C, E138G and R211H/L are suggested to impair the interaction between RP2 and its protein partners (such as ARL3) or with as yet unknown partners. By utilizing a combination of in silico, in vitro and in vivo approaches, our work comprehensively indicates that loss of RP2 protein structural stability is the predominating pathogenic consequence for most RP2 mutations. Our study also reveals a role of the C-terminal domain of RP2 in maintaining the overall protein stability.

  17. Over-expression of microRNA-1 causes arrhythmia by disturbing intracellular trafficking system

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaomin; Liang, Haihai; Wang, He; Chen, Guizhi; Jiang, Hua; Wu, Qiuxia; Liu, Tianyi; Liu, Qiushuang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Yunyan; Yang, Baofeng; Shan, Hongli

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of intracellular trafficking system plays a fundamental role in the progression of cardiovascular disease. Up-regulation of miR-1 contributes to arrhythmia, we sought to elucidate whether intracellular trafficking contributes to miR-1-driven arrhythmia. By performing microarray analyses of the transcriptome in the cardiomyocytes-specific over-expression of microRNA-1 (miR-1 Tg) mice and the WT mice, we found that these differentially expressed genes in miR-1 Tg mice were significantly enrichment with the trafficking-related biological processes, such as regulation of calcium ion transport. Also, the qRT-PCR and western blot results validated that Stx6, Braf, Ube3a, Mapk8ip3, Ap1s1, Ccz1 and Gja1, which are the trafficking-related genes, were significantly down-regulated in the miR-1 Tg mice. Moreover, we found that Stx6 was decreased in the heart of mice after myocardial infarction and in the hypoxic cardiomyocytes, and further confirmed that Stx6 is a target of miR-1. Meanwhile, knockdown of Stx6 in cardiomyocytes resulted in the impairments of PLM and L-type calcium channel, which leads to the increased resting ([Ca2+]i). On the contrary, overexpression of Stx6 attenuated the impairments of miR-1 or hypoxia on PLM and L-type calcium channel. Thus, our studies reveals that trafficking-related gene Stx6 may regulate intracellular calcium and is involved in the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmia, which provides new insights in that miR-1 participates in arrhythmia by regulating the trafficking-related genes and pathway.

  18. Autoantibodies against muscarinic type 3 receptor in Sjögren's syndrome inhibit aquaporin 5 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Ha; Gauna, Adrienne E; Perez, Geidys; Park, Yun-jong; Pauley, Kaleb M; Kawai, Toshihisa; Cha, Seunghee

    2013-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) is a chronic autoimmune disease that mainly targets the salivary and lacrimal glands. It has been controversial whether anti-muscarinic type 3 receptor (α-M3R) autoantibodies in patients with SjS inhibit intracellular trafficking of aquaporin-5 (AQP5), water transport protein, leading to secretory dysfunction. To address this issue, GFP-tagged human AQP5 was overexpressed in human salivary gland cells (HSG-hAQP5) and monitored AQP5 trafficking to the plasma membrane following carbachol (CCh, M3R agonist) stimulation. AQP5 trafficking was indeed mediated by M3R stimulation, shown in partial blockage of trafficking by M3R-antagonist 4-DAMP. HSG-hAQP5 pre-incubated with SjS plasma for 24 hours significantly reduced AQP5 trafficking with CCh, compared with HSG-hAQP5 pre-incubated with healthy control (HC) plasma. This inhibition was confirmed by monoclonal α-M3R antibody and pre-absorbed plasma. Interestingly, HSG-hAQP5 pre-incubated with SjS plasma showed no change in cell volume, compared to the cells incubated with HC plasma showing shrinkage by twenty percent after CCh-stimulation. Our findings clearly indicate that binding of anti-M3R autoantibodies to the receptor, which was verified by immunoprecipitation, suppresses AQP5 trafficking to the membrane and contribute to impaired fluid secretion in SjS. Our current study urges further investigations of clinical associations between SjS symptoms, such as degree of secretory dysfunction, cognitive impairment, and/or bladder irritation, and different profiles (titers, isotypes, and/or specificity) of anti-M3R autoantibodies in individuals with SjS.

  19. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation Regulates Post-endocytic Trafficking of the D2 Dopamine Receptor*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Namkung, Yoon; Dipace, Concetta; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Sibley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-mediated phosphorylation in agonist-induced desensitization, arrestin association, endocytosis, and intracellular trafficking of the D2 dopamine receptor (DAR). Agonist activation of D2 DARs results in rapid and sustained receptor phosphorylation that is solely mediated by GRKs. A survey of GRKs revealed that only GRK2 or GRK3 promotes D2 DAR phosphorylation. Mutational analyses resulted in the identification of eight serine/threonine residues within the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor that are phosphorylated by GRK2/3. Simultaneous mutation of these eight residues results in a receptor construct, GRK(-), that is completely devoid of agonist-promoted GRK-mediated receptor phosphorylation. We found that both wild-type (WT) and GRK(-) receptors underwent a similar degree of agonist-induced desensitization as assessed using [35S]GTPγS binding assays. Similarly, both receptor constructs internalized to the same extent in response to agonist treatment. Furthermore, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to directly assess receptor association with arrestin3, we found no differences between the WT and GRK(-) receptors. Thus, phosphorylation is not required for arrestin-receptor association or agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. In contrast, when we examined recycling of the D2 DARs to the cell surface, subsequent to agonist-induced endocytosis, the GRK(-) construct exhibited less recycling in comparison with the WT receptor. This impairment appears to be due to a greater propensity of the GRK(-) receptors to down-regulate once internalized. In contrast, if the receptor is highly phosphorylated, then receptor recycling is promoted. These results reveal a novel role for GRK-mediated phosphorylation in regulating the post-endocytic trafficking of a G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:19332542

  20. Trafficking to the Ciliary Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Nachury, Maxence V.; Seeley, E. Scott; Jin, Hua

    2010-01-01

    The primary cilium organizes numerous signal transduction cascades and an understanding of signaling receptors trafficking to cilia is now emerging. A defining feature of cilia is the periciliary diffusion barrier that separates the ciliary and plasma membranes despite the topological continuity between these two membranes. Although lateral transport through this barrier may take place, polarized exocytosis to the base of the cilium has been the prevailing model for delivering membrane proteins to cilia. Key players for this polarized exocytosis model include the GTPases Rab8 and Rab11, the exocyst and possibly the intraflagellar tranport machinery. Sorting membrane proteins to cilia critically relies on the recognition of ciliary targeting signals by sorting machines such as the BBSome coat complex or the GTPase Arf4. Finally, signaling at the cilium entails the bidirectional movement of proteins between cytoplasm and cilia and ubiquitination may promote exit from cilia. PMID:19575670

  1. Mutation in the splicing factor Hprp3p linked to retinitis pigmentosa impairs interactions within the U4/U6 snRNP complex.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Santos, Juana Maria; Cao, Huibi; Duan, Rongqi Cathleen; Hu, Jim

    2008-01-15

    Mutations in PRPF3, a gene encoding the essential pre-mRNA splicing factor Hprp3p, have been identified in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa type 18 (RP18). Patients with RP18 have one of two single amino acid substitutions, Pro493Ser or Thr494Met, at the highly conserved Hprp3p C-terminal region. Pro493Ser occurs sporadically, whereas Thr494Met is observed in several unlinked RP families worldwide. The latter mutation also alters a potential recognition motif for phosphorylation by casein kinase II (CKII). To understand the molecular basis of RP18, we examined the consequences of Thr494Met mutation on Hprp3p molecular interactions with components of the U4/U6.U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) complex. Since numerous mutations causing human diseases change pre-mRNA splice sites, we investigated whether Thr494Met substitution affects the processing of PRPF3 mRNA. We found that Thr494Met does not affect PRPF3 mRNA processing, indicating that the mutation may exert its effect primarily at the protein level. We used small hairpin RNAs to specifically silence the endogenous PRPF3 while simultaneously expressing HA-tagged Thr494Met. We demonstrated that the C- but not N-terminal region of Hprp3p is indeed phosphorylated by CKII in vitro and in cells. CKII-mediated Hprp3p phosphorylation was significantly reduced by Thr494Met mutation. Consequently, the Hprp3p C-terminal region is rendered partially defective in its association with itself, Hprp4p, and U4/U6 snRNA. Our findings provide new insights into the biology of Hprp3p and suggest that the loss of Hprp3p phosphorylation at Thr494 is a key step for initiating Thr494Met aberrant interactions within U4/U6 snRNP complex and that these are likely linked to the RP18 phenotype.

  2. Congenital Visual Impairment and Progressive Microcephaly Due to Lysyl-Transfer Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) Synthetase (KARS) Mutations: The Expanding Phenotype of Aminoacyl-Transfer RNA Synthetase Mutations in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Hugh J; Humphreys, Peter; Smith, Amanda; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Bulman, Dennis E; Beaulieu, Chandree L; Majewski, Jacek; Boycott, Kym M; Geraghty, Michael T

    2015-07-01

    Aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthetases (ARSs) are a group of enzymes required for the first step of protein translation. Each aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase links a specific amino acid to its corresponding transfer RNA component within the cytoplasm, mitochondria, or both. Mutations in ARSs have been linked to a growing number of diseases. Lysyl-transfer RNA synthetase (KARS) links the amino acid lysine to its cognate transfer RNA. We report 2 siblings with severe infantile visual loss, progressive microcephaly, developmental delay, seizures, and abnormal subcortical white matter. Exome sequencing identified mutations within the KARS gene (NM_005548.2):c.1312C>T; p.Arg438Trp and c.1573G>A; p.Glu525Lys occurring within a highly conserved region of the catalytic domain. Our patients' phenotype is remarkably similar to a phenotype recently reported in glutaminyl-transfer RNA synthetase (QARS), another bifunctional ARS gene. This finding expands the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in KARS and draws attention to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase as a group of enzymes that are increasingly being implicated in human disease.

  3. A Novel IFITM5 Mutation in Severe Atypical Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type VI Impairs Osteoblast Production of Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Charles R; Reich, Adi; Barnes, Aileen M; Becerra, Patricia; Rauch, Frank; Cabral, Wayne A; Bae, Alison; Quinlan, Aaron; Glorieux, Francis H; Clemens, Thomas L; Marini, Joan C

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) types V and VI are caused, respectively, by a unique dominant mutation in IFITM5, encoding BRIL, a transmembrane ifitm-like protein most strongly expressed in the skeletal system, and recessive null mutations in SERPINF1, encoding pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). We identified a 25-year-old woman with severe OI whose dermal fibroblasts and cultured osteoblasts displayed minimal secretion of PEDF, but whose serum PEDF level was in the normal range. SERPINF1 sequences were normal despite bone histomorphometry consistent with type VI OI and elevated childhood serum alkaline phosphatase. We performed exome sequencing on the proband, both parents, and an unaffected sibling. IFITM5 emerged as the candidate gene from bioinformatics analysis, and was corroborated by membership in a murine bone co-expression network module containing all currently known OI genes. The de novo IFITM5 mutation was confirmed in one allele of the proband, resulting in a p.S40L substitution in the intracellular domain of BRIL but was absent in unaffected family members. IFITM5 expression was normal in proband fibroblasts and osteoblasts, and BRIL protein level was similar to control in differentiated proband osteoblasts on Western blot and in permeabilized mutant osteoblasts by microscopy. In contrast, SERPINF1 expression was decreased in proband osteoblasts; PEDF was barely detectable in conditioned media of proband cells. Expression and secretion of type I collagen was similarly decreased in proband osteoblasts; the expression pattern of several osteoblast markers largely overlapped reported values from cells with a primary PEDF defect. In contrast, osteoblasts from a typical case of type V OI, with an activating mutation at the 5′-terminus of BRIL, have increased SERPINF1 expression and PEDF secretion during osteoblast differentiation. Together, these data suggest that BRIL and PEDF have a relationship that connects the genes for types V and VI OI and

  4. A mutation in the FAM36A gene, the human ortholog of COX20, impairs cytochrome c oxidase assembly and is associated with ataxia and muscle hypotonia.

    PubMed

    Szklarczyk, Radek; Wanschers, Bas F J; Nijtmans, Leo G; Rodenburg, Richard J; Zschocke, Johannes; Dikow, Nicola; van den Brand, Mariël A M; Hendriks-Franssen, Marthe G M; Gilissen, Christian; Veltman, Joris A; Nooteboom, Marco; Koopman, Werner J H; Willems, Peter H G M; Smeitink, Jan A M; Huynen, Martijn A; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P

    2013-02-15

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) is a multi-subunit enzyme that transfers electrons from cytochrome c to molecular oxygen, yielding water. Its biogenesis requires concerted expression of mitochondria- and nuclear-encoded subunits and assembly factors. In this report, we describe a homozygous missense mutation in FAM36A from a patient who displays ataxia and muscle hypotonia. The FAM36A gene is a remote, putative ortholog of the fungal complex IV assembly factor COX20. Messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein co-expression analyses support the involvement of FAM36A in complex IV function in mammals. The c.154A>C mutation in the FAM36A gene, a mutation that is absent in sequenced exomes, leads to a reduced activity and lower levels of complex IV and its protein subunits. The FAM36A protein is nearly absent in patient's fibroblasts. Cells affected by the mutation accumulate subassemblies of complex IV that contain COX1 but are almost devoid of COX2 protein. We observe co-purification of FAM36A and COX2 proteins, supporting that the FAM36A defect hampers the early step of complex IV assembly at the incorporation of the COX2 subunit. Lentiviral complementation of patient's fibroblasts with wild-type FAM36A increases the complex IV activity as well as the amount of holocomplex IV and of individual subunits. These results establish the function of the human gene FAM36A/COX20 in complex IV assembly and support a causal role of the gene in complex IV deficiency.

  5. Impaired Action Potential Initiation in GABAergic Interneurons Causes Hyperexcitable Networks in an Epileptic Mouse Model Carrying a Human NaV1.1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hedrich, Ulrike B.S.; Liautard, Camille; Kirschenbaum, Daniel; Pofahl, Martin; Lavigne, Jennifer; Liu, Yuanyuan; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Escayg, Andrew; Dihné, Marcel; Beck, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in SCN1A and other ion channel genes can cause different epileptic phenotypes, but the precise mechanisms underlying the development of hyperexcitable networks are largely unknown. Here, we present a multisystem analysis of an SCN1A mouse model carrying the NaV1.1-R1648H mutation, which causes febrile seizures and epilepsy in humans. We found a ubiquitous hypoexcitability of interneurons in thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus, without detectable changes in excitatory neurons. Interestingly, somatic Na+ channels in interneurons and persistent Na+ currents were not significantly changed. Instead, the key mechanism of interneuron dysfunction was a deficit of action potential initiation at the axon initial segment that was identified by analyzing action potential firing. This deficit increased with the duration of firing periods, suggesting that increased slow inactivation, as recorded for recombinant mutated channels, could play an important role. The deficit in interneuron firing caused reduced action potential-driven inhibition of excitatory neurons as revealed by less frequent spontaneous but not miniature IPSCs. Multiple approaches indicated increased spontaneous thalamocortical and hippocampal network activity in mutant mice, as follows: (1) more synchronous and higher-frequency firing was recorded in primary neuronal cultures plated on multielectrode arrays; (2) thalamocortical slices examined by field potential recordings revealed spontaneous activities and pathological high-frequency oscillations; and (3) multineuron Ca2+ imaging in hippocampal slices showed increased spontaneous neuronal activity. Thus, an interneuron-specific generalized defect in action potential initiation causes multisystem disinhibition and network hyperexcitability, which can well explain the occurrence of seizures in the studied mouse model and in patients carrying this mutation. PMID:25378155

  6. D27E mutation of VTC1 impairs the interaction with CSN5B and enhances ascorbic acid biosynthesis and seedling growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenghui; Wang, Juan; Yu, Yanwen; Wang, Fengru; Dong, Jingao; Huang, Rongfeng

    2016-11-01

    Our previous investigation revealed that GDP-Man pyrophosphorylase (VTC1), a vital ascorbic acid (AsA) biosynthesis enzyme, could be degraded through interaction with the photomorphogenic factor COP9 signalosome subunit 5B (CSN5B) in the darkness, demonstrating the posttranscriptional regulation of light signal in AsA production. Here, we further report that a point mutation in D27E of VTC1 disables the interaction with CSN5B, resulting in enhancement of AsA biosynthesis and seedling growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. To identify the interaction sites with CSN5B, we first predicted the key amino acids in VTC1 via bioinformatics analysis. And then we biochemically and genetically demonstrated that the 27th Asp was the amino acid that influenced the interaction of VTC1 with CSN5B in plants. Moreover, transgenic lines overexpressing the site-specific mutagenesis from D27 (Asp) into E27 (Glu) in VTC1 showed enhanced AsA accumulation and reduced H2O2 content in Arabidopsis seedlings, compared with the lines overexpressing the mutation from D27 into N27 (Asn) in VTC1. In addition, this regulation of VTC1 D27E mutation promoted seedling growth. Together, our data reveal that the 27th amino acid of VTC1 confers a key regulation in the interaction with CSN5B and AsA biosynthesis, as well as in Arabidopsis seedling growth.

  7. An engineered tale-transcription factor rescues transcription of factor VII impaired by promoter mutations and enhances its endogenous expression in hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Barbon, Elena; Pignani, Silvia; Branchini, Alessio; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko; Bovolenta, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Tailored approaches to restore defective transcription responsible for severe diseases have been poorly explored. We tested transcription activator-like effectors fused to an activation domain (TALE-TFs) in a coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency model. In this model, the deficiency is caused by the −94C > G or −61T > G mutation, which abrogate the binding of Sp1 or HNF-4 transcription factors. Reporter assays in hepatoma HepG2 cells naturally expressing FVII identified a single TALE-TF (TF4) that, by targeting the region between mutations, specifically trans-activated both the variant (>100-fold) and wild-type (20–40-fold) F7 promoters. Importantly, in the genomic context of transfected HepG2 and transduced primary hepatocytes, TF4 increased F7 mRNA and protein levels (2- to 3-fold) without detectable off-target effects, even for the homologous F10 gene. The ectopic F7 expression in renal HEK293 cells was modestly affected by TF4 or by TALE-TF combinations. These results provide experimental evidence for TALE-TFs as gene-specific tools useful to counteract disease-causing promoter mutations. PMID:27341548

  8. CMT-linked loss-of-function mutations in GDAP1 impair store-operated Ca(2+) entry-stimulated respiration.

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, Paloma; Pla-Martín, David; Martínez-Valero, Paula; Rueda, Carlos B; Calpena, Eduardo; Del Arco, Araceli; Palau, Francesc; Satrústegui, Jorgina

    2017-02-21

    GDAP1 is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein involved in Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Lack of GDAP1 gives rise to altered mitochondrial networks and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondrial interactions resulting in a decreased ER-Ca(2+) levels along with a defect on store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) related to a misallocation of mitochondria to subplasmalemmal sites. The defect on SOCE is mimicked by MCU silencing or mitochondrial depolarization, which prevent mitochondrial calcium uptake. Ca(2+) release from de ER and Ca(2+) inflow through SOCE in neuroblastoma cells result in a Ca(2+)-dependent upregulation of respiration which is blunted in GDAP1 silenced cells. Reduced SOCE in cells with CMT recessive missense mutations in the α-loop of GDAP1, but not dominant mutations, was associated with smaller SOCE-stimulated respiration. These cases of GDAP1 deficiency also resulted in a decreased ER-Ca(2+) levels which may have pathological implications. The results suggest that CMT neurons may be under energetic constraints upon stimulation by Ca(2+) mobilization agonists and point to a potential role of perturbed mitochondria-ER interaction related to energy metabolism in forms of CMT caused by some of the recessive or null mutations of GDAP1.

  9. CMT-linked loss-of-function mutations in GDAP1 impair store-operated Ca2+ entry-stimulated respiration

    PubMed Central

    González-Sánchez, Paloma; Pla-Martín, David; Martínez-Valero, Paula; Rueda, Carlos B.; Calpena, Eduardo; del Arco, Araceli; Palau, Francesc; Satrústegui, Jorgina

    2017-01-01

    GDAP1 is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein involved in Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Lack of GDAP1 gives rise to altered mitochondrial networks and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondrial interactions resulting in a decreased ER-Ca2+ levels along with a defect on store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) related to a misallocation of mitochondria to subplasmalemmal sites. The defect on SOCE is mimicked by MCU silencing or mitochondrial depolarization, which prevent mitochondrial calcium uptake. Ca2+ release from de ER and Ca2+ inflow through SOCE in neuroblastoma cells result in a Ca2+-dependent upregulation of respiration which is blunted in GDAP1 silenced cells. Reduced SOCE in cells with CMT recessive missense mutations in the α-loop of GDAP1, but not dominant mutations, was associated with smaller SOCE-stimulated respiration. These cases of GDAP1 deficiency also resulted in a decreased ER-Ca2+ levels which may have pathological implications. The results suggest that CMT neurons may be under energetic constraints upon stimulation by Ca2+ mobilization agonists and point to a potential role of perturbed mitochondria-ER interaction related to energy metabolism in forms of CMT caused by some of the recessive or null mutations of GDAP1. PMID:28220846

  10. Luminal expression of cubilin is impaired in Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome with compound AMN mutations in intron 3 and exon 7

    PubMed Central

    Namour, Fares; Dobrovoljski, Gabriele; Chery, Celine; Audonnet, Sandra; Feillet, François; Sperl, Wolfgang; Gueant, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile megaloblastic anaemia 1 (OMIM # 261100) is a rare autosomic disorder characterized by selective cobalamin mal-absorption and inconstant proteinuria produced by mutations in either CUBN or AMN genes. Amnionless, the gene product of AMN, is a transmembrane protein that binds tightly to the N-terminal end of cubilin, the gene product of CUBN. Cubilin binds to intrinsic factor-cobalamin complex and is expressed in the distal intestine and the proximal renal tubule. We report a compound AMN heterozygosity with c.742C>T, p.Gln248X and c.208-2A>G mutations in 2 siblings that led to premature termination codon in exon 7 and exon 6, respectively. It produced a dramatic decrease in receptor activity in urine, despite absence of CUBN mutation and normal affinity of the receptor for intrinsic factor binding. Heterozygous carriers for c.742T and c.208-2G had no pathological signs. These results indicate that amnionless is essential for the correct luminal expression of cubilin in humans. PMID:21750092

  11. Luminal expression of cubilin is impaired in Imerslund-Grasbeck syndrome with compound AMN mutations in intron 3 and exon 7.

    PubMed

    Namour, Fares; Dobrovoljski, Gabriele; Chery, Celine; Audonnet, Sandra; Feillet, François; Sperl, Wolfgang; Gueant, Jean-Louis

    2011-11-01

    Juvenile megaloblastic anaemia 1 (OMIM # 261100) is a rare autosomic disorder characterized by selective cobalamin mal-absorption and inconstant proteinuria produced by mutations in either CUBN or AMN genes. Amnionless, the gene product of AMN, is a transmembrane protein that binds tightly to the N-terminal end of cubilin, the gene product of CUBN. Cubilin binds to intrinsic factor-cobalamin complex and is expressed in the distal intestine and the proximal renal tubule. We report a compound AMN heterozygosity with c.742C>T, p.Gln248X and c.208-2A>G mutations in 2 siblings that led to premature termination codon in exon 7 and exon 6, respectively. It produced a dramatic decrease in receptor activity in urine, despite absence of CUBN mutation and normal affinity of the receptor for intrinsic factor binding. Heterozygous carriers for c.742T and c.208-2G had no pathological signs. These results indicate that amnionless is essential for the correct luminal expression of cubilin in humans.

  12. Cubilin P1297L mutation associated with hereditary megaloblastic anemia 1 causes impaired recognition of intrinsic factor-vitamin B(12) by cubilin.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, M; Aminoff, M; Jacobsen, C; de La Chapelle, A; Krahe, R; Verroust, P J; Moestrup, S K

    2000-07-15

    Megaloblastic anemia 1 (MGA1) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the selective intestinal malabsorption of intrinsic factor (IF) and vitamin B(12)/cobalamin (Cbl) in complex. Most Finnish patients with MGA1 carry the disease-specific P1297L mutation (FM1) in the IF-B(12) receptor, cubilin. By site-directed mutagenesis, mammalian expression, and functional comparison of the purified wild-type and FM1 mutant forms of the IF-Cbl-binding cubilin region (CUB domains 5-8, amino acid 928-1386), we have investigated the functional implications of the P1297L mutation. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the P1297L substitution specifically increases the K(d) for IF-Cbl binding several-fold, largely by decreasing the association rate constant. In agreement with the binding data, the wild-type protein, but not the FM1 mutant protein, potently inhibits 37 degrees C uptake of iodine 125-IF-Cbl in cubilin-expressing epithelial cells. In conclusion, the data presented show a substantial loss in affinity of the FM1 mutant form of the IF-Cbl binding region of cubilin. This now explains the malabsorption of Cbl and Cbl-dependent anemia in MGA1 patients with the FM1 mutation. (Blood. 2000;96:405-409)

  13. Recessive TRAPPC11 Mutations Cause a Disease Spectrum of Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy and Myopathy with Movement Disorder and Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Bögershausen, Nina; Shahrzad, Nassim; Chong, Jessica X.; von Kleist-Retzow, Jürgen-Christoph; Stanga, Daniela; Li, Yun; Bernier, Francois P.; Loucks, Catrina M.; Wirth, Radu; Puffenberger, Eric G.; Hegele, Robert A.; Schreml, Julia; Lapointe, Gabriel; Keupp, Katharina; Brett, Christopher L.; Anderson, Rebecca; Hahn, Andreas; Innes, A. Micheil; Suchowersky, Oksana; Mets, Marilyn B.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; McLeod, D. Ross; Thiele, Holger; Waggoner, Darrel; Altmüller, Janine; Boycott, Kym M.; Schoser, Benedikt; Nürnberg, Peter; Ober, Carole; Heller, Raoul; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Wollnik, Bernd; Sacher, Michael; Lamont, Ryan E.

    2013-01-01

    Myopathies are a clinically and etiologically heterogeneous group of disorders that can range from limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) to syndromic forms with associated features including intellectual disability. Here, we report the identification of mutations in transport protein particle complex 11 (TRAPPC11) in three individuals of a consanguineous Syrian family presenting with LGMD and in five individuals of Hutterite descent presenting with myopathy, infantile hyperkinetic movements, ataxia, and intellectual disability. By using a combination of whole-exome or genome sequencing with homozygosity mapping, we identified the homozygous c.2938G>A (p.Gly980Arg) missense mutation within the gryzun domain of TRAPPC11 in the Syrian LGMD family and the homozygous c.1287+5G>A splice-site mutation resulting in a 58 amino acid in-frame deletion (p.Ala372_Ser429del) in the foie gras domain of TRAPPC11 in the Hutterite families. TRAPPC11 encodes a component of the multiprotein TRAPP complex involved in membrane trafficking. We demonstrate that both mutations impair the binding ability of TRAPPC11 to other TRAPP complex components and disrupt the Golgi apparatus architecture. Marker trafficking experiments for the p.Ala372_Ser429del deletion indicated normal ER-to-Golgi trafficking but dramatically delayed exit from the Golgi to the cell surface. Moreover, we observed alterations of the lysosomal membrane glycoproteins lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) and LAMP2 as a consequence of TRAPPC11 dysfunction supporting a defect in the transport of secretory proteins as the underlying pathomechanism. PMID:23830518

  14. Female sex trafficking: conceptual issues, current debates, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Meshkovska, Biljana; Siegel, Melissa; Stutterheim, Sarah E; Bos, Arjan E R

    2015-01-01

    Female sex trafficking is a pressing concern. In this article, we provide a comprehensive overview of relevant issues regarding the concept of female sex trafficking and research in the field of human trafficking, drawing on a variety of disciplines, including economics, gender and sexuality studies, psychology, sociology, law, and social work. We discuss the debates surrounding the definition of human trafficking, compare and contrast it with human smuggling, and outline connections between female sex trafficking and the issue of sex work and prostitution. We further discuss the history and current estimations of female sex trafficking. We then outline the main actors in female sex trafficking, including trafficked persons, traffickers, clients, and service providers, and we overview the trafficking process from recruitment to identification, recovery, and (re)integration. Finally, we conclude with recommendations for future research that tie together the concepts of vulnerability, exploitation, and long-term recovery and (re)integration.

  15. OCRL controls trafficking through early endosomes via PtdIns4,5P2-dependent regulation of endosomal actin

    PubMed Central

    Vicinanza, Mariella; Di Campli, Antonella; Polishchuk, Elena; Santoro, Michele; Di Tullio, Giuseppe; Godi, Anna; Levtchenko, Elena; De Leo, Maria Giovanna; Polishchuk, Roman; Sandoval, Lisette; Marzolo, Maria-Paz; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns4,5P2) 5-phosphatase OCRL cause Lowe syndrome, which is characterised by congenital cataracts, central hypotonia, and renal proximal tubular dysfunction. Previous studies have shown that OCRL interacts with components of the endosomal machinery; however, its role in endocytosis, and thus the pathogenic mechanisms of Lowe syndrome, have remained elusive. Here, we show that via its 5-phosphatase activity, OCRL controls early endosome (EE) function. OCRL depletion impairs the recycling of multiple classes of receptors, including megalin (which mediates protein reabsorption in the kidney) that are retained in engorged EEs. These trafficking defects are caused by ectopic accumulation of PtdIns4,5P2 in EEs, which in turn induces an N-WASP-dependent increase in endosomal F-actin. Our data provide a molecular explanation for renal proximal tubular dysfunction in Lowe syndrome and highlight that tight control of PtdIns4,5P2 and F-actin at the EEs is essential for exporting cargoes that transit this compartment. PMID:21971085

  16. Sex Trafficking of Women and Girls

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Neha A; Nour, Nawal M

    2013-01-01

    Sex trafficking involves some form of forced or coerced sexual exploitation that is not limited to prostitution, and has become a significant and growing problem in both the United States and the larger global community. The costs to society include the degradation of human and women’s rights, poor public health, disrupted communities, and diminished social development. Victims of sex trafficking acquire adverse physical and psychological health conditions and social disadvantages. Thus, sex trafficking is a critical health issue with broader social implications that requires both medical and legal attention. Healthcare professionals can work to improve the screening, identification, and assistance of victims of sex trafficking in a clinical setting and help these women and girls access legal and social services. PMID:23687554

  17. Committee opinion no. 507: human trafficking.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Human trafficking is a widespread problem with estimates ranging from 14,000 to 50,000 individuals trafficked into the United States annually. This hidden population involves the commercial sex industry, agriculture, factories, hotel and restaurant businesses, domestic workers, marriage brokers, and some adoption firms. Because 80% of trafficked individuals are women and girls, women’s health care providers may better serve their diverse patient population by increasing their awareness of this problem. The exploitation of people of any race, gender, sexual orientation, or ethnicity is unacceptable at any time, in any place. The members of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists should be aware of this problem and strive to recognize and assist their patients who are victims or who have been victims of human trafficking.

  18. Human trafficking law and social structures.

    PubMed

    Wooditch, Alese

    2012-08-01

    Human trafficking has only recently emerged at the forefront of policy reform, even in developed nations. Yet, heightened awareness of the issue has not translated into effective policy as the majority of nations have ineffective antitrafficking practices; many countries have failed to criminalize human trafficking, whereas others do not actively enforce statutes in place. By applying Black's theory of law, this study offers a preliminary understanding into the variation of global prosecutorial efforts in human trafficking and adequacy of antitrafficking law. To isolate this relationship, the effects of trafficking markets are controlled. As with prior research, the study finds limited support for the theory. The article concludes with a discussion on the implications of the quantity of antitrafficking law and morphology association for policy development.

  19. Ovarian Cystadenoma in a Trafficked Patient.

    PubMed

    Titchen, Kanani E; Katz, Douglas; Martinez, Kidian; White, Krishna

    2016-05-01

    The topic of child sex trafficking is receiving increased attention both in the lay press and in research articles. Recently, a number of physician organizations have issued policy statements calling for the education and involvement of physicians in combating this form of "modern-day slavery." Primary care and emergency medicine physicians have led these efforts, but a number of these victims may present to surgeons. Surgeons are in a unique position to identify trafficked patients; during the process of undraping, intubation, and surgical preparation, signs of trafficking such as tattoos, scars, dental injuries, and bruising may be evident. In addition, these patients may have specific needs in terms of anesthesia and postoperative care due to substance abuse. Here, we report the case of an 18-year-old girl with a history of sexual exploitation who presents for cystadenoma excision. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a sex-trafficked pediatric patient presenting for surgery.

  20. Golgi apparatus and protein trafficking in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baloyannis, Stavros J

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive degeneration of the brain, inducing memory decline, inability in learning, and behavioral alterations, resulting progressively in a marked deterioration of all mental activities and eventually a vegetative state. The main causative factor, however, is still unclear. The implication of amyloid-β, AβPP, tau protein, the selective loss of neurons, the alteration of the synapses, the cytoskeletal changes, and the morphological alterations of the brain capillaries contribute substantially to the pathogenetic profile of the disease, without sufficiently enlightening the initial steps of the pathological procedures. The ultrastructure of the neuronal organelles as well as histochemical studies revealed substantial alterations, primarily concerning mitochondria. In this study, the morphological and morphometric alterations of the Golgi apparatus (GA) are described in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum in twenty AD brains, studied with electron microscopy. As it is well established, GA has a very important role to play in many procedures such as glycosylation, sulfation, and proteolysis of protein systems, which are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum of nerve cells and glia. GA may also play a crucial role in protein trafficking and in misfolding of protein aggregates. In addition, the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein is closely related with the pathology of GA. In AD cases, described in this study, an obvious fragmentation of the cisternae of GA was observed in the Purkinje cells of the vermis and the cerebellar hemispheres. This alteration of GA may be associated with alterations of microtubules, impaired protein trafficking, and dendritic, spinal, and synaptic pathology, since protein trafficking plays an essential role in the three dimensional organization of the dendritic arbor and in the integrity of the synaptic components.

  1. Trafficking in Persons Report 10th Edition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    prohibits most forms of human trafficking through its 2007 Organic Law on the Right of Women to a Violence-Free Life . Article 56 of this law...www.timmatsui.com 20: REUTERS 21: (left) Jacqueline Abromeit/bigStockPhoto.com 21: ( right ) Environmental Justice Foundation/ www.ejfoundation.org 22: Jacques-Jean...prosecuted, and more instances of this human rights abuse have been pre- vented. Countries that once denied the existence of human trafficking now work

  2. Drosophila Vps16A is required for trafficking to lysosomes and biogenesis of pigment granules.

    PubMed

    Pulipparacharuvil, Suprabha; Akbar, Mohammed Ali; Ray, Sanchali; Sevrioukov, Evgueny A; Haberman, Adam S; Rohrer, Jack; Krämer, Helmut

    2005-08-15

    Mutations that disrupt trafficking to lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles cause multiple diseases, including Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. The Drosophila eye is a model system for analyzing such mutations. The eye-color genes carnation and deep orange encode two subunits of the Vps-C protein complex required for endosomal trafficking and pigment-granule biogenesis. Here we demonstrate that dVps16A (CG8454) encodes another Vps-C subunit. Biochemical experiments revealed a specific interaction between the dVps16A C-terminus and the Sec1/Munc18 homolog Carnation but not its closest homolog, dVps33B. Instead, dVps33B interacted with a related protein, dVps16B (CG18112). Deep orange bound both Vps16 homologs. Like a deep orange null mutation, eye-specific RNAi-induced knockdown of dVps16A inhibited lysosomal delivery of internalized ligands and interfered with biogenesis of pigment granules. Ubiquitous knockdown of dVps16A was lethal. Together, these findings demonstrate that Drosophila Vps16A is essential for lysosomal trafficking. Furthermore, metazoans have two types of Vps-C complexes with non-redundant functions.

  3. Selective expression of Parkinson's disease-related Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 G2019S missense mutation in midbrain dopaminergic neurons impairs dopamine release and dopaminergic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoxiang; Sgobio, Carmelo; Gu, Xinglong; Sun, Lixin; Lin, Xian; Yu, Jia; Parisiadou, Loukia; Xie, Chengsong; Sastry, Namratha; Ding, Jinhui; Lohr, Kelly M; Miller, Gary W; Mateo, Yolanda; Lovinger, David M; Cai, Huaibin

    2015-09-15

    Preferential dysfunction/degeneration of midbrain substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopaminergic (DA) neurons contributes to the main movement symptoms manifested in Parkinson's disease (PD). Although the Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) G2019S missense mutation (LRRK2 G2019S) is the most common causative genetic factor linked to PD, the effects of LRRK2 G2019S on the function and survival of SNpc DA neurons are poorly understood. Using a binary gene expression system, we generated transgenic mice expressing either wild-type human LRRK2 (WT mice) or the LRRK2 G2019S mutation (G2019S mice) selectively in the midbrain DA neurons. Here we show that overexpression of LRRK2 G2019S did not induce overt motor abnormalities or substantial SNpc DA neuron loss. However, the LRRK2 G2019S mutation impaired dopamine homeostasis and release in aged mice. This reduction in dopamine content/release coincided with the degeneration of DA axon terminals and decreased expression of DA neuron-enriched genes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular monoamine transporter 2, dopamine transporter and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1. These factors are responsible for dopamine synthesis, transport and degradation, and their expression is regulated by transcription factor paired-like homeodomain 3 (PITX3). Levels of Pitx3 mRNA and protein were similarly decreased in the SNpc DA neurons of aged G2019S mice. Together, these findings suggest that PITX3-dependent transcription regulation could be one of the many potential mechanisms by which LRRK2 G2019S acts in SNpc DA neurons, resulting in downregulation of its downstream target genes critical for dopamine homeostasis and release.

  4. A Point Mutation in the Ubiquitin Ligase RNF170 That Causes Autosomal Dominant Sensory Ataxia Destabilizes the Protein and Impairs Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Forrest A.; Lu, Justine P.; Sliter, Danielle A.; Dupré, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy A.; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J. H.

    2015-01-01

    RNF170 is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane ubiquitin ligase that contributes to the ubiquitination of activated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and also, when point mutated (arginine to cysteine at position 199), causes autosomal dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), a disease characterized by neurodegeneration in the posterior columns of the spinal cord. Here we demonstrate that this point mutation inhibits RNF170 expression and signaling via IP3 receptors. Inhibited expression of mutant RNF170 was seen in cells expressing exogenous RNF170 constructs and in ADSA lymphoblasts, and appears to result from enhanced RNF170 autoubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The basis for these effects was probed via additional point mutations, revealing that ionic interactions between charged residues in the transmembrane domains of RNF170 are required for protein stability. In ADSA lymphoblasts, platelet-activating factor-induced Ca2+ mobilization was significantly impaired, whereas neither Ca2+ store content, IP3 receptor levels, nor IP3 production were altered, indicative of a functional defect at the IP3 receptor locus, which may be the cause of neurodegeneration. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genetic deletion of RNF170 showed that RNF170 mediates the addition of all of the ubiquitin conjugates known to become attached to activated IP3 receptors (monoubiquitin and Lys48- and Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains), and that wild-type and mutant RNF170 have apparently identical ubiquitin ligase activities toward IP3 receptors. Thus, the Ca2+ mobilization defect seen in ADSA lymphoblasts is apparently not due to aberrant IP3 receptor ubiquitination. Rather, the defect likely reflects abnormal ubiquitination of other substrates, or adaptation to the chronic reduction in RNF170 levels. PMID:25882839

  5. A Point Mutation in the Ubiquitin Ligase RNF170 That Causes Autosomal Dominant Sensory Ataxia Destabilizes the Protein and Impairs Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wright, Forrest A; Lu, Justine P; Sliter, Danielle A; Dupré, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy A; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J H

    2015-05-29

    RNF170 is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane ubiquitin ligase that contributes to the ubiquitination of activated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and also, when point mutated (arginine to cysteine at position 199), causes autosomal dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), a disease characterized by neurodegeneration in the posterior columns of the spinal cord. Here we demonstrate that this point mutation inhibits RNF170 expression and signaling via IP3 receptors. Inhibited expression of mutant RNF170 was seen in cells expressing exogenous RNF170 constructs and in ADSA lymphoblasts, and appears to result from enhanced RNF170 autoubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The basis for these effects was probed via additional point mutations, revealing that ionic interactions between charged residues in the transmembrane domains of RNF170 are required for protein stability. In ADSA lymphoblasts, platelet-activating factor-induced Ca(2+) mobilization was significantly impaired, whereas neither Ca(2+) store content, IP3 receptor levels, nor IP3 production were altered, indicative of a functional defect at the IP3 receptor locus, which may be the cause of neurodegeneration. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genetic deletion of RNF170 showed that RNF170 mediates the addition of all of the ubiquitin conjugates known to become attached to activated IP3 receptors (monoubiquitin and Lys(48)- and Lys(63)-linked ubiquitin chains), and that wild-type and mutant RNF170 have apparently identical ubiquitin ligase activities toward IP3 receptors. Thus, the Ca(2+) mobilization defect seen in ADSA lymphoblasts is apparently not due to aberrant IP3 receptor ubiquitination. Rather, the defect likely reflects abnormal ubiquitination of other substrates, or adaptation to the chronic reduction in RNF170 levels.

  6. A novel familial mutation in the PCSK1 gene that alters the oxyanion hole residue of proprotein convertase 1/3 and impairs its enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Wilschanski, Michael; Abbasi, Montaser; Blanco, Elias; Lindberg, Iris; Yourshaw, Michael; Zangen, David; Berger, Itai; Shteyer, Eyal; Pappo, Orit; Bar-Oz, Benjamin; Martín, Martin G; Elpeleg, Orly

    2014-01-01

    Four siblings presented with congenital diarrhea and various endocrinopathies. Exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping identified five regions, comprising 337 protein-coding genes that were shared by three affected siblings. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous N309K mutation in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1) gene, encoding the neuroendocrine convertase 1 precursor (PC1/3) which was recently reported as a cause of Congenital Diarrhea Disorder (CDD). The PCSK1 mutation affected the oxyanion hole transition state-stabilizing amino acid within the active site, which is critical for appropriate proprotein maturation and enzyme activity. Unexpectedly, the N309K mutant protein exhibited normal, though slowed, prodomain removal and was secreted from both HEK293 and Neuro2A cells. However, the secreted enzyme showed no catalytic activity, and was not processed into the 66 kDa form. We conclude that the N309K enzyme is able to cleave its own propeptide but is catalytically inert against in trans substrates, and that this variant accounts for the enteric and systemic endocrinopathies seen in this large consanguineous kindred.

  7. Heterozygous Mutation in IκBNS Leads to Reduced Levels of Natural IgM Antibodies and Impaired Responses to T-Independent Type 2 Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Gabriel K.; Ádori, Monika; Stark, Julian M.; Khoenkhoen, Sharesta; Arnold, Carrie; Beutler, Bruce; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2016-01-01

    Mice deficient in central components of classical NF-κB signaling have low levels of circulating natural IgM antibodies and fail to respond to immunization with T-independent type 2 (TI-2) antigens. A plausible explanation for these defects is the severely reduced numbers of B-1 and marginal zone B (MZB) cells in such mice. By using an ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a role for the atypical IκB protein IκBNS in humoral immunity. IκBNS-deficient mice lack B-1 cells and have severely reduced numbers of MZB cells, and thus resemble several other strains with defects in classical NF-κB signaling. We analyzed mice heterozygous for the identified IκBNS mutation and demonstrate that these mice have an intermediary phenotype in terms of levels of circulating IgM antibodies and responses to TI-2 antigens. However, in contrast to mice that are homozygous for the IκBNS mutation, the heterozygous mice had normal frequencies of B-1 and MZB cells. These results suggest that there is a requirement for IκBNS expression from two functional alleles for maintaining normal levels of circulating natural IgM antibodies and responses to TI-2 antigens. PMID:26973645

  8. A Novel Familial Mutation in the PCSK1 Gene That Alters the Oxyanion Hole Residue of Proprotein Convertase 1/3 and Impairs Its Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wilschanski, Michael; Abbasi, Montaser; Blanco, Elias; Lindberg, Iris; Yourshaw, Michael; Zangen, David; Berger, Itai; Shteyer, Eyal; Pappo, Orit; Bar-Oz, Benjamin; Martín, Martin G.; Elpeleg, Orly

    2014-01-01

    Four siblings presented with congenital diarrhea and various endocrinopathies. Exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping identified five regions, comprising 337 protein-coding genes that were shared by three affected siblings. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous N309K mutation in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1) gene, encoding the neuroendocrine convertase 1 precursor (PC1/3) which was recently reported as a cause of Congenital Diarrhea Disorder (CDD). The PCSK1 mutation affected the oxyanion hole transition state-stabilizing amino acid within the active site, which is critical for appropriate proprotein maturation and enzyme activity. Unexpectedly, the N309K mutant protein exhibited normal, though slowed, prodomain removal and was secreted from both HEK293 and Neuro2A cells. However, the secreted enzyme showed no catalytic activity, and was not processed into the 66 kDa form. We conclude that the N309K enzyme is able to cleave its own propeptide but is catalytically inert against in trans substrates, and that this variant accounts for the enteric and systemic endocrinopathies seen in this large consanguineous kindred. PMID:25272002

  9. The hidden crime: human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Clause, Kristen J; Lawler, Kate Byrnes

    2013-01-01

    As the primary contact in the health care system, nurses can play a role in combating this crime and assisting the victims. Assessment for abuse, neglect, trauma, recurrent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and fear of a controlling partner is critical. Following up on "red flags" and understanding methods of safe questioning can make the difference between slavery and recovery for victims. Nurses must also know the professional referrals in their areas once a potential victim has been identified. This may be a very dangerous undertaking and must be handled by experienced personnel. Referrals to forensic nurses or physicians, domestic violence professionals or law enforcement may be indicated. Initially, a nurse may want to consult with the agency social worker for guidance. Human trafficking is a human rights crime. Unfortunately, it is more prevalent in all types of communities than most people suspect. Nurses can be heroes to the victims through understanding of this crime and vigilance in the assessment and care of all people they encounter in their practices.

  10. Sex work and sex trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ditmore, M; Saunders, P

    1998-01-01

    Preventing HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), as well as sexual and physical violence, are major occupational health and safety concerns for prostitutes. Considerable evidence shows that anti-prostitution laws facilitate violence and abuse against prostitutes and may increase their risk of contracting HIV/STDs. For example, police often take advantage of existing laws against prostitution to demand money or sex. In general, the strict enforcement of anti-prostitution laws marginalizes prostitutes from services which could help them avoid abuse and promotes an environment in which prostitutes must take risks to avoid detection and arrest. One strategy to improve prostitutes' lives would therefore be to remove laws which prevent them from working safely and from travelling abroad to work legally. Projects in which prostitutes are actively involved have helped break down stereotypes against prostitutes, while police-sex worker liaison projects in Scotland and Australia have led to higher levels of reporting of crimes against prostitutes. The Network of Sex Work Projects (NSWP), an organization which links sex worker health programs around the world, has found that the incidence of HIV/STDs among prostitutes is lowest when they have control over their work conditions; access to condoms, lubricants, and other safe sex materials; and respect of their basic human and legal rights. People need to understand that consensual involvement in sex work is different from forced sex trafficking.

  11. Lymphatic Regulation of Cellular Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels play vital roles in immune surveillance and immune regulation by conveying antigen loaded dendritic cells, memory T cells, macrophages and neutrophils from the peripheral tissues to draining lymph nodes where they initiate as well as modify immune responses. Until relatively recently however, there was little understanding of how entry and migration through lymphatic vessels is organized or the specific molecular mechanisms that might be involved. Within the last decade, the situation has been transformed by an explosion of knowledge generated largely through the application of microscopic imaging, transgenic animals, specific markers and function blocking mAbs that is beginning to provide a rational conceptual framework. This article provides a critical review of the recent literature, highlighting seminal discoveries that have revealed the fascinating ultrastructure of leucocyte entry sites in lymphatic vessels, as well as generating controversies over the involvement of integrin adhesion, chemotactic and haptotactic mechanisms in DC entry under normal and inflamed conditions. It also discusses the major changes in lymphatic architecture that occur during inflammation and the different modes of leucocyte entry and trafficking within inflamed lymphatic vessels, as well as presenting a timely update on the likely role of hyaluronan and the major lymphatic endothelial hyaluronan receptor LYVE-1 in leucocyte transit. PMID:27808282

  12. The hidden crime: human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Clause, Kristen J; Lawler, Kate Byrnes

    2013-01-01

    As the primary contact in the health care system, nurses can play a role in combating this crime and assisting the victims. Assessment for abuse, neglect, trauma, recurrent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and fear of a controlling partner is critical. Following up on "red flags" and understanding methods of safe questioning can make the difference between slavery and recovery for victims. Nurses must also know the professional referrals in their areas once a potential victim has been identified. This may be a very dangerous undertaking and must be handled by experienced personnel. Referrals to forensic nurses or physicians, domestic violence professionals or law enforcement may be indicated. Initially, a nurse may want to consult with the agency social worker for guidance. Human trafficking is a human rights crime. Unfortunately, it is more prevalent in all types of communities than most people suspect. Nurses can be heroes to the victims through understanding of this crime and vigilance in the assessment and care of all people they encounter in their practices. To learn more or to help with this cause, visit the Somaly Mam Foundation at www.somaly.org or the U.S. Department of State at www. state.gov.

  13. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations in FAB1A/B impair endomembrane homeostasis, conferring pleiotropic developmental abnormalities in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Tomoko; Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Takegawa, Kaoru; Sato, Masa H

    2011-02-01

    In eukaryotic cells, PtdIns 3,5-kinase, Fab1/PIKfyve produces PtdIns (3,5) P(2) from PtdIns 3-P, and functions in vacuole/lysosome homeostasis. Herein, we show that expression of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) FAB1A/B in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) fab1 knockout cells fully complements the vacuole morphology phenotype. Subcellular localizations of FAB1A and FAB1B fused with green fluorescent protein revealed that FAB1A/B-green fluorescent proteins localize to the endosomes in root epidermal cells of Arabidopsis. Furthermore, reduction in the expression levels of FAB1A/B by RNA interference impairs vacuolar acidification and endocytosis. These results indicate that Arabidopsis FAB1A/B functions as PtdIns 3,5-kinase in plants and in fission yeast. Conditional knockdown mutant shows various phenotypes including root growth inhibition, hyposensitivity to exogenous auxin, and disturbance of root gravitropism. These phenotypes are observed also in the overproducing mutants of FAB1A and FAB1B. The overproducing mutants reveal additional morphological phenotypes including dwarfism, male-gametophyte sterility, and abnormal floral organs. Taken together, this evidence indicates that imbalanced expression of FAB1A/B impairs endomembrane homeostasis including endocytosis, vacuole formation, and vacuolar acidification, which causes pleiotropic developmental phenotypes mostly related to the auxin signaling in Arabidopsis.

  14. Post mortem identification of deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK) gene mutations combined with impaired glucose homeostasis and iron overload features in four infants with severe progressive liver failure.

    PubMed

    Pronicka, Ewa; Węglewska-Jurkiewicz, Anna; Taybert, Joanna; Pronicki, Maciej; Szymańska-Dębińska, Tamara; Karkucińska-Więckowska, Agnieszka; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Kowalski, Paweł; Piekutowska-Abramczuk, Dorota; Pajdowska, Magdalena; Socha, Piotr; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2011-02-01

    Deoxyguanosine kinase deficiency (dGK) is a frequent cause of the hepatocerebral form of mitochondrial depletion syndrome (MDS). A group of 28 infants with severe progressive liver failure of unknown cause was recruited for post mortem search for deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK) gene mutations. Four affected patients (14% of the studied group), two homozygotes, one compound heterozygote, and one heterozygote, with DGUOK mutation found on only one allele, were identified. Three known pathogenic mutations in the DGUOK gene were detected, c.3G>A (p.Met1Ile), c.494A>T (p.Glu165Val), and c.766_767insGATT (p.Phe256X), and one novel molecular variant of unknown pathogenicity, c.813_814insTTT (p.Asn271_Thr272insPhe). Profound mitochondrial DNA depletion was confirmed in available specimens of the liver (4%, 15%, and 10% of the normal value) and in the muscle (4%, 23%, 45%, and 6%, respectively). The patients were born with low weights for gestational age and they presented adaptation trouble during the first days of life. Subsequently, liver failure developed, leading to death at the ages of 18, 6, 5.5, and 2.25 months, respectively. Mild neurological involvement was observed in all children (hypotonia, psychomotor retardation, and ptosis). Hypoglycemia (hypoketotic) and lactic acidosis were the constant laboratory findings. Elevated transferrin saturation, high ferritin, and alpha-fetoprotein levels resembled, in two cases, a neonatal hemochromatosis. Liver histopathology showed severe hepatic damage ranging from micronodular formation and cirrhosis to the total loss of liver architecture with diffuse fibrosis and neocholangiolar proliferation. Pancreatic islet cell hyperplasia with numerous confluent giant islets was found in both autopsied infants. Analysis of the natural history of the disease in our patients and the literature data led us to the following observations: (i) islet cell hyperplasia (and hyperinsulinism) may contribute to MDS-associated hypoglycemia; (ii

  15. Stress at learning facilitates memory formation by regulating AMPA receptor trafficking through a glucocorticoid action.

    PubMed

    Conboy, Lisa; Sandi, Carmen

    2010-02-01

    Stress and glucocorticoids (GCs) can facilitate memory formation. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating their effects are largely unknown. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor (AMPAR) trafficking has been implicated in the changes in synaptic strength at central glutamatergic synapses associated with memory formation. In cell cultures, corticosterone has been shown to condition the synaptic trafficking of the AMPAR GluA2 subunit. In this study, we investigated the involvement of GluA2 trafficking in the facilitation of learning by stress. Using the water maze spatial task involving different stress levels, mice trained under more stressful conditions (water at 22 degrees C) showed better learning and memory, and higher post-training corticosterone levels, than mice trained under lower stress (water at 30 degrees C). Strikingly, this facilitated learning by stress was accompanied by enhanced synaptic expression of GluA2 AMPARs that was not observed in mice trained under less stressful conditions. Interfering with GC actions by injecting the GC synthesis inhibitor, metyrapone, blocked both the memory facilitation and the enhanced GluA2 trafficking induced by stressful learning. Intracerebroventricular infusion of the peptide, pep2m, that blocks GluA2 synaptic trafficking by interfering with the interaction between N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor and GluA2, impaired immediate performance at learning as well as long-term memory retrieval, supporting a causal role for GluA2 trafficking in stress-induced facilitation of spatial learning and memory. Evidence for the involvement of the neural cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin in interaction with GluA2 is also provided. These findings underscore a new mechanism whereby stress can improve memory function.

  16. Visual Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Visual Impairment KidsHealth > For Teens > Visual Impairment Print A ... with the brain, making vision impossible. What Is Visual Impairment? Many people have some type of visual ...

  17. Mice carrying a knock-in mutation of Aicda resulting in a defect in somatic hypermutation have impaired gut homeostasis and compromised mucosal defense.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Shinkura, Reiko; Doi, Yasuko; Maruya, Mikako; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Honjo, Tasuku

    2011-03-01

    To elucidate the specific role of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in mucosal immunity, we generated mice carrying a knock-in point mutation in Aicda, which encodes activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme essential to SHM and class-switch recombination (CSR). These mutant AID(G23S) mice had much less SHM but had normal amounts of immunoglobulin in both serum and intestinal secretions. AID(G23S) mice developed hyperplasia of germinal center B cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues, accompanied by expansion of microflora in the small intestine. Moreover, AID(G23S) mice had more translocation of Yersinia enterocolitica into mesenteric lymph nodes and were more susceptible than wild-type mice to oral challenge with cholera toxin. Together our results indicate that SHM is critical in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and efficient mucosal defense.

  18. Glycosylation-deficient mutations in tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase impair its structure and function and are linked to infantile hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Komaru, Keiichi; Satou, Yasuhito; Al-Shawafi, Hiba A; Numa-Kinjoh, Natsuko; Sohda, Miwa; Oda, Kimimitsu

    2016-03-01

    Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP) is a membrane glycoprotein with a proposed role in bone mineralization. Indeed, mutations in TNSALP have been identified in patients with hypophosphatasia (HPP), a genetic disease characterized by hypomineralization of bone and teeth and a deficiency in serum ALP activity. TNSALP has five potential N-glycosylation sites at N140, N230, N271, N303 and N430 by standard nomenclature. A mutation at one of these sites, N430, was recently detected in a patient with infantile HPP. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that TNSALP has five N-glycans in transfected COS-1 cells and that individual single N-glycan deletion mutants of TNSALP retain the dimeric structure required for ALP activity, excluding the possibility that any single N-glycan plays a vital role in the structure and function of TNSALP. However, we found that TNSALP (N430Q) and TNSALP (N430E) mutants, but not a TNSALP (N430D) mutant, failed to form dimers. The TNSALP (N430S) mutant linked to infantile HPP was glycosylation-defective and unable to dimerise, similar to TNSALP (N430Q) and TNSALP (N430E) mutants; therefore, TNSALP (N430S) was established as a severe allele without strong ALP activity. By contrast to individual single N-glycan deletion mutants, TNSALP devoid of all five N-glycans was present to a much lesser extent than wild-type TNSALP in transfected cells, possibly reflecting its instability. A comprehensive analysis of a series of multiple N-glycan depletion mutants in TNSALP revealed that three N-glycans on N230, N271 and N303 were the minimal requirement for the structure and function of TNSALP and a prerequisite for its stable expression in a cell.

  19. Diabetes mellitus caused by mutations in human insulin: analysis of impaired receptor binding of insulins Wakayama, Los Angeles and Chicago using pharmacoinformatics.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Ataul; Bhayye, Sagar; Adeniyi, Adebayo A; Soliman, Mahmoud E S; Pillay, Tahir S

    2017-03-01

    Several naturally occuring mutations in the human insulin gene are associated with diabetes mellitus. The three known mutant molecules, Wakayama, Los Angeles and Chicago were evaluated using molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) to analyse mechanisms of deprived binding affinity for insulin receptor (IR). Insulin Wakayama, is a variant in which valine at position A3 is substituted by leucine, while in insulin Los Angeles and Chicago, phenylalanine at positions B24 and B25 is replaced by serine and leucine, respectively. These mutations show radical changes in binding affinity for IR. The ZDOCK server was used for molecular docking, while AMBER 14 was used for the MD study. The published crystal structure of IR bound to natural insulin was also used for MD. The binding interactions and MD trajectories clearly explained the critical factors for deprived binding to the IR. The surface area around position A3 was increased when valine was substituted by leucine, while at positions B24 and B25 aromatic amino acid phenylalanine replaced by non-aromatic serine and leucine might be responsible for fewer binding interactions at the binding site of IR that leads to instability of the complex. In the MD simulation, the normal mode analysis, rmsd trajectories and prediction of fluctuation indicated instability of complexes with mutant insulin in order of insulin native insulin < insulin Chicago < insulin Los Angeles < insulin Wakayama molecules which corresponds to the biological evidence of the differing affinities of the mutant insulins for the IR.

  20. Box C/D Small Nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) U60 Regulates Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    Brandis, Katrina A.; Gale, Sarah; Jinn, Sarah; Langmade, Stephen J.; Dudley-Rucker, Nicole; Jiang, Hui; Sidhu, Rohini; Ren, Aileen; Goldberg, Anna; Schaffer, Jean E.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Mobilization of plasma membrane (PM) cholesterol to the endoplasmic reticulum is essential for cellular cholesterol homeostasis. The mechanisms regulating this retrograde, intermembrane cholesterol transfer are not well understood. Because mutant cells with defects in PM to endoplasmic reticulum cholesterol trafficking can be isolated on the basis of resistance to amphotericin B, we conducted an amphotericin B loss-of-function screen in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using insertional mutagenesis to identify genes that regulate this trafficking mechanism. Mutant line A1 displayed reduced cholesteryl ester formation from PM-derived cholesterol and increased de novo cholesterol synthesis, indicating a deficiency in retrograde cholesterol transport. Genotypic analysis revealed that the A1 cell line contained one disrupted allele of the U60 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) host gene, resulting in haploinsufficiency of the box C/D snoRNA U60. Complementation and mutational studies revealed the U60 snoRNA to be the essential feature from this locus that affects cholesterol trafficking. Lack of alteration in predicted U60-mediated site-directed methylation of 28 S rRNA in the A1 mutant suggests that the U60 snoRNA modulates cholesterol trafficking by a mechanism that is independent of this canonical function. Our study adds to a growing body of evidence for participation of small noncoding RNAs in cholesterol homeostasis and is the first to implicate a snoRNA in this cellular function. PMID:24174535

  1. Box C/D small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) U60 regulates intracellular cholesterol trafficking.

    PubMed

    Brandis, Katrina A; Gale, Sarah; Jinn, Sarah; Langmade, Stephen J; Dudley-Rucker, Nicole; Jiang, Hui; Sidhu, Rohini; Ren, Aileen; Goldberg, Anna; Schaffer, Jean E; Ory, Daniel S

    2013-12-13

    Mobilization of plasma membrane (PM) cholesterol to the endoplasmic reticulum is essential for cellular cholesterol homeostasis. The mechanisms regulating this retrograde, intermembrane cholesterol transfer are not well understood. Because mutant cells with defects in PM to endoplasmic reticulum cholesterol trafficking can be isolated on the basis of resistance to amphotericin B, we conducted an amphotericin B loss-of-function screen in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using insertional mutagenesis to identify genes that regulate this trafficking mechanism. Mutant line A1 displayed reduced cholesteryl ester formation from PM-derived cholesterol and increased de novo cholesterol synthesis, indicating a deficiency in retrograde cholesterol transport. Genotypic analysis revealed that the A1 cell line contained one disrupted allele of the U60 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) host gene, resulting in haploinsufficiency of the box C/D snoRNA U60. Complementation and mutational studies revealed the U60 snoRNA to be the essential feature from this locus that affects cholesterol trafficking. Lack of alteration in predicted U60-mediated site-directed methylation of 28 S rRNA in the A1 mutant suggests that the U60 snoRNA modulates cholesterol trafficking by a mechanism that is independent of this canonical function. Our study adds to a growing body of evidence for participation of small noncoding RNAs in cholesterol homeostasis and is the first to implicate a snoRNA in this cellular function.

  2. 3 CFR 8621 - Proclamation 8621 of December 22, 2010. National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, 2011 8621 Proclamation 8621 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8621 of December 22, 2010 Proc. 8621 National Slavery and Human Trafficking... Trafficking Prevention Month, we rededicate ourselves to preventing and ending human trafficking, and...

  3. Child Sex Trafficking in America: A Guide for Parents and Guardians

    MedlinePlus

    Child Sex Trafficking in America: A Guide for Parents and Guardians What is Child Sex Trafficking ? Child sex trafficking is one of the most common types of commercial sexual exploitation . Child sex trafficking is a high priority at the National ...

  4. A Dominant Mutation in the Light-Oxygen and Voltage2 Domain Vicinity Impairs Phototropin1 Signaling in Tomato1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sulabha; Kharshiing, Eros; Srinivas, Ankanagari; Zikihara, Kazunori; Tokutomi, Satoru; Nagatani, Akira; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Bodanapu, Reddaiah; Behera, Rajendra K.; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2014-01-01

    In higher plants, blue light (BL) phototropism is primarily controlled by the phototropins, which are also involved in stomatal movement and chloroplast relocation. These photoresponses are mediated by two phototropins, phot1 and phot2. Phot1 mediates responses with higher sensitivity than phot2, and phot2 specifically mediates chloroplast avoidance and dark positioning responses. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a Nonphototropic seedling1 (Nps1) mutant of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The mutant is impaired in low-fluence BL responses, including chloroplast accumulation and stomatal opening. Genetic analyses show that the mutant locus is dominant negative in nature. In dark-grown seedlings of the Nps1 mutant, phot1 protein accumulates at a highly reduced level relative to the wild type and lacks BL-induced autophosphorylation. The mutant harbors a single glycine-1484-to-alanine transition in the Hinge1 region of a phot1 homolog, resulting in an arginine-to-histidine substitution (R495H) in a highly conserved A′α helix proximal to the light-oxygen and voltage2 domain of the translated gene product. Significantly, the R495H substitution occurring in the Hinge1 region of PHOT1 abolishes its regulatory activity in Nps1 seedlings, thereby highlighting the functional significance of the A′α helix region in phototropic signaling of tomato. PMID:24515830

  5. Aquaporin-2 trafficking is regulated by PDZ-domain containing protein SPA-1.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yumi; Horikawa, Saburo; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Hirai, Keiji; Katayama, Yoshifumi; Asai, Tomoki; Kuwahara, Michio; Katagiri, Koko; Kinashi, Tatsuo; Hattori, Masakazu; Minato, Nagahiro; Sasaki, Sei

    2004-06-18

    Targeted positioning of water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) strictly regulates body water homeostasis. Trafficking of AQP2 to the apical membrane is critical to the reabsorption of water in renal collecting ducts. Controlled apical positioning of AQP2 suggests the existence of proteins that interact with AQP2. A biochemical search for AQP2-interacting proteins led to the identification of PDZ-domain containing protein, signal-induced proliferation-associated gene-1 (SPA-1) which is a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Rap1. The distribution of SPA-1 coincided with that of AQP2 in renal collecting ducts. The site of colocalization was concomitantly relocated by hydration status. AQP2 trafficking to the apical membrane was inhibited by the SPA-1 mutant lacking Rap1GAP activity and by the constitutively active mutant of Rap1. AQP2 trafficking was impaired in SPA-1-deficient mice. Our results show that SPA-1 directly binds to AQP2 and regulates at least in part AQP2 trafficking.

  6. KIF13B regulates angiogenesis through Golgi to plasma membrane trafficking of VEGFR2.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kaori H; Nakajima, Yuki; Geyer, Melissa; Wary, Kishore K; Ushio-Fukai, Masuko; Komarova, Yulia; Malik, Asrar B

    2014-10-15

    Although the trafficking of newly synthesized VEGFR2 to the plasma membrane is a key determinant of angiogenesis, the molecular mechanisms of Golgi to plasma membrane trafficking are unknown. Here, we have identified a key role of the kinesin family plus-end molecular motor KIF13B in delivering VEGFR2 cargo from the Golgi to the endothelial cell surface. KIF13B is shown to interact directly with VEGFR2 on microtubules. We also observed that overexpression of truncated versions of KIF13B containing the binding domains that interact with VEGFR2 inhibited VEGF-induced capillary tube formation. KIF13B depletion prevented VEGF-mediated endothelial migration, capillary tube formation and neo-vascularization in mice. Impairment in trafficking induced by knockdown of KIF13B shunted VEGFR2 towards the lysosomal degradation pathway. Thus, KIF13B is an essential molecular motor required for the trafficking of VEGFR2 from the Golgi, and its delivery to the endothelial cell surface mediates angiogenesis.

  7. RhoB controls endothelial barrier recovery by inhibiting Rac1 trafficking to the cell border

    PubMed Central

    Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; García-Weber, Diego; Barroso, Susana; Feito, Jorge; Ortega, María C.; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Reglero-Real, Natalia; Fernández-Martín, Laura; Durán, Maria C.; Alonso, Miguel A.; Correas, Isabel; Cox, Susan; Ridley, Anne J.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial barrier dysfunction underlies chronic inflammatory diseases. In searching for new proteins essential to the human endothelial inflammatory response, we have found that the endosomal GTPase RhoB is up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines and expressed in the endothelium of some chronically inflamed tissues. We show that although RhoB and the related RhoA and RhoC play additive and redundant roles in various aspects of endothelial barrier function, RhoB specifically inhibits barrier restoration after acute cell contraction by preventing plasma membrane extension. During barrier restoration, RhoB trafficking is induced between vesicles containing RhoB nanoclusters and plasma membrane protrusions. The Rho GTPase Rac1 controls membrane spreading and stabilizes endothelial barriers. We show that RhoB colocalizes with Rac1 in endosomes and inhibits Rac1 activity and trafficking to the cell border during barrier recovery. Inhibition of endosomal trafficking impairs barrier reformation, whereas induction of Rac1 translocation to the plasma membrane accelerates it. Therefore, RhoB-specific regulation of Rac1 trafficking controls endothelial barrier integrity during inflammation. PMID:27138256

  8. Regulation of GPCR Trafficking by Ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Justine E.; Marchese, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-promoted signaling mediates cellular responses to a variety of stimuli involved in diverse physiological processes. In addition, GPCRs are also the largest class of target for many drugs used to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the role of GPCR signaling in health and disease, the molecular mechanisms governing GPCR signaling remain poorly understanding. Classically, GPCR signaling is tightly regulated by GPCR kinases and β-arrestins, which act in a concerted fashion to govern GPCR desensitization and also GPCR trafficking. Ubiquitination has now emerged as an important posttranslational modification that has multiple roles, either directly or indirectly, in governing GPCR trafficking. Recent studies have revealed a mechanistic link between GPCR phosphorylation, β-arrestins, and ubiquitination. Here, we review recent developments in our understanding of how ubiquitin regulates GPCR trafficking within the endocytic pathway. PMID:26055053

  9. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-01-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  10. Monocyte trafficking in acute and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Molly A; Platt, Andrew M; Potteaux, Stephane; Randolph, Gwendalyn J

    2011-10-01

    Environmental signals at the site of inflammation mediate rapid monocyte mobilization and dictate differentiation programs whereby these cells give rise to macrophages or dendritic cells. Monocytes participate in tissue healing, clearance of pathogens and dead cells, and initiation of adaptive immunity. However, recruited monocytes can also contribute to the pathogenesis of infection and chronic inflammatory disease, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we explore monocyte trafficking in the context of acute inflammation, relying predominantly on data from microbial infection models. These mechanisms will be compared to monocyte trafficking during chronic inflammation in experimental models of atherosclerosis. Recent developments suggest that monocyte trafficking shares common themes in diverse inflammatory diseases; however, important differences exist between monocyte migratory pathways in acute and chronic inflammation.

  11. Repression of transcription of presenilin-1 inhibits γ-secretase independent ER Ca²⁺ leak that is impaired by FAD mutations.

    PubMed

    Das, Hriday K; Tchedre, Kissaou; Mueller, Brett

    2012-08-01

    Genetic deletion or mutations of presenilin genes (PS1/PS2) cause familial Alzheimer's disease and calcium (Ca²⁺) signaling abnormalities. PS1/PS2 act as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca²⁺ leak channels that facilitate passive Ca²⁺ leak across ER membrane. Studies with PS1/PS2 double knockout (PS1/PS2-DKO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed that PS1/PS2 were responsible for 80% of passive Ca²⁺ leak from the lumen of endoplasmic reticulum to cytosol. Transient transfection of the wild type PS1 expression construct increased cytoplasmic Ca²⁺ as a result of Ca²⁺ leak across ER membrane whereas the FADPS1 (PS1-M146V) mutation construct alone or in combination with the wild type PS1 expression construct abrogated Ca²⁺ leak in SK-N-SH cells. Inhibition of basal c-jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activity by JNK inhibitor SP600125 repressed PS1 transcription and PS1 protein expression by augmenting p53 protein level in SK-N-SH cells (Lee and Das 2008). In this report we also showed that repression of PS1 transcription by JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited passive Ca²⁺ leak across ER membrane which could be rescued by expressing PS1 wild type and not by expressing FADPS1 (PS1-M146V) under a SP600125 non-responsive promoter. Treatment of SK-N-SH cells with SP600125 also triggered InsP3R-mediated Ca²⁺ release from the ER by addition of 500 nM bradykinin, an agonist of InsP3 receptor (InsP3R1) without changing the expression of InsP3R1. This data confirms that SP600125 increases the Ca²⁺ store in the ER by inhibiting PS1-mediated Ca²⁺ leak across ER membrane. p53, ZNF237 and Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 3 which are repressors of PS1 transcription, also reduced Ca²⁺ leak across ER membrane in SK-N-SH cells but γ-secretase inhibitor or dominant negative γ-secretase-specific PS1 mutant (PS1-D257A) had no significant effect. Therefore, p53, ZNF237, and Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 3 inhibit the function ER Ca²⁺ leak

  12. A mutation deleting sequences encoding the amino terminus of human cytomegalovirus UL84 impairs interaction with UL44 and capsid localization.

    PubMed

    Strang, Blair L; Bender, Brian J; Sharma, Mayuri; Pesola, Jean M; Sanders, Rebecca L; Spector, Deborah H; Coen, Donald M

    2012-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions are required for many biological functions. Previous work has demonstrated an interaction between the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase subunit UL44 and the viral replication factor UL84. In this study, glutathione S-transferase pulldown assays indicated that residues 1 to 68 of UL84 are both necessary and sufficient for efficient interaction of UL84 with UL44 in vitro. We created a mutant virus in which sequences encoding these residues were deleted. This mutant displayed decreased virus replication compared to wild-type virus. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that the mutation decreased but did not abrogate association of UL84 with UL44 in infected cell lysate, suggesting that the association in the infected cell can involve other protein-protein interactions. Further immunoprecipitation assays indicated that IRS1, TRS1, and nucleolin are candidates for such interactions in infected cells. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of viral DNA indicated that the absence of the UL84 amino terminus does not notably affect viral DNA synthesis. Western blotting experiments and pulse labeling of infected cells with [(35)S]methionine demonstrated a rather modest downregulation of levels of multiple proteins and particularly decreased levels of the minor capsid protein UL85. Electron microscopy demonstrated that viral capsids assemble but are mislocalized in nuclei of cells infected with the mutant virus, with fewer cytoplasmic capsids detected. In sum, deletion of the sequences encoding the amino terminus of UL84 affects interaction with UL44 and virus replication unexpectedly, not viral DNA synthesis. Mislocalization of viral capsids in infected cell nuclei likely contributes to the observed decrease in virus replication.

  13. Impaired O-Linked N-Acetylglucosaminylation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum by Mutated Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) Domain-specific O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine Transferase Found in Adams-Oliver Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Mitsutaka; Sawaguchi, Shogo; Kawai, Takami; Nadano, Daita; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Yagi, Hirokazu; Kato, Koichi; Furukawa, Koichi; Okajima, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) domain-specific O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (EOGT) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase that acts on EGF domain-containing proteins such as Notch receptors. Recently, mutations in EOGT have been reported in patients with Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS). Here, we have characterized enzymatic properties of mouse EOGT and EOGT mutants associated with AOS. Simultaneous expression of EOGT with Notch1 EGF repeats in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells led to immunoreactivity with the CTD110.6 antibody in the ER. Consistent with the GlcNAc modification in the ER, the enzymatic properties of EOGT are distinct from those of Golgi-resident GlcNAc transferases; the pH optimum of EOGT ranges from 7.0 to 7.5, and the Km value for UDP N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) is 25 μm. Despite the relatively low Km value for UDP-GlcNAc, EOGT-catalyzed GlcNAcylation depends on the hexosamine pathway, as revealed by the increased O-GlcNAcylation of Notch1 EGF repeats upon supplementation with hexosamine, suggesting differential regulation of the luminal UDP-GlcNAc concentration in the ER and Golgi. As compared with wild-type EOGT, O-GlcNAcylation in the ER is nearly abolished in HEK293T cells exogenously expressing EOGT variants associated with AOS. Introduction of the W207S mutation resulted in degradation of the protein via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, although the stability and ER localization of EOGTR377Q were not affected. Importantly, the interaction between UDP-GlcNAc and EOGTR377Q was impaired without adversely affecting the acceptor substrate interaction. These results suggest that impaired glycosyltransferase activity in mutant EOGT proteins and the consequent defective O-GlcNAcylation in the ER constitute the molecular basis for AOS. PMID:25488668

  14. Role of Occupational Therapy in Combating Human Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Kathleen W; Hatkevich, Beth Ann

    Human trafficking is a modern-day form of slavery that includes sex trafficking, labor trafficking, and trafficking of children. It is estimated that 35.8 million people are enslaved around the world. Because of the traumatic experiences that victims of human trafficking encounter, the needs of victims are extensive and require the services of several providers, including health care providers, for victims to transform into survivors and thrivers. Currently, the role of occupational therapy is minimal and unexplored. The profession of occupational therapy has the capacity of having a profound role in both providing client-centered care services to victims and survivors of human trafficking and partaking in preventive advocacy efforts to combat human trafficking. Further advocacy efforts are required to promote the profession of occupational therapy in combating human trafficking.

  15. Human telomerase: biogenesis, trafficking, recruitment, and activation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jens C; Cech, Thomas R

    2015-06-01

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the extension of telomeric DNA in eukaryotes. Recent work has begun to reveal key aspects of the assembly of the human telomerase complex, its intracellular trafficking involving Cajal bodies, and its recruitment to telomeres. Once telomerase has been recruited to the telomere, it appears to undergo a separate activation step, which may include an increase in its repeat addition processivity. This review covers human telomerase biogenesis, trafficking, and activation, comparing key aspects with the analogous events in other species.

  16. GTPases in intracellular trafficking: an overview.

    PubMed

    Segev, Nava

    2011-02-01

    Small GTPases that belong to the ras sub-families of Rab, Arf, and Rho, and the large GTPase dynamin, regulate intracellular trafficking. This issue of Seminars of Cell and Developmental Biology highlights topics regarding mechanisms by which these GTPases regulate the different steps of vesicular transport: vesicle formation, scission, targeting and fusion. In addition, the emerging roles of GTPases in coordination of individual transport steps as well as coordination of intracellular trafficking with other cellular processes are reviewed. Finally, common structures and mechanisms underlying the function of the ras-like GTPases and the importance of their function to human health and disease are discussed.

  17. Human telomerase: biogenesis, trafficking, recruitment, and activation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the extension of telomeric DNA in eukaryotes. Recent work has begun to reveal key aspects of the assembly of the human telomerase complex, its intracellular trafficking involving Cajal bodies, and its recruitment to telomeres. Once telomerase has been recruited to the telomere, it appears to undergo a separate activation step, which may include an increase in its repeat addition processivity. This review covers human telomerase biogenesis, trafficking, and activation, comparing key aspects with the analogous events in other species. PMID:26063571

  18. Organ trading, tourism, and trafficking within Europe.

    PubMed

    Pattinson, Shaun D

    2008-03-01

    This article argues for a regulatory and institutional response towards organ trading, tourism and trafficking that differs from extant approaches. European countries have hitherto adopted blanket prohibitions on organ trading (i.e. the buying or selling of human organs). This article advances the view that policy makers have thereby overreacted to legitimate public health concerns and the evils of organ trafficking (i.e. organ trading and tourism involving coercion or deception). It argues for a trial of a very tightly regulated system of organ trading that could eventually lead to a limited system of organ tourism (i.e. organ trading involving more than one jurisdiction).

  19. Structure–Function Analysis of Delta Trafficking, Receptor Binding and Signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Annette L.; Stout, Jane R.; Shepard, Scott B.; Klueg, Kristin M.; Dos Santos, Ana A.; Parody, Todd R.; Vaskova, Martina; Muskavitch, Marc A. T.

    2006-01-01

    The transmembrane proteins Delta and Notch act as ligand and receptor in a conserved signaling pathway required for a variety of cell fate specification events in many organisms. Binding of Delta to Notch results in a proteolytic cascade that releases the Notch intracellular domain, allowing it to participate in transcriptional activation in the nucleus. Recent research has implicated the endocytic and ubiquitylation machinery as essential components of Delta–Notch signaling. Our analysis of chimeric and missense Delta variants has delineated a number of structural requirements for Delta trafficking, receptor binding, and signaling. We find that while the Delta N-terminal domain is necessary and sufficient for binding to Notch, the integrity of the epidermal-growth-factor-like repeat (ELR) 2 is also required for Notch binding. Screening of 117 Delta mutant lines for proteins that exhibit aberrant subcellular trafficking has led to the identification of 18 Delta alleles (DlTD alleles) that encode “trafficking-defective” Delta proteins. We find, unexpectedly, that many DlTD alleles contain missense mutations in ELRs within the Delta extracellular domain. Finally, we find that two DlTD alleles contain lysine missense mutations within the Delta intracellular domain (DeltaICD) that may identify residues important for DeltaICD mono-ubiquitylation and subsequent Delta endocytosis and signaling. PMID:17028337

  20. Human Trafficking: A Review for Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakushko, Oksana

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a review of current research on human trafficking for mental health practitioners and scholars. In addition to an overview of definitions, causes and processes of trafficking, the article highlights mental health consequences of trafficking along with suggestions for treatment of survivors. Directions for counseling services,…

  1. 78 FR 59317 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Ending Trafficking in Persons

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... range of human trafficking-related issues. Commonly raised themes included the following: (1..., and 52 RIN 9000-AM55 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Ending Trafficking in Persons AGENCY: Department... Acquisition Regulation (FAR) to strengthen protections against trafficking in persons in Federal...

  2. Trafficking of Children in Albania: Patterns of Recruitment and Reintegration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjermeni, Eglantina; Van Hook, Mary P.; Gjipali, Saemira; Xhillari, Lindita; Lungu, Fatjon; Hazizi, Anila

    2008-01-01

    Problem: Many children in Albania and other countries of Eastern Europe are being trafficked as part of the global business of human trafficking. Objectives: The study sought to identify the patterns of child trafficking involving Albanian children, and especially children's views of the role of family issues and the nature of the trafficking…

  3. Child organ trafficking: global reality and inadequate international response.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Alireza

    2016-06-01

    In organ transplantation, the demand for human organs has grown far faster than the supply of organs. This has opened the door for illegal organ trade and trafficking including from children. Organized crime groups and individual organ brokers exploit the situation and, as a result, black markets are becoming more numerous and organized organ trafficking is expanding worldwide. While underprivileged and vulnerable men and women in developing countries are a major source of trafficked organs, and may themselves be trafficked for the purpose of illegal organ removal and trade, children are at especial risk of exploitation. With the confirmed cases of children being trafficked for their organs, child organ trafficking, which once called a "modern urban legend", is a sad reality in today's world. By presenting a global picture of child organ trafficking, this paper emphasizes that child organ trafficking is no longer a myth but a reality which has to be addressed. It argues that the international efforts against organ trafficking and trafficking in human beings for organ removal have failed to address child organ trafficking adequately. This chapter suggests that more orchestrated international collaboration as well as development of preventive measure and legally binding documents are needed to fight child organ trafficking and to support its victims.

  4. Alternative paradigms for ion channelopathies: disorders of ion channel membrane trafficking and posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Curran, Jerry; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Channelopathies are a diverse set of disorders associated with defects in ion channel (and transporter) function. Although the vast majority of channelopathies are linked with inherited mutations that alter ion channel biophysical properties, another group of similar disorders has emerged that alter ion channel synthesis, membrane trafficking, and/or posttranslational modifications. In fact, some electrical and episodic disorders have now been identified that are not defects in the ion channel but instead reflect dysfunction in an ion channel (or transporter) regulatory protein. This review focuses on alternative paradigms for physiological disorders associated with protein biosynthesis, folding, trafficking, and membrane retention. Furthermore, the review highlights the role of aberrant posttranslational modifications in acquired channelopathies.

  5. Regulated vesicular trafficking of specific PCDH15 and VLGR1 variants in auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Delimont, Duane; Meehan, Daniel T; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2012-10-03

    Usher syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by hearing and balance dysfunction and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. Mouse models carrying mutations for the nine Usher-associated genes have splayed stereocilia, and some show delayed maturation of ribbon synapses suggesting these proteins may play different roles in terminal differentiation of auditory hair cells. The presence of the Usher proteins at the basal and apical aspects of the neurosensory epithelia suggests the existence of regulated trafficking through specific transport proteins and routes. Immature mouse cochleae and UB/OC-1 cells were used in this work to address whether specific variants of PCDH15 and VLGR1 are being selectively transported to opposite poles of the hair cells. Confocal colocalization studies between apical and basal vesicular markers and the different PCDH15 and VLGR1 variants along with sucrose density gradients and the use of vesicle trafficking inhibitors show the existence of Usher protein complexes in at least two vesicular subpools. The apically trafficked pool colocalized with the early endosomal vesicle marker, rab5, while the basally trafficked pool associated with membrane microdomains and SNAP25. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation experiments between SNAP25 and VLGR1 show a physical interaction of these two proteins in organ of Corti and brain. Collectively, these findings establish the existence of a differential vesicular trafficking mechanism for specific Usher protein variants in mouse cochlear hair cells, with the apical variants playing a potential role in endosomal recycling and stereocilia development/maintenance, and the basolateral variants involved in vesicle docking and/or fusion through SNAP25-mediated interactions.

  6. T Cell Trafficking through Lymphatic Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Morgan C.; Teijeira, Alvaro; Halin, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    T cell migration within and between peripheral tissues and secondary lymphoid organs is essential for proper functioning of adaptive immunity. While active T cell migration within a tissue is fairly slow, blood vessels and lymphatic vessels (LVs) serve as speedy highways that enable T cells to travel rapidly over long distances. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of T cell migration out of blood vessels have been intensively studied over the past 30 years. By contrast, less is known about T cell trafficking through the lymphatic vasculature. This migratory process occurs in one manner within lymph nodes (LNs), where recirculating T cells continuously exit into efferent lymphatics to return to the blood circulation. In another manner, T cell trafficking through lymphatics also occurs in peripheral tissues, where T cells exit the tissue by means of afferent lymphatics, to migrate to draining LNs and back into blood. In this review, we highlight how the anatomy of the lymphatic vasculature supports T cell trafficking and review current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular requirements of T cell migration through LVs. Finally, we summarize and discuss recent insights regarding the presumed relevance of T cell trafficking through afferent lymphatics. PMID:28066423

  7. HDLs protect pancreatic β-cells against ER stress by restoring protein folding and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Pétremand, Jannick; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Duprez, Jessica; Allagnat, Florent; Frias, Miguel; James, Richard W; Waeber, Gérard; Jonas, Jean-Christophe; Widmann, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis alteration contributes to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and death and favors the development of diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that HDLs protect β-cells against ER stress induced by thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, palmitate, insulin overexpression, and high glucose concentrations. ER stress marker induction and ER morphology disruption mediated by these stimuli were inhibited by HDLs. Using a temperature-sensitive viral glycoprotein folding mutant, we show that HDLs correct impaired protein trafficking and folding induced by thapsigargin and palmitate. The ability of HDLs to protect β-cells against ER stress was inhibited by brefeldin A, an ER to Golgi trafficking blocker. These results indicate that HDLs restore ER homeostasis in response to ER stress, which is required for their ability to promote β-cell survival. This study identifies a cellular mechanism mediating the beneficial effect of HDLs on β-cells against ER stress-inducing factors.

  8. HDLs Protect Pancreatic β-Cells Against ER Stress by Restoring Protein Folding and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Pétremand, Jannick; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Duprez, Jessica; Allagnat, Florent; Frias, Miguel; James, Richard W.; Waeber, Gérard; Jonas, Jean-Christophe; Widmann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis alteration contributes to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and death and favors the development of diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that HDLs protect β-cells against ER stress induced by thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, palmitate, insulin overexpression, and high glucose concentrations. ER stress marker induction and ER morphology disruption mediated by these stimuli were inhibited by HDLs. Using a temperature-sensitive viral glycoprotein folding mutant, we show that HDLs correct impaired protein trafficking and folding induced by thapsigargin and palmitate. The ability of HDLs to protect β-cells against ER stress was inhibited by brefeldin A, an ER to Golgi trafficking blocker. These results indicate that HDLs restore ER homeostasis in response to ER stress, which is required for their ability to promote β-cell survival. This study identifies a cellular mechanism mediating the beneficial effect of HDLs on β-cells against ER stress-inducing factors. PMID:22399686

  9. VEGFR2 Trafficking, Signaling and Proteolysis is Regulated by the Ubiquitin Isopeptidase USP8.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) regulates many aspects of vascular function. VEGF-A binding to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) stimulates endothelial signal transduction and regulates multiple cellular responses. Activated VEGFR2 undergoes ubiquitination but the enzymes that regulate this post-translational modification are unclear. In this study, the de-ubiquitinating enzyme, USP8, is shown to regulate VEGFR2 trafficking, de-ubiquitination, proteolysis and signal transduction. USP8-depleted endothelial cells displayed altered VEGFR2 ubiquitination and production of a unique VEGFR2 extracellular domain proteolytic fragment caused by VEGFR2 accumulation in the endosome-lysosome system. In addition, perturbed VEGFR2 trafficking impaired VEGF-A-stimulated signal transduction in USP8-depleted cells. Thus, regulation of VEGFR2 ubiquitination and de-ubiquitination has important consequences for the endothelial cell response and vascular physiology.

  10. The Interplay of Axonal Energy Homeostasis and Mitochondrial Trafficking and Anchoring.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2017-02-19

    Mitochondria are key cellular power plants essential for neuronal growth, survival, function, and regeneration after injury. Given their unique morphological features, neurons face exceptional challenges in maintaining energy homeostasis at distal synapses and growth cones where energy is in high demand. Efficient regulation of mitochondrial trafficking and anchoring is critical for neurons to meet altered energy requirements. Mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired transport have been implicated in several major neurological disorders. Thus, research into energy-mediated regulation of mitochondrial recruitment and redistribution is an important emerging frontier. In this review, I discuss new insights into the mechanisms regulating mitochondrial trafficking and anchoring, and provide an updated overview of how mitochondrial motility maintains energy homeostasis in axons, thus contributing to neuronal growth, regeneration, and synaptic function.

  11. The SNARE VAMP7 Regulates Exocytic Trafficking of Interleukin-12 in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiaruttini, Giulia; Piperno, Giulia M.; Jouve, Mabel; De Nardi, Francesca; Larghi, Paola; Peden, Andrew A.; Baj, Gabriele; Müller, Sabina; Valitutti, Salvatore; Galli, Thierry; Benvenuti, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Summary Interleukin-12 (IL-12), produced by dendritic cells in response to activation, is central to pathogen eradication and tumor rejection. The trafficking pathways controlling spatial distribution and intracellular transport of IL-12 vesicles to the cell surface are still unknown. Here, we show that intracellular IL-12 localizes in late endocytic vesicles marked by the SNARE VAMP7. Dendritic cells (DCs) from VAMP7-deficient mice are partially impaired in the multidirectional release of IL-12. Upon encounter with antigen-specific T cells, IL-12-containing vesicles rapidly redistribute at the immune synapse and release IL-12 in a process entirely dependent on VAMP7 expression. Consistently, acquisition of effector functions is reduced in T cells stimulated by VAMP7-null DCs. These results provide insights into IL-12 intracellular trafficking pathways and show that VAMP7-mediated release of IL-12 at the immune synapse is a mechanism to transmit innate signals to T cells. PMID:26972013

  12. Excess sphingomyelin disturbs ATG9A trafficking and autophagosome closure

    PubMed Central

    Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Vindeløv, Signe Diness; Hämälistö, Saara; Mograbi, Baharia; Keldsbo, Anne; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Favaro, Elena; Adam, Dieter; Szyniarowski, Piotr; Hofman, Paul; Krautwald, Stefan; Farkas, Thomas; Petersen, Nikolaj H.T.; Rohde, Mikkel; Linkermann, Andreas; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sphingomyelin is an essential cellular lipid that traffics between plasma membrane and intracellular organelles until directed to lysosomes for SMPD1 (sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1)-mediated degradation. Inactivating mutations in the SMPD1 gene result in Niemann-Pick diseases type A and B characterized by sphingomyelin accumulation and severely disturbed tissue homeostasis. Here, we report that sphingomyelin overload disturbs the maturation and closure of autophagic membranes. Niemann-Pick type A patient fibroblasts and SMPD1-depleted cancer cells accumulate elongated and unclosed autophagic membranes as well as abnormally swollen autophagosomes in the absence of normal autophagosomes and autolysosomes. The immature autophagic membranes are rich in WIPI2, ATG16L1 and MAP1LC3B but display reduced association with ATG9A. Contrary to its normal trafficking between plasma membrane, intracellular organelles and autophagic membranes, ATG9A concentrates in transferrin receptor-positive juxtanuclear recycling endosomes in SMPD1-deficient cells. Supporting a causative role for ATG9A mistrafficking in the autophagy defect observed in SMPD1-deficient cells, ectopic ATG9A effectively reverts this phenotype. Exogenous C12-sphingomyelin induces a similar juxtanuclear accumulation of ATG9A and subsequent defect in the maturation of autophagic membranes in healthy cells while the main sphingomyelin metabolite, ceramide, fails to revert the autophagy defective phenotype in SMPD1-deficient cells. Juxtanuclear accumulation of ATG9A and defective autophagy are also evident in tissues of smpd1-deficient mice with a subsequent inability to cope with kidney ischemia-reperfusion stress. These data reveal sphingomyelin as an important regulator of ATG9A trafficking and maturation of early autophagic membranes. PMID:27070082

  13. Emerging roles of ARHGAP33 in intracellular trafficking of TrkB and pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Takanobu; Hashimoto, Ryota; Sakoori, Kazuto; Sugaya, Yuki; Tanimura, Asami; Hashimotodani, Yuki; Ohi, Kazutaka; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Yasuda, Yuka; Umeda-Yano, Satomi; Kiyama, Yuji; Konno, Kohtarou; Inoue, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Inoue, Takafumi; Numata, Shusuke; Ohnuma, Tohru; Iwata, Nakao; Ozaki, Norio; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Manabe, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Takeda, Masatoshi; Kano, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking of receptor proteins is essential for neurons to detect various extracellular factors during the formation and refinement of neural circuits. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the trafficking of neurotrophin receptors to synapses remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that a brain-enriched sorting nexin, ARHGAP33, is a new type of regulator for the intracellular trafficking of TrkB, a high-affinity receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor. ARHGAP33 knockout (KO) mice exhibit reduced expression of synaptic TrkB, impaired spine development and neuropsychiatric disorder-related behavioural abnormalities. These deficits are rescued by specific pharmacological enhancement of TrkB signalling in ARHGAP33 KO mice. Mechanistically, ARHGAP33 interacts with SORT1 to cooperatively regulate TrkB trafficking. Human ARHGAP33 is associated with brain phenotypes and reduced SORT1 expression is found in patients with schizophrenia. We propose that ARHGAP33/SORT1-mediated TrkB trafficking is essential for synapse development and that the dysfunction of this mechanism may be a new molecular pathology of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26839058

  14. Dysregulation of protein trafficking in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Huang, Timothy; Bu, Guojun; Xu, Huaxi

    2014-08-25

    Intracellular protein trafficking plays an important role in neuronal function and survival. Protein misfolding is a common theme found in many neurodegenerative diseases, and intracellular trafficking machinery contributes to the pathological accumulation and clearance of misfolded proteins. Although neurodegenerative diseases exhibit distinct pathological features, abnormal endocytic trafficking is apparent in several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Down syndrome (DS) and Parkinson's disease (PD). In this review, we will focus on protein sorting defects in three major neurodegenerative diseases, including AD, DS and PD. An important pathological feature of AD is the presence of extracellular senile plaques in the brain. Senile plaques are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide aggregates. Multiple lines of evidence demonstrate that over-production/aggregation of Aβ in the brain is a primary cause of AD and attenuation of Aβ generation has become a topic of extreme interest in AD research. Aβ is generated from β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) through sequential cleavage by β-secretase and the γ-secretase complex. Alternatively, APP can be cleaved by α-secretase within the Aβ domain to release soluble APPα which precludes Aβ generation. DS patients display a strikingly similar pathology to AD patients, including the generation of neuronal amyloid plaques. Moreover, all DS patients develop an AD-like neuropathology by their 40 s. Therefore, understanding the metabolism/processing of APP and how these underlying mechanisms may be pathologically compromised is crucial for future AD and DS therapeutic strategies. Evidence accumulated thus far reveals that synaptic vesicle regulation, endocytic trafficking, and lysosome-mediated autophagy are involved in increased susceptibility to PD. Here we review current knowledge of endosomal trafficking regulation in AD, DS and PD.

  15. Domestic minor sex trafficking: what the PNP needs to know.

    PubMed

    Hornor, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Human trafficking is a major global public health problem and represents a substantial human rights violation. Human trafficking has been receiving attention in both the lay media and professional literature. Human trafficking can include commercial sex, forced labor, child soldiers, and stealing of human organs. One form of human trafficking represents a significant American pediatric health problem: domestic minor sex trafficking (DMST). DMST is the commercial sexual abuse of children by selling, buying, or trading their sexual service. This continuing education article will define DMST and discuss it in terms of prevalence, risk factors, and practice implications for the pediatric nurse practitioner.

  16. Migration as a business: the case of trafficking.

    PubMed

    Salt, J; Stein, J

    1997-01-01

    "A case is made for treating international migration as a global business which has both legitimate and illegitimate sides.... The article focuses on migrant trafficking, the core of the illegitimate business.... Our model conceives of trafficking as an intermediary part of the global migration business facilitating movement of people between origin and destination countries.... The model also suggests how through the existence of common routes and networks of contacts, traffickers increasingly channel migrants, thus determining the geography of movement. We also demonstrate the model with available evidence on trafficking mainly in and across Europe and attempt thereby to show how trafficking operates both theoretically and in practice." (EXCERPT)

  17. Project NO REST: Addressing Human Trafficking in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Dean F

    Project NO REST (North Carolina Organizing and Responding to the Exploitation and Sexual Trafficking of Children) is a 5-year effort funded by the US Children's Bureau to address the trafficking of individuals age 25 years and younger in North Carolina. The project aims to increase awareness of human trafficking affecting children and youth, especially those in the child welfare system; to reduce the number of these youth who are trafficked; and to improve outcomes for those who are trafficked. In the project's first year, nearly 100 stakeholders statewide developed a comprehensive plan to address trafficking. Later, 5 communities were recruited to implement the plan at the local level. Their experiences will be used to develop a toolkit for future anti-trafficking efforts.

  18. Trafficking and contract migrant workers in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Jureidini, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The paper addresses a number of issues regarding the extent to which trafficking may be applied to migrant domestic workers who enter under the kafala system of sponsorship in the Middle East. Migrant domestic workers are the most numerous of those mentioned in reports on trafficking for labour exploitation in the region. The discussion seeks to determine whether "trafficking" can be ex post facto, rather than ex ante? In other words, can the label of trafficking be attributed only after the worker has arrived in the receiving country and is victimized according to the principles of trafficking protocols? In addition, must there be a proven intent to traffic by agents, or can employers who harm and/or exploit them be considered as traffickers alone? Should the harm done to workers on arrival at their place of work be classified (and assisted) as victims of trafficking, or as exploited workers?

  19. Physical health symptoms reported by trafficked women receiving post-trafficking support in Moldova: prevalence, severity and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many trafficked people suffer high levels of physical, sexual and psychological abuse. Yet, there has been limited research on the physical health problems associated with human trafficking or how the health needs of women in post-trafficking support settings vary according to socio-demographic or trafficking characteristics. Methods We analysed the prevalence and severity of 15 health symptoms reported by 120 trafficked women who had returned to Moldova between December 2007 and December 2008 and were registered with the International Organisation for Migration Assistance and Protection Programme. Women had returned to Moldova an average of 5.9 months prior to interview (range 2-12 months). Results Headaches (61.7%), stomach pain (60.9%), memory problems (44.2%), back pain (42.5%), loss of appetite (35%), and tooth pain (35%) were amongst the most commonly reported symptoms amongst both women trafficked for sexual exploitation and women trafficked for labour exploitation. The prevalence of headache and memory problems was strongly associated with duration of exploitation. Conclusions Trafficked women who register for post-trafficking support services after returning to their country of origin are likely to have long-term physical and dental health needs and should be provided with access to comprehensive medical services. Health problems among women who register for post-trafficking support services after returning to their country of origin are not limited to women trafficked for sexual exploitation but are also experienced by victims of labour exploitation. PMID:22834807

  20. Multistep, sequential control of the trafficking and function of the multiple sulfatase deficiency gene product, SUMF1 by PDI, ERGIC-53 and ERp44.

    PubMed

    Fraldi, Alessandro; Zito, Ester; Annunziata, Fabio; Lombardi, Alessia; Cozzolino, Marianna; Monti, Maria; Spampanato, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea; Pucci, Piero; Sitia, Roberto; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2008-09-01

    Sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) encodes for the formylglicine generating enzyme, which activates sulfatases by modifying a key cysteine residue within their catalytic domains. SUMF1 is mutated in patients affected by multiple sulfatase deficiency, a rare recessive disorder in which all sulfatase activities are impaired. Despite the absence of canonical retention/retrieval signals, SUMF1 is largely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where it exerts its enzymatic activity on nascent sulfatases. Part of SUMF1 is secreted and paracrinally taken up by distant cells. Here we show that SUMF1 interacts with protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and ERp44, two thioredoxin family members residing in the early secretory pathway, and with ERGIC-53, a lectin that shuttles between the ER and the Golgi. Functional assays reveal that these interactions are crucial for controlling SUMF1 traffic and function. PDI couples SUMF1 retention and activation in the ER. ERGIC-53 and ERp44 act downstream, favoring SUMF1 export from and retrieval to the ER, respectively. Silencing ERGIC-53 causes proteasomal degradation of SUMF1, while down-regulating ERp44 promotes its secretion. When over-expressed, each of three interactors favors intracellular accumulation. Our results reveal a multistep control of SUMF1 trafficking, with sequential interactions dynamically determining ER localization, activity and secretion.

  1. Trafficking of Aminoglycosides Into Endolymph in Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Steyger, Peter S.

    2009-02-01

    In vitro, aminoglycosides increase the stiffness of cochlear hair cell stereocilia, altering bundle motion and transduction kinetics. Aminoglycosides also permeate the mechanosensitive transduction channel and rapidly initiate cytotoxicity in hair cells. If these effects occur in vivo, aminoglycosides would need to enter endolymph. The most direct route for systemically-administered aminoglycosides to enter endolymph is by trafficking from strial capillaries across the stria vascularis. An as-yet-unidentified active transporter is required to translocate aminoglycosides from the intra-strial space into the cytoplasm of marginal cells. Once in marginal cells, aminoglycosides would passively flow down the electrochemical gradient into endolymph. We present data that support a trans-strial trafficking route of aminoglycosides into endolymph, where they can then interfere with the mechanosensitive hair bundles.

  2. Technosocial Predictive Analytics for Illicit Nuclear Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Butner, R. Scott; Cowell, Andrew J.; Dalton, Angela C.; Haack, Jereme N.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Riensche, Roderick M.; White, Amanda M.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2011-03-29

    Illicit nuclear trafficking networks are a national security threat. These networks can directly lead to nuclear proliferation, as state or non-state actors attempt to identify and acquire nuclear weapons-related expertise, technologies, components, and materials. The ability to characterize and anticipate the key nodes, transit routes, and exchange mechanisms associated with these networks is essential to influence, disrupt, interdict or destroy the function of the networks and their processes. The complexities inherent to the characterization and anticipation of illicit nuclear trafficking networks requires that a variety of modeling and knowledge technologies be jointly harnessed to construct an effective analytical and decision making workflow in which specific case studies can be built in reasonable time and with realistic effort. In this paper, we explore a solution to this challenge that integrates evidentiary and dynamic modeling with knowledge management and analytical gaming, and demonstrate its application to a geopolitical region at risk.

  3. Sex Trafficking: Policies, Programs, and Services.

    PubMed

    Orme, Julie; Ross-Sheriff, Fariyal

    2015-10-01

    Sex trafficking (ST), a contemporary form of female slavery, is a human rights issue of critical concern to social work. The global response to ST has been substantial, and 166 countries have adopted anti-ST legislation. Despite considerable efforts to combat ST, the magnitude is increasing. To date, the majority of anti-ST efforts have focused on criminalization policies that target traffickers or purchasers of sexual services, who are predominantly male; prevention programming and services for predominantly female victims have received less support. Therapeutic services to assist pornography addicts and purchasers of sexual services are also necessary. In this article, authors examine current anti-ST policies, programs, and services, both domestically and globally, and present an innovative paradigm that addresses social inequities and emphasizes prevention programming. They conclude with a discussion of the paradigm's implications for social work policies, practices, and services.

  4. Drug-induced Inhibition and Trafficking Disruption of ion Channels: Pathogenesis of QT Abnormalities and Drug-induced Fatal Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cubeddu, Luigi X

    2016-01-01

    Risk of severe and fatal ventricular arrhythmias, presenting as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), is increased in congenital and acquired forms of long QT syndromes (LQTS). Drug-induced inhibition of K+ currents, IKs, IKr, IK1, and/or Ito, delay repolarization, prolong QT, and increase the risk of TdP. Drug-induced interference with IKr is the most common cause of acquired LQTS/TdP. Multiple drugs bind to KNCH2-hERG-K+ channels affecting IKr, including antiarrythmics, antibiotics, antivirals, azole-antifungals, antimalarials, anticancer, antiemetics, prokinetics, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Azithromycin has been recently added to this list. In addition to direct channel inhibition, some drugs interfere with the traffic of channels from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing mature channel membrane density; e.g., pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol. Other drugs, such as ketoconazole, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, citalopram, escitalopram, donepezil, tamoxifen, endoxifen, atazanavir, and roxitromycin, induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Although many drugs prolong the QT interval, TdP is a rare event. The following conditions increase the risk of drug-induced TdP: a) Disease states/electrolyte levels (heart failure, structural cardiac disease, bradycardia, hypokalemia); b) Pharmacogenomic variables (presence of congenital LQTS, subclinical ion-channel mutations, history of or having a relative with history of drug-induced long QT/TdP); c) Pharmacodynamic and kinetic factors (high doses, women, elderly, metabolism inhibitors, combining two or more QT prolonging drugs, drugs that prolong the QT and increase QT dispersion, and drugs with multiple actions on ion channels). Because most of these conditions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drug use associated with repolarization abnormalities are strongly recommended.

  5. The Strategic Implications of Human Trafficking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    within national or across international borders through coercion, force, kidnapping, deception or fraud, for purposes of placing persons in situations ...prominent form of human trade in West Africa. Parents of families living in poverty are susceptible to the supposed financial benefits derived from...orphans is increasing as a result of armed conflicts and HIV/AIDS. Trafficked children are unlikely to receive immunizations to help eliminate childhood

  6. Trafficking of ThermoTRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ferrandiz-Huertas, Clotilde; Mathivanan, Sakthikumar; Wolf, Christoph Jakob; Devesa, Isabel; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    ThermoTRP channels (thermoTRPs) define a subfamily of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels that are activated by changes in the environmental temperature, from noxious cold to injurious heat. Acting as integrators of several stimuli and signalling pathways, dysfunction of these channels contributes to several pathological states. The surface expression of thermoTRPs is controlled by both, the constitutive and regulated vesicular trafficking. Modulation of receptor surface density during pathological processes is nowadays considered as an interesting therapeutic approach for management of diseases, such as chronic pain, in which an increased trafficking is associated with the pathological state. This review will focus on the recent advances trafficking of the thermoTRP channels, TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM3, TRPM8 and TRPA1, into/from the plasma membrane. Particularly, regulated membrane insertion of thermoTRPs channels contributes to a fine tuning of final channel activity, and indeed, it has resulted in the development of novel therapeutic approaches with successful clinical results such as disruption of SNARE-dependent exocytosis by botulinum toxin or botulinomimetic peptides. PMID:25257900

  7. Ubiquitination and dynactin regulate TMEPAI lysosomal trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shenheng; Jing, Lei; Zhao, Tian; Li, Yuyin; Liu, Zhenxing; Diao, Aipo

    2017-01-01

    The transmembrane prostate androgen-induced protein (TMEPAI) has been reported to be elevated in various tumor cells, is localized to the lysosome and promotes lysosome stability. The molecular mechanism of TMEPAI trafficking however to the lysosome is unknown. Here we report that clathrin and CI-M6PR mediate TMEPAI transport from the Golgi directly into the endo-lysosomal pathway. TMEPAI is ubiquitinated at its C-terminal region and ubiquitination modification of TMEPAI is a signal for its lysosomal trafficking. Moreover, TMEPAI binds the ubiquitin binding proteins Hrs and STAM which is required for its lysosomal transport. In addition, TMEPAI interacts with the dynactin pointed-end complex subunits dynactin 5 and dynactin 6. The aa 132–155 domain is essential for specific TMEPAI binding and deletion of this binding site leads to mis-trafficking of TMEPAI to the plasma membrane. These results reveal the pathway and mechanism regulating transport of TMEPAI to the lysosome, which helps to further understand the role of TMEPAI in tumorigenesis. PMID:28218281

  8. Tay–Sachs disease mutations in HEXA target the α chain of hexosaminidase A to endoplasmic reticulum–associated degradation

    PubMed Central

    Dersh, Devin; Iwamoto, Yuichiro; Argon, Yair

    2016-01-01

    Loss of function of the enzyme β-hexosaminidase A (HexA) causes the lysosomal storage disorder Tay–Sachs disease (TSD). It has been proposed that mutations in the α chain of HexA can impair folding, enzyme assembly, and/or trafficking, yet there is surprisingly little known about the mechanisms of these potential routes of pathogenesis. We therefore investigated the biosynthesis and trafficking of TSD-associated HexA α mutants, seeking to identify relevant cellular quality control mechanisms. The α mutants E482K and G269S are defective in enzymatic activity, unprocessed by lysosomal proteases, and exhibit altered folding pathways compared with wild-type α. E482K is more severely misfolded than G269S, as observed by its aggregation and inability to associate with the HexA β chain. Importantly, both mutants are retrotranslocated from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cytosol and are degraded by the proteasome, indicating that they are cleared via ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Leveraging these discoveries, we observed that manipulating the cellular folding environment or ERAD pathways can alter the kinetics of mutant α degradation. Additionally, growth of patient fibroblasts at a permissive temperature or with chemical chaperones increases cellular Hex activity by improving mutant α folding. Therefore modulation of the ER quality control systems may be a potential therapeutic route for improving some forms of TSD. PMID:27682588

  9. Tay-Sachs disease mutations in HEXA target the α chain of hexosaminidase A to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation.

    PubMed

    Dersh, Devin; Iwamoto, Yuichiro; Argon, Yair

    2016-12-01

    Loss of function of the enzyme β-hexosaminidase A (HexA) causes the lysosomal storage disorder Tay-Sachs disease (TSD). It has been proposed that mutations in the α chain of HexA can impair folding, enzyme assembly, and/or trafficking, yet there is surprisingly little known about the mechanisms of these potential routes of pathogenesis. We therefore investigated the biosynthesis and trafficking of TSD-associated HexA α mutants, seeking to identify relevant cellular quality control mechanisms. The α mutants E482K and G269S are defective in enzymatic activity, unprocessed by lysosomal proteases, and exhibit altered folding pathways compared with wild-type α. E482K is more severely misfolded than G269S, as observed by its aggregation and inability to associate with the HexA β chain. Importantly, both mutants are retrotranslocated from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cytosol and are degraded by the proteasome, indicating that they are cleared via ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Leveraging these discoveries, we observed that manipulating the cellular folding environment or ERAD pathways can alter the kinetics of mutant α degradation. Additionally, growth of patient fibroblasts at a permissive temperature or with chemical chaperones increases cellular Hex activity by improving mutant α folding. Therefore modulation of the ER quality control systems may be a potential therapeutic route for improving some forms of TSD.

  10. Blockage of hERG current and the disruption of trafficking as induced by roxithromycin.

    PubMed

    Han, Sheng-Na; Yang, Song-Hua; Zhang, Yu; Duan, Yan-Yan; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Qiu; Fan, Tian-Li; Ye, Zhen-Kun; Huang, Chen-Zheng; Hu, Xiang-Jie; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Li-Rong

    2013-12-01

    Roxithromycin is an oral macrolide antibiotic agent that has been repeatedly reported to provoke excessive prolongation of the Q-T interval and torsades de pointes in clinical settings. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the arrhythmogenic side effects of roxithromycin, we studied the molecular mechanisms of roxithromycin on human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) K(+) channels expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. Roxithromycin was found to inhibit wild-type (WT) hERG currents in a concentration-dependent manner with a half-maximum block concentration (IC50) of 55.8 ± 9.1 μmol/L. S6 residue hERG mutants (Y652A and F656C) showed reduced levels of hERG current blockage attributable to roxithromycin. Roxithromycin also inhibited the trafficking of hERG protein to the cell membrane, as confirmed by Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. These findings indicate that roxithromycin may cause acquired long-QT syndrome via direct inhibition of hERG current and by disruption of hERG protein trafficking. Mutations in drug-binding sites (Y652A or F656C) of the hERG channel were found to attenuate hERG current blockage by roxithromycin, but did not significantly alter the disruption of trafficking.

  11. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8) regulates endosomal trafficking of the epithelial Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruifeng; Tomkovicz, Vivian R; Butler, Phillip L; Ochoa, Luis A; Peterson, Zerubbabel J; Snyder, Peter M

    2013-02-22

    Ubiquitination plays a key role in trafficking of the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC). Previous work indicated that ubiquitination enhances ENaC endocytosis and sorting to lysosomes for degradation. Moreover, a defect in ubiquitination causes Liddle syndrome, an inherited form of hypertension. In this work, we identified a role for USP8 in the control of ENaC ubiquitination and trafficking. USP8 increased ENaC current in Xenopus oocytes and collecting duct epithelia and enhanced ENaC abundance at the cell surface in HEK 293 cells. This resulted from altered endocytic sorting; USP8 abolished ENaC degradation in the endocytic pathway, but it had no effect on ENaC endocytosis. USP8 interacted with ENaC, as detected by co-immunoprecipitation, and it deubiquitinated ENaC. Consistent with a functional role for deubiquitination, mutation of the cytoplasmic lysines of ENaC reduced the effect of USP8 on ENaC cell surface abundance. In contrast to USP8, USP2-45 increased ENaC surface abundance by reducing endocytosis but not degradation. Thus, USP8 and USP2-45 selectively modulate ENaC trafficking at different steps in the endocytic pathway. Together with previous work, the data indicate that the ubiquitination state of ENaC is critical for the regulation of epithelial Na(+) absorption.

  12. GOLGI IN COPPER HOMEOSTASIS: A VIEW FROM THE MEMBRANE TRAFFICKING FIELD

    PubMed Central

    Polishchuk, Roman; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Copper is essential for a variety of important biological processes as a cofactor and regulator of many enzymes. Incorporation of copper into the secreted and plasma membrane-targeted cuproenzymes takes place in Golgi, a compartment central for normal copper homeostasis. The Golgi complex harbors copper-transporting ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, that transfer copper from the cytosol into Golgi lumen for incorporation into copper-dependent enzymes. The Golgi complex also sends these ATPases to appropriate post-Golgi destinations to ensure correct Cu fluxes in the body and to avoid potentially toxic copper accumulation. Mutations in ATP7A or ATP7B or in the proteins that regulate their trafficking affect their exit from Golgi or subsequent retrieval to this organelle. This, in turn, disrupts the homeostatic Cu balance, resulting in copper deficiency (Menkes disease) or copper overload (Wilson disease). Research over the last decade has yielded significant insights into the enzymatic properties and cell biology of the copper-ATPases. However, the mechanisms through which the Golgi regulates trafficking of ATP7A/7B and, therefore, maintain Cu homeostasis remain unclear. This review summarizes current data on the role of the Golgi in Cu metabolism and outlines questions and challenges that should be addressed to understand ATP7A and ATP7B trafficking mechanisms in health and disease. PMID:23846821

  13. Common α2A and α2C adrenergic receptor polymorphisms do not affect plasma membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Carl M; Sorensen, Matt W; Angelotti, Timothy

    2014-06-01

    Various naturally occurring polymorphic forms of human G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified and linked to diverse pathological diseases, including receptors for vasopressin type 2 (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus) and gonadotropin releasing hormone (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). In most cases, polymorphic amino acid mutations disrupt protein folding, altering receptor function as well as plasma membrane expression. Other pathological GPCR variants have been found that do not alter receptor function, but instead affect only plasma membrane trafficking (e.g., delta opiate and histamine type 1 receptors). Thus, altered membrane trafficking with retained receptor function may be another mechanism causing polymorphic GPCR dysfunction. Two common human α2A and α2C adrenergic receptor (AR) variants have been identified (α2A N251K and α2C Δ322-325 ARs), but pharmacological analysis of ligand binding and second messenger signaling has not consistently demonstrated altered receptor function. However, possible alterations in plasma membrane trafficking have not been investigated. We utilized a systematic approach previously developed for the study of GPCR trafficking motifs and accessory proteins to assess whether these α2 AR variants affected intracellular trafficking or plasma membrane expression. By combining immunofluorescent microscopy, glycosidic processing analysis, and quantitative fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS), we demonstrate that neither variant receptor had altered intracellular localization, glycosylation, nor plasma membrane expression compared to wild-type α2 ARs. Therefore, pathopharmacological properties of α2A N251K and α2C Δ322-325 ARs do not appear to be due to altered receptor pharmacology or plasma membrane trafficking, but may involve interactions with other intracellular signaling cascades or proteins.

  14. Human Trafficking, Mental Illness, and Addiction: Avoiding Diagnostic Overshadowing.

    PubMed

    Stoklosa, Hanni; MacGibbon, Marti; Stoklosa, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews an emergency department-based clinical vignette of a trafficked patient with co-occurring pregnancy-related, mental health, and substance use disorder issues. The authors, including a survivor of human trafficking, draw on their backgrounds in addiction care, human trafficking, emergency medicine, and psychiatry to review the literature on relevant general health and mental health consequences of trafficking and propose an approach to the clinical complexities this case presents. In their discussion, the authors explicate the deleterious role of implicit bias and diagnostic overshadowing in trafficked patients with co-occurring addiction and mental illness. Finally, the authors propose a trauma-informed, multidisciplinary response to potentially trafficked patients.

  15. Child human trafficking victims: challenges for the child welfare system.

    PubMed

    Fong, Rowena; Berger Cardoso, Jodi

    2010-08-01

    Since the passing of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act in 2000 and its reauthorization by President George Bush in 2008, federal, state and community efforts in identifying and providing services for victims of human trafficking have significantly improved. However, most of the research and resources for trafficking victims have been directed towards adults rather than children. Researchers agree that there is a growing number of sexually exploited and trafficked children in the United States yet few programs emphasize the unique experiences and special needs of this population. This article examines commercial sexual exploitation of children; differentiates the needs and problems between child prostitution and victims of human trafficking; reviews and critiques current treatment practices; and summarizes challenges and successes in working with child victims of human trafficking, offering practice and policy recommendations.

  16. HAPLESS13-Mediated Trafficking of STRUBBELIG Is Critical for Ovule Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Gang; Feng, Chong; Liu, Hai-Hong; Ge, Fu-Rong; Li, Sha; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Planar morphogenesis, a distinct feature of multicellular organisms, is crucial for the development of ovule, progenitor of seeds. Both receptor-like kinases (RLKs) such as STRUBBELIG (SUB) and auxin gradient mediated by PIN-FORMED1 (PIN1) play instructive roles in this process. Fine-tuned intercellular communications between different cell layers during ovule development demands dynamic membrane distribution of these cell-surface proteins, presumably through vesicle-mediated sorting. However, the way it’s achieved and the trafficking routes involved are obscure. We report that HAPLESS13 (HAP13)-mediated trafficking of SUB is critical for ovule development. HAP13 encodes the μ subunit of adaptor protein 1 (AP1) that mediates protein sorting at the trans-Golgi network/early endosome (TGN/EE). The HAP13 mutant, hap13-1, is defective in outer integument growth, resulting in exposed nucellus accompanied with impaired pollen tube guidance and reception. SUB is mis-targeted in hap13-1. However, unlike that of PIN2, the distribution of PIN1 is independent of HAP13. Genetic interference of exocytic trafficking at the TGN/EE by specifically downregulating HAP13 phenocopied the defects of hap13-1 in SUB targeting and ovule development, supporting a key role of sporophytically expressed SUB in instructing female gametogenesis. PMID:27541731

  17. P120-Catenin Regulates Early Trafficking Stages of the N-Cadherin Precursor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wehrendt, Diana P.; Carmona, Fernando; González Wusener, Ana E.; González, Ángela; Martínez, Juan M. Lázaro; Arregui, Carlos O.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that binding of p120 catenin to the cytoplasmic domain of surface cadherin prevents cadherin endocytosis and degradation, contributing to cell-cell adhesion. In the present work we show that p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor, contributes to its anterograde movement from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi complex. In HeLa cells, depletion of p120 expression, or blocking its binding to N-cadherin, increased the accumulation of the precursor in the ER, while it decreased the localization of mature N-cadherin at intercellular junctions. Reconstitution experiments in p120-deficient SW48 cells with all three major isoforms of p120 (1, 3 and 4) had similar capacity to promote the processing of the N-cadherin precursor to the mature form, and its localization at cell-cell junctions. P120 catenin and protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B facilitated the recruitment of the N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF), an ATPase involved in vesicular trafficking, to the N-cadherin precursor complex. Dominant negative NSF E329Q impaired N-cadherin trafficking, maturation and localization at cell-cell junctions. Our results uncover a new role for p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor ensuring its trafficking through the biosynthetic pathway towards the cell surface. PMID:27254316

  18. United States Federal Guidance on Witness Protection in Human Trafficking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    UNITED STATES FEDERAL GUIDANCE ON WITNESS PROTECTION IN HUMAN TRAFFICKING A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army...JUN 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE United States Federal Guidance on Witness Protection in Human Trafficking 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...United States needs overarching federal guidance on witness protection for human trafficking victims/witnesses in order to enhance their safety and

  19. The Need to Communicate: Fighting Human Trafficking in Vietnam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    trafficking for sexual exploitation, labor exploitation, fraudulent marriages, and adoption. 9 Destination countries include (but are not limited to) those...problem. Scholars have studied human trafficking from multiple angles. Siddharth Kara’s book Sex Trafficking: Inside the Business of Modern Slavery is... Slavery (Columbia University Press, 2008), http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/kara13960. 16 Ibid., 200. 17 Do Anh Tuan and Ma Dang Thi Thanh, Policing

  20. Aberrant trafficking of human melanocortin 1 receptor variants associated with red hair and skin cancer: Steady-state retention of mutant forms in the proximal golgi.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Laorden, Berta L; Herraiz, Cecilia; Valencia, Julio C; Hearing, Vincent J; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José C

    2009-09-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a Gs protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed in melanocytes, is a major determinant of skin pigmentation and phototype. MC1R activation stimulates melanogenesis and increases the ratio of black, strongly photoprotective eumelanins to reddish, poorly photoprotective pheomelanins. Several MC1R alleles are associated with red hair, fair skin, increased sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation (the RHC phenotype) and increased skin cancer risk. Three highly penetrant RHC variants, R151C, R160W, and D294H are loss-of-function MC1R mutants with altered cell surface expression. In this study, we show that forward trafficking was normal for D294H. Conversely, export traffic was impaired for R151C, which accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and for R160W, which was enriched in the cis-Golgi. This is the first report of steady-state retention in a post-ER secretory compartment of a GPCR mutant found in the human population. Residues R151 and R160 are located in the MC1R second intracellular loop (il2). Two other mutations in il2, T157A preventing T157 phosphorylation and R162P disrupting a (160)RARR(163) motif, also caused intracellular retention. Moreover, T157 was phosphorylated in wild-type MC1R and a T157D mutation mimicking constitutive phosphorylation allowed normal traffic, and rescued the retention phenotype of R160W and R162P. Therefore, MC1R export is likely regulated by T157 phosphorylation and the (160)RARR(163) arginine-based motif functions as an ER retrieval signal. These elements are conserved in mammalian MC1Rs and in all five types of human melanocortin receptors. Thus, members of this GPCR subfamily might share common mechanisms for regulation of plasma membrane expression.

  1. Topological location and structural importance of the NBCe1-A residues mutated in proximal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Newman, Debra; Liu, Weixin; Pushkin, Alexander; Abuladze, Natalia; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-04-30

    NBCe1-A electrogenically cotransports Na(+) and HCO(3)(-) across the basolateral membrane of renal proximal tubule cells. Eight missense mutations and 3 nonsense mutations in NBCe1-A cause severe proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA). In this study, the topologic properties and structural importance of the 8 endogenous residues mutated in pRTA and the in situ topology of NBCe1-A were examined by the substituted cysteine accessibility method. Of the 55 analyzed individually introduced cysteines, 8 were labeled with both membrane permeant (biotin maleimide (BM)) and impermeant (2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino)ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA)) sulfhydryl reagents, 4 with only BM, and 3 with only MTS-TAMRA. The location of the labeled and unlabeled introduced cysteines clearly indicates that the transmembrane region of NBCe1-A contains 14 transmembrane segments (TMs). In this in situ based NBCe1-A topology, residues mutated in pRTA (pRTA residues) are assigned as: Ser(427), TM1; Thr(485) and Gly(486), TM3; Arg(510) and Leu(522), TM4; Ala(799), TM10; and Arg(881), TM12. Substitution of pRTA residues with cysteines impaired the membrane trafficking of R510C and R881C, the remaining membrane-processed constructs had various impaired transport function. Surprisingly, none of the membrane-processed constructs was accessible to labeling with BM and MTS-TAMRA, nor were they functionally sensitive to the inhibition by (2-aminoethyl)methanethiosulfonate. Functional analysis of Thr(485) with different amino acid substitutions indicated it resides in a unique region important for NBCe1-A function. Our findings demonstrate that the pRTA residues in NBCe1-A are buried in the protein complex/lipid bilayer where they perform important structural roles.

  2. Topological Location and Structural Importance of the NBCe1-A Residues Mutated in Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Newman, Debra; Liu, Weixin; Pushkin, Alexander; Abuladze, Natalia; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    NBCe1-A electrogenically cotransports Na+ and HCO3− across the basolateral membrane of renal proximal tubule cells. Eight missense mutations and 3 nonsense mutations in NBCe1-A cause severe proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA). In this study, the topologic properties and structural importance of the 8 endogenous residues mutated in pRTA and the in situ topology of NBCe1-A were examined by the substituted cysteine accessibility method. Of the 55 analyzed individually introduced cysteines, 8 were labeled with both membrane permeant (biotin maleimide (BM)) and impermeant (2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino)ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA)) sulfhydryl reagents, 4 with only BM, and 3 with only MTS-TAMRA. The location of the labeled and unlabeled introduced cysteines clearly indicates that the transmembrane region of NBCe1-A contains 14 transmembrane segments (TMs). In this in situ based NBCe1-A topology, residues mutated in pRTA (pRTA residues) are assigned as: Ser427, TM1; Thr485 and Gly486, TM3; Arg510 and Leu522, TM4; Ala799, TM10; and Arg881, TM12. Substitution of pRTA residues with cysteines impaired the membrane trafficking of R510C and R881C, the remaining membrane-processed constructs had various impaired transport function. Surprisingly, none of the membrane-processed constructs was accessible to labeling with BM and MTS-TAMRA, nor were they functionally sensitive to the inhibition by (2-aminoethyl)methanethiosulfonate. Functional analysis of Thr485 with different amino acid substitutions indicated it resides in a unique region important for NBCe1-A function. Our findings demonstrate that the pRTA residues in NBCe1-A are buried in the protein complex/lipid bilayer where they perform important structural roles. PMID:20197274

  3. Domestic minor sex trafficking in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kotrla, Kimberly

    2010-04-01

    By now, most social workers are familiar with the issue of human trafficking. However, many are likely unfamiliar with research indicating that youths constitute the most vulnerable group in the United States for becoming victims of sex trafficking and that most women in prostitution actually entered as minors. Some experts are now referring to the sex trafficking of U.S. children and youths as "domestic minor sex trafficking," or DMST. This article seeks to acquaint readers with what is currently known regarding the extent of DMST, who is at risk for becoming a victim, and implications for the social work profession in addressing this tragedy.

  4. Tackling Trafficking by Targeting Sex Buyers: Can It Work?

    PubMed

    Niemi, Johanna; Aaltonen, Jussi

    2016-08-23

    The European legal instruments on human trafficking encourage states to tackle the demand for services of trafficked persons, for example, by making the use of services of a trafficked person a criminal offense. In Finland, buying sex from a trafficked person is a criminal offense. This article reports the results of an evaluation of the Finnish law and shows that the implementation has been inefficient. The authors argue that with an amendment of the law, the implementation could be improved but a truly efficient policy would require a total ban of sex purchase along the lines of the Swedish model.

  5. Active Trafficking of Alpha 1 Antitrypsin across the Lung Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Lockett, Angelia D.; Brown, Mary Beth; Santos-Falcon, Nieves; Rush, Natalia I.; Oueini, Houssam; Oberle, Amber J.; Bolanis, Esther; Fragoso, Miryam A.; Petrusca, Daniela N.; Serban, Karina A.; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Presson Jr., Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The homeostatic lung protective effects of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) may require the transport of circulating proteinase inhibitor across an intact lung endothelial barrier. We hypothesized that uninjured pulmonary endothelial cells transport A1AT to lung epithelial cells. Purified human A1AT was rapidly taken up by confluent primary rat pulmonary endothelial cell monolayers, was secreted extracellularly, both apically and basolaterally, and was taken up by adjacent rat lung epithelial cells co-cultured on polarized transwells. Similarly, polarized primary human lung epithelial cells took up basolaterally-, but not apically-supplied A1AT, followed by apical secretion. Evidence of A1AT transcytosis across lung microcirculation was confirmed in vivo by two-photon intravital microscopy in mice. Time-lapse confocal microscopy indicated that A1AT co-localized with Golgi in the endothelium whilst inhibition of the classical secretory pathway with tunicamycin significantly increased intracellular retention of A1AT. However, inhibition of Golgi secretion promoted non-classical A1AT secretion, associated with microparticle release. Polymerized A1AT or A1AT supplied to endothelial cells exposed to soluble cigarette smoke extract had decreased transcytosis. These results suggest previously unappreciated pathways of A1AT bidirectional uptake and secretion from lung endothelial cells towards the alveolar epithelium and airspaces. A1AT trafficking may determine its functional bioavailablity in the lung, which could be impaired in individuals exposed to smoking or in those with A1AT deficiency. PMID:24743137

  6. TLR signals posttranscriptionally regulate the cytokine trafficking mediator sortilin

    PubMed Central

    Yabe-Wada, Toshiki; Matsuba, Shintaro; Takeda, Kazuya; Sato, Tetsuya; Suyama, Mikita; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Takai, Toshiyuki; Shi, Haifeng; Philpott, Caroline C.; Nakamura, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Regulating the transcription, translation and secretion of cytokines is crucial for controlling the appropriate balance of inflammation. Here we report that the sorting receptor sortilin plays a key role in cytokine production. We observed interactions of sortilin with multiple cytokines including IFN-α, and sortilin depletion in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) led to a reduction of IFN-α secretion, suggesting a pivotal role of sortilin in the exocytic trafficking of IFN-α in pDCs. Moreover, sortilin mRNA was degraded posttranscriptionally upon stimulation with various TLR ligands. Poly-rC-binding protein 1 (PCBP1) recognized the C-rich element (CRE) in the 3′ UTR of sortilin mRNA, and depletion of PCBP1 enhanced the degradation of sortilin transcripts, suggesting that PCBP1 can act as a trans-acting factor to stabilize sortilin transcripts. The nucleotide-binding ability of PCBP1 was impaired by zinc ions and alterations of intracellular zinc affect sortilin expression. PCBP1 may therefore control the stability of sortilin transcripts by sensing intracellular zinc levels. Collectively, our findings provide insights into the posttranslational regulation of cytokine production through the posttranscriptional control of sortilin expression by TLR signals. PMID:27220277

  7. Oxidative stress inhibits caveolin-1 palmitoylation and trafficking in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parat, Marie-Odile; Stachowicz, Rafal Z.; Fox, Paul L.

    2002-01-01

    During normal and pathological conditions, endothelial cells (ECs) are subjected to locally generated reactive oxygen species, produced by themselves or by other vessel wall cells. In excess these molecules cause oxidative injury to the cell but at moderate levels they might modulate intracellular signalling pathways. We have investigated the effect of oxidative stress on the palmitoylation and trafficking of caveolin-1 in bovine aortic ECs. Exogenous H2O2 did not alter the intracellular localization of caveolin-1 in ECs. However, metabolic labelling experiments showed that H2O2 inhibited the trafficking of newly synthesized caveolin-1 to membrane raft domains. Several mechanisms potentially responsible for this inhibition were examined. Impairment of caveolin-1 synthesis by H2O2 was not responsible for diminished trafficking. Similarly, the inhibition was independent of H2O2-induced caveolin-1 phosphorylation as shown by the markedly different concentration dependences. We tested the effect of H2O2 on palmitoylation of caveolin-1 by the incorporation of [3H]palmitic acid. Exposure of ECs to H2O2 markedly inhibited the palmitoylation of caveolin-1. Comparable inhibition was observed after treatment of cells with H2O2 delivered either as a bolus or by continuous delivery with glucose and glucose oxidase. Kinetic studies showed that H2O2 did not alter the rate of caveolin-1 depalmitoylation but instead decreased the 'on-rate' of palmitoylation. Together these results show for the first time the modulation of protein palmitoylation by oxidative stress, and suggest a cellular mechanism by which stress might influence caveolin-1-dependent cell activities such as the concentration of signalling proteins and cholesterol trafficking.

  8. The chemokine CX3CL1 promotes trafficking of dendritic cells through inflamed lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Louise A.; Jackson, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tissue inflammation is characterised by increased trafficking of antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) from the periphery via afferent lymphatics to draining lymph nodes, with a resulting stimulation of ongoing immune responses. Transmigration across lymphatic endothelium constitutes the first step in this process and is known to involve the chemokine CCL21 and its receptor CCR7. However, the precise details of DC transit remain obscure and it is likely that additional chemokine-receptor pairs have roles in lymphatic vessel entry. Here, we report that the transmembrane chemokine CX3CL1 (fractalkine) is induced in inflamed lymphatic endothelium, both in vitro in TNF-α-treated human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells (HDLECs) and in vivo in a mouse model of skin hypersensitivity. However, unlike blood endothelial cells, which express predominantly transmembrane CX3CL1 as a leukocyte adhesion molecule, HDLECs shed virtually all CX3CL1 at their basolateral surface through matrix metalloproteinases. We show for the first time that both recombinant soluble CX3CL1 and endogenous secreted CX3CL1 promote basolateral-to-luminal migration of DCs across HDLEC monolayers in vitro. Furthermore, we show in vivo that neutralising antibodies against CX3CL1 dramatically reduce allergen-induced trafficking of cutaneous DCs to draining lymph nodes as assessed by FITC skin painting in mice. Finally, we show that deletion of the CX3CL1 receptor in Cx3cr1−/− DCs results in markedly delayed lymphatic trafficking in vivo and impaired translymphatic migration in vitro, thus establishing a previously unrecognised role for this atypical chemokine in regulating DC trafficking through the lymphatics. PMID:24006262

  9. 3 CFR 8772 - Proclamation 8772 of December 30, 2011. National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, 2012 8772 Proclamation 8772 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8772 of December 30, 2011 Proc. 8772 National Slavery and Human Trafficking... people, organizations, and government entities that are working to combat human trafficking; and...

  10. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia Presidential Documents Other Presidential... Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia On October 21, 1995, by Executive Order 12978, the President... economy of the United States constituted by the actions of significant narcotics traffickers centered...

  11. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia Presidential Documents Other Presidential... Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia On October 21, 1995, by Executive Order 12978, the President declared a national emergency with respect to significant narcotics traffickers centered in...

  12. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia Presidential Documents Other Presidential... Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia On October 21, 1995, by Executive Order 12978, the President... economy of the United States constituted by the actions of significant narcotics traffickers centered...

  13. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia Presidential Documents Other Presidential... Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia On October 21, 1995, by Executive Order 12978, the President... economy of the United States constituted by the actions of significant narcotics traffickers centered...

  14. Assisting victims of human trafficking: strategies to facilitate identification, exit from trafficking, and the restoration of wellness.

    PubMed

    Hodge, David R

    2014-04-01

    Human trafficking is a pressing social justice concern. Social work is uniquely situated to address this problem. However, despite the profession's commitment to social justice, the scholarship to equip social workers to address this issue has been largely absent from professional discourse. To address this gap, this article helps social work practitioners to assist victims of human trafficking. After orienting readers to the scope and process of human trafficking, the topics of victim identification, exit from trafficking, and the restoration of psychological wellness are discussed. By equipping themselves in these three areas, practitioners can advance social justice on behalf of some of the most exploited people in the world.

  15. Evidence for Ubiquitin-Regulated Nuclear and Subnuclear Trafficking among Paramyxovirinae Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pentecost, Mickey; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Beaty, Shannon M.; Park, Arnold; Wang, Yao E.; Yun, Tatyana E; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    The paramyxovirus matrix (M) protein is a molecular scaffold required for viral morphogenesis and budding at the plasma membrane. Transient nuclear residence of some M proteins hints at non-structural roles. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate the nuclear sojourn. Previously, we found that the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of Nipah virus M (NiV-M) is a prerequisite for budding, and is regulated by a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLSbp), a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), and monoubiquitination of the K258 residue within the NLSbp itself (NLSbp-lysine). To define whether the sequence determinants of nuclear trafficking identified in NiV-M are common among other Paramyxovirinae M proteins, we generated the homologous NES and NLSbp-lysine mutations in M proteins from the five major Paramyxovirinae genera. Using quantitative 3D confocal microscopy, we determined that the NES and NLSbp-lysine are required for the efficient nuclear export of the M proteins of Nipah virus, Hendra virus, Sendai virus, and Mumps virus. Pharmacological depletion of free ubiquitin or mutation of the conserved NLSbp-lysine to an arginine, which inhibits M ubiquitination, also results in nuclear and nucleolar retention of these M proteins. Recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV-eGFP) bearing the NES or NLSbp-lysine M mutants rescued at similar efficiencies to wild type. However, foci of cells expressing the M mutants displayed marked fusogenicity in contrast to wild type, and infection did not spread. Recombinant Mumps virus (rMuV-eGFP) bearing the homologous mutations showed similar defects in viral morphogenesis. Finally, shotgun proteomics experiments indicated that the interactomes of Paramyxovirinae M proteins are significantly enriched for components of the nuclear pore complex, nuclear transport receptors, and nucleolar proteins. We then synthesize our functional and proteomics data to propose a working model for the ubiquitin-regulated nuclear

  16. α-Synuclein-induced lysosomal dysfunction occurs through disruptions in protein trafficking in human midbrain synucleinopathy models.

    PubMed

    Mazzulli, Joseph R; Zunke, Friederike; Isacson, Ole; Studer, Lorenz; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates comprised of α-synuclein (α-syn). A major barrier in treatment discovery for PD is the lack of identifiable therapeutic pathways capable of reducing aggregates in human neuronal model systems. Mutations in key components of protein trafficking and cellular degradation machinery represent important risk factors for PD; however, their precise role in disease progression and interaction with α-syn remains unclear. Here, we find that α-syn accumulation reduced lysosomal degradation capacity in human midbrain dopamine models of synucleinopathies through disrupting hydrolase trafficking. Accumulation of α-syn at the cell body resulted in aberrant association wit