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Sample records for mutations causing multidrug

  1. Mutation of Glu521 or Glu535 in Cytoplasmic Loop 5 Causes Differential Misfolding in Multiple Domains of Multidrug and Organic Anion Transporter MRP1 (ABCC1)*

    PubMed Central

    Iram, Surtaj H.; Cole, Susan P. C.

    2012-01-01

    The polytopic 5-domain multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) extrudes a variety of drugs and organic anions across the plasma membrane. Four charged residues in the fifth cytoplasmic loop (CL5) connecting transmembrane helix 9 (TM9) to TM10 are critical for stable expression of MRP1 at the plasma membrane. Thus Ala substitution of Lys513, Lys516, Glu521, and Glu535 all cause misfolding of MRP1 and target the protein for proteasome-mediated degradation. Of four chemical chaperones tested, 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) was the most effective at restoring expression of MRP1 mutants K513A, K516A, E521A, and E535A. However, although 4-PBA treatment of K513A resulted in wild-type protein levels (and activity), the same treatment had little or no effect on the expression of K516A. On the other hand, 4-PBA treatment allowed both E521A and E535A to exit the endoplasmic reticulum and be stably expressed at the plasma membrane. However, the 4-PBA-rescued E535A mutant exhibited decreased transport activity associated with reduced substrate affinity and conformational changes in both halves of the transporter. By contrast, E521A exhibited reduced transport activity associated with alterations in the mutant interactions with ATP as well as a distinct conformational change in the COOH-proximal half of MRP1. These findings illustrate the critical and complex role of CL5 for stable expression of MRP1 at the plasma membrane and more specifically show the differential importance of Glu521 and Glu535 in interdomain interactions required for proper folding and assembly of MRP1 into a fully transport competent native structure. PMID:22232552

  2. Prevalent mutator genotype identified in fungal pathogen Candida glabrata promotes multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Healey, Kelley R; Zhao, Yanan; Perez, Winder B; Lockhart, Shawn R; Sobel, Jack D; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Sanglard, Dominique; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Alexander, Barbara D; Jimenez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Shor, Erika; Perlin, David S

    2016-03-29

    The fungal pathogen Candida glabrata has emerged as a major health threat since it readily acquires resistance to multiple drug classes, including triazoles and/or echinocandins. Thus far, cellular mechanisms promoting the emergence of resistance to multiple drug classes have not been described in this organism. Here we demonstrate that a mutator phenotype caused by a mismatch repair defect is prevalent in C. glabrata clinical isolates. Strains carrying alterations in mismatch repair gene MSH2 exhibit a higher propensity to breakthrough antifungal treatment in vitro and in mouse models of colonization, and are recovered at a high rate (55% of all C. glabrata recovered) from patients. This genetic mechanism promotes the acquisition of resistance to multiple antifungals, at least partially explaining the elevated rates of triazole and multi-drug resistance associated with C. glabrata. We anticipate that identifying MSH2 defects in infecting strains may influence the management of patients on antifungal drug therapy.

  3. Population Genetics Study of Isoniazid Resistance Mutations and Evolution of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis†

    PubMed Central

    Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; Brimacombe, Michael; Bobadilla del Valle, Miriam; Cavatore, Magali; Guerrero, Marta Inírida; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Billman-Jacobe, Helen; Lavender, Caroline; Fyfe, Janet; García-García, Lourdes; León, Clara Inés; Bose, Mridula; Chaves, Fernando; Murray, Megan; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Cave, M. Donald; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Alland, David

    2006-01-01

    The molecular basis for isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is complex. Putative isoniazid resistance mutations have been identified in katG, ahpC, inhA, kasA, and ndh. However, small sample sizes and related potential biases in sample selection have precluded the development of statistically valid and significant population genetic analyses of clinical isoniazid resistance. We present the first large-scale analysis of 240 alleles previously associated with isoniazid resistance in a diverse set of 608 isoniazid-susceptible and 403 isoniazid-resistant clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. We detected 12 mutant alleles in isoniazid-susceptible isolates, suggesting that these alleles are not involved in isoniazid resistance. However, mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were strongly associated with isoniazid resistance, while kasA mutations were associated with isoniazid susceptibility. Remarkably, the distribution of isoniazid resistance-associated mutations was different in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates from that in multidrug-resistant isolates, with significantly fewer isoniazid resistance mutations in the isoniazid-monoresistant group. Mutations in katG315 were significantly more common in the multidrug-resistant isolates. Conversely, mutations in the inhA promoter were significantly more common in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates. We tested for interactions among mutations and resistance to different drugs. Mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were associated with rifampin resistance, but only katG315 mutations were associated with ethambutol resistance. There was also a significant inverse association between katG315 mutations and mutations in ahpC or inhA and between mutations in kasA and mutations in ahpC. Our results suggest that isoniazid resistance and the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains are complex dynamic processes that may be influenced by interactions between genes and drug-resistant phenotypes. PMID:16870753

  4. Population genetics study of isoniazid resistance mutations and evolution of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; Brimacombe, Michael; Bobadilla del Valle, Miriam; Cavatore, Magali; Guerrero, Marta Inírida; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Billman-Jacobe, Helen; Lavender, Caroline; Fyfe, Janet; García-García, Lourdes; León, Clara Inés; Bose, Mridula; Chaves, Fernando; Murray, Megan; Eisenach, Kathleen D; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Cave, M Donald; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Alland, David

    2006-08-01

    The molecular basis for isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is complex. Putative isoniazid resistance mutations have been identified in katG, ahpC, inhA, kasA, and ndh. However, small sample sizes and related potential biases in sample selection have precluded the development of statistically valid and significant population genetic analyses of clinical isoniazid resistance. We present the first large-scale analysis of 240 alleles previously associated with isoniazid resistance in a diverse set of 608 isoniazid-susceptible and 403 isoniazid-resistant clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. We detected 12 mutant alleles in isoniazid-susceptible isolates, suggesting that these alleles are not involved in isoniazid resistance. However, mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were strongly associated with isoniazid resistance, while kasA mutations were associated with isoniazid susceptibility. Remarkably, the distribution of isoniazid resistance-associated mutations was different in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates from that in multidrug-resistant isolates, with significantly fewer isoniazid resistance mutations in the isoniazid-monoresistant group. Mutations in katG315 were significantly more common in the multidrug-resistant isolates. Conversely, mutations in the inhA promoter were significantly more common in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates. We tested for interactions among mutations and resistance to different drugs. Mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were associated with rifampin resistance, but only katG315 mutations were associated with ethambutol resistance. There was also a significant inverse association between katG315 mutations and mutations in ahpC or inhA and between mutations in kasA and mutations in ahpC. Our results suggest that isoniazid resistance and the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains are complex dynamic processes that may be influenced by interactions between genes and drug-resistant phenotypes. PMID:16870753

  5. Clinical management of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Valverde, Mercedes; Sojo-Dorado, Jesús; Pascual, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae showing resistance to cephalosporins due to extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) or plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes, and those producing carbapenemases have spread worldwide during the last decades. Many of these isolates are also resistant to other first-line agents such as fluoroquinolones or aminoglycosides, leaving few available options for therapy. Thus, older drugs such as colistin and fosfomycin are being increasingly used. Infections caused by these bacteria are associated with increased morbidity and mortality compared with those caused by their susceptible counterparts. Most of the evidence supporting the present recommendations is from in vitro data, animal studies, and observational studies. While carbapenems are considered the drugs of choice for ESBL and AmpC producers, recent data suggest that certain alternatives may be suitable for some types of infections. Combined therapy seems superior to monotherapy in the treatment of invasive infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Optimization of dosage according to pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics data is important for the treatment of infections caused by isolates with borderline minimum inhibitory concentration due to low-level resistance mechanisms. The increasing frequency and the rapid spread of multidrug resistance among the Enterobacteriaceae is a true and complex public health problem. PMID:25165544

  6. Multidrug resistant citrobacter: an unusual cause of liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Ghosh, Soumik; Rath, Deepak; Gadpayle, A K

    2013-01-01

    Liver abscesses are infectious, space occupying lesions in the liver, the two most common abscesses being pyogenic and amoebic. A pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a rare condition with a reported incidence of 20 per 100 000 hospital admissions in the western population. The right lobe of the liver is the most common site in both types of liver abscess. Clinical presentation is elusive with complaints of fever, right upper quadrant pain in the abdomen and hepatomegaly with or without jaundice. The aetiology of PLA has changed in the past few decades and may be of biliary, portal, arterial or traumatic origin, but many cases are still cryptogenic. The most common organisms causing PLA are Gram-negative aerobes, especially Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Studies have shown a high degree of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated organism resulting in an overall lower mortality in PLA. Here, we present a case of PLA caused by multidrug-resistant Citrobacter freundii, which is an unusual organism to be isolated.

  7. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo de; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosa isolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed.

  8. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosaisolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed. PMID:26676375

  9. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stránecký, Viktor; Hoischen, Alexander; Hartmannová, Hana; Zaki, Maha S.; Chaudhary, Amit; Zudaire, Enrique; Nosková, Lenka; Barešová, Veronika; Přistoupilová, Anna; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Sovová, Jana; Hůlková, Helena; Piherová, Lenka; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; de Silva, Deepthi; Senanayake, Manouri P.; Farrag, Sameh; Zeman, Jiří; Martásek, Pavel; Baxová, Alice; Afifi, Hanan H.; St. Croix, Brad; Brunner, Han G.; Temtamy, Samia; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T [p.Arg88*] and c.505C>T [p.Arg169*]) or splicing mutations (c.1435–12A>G [p.Gly479Phefs*119]) in ANTXR1, which encodes anthrax toxin receptor 1. The nonsense mutations predictably trigger nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, resulting in the loss of ANTXR1. The transcript with the splicing mutation theoretically encodes a truncated ANTXR1 containing a neopeptide composed of 118 unique amino acids in its C terminus. GAPO syndrome’s major phenotypic features, which include dental abnormalities and the accumulation of extracellular matrix, recapitulate those found in Antxr1-mutant mice and point toward an underlying defect in extracellular-matrix regulation. Thus, we propose that mutations affecting ANTXR1 function are responsible for this disease’s characteristic generalized defect in extracellular-matrix homeostasis. PMID:23602711

  10. ACTN1 mutations cause congenital macrothrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kunishima, Shinji; Okuno, Yusuke; Yoshida, Kenichi; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Sanada, Masashi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyazaki, Koji; Sakai, Michio; Ohtake, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Iguchi, Akihiro; Niimi, Gen; Otsu, Makoto; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Seiji; Ogawa, Seishi

    2013-03-01

    Congenital macrothrombocytopenia (CMTP) is a heterogeneous group of rare platelet disorders characterized by a congenital reduction of platelet counts and abnormally large platelets, for which CMTP-causing mutations are only found in approximately half the cases. We herein performed whole-exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing to identify mutations that cause CMTP, in which a dominant mode of transmission had been suspected but for which no known responsible mutations have been documented. In 13 Japanese CMTP-affected pedigrees, we identified six (46%) affected by ACTN1 variants cosegregating with CMTP. In the entire cohort, ACNT1 variants accounted for 5.5% of the dominant forms of CMTP cases and represented the fourth most common cause in Japanese individuals. Individuals with ACTN1 variants presented with moderate macrothrombocytopenia with anisocytosis but were either asymptomatic or had only a modest bleeding tendency. ACTN1 encodes α-actinin-1, a member of the actin-crosslinking protein superfamily that participates in the organization of the cytoskeleton. In vitro transfection experiments in Chinese hamster ovary cells demonstrated that altered α-actinin-1 disrupted the normal actin-based cytoskeletal structure. Moreover, transduction of mouse fetal liver-derived megakaryocytes with disease-associated ACTN1 variants caused a disorganized actin-based cytoskeleton in megakaryocytes, resulting in the production of abnormally large proplatelet tips, which were reduced in number. Our findings provide an insight into the pathogenesis of CMTP.

  11. Prostaglandin transporter mutations cause pachydermoperiostosis with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Diggle, Christine P; Parry, David A; Logan, Clare V; Laissue, Paul; Rivera, Carolina; Restrepo, Carlos Martín; Fonseca, Dora J; Morgan, Joanne E; Allanore, Yannick; Fontenay, Michaela; Wipff, Julien; Varret, Mathilde; Gibault, Laure; Dalantaeva, Nadezhda; Korbonits, Márta; Zhou, Bowen; Yuan, Gang; Harifi, Ghita; Cefle, Kivanc; Palanduz, Sukru; Akoglu, Hadim; Zwijnenburg, Petra J; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Aubry-Rozier, Bérengère; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Accadia, Maria; Brancati, Francesco; Sheridan, Eamonn G; Taylor, Graham R; Carr, Ian M; Johnson, Colin A; Markham, Alexander F; Bonthron, David T

    2012-08-01

    Pachydermoperiostosis, or primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO), is an inherited multisystem disorder, whose features closely mimic the reactive osteoarthropathy that commonly accompanies neoplastic and inflammatory pathologies. We previously described deficiency of the prostaglandin-degrading enzyme 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) as a cause of this condition, implicating elevated circulating prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) as causative of PHO, and perhaps also as the principal mediator of secondary HO. However, PHO is genetically heterogeneous. Here, we use whole-exome sequencing to identify recessive mutations of the prostaglandin transporter SLCO2A1, in individuals lacking HPGD mutations. We performed exome sequencing of four probands with severe PHO, followed by conventional mutation analysis of SLCO2A1 in nine others. Biallelic SLCO2A1 mutations were identified in 12 of the 13 families. Affected individuals had elevated urinary PGE(2), but unlike HPGD-deficient patients, also excreted considerable quantities of the PGE(2) metabolite, PGE-M. Clinical differences between the two groups were also identified, notably that SLCO2A1-deficient individuals have a high frequency of severe anemia due to myelofibrosis. These findings reinforce the key role of systemic or local prostaglandin excess as the stimulus to HO. They also suggest that the induction or maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells by prostaglandin may depend upon transporter activity. PMID:22553128

  12. Mutations in XRCC4 cause primordial dwarfism without causing immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shinta; Kurosawa, Aya; Adachi, Noritaka

    2016-08-01

    In successive reports from 2014 to 2015, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 4 (XRCC4) has been identified as a novel causative gene of primordial dwarfism. XRCC4 is indispensable for non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks. As NHEJ is essential for V(D)J recombination during lymphocyte development, it is generally believed that abnormalities in XRCC4 cause severe combined immunodeficiency. Contrary to expectations, however, no overt immunodeficiency has been observed in patients with primordial dwarfism harboring XRCC4 mutations. Here, we describe the various XRCC4 mutations that lead to disease and discuss their impact on NHEJ and V(D)J recombination. PMID:27169690

  13. Mutations in XRCC4 cause primordial dwarfism without causing immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shinta; Kurosawa, Aya; Adachi, Noritaka

    2016-08-01

    In successive reports from 2014 to 2015, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 4 (XRCC4) has been identified as a novel causative gene of primordial dwarfism. XRCC4 is indispensable for non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks. As NHEJ is essential for V(D)J recombination during lymphocyte development, it is generally believed that abnormalities in XRCC4 cause severe combined immunodeficiency. Contrary to expectations, however, no overt immunodeficiency has been observed in patients with primordial dwarfism harboring XRCC4 mutations. Here, we describe the various XRCC4 mutations that lead to disease and discuss their impact on NHEJ and V(D)J recombination.

  14. FAT1 mutations cause a glomerulotubular nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gee, Heon Yung; Sadowski, Carolin E; Aggarwal, Pardeep K; Porath, Jonathan D; Yakulov, Toma A; Schueler, Markus; Lovric, Svjetlana; Ashraf, Shazia; Braun, Daniela A; Halbritter, Jan; Fang, Humphrey; Airik, Rannar; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Cho, Kyeong Jee; Chan, Timothy A; Morris, Luc G T; ffrench-Constant, Charles; Allen, Nicholas; McNeill, Helen; Büscher, Rainer; Kyrieleis, Henriette; Wallot, Michael; Gaspert, Ariana; Kistler, Thomas; Milford, David V; Saleem, Moin A; Keng, Wee Teik; Alexander, Stephen I; Valentini, Rudolph P; Licht, Christoph; Teh, Jun C; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Koziell, Ania; Bierzynska, Agnieszka; Soliman, Neveen A; Otto, Edgar A; Lifton, Richard P; Holzman, Lawrence B; Sibinga, Nicholas E S; Walz, Gerd; Tufro, Alda; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) causes 15% of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here we show that recessive mutations in FAT1 cause a distinct renal disease entity in four families with a combination of SRNS, tubular ectasia, haematuria and facultative neurological involvement. Loss of FAT1 results in decreased cell adhesion and migration in fibroblasts and podocytes and the decreased migration is partially reversed by a RAC1/CDC42 activator. Podocyte-specific deletion of Fat1 in mice induces abnormal glomerular filtration barrier development, leading to podocyte foot process effacement. Knockdown of Fat1 in renal tubular cells reduces migration, decreases active RAC1 and CDC42, and induces defects in lumen formation. Knockdown of fat1 in zebrafish causes pronephric cysts, which is partially rescued by RAC1/CDC42 activators, confirming a role of the two small GTPases in the pathogenesis. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of SRNS and tubulopathy, linking FAT1 and RAC1/CDC42 to podocyte and tubular cell function. PMID:26905694

  15. FAT1 mutations cause a glomerulotubular nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Heon Yung; Sadowski, Carolin E.; Aggarwal, Pardeep K.; Porath, Jonathan D.; Yakulov, Toma A.; Schueler, Markus; Lovric, Svjetlana; Ashraf, Shazia; Braun, Daniela A.; Halbritter, Jan; Fang, Humphrey; Airik, Rannar; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Cho, Kyeong Jee; Chan, Timothy A.; Morris, Luc G. T.; ffrench-Constant, Charles; Allen, Nicholas; McNeill, Helen; Büscher, Rainer; Kyrieleis, Henriette; Wallot, Michael; Gaspert, Ariana; Kistler, Thomas; Milford, David V.; Saleem, Moin A.; Keng, Wee Teik; Alexander, Stephen I.; Valentini, Rudolph P.; Licht, Christoph; Teh, Jun C.; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Koziell, Ania; Bierzynska, Agnieszka; Soliman, Neveen A.; Otto, Edgar A.; Lifton, Richard P.; Holzman, Lawrence B.; Sibinga, Nicholas E. S.; Walz, Gerd; Tufro, Alda; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) causes 15% of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here we show that recessive mutations in FAT1 cause a distinct renal disease entity in four families with a combination of SRNS, tubular ectasia, haematuria and facultative neurological involvement. Loss of FAT1 results in decreased cell adhesion and migration in fibroblasts and podocytes and the decreased migration is partially reversed by a RAC1/CDC42 activator. Podocyte-specific deletion of Fat1 in mice induces abnormal glomerular filtration barrier development, leading to podocyte foot process effacement. Knockdown of Fat1 in renal tubular cells reduces migration, decreases active RAC1 and CDC42, and induces defects in lumen formation. Knockdown of fat1 in zebrafish causes pronephric cysts, which is partially rescued by RAC1/CDC42 activators, confirming a role of the two small GTPases in the pathogenesis. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of SRNS and tubulopathy, linking FAT1 and RAC1/CDC42 to podocyte and tubular cell function. PMID:26905694

  16. DCDC2 Mutations Cause Neonatal Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Girard, Muriel; Bizet, Albane A; Lachaux, Alain; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Filhol, Emilie; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Henry, Charline; Fabre, Monique; Viremouneix, Loic; Galmiche, Louise; Debray, Dominique; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Pariente, Danièle; Guettier, Catherine; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Heidet, Laurence; Bertholet, Aurelia; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal sclerosing cholangitis (NSC) is a rare biliary disease leading to liver transplantation in childhood. Patients with NSC and ichtyosis have already been identified with a CLDN1 mutation, encoding a tight-junction protein. However, for the majority of patients, the molecular basis of NSC remains unknown. We identified biallelic missense mutations or in-frame deletion in DCDC2 in four affected children. Mutations involve highly conserved amino acids in the doublecortin domains of the protein. In cholangiocytes, DCDC2 protein is normally located in the cytoplasm and cilia, whereas in patients the mutated protein is accumulated in the cytoplasm, absent from cilia, and associated with ciliogenesis defect. This is the first report of DCDC2 mutations in NSC. This data expands the molecular spectrum of NSC, that can be considered as a ciliopathy and also expands the clinical spectrum of the DCDC2 mutations, previously reported in dyslexia, deafness, and nephronophtisis. PMID:27319779

  17. DCDC2 Mutations Cause Neonatal Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Girard, Muriel; Bizet, Albane A; Lachaux, Alain; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Filhol, Emilie; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Henry, Charline; Fabre, Monique; Viremouneix, Loic; Galmiche, Louise; Debray, Dominique; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Pariente, Danièle; Guettier, Catherine; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Heidet, Laurence; Bertholet, Aurelia; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal sclerosing cholangitis (NSC) is a rare biliary disease leading to liver transplantation in childhood. Patients with NSC and ichtyosis have already been identified with a CLDN1 mutation, encoding a tight-junction protein. However, for the majority of patients, the molecular basis of NSC remains unknown. We identified biallelic missense mutations or in-frame deletion in DCDC2 in four affected children. Mutations involve highly conserved amino acids in the doublecortin domains of the protein. In cholangiocytes, DCDC2 protein is normally located in the cytoplasm and cilia, whereas in patients the mutated protein is accumulated in the cytoplasm, absent from cilia, and associated with ciliogenesis defect. This is the first report of DCDC2 mutations in NSC. This data expands the molecular spectrum of NSC, that can be considered as a ciliopathy and also expands the clinical spectrum of the DCDC2 mutations, previously reported in dyslexia, deafness, and nephronophtisis.

  18. Mutations in GNAL cause primary torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Tania; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Masuho, Ikuo; Luciano, Marta San; Raymond, Deborah; Factor, Stewart; Lang, Anthony E.; Liang, Tsao-Wei; Trosch, Richard M.; White, Sierra; Ainehsazan, Edmond; Herve, Denis; Sharma, Nutan; Ehrlich, Michelle E.; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Bressman, Susan B.; Ozelius, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by repetitive twisting muscle contractions and postures1,2. Its molecular pathophysiology is poorly understood, in part due to limited knowledge of the genetic basis of the disorder. Only three genes for primary torsion dystonia (PTD), TOR1A (DYT1)3, THAP1 (DYT6)4, and CIZ15 have been identified. Using exome sequencing in two PTD families we identified a novel causative gene, GNAL, with a nonsense p.S293X mutation resulting in premature stop codon in one family and a missense p.V137M mutation in the other. Screening of GNAL in 39 PTD families, revealed six additional novel mutations in this gene. Impaired function of several of the mutations was shown by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays. PMID:23222958

  19. 8-oxoguanine causes spontaneous de novo germline mutations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Mizuki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Furuichi, Masato; Iwasaki, Yuki; Hokama, Masaaki; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Gondo, Yoichi; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous germline mutations generate genetic diversity in populations of sexually reproductive organisms, and are thus regarded as a driving force of evolution. However, the cause and mechanism remain unclear. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is a candidate molecule that causes germline mutations, because it makes DNA more prone to mutation and is constantly generated by reactive oxygen species in vivo. We show here that endogenous 8-oxoG caused de novo spontaneous and heritable G to T mutations in mice, which occurred at different stages in the germ cell lineage and were distributed throughout the chromosomes. Using exome analyses covering 40.9 Mb of mouse transcribed regions, we found increased frequencies of G to T mutations at a rate of 2 × 10−7 mutations/base/generation in offspring of Mth1/Ogg1/Mutyh triple knockout (TOY-KO) mice, which accumulate 8-oxoG in the nuclear DNA of gonadal cells. The roles of MTH1, OGG1, and MUTYH are specific for the prevention of 8-oxoG-induced mutation, and 99% of the mutations observed in TOY-KO mice were G to T transversions caused by 8-oxoG; therefore, we concluded that 8-oxoG is a causative molecule for spontaneous and inheritable mutations of the germ lineage cells. PMID:24732879

  20. ELOVL5 mutations cause spinocerebellar ataxia 38.

    PubMed

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Borroni, Barbara; Giorgio, Elisa; Lacerenza, Daniela; Ferrero, Marta; Lo Buono, Nicola; Ragusa, Neftj; Mancini, Cecilia; Gaussen, Marion; Calcia, Alessandro; Mitro, Nico; Hoxha, Eriola; Mura, Isabella; Coviello, Domenico A; Moon, Young-Ah; Tesson, Christelle; Vaula, Giovanna; Couarch, Philippe; Orsi, Laura; Duregon, Eleonora; Papotti, Mauro Giulio; Deleuze, Jean-François; Imbert, Jean; Costanzi, Chiara; Padovani, Alessandro; Giunti, Paola; Maillet-Vioud, Marcel; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Tempia, Filippo; Funaro, Ada; Boccone, Loredana; Caruso, Donatella; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorders involving the cerebellum and 23 different genes. We mapped SCA38 to a 56 Mb region on chromosome 6p in a SCA-affected Italian family by whole-genome linkage analysis. Targeted resequencing identified a single missense mutation (c.689G>T [p.Gly230Val]) in ELOVL5. Mutation screening of 456 independent SCA-affected individuals identified the same mutation in two further unrelated Italian families. Haplotyping showed that at least two of the three families shared a common ancestor. One further missense variant (c.214C>G [p.Leu72Val]) was found in a French family. Both missense changes affect conserved amino acids, are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools, and were not identified in ethnically matched controls or within variant databases. ELOVL5 encodes an elongase involved in the synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω3 and ω6 series. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, two final products of the enzyme, were reduced in the serum of affected individuals. Immunohistochemistry on control mice and human brain demonstrated high levels in Purkinje cells. In transfection experiments, subcellular localization of altered ELOVL5 showed a perinuclear distribution with a signal increase in the Golgi compartment, whereas the wild-type showed a widespread signal in the endoplasmic reticulum. SCA38 and SCA34 are examples of SCAs due to mutations in elongase-encoding genes, emphasizing the importance of fatty-acid metabolism in neurological diseases.

  1. Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Retrospective katG and rpoB Mutation Profile Analysis in Isolates from a Reference Center in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Flávia A. D.; Bernardo, Vagner; Gomgnimbou, Michel K.; Sola, Christophe; Siqueira, Hélio R.; Pereira, Márcia A. S.; Fandinho, Fátima C. O.; Gomes, Harrison M.; Araújo, Marcelo E. I.; Suffys, Philip N.; Marques, Elizabeth A.; Albano, Rodolpho M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance is a critical factor in tuberculosis control. To gain better understanding of multidrug resistant tuberculosis in Brazil, a retrospective study was performed to compare genotypic diversity and drug resistance associated mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from a national reference center. Methods and Findings Ninety-nine multidrug resistant isolates from 12 Brazilian states were studied. Drug-resistance patterns were determined and the rpoB and katG genes were screened for mutations. Genotypic diversity was investigated by IS6110-RFLP and Luminex 47 spoligotyping. Mutations in rpoB and katG were seen in 91% and 93% of the isolates, respectively. Codon 315 katG mutations occurred in 82.8% of the isolates with a predominance of the Ser315Thr substitution. Twenty-five isolates were clustered in 11 groups with identical IS6110-RFLP patterns while 74 showed unique patterns with no association between mutation frequencies or susceptibility profiles. The most prevalent spoligotyping lineages were LAM (47%), T (17%) and Haarlen (12%). The Haarlen lineage showed a higher frequency of codon 516 rpoB mutations while codon 531 mutations prevailed in the other isolates. Conclusions Our data suggest that there were no major multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis strains transmitted among patients referred to the reference center, indicating an independent acquisition of resistance. In addition, drug resistance associated mutation profiles were well established among the main spoligotyping lineages found in these Brazilian multidrug resistant isolates, providing useful data for patient management and treatment. PMID:25093512

  2. Equine diseases caused by known genetic mutations.

    PubMed

    Finno, Carrie J; Spier, Sharon J; Valberg, Stephanie J

    2009-03-01

    The recent development of equine genome maps by the equine genome community and the complete sequencing of the horse genome performed at the Broad Institute have accelerated the pace of genetic discovery. This review focuses on genetic diseases in the horse for which a mutation is currently known, including hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, severe combined immunodeficiency, overo lethal white syndrome, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, glycogen branching enzyme deficiency, malignant hyperthermia, hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia, and polysaccharide storage myopathy. Emphasis is placed on the prevalence, clinical signs, etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis for each disease.

  3. Mutations in ZBTB20 cause Primrose syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cordeddu, Viviana; Redeker, Bert; Stellacci, Emilia; Jongejan, Aldo; Fragale, Alessandra; Bradley, Ted E J; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Ciolfi, Andrea; Cecchetti, Serena; Muto, Valentina; Bernardini, Laura; Azage, Meron; Carvalho, Daniel R; Espay, Alberto J; Male, Alison; Molin, Anna-Maja; Posmyk, Renata; Battisti, Carla; Casertano, Alberto; Melis, Daniela; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Mannens, Marcel M; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Stella, Lorenzo; Tartaglia, Marco; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2014-08-01

    Primrose syndrome and 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome are clinically related disorders characterized by tall stature, macrocephaly, intellectual disability, disturbed behavior and unusual facial features, with diabetes, deafness, progressive muscle wasting and ectopic calcifications specifically occurring in the former. We report that missense mutations in ZBTB20, residing within the 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome critical region, underlie Primrose syndrome. This finding establishes a genetic link between these disorders and delineates the impact of ZBTB20 dysregulation on development, growth and metabolism.

  4. Somatic Activating PIK3CA Mutations Cause Venous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Nisha; Kangas, Jaakko; Mendola, Antonella; Godfraind, Catherine; Schlögel, Matthieu J; Helaers, Raphael; Eklund, Lauri; Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2015-12-01

    Somatic mutations in TEK, the gene encoding endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2, cause more than half of sporadically occurring unifocal venous malformations (VMs). Here, we report that somatic mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the catalytic p110α subunit of PI3K, cause 54% (27 out of 50) of VMs with no detected TEK mutation. The hotspot mutations c.1624G>A, c.1633G>A, and c.3140A>G (p.Glu542Lys, p.Glu545Lys, and p.His1047Arg), frequent in PIK3CA-associated cancers, overgrowth syndromes, and lymphatic malformation (LM), account for >92% of individuals who carry mutations. Like VM-causative mutations in TEK, the PIK3CA mutations cause chronic activation of AKT, dysregulation of certain important angiogenic factors, and abnormal endothelial cell morphology when expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The p110α-specific inhibitor BYL719 restores all abnormal phenotypes tested, in PIK3CA- as well as TEK-mutant HUVECs, demonstrating that they operate via the same pathogenic pathways. Nevertheless, significant genotype-phenotype correlations in lesion localization and histology are observed between individuals with mutations in PIK3CA versus TEK, pointing to gene-specific effects. PMID:26637981

  5. Mutations in FEZF1 cause Kallmann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kotan, L Damla; Hutchins, B Ian; Ozkan, Yusuf; Demirel, Fatma; Stoner, Hudson; Cheng, Paul J; Esen, Ihsan; Gurbuz, Fatih; Bicakci, Y Kenan; Mengen, Eda; Yuksel, Bilgin; Wray, Susan; Topaloglu, A Kemal

    2014-09-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons originate outside the CNS in the olfactory placode and migrate into the CNS, where they become integral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Disruption of this migration results in Kallmann syndrome (KS), which is characterized by anosmia and pubertal failure due to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Using candidate-gene screening, autozygosity mapping, and whole-exome sequencing in a cohort of 30 individuals with KS, we searched for genes newly associated with KS. We identified homozygous loss-of-function mutations in FEZF1 in two independent consanguineous families each with two affected siblings. The FEZF1 product is known to enable axons of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) to penetrate the CNS basal lamina in mice. Because a subset of axons in these tracks is the migratory pathway for GnRH neurons, in FEZF1 deficiency, GnRH neurons also fail to enter the brain. These results indicate that FEZF1 is required for establishment of the central component of the HPG axis in humans.

  6. Mutations in FEZF1 Cause Kallmann Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kotan, L. Damla; Hutchins, B. Ian; Ozkan, Yusuf; Demirel, Fatma; Stoner, Hudson; Cheng, Paul J.; Esen, Ihsan; Gurbuz, Fatih; Bicakci, Y. Kenan; Mengen, Eda; Yuksel, Bilgin; Wray, Susan; Topaloglu, A. Kemal

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons originate outside the CNS in the olfactory placode and migrate into the CNS, where they become integral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Disruption of this migration results in Kallmann syndrome (KS), which is characterized by anosmia and pubertal failure due to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Using candidate-gene screening, autozygosity mapping, and whole-exome sequencing in a cohort of 30 individuals with KS, we searched for genes newly associated with KS. We identified homozygous loss-of-function mutations in FEZF1 in two independent consanguineous families each with two affected siblings. The FEZF1 product is known to enable axons of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) to penetrate the CNS basal lamina in mice. Because a subset of axons in these tracks is the migratory pathway for GnRH neurons, in FEZF1 deficiency, GnRH neurons also fail to enter the brain. These results indicate that FEZF1 is required for establishment of the central component of the HPG axis in humans. PMID:25192046

  7. Overlapping DSPP mutations cause dentin dysplasia and dentinogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    McKnight, D A; Simmer, J P; Hart, P S; Hart, T C; Fisher, L W

    2008-12-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentin dysplasia (DD) are allelic disorders due to mutations in DSPP. Typically, the phenotype breeds true within a family. Recently, two reports showed that 3 different net -1 bp frameshift mutations early in DSPP's repeat domain caused DD, whereas 6 more 3' frameshift mutations were associated with DGI. Here we identify a DD kindred with a novel -1 bp frameshift (c.3141delC) that falls within the portion of the DSPP repeat domain previously associated solely with the DGI phenotype. This new frameshift mutation shows that overlapping DSPP mutations can give rise to either DGI or DD phenotypes. Furthermore, the consistent kindred presentation of the DD or DGI phenotype appears to be dependent on an as-yet-undescribed genetic modifier closely linked to DSPP.

  8. Heterozygous Reelin Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Lateral Temporal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  9. Heterozygous reelin mutations cause autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C E; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  10. [Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin cause ichthyosis vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sumangali Chandra; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Bygum, Anette

    2011-02-14

    Ichthyosis vulgaris is a common genetic skin disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1:250 caused by mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin. This disorder manifests itself within the first year of life and is clinically characterized by dry, scaly skin, keratosis pilaris, palmar hyperlinearity and atopic manifestations. Patients with a severe phenotype are homozygous or compound heterozygous for the mutations, whereas heterozygous patients show mild disease, suggesting semidominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. We present a patient with classic severe ichthyosis vulgaris, atopic eczema and two loss-of-function mutations.

  11. A novel PITX2 mutation causing iris hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Masashi; Tokita, Yoshihito; Machida, Junichiro; Shibata, Akio; Tatematsu, Tadashi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Shimozato, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Nakashima, Mitsuko

    2014-01-01

    Iris hypoplasia (IH) is rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a poorly developed iris stroma and malformations of the eyes and umbilicus. This disorder is caused by mutation of the paired-like homeodomain 2 (PITX2) gene. Here, we describe a novel PITX2 mutation (c.205C>T) in an IH family presenting with very mild eye features but with tooth agenesis as the most obvious clinical feature. PMID:27081499

  12. A DSPP mutation causing dentinogenesis imperfecta and characterization of the mutational effect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Song, Su Jeong; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Jung-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the DSPP gene have been identified in nonsyndromic hereditary dentin defects, but the genotype-phenotype correlations are not fully understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the mutations of DSPP affecting the IPV leader sequence result in mutant DSPP retention in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this study, we identified a Korean family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III. To identify the disease causing mutation in this family, we performed mutational analysis based on candidate gene sequencing. Exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP gene were sequenced, and the effects of the identified mutation on the pre-mRNA splicing and protein secretion were investigated. Candidate gene sequencing revealed a mutation (c.50C > T, p.P17L) in exon 2 of the DSPP gene. The splicing assay showed that the mutation did not influence pre-mRNA splicing. However, the mutation interfered with protein secretion and resulted in the mutant protein remaining largely in the ER. These results suggest that the mutation affects ER-to-Golgi apparatus export and results in the reduction of secreted DSPP and ER overload. This may induce cell stress and damage processing and/or transport of dentin matrix proteins or other critical proteins.

  13. Novel GABRG2 mutations cause familial febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Morin-Brureau, Mélanie; Picard, Fabienne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lambrecq, Virginie; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Iacomino, Michele; Ishida, Saeko; An-Gourfinkel, Isabelle; Daniau, Mailys; Hardies, Katia; Baulac, Michel; Dulac, Olivier; Leguern, Eric; Nabbout, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in a large family with febrile seizures (FS) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and subsequently search for additional mutations in a cohort of 107 families with FS, with or without epilepsy. Methods: The cohort consisted of 1 large family with FS and TLE, 64 smaller French families recruited through a national French campaign, and 43 Italian families. Molecular analyses consisted of whole-exome sequencing and mutational screening. Results: Exome sequencing revealed a p.Glu402fs*3 mutation in the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor gene (GABRG2) in the large family with FS and TLE. Three additional nonsense and frameshift GABRG2 mutations (p.Arg136*, p.Val462fs*33, and p.Pro59fs*12), 1 missense mutation (p.Met199Val), and 1 exonic deletion were subsequently identified in 5 families of the follow-up cohort. Conclusions: We report GABRG2 mutations in 5.6% (6/108) of families with FS, with or without associated epilepsy. This study provides evidence that GABRG2 mutations are linked to the FS phenotype, rather than epilepsy, and that loss-of-function of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit is the probable underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:27066572

  14. The spectrum of mutations causing end-plate acetylcholinesterase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ohno, K; Engel, A G; Brengman, J M; Shen, X M; Heidenreich, F; Vincent, A; Milone, M; Tan, E; Demirci, M; Walsh, P; Nakano, S; Akiguchi, I

    2000-02-01

    The end-plate species of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an asymmetric enzyme consisting of a collagenic tail subunit composed of three collagenic strands (ColQ), each attached to a tetramer of the T isoform of the catalytic subunit (AChE(T)) via a proline-rich attachment domain. The principal function of the tail subunit is to anchor asymmetric AChE in the synaptic basal lamina. Human end-plate AChE deficiency was recently shown to be caused by mutations in COLQ. We here report nine novel COLQ mutations in 7 patients with end-plate AChE deficiency. We examine the effects of the mutations on the assembly of asymmetric AChE by coexpressing each genetically engineered COLQ mutant with ACHE(T) in COS cells. We classify the newly recognized and previously reported COLQ mutations into four classes according to their position in ColQ and their effect on AChE expression. We find that missense mutations in the proline-rich attachment domain abrogate attachment of catalytic subunits, that truncation mutations in the ColQ collagen domain prevent the assembly of asymmetric AChE, that hydrophobic missense residues in the C-terminal domain prevent triple helical assembly of the ColQ collagen domain, and that other mutations in the C-terminal region produce asymmetric species of AChE that are likely insertion incompetent. PMID:10665486

  15. Periaxin mutations cause recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Boerkoel, C F; Takashima, H; Stankiewicz, P; Garcia, C A; Leber, S M; Rhee-Morris, L; Lupski, J R

    2001-02-01

    The periaxin gene (PRX) encodes two PDZ-domain proteins, L- and S-periaxin, that are required for maintenance of peripheral nerve myelin. Prx(-/-) mice develop a severe demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, despite apparently normal initial formation of myelin sheaths. We hypothesized that mutations in PRX could cause human peripheral myelinopathies. In accordance with this, we identified three unrelated Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy patients with recessive PRX mutations-two with compound heterozygous nonsense and frameshift mutations, and one with a homozygous frameshift mutation. We mapped PRX to 19q13.13-13.2, a region recently associated with a severe autosomal recessive demyelinating neuropathy in a Lebanese family (Delague et al. 2000) and syntenic to the location of Prx on murine chromosome 7 (Gillespie et al. 1997). PMID:11133365

  16. Alexander disease: a leukodystrophy caused by a mutation in GFAP.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anne B

    2004-05-01

    Alexander disease, a rare fatal disorder of the central nervous system, causes progressive loss of motor and mental function. Until recently it was of unknown etiology, almost all cases were sporadic, and there was no effective treatment. It was most common in an infantile form, somewhat less so in a juvenile form, and was rarely seen in an adult-onset form. A number of investigators have now shown that almost all cases of Alexander disease have a dominant mutation in one allele of the gene for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) that causes replacement of one amino acid for another. Only in very rare cases of the adult-onset form is the mutation present in either parent. Thus, in almost all cases, the mutation arises as a spontaneous event, possibly in the germ cell of one parent.

  17. Mutations in LPIN1 cause recurrent acute myoglobinuria in childhood.

    PubMed

    Zeharia, Avraham; Shaag, Avraham; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Hindi, Tareq; de Lonlay, Pascale; Erez, Gilli; Hubert, Laurence; Saada, Ann; de Keyzer, Yves; Eshel, Gideon; Vaz, Frédéric M; Pines, Ophry; Elpeleg, Orly

    2008-10-01

    Recurrent episodes of life-threatening myoglobinuria in childhood are caused by inborn errors of glycogenolysis, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Nonetheless, approximately half of the patients do not suffer from a defect in any of these pathways. Using homozygosity mapping, we identified six deleterious mutations in the LPIN1 gene in patients who presented at 2-7 years of age with recurrent, massive rhabdomyolysis. The LPIN1 gene encodes the muscle-specific phosphatidic acid phosphatase, a key enzyme in triglyceride and membrane phospholipid biosynthesis. Of six individuals who developed statin-induced myopathy, one was a carrier for Glu769Gly, a pathogenic mutation in the LPIN1 gene. Analysis of phospholipid content disclosed accumulation of phosphatidic acid and lysophospholipids in muscle tissue of the more severe genotype. Mutations in the LPIN1 gene cause recurrent rhabdomyolysis in childhood, and a carrier state may predispose for statin-induced myopathy. PMID:18817903

  18. Mutations in LPIN1 cause recurrent acute myoglobinuria in childhood.

    PubMed

    Zeharia, Avraham; Shaag, Avraham; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Hindi, Tareq; de Lonlay, Pascale; Erez, Gilli; Hubert, Laurence; Saada, Ann; de Keyzer, Yves; Eshel, Gideon; Vaz, Frédéric M; Pines, Ophry; Elpeleg, Orly

    2008-10-01

    Recurrent episodes of life-threatening myoglobinuria in childhood are caused by inborn errors of glycogenolysis, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Nonetheless, approximately half of the patients do not suffer from a defect in any of these pathways. Using homozygosity mapping, we identified six deleterious mutations in the LPIN1 gene in patients who presented at 2-7 years of age with recurrent, massive rhabdomyolysis. The LPIN1 gene encodes the muscle-specific phosphatidic acid phosphatase, a key enzyme in triglyceride and membrane phospholipid biosynthesis. Of six individuals who developed statin-induced myopathy, one was a carrier for Glu769Gly, a pathogenic mutation in the LPIN1 gene. Analysis of phospholipid content disclosed accumulation of phosphatidic acid and lysophospholipids in muscle tissue of the more severe genotype. Mutations in the LPIN1 gene cause recurrent rhabdomyolysis in childhood, and a carrier state may predispose for statin-induced myopathy.

  19. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by compound heterozygosity for Twinkle mutations and modeling of Twinkle mutations causing recessive disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Stapleton, Gail A.; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K.; Mandell, Jessica B.; Morales, Augusto; Klevit, Rachel E.; King, Mary-Claire; Rogers, R. Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes required for the replication and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA cause progressive multisystemic neuromuscular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Biallelic mutations in C10orf2, encoding the Twinkle mitochondrial DNA helicase, lead to infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia (IOSCA), as well as milder and more severe phenotypes. We present a 13-year-old girl with ataxia, severe hearing loss, optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the patient is compound heterozygous for previously unreported variants in the C10orf2 gene: a paternally inherited frameshift variant (c.333delT; p.L112Sfs*3) and a maternally inherited missense variant (c.904C>T; p.R302W). The identification of novel C10orf2 mutations extends the spectrum of mutations in the Twinkle helicase causing recessive disease, in particular the intermediate IOSCA phenotype. Structural modeling suggests that the p.R302W mutation and many other recessively inherited Twinkle mutations impact the position or interactions of the linker region, which is critical for the oligomeric ring structure and activity of the helicase. This study emphasizes the utility of whole-exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of a complex multisystemic disorder. PMID:27551684

  20. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by compound heterozygosity for Twinkle mutations and modeling of Twinkle mutations causing recessive disease.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Sarah B; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Stapleton, Gail A; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K; Mandell, Jessica B; Morales, Augusto; Klevit, Rachel E; King, Mary-Claire; Rogers, R Curtis

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes required for the replication and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA cause progressive multisystemic neuromuscular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Biallelic mutations in C10orf2, encoding the Twinkle mitochondrial DNA helicase, lead to infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia (IOSCA), as well as milder and more severe phenotypes. We present a 13-year-old girl with ataxia, severe hearing loss, optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the patient is compound heterozygous for previously unreported variants in the C10orf2 gene: a paternally inherited frameshift variant (c.333delT; p.L112Sfs*3) and a maternally inherited missense variant (c.904C>T; p.R302W). The identification of novel C10orf2 mutations extends the spectrum of mutations in the Twinkle helicase causing recessive disease, in particular the intermediate IOSCA phenotype. Structural modeling suggests that the p.R302W mutation and many other recessively inherited Twinkle mutations impact the position or interactions of the linker region, which is critical for the oligomeric ring structure and activity of the helicase. This study emphasizes the utility of whole-exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of a complex multisystemic disorder. PMID:27551684

  1. Periaxin mutations cause a broad spectrum of demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroshi; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; De Jonghe, Peter; Ceuterick, Chantal; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Voit, Thomas; Schröder, J-Michael; Williams, Anna; Brophy, Peter J; Timmerman, Vincent; Lupski, James R

    2002-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that apparent loss-of-function mutations in the periaxin gene cause autosomal recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy or severe demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this report, we extend the associated phenotypes with the identification of two additional families with novel periaxin gene mutations (C715X and R82fsX96) and provide detailed neuropathology. Each patient had marked sensory involvement; two siblings with a homozygous C715X mutation had much worse sensory impairment than motor impairment. Despite early disease onset, these siblings with the C715X mutation had relatively slow disease progression and adult motor impairment typical of classic demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. In contrast, a patient with the homozygous R82fsX96 mutation had a disease course consistent with Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy. The neuropathology of patients in both families was remarkable for demyelination, onion bulb and occasional tomacula formation with focal myelin thickening, abnormalities of the paranodal myelin loops, and focal absence of paranodal septate-like junctions between the terminal loops and axon. Our study indicates a prominent sensory neuropathy resulting from periaxin gene mutations and suggests a role for the carboxyl terminal domain of the periaxin protein. PMID:12112076

  2. Mutations in the NHEJ component XRCC4 cause primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jennie E; van der Burg, Mirjam; IJspeert, Hanna; Carroll, Paula; Wu, Qian; Ochi, Takashi; Leitch, Andrea; Miller, Edward S; Kysela, Boris; Jawad, Alireza; Bottani, Armand; Brancati, Francesco; Cappa, Marco; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Deshpande, Charu; Faqeih, Eissa A; Graham, Gail E; Ranza, Emmanuelle; Blundell, Tom L; Jackson, Andrew P; Stewart, Grant S; Bicknell, Louise S

    2015-03-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a key cellular process ensuring genome integrity. Mutations in several components of the NHEJ pathway have been identified, often associated with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), consistent with the requirement for NHEJ during V(D)J recombination to ensure diversity of the adaptive immune system. In contrast, we have recently found that biallelic mutations in LIG4 are a common cause of microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD), a phenotype characterized by prenatal-onset extreme global growth failure. Here we provide definitive molecular genetic evidence supported by biochemical, cellular, and immunological data for mutations in XRCC4, encoding the obligate binding partner of LIG4, causing MPD. We report the identification of biallelic mutations in XRCC4 in five families. Biochemical and cellular studies demonstrate that these alterations substantially decrease XRCC4 protein levels leading to reduced cellular ligase IV activity. Consequently, NHEJ-dependent repair of ionizing-radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is compromised in XRCC4 cells. Similarly, immunoglobulin junctional diversification is impaired in cells. However, immunoglobulin levels are normal, and individuals lack overt signs of immunodeficiency. Additionally, in contrast to individuals with LIG4 mutations, pancytopenia leading to bone marrow failure has not been observed. Hence, alterations that alter different NHEJ proteins give rise to a phenotypic spectrum, from SCID to extreme growth failure, with deficiencies in certain key components of this repair pathway predominantly exhibiting growth deficits, reflecting differential developmental requirements for NHEJ proteins to support growth and immune maturation. PMID:25728776

  3. Mutations in the NHEJ Component XRCC4 Cause Primordial Dwarfism

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jennie E.; van der Burg, Mirjam; IJspeert, Hanna; Carroll, Paula; Wu, Qian; Ochi, Takashi; Leitch, Andrea; Miller, Edward S.; Kysela, Boris; Jawad, Alireza; Bottani, Armand; Brancati, Francesco; Cappa, Marco; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Deshpande, Charu; Faqeih, Eissa A.; Graham, Gail E.; Ranza, Emmanuelle; Blundell, Tom L.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Stewart, Grant S.; Bicknell, Louise S.

    2015-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a key cellular process ensuring genome integrity. Mutations in several components of the NHEJ pathway have been identified, often associated with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), consistent with the requirement for NHEJ during V(D)J recombination to ensure diversity of the adaptive immune system. In contrast, we have recently found that biallelic mutations in LIG4 are a common cause of microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD), a phenotype characterized by prenatal-onset extreme global growth failure. Here we provide definitive molecular genetic evidence supported by biochemical, cellular, and immunological data for mutations in XRCC4, encoding the obligate binding partner of LIG4, causing MPD. We report the identification of biallelic mutations in XRCC4 in five families. Biochemical and cellular studies demonstrate that these alterations substantially decrease XRCC4 protein levels leading to reduced cellular ligase IV activity. Consequently, NHEJ-dependent repair of ionizing-radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is compromised in XRCC4 cells. Similarly, immunoglobulin junctional diversification is impaired in cells. However, immunoglobulin levels are normal, and individuals lack overt signs of immunodeficiency. Additionally, in contrast to individuals with LIG4 mutations, pancytopenia leading to bone marrow failure has not been observed. Hence, alterations that alter different NHEJ proteins give rise to a phenotypic spectrum, from SCID to extreme growth failure, with deficiencies in certain key components of this repair pathway predominantly exhibiting growth deficits, reflecting differential developmental requirements for NHEJ proteins to support growth and immune maturation. PMID:25728776

  4. Mutations in NSUN2 Cause Autosomal- Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi-Moheb, Lia; Mertel, Sara; Gonsior, Melanie; Nouri-Vahid, Leyla; Kahrizi, Kimia; Cirak, Sebahattin; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Motazacker, M. Mahdi; Esmaeeli-Nieh, Sahar; Cremer, Kirsten; Weißmann, Robert; Tzschach, Andreas; Garshasbi, Masoud; Abedini, Seyedeh S.; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, H. Hilger; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Kuss, Andreas W.

    2012-01-01

    With a prevalence between 1 and 3%, hereditary forms of intellectual disability (ID) are among the most important problems in health care. Particularly, autosomal-recessive forms of the disorder have a very heterogeneous molecular basis, and genes with an increased number of disease-causing mutations are not common. Here, we report on three different mutations (two nonsense mutations, c.679C>T [p.Gln227∗] and c.1114C>T [p.Gln372∗], as well as one splicing mutation, g.6622224A>C [p.Ile179Argfs∗192]) that cause a loss of the tRNA-methyltransferase-encoding NSUN2 main transcript in homozygotes. We identified the mutations by sequencing exons and exon-intron boundaries within the genomic region where the linkage intervals of three independent consanguineous families of Iranian and Kurdish origin overlapped with the previously described MRT5 locus. In order to gain further evidence concerning the effect of a loss of NSUN2 on memory and learning, we constructed a Drosophila model by deleting the NSUN2 ortholog, CG6133, and investigated the mutants by using molecular and behavioral approaches. When the Drosophila melanogaster NSUN2 ortholog was deleted, severe short-term-memory (STM) deficits were observed; STM could be rescued by re-expression of the wild-type protein in the nervous system. The humans homozygous for NSUN2 mutations showed an overlapping phenotype consisting of moderate to severe ID and facial dysmorphism (which includes a long face, characteristic eyebrows, a long nose, and a small chin), suggesting that mutations in this gene might even induce a syndromic form of ID. Moreover, our observations from the Drosophila model point toward an evolutionarily conserved role of RNA methylation in normal cognitive development. PMID:22541559

  5. ADCY5 mutations are another cause of benign hereditary chorea

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Wiethoff, Sarah; Hersheson, Joshua; Ryten, Mina; Balint, Bettina; Ganos, Christos; Stamelou, Maria; Quinn, Niall; Houlden, Henry; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the contribution of ADCY5 mutations in cases with genetically undefined benign hereditary chorea (BHC). Methods: We studied 18 unrelated cases with BHC (7 familial, 11 sporadic) who were negative for NKX2-1 mutations. The diagnosis of BHC was based on the presence of a childhood-onset movement disorder, predominantly characterized by chorea and no other major neurologic features. ADCY5 analysis was performed by whole-exome sequencing or Sanger sequencing. ADCY5 and NKX2-1 expression during brain development and in the adult human brain was assessed using microarray analysis of postmortem brain tissue. Results: The c.1252C>T; p.R418W mutation was identified in 2 cases (1 familial, 1 sporadic). The familial case inherited the mutation from the affected father, who had a much milder presentation, likely due to low-grade somatic mosaicism. The mutation was de novo in the sporadic case. The clinical presentation of these cases featured nonparoxysmal generalized chorea, as well as dystonia in the most severely affected, but no facial myokymia. We observed significant progression of symptoms in ADCY5 mutation carriers, in contrast to BHC secondary to NKX2-1 mutations. The difference in the clinical course is mirrored by the brain expression data, showing increasing ADCY5 expression in the striatum during brain development, whereas NKX2-1 shows an opposite trend. Conclusions: Our study identifies mutations in ADCY5, the gene previously linked to familial dyskinesia with facial myokymia, as a cause of familial and sporadic BHC. ADCY5 genetic analysis should be performed in cases with a benign choreiform movement disorder even in the absence of facial myokymia. PMID:26085604

  6. Mutations in IMPG1 Cause Vitelliform Macular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Gaël; Meunier, Isabelle; Avila-Fernández, Almudena; Banfi, Sandro; Le Meur, Guylène; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Corton, Marta; Simonelli, Francesca; Brabet, Philippe; Labesse, Gilles; Audo, Isabelle; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Zeitz, Christina; Sahel, José-Alain; Weber, Michel; Dollfus, Hélène; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Allorge, Delphine; De Baere, Elfride; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Kohl, Susanne; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Hollyfield, Joe G.; Sénéchal, Audrey; Hebrard, Maxime; Bocquet, Béatrice; Ayuso García, Carmen; Hamel, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophies (VMD) are inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by yellow, round deposits visible upon fundus examination and encountered in individuals with juvenile Best macular dystrophy (BMD) or adult-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD). Although many BMD and some AVMD cases harbor mutations in BEST1 or PRPH2, the underlying genetic cause remains unknown for many affected individuals. In a large family with autosomal-dominant VMD, gene mapping and whole-exome sequencing led to the identification of a c.713T>G (p.Leu238Arg) IMPG1 mutation, which was subsequently found in two other families with autosomal-dominant VMD and the same phenotype. IMPG1 encodes the SPACR protein, a component of the rod and cone photoreceptor extracellular matrix domains. Structural modeling indicates that the p.Leu238Arg substitution destabilizes the conserved SEA1 domain of SPACR. Screening of 144 probands who had various forms of macular dystrophy revealed three other IMPG1 mutations. Two individuals from one family affected by autosomal-recessive VMD were homozygous for the splice-site mutation c.807+1G>T, and two from another family were compound heterozygous for the mutations c.461T>C (p.Leu154Pro) and c.1519C>T (p.Arg507∗). Most cases had a normal or moderately decreased electrooculogram Arden ratio. We conclude that IMPG1 mutations cause both autosomal-dominant and -recessive forms of VMD, thus indicating that impairment of the interphotoreceptor matrix might be a general cause of VMD. PMID:23993198

  7. Mapping of mutation causing Friedreich's ataxia to human chromosome 9.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, S; Shaw, J; Rowland, A; Wallis, J; South, S; Nakamura, Y; von Gabain, A; Farrall, M; Williamson, R

    1988-07-21

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessive disease with progressive degeneration of the central and peripheral nervous system. The biochemical abnormality underlying the disorder has not been identified. Prompted by the success in localizing the mutations causing Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Huntington's disease and cystic fibrosis, we have undertaken molecular genetic linkage studies to determine the chromosomal site of the Friedreich's ataxia mutation as an initial step towards the isolation and characterization of the defective gene. We report the assignment of the gene mutation for this disorder to chromosome 9p22-CEN by genetic linkage to an anonymous DNA marker MCT112 and the interferon-beta gene probe. In contrast to the clinical variation seen for the disorder, no evidence of genetic heterogeneity is observed.

  8. Novel mutations in PXDN cause microphthalmia and anterior segment dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Alex; Lao, Richard; Ling-Fung Tang, Paul; Wan, Eunice; Mayer, Wasima; Bardakjian, Tanya; Shaw, Gary M; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Schneider, Adele; Slavotinek, Anne

    2015-03-01

    We used exome sequencing to study a non-consanguineous family with two children who had anterior segment dysgenesis, sclerocornea, microphthalmia, hypotonia and developmental delays. Sanger sequencing verified two Peroxidasin (PXDN) mutations in both sibs--a maternally inherited, nonsense mutation, c.1021C>T predicting p.(Arg341*), and a paternally inherited, 23-basepair deletion causing a frameshift and premature protein truncation, c.2375_2397del23, predicting p.(Leu792Hisfs*67). We re-examined exome data from 20 other patients with structural eye defects and identified two additional PXDN mutations in a sporadic male with bilateral microphthalmia, cataracts and anterior segment dysgenesis--a maternally inherited, frameshift mutation, c.1192delT, predicting p.(Tyr398Thrfs*40) and a paternally inherited, missense substitution that was predicted to be deleterious, c.947 A>C, predicting p.(Gln316Pro). Mutations in PXDN were previously reported in three families with congenital cataracts, microcornea, sclerocornea and developmental glaucoma. The gene is expressed in corneal epithelium and is secreted into the extracellular matrix. Defective peroxidasin has been shown to impair sulfilimine bond formation in collagen IV, a constituent of the basement membrane, implying that the eye defects result because of loss of basement membrane integrity in the developing eye. Our finding of a broader phenotype than previously appreciated for PXDN mutations is typical for exome-sequencing studies, which have proven to be highly effective for mutation detection in patients with atypical presentations. We conclude that PXDN sequencing should be considered in microphthalmia with anterior segment dysgenesis.

  9. Dental Abnormalities Caused by Novel Compound Heterozygous CTSK Mutations.

    PubMed

    Xue, Y; Wang, L; Xia, D; Li, Q; Gao, S; Dong, M; Cai, T; Shi, S; He, L; Hu, K; Mao, T; Duan, X

    2015-05-01

    Cathepsin K (CTSK) is an important protease responsible for degrading type I collagen, osteopontin, and other bone matrix proteins. The mutations in the CTSK gene can cause pycnodysostosis (OMIM 265800), a rare autosomal recessive bone dysplasia. Patients with pycnodysostosis have been reported to present specific dental abnormalities; however, whether these dental abnormalities are related to dysfunctional CTSK has never been reported. Here we investigated the histologic changes of cementum and alveolar bone in a pycnodysostosis patient, caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations in the CTSK gene (c.87 G>A p.W29X and c.848 A>G p.Y283C). The most impressive manifestations in tooth were extensive periradicular high-density clumps with unclear periodontal space by orthopantomography examination and micro-computed tomography scanning analysis. Hematoxylin/eosin and toluidine blue staining and atomic force microscopy analysis showed that the cementum became significantly thickened, softened, and full of cementocytes. The disorganized bone structure was the main character of alveolar bone. The p.W29X mutation may represent the loss-of-function allele with an earlier termination codon in the precursor CTSK polypeptide. Residue Y283 is highly conserved among papain-like cysteine proteases. Three-dimensional structure modeling analysis found that the loss of the hydroxybenzene residue in the Y283C mutation would interrupt the hydrogen network and possibly affect the self-cleavage of the CTSK enzyme. Furthermore, p.Y283C mutation did not affect the mRNA and protein levels of overexpressed CTSK in COS-7 system but did reduce CTSK enzyme activity. In conclusion, the histologic and ultrastructural changes of cementum and alveolar bone might be affected by CTSK mutation via reduction of its enzyme activity (clinical trial registration: ChiCTR-TNC-10000876).

  10. Homozygous STIL Mutation Causes Holoprosencephaly and Microcephaly in Two Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Mouden, Charlotte; de Tayrac, Marie; Dubourg, Christèle; Rose, Sophie; Carré, Wilfrid; Hamdi-Rozé, Houda; Babron, Marie-Claude; Akloul, Linda; Héron-Longe, Bénédicte; Odent, Sylvie; Dupé, Valérie; Giet, Régis; David, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a frequent congenital malformation of the brain characterized by impaired forebrain cleavage and midline facial anomalies. Heterozygous mutations in 14 genes have been identified in HPE patients that account for only 30% of HPE cases, suggesting the existence of other HPE genes. Data from homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous Turkish family were combined to identify a homozygous missense mutation (c.2150G>A; p.Gly717Glu) in STIL, common to the two affected children. STIL has a role in centriole formation and has previously been described in rare cases of microcephaly. Rescue experiments in U2OS cells showed that the STIL p.Gly717Glu mutation was not able to fully restore the centriole duplication failure following depletion of endogenous STIL protein indicating the deleterious role of the mutation. In situ hybridization experiments using chick embryos demonstrated that expression of Stil was in accordance with a function during early patterning of the forebrain. It is only the second time that a STIL homozygous mutation causing a recessive form of HPE was reported. This result also supports the genetic heterogeneity of HPE and increases the panel of genes to be tested for HPE diagnosis. PMID:25658757

  11. Red cell glycolytic enzyme disorders caused by mutations: an update.

    PubMed

    Climent, Fernando; Roset, Feliu; Repiso, Ada; Pérez de la Ossa, Pablo

    2009-06-01

    Glycolysis is one of the principle pathways of ATP generation in cells and is present in all cell tissues; in erythrocytes, glycolysis is the only pathway for ATP synthesis since mature red cells lack the internal structures necessary to produce the energy vital for life. Red cell deficiencies have been detected in all erythrocyte glycolytic pathways, although their frequencies differ owing to diverse causes, such as the affected enzyme and severity of clinical manifestations. The number of enzyme deficiencies known is endless. The most frequent glycolysis abnormality is pyruvate kinase deficiency, since around 500 cases are known, the first of which was reported in 1961. However, only approximately 200 cases were due to mutations. In contrast, only one case of phosphoglycerate mutase BB type mutation, described in 2003, has been detected. Most mutations are located in the coding sequences of genes, while others, missense, deletions, insertions, splice defects, premature stop codons and promoter mutations, are also frequent. Understanding of the crystal structure of enzymes permits molecular modelling studies which, in turn, reveal how mutations can affect enzyme structure and function. PMID:19519368

  12. An MRPS12 mutation modifies aminoglycoside sensitivity caused by 12S rRNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Emperador, Sonia; Pacheu-Grau, David; Bayona-Bafaluy, M. Pilar; Garrido-Pérez, Nuria; Martín-Navarro, Antonio; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Several homoplasmic pathologic mutations in mitochondrial DNA, such as those causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or non-syndromic hearing loss, show incomplete penetrance. Therefore, other elements must modify their pathogenicity. Discovery of these modifying factors is not an easy task because in multifactorial diseases conventional genetic approaches may not always be informative. Here, we have taken an evolutionary approach to unmask putative modifying factors for a particular homoplasmic pathologic mutation causing aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss, the m.1494C>T transition in the mitochondrial DNA. The mutation is located in the decoding site of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. We first looked at mammalian species that had fixed the human pathologic mutation. These mutations are called compensated pathogenic deviations because an organism carrying one must also have another that suppresses the deleterious effect of the first. We found that species from the primate family Cercopithecidae (old world monkeys) harbor the m.1494T allele even if their auditory function is normal. In humans the m.1494T allele increases the susceptibility to aminoglycosides. However, in primary fibroblasts from a Cercopithecidae species, aminoglycosides do not impair cell growth, respiratory complex IV activity and quantity or the mitochondrial protein synthesis. Interestingly, this species also carries a fixed mutation in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12. We show that the expression of this variant in a human m.1494T cell line reduces its susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Because several mutations in this human protein have been described, they may possibly explain the absence of pathologic phenotype in some pedigree members with the most frequent pathologic mutations in mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. PMID:25642242

  13. ARHGDIA mutations cause nephrotic syndrome via defective RHO GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Heon Yung; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Hurd, Toby W.; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Fang, Humphrey; Beck, Bodo B.; Gribouval, Olivier; Zhou, Weibin; Diaz, Katrina A.; Natarajan, Sivakumar; Wiggins, Roger C.; Lovric, Svjetlana; Chernin, Gil; Schoeb, Dominik S.; Ovunc, Bugsu; Frishberg, Yaacov; Soliman, Neveen A.; Fathy, Hanan M.; Goebel, Heike; Hoefele, Julia; Weber, Lutz T.; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Faul, Christian; Han, Zhe; Washburn, Joseph; Antignac, Corinne; Levy, Shawn; Otto, Edgar A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is divided into steroid-sensitive (SSNS) and -resistant (SRNS) variants. SRNS causes end-stage kidney disease, which cannot be cured. While the disease mechanisms of NS are not well understood, genetic mapping studies suggest a multitude of unknown single-gene causes. We combined homozygosity mapping with whole-exome resequencing and identified an ARHGDIA mutation that causes SRNS. We demonstrated that ARHGDIA is in a complex with RHO GTPases and is prominently expressed in podocytes of rat glomeruli. ARHGDIA mutations (R120X and G173V) from individuals with SRNS abrogated interaction with RHO GTPases and increased active GTP-bound RAC1 and CDC42, but not RHOA, indicating that RAC1 and CDC42 are more relevant to the pathogenesis of this SRNS variant than RHOA. Moreover, the mutations enhanced migration of cultured human podocytes; however, enhanced migration was reversed by treatment with RAC1 inhibitors. The nephrotic phenotype was recapitulated in arhgdia-deficient zebrafish. RAC1 inhibitors were partially effective in ameliorating arhgdia-associated defects. These findings identify a single-gene cause of NS and reveal that RHO GTPase signaling is a pathogenic mediator of SRNS. PMID:23867502

  14. MMP13 mutation causes spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Missouri type (SEMDMO)

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ann M.; Inada, Masaki; Krane, Stephen M.; Christie, Paul T.; Harding, Brian; López-Otín, Carlos; Sánchez, Luis M.; Pannett, Anna A.J.; Dearlove, Andrew; Hartley, Claire; Byrne, Michael H.; Reed, Anita A.C.; Nesbit, M. Andrew; Whyte, Michael P.; Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2005-01-01

    MMPs, which degrade components of the ECM, have roles in embryonic development, tissue repair, cancer, arthritis, and cardiovascular disease. We show that a missense mutation of MMP13 causes the Missouri type of human spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMDMO), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by defective growth and modeling of vertebrae and long bones. Genome-wide linkage analysis mapped SEMDMO to a 17-cM region on chromosome 11q14.3–23.2 that contains a cluster of 9 MMP genes. Among these, MMP13 represented the best candidate for SEMDMO, since it preferentially degrades collagen type II, abnormalities of which cause skeletal dysplasias that include Strudwick type SEMD. DNA sequence analysis revealed a missense mutation, F56S, that substituted an evolutionarily conserved phenylalanine residue for a serine in the proregion domain of MMP13. We predicted, by modeling MMP13 structure, that this F56S mutation would result in a hydrophobic cavity with misfolding, autoactivation, and degradation of mutant protein intracellularly. Expression of wild-type and mutant MMP13s in human embryonic kidney cells confirmed abnormal intracellular autoactivation and autodegradation of F56S MMP13 such that only enzymatically inactive, small fragments were secreted. Thus, the F56S mutation results in deficiency of MMP13, which leads to the human skeletal developmental anomaly of SEMDMO. PMID:16167086

  15. Mutations in the pericentrin (PCNT) gene cause primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Anita; Thiel, Christian T; Schindler, Detlev; Wick, Ursula; Crow, Yanick J; Ekici, Arif B; van Essen, Anthonie J; Goecke, Timm O; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H; Zweier, Christiane; Brunner, Han G; Becker, Kristin; Curry, Cynthia J; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dörfler, Arnd; Kinning, Esther; Megarbane, André; Meinecke, Peter; Semple, Robert K; Spranger, Stephanie; Toutain, Annick; Trembath, Richard C; Voss, Egbert; Wilson, Louise; Hennekam, Raoul; de Zegher, Francis; Dörr, Helmuth-Günther; Reis, André

    2008-02-01

    Fundamental processes influencing human growth can be revealed by studying extreme short stature. Using genetic linkage analysis, we find that biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the centrosomal pericentrin (PCNT) gene on chromosome 21q22.3 cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) in 25 patients. Adults with this rare inherited condition have an average height of 100 centimeters and a brain size comparable to that of a 3-month-old baby, but are of near-normal intelligence. Absence of PCNT results in disorganized mitotic spindles and missegregation of chromosomes. Mutations in related genes are known to cause primary microcephaly (MCPH1, CDK5RAP2, ASPM, and CENPJ). PMID:18174396

  16. Mutations in PCBD1 Cause Hypomagnesemia and Renal Magnesium Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Ferrè, Silvia; de Baaij, Jeroen H.F.; Ferreira, Patrick; Germann, Roger; de Klerk, Johannis B.C.; Lavrijsen, Marla; van Zeeland, Femke; Venselaar, Hanka; Kluijtmans, Leo A.J.; Hoenderop, Joost G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in PCBD1 are causative for transient neonatal hyperphenylalaninemia and primapterinuria (HPABH4D). Until now, HPABH4D has been regarded as a transient and benign neonatal syndrome without complications in adulthood. In our study of three adult patients with homozygous mutations in the PCBD1 gene, two patients were diagnosed with hypomagnesemia and renal Mg2+ loss, and two patients developed diabetes with characteristics of maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY), regardless of serum Mg2+ levels. Our results suggest that these clinical findings are related to the function of PCBD1 as a dimerization cofactor for the transcription factor HNF1B. Mutations in the HNF1B gene have been shown to cause renal malformations, hypomagnesemia, and MODY. Gene expression studies combined with immunohistochemical analysis in the kidney showed that Pcbd1 is expressed in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT), where Pcbd1 transcript levels are upregulated by a low Mg2+-containing diet. Overexpression in a human kidney cell line showed that wild-type PCBD1 binds HNF1B to costimulate the FXYD2 promoter, the activity of which is instrumental in Mg2+ reabsorption in the DCT. Of seven PCBD1 mutations previously reported in HPABH4D patients, five mutations caused proteolytic instability, leading to reduced FXYD2 promoter activity. Furthermore, cytosolic localization of PCBD1 increased when coexpressed with HNF1B mutants. Overall, our findings establish PCBD1 as a coactivator of the HNF1B-mediated transcription necessary for fine tuning FXYD2 transcription in the DCT and suggest that patients with HPABH4D should be monitored for previously unrecognized late complications, such as hypomagnesemia and MODY diabetes. PMID:24204001

  17. Mutation in BAG3 Causes Severe Dominant Childhood Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Selcen, Duygu; Muntoni, Francesco; Burton, Barbara K.; MD, Elena Pegoraro; Sewry, Caroline; Bite, Anna V.; Engel, Andrew G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) are morphologically distinct but genetically heterogeneous muscular dystrophies in which disintegration of Z disks and then of myofibrils is followed by ectopic accumulation of multiple proteins. Cardiomyopathy, neuropathy, and dominant inheritance are frequent associated features. Mutations in αB-crystallin, desmin, myotilin, Zasp, or filamin-C can cause MFM, and were detected in 32/85 patients of the Mayo MFM cohort. Bag3, another Z-disk associated protein, has antiapoptotic properties and its targeted deletion in mice causes fulminant myopathy with early lethality. We therefore searched for mutations in BAG3 in 53 unrelated MFM patients. Methods We searched for mutations in BAG3 by direct sequencing and excluded polymorphism using allele-specific PCR in relatives and 200 control subjects. We analyzed structural changes in muscle by histochemistry, immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy, examined mobility of the mutant Bag3 by nondenaturing electrophoresis, and searched for abnormal aggregation of the mutant protein in COS-7 cells. Results We identified a heterozygous p.Pro209Leu mutation in three patients. All presented in childhood, had progressive limb and axial muscle weakness, and developed cardiomyopathy and severe respiratory insufficiency in their teens; two had rigid spines and one a peripheral neuropathy. Electron microscopy showed disintegration of Z disks, extensive accumulation of granular debris and larger inclusions, and apoptosis of 8% of the nuclei. On nondenaturing electrophoresis of muscle extracts, the Bag3 complex migrated faster in patient than control extracts, and expression of FLAG-labeled mutant and wild-type Bag3 in COS cells revealed abnormal aggregation of the mutant protein. Interpretation We conclude mutation in Bag3 defines a novel severe autosomal dominant childhood muscular dystrophy. PMID:19085932

  18. SOX2 mutation causes anophthalmia, hearing loss, and brain anomalies.

    PubMed

    Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Pauer, Gayle J T; Reid, Janet; Simpson, Ellen; Crowe, Sue; Maumenee, Irene H; Traboulsi, Elias I

    2005-10-01

    The SOX2 transcription factor is expressed early in the embryonic stem cells of the blastocyst and later in the neural stem cells. It is a member of the SOX family of proteins that carry a DNA-binding high-mobility group domain and additional domains that regulate embryonic development and cell fate determinations. We surveyed 93 patients with severe eye malformations for mutations in SOX2. Here, we report a novel nonsense mutation in one female patient with bilateral clinical anophthalmia, absence of all optic pathways, and other neurological abnormalities. The mutation, Q155X, creates a premature termination codon early in the transcriptional activation domain and is likely to be a null allele. Our data show that mutations in SOX2 can cause not only anophthalmia, but also aplasia of the optic nerve, chiasm and optic tract, as well as modest bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, and global developmental delay, underscoring the importance of SOX2 in early human eye and brain development.

  19. Heterozygous mutations of OTX2 cause severe ocular malformations.

    PubMed

    Ragge, Nicola K; Brown, Alison G; Poloschek, Charlotte M; Lorenz, Birgit; Henderson, R Alex; Clarke, Michael P; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Fielder, Alistair; Gerrelli, Dianne; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Ruddle, Piers; Hurst, Jane; Collin, J Richard O; Salt, Alison; Cooper, Simon T; Thompson, Pamela J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Williamson, Kathleen A; Fitzpatrick, David R; van Heyningen, Veronica; Hanson, Isabel M

    2005-06-01

    Major malformations of the human eye, including microphthalmia and anophthalmia, are examples of phenotypes that recur in families yet often show no clear Mendelian inheritance pattern. Defining loci by mapping is therefore rarely feasible. Using a candidate-gene approach, we have identified heterozygous coding-region changes in the homeobox gene OTX2 in eight families with ocular malformations. The expression pattern of OTX2 in human embryos is consistent with the eye phenotypes observed in the patients, which range from bilateral anophthalmia to retinal defects resembling Leber congenital amaurosis and pigmentary retinopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed defects of the optic nerve, optic chiasm, and, in some cases, brain. In two families, the mutations appear to have occurred de novo in severely affected offspring, and, in two other families, the mutations have been inherited from a gonosomal mosaic parent. Data from these four families support a simple model in which OTX2 heterozygous loss-of-function mutations cause ocular malformations. Four additional families display complex inheritance patterns, suggesting that OTX2 mutations alone may not lead to consistent phenotypes. The high incidence of mosaicism and the reduced penetrance have implications for genetic counseling.

  20. IARS mutation causes prenatal death in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Takeda, Kenji; Hara, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Kita, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Hanzawa, Kei

    2016-09-01

    Isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (IARS) c.235G > C (p.V79L) is a causative mutation for a recessive disease called IARS disorder in Japanese black cattle. The disease is involved in weak calf syndrome and is characterized by low birth weight, weakness and poor suckling. The gestation period is often slightly extended, implying that intrauterine growth is retarded. In a previous analysis of 2597 artificial insemination (AI) procedures, we suggested that the IARS mutation might contribute toward an increase in the incidence of prenatal death. In this study, we extended this analysis to better clarify the association between the IARS mutation and prenatal death. The IARS genotypes of 92 animals resulting from crosses between carrier (G/C) × G/C were 27 normal (G/G), 55 G/C and 10 affected animals (C/C) (expected numbers: 23, 46 and 23, respectively). Compared to the expected numbers, there were significantly fewer affected animals in this population (P < 0.05), suggesting that more than half of the affected embryos died prenatally. When the number of AI procedures examined was increased to 11 580, the frequency of re-insemination after G/C × G/C insemination was significantly higher at 61-140 days (P < 0.001). The findings suggested that the homozygous IARS mutation not only causes calf death, but also embryonic or fetal death. PMID:27229878

  1. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum Cyclic Amine Resistance Locus (PfCARL) Confer Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    LaMonte, Gregory; Lim, Michelle Yi-Xiu; Wree, Melanie; Reimer, Christin; Nachon, Marie; Corey, Victoria; Gedeck, Peter; Plouffe, David; Du, Alan; Figueroa, Nelissa; Yeung, Bryan; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum cyclic amine resistance locus (PfCARL) are associated with parasite resistance to the imidazolopiperazines, a potent class of novel antimalarial compounds that display both prophylactic and transmission-blocking activity, in addition to activity against blood-stage parasites. Here, we show that pfcarl encodes a protein, with a predicted molecular weight of 153 kDa, that localizes to the cis-Golgi apparatus of the parasite in both asexual and sexual blood stages. Utilizing clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-mediated gene introduction of 5 variants (L830V, S1076N/I, V1103L, and I1139K), we demonstrate that mutations in pfcarl are sufficient to generate resistance against the imidazolopiperazines in both asexual and sexual blood-stage parasites. We further determined that the mutant PfCARL protein confers resistance to several structurally unrelated compounds. These data suggest that PfCARL modulates the levels of small-molecule inhibitors that affect Golgi-related processes, such as protein sorting or membrane trafficking, and is therefore an important mechanism of resistance in malaria parasites. PMID:27381290

  2. CSB-PGBD3 Mutations Cause Premature Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangyu; Tang, Tie-Shan; Zhao, Shidou; Jiao, Xue; Gong, Juanjuan; Gao, Fei; Guo, Caixia; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a rare, heterogeneous disorder characterized by cessation of menstruation occurring before the age of 40 years. Genetic etiology is responsible for perhaps 25% of cases, but most cases are sporadic and unexplained. In this study, through whole exome sequencing in a non-consanguineous family having four affected members with POF and Sanger sequencing in 432 sporadic cases, we identified three novel mutations in the fusion gene CSB-PGBD3. Subsequently functional studies suggest that mutated CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein was impaired in response to DNA damage, as indicated by delayed or absent recruitment to damaged sites. Our data provide the first evidence that mutations in the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein can cause human disease, even in the presence of functional CSB, thus potentially explaining conservation of the fusion protein for 43 My since marmoset. The localization of the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein to UVA-induced nuclear DNA repair foci further suggests that the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein, like many other proteins that can cause POF, modulates or participates in DNA repair. PMID:26218421

  3. Similar phenotypes caused by mutations in OTOG and OTOGL

    PubMed Central

    Oonk, Anne M.M.; Leijendeckers, Joop M.; Huygen, Patrick L.M.; Schraders, Margit; del Campo, Miguel; del Castillo, Ignacio; Tekin, Mustafa; Feenstra, Ilse; Beynon, Andy J.; Kunst, Henricus P.M.; Snik, Ad F.M.; Kremer, Hannie; Admiraal, Ronald J.C.; Pennings, Ronald J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives recently, OTOG and OTOGL were identified as human deafness genes. Currently, only four families are known to have autosomal recessive hearing loss based on mutations in these genes. Since the two genes code for proteins (otogelin and otogelin-like) that are strikingly similar in structure and localization in the inner ear, this study is focused on characterizing and comparing the hearing loss caused by mutations in these genes. Design To evaluate this type of hearing, an extensive set of audiometric and vestibular examinations was performed in the 13 patients from four families. Results all families show a flat to downsloping configuration of the audiogram with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Speech recognition scores remain good (>90%). Hearing loss is not significantly different in the four families and the psychophysical test results also do not differ between the families. Vestibular examinations show evidence for vestibular hyporeflexia. Conclusion since otogelin and otogelin-like are localized in the tectorial membrane, one could expect a cochlear conductive hearing loss, as was previously shown in DFNA13 (COL11A2) and DFNA8/12 (TECTA) patients. Results of psychophysical examinations, however, do not support this. Furthermore, the authors can conclude that there are no phenotypic differences between hearing loss based on mutations in OTOG or OTOGL. This phenotype description will facilitate counseling of hearing loss caused by defects in either of these two genes. PMID:24378291

  4. CSB-PGBD3 Mutations Cause Premature Ovarian Failure.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yingying; Guo, Ting; Li, Guangyu; Tang, Tie-Shan; Zhao, Shidou; Jiao, Xue; Gong, Juanjuan; Gao, Fei; Guo, Caixia; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a rare, heterogeneous disorder characterized by cessation of menstruation occurring before the age of 40 years. Genetic etiology is responsible for perhaps 25% of cases, but most cases are sporadic and unexplained. In this study, through whole exome sequencing in a non-consanguineous family having four affected members with POF and Sanger sequencing in 432 sporadic cases, we identified three novel mutations in the fusion gene CSB-PGBD3. Subsequently functional studies suggest that mutated CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein was impaired in response to DNA damage, as indicated by delayed or absent recruitment to damaged sites. Our data provide the first evidence that mutations in the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein can cause human disease, even in the presence of functional CSB, thus potentially explaining conservation of the fusion protein for 43 My since marmoset. The localization of the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein to UVA-induced nuclear DNA repair foci further suggests that the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein, like many other proteins that can cause POF, modulates or participates in DNA repair. PMID:26218421

  5. Filamin A mutation is one cause of FG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Unger, Sheila; Mainberger, Anita; Spitz, Christian; Bähr, Anna; Zeschnigk, Christine; Zabel, Bernhard; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J

    2007-08-15

    FG syndrome was originally described as a rare syndromic cause of X-linked mental retardation associated with congenital heart disease, anal atresia, inguinal hernia, cryptorchidism, and other anomalies. However, recent reports have highlighted the more common milder presentation which has for cardinal features developmental delay, particularly in speech, neonatal hypotonia, relative macrocephaly, dysmorphic facial features, severe constipation, and few if any congenital malformations. Thus far, five separate loci have been identified on the X chromosome but attempts at finding the responsible gene have not yet been successful. Given that one putative FG locus (FGS2) is situated at Xq28, which is the location of the Filamin A gene (FLNA), and that a Filamin A mutation was reported in a boy with facial dysmorphism and constipation, it was hypothesized that Filamin A mutations could be one cause of FG syndrome. Indeed, a previously unreported FLNA missense mutation (P1291L) was detected in our patient with FG syndrome, thus supporting this hypothesis and indicating that FG syndrome could now be added to the list of Filamin A-related disorders. Filamin A studies in other children with FG syndrome would help to confirm this association. PMID:17632775

  6. Mutations in TUBB8 cause human oocyte meiotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruizhi; Sang, Qing; Kuang, Yanping; Sun, Xiaoxi; Yan, Zheng; Zhang, Shaozhen; Shi, Juanzi; Tian, Guoling; Luchniak, Anna; Fukuda, Yusuke; Li, Bin; Yu, Min; Chen, Junling; Xu, Yao; Guo, Luo; Qu, Ronggui; Wang, Xueqian; Sun, Zhaogui; Liu, Miao; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Hongyan; Feng, Yi; Shao, Ruijin; Chai, Renjie; Li, Qiaoli; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Rui; Nogales, Eva; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Gupta, Mohan L.; Cowan, Nicholas J.; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Successful human reproduction depends on the fusion of a mature oocyte with a sperm cell to form a fertilized egg. The genetic events that lead to human oocyte maturation arrest are unknown. Methods We recruited a rare four-generation family with female infertility as a consequence of oocyte meiosis I arrest. We applied whole-exome and direct Sanger sequencing to an additional 23 patients following identification of mutations in a candidate gene, TUBB8. Expression of TUBB8 and all other β-tubulin isotypes was measured in human oocytes, early embryos, sperm cells and several somatic tissues by qRT-PCR. The effect of the TUBB8 mutations was assessed on α/β tubulin heterodimer assembly in vitro, on microtubule architecture in HeLa cells, on microtubule dynamics in yeast cells, and on spindle assembly in mouse and human oocytes via microinjection of the corresponding cRNAs. Results We identified seven mutations in the primate-specific gene TUBB8 that are responsible for human oocyte meiosis I arrest in seven families. TUBB8 expression is unique to oocytes and the early embryo, where this gene accounts for almost all of the expressed β-tubulin. The mutations affect the chaperone-dependent folding and assembly of the α/β-tubulin heterodimer, induce microtubule chaos upon expression in cultured cells, alter microtubule dynamics in vivo, and cause catastrophic spindle assembly defects and maturation arrest upon expression in mouse and human oocytes. Conclusions TUBB8 mutations function via dominant negative effects that massively disrupt proper microtubule behavior. TUBB8 is a key gene involved in human oocyte meiotic spindle assembly and maturation. PMID:26789871

  7. Mutations in ALDH1A3 cause microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Aldahmesh, M A; Khan, A O; Hijazi, H; Alkuraya, F S

    2013-08-01

    Microphthalmia is an important inborn error of eye development that can be associated with multisystem involvement. Anophthalmia is more severe and rarer. Single mutations in an expanding list of genes are known to cause this spectrum of anomaly. In one branch of a multiplex family with microphthalmia and anophthalmia, autozygome analysis excluded all known microphthalmia genes at the time of doing this study. Exome sequencing and autozygome filtration identified a novel homozygous variant in ALDH1A3. Subsequently, we identified another homozygous variant in 2 of the 10 probands with microphthalmia we specifically screened for mutations in ALDH1A3. Interestingly, the other branch of the original family was found to segregate anophthalmia/syndactyly with a novel homozygous SMOC1 variant. Our data support the very recent and independent identification of ALDH1A3 as a disease gene in microphthalmia. Locus heterogeneity should be considered in consanguineous families even for extremely rare phenotypes.

  8. Mutations in KPTN cause macrocephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, and seizures.

    PubMed

    Baple, Emma L; Maroofian, Reza; Chioza, Barry A; Izadi, Maryam; Cross, Harold E; Al-Turki, Saeed; Barwick, Katy; Skrzypiec, Anna; Pawlak, Robert; Wagner, Karin; Coblentz, Roselyn; Zainy, Tala; Patton, Michael A; Mansour, Sahar; Rich, Phillip; Qualmann, Britta; Hurles, Matt E; Kessels, Michael M; Crosby, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    The proper development of neuronal circuits during neuromorphogenesis and neuronal-network formation is critically dependent on a coordinated and intricate series of molecular and cellular cues and responses. Although the cortical actin cytoskeleton is known to play a key role in neuromorphogenesis, relatively little is known about the specific molecules important for this process. Using linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing on samples from families from the Amish community of Ohio, we have demonstrated that mutations in KPTN, encoding kaptin, cause a syndrome typified by macrocephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, and seizures. Our immunofluorescence analyses in primary neuronal cell cultures showed that endogenous and GFP-tagged kaptin associates with dynamic actin cytoskeletal structures and that this association is lost upon introduction of the identified mutations. Taken together, our studies have identified kaptin alterations responsible for macrocephaly and neurodevelopmental delay and define kaptin as a molecule crucial for normal human neuromorphogenesis. PMID:24239382

  9. Mutations in KPTN Cause Macrocephaly, Neurodevelopmental Delay, and Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Baple, Emma L.; Maroofian, Reza; Chioza, Barry A.; Izadi, Maryam; Cross, Harold E.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Barwick, Katy; Skrzypiec, Anna; Pawlak, Robert; Wagner, Karin; Coblentz, Roselyn; Zainy, Tala; Patton, Michael A.; Mansour, Sahar; Rich, Phillip; Qualmann, Britta; Hurles, Matt E.; Kessels, Michael M.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    The proper development of neuronal circuits during neuromorphogenesis and neuronal-network formation is critically dependent on a coordinated and intricate series of molecular and cellular cues and responses. Although the cortical actin cytoskeleton is known to play a key role in neuromorphogenesis, relatively little is known about the specific molecules important for this process. Using linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing on samples from families from the Amish community of Ohio, we have demonstrated that mutations in KPTN, encoding kaptin, cause a syndrome typified by macrocephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, and seizures. Our immunofluorescence analyses in primary neuronal cell cultures showed that endogenous and GFP-tagged kaptin associates with dynamic actin cytoskeletal structures and that this association is lost upon introduction of the identified mutations. Taken together, our studies have identified kaptin alterations responsible for macrocephaly and neurodevelopmental delay and define kaptin as a molecule crucial for normal human neuromorphogenesis. PMID:24239382

  10. Mutations in PYCR1 cause cutis laxa with progeroid features.

    PubMed

    Reversade, Bruno; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Dimopoulou, Aikaterini; Fischer, Björn; Chng, Serene C; Li, Yun; Shboul, Mohammad; Tham, Puay-Yoke; Kayserili, Hülya; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Shahwan, Monzer; Brancati, Francesco; Lee, Hane; O'Connor, Brian D; Schmidt-von Kegler, Mareen; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F; Masri, Amira; Alkazaleh, Fawaz; Guerra, Deanna; Ferrari, Paola; Nanda, Arti; Rajab, Anna; Markie, David; Gray, Mary; Nelson, John; Grix, Arthur; Sommer, Annemarie; Savarirayan, Ravi; Janecke, Andreas R; Steichen, Elisabeth; Sillence, David; Hausser, Ingrid; Budde, Birgit; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Seemann, Petra; Kunkel, Désirée; Zambruno, Giovanna; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Schuelke, Markus; Robertson, Stephen; Hamamy, Hanan; Wollnik, Bernd; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe

    2009-09-01

    Autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) describes a group of syndromal disorders that are often associated with a progeroid appearance, lax and wrinkled skin, osteopenia and mental retardation. Homozygosity mapping in several kindreds with ARCL identified a candidate region on chromosome 17q25. By high-throughput sequencing of the entire candidate region, we detected disease-causing mutations in the gene PYCR1. We found that the gene product, an enzyme involved in proline metabolism, localizes to mitochondria. Altered mitochondrial morphology, membrane potential and increased apoptosis rate upon oxidative stress were evident in fibroblasts from affected individuals. Knockdown of the orthologous genes in Xenopus and zebrafish led to epidermal hypoplasia and blistering that was accompanied by a massive increase of apoptosis. Our findings link mutations in PYCR1 to altered mitochondrial function and progeroid changes in connective tissues.

  11. Diseases caused by mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1

    PubMed Central

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Feske, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels mediate a specific form of Ca2+ influx called store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) that contributes to the function of many cell types. CRAC channels are formed by ORAI1 proteins located in the plasma membrane, which form its ion-conducting pore. ORAI1 channels are activated by stromal interaction molecule (STIM) 1 and STIM2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Loss- and gain-of-function gene mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 in human patients cause distinct disease syndromes. CRAC channelopathy is caused by loss-of-function mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 that abolish CRAC channel function and SOCE; it is characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-like disease, autoimmunity, muscular hypotonia, and ectodermal dysplasia, with defects in dental enamel. The latter defect emphasizes an important role of CRAC channels in tooth development. By contrast, autosomal dominant gain-of-function mutations in these genes result in constitutive CRAC channel activation, SOCE, and increased intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with an overlapping spectrum of diseases, including non-syndromic tubular aggregate myopathy (TAM) and York platelet and Stormorken syndromes, two syndromes defined, besides myopathy, by thrombocytopenia, thrombopathy, and bleeding diathesis. The fact that myopathy results from loss- and gain-of-function mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 highlights the importance of CRAC channels for Ca2+ homeostasis in skeletal muscle function. The cellular dysfunction and clinical disease spectrum observed in mutant patients provide important information about the molecular regulation of ORAI1 and STIM1 proteins and the role of CRAC channels in human physiology. PMID:26469693

  12. [Advances in hereditary hearing loss caused by TMC1 mutations].

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaiwen; Wang, Hongyang; Wang, Qiuju

    2016-03-01

    Hearing loss is the most frequent sensorineural disorder worldwild, among which about 50% are caused by genetic factors. TMC1 is one of the common genes causing hereditary hearing loss. TMC1 mutations can cause pre-lingual profound/severe autosomal recessive (DFNB7/11) and post-lingual progressive autosomal dominant (DFNA36) non-syndromic hearing loss. Murine models studies show that TMC1, 2 are expressed in cochlea inner and outer hair cells and maintain normal mechanoelectrical transduction (MET) functions of the hair cells. A growing number of evidence indicate that TMC1, 2 are components of the MET complex. It is necessary to definite the precise distribution and exact function of TMC1, 2, because it is important to understand the regulating mechanism of auditory function. PMID:27033582

  13. Homozygous Nonsense Mutations in TWIST2 Cause Setleis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tukel, Turgut; Šošić, Dražen; Al-Gazali, Lihadh I.; Erazo, Mónica; Casasnovas, Jose; Franco, Hector L.; Richardson, James A.; Olson, Eric N.; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Desnick, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The focal facial dermal dysplasias (FFDDs) are a group of inherited developmental disorders in which the characteristic diagnostic feature is bitemporal scar-like lesions that resemble forceps marks. To date, the genetic defects underlying these ectodermal dysplasias have not been determined. To identify the gene defect causing autosomal-recessive Setleis syndrome (type III FFDD), homozygosity mapping was performed with genomic DNAs from five affected individuals and 26 members of the consanguineous Puerto Rican (PR) family originally described by Setleis and colleagues. Microsatellites D2S1397 and D2S2968 were homozygous in all affected individuals, mapping the disease locus to 2q37.3. Haplotype analyses of additional markers in the PR family and a consanguineous Arab family further limited the disease locus to ∼3 Mb between D2S2949 and D2S2253. Of the 29 candidate genes in this region, the bHLH transcription factor, TWIST2, was initially sequenced on the basis of its known involvement in murine facial development. Homozygous TWIST2 nonsense mutations, c.324C>T and c.486C>T, were identified in the affected members of the Arab and PR families, respectively. Characterization of the expressed mutant proteins, p.Q65X and p.Q119X, by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and immunoblot analyses indicated that they were truncated and unstable. Notably, Setleis syndrome patients and Twist2 knockout mice have similar facial features, indicating the gene's conserved role in mammalian development. Although human TWIST2 and TWIST1 encode highly homologous bHLH transcription factors, the finding that TWIST2 recessive mutations cause an FFDD and dominant TWIST1 mutations cause Saethre-Chotzen craniocynostosis suggests that they function independently in skin and bone development. PMID:20691403

  14. LAMB3 mutations causing autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Seymen, F; Lee, K E; Ko, J; Yildirim, M; Tuna, E B; Gencay, K; Shin, T J; Kyun, H K; Simmer, J P; Hu, J C-C

    2013-10-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) can be either isolated or part of a larger syndrome. Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a collection of autosomal-recessive disorders featuring AI associated with skin fragility and other symptoms. JEB is a recessive syndrome usually caused by mutations in both alleles of COL17A1, LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2. In rare cases, heterozygous carriers in JEB kindreds display enamel malformations in the absence of skin fragility (isolated AI). We recruited two kindreds with autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI) characterized by generalized severe enamel hypoplasia with deep linear grooves and pits. Whole-exome sequencing of both probands identified novel heterozygous mutations in the last exon of LAMB3 that likely truncated the protein. The mutations perfectly segregated with the enamel defects in both families. In Family 1, an 8-bp deletion (c.3446_3453del GACTGGAG) shifted the reading frame (p.Gly 1149Glufs*8). In Family 2, a single nucleotide substitution (c.C3431A) generated an in-frame translation termination codon (p.Ser1144*). We conclude that enamel formation is particularly sensitive to defects in hemidesmosome/basement-membrane complexes and that syndromic and non-syndromic forms of AI can be etiologically related. PMID:23958762

  15. RTTN Mutations Cause Primary Microcephaly and Primordial Dwarfism in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shamseldin, Hanan; Alazami, Anas M.; Manning, Melanie; Hashem, Amal; Caluseiu, Oana; Tabarki, Brahim; Esplin, Edward; Schelley, Susan; Innes, A. Micheil; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Lamont, Ryan; Majewski, Jacek; Bernier, Francois P.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2015-01-01

    Primary microcephaly is a developmental brain anomaly that results from defective proliferation of neuroprogenitors in the germinal periventricular zone. More than a dozen genes are known to be mutated in autosomal-recessive primary microcephaly in isolation or in association with a more generalized growth deficiency (microcephalic primordial dwarfism), but the genetic heterogeneity is probably more extensive. In a research protocol involving autozygome mapping and exome sequencing, we recruited a multiplex consanguineous family who is affected by severe microcephalic primordial dwarfism and tested negative on clinical exome sequencing. Two candidate autozygous intervals were identified, and the second round of exome sequencing revealed a single intronic variant therein (c.2885+8A>G [p.Ser963∗] in RTTN exon 23). RT-PCR confirmed that this change creates a cryptic splice donor and thus causes retention of the intervening 7 bp of the intron and leads to premature truncation. On the basis of this finding, we reanalyzed the exome file of a second consanguineous family affected by a similar phenotype and identified another homozygous change in RTTN as the likely causal mutation. Combined linkage analysis of the two families confirmed that RTTN maps to the only significant linkage peak. Finally, through international collaboration, a Canadian multiplex family affected by microcephalic primordial dwarfism and biallelic mutation of RTTN was identified. Our results expand the phenotype of RTTN-related disorders, hitherto limited to polymicrogyria, to include microcephalic primordial dwarfism with a complex brain phenotype involving simplified gyration. PMID:26608784

  16. Mutations in CDK5RAP2 cause Seckel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Gökhan; Brown, Karen E; Kayserili, Hülya; Pohl, Esther; Caliebe, Almuth; Zahnleiter, Diana; Rosser, Elisabeth; Bögershausen, Nina; Uyguner, Zehra Oya; Altunoglu, Umut; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Rauch, Anita; Li, Yun; Thiel, Christian Thomas; Wollnik, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Seckel syndrome is a heterogeneous, autosomal recessive disorder marked by prenatal proportionate short stature, severe microcephaly, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features. Here, we describe the novel homozygous splice-site mutations c.383+1G>C and c.4005-9A>G in CDK5RAP2 in two consanguineous families with Seckel syndrome. CDK5RAP2 (CEP215) encodes a centrosomal protein which is known to be essential for centrosomal cohesion and proper spindle formation and has been shown to be causally involved in autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. We establish CDK5RAP2 as a disease-causing gene for Seckel syndrome and show that loss of functional CDK5RAP2 leads to severe defects in mitosis and spindle organization, resulting in cells with abnormal nuclei and centrosomal pattern, which underlines the important role of centrosomal and mitotic proteins in the pathogenesis of the disease. Additionally, we present an intriguing case of possible digenic inheritance in Seckel syndrome: A severely affected child of nonconsanguineous German parents was found to carry heterozygous mutations in CDK5RAP2 and CEP152. This finding points toward a potential additive genetic effect of mutations in CDK5RAP2 and CEP152. PMID:26436113

  17. Mutations in CDK5RAP2 cause Seckel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Gökhan; Brown, Karen E; Kayserili, Hülya; Pohl, Esther; Caliebe, Almuth; Zahnleiter, Diana; Rosser, Elisabeth; Bögershausen, Nina; Uyguner, Zehra Oya; Altunoglu, Umut; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Rauch, Anita; Li, Yun; Thiel, Christian Thomas; Wollnik, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Seckel syndrome is a heterogeneous, autosomal recessive disorder marked by prenatal proportionate short stature, severe microcephaly, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features. Here, we describe the novel homozygous splice-site mutations c.383+1G>C and c.4005-9A>G in CDK5RAP2 in two consanguineous families with Seckel syndrome. CDK5RAP2 (CEP215) encodes a centrosomal protein which is known to be essential for centrosomal cohesion and proper spindle formation and has been shown to be causally involved in autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. We establish CDK5RAP2 as a disease-causing gene for Seckel syndrome and show that loss of functional CDK5RAP2 leads to severe defects in mitosis and spindle organization, resulting in cells with abnormal nuclei and centrosomal pattern, which underlines the important role of centrosomal and mitotic proteins in the pathogenesis of the disease. Additionally, we present an intriguing case of possible digenic inheritance in Seckel syndrome: A severely affected child of nonconsanguineous German parents was found to carry heterozygous mutations in CDK5RAP2 and CEP152. This finding points toward a potential additive genetic effect of mutations in CDK5RAP2 and CEP152.

  18. Mutations in CDK5RAP2 cause Seckel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Gökhan; Brown, Karen E; Kayserili, Hülya; Pohl, Esther; Caliebe, Almuth; Zahnleiter, Diana; Rosser, Elisabeth; Bögershausen, Nina; Uyguner, Zehra Oya; Altunoglu, Umut; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Rauch, Anita; Li, Yun; Thiel, Christian Thomas; Wollnik, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Seckel syndrome is a heterogeneous, autosomal recessive disorder marked by prenatal proportionate short stature, severe microcephaly, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features. Here, we describe the novel homozygous splice-site mutations c.383+1G>C and c.4005-9A>G in CDK5RAP2 in two consanguineous families with Seckel syndrome. CDK5RAP2 (CEP215) encodes a centrosomal protein which is known to be essential for centrosomal cohesion and proper spindle formation and has been shown to be causally involved in autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. We establish CDK5RAP2 as a disease-causing gene for Seckel syndrome and show that loss of functional CDK5RAP2 leads to severe defects in mitosis and spindle organization, resulting in cells with abnormal nuclei and centrosomal pattern, which underlines the important role of centrosomal and mitotic proteins in the pathogenesis of the disease. Additionally, we present an intriguing case of possible digenic inheritance in Seckel syndrome: A severely affected child of nonconsanguineous German parents was found to carry heterozygous mutations in CDK5RAP2 and CEP152. This finding points toward a potential additive genetic effect of mutations in CDK5RAP2 and CEP152. PMID:26436113

  19. Bacteremic Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Are Associated With Severe Sepsis at Admission

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Chien; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Hung, Sheng-Che; Wang, Hung-Ping; Huang, Yun-Jhong; Wang, Jann-Tay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical features and treatment outcomes among patients with bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) and non-MDR Enterobacteriaceae and to identify whether MDR pathogens were independently associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation. The clinical data of adult patients visiting and being treated at Chia-Yi Christian Hospital due to bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae from January 2006 to August 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 585 patients were enrolled. Among them, 220 (37.6%) were caused by the MDR Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 206 patients (35.2%) developed severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation. Patients in the MDR group tend to be male and have a past history of gout, recurrent UTI, prior hospitalization, hydronephrosis, renal stone, ureteral stone, indwelling urinary catheter, newly development of renal dysfunction, severe sepsis or septic shock, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, receipt of ineffective empirical therapy, longer hospital stay, and higher in-hospital mortality (2.7% vs 1.9%, P = 0.569). Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, it is revealed that independent predictors associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation were liver cirrhosis (OR 2.868; 95% CI 1.439–5.716; P = 0.003), indwelling urinary catheter (OR 1.936; 95% CI 1.238–3.027; P = 0.004), and MDR Enterobacteriaceae (OR 1.447; 95% CI 1.002–2.090; P = 0.049). Multidrug resistance was associated with the development of severe sepsis or septic shock upon presentation among patients with bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae. Therefore, empirical antibiotics therapy for patients with UTI presented with severe sepsis and/or septic shock should be more broad-spectrum to effectively cover MDR Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27196480

  20. Multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus hominis subsp. novobiosepticus causing septicemia in patients with malignancy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Priyamvada; Ahmed, Nishat Hussain; Biswal, Indu; Grover, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A new subspecies of Staphylococcus hominis described by Kloos et al. in 1998 and named S. hominis subsp. novobiosepticus (SHN) has been implicated in nosocomial outbreaks. Multidrug resistance, including resistance to novobiocin and oxacillin, is a particularly important feature of SHN. In our institute, we encountered 13 cases of S. hominis subsp. hominis in cancer patients with septicemia, of which seven were methicillin resistant. The isolates were identified by VITEK ® 2 compact automated system, using GP REF 21342 identification card and antimicrobial susceptibility testing card P-628. The biochemical reactions and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of the seven methicillin-resistant isolates were re-analyzed and patient details were re-checked to finally identify them as SHN. The increasing number of cases reporting isolation of SHN from biological specimens point to potential virulence and clinical importance of this bacterium.

  1. Mutations in NOTCH1 cause Adams-Oliver syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stittrich, Anna-Barbara; Lehman, Anna; Bodian, Dale L; Ashworth, Justin; Zong, Zheyuan; Li, Hong; Lam, Patricia; Khromykh, Alina; Iyer, Ramaswamy K; Vockley, Joseph G; Baveja, Rajiv; Silva, Ermelinda Santos; Dixon, Joanne; Leon, Eyby L; Solomon, Benjamin D; Glusman, Gustavo; Niederhuber, John E; Roach, Jared C; Patel, Millan S

    2014-09-01

    Notch signaling determines and reinforces cell fate in bilaterally symmetric multicellular eukaryotes. Despite the involvement of Notch in many key developmental systems, human mutations in Notch signaling components have mainly been described in disorders with vascular and bone effects. Here, we report five heterozygous NOTCH1 variants in unrelated individuals with Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS), a rare disease with major features of aplasia cutis of the scalp and terminal transverse limb defects. Using whole-genome sequencing in a cohort of 11 families lacking mutations in the four genes with known roles in AOS pathology (ARHGAP31, RBPJ, DOCK6, and EOGT), we found a heterozygous de novo 85 kb deletion spanning the NOTCH1 5' region and three coding variants (c.1285T>C [p.Cys429Arg], c.4487G>A [p.Cys1496Tyr], and c.5965G>A [p.Asp1989Asn]), two of which are de novo, in four unrelated probands. In a fifth family, we identified a heterozygous canonical splice-site variant (c.743-1 G>T) in an affected father and daughter. These variants were not present in 5,077 in-house control genomes or in public databases. In keeping with the prominent developmental role described for Notch1 in mouse vasculature, we observed cardiac and multiple vascular defects in four of the five families. We propose that the limb and scalp defects might also be due to a vasculopathy in NOTCH1-related AOS. Our results suggest that mutations in NOTCH1 are the most common cause of AOS and add to a growing list of human diseases that have a vascular and/or bony component and are caused by alterations in the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:25132448

  2. Mutations in PTF1A cause pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis.

    PubMed

    Sellick, Gabrielle S; Barker, Karen T; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Fleischmann, Christina; Coleman, Richard J; Garrett, Christine; Gloyn, Anna L; Edghill, Emma L; Hattersley, Andrew T; Wellauer, Peter K; Goodwin, Graham; Houlston, Richard S

    2004-12-01

    Individuals with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus usually present within the first three months of life and require insulin treatment. We recently identified a locus on chromosome 10p13-p12.1 involved in permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus associated with pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis in a genome-wide linkage search of a consanguineous Pakistani family. Here we report the further linkage analysis of this family and a second family of Northern European descent segregating an identical phenotype. Positional cloning identified the mutations 705insG and C886T in the gene PTF1A, encoding pancreas transcription factor 1alpha, as disease-causing sequence changes. Both mutations cause truncation of the expressed PTF1A protein C-terminal to the basic-helix-loop-helix domain. Reporter-gene studies using a minimal PTF1A deletion mutant indicate that the deleted region defines a new domain that is crucial for the function of this protein. PTF1A is known to have a role in mammalian pancreatic development, and the clinical phenotype of the affected individuals implicated the protein as a key regulator of cerebellar neurogenesis. The essential role of PTF1A in normal cerebellar development was confirmed by detailed neuropathological analysis of Ptf1a(-/-) mice. PMID:15543146

  3. Genomic transition of enterococci from gut commensals to leading causes of multidrug-resistant hospital infection in the antibiotic era.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Michael S; Lebreton, Francois; van Schaik, Willem

    2013-02-01

    The enterococci evolved over eons as highly adapted members of gastrointestinal consortia of a wide variety of hosts, but for reasons that are not entirely clear, emerged in the 1970s as leading causes of multidrug resistant hospital infection. Hospital-adapted pathogenic isolates are characterized by the presence of multiple mobile elements conferring antibiotic resistance, as well as pathogenicity islands, capsule loci and other variable traits. Enterococci may have been primed to emerge among the vanguard of antibiotic resistant strains because of their occurrence in the GI tracts of insects and simple organisms living and feeding on organic matter that is colonized by antibiotic resistant, antibiotic producing micro-organisms. In response to the opportunity to inhabit a new niche--the antibiotic treated hospital patient--the enterococcal genome is evolving in a pattern characteristic of other bacteria that have emerged as pathogens because of opportunities stemming from anthropogenic change.

  4. Causes, consequences, and perspectives in the variations of intestinal density of colonization of multidrug-resistant enterobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ruppé, Etienne; Andremont, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is a complex environment that hosts 1013 to 1014 bacteria. Among these bacteria stand multidrug-resistant enterobacteria (MDRE), which intestinal densities can substantially vary, especially according to antibiotic exposure. The intestinal density of MDRE and their relative abundance (i.e., the proportion between the density of MDRE and the density of total enterobacteria) could play a major role in the infection process or patient-to-patient transmission. This review discusses the recent advances in understanding (i) what causes variations in the density or relative abundance of intestinal colonization, (ii) what are the clinical consequences of these variations, and (iii) what are the perspectives for maintaining these markers at low levels. PMID:23755045

  5. RYR1 mutations cause ophthalmoplegia, facial weakness, and malignant hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Shaaban, Sherin; Ramos-Platt, Leigh; Gilles, Floyd H.; Chan, Wai-Man; Andrews, Caroline; De Girolami, Umberto; Demer, Joseph; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the genetic cause of congenital ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, facial paralysis and mild hypotonia segregating in two pedigrees diagnosed with atypical Moebius syndrome or congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM). Methods Homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing were conducted to identify causative mutations in affected family members. Histories, physical examinations, and clinical data were reviewed. Results Missense mutations resulting in two homozygous RYR1 amino acid substitutions (E989G and R3772W) and two compound heterozygous RYR1 substitutions (H283R and R3772W) were identified in a consanguineous and a non-consanguineous pedigree, respectively. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed marked hypoplasia of extraocular muscles and intraorbital cranial nerves. Skeletal muscle biopsies revealed non-specific myopathic changes. Clinically, the patients’ ophthalmoplegia and facial weakness were far more significant than their hypotonia and limb weakness, and were accompanied by an unrecognized susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia. Conclusions Affected children presenting with severe congenital ophthalmoplegia and facial weakness in the setting of only mild skeletal myopathy harbored recessive mutations in RYR1, encoding the ryanodine receptor 1, and were susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. While ophthalmoplegia occurs rarely in RYR1-related myopathies, these children were atypical because they lacked significant weakness, respiratory insufficiency, or scoliosis. Clinical relevance RYR1-associated myopathies should be included in the differential diagnosis of congenital ophthalmoplegia and facial weakness, even without clinical skeletal myopathy. These patients should also be considered susceptible to malignant hyperthermia, a life-threatening anesthetic complication avoidable if anticipated pre-surgically. PMID:24091937

  6. Lethal neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by multi-drug resistant, highly virulent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Dufendach, Kevin R; Wellons, John C; Kuba, Maria G; Nickols, Hilary H; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G; Wynn, James L

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal meningitis is a rare but devastating condition. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria represent a substantial global health risk. This study reports on an aggressive case of lethal neonatal meningitis due to a MDR Escherichia coli (serotype O75:H5:K1). Serotyping, MDR pattern and phylogenetic typing revealed that this strain is an emergent and highly virulent neonatal meningitis E. coli isolate. The isolate was resistant to both ampicillin and gentamicin; antibiotics currently used for empiric neonatal sepsis treatment. The strain was also positive for multiple virulence genes including K1 capsule, fimbrial adhesion fimH, siderophore receptors iroN, fyuA and iutA, secreted autotransporter toxin sat, membrane associated proteases ompA and ompT, type II polysaccharide synthesis genes (kpsMTII) and pathogenicity-associated island (PAI)-associated malX gene. The presence of highly-virulent MDR organisms isolated in neonates underscores the need to implement rapid drug resistance diagnostic methods and should prompt consideration of alternate empiric therapy in neonates with Gram negative meningitis. PMID:27030919

  7. Mutations in POMGNT1 cause non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingchu; Yamada, Takeyuki; Sun, Zixi; Eblimit, Aiden; Lopez, Irma; Wang, Feng; Manya, Hiroshi; Xu, Shan; Zhao, Li; Li, Yumei; Kimchi, Adva; Sharon, Dror; Sui, Ruifang; Endo, Tamao; Koenekoop, Robert K; Chen, Rui

    2016-04-15

    A growing number of human diseases have been linked to defects in protein glycosylation that affects a wide range of organs. Among them, O-mannosylation is an unusual type of protein glycosylation that is largely restricted to the muscular and nerve system. Consistently, mutations in genes involved in the O-mannosylation pathway result in infantile-onset, severe developmental defects involving skeleton muscle, brain and eye, such as the muscle-eye-brain disease (MIM no. 253280). However, the functional importance of O-mannosylation in these tissues at later stages remains largely unknown. In our study, we have identified recessive mutations in POMGNT1, which encodes an essential component in O-mannosylation pathway, in three unrelated families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), but without extraocular involvement. Enzymatic assay of these mutant alleles demonstrate that they greatly reduce the POMGNT1 enzymatic activity and are likely to be hypomorphic. Immunohistochemistry shows that POMGNT1 is specifically expressed in photoreceptor basal body. Taken together, our work identifies a novel disease-causing gene for RP and indicates that proper protein O-mannosylation is not only essential for early organ development, but also important for maintaining survival and function of the highly specialized retinal cells at later stages. PMID:26908613

  8. Courtship Anomalies Caused by Doublesex Mutations in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Villella, A.; Hall, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    The role played by the sex-determining gene doublesex (dsx) and its influence on Drosophila courtship were examined. Against a background of subnormal male-like behavior that is reported to be an attribute of haplo-X flies homozygous for the original dsx mutation, and given that a sex-specific muscle is unaffected by genetic variation at this locus, analyses of several reproductive behaviors and control for genetic background effects indicated that XY dsx mutants are impaired in their willingness to court females. When they did court, certain behavioral actions were normal, including components of courtship song. However, these mutants never produced courtship humming sounds. Mature XY dsx flies elicited anomalously high levels of courtship; that this occurs merely because of a delay in imaginal development was experimentally discounted. The current analysis reconciled two ostensibly conflicting reports involving the courtship-stimulating qualities of this mutant type. Such experiments also uncovered a new behavioral anomaly: dsx mutations caused chromosomal males to court other males at abnormally high levels. These results are discussed from the perspective of doublesex's influence on internal tissues of adult Drosophila involved in the triggering and neural control of male- and female-like elements of courtship, reproductive pheromone production, or a combination of such factors. PMID:8722785

  9. Mutations in 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase cause primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Sandeep; Diggle, Christine P; Carr, Ian M; Fishwick, Colin W G; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Ibrahim, Gamal H; Helliwell, Philip S; Latos-Bieleńska, Anna; Phillips, Simon E V; Markham, Alexander F; Bennett, Christopher P; Bonthron, David T

    2008-06-01

    Digital clubbing, recognized by Hippocrates in the fifth century BC, is the outward hallmark of pulmonary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, a clinical constellation that develops secondary to various acquired diseases, especially intrathoracic neoplasm. The pathogenesis of clubbing and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy has hitherto been poorly understood, but a clinically indistinguishable primary (idiopathic) form of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO) is recognized. This familial disorder can cause diagnostic confusion, as well as significant disability. By autozygosity methods, we mapped PHO to chromosome 4q33-q34 and identified mutations in HPGD, encoding 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, the main enzyme of prostaglandin degradation. Homozygous individuals develop PHO secondary to chronically elevated prostaglandin E(2) levels. Heterozygous relatives also show milder biochemical and clinical manifestations. These findings not only suggest therapies for PHO, but also imply that clubbing secondary to other pathologies may be prostaglandin mediated. Testing for HPGD mutations and biochemical testing for HPGD deficiency in patients with unexplained clubbing might help to obviate extensive searches for occult pathology. PMID:18500342

  10. Disabilities caused by unstable mutations in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Patricia; Morales, Fernando; Castro, Isabel

    2004-09-01

    Motonic dystrophy and fragile X syndrome are two genetically determined relatively common disabilities. Both are examples of a new type of mutation mechanism called unstable or dynamic mutations, triple repeats expansions or DNA amplification. Fragile X syndrome is recognized as the main cause of hereditary mental retardation and myotonic dystrophy is considered the most common muscular dystrophy of adults. This is a prospective non randomized study of clinically affected people, in order to confirm the diagnosis with molecular techniques (Southern blot and PCR) and to perform cascade screening of the rest of the family to offer them adequate genetic counseling. We were able to corroborate the initial diagnosis in most clinical cases of myotonic dystrophy, but in the cases of mental retardation more than half studies were negative for fragile X syndrome, stressing the difficulties encountered by medical practitioners to diagnose this syndrome. The reasons for this are several; probable the main culprit is the subtle and unspecific clinical picture affected individuals exhibit, particularly children before puberty. Cascade screening, genetic counseling and selective abortion are the only tools available to prevent these disabling diseases for the moment. PMID:17361543

  11. Mutations in Fibrillin-1 Cause Congenital Scleroderma: Stiff Skin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Loeys, B.L.; Gerber, E.E.; Riegert-Johnson, D.; Iqbal, S.; Whiteman, P.; McConnell, V.; Chillakuri, C.R.; Macaya, D.; Coucke, P.J.; De Paepe, A.; Judge, D.P.; Wigley, F.; Davis, E.C.; Mardon, H.J.; Handford, P.; Keene, D.R.; Sakai, L.Y.; Dietz, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    The predisposition for scleroderma, defined as fibrosis and hardening of the skin, is poorly understood. We report that stiff skin syndrome (SSS), an autosomal dominant congenital form of scleroderma, is caused by mutations in the sole Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence-encoding domain of fibrillin-1 that mediates integrin binding. Ordered polymers of fibrillin-1 (termed microfibrils) initiate elastic fiber assembly and bind to and regulate the activation of the pro-fibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). Altered cell-matrix interactions in SSS accompany excessive microfibrillar deposition, impaired elastogenesis, and increased TGFβ concentration and signaling in the dermis. The observation of similar findings in systemic sclerosis (SSc), a more common acquired form of scleroderma, suggests broad pathogenic relevance. PMID:20375004

  12. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing and mutational profile for multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis surveillance in Portugal: a 3-year period overview.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carla; Perdigão, João; Jordão, Luísa; Portugal, Isabel

    2014-12-01

    Multidrug tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) cases constitute a serious health problem in Portugal, of which the majority of isolates belong to the Lisboa family and the Q1 cluster, highly related to the Lisboa family. Here we sought to investigate the molecular basis of resistant TB as well as to determine the prevalence of specific drug resistance mutations and their association with MDR-TB and/or XDR-TB. In total, 74 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Lisbon Health Region were genotyped by 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR), and the mutational profile associated with first- and second-line drug resistance was studied. Seven new mutations were found, whilst the remaining 28 mutations had been previously associated with drug resistance. None of the mutations was specifically associated with MDR-TB. The mutational patterns observed among isolates belonging to Lisboa3 and Q1 clusters were also observed in isolates with unique MIRU-VNTR patterns but closely related to these strains. Such data suggest that the genotyping technique employed discriminates isolates with the same mutational profile. To establish the most adequate genotyping technique, the discriminatory power of three different MIRU-VNTR sets was analysed. The 15-loci MIRU-VNTR set showed adequate discriminatory power, comparable with the 24-loci set, allowing clustering of 60% and 86% of the MDR-TB and XDR-TB isolates, respectively, the majority of which belonged to the Lisboa3 and Q1 clusters. From an epidemiological standpoint, this study suggests combined mutational and genotyping analysis as a valuable tool for drug resistance surveillance.

  13. Association between infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria and mortality in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Paramythiotou, Elisabeth; Routsi, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of gram-negative multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens is increasing in hospitals and particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. The clinical consequences of infections caused by MDR pathogens remain controversial. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available data concerning the impact of these infections on mortality in ICU patients. Twenty-four studies, conducted exclusively in ICU patients, were identified through PubMed search over the years 2000-2015. Bloodstream infection was the only infection examined in eight studies, respiratory infections in four and variable infections in others. Comparative data on the appropriateness of empirical antibiotic treatment were provided by only seven studies. In ten studies the presence of antimicrobial resistance was not associated with increased mortality; on the contrary, in other studies a significant impact of antibiotic resistance on mortality was found, though, sometimes, mediated by inappropriate antimicrobial treatment. Therefore, a direct association between infections due to gram-negative MDR bacteria and mortality in ICU patients cannot be confirmed. Sample size, presence of multiple confounders and other methodological issues may influence the results. These data support the need for further studies to elucidate the real impact of infections caused by resistant bacteria in ICU patients. PMID:27152254

  14. Novel mutations in PDE6B causing human retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lu-Lu; Han, Ru-Yi; Yang, Fa-Yu; Yu, Xin-Ping; Xu, Jin-Ling; Min, Qing-Jie; Tian, Jie; Ge, Xiang-Lian; Zheng, Si-Si; Lin, Ye-Wen; Zheng, Yi-Han; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify the genetic defects of a Chinese patient with sporadic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). METHODS Ophthalmologic examinations were performed on the sporadic RP patient, 144 genes associated with retinal diseases were scanned with capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) approach. Two heterozygous mutations in PDE6B were confirmed in the pedigree by Sanger sequencing subsequently. The carrier frequency of PDE6B mutations of reported PDE6B mutations based on the available two public exome databases (1000 Genomes Project and ESP6500 Genomes Project) and one in-house exome database was investigated. RESULTS We identified compound heterozygosity of two novel nonsense mutations c.1133G>A (p.W378X) and c.2395C>T (p.R799X) in PDE6B, one reported causative gene for RP. Neither of the two mutations in our study was presented in three exome databases. Two mutations (p.R74C and p.T604I) in PDE6B have relatively high frequencies in the ESP6500 and in-house databases, respectively, while no common dominant mutation in each of the database or across all databases. CONCLUSION We demonstrates that compound heterozygosity of two novel nonsense mutations in PDE6B could lead to RP. These results collectively point to enormous potential of next-generation sequencing in determining the genetic etiology of RP and how various mutations in PDE6B contribute to the genetic heterogeneity of RP. PMID:27588261

  15. Novel MBTPS2 missense mutation causes a keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans phenotype: mutation update and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Wang, Y; Cheng, R; Ni, C; Liang, J; Li, M; Yao, Z

    2016-10-01

    Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is an X-linked condition characterized by keratotic follicular papules and progressive alopecia, which is caused by mutations in the MBTPS2 gene. We carried out a genetic study on a child who was suspected clinically to have KFSD. Sanger sequencing was performed to detect mutations in the entire coding region of MBTPS2. A novel missense mutation (c.599C>T) was identified in the patient, confirming a diagnosis of KFSD. We reviewed related cases with MBTPS2 mutations for evidence of genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:27663151

  16. Mutations in Citron Kinase Cause Recessive Microlissencephaly with Multinucleated Neurons.

    PubMed

    Harding, Brian N; Moccia, Amanda; Drunat, Séverine; Soukarieh, Omar; Tubeuf, Hélène; Chitty, Lyn S; Verloes, Alain; Gressens, Pierre; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Joriot, Sylvie; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Martins, Alexandra; Passemard, Sandrine; Bielas, Stephanie L

    2016-08-01

    Primary microcephaly is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is caused by a reduction in brain size as a result of defects in the proliferation of neural progenitor cells during development. Mutations in genes encoding proteins that localize to the mitotic spindle and centrosomes have been implicated in the pathogenicity of primary microcephaly. In contrast, the contractile ring and midbody required for cytokinesis, the final stage of mitosis, have not previously been implicated by human genetics in the molecular mechanisms of this phenotype. Citron kinase (CIT) is a multi-domain protein that localizes to the cleavage furrow and midbody of mitotic cells, where it is required for the completion of cytokinesis. Rodent models of Cit deficiency highlighted the role of this gene in neurogenesis and microcephaly over a decade ago. Here, we identify recessively inherited pathogenic variants in CIT as the genetic basis of severe microcephaly and neonatal death. We present postmortem data showing that CIT is critical to building a normally sized human brain. Consistent with cytokinesis defects attributed to CIT, multinucleated neurons were observed throughout the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of an affected proband, expanding our understanding of mechanisms attributed to primary microcephaly. PMID:27453579

  17. Recessive mutations in DGKE cause atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Mathieu; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Schaefer, Franz; Choi, Murim; Tang, Wai Ho; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Fakhouri, Fadi; Taque, Sophie; Nobili, François; Martinez, Frank; Ji, Weizhen; Overton, John D.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Morin, Denis; Deschenes, Georges; Baudouin, Véronique; Llanas, Brigitte; Collard, Laure; Majid, Mohammed A.; Simkova, Eva; Nürnberg, Peter; Rioux-Leclerc, Nathalie; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Gubler, Marie Claire; Hwa, John; Loirat, Chantal; Lifton, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Pathologic thrombosis is a major cause of mortality. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) features episodes of small vessel thrombosis resulting in microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure1. Atypical HUS (aHUS) can result from genetic or autoimmune factors2 that lead to pathologic complement cascade activation3. By exome sequencing we identify recessive mutations in DGKE (diacylglycerol kinase epsilon) that co-segregate with aHUS in 9 unrelated kindreds, defining a distinctive Mendelian disease. Affected patients present with aHUS before age 1, have persistent hypertension, hematuria and proteinuria (sometimes nephrotic range), and develop chronic kidney disease with age. DGKE is found in endothelium, platelets, and podocytes. Arachidonic acid-containing diacylglycerols (DAG) activate protein kinase C, which promotes thrombosis. DGKE normally inactivates DAG signaling. We infer that loss of DGKE function results in a pro-thrombotic state. These findings identify a new mechanism of pathologic thrombosis and kidney failure and have immediate implications for treatment of aHUS patients. PMID:23542698

  18. Conjunctivitis caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates with reduced cephalosporin susceptibility and multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Kitagawa, Yutaka; Maruyama, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sakane, Yuri; Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2013-12-01

    We report two cases of conjunctivitis caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae with reduced cephalosporin susceptibility. Patients showed no response to cefmenoxime eye drops and intravenous ceftriaxone administration. The patients' condition improved after the addition of oral minocycline. The isolates contained the mosaic penA for reduction of β-lactam susceptibility.

  19. Ability of bacteriophage in resolving wound infection caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in uncontrolled diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Shivaswamy, VinodKumar Chickmangalure; Kalasuramath, Suneeta Basavaraj; Sadanand, Chethan Kumar; Basavaraju, Abhishek Kilagere; Ginnavaram, Varsha; Bille, Sumanth; Ukken, Sanjay Saju; Pushparaj, Usha Nandini

    2015-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a substantial nosocomial pathogen, has developed resistance to almost all available antimicrobial drugs. Bacteriophage therapy is a possible alternative treatment for multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections. In this study, we have successfully isolated bacteriophage active against clinical strains of A. baumannii by enrichment from hospital sewage sludge using representatives of those strains. The bacteriophage isolated against A. baumannii formed plaques against beta-lactamases producing strains of A. baumannii. The utility of bacteriophage specific for A. baumannii to resolve wound infection in uncontrolled diabetic rats was evaluated. Five groups of uncontrolled diabetic rats were used. Group I was noninfected (Control), Group II was infected with MDR A. baumannii and challenged with bacteriophage, Group III was infected with MDR A. baumannii, Group IV was infected with MDR A. baumannii and challenged with antibiotic colistin, and Group V consisted of noninfected rats and sprayed with phage (Phage control). A significant decrease in infection, period of epithelization, and wound contraction was observed in the phage-challenged group when compared with antibiotic-treated uncontrolled diabetic rats and the control group. To conclude the study, new insights are provided into the biology of the broad host range of A. baumannii phage, demonstrating that A. baumannii phage has prospects for the treatment of infections caused by the MDR A. baumannii.

  20. Truncating mutations in APP cause a distinct neurological phenotype.

    PubMed

    Klein, Steven; Goldman, Alexander; Lee, Hane; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Bhakta, Viraj; Nelson, Stanley F; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2016-09-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) gene have been implicated in early onset Alzheimer disease. These mutations alter protein structure to favor the pathologic production of Aβ. We report that homozygous nonsense mutations in APP are associated with decreased somatic growth, microcephaly, hypotonia, developmental delay, thinning of the corpus callosum, and seizures. We compare the phenotype of this case to those reported in mouse models and demonstrate multiple similarities, strengthening the role of amyloid precursor protein in normal brain function and development. Ann Neurol 2016;80:456-460. PMID:27422356

  1. Mutations in argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA of Japanese patients, causing classical citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Terazono, Hiroki; Saheki, Takeyori

    1994-12-01

    Citrullinemia is an autosomal recessive disease caused by a genetic deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase. In order to characterize mutations in Japanese patients with classical citrullinemia, RNA isolated from 10 unrelated patients was reverse-transcribed, and cDNA amplified by PCR was cloned and sequenced. The 10 mutations identified included 6 missense mutations (A118T, A192V, R272C, G280R, R304W, and R363L), 2 mutations associated with an absence of an exon 7 or exon 13, 1 mutation with a deletion of the first 7 bp in exon 16 (which might be caused by abnormal splicing), and 1 mutation with an insertion of 37 bp within exons 15 and 16 in cDNA. The insertion mutation and the five missense mutations (R304W being excluded) are new mutations described in the present paper. These are in addition to 14 mutations (9 missense mutations, 4 mutations associated with an absence of an exon in mRNA, and 1 splicing mutation) that we identified previously in mainly American patients with neonatal citrullinemia. Two of these 20 mutations, a deletion of exon 13 sequence and a 7-bp deletion in exon 16, were common to Japanese and American populations from different ethnic backgrounds; however, other mutations were unique to each population. Furthermore, the presence of a frequent mutation - the exon 7 deletion mutation in mRNA, which accounts for 10 of 23 affected alleles - was demonstrated in Japanese citrullinemia. This differs from the situation in the United States, where there was far greater heterogeneity of mutations.

  2. Error-prone polymerase activity causes multinucleotide mutations in humans

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    About 2% of human genetic polymorphisms have been hypothesized to arise via multinucleotide mutations (MNMs), complex events that generate SNPs at multiple sites in a single generation. MNMs have the potential to accelerate the pace at which single genes evolve and to confound studies of demography and selection that assume all SNPs arise independently. In this paper, we examine clustered mutations that are segregating in a set of 1092 human genomes, demonstrating that the signature of MNM becomes enriched as large numbers of individuals are sampled. We estimate the percentage of linked SNP pairs that were generated by simultaneous mutation as a function of the distance between affected sites and show that MNMs exhibit a high percentage of transversions relative to transitions, findings that are reproducible in data from multiple sequencing platforms and cannot be attributed to sequencing error. Among tandem mutations that occur simultaneously at adjacent sites, we find an especially skewed distribution of ancestral and derived alleles, with GC → AA, GA → TT, and their reverse complements making up 27% of the total. These mutations have been previously shown to dominate the spectrum of the error-prone polymerase Pol ζ, suggesting that low-fidelity DNA replication by Pol ζ is at least partly responsible for the MNMs that are segregating in the human population. We develop statistical estimates of MNM prevalence that can be used to correct phylogenetic and population genetic inferences for the presence of complex mutations. PMID:25079859

  3. HPGD mutations cause cranioosteoarthropathy but not autosomal dominant digital clubbing.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Wenke; Beninde, Julia; Hoffmann, Katrin; Lindner, Tom H; Bassir, Christian; Aksu, Fuat; Hübner, Christoph; Verbeek, Nienke E; Mundlos, Stefan; Horn, Denise

    2009-12-01

    Cranio-osteoarthropathy, clinically classified as a variant of primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, is a very rare autosomal-recessive condition characterized by delayed closure of the cranial sutures and fontanels, digital clubbing, arthropathy, and periostosis. Recently, mutations in the gene HPGD, which encodes the NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, were reported in four families affected with primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and one family with autosomal-recessive isolated nail clubbing. We report the clinical and molecular findings in four patients from two families affected with cranio-osteoarthropathy and one family with isolated, autosomal dominant digital clubbing. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping identified a locus for cranio-osteoarthropathy harboring the HPGD gene in one affected family. We detected two novel homozygous mutations in HPGD in these families: a missense mutation affecting the NAD(+) binding motif and a frameshift mutation. The clinical presentation in our patients was variable. Digital clubbing and hyperhidrosis were present in all cases. Delayed closure of the cranial sutures and fontanels, periostosis, and arthropathy were not consistent clinical features. No HPGD mutation was detected in a familial case of autosomal dominant isolated digital clubbing. The failure to identify any mutation in a family with an autosomal dominant type of isolated digital clubbing suggests that HPGD is not the major gene for this condition. PMID:19568269

  4. Separating the roles of acropetal and basipetal auxin transport on gravitropism with mutations in two Arabidopsis multidrug resistance-like ABC transporter genes.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel R; Miller, Nathan D; Splitt, Bessie L; Wu, Guosheng; Spalding, Edgar P

    2007-06-01

    Two Arabidopsis thaliana ABC transporter genes linked to auxin transport by various previous results were studied in a reverse-genetic fashion. Mutations in Multidrug Resistance-Like1 (MDR1) reduced acropetal auxin transport in roots by 80% without affecting basipetal transport. Conversely, mutations in MDR4 blocked 50% of basipetal transport without affecting acropetal transport. Developmental and auxin distribution phenotypes associated with these altered auxin flows were studied with a high-resolution morphometric system and confocal microscopy, respectively. Vertically grown mdr1 roots produced positive and negative curvatures threefold greater than the wild type, possibly due to abnormal auxin distribution observed in the elongation zone. However, upon 90 degrees reorientation, mdr1 gravitropism was inseparable from the wild type. Thus, acropetal auxin transport maintains straight growth but contributes surprisingly little to gravitropism. Conversely, vertically maintained mdr4 roots grew as straight as the wild type, but their gravitropism was enhanced. Upon reorientation, curvature in this mutant developed faster, was distributed more basally, and produced a greater total angle than the wild type. An amplified auxin asymmetry may explain the mdr4 hypertropism. Double mutant analysis indicated that the two auxin transport streams are more independent than interdependent. The hypothesis that flavanols regulate MDR-dependent auxin transport was supported by the epistatic relationship of mdr4 to the tt4 phenylpropanoid pathway mutation.

  5. Separating the Roles of Acropetal and Basipetal Auxin Transport on Gravitropism with Mutations in Two Arabidopsis Multidrug Resistance-Like ABC Transporter Genes[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Daniel R.; Miller, Nathan D.; Splitt, Bessie L.; Wu, Guosheng; Spalding, Edgar P.

    2007-01-01

    Two Arabidopsis thaliana ABC transporter genes linked to auxin transport by various previous results were studied in a reverse-genetic fashion. Mutations in Multidrug Resistance-Like1 (MDR1) reduced acropetal auxin transport in roots by 80% without affecting basipetal transport. Conversely, mutations in MDR4 blocked 50% of basipetal transport without affecting acropetal transport. Developmental and auxin distribution phenotypes associated with these altered auxin flows were studied with a high-resolution morphometric system and confocal microscopy, respectively. Vertically grown mdr1 roots produced positive and negative curvatures threefold greater than the wild type, possibly due to abnormal auxin distribution observed in the elongation zone. However, upon 90° reorientation, mdr1 gravitropism was inseparable from the wild type. Thus, acropetal auxin transport maintains straight growth but contributes surprisingly little to gravitropism. Conversely, vertically maintained mdr4 roots grew as straight as the wild type, but their gravitropism was enhanced. Upon reorientation, curvature in this mutant developed faster, was distributed more basally, and produced a greater total angle than the wild type. An amplified auxin asymmetry may explain the mdr4 hypertropism. Double mutant analysis indicated that the two auxin transport streams are more independent than interdependent. The hypothesis that flavanols regulate MDR-dependent auxin transport was supported by the epistatic relationship of mdr4 to the tt4 phenylpropanoid pathway mutation. PMID:17557805

  6. Mutation at embB Codon 306, a Potential Marker for the Identification of Multidrug Resistance Associated with Ethambutol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Córdoba, Betzaida; Juárez-Eusebio, Dulce María; Almaraz-Velasco, Raquel; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Laniado-Laborin, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Ethambutol inhibits arabinogalactan and lipoarabinomannan biosynthesis in mycobacteria. The occurrence of mutations in embB codon 306 in ethambutol-susceptible isolates and their absence in resistant isolates has raised questions regarding the utility of this codon as a potential marker for resistance against ethambutol. The characterization of mutations on embB 306 will contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to this drug; therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between embB 306 mutations and first-line drug resistance profiles in tuberculosis isolates. We sequenced the region surrounding the embB 306 codon in 175 tuberculosis clinical isolates, divided according to drug sensitivity, in three groups: 110 were resistant to at least one first-line drug, of which 61 were resistant to ethambutol (EMBr), 49 were sensitive to ethambutol (EMBs) but were resistant to another drug, and 65 were pansensitive isolates (Ps). The associations between embB 306 mutations and phenotypic resistance to all first-line drugs were determined, and their validity and safety as a diagnostic marker were assessed. One of the Ps isolates (1/65), one of the EMBs isolates (1/49), and 20 of the EMBr isolates (20/61) presented with an embB 306 mutation. Four different single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at embB 306 were associated with simultaneous resistance to ethambutol, isoniazid, and rifampin (odds ratio [OR], 17.7; confidence interval [CI], 5.6 to 56.1) and showed a positive predictive value of 82%, with a specificity of 97% for diagnosing multidrug resistance associated with ethambutol, indicating its potential as a molecular marker for several drugs. PMID:26124153

  7. Nemaline myopathy caused by mutations in the nebulin gene may present as a distal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Karcagi, Veronika; Pouget, Jean; Franques, Jerôme; Pellissier, Jean François; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; von der Hagen, Maja; Huebner, Angela; Schoser, Benedikt; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2011-08-01

    Mutations in the nebulin gene are the main cause of autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy, with clinical presentations ranging from mild to severe disease. We have previously reported a nonspecific distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene in six Finnish patients from four different families. Here we describe three non-Finnish patients in two unrelated families with distal nemaline myopathy caused by four different compound heterozygous nebulin mutations, only one of which is a missense mutation. One of the mutations has previously been identified in one family with the severe form of nemaline myopathy. We conclude that nemaline myopathy and distal myopathy caused by nebulin mutations form a clinical and histological continuum. Nemaline myopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with an early-onset predominantly distal myopathy. PMID:21724397

  8. cis-Regulatory Mutations Are a Genetic Cause of Human Limb Malformations

    PubMed Central

    VanderMeer, Julia E.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mutations that cause human limb malformations are often difficult to determine, particularly for limb malformations that occur as isolated traits. Evidence from a variety of studies shows that cis-regulatory mutations, specifically in enhancers, can lead to some of these isolated limb malformations. Here, we provide a review of human limb malformations that have been shown to be caused by enhancer mutations and propose that cis-regulatory mutations will continue to be identified as the cause of additional human malformations as our understanding of regulatory sequences improves. PMID:21509892

  9. GIGYF2 mutations are not a frequent cause of familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Di Fonzo, Alessio; Fabrizio, Edito; Thomas, Astrid; Fincati, Emiliana; Marconi, Roberto; Tinazzi, Michele; Breedveld, Guido J; Simons, Erik J; Chien, Hsin F; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Horstink, Martin W; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Borroni, Barbara; Cossu, Giovanni; Dalla Libera, Alessio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Guidi, Marco; De Mari, Michele; Lopiano, Leonardo; Martignoni, Emilia; Marini, Paolo; Onofrj, Marco; Padovani, Alessandro; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Toni, Vincenzo; Sampaio, Cristina; Barbosa, Egberto R; Meco, Giuseppe; Oostra, Ben A; Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2009-11-01

    Mutations in the Grb10-interacting GYF protein 2 (GIGYF2) gene, within the PARK11 locus, have been nominated as a cause of Parkinson's disease in Italian and French populations. By sequencing the whole GIGYF2 coding region in forty-six probands (thirty-seven Italians) with familial Parkinson's disease compatible with an autosomal dominant inheritance, we identified no mutations. Our data add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that GIGYF2 mutations are not a frequent cause of PD.

  10. Mutations in PAX3 that cause Waardenburg syndrome type I: Ten new mutations and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.T.; Hoth, C.F.; Milunsky, A.

    1995-08-28

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, and pigmentary disturbances, and it represents the most common form of inherited deafness in infants. WS type I is characterized by the presence of dystopia canthorum, while individuals with WS type II have normally-located canthi. WS type III is similar to WS type I but is also characterized by musculoskeletal abnormalities. Defects in the PAX3 gene, a transcription factor expressed during embryonic development, have been shown to cause WS types I and III in several families. In contrast, mutations in PAX3 do not cause WS type II, and linkage of the disease to other chromosomal regions has been demonstrated. We describe 10 additional mutations in the PAX3 gene in families with WS type I. Eight of these mutations are in the region of PAX3, where only one mutation has been previously described. These mutations, together with those previously reported, cover essentially the entire PAX3 gene and represent a wide spectrum of mutations that can cause WS type I. Thus far, all but one of the mutations are private; only one mutation has been reported in two apparently unrelated families. Our analysis thus far demonstrates little correlation between genotype and phenotype; deletions of the entire PAX3 gene result in phenotypes indistinguishable from those associated with single-base substitutions in the paired domain or homeodomain of PAX3. Moreover, two similar mutations in close proximity can result in significantly different phenotypes, WS type I in one family and WS type III in another. 47 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Mutations of DEPDC5 cause autosomal dominant focal epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Saeko; Picard, Fabienne; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Noé, Eric; Achaz, Guillaume; Thomas, Pierre; Genton, Pierre; Mundwiller, Emeline; Wolff, Markus; Marescaux, Christian; Miles, Richard; Baulac, Michel; Hirsch, Edouard; Leguern, Eric; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    The main familial focal epilepsies of childhood are autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy, familial temporal lobe epilepsy and familial focal epilepsy with variable foci. A frameshift mutation in the DEPDC5 (DEP domain containing protein 5) gene was identified in a family with focal epilepsy with variable foci, by linkage analysis and exome sequencing. Subsequent pyrosequencing of DEPDC5 in a cohort of 15 additional families with focal epilepsies revealed four nonsense and one missense mutations. Our findings provided evidence for frequent (37%) loss-of-function mutations in DEPDC5 associated with a broad spectrum of focal epilepsies. The implication of a DEP domain (Dishevelled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin domain)-containing protein that may be involved in membrane trafficking and/or G-protein signaling, opens new avenues for research. PMID:23542701

  12. Changing carbapenemase gene pattern in an epidemic multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii lineage causing multiple outbreaks in central Italy

    PubMed Central

    D'Arezzo, Silvia; Principe, Luigi; Capone, Alessandro; Petrosillo, Nicola; Petrucca, Andrea; Visca, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii are a challenging problem worldwide. Here, the molecular epidemiology and the genetic basis of antibiotic resistance in 111 MDR A. baumannii strains isolated from June 2005 to March 2009 from infected patients in 10 intensive care units (ICUs) in central Italy were investigated. Methods Epidemiological typing was performed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA, PCR-based sequence grouping and macrorestriction analysis. MICs of antibiotics were determined by the broth microdilution method. Genes for OXA carbapenemases, metallo-β-lactamases and the CarO porin were searched for by PCR. Results Molecular genotyping identified one predominant A. baumannii lineage, related to the international clonal lineage II, accounting for 95.6% of isolates. Isolates referable to this lineage were recovered from all ICUs surveyed and were resistant to nearly all classes of antimicrobials, with the exception of tigecycline and colistin. A high percentage (60.5%) of A. baumannii isolates showed elevated resistance to imipenem (MICs ≥ 128 mg/L), concomitant with resistance to meropenem. Carbapenem resistance was associated with the presence of either blaOXA-58-like (22.8%) or blaOXA-23-like (71.1%) carbapenemase genes. Molecular typing showed that the epidemic lineage encoding OXA-23 emerged in 2007 and displaced a genetically related clone encoding OXA-58 that had been responsible for previous ICU outbreaks in the same region. Conclusions Emergence of the OXA-23 epidemic lineage could result from selective advantage conferred by the blaOXA-23-like determinant, which provides increased resistance to carbapenems. PMID:21088019

  13. Mutations that Cause Human Disease: A Computational/Experimental Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Beernink, P; Barsky, D; Pesavento, B

    2006-01-11

    International genome sequencing projects have produced billions of nucleotides (letters) of DNA sequence data, including the complete genome sequences of 74 organisms. These genome sequences have created many new scientific opportunities, including the ability to identify sequence variations among individuals within a species. These genetic differences, which are known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are particularly important in understanding the genetic basis for disease susceptibility. Since the report of the complete human genome sequence, over two million human SNPs have been identified, including a large-scale comparison of an entire chromosome from twenty individuals. Of the protein coding SNPs (cSNPs), approximately half leads to a single amino acid change in the encoded protein (non-synonymous coding SNPs). Most of these changes are functionally silent, while the remainder negatively impact the protein and sometimes cause human disease. To date, over 550 SNPs have been found to cause single locus (monogenic) diseases and many others have been associated with polygenic diseases. SNPs have been linked to specific human diseases, including late-onset Parkinson disease, autism, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The ability to predict accurately the effects of these SNPs on protein function would represent a major advance toward understanding these diseases. To date several attempts have been made toward predicting the effects of such mutations. The most successful of these is a computational approach called ''Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant'' (SIFT). This method uses sequence conservation among many similar proteins to predict which residues in a protein are functionally important. However, this method suffers from several limitations. First, a query sequence must have a sufficient number of relatives to infer sequence conservation. Second, this method does not make use of or provide any information on protein structure, which can be used to

  14. Mutation in FAM134B causing severe hereditary sensory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sinead M; Davidson, Gabrielle L; Brandner, Sebastian; Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary M

    2013-01-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are rare inherited neuropathies presenting with sensory loss and complications, including ulcers, infections, osteomyelitis and amputations. Usually, sensory symptoms predominate although motor involvement can occur. Autonomic features may be minimal (then hereditary sensory neuropathy, HSN, is preferred). HSAN has been classified into five subtypes depending on clinical presentation.1 Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy II (HSANII or HSNII) is an early onset, autosomal recessive sensory neuropathy with ulcero-mutilating complications due to mutations in the HSN2 isoform of the WNK1 gene.2 Recently, a similar phenotype was described in a Saudi-Arabian family, and a homozygous nonsense mutation found in a new gene, FAM134B (family with sequence similarity 134, member B), encoding a newly identified Golgi protein. The index case in this family was initially thought to have leprosy. Three additional families (out of 75 patients) with similar phenotypes were found to have homozygous loss of function mutations in FAM134B.3 Here, we report the clinical and pathological findings in a further patient with HSNII due to a homozygous mutation in FAM134B. PMID:21115472

  15. Mosaic Activating Mutations in FGFR1 Cause Encephalocraniocutaneous Lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James T; Tan, Tiong Yang; Alcantara, Diana; Tétrault, Martine; Timms, Andrew E; Jensen, Dana; Collins, Sarah; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J M; Lindhurst, Marjorie J; Christensen, Katherine M; Braddock, Stephen R; Brandling-Bennett, Heather; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Chung, Brian; Lehman, Anna; Su, John; Ng, SuYuen; Amor, David J; Majewski, Jacek; Biesecker, Les G; Boycott, Kym M; Dobyns, William B; O'Driscoll, Mark; Moog, Ute; McDonell, Laura M

    2016-03-01

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a sporadic condition characterized by ocular, cutaneous, and central nervous system anomalies. Key clinical features include a well-demarcated hairless fatty nevus on the scalp, benign ocular tumors, and central nervous system lipomas. Seizures, spasticity, and intellectual disability can be present, although affected individuals without seizures and with normal intellect have also been reported. Given the patchy and asymmetric nature of the malformations, ECCL has been hypothesized to be due to a post-zygotic, mosaic mutation. Despite phenotypic overlap with several other disorders associated with mutations in the RAS-MAPK and PI3K-AKT pathways, the molecular etiology of ECCL remains unknown. Using exome sequencing of DNA from multiple affected tissues from five unrelated individuals with ECCL, we identified two mosaic mutations, c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) and c.1966A>G (p.Lys656Glu) within the tyrosine kinase domain of FGFR1, in two affected individuals each. These two residues are the most commonly mutated residues in FGFR1 in human cancers and are associated primarily with CNS tumors. Targeted resequencing of FGFR1 in multiple tissues from an independent cohort of individuals with ECCL identified one additional individual with a c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) mutation in FGFR1. Functional studies of ECCL fibroblast cell lines show increased levels of phosphorylated FGFRs and phosphorylated FRS2, a direct substrate of FGFR1, as well as constitutive activation of RAS-MAPK signaling. In addition to identifying the molecular etiology of ECCL, our results support the emerging overlap between mosaic developmental disorders and tumorigenesis. PMID:26942290

  16. Mosaic Activating Mutations in FGFR1 Cause Encephalocraniocutaneous Lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, James T.; Tan, Tiong Yang; Alcantara, Diana; Tétrault, Martine; Timms, Andrew E.; Jensen, Dana; Collins, Sarah; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.M.; Lindhurst, Marjorie J.; Christensen, Katherine M.; Braddock, Stephen R.; Brandling-Bennett, Heather; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Chung, Brian; Lehman, Anna; Su, John; Ng, SuYuen; Amor, David J.; Majewski, Jacek; Biesecker, Les G.; Boycott, Kym M.; Dobyns, William B.; O’Driscoll, Mark; Moog, Ute; McDonell, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a sporadic condition characterized by ocular, cutaneous, and central nervous system anomalies. Key clinical features include a well-demarcated hairless fatty nevus on the scalp, benign ocular tumors, and central nervous system lipomas. Seizures, spasticity, and intellectual disability can be present, although affected individuals without seizures and with normal intellect have also been reported. Given the patchy and asymmetric nature of the malformations, ECCL has been hypothesized to be due to a post-zygotic, mosaic mutation. Despite phenotypic overlap with several other disorders associated with mutations in the RAS-MAPK and PI3K-AKT pathways, the molecular etiology of ECCL remains unknown. Using exome sequencing of DNA from multiple affected tissues from five unrelated individuals with ECCL, we identified two mosaic mutations, c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) and c.1966A>G (p.Lys656Glu) within the tyrosine kinase domain of FGFR1, in two affected individuals each. These two residues are the most commonly mutated residues in FGFR1 in human cancers and are associated primarily with CNS tumors. Targeted resequencing of FGFR1 in multiple tissues from an independent cohort of individuals with ECCL identified one additional individual with a c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) mutation in FGFR1. Functional studies of ECCL fibroblast cell lines show increased levels of phosphorylated FGFRs and phosphorylated FRS2, a direct substrate of FGFR1, as well as constitutive activation of RAS-MAPK signaling. In addition to identifying the molecular etiology of ECCL, our results support the emerging overlap between mosaic developmental disorders and tumorigenesis. PMID:26942290

  17. Severe forms of Baraitser–Winter syndrome are caused by ACTB mutations rather than ACTG1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Di Donato, N; Rump, A; Koenig, R; Der Kaloustian, V M; Halal, F; Sonntag, K; Krause, C; Hackmann, K; Hahn, G; Schrock, E; Verloes, A

    2014-01-01

    ACTB and ACTG1 mutations have recently been reported to cause Baraitser–Winter syndrome (BRWS) – a rare condition characterized by ptosis, colobomata, neuronal migration disorder, distinct facial anomalies and intellectual disability. One of the patients carrying an ACTB mutation was previously diagnosed with Fryns–Aftimos syndrome (FAS), which is a rare and severe, multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndrome whose symptoms partially overlap with that of BRWS. However, several patients with Fryns–Aftimos were considered not to fit into the ACTB and ACTG1 spectrum because of their severe impairment and additional malformations. We report on three patients who had been diagnosed with FAS. All three patients carry a mutation in the ACTB gene. On the basis of the ACTB mutations and analysis of the clinical findings, we reclassify the diagnosis of these patients as severe BRWS. We suggest that mutations in ACTB cause a distinctly more severe phenotype than ACTG1 mutations, despite the structural similarity of beta- and gamma-actins and their overlapping expression pattern. We expand the spectrum of BRWS and confirm that FAS is not a separate entity but an early and severe manifestation of BRWS. PMID:23756437

  18. Polyaromatic alkaloids from marine invertebrates as cytotoxic compounds and inhibitors of multidrug resistance caused by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, A. R.; García Grávalos, M. D.; Fernández Puentes, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of several members of the family of lamellarins, polyaromatic alkaloids isolated from tunicates belonging to the genus Didemnum, on the growth of several tumour cell lines and on P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR), were investigated. Cytotoxicity experiments of lamellarins were performed on a panel of tumour cell lines, including two multidrug-resistant cell lines. Some lamellarins showed good anti-tumour activity, with similar levels of cytotoxicity against both the resistant and their corresponding parental cell lines. Two lamellarins displayed a high potency against lung carcinoma cells. Studies of the resistance modifier activity of the different lamellarins at non-toxic concentrations were also carried out in cells exhibiting MDR, and lamellarin I was selected for the highest chemosensitising activity. At non-toxic doses, verapamil and lamellarin I effectively increased the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, vinblastine and daunorubicin in a concentration-dependent manner in multidrug-resistant cells, but the potency of lamellarin I as a MDR modulator was 9- to 16-fold higher than that of verapamil. In vitro measurements of rhodamine 123 accumulation in the multidrug-resistant Lo Vo/Dx cells suggest that lamellarin I reverses MDR by directly inhibiting the P-gp-mediated drug efflux. This work underscores the possibility of using these marine-derived compounds as a potential new source of anti-tumoral drugs active on resistant cells as well as of non-toxic modulators of the MDR phenotype. PMID:8795567

  19. Forty-eight novel mutations causing biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Procter, Melinda; Wolf, Barry; Mao, Rong

    2016-03-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder that results in the inability to recycle the vitamin biotin and is characterized by neurological and cutaneous symptoms. The symptoms can be ameliorated or prevented by administering pharmacological doses of biotin. Since 2008, approximately 300 samples have been submitted to ARUP's Molecular Sequencing Laboratory for biotinidase mutation analysis. Of these, 48 novel alterations in the biotinidase gene have been identified. Correlating the individual's serum enzymatic activity with the genotype, we have been able to determine the effect of the novel alteration on enzyme activity and, thereby, determine its likelihood of being pathogenic in 44 of these individuals. The novel mutations and uncertain alterations have been added to the database established by ARUP (http://arup.utah.edu/database/BTD/BTD_welcome.phps) to help clinicians make decisions about management and to better counsel their patients based on their genotypes. PMID:26810761

  20. ALDH1A3 mutations cause recessive anophthalmia and microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Fares-Taie, Lucas; Gerber, Sylvie; Chassaing, Nicolas; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hanein, Sylvain; Silva, Eduardo; Serey, Margaux; Serre, Valérie; Gérard, Xavier; Baumann, Clarisse; Plessis, Ghislaine; Demeer, Bénédicte; Brétillon, Lionel; Bole, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Calvas, Patrick; Kaplan, Josseline; Ragge, Nicola; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2013-02-01

    Anophthalmia and microphthalmia (A/M) are early-eye-development anomalies resulting in absent or small ocular globes, respectively. A/M anomalies occur in syndromic or nonsyndromic forms. They are genetically heterogeneous, some mutations in some genes being responsible for both anophthalmia and microphthalmia. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping, exome sequencing, and Sanger sequencing, we identified homozygosity for one splice-site and two missense mutations in the gene encoding the A3 isoform of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1A3) in three consanguineous families segregating A/M with occasional orbital cystic, neurological, and cardiac anomalies. ALDH1A3 is a key enzyme in the formation of a retinoic acid gradient along the dorso-ventral axis during early eye development. Transitory expression of mutant ALDH1A3 open reading frames showed that both missense mutations reduce the accumulation of the enzyme, potentially leading to altered retinoic acid synthesis. Although the role of retinoic acid signaling in eye development is well established, our findings provide genetic evidence of a direct link between retinoic-acid-synthesis dysfunction and early-eye-development anomalies in humans.

  1. Milder progressive cerebellar atrophy caused by biallelic SEPSECS mutations.

    PubMed

    Iwama, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Masayuki; Hirabayashi, Shinichi; Ohba, Chihiro; Iwabuchi, Emi; Miyatake, Satoko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Ito, Shuichi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-06-01

    Cerebellar atrophy is recognized in various types of childhood neurological disorders with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Genetic analyses such as whole exome sequencing are useful for elucidating the genetic basis of these conditions. Pathological recessive mutations in Sep (O-phosphoserine) tRNA:Sec (selenocysteine) tRNA synthase (SEPSECS) have been reported in a total of 11 patients with pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2, progressive cerebellocerebral atrophy or progressive encephalopathy, yet detailed clinical features are limited to only four patients. We identified two new families with progressive cerebellar atrophy, and by whole exome sequencing detected biallelic SEPSECS mutations: c.356A>G (p.Asn119Ser) and c.77delG (p.Arg26Profs*42) in family 1, and c.356A>G (p.Asn119Ser) and c.467G>A (p.Arg156Gln) in family 2. Their development was slightly delayed regardless of normal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in infancy. The progression of clinical symptoms in these families is evidently slower than in previously reported cases, and the cerebellar atrophy milder by brain MRI, indicating that SEPSECS mutations are also involved in milder late-onset cerebellar atrophy. PMID:26888482

  2. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy caused by a mutation in the GATOR1 complex gene NPRL3.

    PubMed

    Korenke, Georg-Christoph; Eggert, Marlene; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in NPRL3, one of three genes that encode proteins of the mTORC1-regulating GATOR1 complex, have recently been reported to cause cortical dysplasia with focal epilepsy. We have now analyzed a multiplex epilepsy family by whole exome sequencing and identified a frameshift mutation (NM_001077350.2; c.1522delG; p.E508Rfs*46) within exon 13 of NPRL3. This truncating mutation causes an epilepsy phenotype characterized by early childhood onset of mainly nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The penetrance in our family was low (three affected out of six mutation carriers), compared to families with either ion channel- or DEPDC5-associated familial nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The absence of apparent structural brain abnormalities suggests that mutations in NPRL3 are not necessarily associated with focal cortical dysplasia but might be able to cause epilepsy by different, yet unknown pathomechanisms.

  3. Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta Caused by Missense Mutations in SPARC

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Majewski, Jacek; Tétreault, Martine; Nadaf, Javad; Kannu, Peter; Sochett, Etienne; Howard, Andrew; Stimec, Jennifer; Dupuis, Lucie; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Palomo, Telma; Ouellet, Jean; Al-Jallad, Hadil; Mort, John S.; Moffatt, Pierre; Boudko, Sergei; Bächinger, Hans-Peter; Rauch, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (SPARC) is a glycoprotein that binds to collagen type I and other proteins in the extracellular matrix. Using whole-exome sequencing to identify the molecular defect in two unrelated girls with severe bone fragility and a clinical diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta type IV, we identified two homozygous variants in SPARC (GenBank: NM_003118.3; c.497G>A [p.Arg166His] in individual 1; c.787G>A [p.Glu263Lys] in individual 2). Published modeling and site-directed mutagenesis studies had previously shown that the residues substituted by these mutations form an intramolecular salt bridge in SPARC and are essential for the binding of SPARC to collagen type I. The amount of SPARC secreted by skin fibroblasts was reduced in individual 1 but appeared normal in individual 2. The migration of collagen type I alpha chains produced by these fibroblasts was mildly delayed on SDS-PAGE gel, suggesting some overmodification of collagen during triple helical formation. Pulse-chase experiments showed that collagen type I secretion was mildly delayed in skin fibroblasts from both individuals. Analysis of an iliac bone sample from individual 2 showed that trabecular bone was hypermineralized on the material level. In conclusion, these observations show that homozygous mutations in SPARC can give rise to severe bone fragility in humans. PMID:26027498

  4. Late-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 4F caused by periaxin gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Shoko; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Akiko; Maeda, Kengo; Suzuki, Takashi; Haruki, Hiroyo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Okamoto, Yuji; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    We identified the main features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, type 4F, caused by a periaxin gene (PRX) mutation in Japanese patients. Periaxin is known as one of the key myelination molecules, forming tight junction between myelin loop and axon. We collected 427 DNA samples from individuals with CMT or CMT-related neuropathy, negative for PMP22 duplication. We investigated PRX mutations using a purpose-built resequencing array screen during the period 2006-2012. We detected two types of PRX mutations in three patients; one patient showed a novel homozygous p.D651N mutation and the other two showed homozygous p.R1070X mutation. All PRX mutations reported so far have been of nonsense or frameshift type. In this study, we found homozygous missense mutation p.D651N. Aspartate 651 is located in a repeat domain; its position might indicate an important function. PRX mutations usually lead to early-onset, autosomal-recessive demyelinating CMT neuropathy 4F (CMT4F) or Dejerine-Sottas disease; their clinical phenotypes are severe. In our three patients, the onset of the disease was at the age of 27 years or later, and their clinical phenotypes were milder compared with those reported in previous studies. We showed a variation of clinical phenotypes for CMT4F caused by a novel, nonsense PRX mutation. PMID:22847150

  5. Homozygous missense and nonsense mutations in BMPR1B cause acromesomelic chondrodysplasia-type Grebe.

    PubMed

    Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Deichsel, Alexandra; Wille, Ulrike; Kakar, Naseebullah; Koll, Randi; Bassir, Christian; Ahmad, Jamil; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Mundlos, Stefan; Kubisch, Christian; Borck, Guntram; Klopocki, Eva; Mueller, Thomas D; Doelken, Sandra C; Seemann, Petra

    2014-06-01

    Acromesomelic chondrodysplasias (ACDs) are characterized by disproportionate shortening of the appendicular skeleton, predominantly affecting the middle (forearms and forelegs) and distal segments (hands and feet). Here, we present two consanguineous families with missense (c.157T>C, p.(C53R)) or nonsense (c.657G>A, p.(W219*)) mutations in BMPR1B. Homozygous affected individuals show clinical and radiographic findings consistent with ACD-type Grebe. Functional analysis of the missense mutation C53R revealed that the mutated receptor was partially located at the cell membrane. In contrast to the wild-type receptor, C53R mutation hindered the activation of the receptor by its ligand GDF5, as shown by reporter gene assay. Further, overexpression of the C53R mutation in an in vitro chondrogenesis assay showed no effect on cell differentiation, indicating a loss of function. The nonsense mutation (c.657G>A, p.(W219*)) introduces a premature stop codon, which is predicted to be subject to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, causing reduced protein translation of the mutant allele. A loss-of-function effect of both mutations causing recessive ACD-type Grebe is further supported by the mild brachydactyly or even non-penetrance of these mutations observed in the heterozygous parents. In contrast, dominant-negative BMPR1B mutations described previously are associated with autosomal-dominant brachydactyly-type A2. PMID:24129431

  6. Apolipoprotein AI mutation Arg-60 causes autosomal dominant amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Soutar, A K; Hawkins, P N; Vigushin, D M; Tennent, G A; Booth, S E; Hutton, T; Nguyen, O; Totty, N F; Feest, T G; Hsuan, J J

    1992-01-01

    A mutation in the gene for apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) was identified in an English family with autosomal dominant non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. The plasma of all affected individuals contained a variant apoAI with one additional charge, as well as normal apoAI. The propositus was heterozygous; the coding region of his apoAI gene contained both the normal sequence and a single-base substitution changing the codon for residue 60 of the mature protein from CTG (leucine) to CGG (arginine). Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization showed that the other affected individuals were also heterozygotes and that there was concordance of the mutant allele with the presence of variant plasma apoAI. Amyloid fibrils isolated from the spleen of the propositus consisted of proteins that ran as a doublet with an apparent mass of approximately 10 kDa in SDS/PAGE and a trace band at 28 kDa. Electrospray mass spectrometry of the purified 10-kDa material revealed components with mass corresponding to the N-terminal 88, 92, 93, and 94 residues of apoAI each with substitution of arginine for leucine. These observations were confirmed by direct protein sequencing and laser desorption time-of-flight mass analysis. No material with the normal apoAI sequence was detected. The trace band at 28 kDa yielded the N-terminal sequence of mature apoAI, indicating that intact or minimally degraded apoAI was also present in the fibril preparation. Discovery of this mutation and the detailed characterization of the apoAI fragments that form the amyloid fibrils open additional avenues for investigation of amyloidogenesis. Images PMID:1502149

  7. Nitrative and oxidative DNA damage caused by K-ras mutation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Shiho; Saito, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Noboru; Ma, Ning; Hiraku, Yusuke; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Mutated K-ras in transgenic mice caused nitrative DNA damage, 8-nitroguanine. {yields} The mutagenic 8-nitroguanine seemed to be generated by iNOS via Ras-MAPK signal. {yields} Mutated K-ras produces additional mutagenic lesions, as a new oncogenic role. -- Abstract: Ras mutation is important for carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis consists of multi-step process with mutations in several genes. We investigated the role of DNA damage in carcinogenesis initiated by K-ras mutation, using conditional transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that mutagenic 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) were apparently formed in adenocarcinoma caused by mutated K-ras. 8-Nitroguanine was co-localized with iNOS, eNOS, NF-{kappa}B, IKK, MAPK, MEK, and mutated K-ras, suggesting that oncogenic K-ras causes additional DNA damage via signaling pathway involving these molecules. It is noteworthy that K-ras mutation mediates not only cell over-proliferation but also the accumulation of mutagenic DNA lesions, leading to carcinogenesis.

  8. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain that caused an outbreak in a neurosurgery ward and its aac(6')-Iae gene cassette encoding a novel aminoglycoside acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Jun-ichiro; Asagi, Tsukasa; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Fujino, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Morita, Koji; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi; Kirikae, Teruo

    2005-09-01

    We characterized multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients involved in an outbreak of catheter-associated urinary tract infections that occurred in a neurosurgery ward of a hospital in Sendai, Japan. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of SpeI-, XbaI-, or HpaI-digested genomic DNAs from the isolates revealed that clonal expansion of a P. aeruginosa strain designated IMCJ2.S1 had occurred in the ward. This strain possessed broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and chlorhexidine. Strain IMCJ2.S1 showed a level of resistance to some kinds of disinfectants similar to that of a control strain of P. aeruginosa, ATCC 27853. IMCJ2.S1 contained a novel class 1 integron, In113, in the chromosome but not on a plasmid. In113 contains an array of three gene cassettes of bla(IMP-1), a novel aminoglycoside resistance gene, and the aadA1 gene. The aminoglycoside resistance gene, designated aac(6')-Iae, encoded a 183-amino-acid protein that shared 57.1% identity with AAC(6')-Iq. Recombinant AAC(6')-Iae protein showed aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase activity by thin-layer chromatography. Escherichia coli expressing exogenous aac(6')-Iae showed resistance to amikacin, dibekacin, isepamicin, kanamycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin but not to arbekacin, gentamicins, or streptomycin. Alterations of gyrA and parC at the amino acid sequence level were detected in IMCJ2.S1, suggesting that such mutations confer the resistance to fluoroquinolones observed for this strain. These results indicate that P. aeruginosa IMCJ2.S1 has developed multidrug resistance by acquiring resistance determinants, including a novel member of the aac(6')-I family and mutations in drug resistance genes.

  9. Splicing site mutations in dentin sialophosphoprotein causing dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Holappa, Heidi; Nieminen, Pekka; Tolva, Liisa; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2006-10-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II (OMIM # 125490) is an inherited disorder affecting dentin. Defective dentin formation results in discolored teeth that are prone to attrition and fracture. To date, several mutations have been described in the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene, causing DGI types II and III and dentin dysplasia type II. DSPP encodes two proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Here, we describe a mutational analysis of DSPP in seven Finnish families with DGI type II. We report two mutations and five single nucleotide polymorphisms. In one family we found a mutation that has been described earlier in families with different ethnicity, while in six families we found a novel g.1194C>A (IVS2-3) transversion. Bioinformatic analysis of known DSPP mutations suggests that DGI type II is usually caused by aberration of normal splicing.

  10. Periaxin mutation causes early-onset but slow-progressive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Kijima, Kazuki; Numakura, Chikahiko; Shirahata, Emi; Sawaishi, Yukio; Shimohata, Mitsuteru; Igarashi, Shuichi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2004-01-01

    Periaxin (PRX) plays a significant role in the myelination of the peripheral nerve. To date, seven non-sense or frameshift PRX mutations have been reported in six pedigrees with Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy or severe Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT). We detected a PRX mutation in three patients in the screening of 66 Japanese demyelinating CMT patients who were negative for the gene mutation causing dominant or X-linked demyelinating CMT. Three unrelated patients were homozygous for a novel R1070X mutation and presented early-onset but slowly progressive distal motor and sensory neuropathies. Mutations lacking the carboxyl-terminal acidic domain may show loss-of-function effects and cause severe demyelinating CMT. PMID:15197604

  11. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like Disease Caused by AIMP1/p43 Homozygous Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Feinstein, Miora; Markus, Barak; Noyman, Iris; Shalev, Hannah; Flusser, Hagit; Shelef, Ilan; Liani-Leibson, Keren; Shorer, Zamir; Cohen, Idan; Khateeb, Shareef; Sivan, Sara; Birk, Ohad S.

    2010-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease is an X-linked hypomyelinating leukodystrophy caused by PLP1 mutations. A similar autosomal-recessive phenotype, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease (PMLD), has been shown to be caused by homozygous mutations in GJC2 or HSPD1. We report a consanguineous Israeli Bedouin kindred with clinical and radiological findings compatible with PMLD in which linkage to PLP1, GJC2, and HSPD1 was excluded. Through genome-wide homozygosity mapping and mutation analysis, we demonstrated in all affected individuals a homozygous frameshift mutation that fully abrogates the main active domain of AIMP1, encoding ARS-interacting multifunctional protein 1. The mutation fully segregates with the disease-associated phenotype and was not found in 250 Bedouin controls. Our findings are in line with the previously demonstrated inability of mutant mice lacking the AIMP1/p43 ortholog to maintain axon integrity in the central and peripheral neural system. PMID:21092922

  12. Characterization of mutations causing rifampicin and isoniazid resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Syria.

    PubMed

    Madania, Ammar; Habous, Maya; Zarzour, Hana; Ghoury, Ifad; Hebbo, Barea

    2012-01-01

    In order to characterize mutations causing rifampicin and isoniazid resistance of M. tuberculosis in Syria, 69 rifampicin resistant (Rif(r)) and 72 isoniazid resistant (Inh(r)) isolates were screened for point mutations in hot spots of the rpoB, katG and inhA genes by DNA sequencing and real time PCR. Of 69 Rif(r) isolates, 62 (90%) had mutations in the rifampin resistance determining region (RRDR) of the rpoB gene, with codons 531 (61%), 526 (13%), and 516 (8.7%) being the most commonly mutated. We found two new mutations (Asp516Thr and Ser531Gly) described for the first time in the rpoB-RRDR in association with rifampicin resistance. Only one mutation (Ile572Phe) was found outside the rpoB-RRDR. Of 72 Inh(r) strains, 30 (41.6%) had a mutation in katGcodon315 (with Ser315Thr being the predominant alteration), and 23 (32%) harbored the inhA(-15C-->T) mutation. While the general pattern of rpoB-RRDR and katG mutations reflected those found worldwide, the prevalence of the inhA(-15C-->T mutation was above the value found in most other countries, emphasizing the great importance of testing the inhA(-15C-->T) mutation for prediction of isoniazid resistance in Syria. Sensitivity of a rapid test using real time PCR and 3'-Minor groove binder (MGB) probes in detecting Rif(r) and Inh(r) isolates was 90% and 69.4%, respectively. This demonstrates that a small set of MGB-probes can be used in real time PCR in order to detect most mutations causing resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid.

  13. Mutations in the SPG7 gene cause chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia through disordered mitochondrial DNA maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Gorman, Gráinne S; Griffin, Helen; Kurzawa-Akanbi, Marzena; Blakely, Emma L.; Wilson, Ian; Sitarz, Kamil; Moore, David; Murphy, Julie L.; Alston, Charlotte L.; Pyle, Angela; Coxhead, Jon; Payne, Brendan; Gorrie, George H.; Longman, Cheryl; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; McConville, John; Dick, David; Imam, Ibrahim; Hilton, David; Norwood, Fiona; Baker, Mark R.; Jaiser, Stephan R.; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Farrell, Michael; McCarthy, Allan; Lynch, Timothy; McFarland, Robert; Schaefer, Andrew M.; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Horvath, Rita; Taylor, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite being a canonical presenting feature of mitochondrial disease, the genetic basis of progressive external ophthalmoplegia remains unknown in a large proportion of patients. Here we show that mutations in SPG7 are a novel cause of progressive external ophthalmoplegia associated with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions. After excluding known causes, whole exome sequencing, targeted Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis were used to study 68 adult patients with progressive external ophthalmoplegia either with or without multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. Nine patients (eight probands) were found to carry compound heterozygous SPG7 mutations, including three novel mutations: two missense mutations c.2221G>A; p.(Glu741Lys), c.2224G>A; p.(Asp742Asn), a truncating mutation c.861dupT; p.Asn288*, and seven previously reported mutations. We identified a further six patients with single heterozygous mutations in SPG7, including two further novel mutations: c.184-3C>T (predicted to remove a splice site before exon 2) and c.1067C>T; p.(Thr356Met). The clinical phenotype typically developed in mid-adult life with either progressive external ophthalmoplegia/ptosis and spastic ataxia, or a progressive ataxic disorder. Dysphagia and proximal myopathy were common, but urinary symptoms were rare, despite the spasticity. Functional studies included transcript analysis, proteomics, mitochondrial network analysis, single fibre mitochondrial DNA analysis and deep re-sequencing of mitochondrial DNA. SPG7 mutations caused increased mitochondrial biogenesis in patient muscle, and mitochondrial fusion in patient fibroblasts associated with the clonal expansion of mitochondrial DNA mutations. In conclusion, the SPG7 gene should be screened in patients in whom a disorder of mitochondrial DNA maintenance is suspected when spastic ataxia is prominent. The complex neurological phenotype is likely a result of the clonal

  14. Mutations in repeating structural motifs of tropomyosin cause gain of function in skeletal muscle myopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Marston, Steven; Memo, Massimiliano; Messer, Andrew; Papadaki, Maria; Nowak, Kristen; McNamara, Elyshia; Ong, Royston; El-Mezgueldi, Mohammed; Li, Xiaochuan; Lehman, William

    2013-12-15

    The congenital myopathies include a wide spectrum of clinically, histologically and genetically variable neuromuscular disorders many of which are caused by mutations in genes for sarcomeric proteins. Some congenital myopathy patients have a hypercontractile phenotype. Recent functional studies demonstrated that ACTA1 K326N and TPM2 ΔK7 mutations were associated with hypercontractility that could be explained by increased myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity. A recent structure of the complex of actin and tropomyosin in the relaxed state showed that both these mutations are located in the actin-tropomyosin interface. Tropomyosin is an elongated molecule with a 7-fold repeated motif of around 40 amino acids corresponding to the 7 actin monomers it interacts with. Actin binds to tropomyosin electrostatically at two points, through Asp25 and through a cluster of amino acids that includes Lys326, mutated in the gain-of-function mutation. Asp25 interacts with tropomyosin K6, next to K7 that was mutated in the other gain-of-function mutation. We identified four tropomyosin motifs interacting with Asp25 (K6-K7, K48-K49, R90-R91 and R167-K168) and three E-E/D-K/R motifs interacting with Lys326 (E139, E181 and E218), and we predicted that the known skeletal myopathy mutations ΔK7, ΔK49, R91G, ΔE139, K168E and E181K would cause a gain of function. Tests by an in vitro motility assay confirmed that these mutations increased Ca(2+) sensitivity, while mutations not in these motifs (R167H, R244G) decreased Ca(2+) sensitivity. The work reported here explains the molecular mechanism for 6 out of 49 known disease-causing mutations in the TPM2 and TPM3 genes, derived from structural data of the actin-tropomyosin interface.

  15. Feroniellin A-induced autophagy causes apoptosis in multidrug-resistant human A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kaewpiboon, Chutima; Surapinit, Serm; Malilas, Waraporn; Moon, Jeong; Phuwapraisirisan, Preecha; Tip-Pyang, Santi; Johnston, Randal N; Koh, Sang Seok; Assavalapsakul, Wanchai; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2014-04-01

    During the screening of natural chemicals that can reverse multidrug resistance in human A549 lung cancer cells resistant to etoposide (A549RT-eto), we discovered that Feroniellin A (FERO), a novel furanocoumarin, shows toxicity toward A549RT-eto cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. FERO reduced the expression of NF-κB, leading to downregulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by MDR1, which eventually sensitized A549RT-eto cells to apoptosis. FERO specifically diminished transcription and promoter activity of MDR1 but did not inhibit the expression of other multidrug resistance genes MRP2 and BCRP. Moreover, co-administration of FERO with Bay11-7802, an inhibitor of NF-κB, accelerated apoptosis of A549RT-eto cells through decreased expression of P-gp, indicating that NF-κB is involved in multidrug resistance. Conversely, addition of Z-VAD, a pan-caspase inhibitor, blocked FERO-induced apoptosis in A549RT-eto cells but did not block downregulation of P-gp, indicating that a decrease in P-gp expression is necessary but not sufficient for FERO-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, we found that FERO also induces autophagy, which is characterized by the conversion of LC3 I to LC3 II, induction of GFP-LC3 puncta, enhanced expression of Beclin-1 and ATG5, and inactivation of mTOR. Furthermore, suppression of Beclin-1 by siRNA reduced FERO-induced apoptosis in A549RT-eto cells and activation of autophagy by rapamycin accelerated FERO-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy plays an active role in FERO-induced apoptosis. Herein, we report that FERO reverses multidrug resistance in A549RT-eto cells and exerts its cytotoxic effect by induction of both autophagy and apoptosis, which suggests that FERO can be a useful anticancer drug for multidrug-resistant lung cancer. PMID:24535083

  16. Feroniellin A-induced autophagy causes apoptosis in multidrug-resistant human A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kaewpiboon, Chutima; Surapinit, Serm; Malilas, Waraporn; Moon, Jeong; Phuwapraisirisan, Preecha; Tip-Pyang, Santi; Johnston, Randal N; Koh, Sang Seok; Assavalapsakul, Wanchai; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2014-04-01

    During the screening of natural chemicals that can reverse multidrug resistance in human A549 lung cancer cells resistant to etoposide (A549RT-eto), we discovered that Feroniellin A (FERO), a novel furanocoumarin, shows toxicity toward A549RT-eto cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. FERO reduced the expression of NF-κB, leading to downregulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by MDR1, which eventually sensitized A549RT-eto cells to apoptosis. FERO specifically diminished transcription and promoter activity of MDR1 but did not inhibit the expression of other multidrug resistance genes MRP2 and BCRP. Moreover, co-administration of FERO with Bay11-7802, an inhibitor of NF-κB, accelerated apoptosis of A549RT-eto cells through decreased expression of P-gp, indicating that NF-κB is involved in multidrug resistance. Conversely, addition of Z-VAD, a pan-caspase inhibitor, blocked FERO-induced apoptosis in A549RT-eto cells but did not block downregulation of P-gp, indicating that a decrease in P-gp expression is necessary but not sufficient for FERO-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, we found that FERO also induces autophagy, which is characterized by the conversion of LC3 I to LC3 II, induction of GFP-LC3 puncta, enhanced expression of Beclin-1 and ATG5, and inactivation of mTOR. Furthermore, suppression of Beclin-1 by siRNA reduced FERO-induced apoptosis in A549RT-eto cells and activation of autophagy by rapamycin accelerated FERO-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy plays an active role in FERO-induced apoptosis. Herein, we report that FERO reverses multidrug resistance in A549RT-eto cells and exerts its cytotoxic effect by induction of both autophagy and apoptosis, which suggests that FERO can be a useful anticancer drug for multidrug-resistant lung cancer.

  17. The C342R mutation in FGFR2 causes Crouzon syndrome with elbow deformity.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ronghu; Yang, Xianxian; Tianyi, Cai; Ge, Min; Lei, Jiaqi; Mu, Xiongzheng

    2015-03-01

    Crouzon syndrome is an autosomal dominant craniosynostosis syndrome caused by mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR-2). Numerous findings from animal studies imply a critical role for FGFRs in the regulation of skeletal development. Here, we report 2 unrelated patients with Crouzon syndrome accompanied by elbow deformity. Subsequently, we analyzed the sequence of the FGFR2 gene and found that both of the patients carried the Cys342Arg mutation. The findings suggest that the C342R mutation in FGFR2 may cause Crouzon syndrome and elbow deformity in Chinese patients. PMID:25759925

  18. Tay-Sachs disease-causing mutations and neutral polymorphisms in the Hex A gene.

    PubMed

    Myerowitz, R

    1997-01-01

    Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the central nervous system. The disorder results from mutations in the gene encoding the alpha-subunit of beta-hexosaminidase A, a lysosomal enzyme composed of alpha and beta polypeptides. Seventy-eight mutations in the Hex A gene have been described and include 65 single base substitutions, one large and 10 small deletions, and two small insertions. Because these mutations cripple the catalytic activity of beta-hexosaminidase to varying degrees, Tay-Sachs disease displays clinical heterogeneity. Forty-five of the single base substitutions cause missense mutations; 39 of these are disease causing, three are benign but cause a change in phenotype, and three are neutral polymorphisms. Six nonsense mutations and 14 splice site lesions result from single base substitutions, and all but one of the splice site lesions cause a severe form of Tay-Sachs disease. Eight frameshift mutations arise from six deletion- and two insertion-type lesions. One of these insertions, consisting of four bases within exon 11, is found in 80% of the carriers of Tay-Sachs disease from the Ashkenazi Jewish population, an ethnic group that has a 10-fold higher gene frequency for a severe form of the disorder than the general population. A very large deletion, 7.5 kilobases, including all of exon 1 and portions of DNA upstream and downstream from that exon, is the major mutation found in Tay-Sachs disease carriers from the French Canadian population, a geographic isolate displaying an elevated carrier frequency. Most of the other mutations are confined to single pedigrees. Identification of these mutations has permitted more accurate carrier information, prenatal diagnosis, and disease prognosis. In conjunction with a precise tertiary structure of the enzyme, these mutations could be used to gain insight into the structure-function relationships of the lysosomal enzyme.

  19. Absence of heartbeat in the Xenopus tropicalis mutation muzak is caused by a nonsense mutation in cardiac myosin myh6

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Daya, Anita; Sater, Amy K.; Wells, Dan E.; Mohun, Timothy J.; Zimmerman, Lyle B.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms coupling heart function and cardiac morphogenesis can be accessed in lower vertebrate embryos that can survive to swimming tadpole stages on diffused oxygen. Forward genetic screens in Xenopus tropicalis have identified more than 80 mutations affecting diverse developmental processes, including cardiac morphogenesis and function. In the first positional cloning of a mutation in X. tropicalis, we show that non-contractile hearts in muzak (muz) embryos are caused by a premature stop codon in the cardiac myosin heavy chain gene myh6. The mutation deletes the coiled-coil domain responsible for polymerization into thick filaments, severely disrupting the cardiomyocyte cytoskeleton. Despite the lack of contractile activity and absence of a major structural protein, early stages of cardiac morphogenesis including looping and chamber formation are grossly normal. Muz hearts subsequently develop dilated chambers with compressed endocardium and fail to form identifiable cardiac valves and trabeculae. PMID:19769958

  20. Mutations in Ehrlichia chaffeensis Causing Polar Effects in Gene Expression and Differential Host Specificities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuanmin; Nair, Arathy D S; Jaworski, Deborah C; Ganta, Roman R

    2015-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis, a tick-borne rickettsial, is responsible for human monocytic ehrlichiosis. In this study, we assessed E. chaffeensis insertion mutations impacting the transcription of genes near the insertion sites. We presented evidence that the mutations within the E. chaffeensis genome at four genomic locations cause polar effects in altering gene expressions. We also reported mutations causing attenuated growth in deer (the pathogen's reservoir host) and in dog (an incidental host), but not in its tick vector, Amblyomma americanum. This is the first study documenting insertion mutations in E. chaffeensis that cause polar effects in altering gene expression from the genes located upstream and downstream to insertion sites and the differential requirements of functionally active genes of the pathogen for its persistence in vertebrate and tick hosts. This study is important in furthering our knowledge on E. chaffeensis pathogenesis. PMID:26186429

  1. Structural Basis of Disease-Causing Mutations in Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1β†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Peng; Rha, Geun Bae; Chi, Young-In

    2008-01-01

    HNF1β is an atypical POU transcription factor that participates in a hierarchical network of transcription factors controlling the development and proper function of vital organs such as liver, pancreas, and kidney. Many inheritable mutations on HNF1β are the monogenic causes of diabetes and several kidney diseases. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of its function and the structural basis of mutations, we have determined the crystal structure of human HNF1β DNA binding domain in complex with a high-affinity promoter. Disease-causing mutations have been mapped to our structure, and their predicted effects have been tested by a set of biochemical/ functional studies. These findings together with earlier findings with a homologous protein HNF1α, help us to understand the structural basis of promoter recognition by these atypical POU transcription factors and the site-specific functional disruption by disease-causing mutations. PMID:17924661

  2. Fifteen novel FBN1 mutations causing Marfan syndrome detected by heteroduplex analysis of genomic amplicons.

    PubMed Central

    Nijbroek, G; Sood, S; McIntosh, I; Francomano, C A; Bull, E; Pereira, L; Ramirez, F; Pyeritz, R E; Dietz, H C

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1), a component of the extracellular microfibril, cause the Marfan syndrome (MFS). This statement is supported by the observations that the classic Marfan phenotype cosegregates with intragenic and/or flanking marker alleles in all families tested and that a significant number of FBN1 mutations have been identified in affected individuals. We have now devised a method to screen the entire coding sequence and flanking splice junctions of FBN1. On completion for a panel of nine probands with classic MFS, six new mutations were identified that accounted for disease in seven (78%) of nine patients. Nine additional new mutations have been characterized in the early stages of a larger screening project. These 15 mutations were equally distributed throughout the gene and, with one exception, were specific to single families. One-third of mutations created premature termination codons, and 6 of 15 substituted residues with putative significance for calcium binding to epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. Mutations causing severe and rapidly progressive disease that presents in the neonatal period can occur in a larger region of the gene than previously demonstrated, and the nature of the mutation is as important a determinant as its location, in predisposing to this phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7611299

  3. Sun exposure causes somatic second-hit mutations and angiofibroma development in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Tyburczy, Magdalena E; Wang, Ji-An; Li, Shaowei; Thangapazham, Rajesh; Chekaluk, Yvonne; Moss, Joel; Kwiatkowski, David J; Darling, Thomas N

    2014-04-15

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is characterized by the formation of tumors in multiple organs and is caused by germline mutation in one of two tumor suppressor genes, TSC1 and TSC2. As for other tumor suppressor gene syndromes, the mechanism of somatic second-hit events in TSC tumors is unknown. We grew fibroblast-like cells from 29 TSC skin tumors from 22 TSC subjects and identified germline and second-hit mutations in TSC1/TSC2 using next-generation sequencing. Eighteen of 22 (82%) subjects had a mutation identified, and 8 of the 18 (44%) subjects were mosaic with mutant allele frequencies of 0 to 19% in normal tissue DNA. Multiple tumors were available from four patients, and in each case, second-hit mutations in TSC2 were distinct indicating they arose independently. Most remarkably, 7 (50%) of the 14 somatic point mutations were CC>TT ultraviolet 'signature' mutations, never seen as a TSC germline mutation. These occurred exclusively in facial angiofibroma tumors from sun-exposed sites. These results implicate UV-induced DNA damage as a cause of second-hit mutations and development of TSC facial angiofibromas and suggest that measures to limit UV exposure in TSC children and adults should reduce the frequency and severity of these lesions.

  4. GNA14 Somatic Mutation Causes Congenital and Sporadic Vascular Tumors by MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young H; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; Qiu, Jingyao; Straub, Robert; Bruckner, Anna; Bercovitch, Lionel; Narayan, Deepak; McNiff, Jennifer; Ko, Christine; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Antaya, Richard; Halaban, Ruth; Choate, Keith A

    2016-08-01

    Vascular tumors are among the most common neoplasms in infants and children; 5%-10% of newborns present with or develop lesions within the first 3 months of life. Most are benign infantile hemangiomas that typically regress by 5 years of age; other vascular tumors include congenital tufted angiomas (TAs), kaposiform hemangioendotheliomas (KHEs), and childhood lobular capillary hemangiomas (LCHs). Some of these lesions can become locally invasive and unresponsive to pharmacologic intervention, leading to significant complications. Recent investigation has revealed that activating mutations in HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, GNAQ, and GNA11 can cause certain types of rare childhood vascular tumors, and we have now identified causal recurrent somatic activating mutations in GNA14 by whole-exome and targeted sequencing. We found somatic activating GNA14 c.614A>T (p.Gln205Leu) mutations in one KHE, one TA, and one LCH and a GNA11 c.547C>T (p.Arg183Cys) mutation in two LCH lesions. We examined mutation pathobiology via expression of mutant GNA14 or GNA11 in primary human endothelial cells and melanocytes. GNA14 and GNA11 mutations induced changes in cellular morphology and rendered cells growth-factor independent by upregulating the MAPK pathway. Our findings identify GNA14 mutations as a cause of childhood vascular tumors, offer insight into mechanisms of oncogenic transformation by mutations affecting Gaq family members, and identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27476652

  5. Mutations in acid [beta]-galactosidase cause GM[sub 1]-gangliosidosis in American patients

    SciTech Connect

    Boustany, R.M.; Qian, W.H. ); Suzuki, K. )

    1993-10-01

    The authors describe four new mutations in the [beta]-galactosidase gene. These are the first mutations causing infantile and juvenile GM[sub 1]-gangliosidosis to be described in American patients. Cell lines from two patients with juvenile and from six patients with infantile GM[sub 1]-gangliosidosis were analyzed. Northern blot analysis showed the acid [beta]-galactosidase message to be of normal size and quantity in two juvenile and four infantile cases and of normal size but reduced quantity in two infantile cases. The mutations are distinct from the Japanese mutations. All are point mutations leading to amino acid substitutions: Lys[sup 577] [yields] Arg, Arg[sup 590] [yields] His, and Glu[sup 632] [yields] Gly. The fourth mutation, Arg[sup 208] [yields] Cys, accounts for 10 of 16 possible alleles. Two infantile cases from Puerto Rico of Spanish ancestry are homozygous for this mutation, suggesting that this allele may have come to South America and North America via Puerto Rico. That these mutations cause clinical disease was confirmed by marked reduction in catalytic activity of the mutant proteins in the Cos-1 cell expression system. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Recurring dominant-negative mutations in the AVP-NPII gene cause neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Repaske, D.R.; Phillips, J.A.; Krishnamani, M.R.S.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a familial form of arginine vasopressin (or antidiuretic hormone) deficiency that is usually manifest in early childhood with polyuria, polydipsia and an antidiuretic response to exogenous vasopressin or its analogs. The phenotype is postulated to arise from gliosis and depletion of the magnocellular neurons that produce vasopressin in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. ADNDI is caused by heterozygosity for a variety of mutations in the AVP-NPII gene which encodes vasopressin, its carrier protein (NPII) and a glycoprotein (copeptin) of unknown function. These mutations include: (1) Ala 19{r_arrow}Thr (G279A) in AVP`s signal peptide, (2) Gly 17{r_arrow}Val (G1740T), (3) Pro 24{r_arrow}Leu (C1761T), (4) Gly 57{r_arrow}Ser (G1859A) and (5) del Glu 47({delta}AGG 1824-26), all of which occur in NPII. In characterizing the AVP-NPII mutations in five non-related ADNDI kindreds, we have detected two kindreds having mutation 1 (G279A), two having mutation 3 (C1761T) and one having mutation 4 (G1859A) without any other allelic changes being detected. Two of these recurring mutations (G279A and G1859A) are transitions that occur at CpG dinucleotides while the third (C1761T) does not. Interestingly, families with the same mutations differed in their ethnicity or in their affected AVP-NPII allele`s associated haplotype of closely linked DNA polymorphisms. Our data indicated that at least three of five known AVP-NPII mutations causing ADNDI tend to recur but the mechanisms by which these dominant-negative mutations cause variable or progressive expression of the ADNDI phenotype remain unclear.

  7. Mutation of ATF6 causes autosomal recessive achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Muhammad; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saqib, Muhammad Arif Nadeem; Zulfiqar, Fareeha; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ashraf, Naeem Mahmood; Ullah, Ehsan; Wang, Xin; Sajid, Sundus; Khan, Falak Sher; Amin-ud-Din, Muhammad; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Hameed, Abdul; Riazuddin, Saima; Ahmed, Zubair M; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-09-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is an early-onset retinal dystrophy characterized by photophobia, nystagmus, color blindness and severely reduced visual acuity. Currently mutations in five genes CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2, PDE6C and PDE6H have been implicated in ACHM. We performed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis in a consanguineous Pakistani ACHM family and mapped the locus to a 15.12-Mb region on chromosome 1q23.1-q24.3 with a maximum LOD score of 3.6. A DNA sample from an affected family member underwent exome sequencing. Within the ATF6 gene, a single-base insertion variant c.355_356dupG (p.Glu119Glyfs*8) was identified, which completely segregates with the ACHM phenotype within the family. The frameshift variant was absent in public variant databases, in 130 exomes from unrelated Pakistani individuals, and in 235 ethnically matched controls. The variant is predicted to result in a truncated protein that lacks the DNA binding and transmembrane domains and therefore affects the function of ATF6 as a transcription factor that initiates the unfolded protein response during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Immunolabeling with anti-ATF6 antibodies showed localization throughout the mouse neuronal retina, including retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptor cells, inner nuclear layer, inner and outer plexiform layers, with a more prominent signal in retinal ganglion cells. In contrast to cytoplasmic expression of wild-type protein, in heterologous cells ATF6 protein with the p.Glu119Glyfs*8 variant is mainly confined to the nucleus. Our results imply that response to ER stress as mediated by the ATF6 pathway is essential for color vision in humans. PMID:26063662

  8. Mutation of Elfn1 in Mice Causes Seizures and Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Jackie; Mitchell, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of proteins with extracellular leucine-rich repeats (eLRRs) have been implicated in directing neuronal connectivity. We previously identified a novel family of eLRR proteins in mammals: the Elfns are transmembrane proteins with 6 LRRs, a fibronectin type-3 domain and a long cytoplasmic tail. The recent discovery that Elfn1 protein, expressed postsynaptically, can direct the elaboration of specific electrochemical properties of synapses between particular cell types in the hippocampus strongly reinforces this hypothesis. Here, we present analyses of an Elfn1 mutant mouse line and demonstrate a functional requirement for this gene in vivo. We first carried out detailed expression analysis of Elfn1 using a β-galactosidase reporter gene in the knockout line. Elfn1 is expressed in distinct subsets of interneurons of the hippocampus and cortex, and also in discrete subsets of cells in the habenula, septum, globus pallidus, dorsal subiculum, amygdala and several other regions. Elfn1 is expressed in diverse cell types, including local GABAergic interneurons as well as long-range projecting GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. Elfn1 protein localises to axons of excitatory neurons in the habenula, and long-range GABAergic neurons of the globus pallidus, suggesting the possibility of additional roles for Elfn1 in axons or presynaptically. While gross anatomical analyses did not reveal any obvious neuroanatomical abnormalities, behavioural analyses clearly illustrate functional effects of Elfn1 mutation. Elfn1 mutant mice exhibit seizures, subtle motor abnormalities, reduced thigmotaxis and hyperactivity. The hyperactivity is paradoxically reversible by treatment with the stimulant amphetamine, consistent with phenotypes observed in animals with habenular lesions. These analyses reveal a requirement for Elfn1 in brain function and are suggestive of possible relevance to the etiology and pathophysiology of epilepsy and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

  9. Nature and frequency of mutations in the argininosuccinate synthetase gene that cause classical citrullinemia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Kakinoki, H; Fukushige, T; Shaheen, N; Terazono, H; Saheki, T

    1995-10-01

    Citrullinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a genetic deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). So far 20 mutations in ASS mRNA have been identified in human classical citrullinemia, including 14 single base changes causing missense mutations in the coding sequence of the enzyme, 4 mutations associated with an absence of exons 5, 6, 7, or 13 in mRNA, 1 mutation with a deletion of the first 7 bases in exon 16 (which is caused by abnormal splicing), and 1 mutation with an insertion of 37 bases between the exon 15 and 16 regions in mRNA. In order to identify the abnormality in the ASS gene causing the exon 7 and 13 deletion mutations and the 37-base insertion mutation between exons 15 and 16 in mRNA, and to establish a DNA diagnostic test, we isolated and sequenced the genomic DNA surrounding each exon. The absence of exon 7 or 13 in ASS mRNA resulted from abnormal splicing caused by a single base change in the intron region: IVS-6(-2) (a transition of A to G at the second nucleotide position within the 3' splice cleavage site of intron 6) and IVS-13(+5) (a transition of G to A at the fifth nucleotide position within the 5' splice cleavage site of intron 13), respectively. The IVS-6(-2) mutation resulted in the creation of an MspI restriction site. DNA diagnostic analysis of 33 Japanese alleles with classical citrullinemia showed that 19 alleles had the IVS-6(-2) mutation (over 50% of the mutated alleles in Japanese patients). It was thus confirmed that one mutation is predominant in Japan. This differs from the situation in the USA where there is far greater heterogeneity. The insertion mutation in mRNA on the other hand resulted from abnormal splicing caused by a 13-bp deletion at the splice-junction between exon 15 and intron 15. The deletion had a short direct repeat (CTCAGG) at the breakpoint junction and presumably resulted from slipped mispairing. PMID:7557970

  10. A novel missense mutation in the connexin30 causes nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Hung; Liu, Yu-Fan; Su, Ching-Chyuan; Su, Mao-Chang; Li, Shuan-Yow; Yang, Jiann-Jou

    2011-01-01

    Dysfunctional gap junctions caused by GJB2 (CX26) and GJB6 (CX30) mutations are implicated in nearly half of nonsyndromic hearing loss cases. A recent study identified a heterozygous mutation, c.119C>T (p.A40V), in the GJB6 gene of patients with nonsyndromic hearing loss. However, the functional role of the mutation in hearing loss remains unclear. In this study, analyses of cell biology indicated that a p.A40V missense mutation of CX30 causes CX30 protein accumulation in the Golgi body rather than in the cytoplasmic membrane. The tet-on protein expression system was used for further study of mutant proteins in CX30 and CX30A40V co-expressions and in CX26 and CX30A40V co-expressions. The p.A40V missense mutation exerted a dominant negative effect on both normal CX30 and CX26, which impaired gap junction formation. Moreover, computer-assisted modeling suggested that this p.A40V mutation affects the intra molecular interaction in the hydrophobic core of Trp44, which significantly alters the efficiency of gap junction formation. These findings suggest that the p.A40V mutation in CX30 causes autosomal-dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss. These data provide a novel molecular explanation for the role of GJB6 in hearing loss.

  11. Functional Characterization of PRKAR1A Mutations Reveals a Unique Molecular Mechanism Causing Acrodysostosis but Multiple Mechanisms Causing Carney Complex.

    PubMed

    Rhayem, Yara; Le Stunff, Catherine; Abdel Khalek, Waed; Auzan, Colette; Bertherat, Jerome; Linglart, Agnès; Couvineau, Alain; Silve, Caroline; Clauser, Eric

    2015-11-13

    The main target of cAMP is PKA, the main regulatory subunit of which (PRKAR1A) presents mutations in two genetic disorders: acrodysostosis and Carney complex. In addition to the initial recurrent mutation (R368X) of the PRKAR1A gene, several missense and nonsense mutations have been observed recently in acrodysostosis with hormonal resistance. These mutations are located in one of the two cAMP-binding domains of the protein, and their functional characterization is presented here. Expression of each of the PRKAR1A mutants results in a reduction of forskolin-induced PKA activation (measured by a reporter assay) and an impaired ability of cAMP to dissociate PRKAR1A from the catalytic PKA subunits by BRET assay. Modeling studies and sensitivity to cAMP analogs specific for domain A (8-piperidinoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate) or domain B (8-(6-aminohexyl)aminoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate) indicate that the mutations impair cAMP binding locally in the domain containing the mutation. Interestingly, two of these mutations affect amino acids for which alternative amino acid substitutions have been reported to cause the Carney complex phenotype. To decipher the molecular mechanism through which homologous substitutions can produce such strikingly different clinical phenotypes, we studied these mutations using the same approaches. Interestingly, the Carney mutants also demonstrated resistance to cAMP, but they expressed additional functional defects, including accelerated PRKAR1A protein degradation. These data demonstrate that a cAMP binding defect is the common molecular mechanism for resistance of PKA activation in acrodysosotosis and that several distinct mechanisms lead to constitutive PKA activation in Carney complex. PMID:26405036

  12. Recessive mutations in a distal PTF1A enhancer cause isolated pancreatic agenesis.

    PubMed

    Weedon, Michael N; Cebola, Inês; Patch, Ann-Marie; Flanagan, Sarah E; De Franco, Elisa; Caswell, Richard; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Cho, Candy H-H; Lango Allen, Hana; Houghton, Jayne A L; Roth, Christian L; Chen, Rongrong; Hussain, Khalid; Marsh, Phil; Vallier, Ludovic; Murray, Anna; Ellard, Sian; Ferrer, Jorge; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of cis-regulatory mutations to human disease remains poorly understood. Whole-genome sequencing can identify all noncoding variants, yet the discrimination of causal regulatory mutations represents a formidable challenge. We used epigenomic annotation in human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitor cells to guide the interpretation of whole-genome sequences from individuals with isolated pancreatic agenesis. This analysis uncovered six different recessive mutations in a previously uncharacterized ~400-bp sequence located 25 kb downstream of PTF1A (encoding pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a) in ten families with pancreatic agenesis. We show that this region acts as a developmental enhancer of PTF1A and that the mutations abolish enhancer activity. These mutations are the most common cause of isolated pancreatic agenesis. Integrating genome sequencing and epigenomic annotation in a disease-relevant cell type can thus uncover new noncoding elements underlying human development and disease. PMID:24212882

  13. Recessive mutations in a distal PTF1A enhancer cause isolated pancreatic agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Sarah E.; De Franco, Elisa; Caswell, Richard; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A.; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Cho, Candy H-H.; Allen, Hana Lango; Houghton, Jayne AL.; Roth, Christian L.; Chen, Rongrong; Hussain, Khalid; Marsh, Phil; Vallier, Ludovic; Murray, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of cis-regulatory mutations to human disease remains poorly understood. Whole genome sequencing can identify all non-coding variants, yet discrimination of causal regulatory mutations represents a formidable challenge. We used epigenomic annotation in hESC-derived embryonic pancreatic progenitor cells to guide the interpretation of whole genome sequences from patients with isolated pancreatic agenesis. This uncovered six different recessive mutations in a previously uncharacterized ~400bp sequence located 25kb downstream of PTF1A (pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a) in ten families with pancreatic agenesis. We show that this region acts as a developmental enhancer of PTF1A and that the mutations abolish enhancer activity. These mutations are the most common cause of isolated pancreatic agenesis. Integrating genome sequencing and epigenomic annotation in a disease-relevant cell type can uncover novel non-coding elements underlying human development and disease. PMID:24212882

  14. In silico investigation of molecular effects caused by missense mutations in creatine transporter protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Schwatz, Charles; Alexov, Emil

    2011-03-01

    Creatine transporter (CT) protein, which is encoded by SLC6A8 gene, is essential for taking up the creatine in the cell, which in turn plays a key role in the spatial and temporal maintenance of energy in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. It was shown that some missense mutations in CT cause mental retardation, while others are harmless non-synonymous single nucleoside polymorphism (nsSNP). Currently fifteen missense mutations in CT are known, among which twelve are disease-causing. Sequence analysis reveals that there is no clear trend distinguishing disease-causing from harmless missense mutations. Because of that, we built 3D model of the CT using highly homologous template and use the model to investigate the effects of mutations of CT stability and hydrogen bond network. It is demonstrated that disease-causing mutations affect the folding free energy and ionization states of titratable group in much greater extend as compared with harmless mutations. Supported by grants from NLM, NIH, grant numbers 1R03LM009748 and 1R03LM009748-S1.

  15. Mutations in Twinkle primase-helicase cause Perrault syndrome with neurologic features

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Yukiko; Walsh, Tom; Ohsawa, Ryosuke; Newby, Marta; Hiraki-Kamon, Keiko; Kuramochi, Masahito; Lee, Ming K.; Klevit, Rachel E.; Martin, Alan; Maruyama, Hirofumi; King, Mary-Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in 2 families of progressive ataxia, axonal neuropathy, hyporeflexia, and abnormal eye movements, accompanied by progressive hearing loss and ovarian dysgenesis, with a clinical diagnosis of Perrault syndrome. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify causative mutations in the 2 affected sisters in each family. Family 1 is of Japanese ancestry, and family 2 is of European ancestry. Results: In family 1, affected individuals were compound heterozygous for chromosome 10 open reading frame 2 (C10orf2) p.Arg391His and p.Asn585Ser. In family 2, affected individuals were compound heterozygous for C10orf2 p.Trp441Gly and p.Val507Ile. C10orf2 encodes Twinkle, a primase-helicase essential for replication of mitochondrial DNA. Conservation and structural modeling support the causality of the mutations. Twinkle is known also to harbor multiple mutations, nearly all missenses, leading to dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia type 3 and to recessive mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 7, also known as infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia. Conclusions: Our study identifies Twinkle mutations as a cause of Perrault syndrome accompanied by neurologic features and expands the phenotypic spectrum of recessive disease caused by mutations in Twinkle. The phenotypic heterogeneity of conditions caused by Twinkle mutations and the genetic heterogeneity of Perrault syndrome call for genomic definition of these disorders. PMID:25355836

  16. Diazoxide-responsive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia caused by HNF4A gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, S E; Kapoor, R R; Mali, G; Cody, D; Murphy, N; Schwahn, B; Siahanidou, T; Banerjee, I; Akcay, T; Rubio-Cabezas, O; Shield, J P H; Hussain, K; Ellard, S

    2010-01-01

    Objective The phenotype associated with heterozygous HNF4A gene mutations has recently been extended to include diazoxide responsive neonatal hypoglycemia in addition to maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). To date, mutation screening has been limited to patients with a family history consistent with MODY. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of HNF4A mutations in a large cohort of patients with diazoxide responsive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (HH). Subjects and methods We sequenced the ABCC8, KCNJ11, GCK, GLUD1, and/or HNF4A genes in 220 patients with HH responsive to diazoxide. The order of genetic testing was dependent upon the clinical phenotype. Results A genetic diagnosis was possible for 59/220 (27%) patients. KATP channel mutations were most common (15%) followed by GLUD1 mutations causing hyperinsulinism with hyperammonemia (5.9%), and HNF4A mutations (5%). Seven of the 11 probands with a heterozygous HNF4A mutation did not have a parent affected with diabetes, and four de novo mutations were confirmed. These patients were diagnosed with HI within the first week of life (median age 1 day), and they had increased birth weight (median +2.4 SDS). The duration of diazoxide treatment ranged from 3 months to ongoing at 8 years. Conclusions In this large series, HNF4A mutations are the third most common cause of diazoxide responsive HH. We recommend that HNF4A sequencing is considered in all patients with diazoxide responsive HH diagnosed in the first week of life irrespective of a family history of diabetes, once KATP channel mutations have been excluded. PMID:20164212

  17. Mutations in the β-myosin rod cause myosin storage myopathy via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Armel, Thomas Z.; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2009-01-01

    Myosin storage myopathy (MSM) is a congenital myopathy characterized by the presence of subsarcolemmal inclusions of myosin in the majority of type I muscle fibers, and has been linked to 4 mutations in the slow/cardiac muscle myosin, β-MyHC (MYH7). Although the majority of the >230 disease causing mutations in MYH7 are located in the globular head region of the molecule, those responsible for MSM are part of a subset of MYH7 mutations that are located in the α-helical coiled-coil tail. Mutations in the myosin head are thought to affect the ATPase and actin-binding properties of the molecule. To date, however, there are no reports of the molecular mechanism of pathogenesis for mutations in the rod region of muscle myosins. Here, we present analysis of 4 mutations responsible for MSM: L1793P, R1845W, E1886K, and H1901L. We show that each MSM mutation has a different molecular phenotype, suggesting that there are multiple mechanisms by which MSM can be caused. These mechanisms range from thermodynamic and functional irregularities of individual proteins (L1793P), to varying defects in the assembly and stability of filaments formed from the proteins (R1845W, E1886K, and H1901L). In addition to furthering our understanding of MSM, these observations provide the first insight into how mutations affect the rod region of muscle myosins, and provide a framework for future studies of disease-causing mutations in this region of the molecule. PMID:19336582

  18. Mutations Causing Complex Disease May under Certain Circumstances Be Protective in an Epidemiological Sense.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Sabine; Wolf, Andreas; Cooper, David N; Krawczak, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Guided by the practice of classical epidemiology, research into the genetic basis of complex disease has usually taken for granted the dictum that causative mutations are invariably over-represented among clinically affected as compared to unaffected individuals. However, we show that this supposition is not true and that a mutation contributing to the etiology of a complex disease can, under certain circumstances, be depleted among patients. Populations with defined disease prevalence were repeatedly simulated under a Wright-Fisher model, assuming various types of population history and genotype-phenotype relationship. For each simulation, the resulting mutation-specific population frequencies and odds ratios (ORs) were evaluated. In addition, the relationship between mutation frequency and OR was studied using real data from the NIH GWAS catalogue of reported phenotype associations of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). While rare diseases (prevalence <1%) were found to be consistently caused by rare mutations with ORs>1, up to 20% of mutations causing a pandemic disease (prevalence 10-20%) had ORs<1, and their population frequency ranged from 0% to 100%. Moreover, simulation-based ORs exhibited a wide distribution, irrespective of mutation frequency. In conclusion, a substantial proportion of mutations causing common complex diseases may appear 'protective' in genetic epidemiological studies and hence would normally tend to be excluded, albeit erroneously, from further study. This apparently paradoxical result is explicable in terms of mutual confounding of the respective genotype-phenotype relationships due to a negative correlation between causal mutations induced by their common gene genealogy. As would be predicted by our findings, a significant negative correlation became apparent in published genome-wide association studies between the OR of genetic variants associated with a particular disease and the prevalence of that disease. PMID:26161957

  19. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  20. Nemaline myopathy caused byTNNT1 mutations in a Dutch pedigree.

    PubMed

    van der Pol, W Ludo; Leijenaar, Jolien F; Spliet, Wim G M; Lavrijsen, Selma W; Jansen, Nicolaas J G; Braun, Kees P J; Mulder, Marcel; Timmers-Raaijmakers, Brigitte; Ratsma, Kimberly; Dooijes, Dennis; van Haelst, Mieke M

    2014-03-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by early onset muscular weakness and sarcoplasmatic or intranuclear inclusions of rod-shaped Z-disk material in muscle fibers. Thus far, mutations in seven genes have been identified as cause of NM. Only one singleTNNT1 nonsense mutation has been previously described that causes autosomal recessive NM in the old order Amish with a very specific clinical phenotype including rapidly progressive contractures. Here, we report a patient who is compound heterozygous for a c.309+1G>A mutation and an exon 14 deletion in theTNNT1 gene. This report confirms the specific clinical phenotype ofTNNT1 NM and documents two newTNNT1 mutations outside the old order Amish. PMID:24689076

  1. A Dominant Mutation in Hexokinase 1 (HK1) Causes Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lori S.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Bowne, Sara J.; Lang, Steven; Blanton, Susan H.; Cadena, Elizabeth; Avery, Cheryl E.; Lewis, Richard A.; Webb-Jones, Kaylie; Wheaton, Dianna H.; Birch, David G.; Coussa, Razck; Ren, Huanan; Lopez, Irma; Chakarova, Christina; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Garcia, Charles A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Weinstock, George M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To identify the cause of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in UTAD003, a large, six-generation Louisiana family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Methods. A series of strategies, including candidate gene screening, linkage exclusion, genome-wide linkage mapping, and whole-exome next-generation sequencing, was used to identify a mutation in a novel disease gene on chromosome 10q22.1. Probands from an additional 404 retinal degeneration families were subsequently screened for mutations in this gene. Results. Exome sequencing in UTAD003 led to identification of a single, novel coding variant (c.2539G>A, p.Glu847Lys) in hexokinase 1 (HK1) present in all affected individuals and absent from normal controls. One affected family member carries two copies of the mutation and has an unusually severe form of disease, consistent with homozygosity for this mutation. Screening of additional adRP probands identified four other families (American, Canadian, and Sicilian) with the same mutation and a similar range of phenotypes. The families share a rare 450-kilobase haplotype containing the mutation, suggesting a founder mutation among otherwise unrelated families. Conclusions. We identified an HK1 mutation in five adRP families. Hexokinase 1 catalyzes phosphorylation of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate. HK1 is expressed in retina, with two abundant isoforms expressed at similar levels. The Glu847Lys mutation is located at a highly conserved position in the protein, outside the catalytic domains. We hypothesize that the effect of this mutation is limited to the retina, as no systemic abnormalities in glycolysis were detected. Prevalence of the HK1 mutation in our cohort of RP families is 1%. PMID:25190649

  2. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSANI) caused by a novel mutation in SPTLC2

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sinéad M.; Ernst, Daniela; Wei, Yu; Laurà, Matilde; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Polke, James; Blake, Julian; Winer, John; Houlden, Henry; Hornemann, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical and neurophysiologic phenotype of a family with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSANI) due to a novel mutation in SPTLC2 and to characterize the biochemical properties of this mutation. Methods: We screened 107 patients with HSAN who were negative for other genetic causes for mutations in SPTLC2. The biochemical properties of a new mutation were characterized in cell-free and cell-based activity assays. Results: A novel mutation (A182P) was found in 2 subjects of a single family. The phenotype of the 2 subjects was an ulcero-mutilating sensory-predominant neuropathy as described previously for patients with HSANI, but with prominent motor involvement and earlier disease onset in the first decade of life. Affected patients had elevated levels of plasma 1-deoxysphingolipids (1-deoxySLs). Biochemically, the A182P mutation was associated with a reduced canonical activity but an increased alternative activity with alanine, which results in largely increased 1-deoxySL levels, supporting their pathogenicity. Conclusion: This study confirms that mutations in SPTLC2 are associated with increased deoxySL formation causing HSANI. PMID:23658386

  3. SAAMBE: Webserver to Predict the Charge of Binding Free Energy Caused by Amino Acids Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Petukh, Marharyta; Dai, Luogeng; Alexov, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the effect of amino acid substitutions on protein–protein affinity (typically evaluated via the change of protein binding free energy) is important for both understanding the disease-causing mechanism of missense mutations and guiding protein engineering. In addition, researchers are also interested in understanding which energy components are mostly affected by the mutation and how the mutation affects the overall structure of the corresponding protein. Here we report a webserver, the Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE) webserver, which addresses the demand for tools for predicting the change of protein binding free energy. SAAMBE is an easy to use webserver, which only requires that a coordinate file be inputted and the user is provided with various, but easy to navigate, options. The user specifies the mutation position, wild type residue and type of mutation to be made. The server predicts the binding free energy change, the changes of the corresponding energy components and provides the energy minimized 3D structure of the wild type and mutant proteins for download. The SAAMBE protocol performance was tested by benchmarking the predictions against over 1300 experimentally determined changes of binding free energy and a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.62 was obtained. How the predictions can be used for discriminating disease-causing from harmless mutations is discussed. The webserver can be accessed via http://compbio.clemson.edu/saambe_webserver/. PMID:27077847

  4. SAAMBE: Webserver to Predict the Charge of Binding Free Energy Caused by Amino Acids Mutations.

    PubMed

    Petukh, Marharyta; Dai, Luogeng; Alexov, Emil

    2016-04-12

    Predicting the effect of amino acid substitutions on protein-protein affinity (typically evaluated via the change of protein binding free energy) is important for both understanding the disease-causing mechanism of missense mutations and guiding protein engineering. In addition, researchers are also interested in understanding which energy components are mostly affected by the mutation and how the mutation affects the overall structure of the corresponding protein. Here we report a webserver, the Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE) webserver, which addresses the demand for tools for predicting the change of protein binding free energy. SAAMBE is an easy to use webserver, which only requires that a coordinate file be inputted and the user is provided with various, but easy to navigate, options. The user specifies the mutation position, wild type residue and type of mutation to be made. The server predicts the binding free energy change, the changes of the corresponding energy components and provides the energy minimized 3D structure of the wild type and mutant proteins for download. The SAAMBE protocol performance was tested by benchmarking the predictions against over 1300 experimentally determined changes of binding free energy and a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.62 was obtained. How the predictions can be used for discriminating disease-causing from harmless mutations is discussed. The webserver can be accessed via http://compbio.clemson.edu/saambe_webserver/.

  5. Mutations in IFT172 cause isolated retinal degeneration and Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bujakowska, Kinga M; Zhang, Qi; Siemiatkowska, Anna M; Liu, Qin; Place, Emily; Falk, Marni J; Consugar, Mark; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Lonjou, Christine; Carpentier, Wassila; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; den Hollander, Anneke I; Cremers, Frans P M; Leroy, Bart P; Gai, Xiaowu; Sahel, José-Alain; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Collin, Rob W J; Zeitz, Christina; Audo, Isabelle; Pierce, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles present on most mammalian cells. The assembly and maintenance of primary cilia are facilitated by intraflagellar transport (IFT), a bidirectional protein trafficking along the cilium. Mutations in genes coding for IFT components have been associated with a group of diseases called ciliopathies. These genetic disorders can affect a variety of organs including the retina. Using whole exome sequencing in three families, we identified mutations in Intraflagellar Transport 172 Homolog [IFT172 (Chlamydomonas)] that underlie an isolated retinal degeneration and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Extensive functional analyses of the identified mutations in cell culture, rat retina and in zebrafish demonstrated their hypomorphic or null nature. It has recently been reported that mutations in IFT172 cause a severe ciliopathy syndrome involving skeletal, renal, hepatic and retinal abnormalities (Jeune and Mainzer-Saldino syndromes). Here, we report for the first time that mutations in this gene can also lead to an isolated form of retinal degeneration. The functional data for the mutations can partially explain milder phenotypes; however, the involvement of modifying alleles in the IFT172-associated phenotypes cannot be excluded. These findings expand the spectrum of disease associated with mutations in IFT172 and suggest that mutations in genes originally reported to be associated with syndromic ciliopathies should also be considered in subjects with non-syndromic retinal dystrophy.

  6. Mutations in DNMT1 cause hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Christopher J.; Botuyan, Maria-Victoria; Wu, Yanhong; Ward, Christopher J.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Hammans, Simon; Hojo, Kaori; Yamanishi, Hiromitch; Karpf, Adam R.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Simon, Mariella; Lander, Cecilie; Boardman, Lisa A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Smith, Glenn E.; Litchy, William J.; Boes, Benjamin; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Middha, Sumit; Dyck, P. James; Parisi, Joseph E.; Mer, Georges; Smith, David I.; Dyck, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is crucial for maintenance of methylation, gene regulation and chromatin stability1-3. DNA mismatch repair, cell cycle regulation in post-mitotic neurons4,5 and neurogenesis6 are influenced by DNA methylation. Here we show mutations in DNMT1 cause both central and peripheral neurodegeneration in one form of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN1) with dementia and hearing loss7,8. Exome sequencing led to the identification of DNMT1 mutation c.A1484G (p.Tyr495Cys) in two American and one Japanese kindreds and a triple nucleotide change c.1470TCC-1472ATA (p.Asp490Glu-Pro491Tyr) in one European kindred. All mutations are within the targeting sequence (TS) domain of DNMT1. These mutations cause premature degradation of mutant proteins, reduced methyltransferase activity and impaired heterochromatin binding during the G2 cell cycle phase, leading to global hypomethylation and site specific hypermethylation. Our study demonstrates DNMT1 mutations cause aberrant methylation implicated in complex pathogenesis. The discovered DNMT1 mutations provide a new framework for the study of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21532572

  7. Mutations in DVL1 Cause an Osteosclerotic Form of Robinow Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bunn, Kieran J.; Daniel, Phil; Rösken, Heleen S.; O’Neill, Adam C.; Cameron-Christie, Sophia R.; Morgan, Tim; Brunner, Han G.; Lai, Angeline; Kunst, Henricus P.M.; Markie, David M.; Robertson, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Robinow syndrome (RS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous condition that can be caused by mutations in genes encoding components of the non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In contrast, germline mutations that act to increase canonical Wnt signaling lead to distinctive osteosclerotic phenotypes. Here, we identified de novo frameshift mutations in DVL1, a mediator of both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling, as the cause of RS-OS, an RS subtype involving osteosclerosis, in three unrelated individuals. The mutations all delete the DVL1 C terminus and replace it, in each instance, with a novel, highly basic sequence. We showed the presence of mutant transcript in fibroblasts from one individual with RS-OS and demonstrated unimpaired protein stability with transfected GFP-tagged constructs bearing a frameshift mutation. In vitro TOPFlash assays, in apparent contradiction to the osteosclerotic phenotype, revealed that the mutant allele was less active than the wild-type allele in the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. However, when the mutant and wild-type alleles were co-expressed, canonical Wnt activity was 2-fold higher than that in the wild-type construct alone. This work establishes that DVL1 mutations cause a specific RS subtype, RS-OS, and that the osteosclerosis associated with this subtype might be the result of an interaction between the wild-type and mutant alleles and thus lead to elevated canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:25817014

  8. Autosomal-Dominant Multiple Pterygium Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in MYH3

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Beck, Anita E.; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Harrell, Tanya M.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Jain, Mahim; Alanay, Yasemin; Berry, Susan A.; Carey, John C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lee, Brendan H.; Krakow, Deborah; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Anderson, Peter; Blue, Elizabeth Marchani; Annable, Marcus; Browning, Brian L.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Chen, Christina; Chin, Jennifer; Chong, Jessica X.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Davis, Colleen P.; Frazar, Christopher; Harrell, Tanya M.; He, Zongxiao; Jain, Preti; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jimenez, Guillaume; Johanson, Eric; Jun, Goo; Kircher, Martin; Kolar, Tom; Krauter, Stephanie A.; Krumm, Niklas; Leal, Suzanne M.; Luksic, Daniel; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; McGee, Sean; O’Reilly, Patrick; Paeper, Bryan; Patterson, Karynne; Perez, Marcos; Phillips, Sam W.; Pijoan, Jessica; Poel, Christa; Reinier, Frederic; Robertson, Peggy D.; Santos-Cortez, Regie; Shaffer, Tristan; Shephard, Cindy; Shively, Kathryn M.; Siegel, Deborah L.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tabor, Holly K.; Tackett, Monica; Underwood, Jason G.; Wegener, Marc; Wang, Gao; Wheeler, Marsha M.; Yi, Qian; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare Mendelian conditions characterized by multiple pterygia, scoliosis, and congenital contractures of the limbs. MPS typically segregates as an autosomal-recessive disorder, but rare instances of autosomal-dominant transmission have been reported. Whereas several mutations causing recessive MPS have been identified, the genetic basis of dominant MPS remains unknown. We identified four families affected by dominantly transmitted MPS characterized by pterygia, camptodactyly of the hands, vertebral fusions, and scoliosis. Exome sequencing identified predicted protein-altering mutations in embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) in three families. MYH3 mutations underlie distal arthrogryposis types 1, 2A, and 2B, but all mutations reported to date occur in the head and neck domains. In contrast, two of the mutations found to cause MPS in this study occurred in the tail domain. The phenotypic overlap among persons with MPS, coupled with physical findings distinct from other conditions caused by mutations in MYH3, suggests that the developmental mechanism underlying MPS differs from that of other conditions and/or that certain functions of embryonic myosin might be perturbed by disruption of specific residues and/or domains. Moreover, the vertebral fusions in persons with MPS, coupled with evidence of MYH3 expression in bone, suggest that embryonic myosin plays a role in skeletal development. PMID:25957469

  9. Autosomal-Dominant Multiple Pterygium Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in MYH3.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jessica X; Burrage, Lindsay C; Beck, Anita E; Marvin, Colby T; McMillin, Margaret J; Shively, Kathryn M; Harrell, Tanya M; Buckingham, Kati J; Bacino, Carlos A; Jain, Mahim; Alanay, Yasemin; Berry, Susan A; Carey, John C; Gibbs, Richard A; Lee, Brendan H; Krakow, Deborah; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare Mendelian conditions characterized by multiple pterygia, scoliosis, and congenital contractures of the limbs. MPS typically segregates as an autosomal-recessive disorder, but rare instances of autosomal-dominant transmission have been reported. Whereas several mutations causing recessive MPS have been identified, the genetic basis of dominant MPS remains unknown. We identified four families affected by dominantly transmitted MPS characterized by pterygia, camptodactyly of the hands, vertebral fusions, and scoliosis. Exome sequencing identified predicted protein-altering mutations in embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) in three families. MYH3 mutations underlie distal arthrogryposis types 1, 2A, and 2B, but all mutations reported to date occur in the head and neck domains. In contrast, two of the mutations found to cause MPS in this study occurred in the tail domain. The phenotypic overlap among persons with MPS, coupled with physical findings distinct from other conditions caused by mutations in MYH3, suggests that the developmental mechanism underlying MPS differs from that of other conditions and/or that certain functions of embryonic myosin might be perturbed by disruption of specific residues and/or domains. Moreover, the vertebral fusions in persons with MPS, coupled with evidence of MYH3 expression in bone, suggest that embryonic myosin plays a role in skeletal development.

  10. Noncompliance with the world health organization-multidrug therapy among leprosy patients in Cebu, Philippines: its causes and implications on the leprosy control program.

    PubMed

    Honrado, Elsie R; Tallo, Veronica; Balis, Angelita C; Chan, Gertrude P; Cho, Sang Nae

    2008-04-01

    The success of current World Health Organization (WHO) key strategy for leprosy elimination (ie, multidrug therapy [MDT] regimen) depends largely on the efficiency of health care delivery services and patient compliance. A high rate of noncompliance with this regimen has serious implications for the leprosy control program because it can set the stage for the emergence of drug resistance, eventually resulting in treatment failure and failure of the program. A community-based descriptive study using pretested interviews conducted in 12 leprosy endemic areas in Cebu, Philippines, showed that the noncompliance rate with the WHO-MDT regimen among 233 study subjects was 30%. The causes of noncompliance are drug-related, health care provider-triggered, or patient-inducted, or some combination of these. Recommendations on strategic interventions to obviate the cause for noncompliance are presented. PMID:18346553

  11. Erythrocytic Pyruvate Kinase Mutations Causing Hemolytic Anemia, Osteosclerosis, and Secondary Hemochromatosis in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, G. Inal; Raj, K.; Foureman, P.; Lehman, S.; Manhart, K.; Abdulmalik, O.; Giger, U.

    2013-01-01

    Background Erythrocytic pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency, first documented in Basenjis, is the most common inherited erythroenzymopathy in dogs. Objectives To report 3 new breed-specific PK-LR gene mutations and a retrospective survey of PK mutations in a small and selected group of Beagles and West Highland White Terriers (WHWT). Animals Labrador Retrievers (2 siblings, 5 unrelated), Pugs (2 siblings, 1 unrelated), Beagles (39 anemic, 29 other), WHWTs (22 anemic, 226 nonanemic), Cairn Terrier (n = 1). Methods Exons of the PK-LR gene were sequenced from genomic DNA of young dogs (<2 years) with persistent highly regenerative hemolytic anemia. Results A nonsense mutation (c.799C>T) resulting in a premature stop codon was identified in anemic Labrador Retriever siblings that had osteosclerosis, high serum ferritin concentrations, and severe hepatic secondary hemochromatosis. Anemic Pug and Beagle revealed 2 different missense mutations (c.848T>C, c.994G>A, respectively) resulting in intolerable amino acid changes to protein structure and enzyme function. Breed-specific mutation tests were developed. Among the biased group of 248 WHWTs, 9% and 35% were homozygous (affected) and heterozygous, respectively, for the previously described mutation (mutant allele frequency 0.26). A PK-deficient Cairn Terrier had the same insertion mutation as the affected WHWTs. Of the selected group of 68 Beagles, 35% were PK-deficient and 3% were carriers (0.37). Conclusions and Clinical Importance Erythrocytic PK deficiency is caused by different mutations in different dog breeds and causes chronic severe hemolytic anemia, hemosiderosis, and secondary hemochromatosis because of chronic hemolysis and, an as yet unexplained osteosclerosis. The newly developed breed-specific mutation assays simplify the diagnosis of PK deficiency. PMID:22805166

  12. De novo mutations in synaptic transmission genes including DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that epileptic encephalopathies are genetically highly heterogeneous, underscoring the need for large cohorts of well-characterized individuals to further define the genetic landscape. Through a collaboration between two consortia (EuroEPINOMICS and Epi4K/EPGP), we analyzed exome-sequencing data of 356 trios with the "classical" epileptic encephalopathies, infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome, including 264 trios previously analyzed by the Epi4K/EPGP consortium. In this expanded cohort, we find 429 de novo mutations, including de novo mutations in DNM1 in five individuals and de novo mutations in GABBR2, FASN, and RYR3 in two individuals each. Unlike previous studies, this cohort is sufficiently large to show a significant excess of de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy probands compared to the general population using a likelihood analysis (p = 8.2 × 10(-4)), supporting a prominent role for de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies. We bring statistical evidence that mutations in DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathy, find suggestive evidence for a role of three additional genes, and show that at least 12% of analyzed individuals have an identifiable causal de novo mutation. Strikingly, 75% of mutations in these probands are predicted to disrupt a protein involved in regulating synaptic transmission, and there is a significant enrichment of de novo mutations in genes in this pathway in the entire cohort as well. These findings emphasize an important role for synaptic dysregulation in epileptic encephalopathies, above and beyond that caused by ion channel dysfunction.

  13. De Novo Mutations in Synaptic Transmission Genes Including DNM1 Cause Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Appenzeller, Silke; Balling, Rudi; Barisic, Nina; Baulac, Stéphanie; Caglayan, Hande; Craiu, Dana; De Jonghe, Peter; Depienne, Christel; Dimova, Petia; Djémié, Tania; Gormley, Padhraig; Guerrini, Renzo; Helbig, Ingo; Hjalgrim, Helle; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Jähn, Johanna; Klein, Karl Martin; Koeleman, Bobby; Komarek, Vladimir; Krause, Roland; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes R.; Lerche, Holger; Linnankivi, Tarja; Marini, Carla; May, Patrick; Møller, Rikke S.; Muhle, Hiltrud; Pal, Deb; Palotie, Aarno; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Robbiano, Angela; Roelens, Filip; Rosenow, Felix; Selmer, Kaja; Serratosa, Jose M.; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Stephani, Ulrich; Sterbova, Katalin; Striano, Pasquale; Suls, Arvid; Talvik, Tiina; von Spiczak, Sarah; Weber, Yvonne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Zara, Federico; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K.; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Amron, Dina; Bautista, Jocelyn F.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bluvstein, Judith; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P.; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B.; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B.; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haas, Kevin; Haut, Sheryl R.; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L.; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Kossoff, Eric H.; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; McGuire, Shannon M.; Motika, Paul V.; Novotny, Edward J.; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M.; Parent, Jack; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Sadleir, Lynette; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Shellhaas, Renée A.; Sherr, Elliott; Shih, Jerry J.; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C.; Sullivan, Joe; Thio, Liu Lin; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P.G.; Von Allmen, Gretchen K.; Weisenberg, Judith L.; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R.; Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E.; Epstein, Michael P.; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B.; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L.; Johnson, Michael R.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Marson, Anthony G.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; O’Brien, Terence J.; Ottman, Ruth; Petrou, Stephen; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sherr, Elliott

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that epileptic encephalopathies are genetically highly heterogeneous, underscoring the need for large cohorts of well-characterized individuals to further define the genetic landscape. Through a collaboration between two consortia (EuroEPINOMICS and Epi4K/EPGP), we analyzed exome-sequencing data of 356 trios with the “classical” epileptic encephalopathies, infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome, including 264 trios previously analyzed by the Epi4K/EPGP consortium. In this expanded cohort, we find 429 de novo mutations, including de novo mutations in DNM1 in five individuals and de novo mutations in GABBR2, FASN, and RYR3 in two individuals each. Unlike previous studies, this cohort is sufficiently large to show a significant excess of de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy probands compared to the general population using a likelihood analysis (p = 8.2 × 10−4), supporting a prominent role for de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies. We bring statistical evidence that mutations in DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathy, find suggestive evidence for a role of three additional genes, and show that at least 12% of analyzed individuals have an identifiable causal de novo mutation. Strikingly, 75% of mutations in these probands are predicted to disrupt a protein involved in regulating synaptic transmission, and there is a significant enrichment of de novo mutations in genes in this pathway in the entire cohort as well. These findings emphasize an important role for synaptic dysregulation in epileptic encephalopathies, above and beyond that caused by ion channel dysfunction. PMID:25262651

  14. Bacteremic Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Are Associated With Severe Sepsis at Admission: Implication for Empirical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Chien; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Hung, Sheng-Che; Wang, Hung-Ping; Huang, Yun-Jhong; Wang, Jann-Tay

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical features and treatment outcomes among patients with bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) and non-MDR Enterobacteriaceae and to identify whether MDR pathogens were independently associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation.The clinical data of adult patients visiting and being treated at Chia-Yi Christian Hospital due to bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae from January 2006 to August 2015 were retrospectively analyzed.A total of 585 patients were enrolled. Among them, 220 (37.6%) were caused by the MDR Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 206 patients (35.2%) developed severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation. Patients in the MDR group tend to be male and have a past history of gout, recurrent UTI, prior hospitalization, hydronephrosis, renal stone, ureteral stone, indwelling urinary catheter, newly development of renal dysfunction, severe sepsis or septic shock, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, receipt of ineffective empirical therapy, longer hospital stay, and higher in-hospital mortality (2.7% vs 1.9%, P = 0.569). Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, it is revealed that independent predictors associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation were liver cirrhosis (OR 2.868; 95% CI 1.439-5.716; P = 0.003), indwelling urinary catheter (OR 1.936; 95% CI 1.238-3.027; P = 0.004), and MDR Enterobacteriaceae (OR 1.447; 95% CI 1.002-2.090; P = 0.049).Multidrug resistance was associated with the development of severe sepsis or septic shock upon presentation among patients with bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae. Therefore, empirical antibiotics therapy for patients with UTI presented with severe sepsis and/or septic shock should be more broad-spectrum to effectively cover MDR Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27196480

  15. Cataracts and microphthalmia caused by a Gja8 mutation in extracellular loop 2.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chun-Hong; Chang, Bo; Derosa, Adam M; Cheng, Catherine; White, Thomas W; Gong, Xiaohua

    2012-01-01

    The mouse semi-dominant Nm2249 mutation displays variable cataracts in heterozygous mice and smaller lenses with severe cataracts in homozygous mice. This mutation is caused by a Gja8(R205G) point mutation in the second extracellular loop of the Cx50 (or α8 connexin) protein. Immunohistological data reveal that Cx50-R205G mutant proteins and endogenous wild-type Cx46 (or α3 connexin) proteins form diffuse tiny spots rather than typical punctate signals of normal gap junctions in the lens. The level of phosphorylated Cx46 proteins is decreased in Gja8(R205G/R205G) mutant lenses. Genetic analysis reveals that the Cx50-R205G mutation needs the presence of wild-type Cx46 to disrupt lens peripheral fibers and epithelial cells. Electrophysiological data in Xenopus oocytes reveal that Cx50-R205G mutant proteins block channel function of gap junctions composed of wild-type Cx50, but only affect the gating of wild-type Cx46 channels. Both genetic and electrophysiological results suggest that Cx50-R205G mutant proteins alone are unable to form functional channels. These findings imply that the Gja8(R205G) mutation differentially impairs the functions of Cx50 and Cx46 to cause cataracts, small lenses and microphthalmia. The Gja8(R205G) mutation occurs at the same conserved residue as the human GJA8(R198W) mutation. This work provides molecular insights to understand the cataract and microphthalmia/microcornea phenotype caused by Gja8 mutations in mice and humans.

  16. Mutations in PSMB8 Cause CANDLE Syndrome with Evidence of Genetic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Ramot, Yuval; Torrelo, Antonio; Paller, Amy S.; Si, Nuo; Babay, Sofia; Kim, Peter W.; Sheikh, Afzal; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Chen, Yongqing; Vera, Angel; Zhang, Xue; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Zlotogorski, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Objective Chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome is an autoinflammatory syndrome recently described in children. We investigated the clinical phenotype, genetic cause and the immune dysregulation in nine CANDLE patients. Methods Genomic DNA from all patients was screened for PSMB8 (Proteasome subunit beta type-8) mutations. Serum cytokine levels were measured from four patients. Skin biopsies were evaluated immunohistochemically and blood microarray profile (n=4) and stat-1 phosphorylation (n=3) were assessed. Results One patient was homozygous for a novel nonsense mutation in PSMB8 (c.405C>A) suggesting a protein truncation, four patients were homozygous and two were heterozygous for a previously reported missense mutation (c.224C>T), and one patient showed no mutation. None of these sequence changes was observed in chromosomes from 750 healthy controls. Of the four patients with the same mutation, only two share the same haplotype indicating a mutational hot spot. PSMB8 mutation-positive and -negative patients expressed high IP-10 (Interferon gamma-induced protein 10) levels. Levels of MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-1Ra were moderately elevated. Microarray profiles and monocyte stat-1 activation suggested a unique interferon (IFN) signaling signature, unlike in other autoinflammatory disorders. Conclusion CANDLE is caused by mutations in PSMB8, a gene recently reported to cause JMP syndrome (joint contractures, muscle atrophy and panniculitis induced lipodystrophy) in adults. We extend the clinical and pathogenic description of this novel autoinflammatory syndrome, thereby expanding the clinical and genetic disease spectrum of PSMB8-associated disorders. IFN may be a key mediator of the inflammatory response and may present a therapeutic target. PMID:21953331

  17. Mutations in MME cause an autosomal‐recessive Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 2

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Yuan, Junhui; Yoshimura, Akiko; Mitsui, Jun; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Masaki; Ishihara, Satoshi; Tanabe, Hajime; Nozuma, Satoshi; Okamoto, Yuji; Matsuura, Eiji; Ohkubo, Ryuichi; Inamizu, Saeko; Shiraishi, Wataru; Yamasaki, Ryo; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun‐ichi; Oya, Yasushi; Yabe, Hayato; Nishikawa, Noriko; Tobisawa, Shinsuke; Matsuda, Nozomu; Masuda, Masayuki; Kugimoto, Chiharu; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Yano, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Jun; Doi, Koichiro; Nakagawa, Masanori; Morishita, Shinichi; Tsuji, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to identify new causes of Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease in patients with autosomal‐recessive (AR) CMT. Methods To efficiently identify novel causative genes for AR‐CMT, we analyzed 303 unrelated Japanese patients with CMT using whole‐exome sequencing and extracted recessive variants/genes shared among multiple patients. We performed mutation screening of the newly identified membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME) gene in 354 additional patients with CMT. We clinically, genetically, pathologically, and radiologically examined 10 patients with the MME mutation. Results We identified recessive mutations in MME in 10 patients. The MME gene encodes neprilysin (NEP), which is well known to be one of the most prominent beta‐amyloid (Aβ)‐degrading enzymes. All patients had a similar phenotype consistent with late‐onset axonal neuropathy. They showed muscle weakness, atrophy, and sensory disturbance in the lower extremities. All the MME mutations could be loss‐of‐function mutations, and we confirmed a lack/decrease of NEP protein expression in a peripheral nerve. No patients showed symptoms of dementia, and 1 patient showed no excess Aβ in Pittsburgh compound‐B positron emission tomography imaging. Interpretation Our results indicate that loss‐of‐function MME mutations are the most frequent cause of adult‐onset AR‐CMT2 in Japan, and we propose that this new disease should be termed AR‐CMT2T. A loss‐of‐function MME mutation did not cause early‐onset Alzheimer's disease. Identifying the MME mutation responsible for AR‐CMT could improve the rate of molecular diagnosis and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of CMT. Ann Neurol 2016;79:659–672 PMID:26991897

  18. Expanding the Spectrum of Founder Mutations Causing Isolated Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Ho; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Lee, Phil H.; Shaw, Natalie D.; Hall, Janet E.; Plummer, Lacey; Buck, Cassandra L.; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Jarzabek, Katarzyna; Wołczynski, Sławomir; Quinton, Richard; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Dode, Catherine; Ogata, Tsutomu; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Layman, Lawrence C.; Gusella, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Loss of function (LoF) mutations in more than 20 genes are now known to cause isolated GnRH deficiency (IGD) in humans. Most causal IGD mutations are typically private, ie, limited to a single individual/pedigree. However, somewhat paradoxically, four IGD genes (GNRH1, TAC3, PROKR2, and GNRHR) have been shown to harbor LoF founder mutations that are shared by multiple unrelated individuals. It is not known whether similar founder mutations occur in other IGD genes. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether shared deleterious mutations in IGD-associated genes represent founder alleles. Setting: This study was an international collaboration among academic medical centers. Methods: IGD patients with shared mutations, defined as those documented in three or more unrelated probands in 14 IGD-associated genes, were identified from various academic institutions, the Human Gene Mutation Database, and literature reports by other international investigators. Haplotypes of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and short tandem repeats surrounding the mutations were constructed to assess genetic ancestry. Results: A total of eight founder mutations in five genes, GNRHR (Q106R, R262Q, R139H), TACR3 (W275X), PROKR2 (R85H), FGFR1 (R250Q, G687R), and HS6ST1 (R382W) were identified. Most founder alleles were present at low frequency in the general population. The estimated age of these mutant alleles ranged from 1925 to 5600 years and corresponded to the time of rapid human population expansion. Conclusions: We have expanded the spectrum of founder alleles associated with IGD to a total of eight founder mutations. In contrast to the approximately 9000-year-old PROKR2 founder allele that may confer a heterozygote advantage, the rest of the founder alleles are relatively more recent in origin, in keeping with the timing of recent human population expansion and any selective heterozygote advantage of these alleles requires further evaluation. PMID:26207952

  19. Point mutations throughout the GLI3 gene cause Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalff-Suske, M; Wild, A; Topp, J; Wessling, M; Jacobsen, E M; Bornholdt, D; Engel, H; Heuer, H; Aalfs, C M; Ausems, M G; Barone, R; Herzog, A; Heutink, P; Homfray, T; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; König, R; Kunze, J; Meinecke, P; Müller, D; Rizzo, R; Strenge, S; Superti-Furga, A; Grzeschik, K H

    1999-09-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, characterized by craniofacial and limb anomalies (GCPS; MIM 175700), previously has been demonstrated to be associated with translocations as well as point mutations affecting one allele of the zinc finger gene GLI3. In addition to GCPS, Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS; MIM 146510) and post-axial polydactyly type A (PAP-A; MIM 174200), two other disorders of human development, are caused by GLI3 mutations. In order to gain more insight into the mutational spectrum associated with a single phenotype, we report here the extension of the GLI3 mutation analysis to 24 new GCPS cases. We report the identification of 15 novel mutations present in one of the patient's GLI3 alleles. The mutations map throughout the coding gene regions. The majority are truncating mutations (nine of 15) that engender prematurely terminated protein products mostly but not exclusively N-terminally to or within the central region encoding the DNA-binding domain. Two missense and two splicing mutations mapping within the zinc finger motifs presumably also interfere with DNA binding. The five mutations identified within the protein regions C-terminal to the zinc fingers putatively affect additional functional properties of GLI3. In cell transfection experiments using fusions of the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4 to different segments of GLI3, transactivating capacity was assigned to two adjacent independent domains (TA(1)and TA(2)) in the C-terminal third of GLI3. Since these are the only functional domains affected by three C-terminally truncating mutations, we postulate that GCPS may be due either to haploinsufficiency resulting from the complete loss of one gene copy or to functional haploinsufficiency related to compromised properties of this transcription factor such as DNA binding and transactivation. PMID:10441342

  20. Mutations in MECOM, Encoding Oncoprotein EVI1, Cause Radioulnar Synostosis with Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Niihori, Tetsuya; Ouchi-Uchiyama, Meri; Sasahara, Yoji; Kaneko, Takashi; Hashii, Yoshiko; Irie, Masahiro; Sato, Atsushi; Saito-Nanjo, Yuka; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Nakayama, Keiko; Ozono, Keiichi; Kure, Shigeo; Matsubara, Yoichi; Imaizumi, Masue; Aoki, Yoko

    2015-12-01

    Radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (RUSAT) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, characterized by thrombocytopenia and congenital fusion of the radius and ulna. A heterozygous HOXA11 mutation has been identified in two unrelated families as a cause of RUSAT. However, HOXA11 mutations are absent in a number of individuals with RUSAT, which suggests that other genetic loci contribute to RUSAT. In the current study, we performed whole exome sequencing in an individual with RUSAT and her healthy parents and identified a de novo missense mutation in MECOM, encoding EVI1, in the individual with RUSAT. Subsequent analysis of MECOM in two other individuals with RUSAT revealed two additional missense mutations. These three mutations were clustered within the 8(th) zinc finger motif of the C-terminal zinc finger domain of EVI1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and qPCR assays of the regions harboring the ETS-like motif that is known as an EVI1 binding site showed a reduction in immunoprecipitated DNA for two EVI1 mutants compared with wild-type EVI1. Furthermore, reporter assays showed that MECOM mutations led to alterations in both AP-1- and TGF-β-mediated transcriptional responses. These functional assays suggest that transcriptional dysregulation by mutant EVI1 could be associated with the development of RUSAT. We report missense mutations in MECOM resulting in a Mendelian disorder that provide compelling evidence for the critical role of EVI1 in normal hematopoiesis and in the development of forelimbs and fingers in humans.

  1. Nephrin mutations cause childhood- and adult-onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Santín, Sheila; García-Maset, Rafael; Ruíz, Patricia; Giménez, Isabel; Zamora, Isabel; Peña, Antonia; Madrid, Alvaro; Camacho, Juan A; Fraga, Gloria; Sánchez-Moreno, Ana; Cobo, Maria Angeles; Bernis, Carmen; Ortiz, Alberto; de Pablos, Augusto Luque; Pintos, Guillem; Justa, Maria Luisa; Hidalgo-Barquero, Emilia; Fernández-Llama, Patricia; Ballarín, José; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in the NPHS1 gene cause congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type presenting before the first 3 months of life. Recently, NPHS1 mutations have also been identified in childhood-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome and milder courses of disease, but their role in adults with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis remains unknown. Here we developed an in silico scoring matrix to evaluate the pathogenicity of amino-acid substitutions using the biophysical and biochemical difference between wild-type and mutant amino acid, the evolutionary conservation of the amino-acid residue in orthologs, and defined domains, with the addition of contextual information. Mutation analysis was performed in 97 patients from 89 unrelated families, of which 52 presented with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome after 18 years of age. Compound heterozygous or homozygous NPHS1 mutations were identified in five familial and seven sporadic cases, including one patient 27 years old at onset of the disease. Substitutions were classified as 'severe' or 'mild' using this in silico approach. Our results suggest an earlier onset of the disease in patients with two 'severe' mutations compared to patients with at least one 'mild' mutation. The finding of mutations in a patient with adult-onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis indicates that NPHS1 analysis could be considered in patients with later onset of the disease.

  2. Specific filaggrin mutations cause ichthyosis vulgaris and are significantly associated with atopic dermatitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Toshifumi; Akiyama, Masashi; Sandilands, Aileen; Nemoto-Hasebe, Ikue; Sakai, Kaori; Nagasaki, Akari; Ota, Mitsuhito; Hata, Hiroo; Evans, Alan T; Palmer, Colin N A; Shimizu, Hiroshi; McLean, W H Irwin

    2008-06-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) have been identified as the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) and shown to be major predisposing factors for atopic dermatitis (AD). However, these studies have been mainly carried out in European populations. In early 2007, we identified two Oriental-specific FLG mutations in four Japanese families with IV and reported that filaggrin mutations were also significant predisposing factors for AD in Japan. However, the frequency of FLG mutations observed in our Japanese AD cohort (5.6%), was much lower than that seen in Europeans (up to 48%). Here, we studied a further seven Japanese families with IV and identified two additional nonsense mutations in FLG, S2889X, and S3296X. We found that more than 20% of patients in our Japanese AD case series carry FLG mutations, and there is significant statistical association between the four mutations and AD (chi(2) P=8.4 x 10(-6); heterozygote odds ratio 7.57, 95% CI 2.84-23.03). These data emphasize that skin-barrier impairment due to reduced filaggrin expression plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AD and sheds further light on the genetic architecture of atopy in Japan.

  3. Mutations in INF2 Are a Major Cause of Autosomal Dominant Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Olivia; Benoit, Geneviève; Gribouval, Olivier; Nevo, Fabien; Tête, Marie-Josèphe; Dantal, Jacques; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Touchard, Guy; Karras, Alexandre; Presne, Claire; Grunfeld, Jean-Pierre; Legendre, Christophe; Joly, Dominique; Rieu, Philippe; Mohsin, Nabil; Hannedouche, Thierry; Moal, Valérie; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Broutin, Isabelle; Mollet, Géraldine

    2011-01-01

    The recent identification of mutations in the INF2 gene, which encodes a member of the formin family of actin-regulating proteins, in cases of familial FSGS supports the importance of an intact actin cytoskeleton in podocyte function. To determine better the prevalence of INF2 mutations in autosomal dominant FSGS, we screened 54 families (78 patients) and detected mutations in 17% of them. All mutations were missense variants localized to the N-terminal diaphanous inhibitory domain of the protein, a region that interacts with the C-terminal diaphanous autoregulatory domain, thereby competing for actin monomer binding and inhibiting depolymerization. Six of the seven distinct altered residues localized to an INF2 region that corresponded to a subdomain of the mDia1 diaphanous inhibitory domain reported to co-immunoprecipitate with IQ motif–containing GTPase-activating protein 1 (IQGAP1). In addition, we evaluated 84 sporadic cases but detected a mutation in only one patient. In conclusion, mutations in INF2 are a major cause of autosomal dominant FSGS. Because IQGAP1 interacts with crucial podocyte proteins such as nephrin and PLCε1, the identification of mutations that may alter the putative INF2–IQGAP1 interaction provides additional insight into the pathophysiologic mechanisms linking formin proteins to podocyte dysfunction and FSGS. PMID:21258034

  4. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyu; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liao, Yong; Guo, Luo; Wang, Honglian; He, Lin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Xing, Qinghe

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser) in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203) containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  5. Crystalline cataract caused by a heterozygous missense mutation in γD-crystallin (CRYGD)

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Caroline; Nihalani, Bharti R.; Engle, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe phenotypic characteristics of two pedigrees manifesting early onset crystalline cataract with mutations in the γD-crystallin gene (CRYGD). Methods A detailed medical history was obtained from two Caucasian pedigrees manifesting autosomal dominant congenital cataracts. Genomic DNA was extracted from saliva (DNA Genotek). Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) based genome analysis of the larger pedigree revealed linkage to an 8.2 MB region on chromosome 2q33-q35 which encompassed the crystallin-gamma gene cluster (CRYG). Exons and flanking introns of CRYGA, CRYGB, CRYGC and CRYGD were amplified and sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Results A morphologically unique cataract with extensive refractile “crystals” scattered throughout the nucleus and perinuclear cortex was found in the probands from both pedigrees. A heterozygous C→A mutation was identified at position 109 of the coding sequence (R36S of the processed protein) in exon 2 of CRYGD and this missense mutation was found to cosegregate with the disease in the larger family; this mutation was then identified in affected individuals of pedigree 2 as well. Conclusions The heterozygous 109C→A CRYGD missense mutation is associated with a distinct crystalline cataract in two US Caucasian pedigrees. This confirms crystalline cataract formation with this mutation, as previously reported in sporadic childhood case from the Czech Republic and in members of a Chinese family. PMID:22219628

  6. Segmental basal cell naevus syndrome caused by an activating mutation in smoothened.

    PubMed

    Khamaysi, Z; Bochner, R; Indelman, M; Magal, L; Avitan-Hersh, E; Sarig, O; Sprecher, E; Bergman, R

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant sonic hedgehog signalling, mostly due to PTCH1 mutations, has been shown to play a central role in the pathogenesis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), as well as in basal cell naevus syndrome (BCNS). Mutations in smoothened (SMO) encoding a receptor for sonic hedgehog have been reported in sporadic BCCs but not in BCNS. We report a case with multiple BCCs, pits and comedones in a segmental distribution over the upper part of the body, along with other findings compatible with BCNS. Histopathologically, there were different types of BCC. A heterozygous mutation (c.1234C>T, p.L412F) in SMO was detected in three BCCs but not in peripheral blood lymphocytes or the uninvolved skin. These were compatible with the type 1 mosaic form of BCNS. The p.L412F mutation was found experimentally to result in increased SMO transactivating activity, and the patient responded to vismodegib therapy. Activating mutations in SMO may cause BCNS. The identification of a gain-of-function mutation in SMO causing a type 1 mosaic form of BCNS further expands our understanding of the pathogenesis of BCC, with implications for the treatment of these tumours, whether sporadic or inherited. PMID:26822128

  7. Loss of function mutation in LOX causes thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian S; Halabi, Carmen M; Hoffman, Erin P; Carmichael, Nikkola; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Lian, Christine G; Bierhals, Andrew J; Vuzman, Dana; Mecham, Robert P; Frank, Natasha Y; Stitziel, Nathan O

    2016-08-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) represent a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many individuals presenting with an inherited form of TAAD do not have causal mutations in the set of genes known to underlie disease. Using whole-genome sequencing in two first cousins with TAAD, we identified a missense mutation in the lysyl oxidase (LOX) gene (c.893T > G encoding p.Met298Arg) that cosegregated with disease in the family. Using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) genome engineering tools, we introduced the human mutation into the homologous position in the mouse genome, creating mice that were heterozygous and homozygous for the human allele. Mutant mice that were heterozygous for the human allele displayed disorganized ultrastructural properties of the aortic wall characterized by fragmented elastic lamellae, whereas mice homozygous for the human allele died shortly after parturition from ascending aortic aneurysm and spontaneous hemorrhage. These data suggest that a missense mutation in LOX is associated with aortic disease in humans, likely through insufficient cross-linking of elastin and collagen in the aortic wall. Mutation carriers may be predisposed to vascular diseases because of weakened vessel walls under stress conditions. LOX sequencing for clinical TAAD may identify additional mutation carriers in the future. Additional studies using our mouse model of LOX-associated TAAD have the potential to clarify the mechanism of disease and identify novel therapeutics specific to this genetic cause. PMID:27432961

  8. Mutation at a distance caused by homopolymeric guanine repeats in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael J; Yu, Yen-Hsin; Guo, Jheng-Fen; Chong, Shin Yen; Kao, Cheng-Fu; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2016-05-01

    Mutation provides the raw material from which natural selection shapes adaptations. The rate at which new mutations arise is therefore a key factor that determines the tempo and mode of evolution. However, an accurate assessment of the mutation rate of a given organism is difficult because mutation rate varies on a fine scale within a genome. A central challenge of evolutionary genetics is to determine the underlying causes of this variation. In earlier work, we had shown that repeat sequences not only are prone to a high rate of expansion and contraction but also can cause an increase in mutation rate (on the order of kilobases) of the sequence surrounding the repeat. We perform experiments that show that simple guanine repeats 13 bp (base pairs) in length or longer (G 13+ ) increase the substitution rate 4- to 18-fold in the downstream DNA sequence, and this correlates with DNA replication timing (R = 0.89). We show that G 13+ mutagenicity results from the interplay of both error-prone translesion synthesis and homologous recombination repair pathways. The mutagenic repeats that we study have the potential to be exploited for the artificial elevation of mutation rate in systems biology and synthetic biology applications.

  9. Loss of function mutation in LOX causes thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian S; Halabi, Carmen M; Hoffman, Erin P; Carmichael, Nikkola; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Lian, Christine G; Bierhals, Andrew J; Vuzman, Dana; Mecham, Robert P; Frank, Natasha Y; Stitziel, Nathan O

    2016-08-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) represent a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many individuals presenting with an inherited form of TAAD do not have causal mutations in the set of genes known to underlie disease. Using whole-genome sequencing in two first cousins with TAAD, we identified a missense mutation in the lysyl oxidase (LOX) gene (c.893T > G encoding p.Met298Arg) that cosegregated with disease in the family. Using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) genome engineering tools, we introduced the human mutation into the homologous position in the mouse genome, creating mice that were heterozygous and homozygous for the human allele. Mutant mice that were heterozygous for the human allele displayed disorganized ultrastructural properties of the aortic wall characterized by fragmented elastic lamellae, whereas mice homozygous for the human allele died shortly after parturition from ascending aortic aneurysm and spontaneous hemorrhage. These data suggest that a missense mutation in LOX is associated with aortic disease in humans, likely through insufficient cross-linking of elastin and collagen in the aortic wall. Mutation carriers may be predisposed to vascular diseases because of weakened vessel walls under stress conditions. LOX sequencing for clinical TAAD may identify additional mutation carriers in the future. Additional studies using our mouse model of LOX-associated TAAD have the potential to clarify the mechanism of disease and identify novel therapeutics specific to this genetic cause.

  10. BMP9 mutations cause a vascular-anomaly syndrome with phenotypic overlap with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney L; McDonald, Jamie; O'Fallon, Brendan; Upton, Paul D; Li, Wei; Roman, Beth L; Young, Sarah; Plant, Parker; Fülöp, Gyula T; Langa, Carmen; Morrell, Nicholas W; Botella, Luisa M; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Stevenson, David A; Runo, James R; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar

    2013-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), the most common inherited vascular disorder, is caused by mutations in genes involved in the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway (ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4). Yet, approximately 15% of individuals with clinical features of HHT do not have mutations in these genes, suggesting that there are undiscovered mutations in other genes for HHT and possibly vascular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. The genetic etiology for 191 unrelated individuals clinically suspected to have HHT was investigated with the use of exome and Sanger sequencing; these individuals had no mutations in ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4. Mutations in BMP9 (also known as GDF2) were identified in three unrelated probands. These three individuals had epistaxis and dermal lesions that were described as telangiectases but whose location and appearance resembled lesions described in some individuals with RASA1-related disorders (capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome). Analyses of the variant proteins suggested that mutations negatively affect protein processing and/or function, and a bmp9-deficient zebrafish model demonstrated that BMP9 is involved in angiogenesis. These data confirm a genetic cause of a vascular-anomaly syndrome that has phenotypic overlap with HHT.

  11. Muscle imaging in patients with tubular aggregate myopathy caused by mutations in STIM1

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Giorgio; D'Amico, Adele; Monforte, Mauro; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Vialle, Marc; Fattori, Fabiana; Vissing, John; Ricci, Enzo; Bertini, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Tubular aggregate myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by tubular aggregates as the hallmark on muscle biopsy. Mutations in STIM1 have recently been identified as one genetic cause in a number of tubular aggregate myopathy cases. To characterize the pattern of muscle involvement in this disease, upper and lower girdles and lower limbs were imaged in five patients with mutations in STIM1, and the scans were compared with two patients with tubular aggregate myopathy not caused by mutations in STIM1. A common pattern of involvement was found in STIM1-mutated patients, although with variable extent and severity of lesions. In the upper girdle, the subscapularis muscle was invariably affected. In the lower limbs, all the patients showed a consistent involvement of the flexor hallucis longus, which is very rarely affected in other muscle diseases, and a diffuse involvement of thigh and posterior leg with sparing of gracilis, tibialis anterior and, to a lesser extent, short head of biceps femoris. Mutations in STIM1 are associated with a homogeneous involvement on imaging despite variable clinical features. Muscle imaging can be useful in identifying STIM1-mutated patients especially among other forms of tubular aggregate myopathy. PMID:26255678

  12. Mutation at a distance caused by homopolymeric guanine repeats in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael J; Yu, Yen-Hsin; Guo, Jheng-Fen; Chong, Shin Yen; Kao, Cheng-Fu; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2016-05-01

    Mutation provides the raw material from which natural selection shapes adaptations. The rate at which new mutations arise is therefore a key factor that determines the tempo and mode of evolution. However, an accurate assessment of the mutation rate of a given organism is difficult because mutation rate varies on a fine scale within a genome. A central challenge of evolutionary genetics is to determine the underlying causes of this variation. In earlier work, we had shown that repeat sequences not only are prone to a high rate of expansion and contraction but also can cause an increase in mutation rate (on the order of kilobases) of the sequence surrounding the repeat. We perform experiments that show that simple guanine repeats 13 bp (base pairs) in length or longer (G 13+ ) increase the substitution rate 4- to 18-fold in the downstream DNA sequence, and this correlates with DNA replication timing (R = 0.89). We show that G 13+ mutagenicity results from the interplay of both error-prone translesion synthesis and homologous recombination repair pathways. The mutagenic repeats that we study have the potential to be exploited for the artificial elevation of mutation rate in systems biology and synthetic biology applications. PMID:27386516

  13. Mutation at a distance caused by homopolymeric guanine repeats in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Michael J.; Yu, Yen-Hsin; Guo, Jheng-Fen; Chong, Shin Yen; Kao, Cheng-Fu; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Mutation provides the raw material from which natural selection shapes adaptations. The rate at which new mutations arise is therefore a key factor that determines the tempo and mode of evolution. However, an accurate assessment of the mutation rate of a given organism is difficult because mutation rate varies on a fine scale within a genome. A central challenge of evolutionary genetics is to determine the underlying causes of this variation. In earlier work, we had shown that repeat sequences not only are prone to a high rate of expansion and contraction but also can cause an increase in mutation rate (on the order of kilobases) of the sequence surrounding the repeat. We perform experiments that show that simple guanine repeats 13 bp (base pairs) in length or longer (G13+) increase the substitution rate 4- to 18-fold in the downstream DNA sequence, and this correlates with DNA replication timing (R = 0.89). We show that G13+ mutagenicity results from the interplay of both error-prone translesion synthesis and homologous recombination repair pathways. The mutagenic repeats that we study have the potential to be exploited for the artificial elevation of mutation rate in systems biology and synthetic biology applications. PMID:27386516

  14. Muscle imaging in patients with tubular aggregate myopathy caused by mutations in STIM1.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Giorgio; D'Amico, Adele; Monforte, Mauro; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Vialle, Marc; Fattori, Fabiana; Vissing, John; Ricci, Enzo; Bertini, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    Tubular aggregate myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by tubular aggregates as the hallmark on muscle biopsy. Mutations in STIM1 have recently been identified as one genetic cause in a number of tubular aggregate myopathy cases. To characterize the pattern of muscle involvement in this disease, upper and lower girdles and lower limbs were imaged in five patients with mutations in STIM1, and the scans were compared with two patients with tubular aggregate myopathy not caused by mutations in STIM1. A common pattern of involvement was found in STIM1-mutated patients, although with variable extent and severity of lesions. In the upper girdle, the subscapularis muscle was invariably affected. In the lower limbs, all the patients showed a consistent involvement of the flexor hallucis longus, which is very rarely affected in other muscle diseases, and a diffuse involvement of thigh and posterior leg with sparing of gracilis, tibialis anterior and, to a lesser extent, short head of biceps femoris. Mutations in STIM1 are associated with a homogeneous involvement on imaging despite variable clinical features. Muscle imaging can be useful in identifying STIM1-mutated patients especially among other forms of tubular aggregate myopathy. PMID:26255678

  15. Sporadic cardiac and skeletal myopathy caused by a de novo desmin mutation.

    PubMed

    Park, K Y; Dalakas, M C; Semino-Mora, C; Lee, H S; Litvak, S; Takeda, K; Ferrans, V J; Goldfarb, L G

    2000-06-01

    Desmin myopathy is a familial or sporadic disorder characterized by intracytoplasmic accumulation of desmin in the muscle cells. We and others have previously identified desmin gene mutations in patients with familial myopathy, but close to 45% of the patients do not report previous family history of the disease. The present study was conducted to determine the cause of desmin myopathy in a sporadic patient presenting with symmetrical muscle weakness and atrophy combined with atrioventricular conduction block requiring a permanent pacemaker. A novel heterozygous R406W mutation in the desmin gene was identified by sequencing cDNA and genomic DNA. Expression of a construct containing the patient's mutant desmin cDNA in SW13 (vim-) cells demonstrated a high pathogenic potential of the R406W mutation. This mutation was not found in the patient's father, mother or sister by sequencing and restriction analysis. Testing with five microsatellite markers and four intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms excluded alternative paternity. Haplotype analysis indicates that the patient's father was germ-line mosaic for the desmin mutation. We conclude that de novo mutations in the desmin gene may be the cause of sporadic forms of desmin-related cardiac and skeletal myopathy.

  16. FAS Haploinsufficiency Caused by Extracellular Missense Mutations Underlying Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Bielke, María Gabriela Simesen; Perez, Laura; Yancoski, Judith; Oliveira, João Bosco; Danielian, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in the FAS gene are the most common cause of Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS), and the majority of them affect the intracellular domain of FAS protein, particularly the region termed death domain. However, approximately one third of these mutations affect the extracellular region of FAS and most are stop codons, with very few missense changes having been described to date. We previously described 7 patients with a FAS missense extracellular mutation, C107Y, two in homozygozity and 5 in heterozygosity. We investigated here the mechanistic effects of this mutation and observed that the homozygous patients did not show any FAS surface expression, while the heterozygous patients had diminished receptor expression. Aiming to understand why a missense mutation was abolishing receptor expression, we analyzed intracellular FAS protein trafficking using fluorescent fusion proteins of wild type FAS, two missense extracellular mutants (FAS-C107Y and FAS-C104Y) and one missense change localized in the intracellular region, FAS-D260E. The FAS-C107Y and FAS-C104Y mutants failed to reach the cell surface, being retained at the endoplasmic reticulum, unlike the WT or the FAS-D260E which were clearly expressed at the plasma membrane. These results support haploinsufficiency as the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of ALPS caused by extracellular FAS missense mutations. PMID:26563159

  17. Identification of a Novel GJA8 (Cx50) Point Mutation Causes Human Dominant Congenital Cataracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiang-Lian; Zhang, Yilan; Wu, Yaming; Lv, Jineng; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary cataracts are clinically and genetically heterogeneous lens diseases that cause a significant proportion of visual impairment and blindness in children. Human cataracts have been linked with mutations in two genes, GJA3 and GJA8, respectively. To identify the causative mutation in a family with hereditary cataracts, family members were screened for mutations by PCR for both genes. Sequencing the coding regions of GJA8, coding for connexin 50, revealed a C > A transversion at nucleotide 264, which caused p.P88T mutation. To dissect the molecular consequences of this mutation, plasmids carrying wild-type and mutant mouse ORFs of Gja8 were generated and ectopically expressed in HEK293 cells and human lens epithelial cells, respectively. The recombinant proteins were assessed by confocal microscopy and Western blotting. The results demonstrate that the molecular consequences of the p.P88T mutation in GJA8 include changes in connexin 50 protein localization patterns, accumulation of mutant protein, and increased cell growth.

  18. A novel heterozygous SOX2 mutation causing congenital bilateral anophthalmia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Macchiaroli, Annamaria; Kelberman, Daniel; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Drury, Suzanne; Islam, Lily; Giangiobbe, Sara; Ironi, Gabriele; Lench, Nicholas; Sowden, Jane C; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario; Cavallo, Luciano; Gasperi, Maurizio; Faienza, Maria Felicia

    2014-01-25

    Heterozygous de novo mutations in SOX2 have been reported in approximately 10-20% of patients with unilateral or bilateral anophthalmia or microphthalmia. An additional phenotype of hypopituitarism, with anterior pituitary hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, has been reported in patients carrying SOX2 alterations. We report a novel heterozygous mutation in the SOX2 gene in a male affected with congenital bilateral anophthalmia, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and growth hormone deficiency. The mutation we describe is a cytosine deletion in position 905 (c905delC) which causes frameshift and an aberrant C-terminal domain. Our report highlights the fact that subjects affected with eye anomalies and harboring SOX2 mutations are at high risk for gonadotropin deficiency, which has important implications for their clinical management.

  19. Mutations in DEPDC5 cause familial focal epilepsy with variable foci.

    PubMed

    Dibbens, Leanne M; de Vries, Boukje; Donatello, Simona; Heron, Sarah E; Hodgson, Bree L; Chintawar, Satyan; Crompton, Douglas E; Hughes, James N; Bellows, Susannah T; Klein, Karl Martin; Callenbach, Petra M C; Corbett, Mark A; Gardner, Alison E; Kivity, Sara; Iona, Xenia; Regan, Brigid M; Weller, Claudia M; Crimmins, Denis; O'Brien, Terence J; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Mulley, John C; Dubeau, Francois; Licchetta, Laura; Bisulli, Francesca; Cossette, Patrick; Thomas, Paul Q; Gecz, Jozef; Serratosa, Jose; Brouwer, Oebele F; Andermann, Frederick; Andermann, Eva; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Pandolfo, Massimo; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2013-05-01

    The majority of epilepsies are focal in origin, with seizures emanating from one brain region. Although focal epilepsies often arise from structural brain lesions, many affected individuals have normal brain imaging. The etiology is unknown in the majority of individuals, although genetic factors are increasingly recognized. Autosomal dominant familial focal epilepsy with variable foci (FFEVF) is notable because family members have seizures originating from different cortical regions. Using exome sequencing, we detected DEPDC5 mutations in two affected families. We subsequently identified mutations in five of six additional published large families with FFEVF. Study of families with focal epilepsy that were too small for conventional clinical diagnosis with FFEVF identified DEPDC5 mutations in approximately 12% of families (10/82). This high frequency establishes DEPDC5 mutations as a common cause of familial focal epilepsies. Shared homology with G protein signaling molecules and localization in human neurons suggest a role of DEPDC5 in neuronal signal transduction.

  20. A novel fibrinogen B beta chain frameshift mutation causes congenital afibrinogenaemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Xiaojuan; Wang, Zhaoyue; Yu, Ziqiang; Cao, Lijuan; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Xia; Ruan, Changgeng

    2013-07-01

    Congenital afibrinogenaemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by various mutations within the fibrinogen genes FGA, FGB and FGG. Ins/del mutations in FGB are extremely rare. We report a patient with afibrinogenaemia who suffered from umbilical cord bleeding and repeated bleeding episodes. His plasma fibrinogen levels could not be detected using the Clauss method and immunological methods. Molecular analyses revealed homozygosity in a novel four bases insertion in codon 40 of FGB exon 2 (g. 2833_2834 ins GTTT), which resulted in a truncated 50-residue polypeptide that contained 11 exceptional abnormal residues. In the transient expression experiments, mutant fibrinogen could be detected at higher level than wild-type fibrinogen in COS-7 cell lysates but not in culture media. These results suggest that the homozygous mutation in FGB could be responsible for congenital afibrinogenaemia in this patient. This frameshift mutation could impair fibrinogen assembly and secretion without influencing the protein synthesis.

  1. A human CCT5 gene mutation causing distal neuropathy impairs hexadecamer assembly in an archaeal model

    PubMed Central

    Min, Wonki; Angileri, Francesca; Luo, Haibin; Lauria, Antonino; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Almerico, Anna Maria; Cappello, Francesco; de Macario, Everly Conway; Lednev, Igor K.; Macario, Alberto J. L.; Robb, Frank T.

    2014-01-01

    Chaperonins mediate protein folding in a cavity formed by multisubunit rings. The human CCT has eight non-identical subunits and the His147Arg mutation in one subunit, CCT5, causes neuropathy. Knowledge is scarce on the impact of this and other mutations upon the chaperone's structure and functions. To make progress, experimental models must be developed. We used an archaeal mutant homolog and demonstrated that the His147Arg mutant has impaired oligomeric assembly, ATPase activity, and defective protein homeostasis functions. These results establish for the first time that a human chaperonin gene defect can be reproduced and studied at the molecular level with an archaeal homolog. The major advantage of the system, consisting of rings with eight identical subunits, is that it amplifies the effects of a mutation as compared with the human counterpart, in which just one subunit per ring is defective. Therefore, the slight deficit of a non-lethal mutation can be detected and characterized. PMID:25345891

  2. Gain-of-function SOS1 mutations cause a distinctive form of noonansyndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, Marco; Pennacchio, Len A.; Zhao, Chen; Yadav, KamleshK.; Fodale, Valentina; Sarkozy, Anna; Pandit, Bhaswati; Oishi, Kimihiko; Martinelli, Simone; Schackwitz, Wendy; Ustaszewska, Anna; Martin, Joes; Bristow, James; Carta, Claudio; Lepri, Francesca; Neri, Cinzia; Vasta,Isabella; Gibson, Kate; Curry, Cynthia J.; Lopez Siguero, Juan Pedro; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Gelb, Brude D.

    2006-09-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a developmental disordercharacterized by short stature, facial dysmorphia, congenital heartdefects and skeletal anomalies1. Increased RAS-mitogenactivated proteinkinase (MAPK) signaling due to PTPN11 and KRAS mutations cause 50 percentof NS2-6. Here, we report that 22 of 129 NS patients without PTPN11 orKRAS mutation (17 percent) have missense mutations in SOS1, which encodesa RAS-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). SOS1 mutationscluster at residues implicated in the maintenance of SOS1 in itsautoinhibited form and ectopic expression of two NS-associated mutantsinduced enhanced RAS activation. The phenotype associated with SOS1defects is distinctive, although within NS spectrum, with a highprevalence of ectodermal abnormalities but generally normal developmentand linear growth. Our findings implicate for the first timegain-of-function mutations in a RAS GEF in inherited disease and define anew mechanism by which upregulation of the RAS pathway can profoundlychange human development.

  3. De novo SHANK3 mutation causes Rett syndrome-like phenotype in a female patient.

    PubMed

    Hara, Munetsugu; Ohba, Chihiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder predominantly affecting females. Females with the MECP2 mutations exhibit a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from classical Rett syndrome to asymptomatic carriers. Mutations of genes encoding cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) are also found in early onset RTT variants. Here, we present the first report of a female patient with RTT-like phenotype caused by SHANK3 (SH3 and multiple ankylin repeat domain 3) mutation, indicating that the clinical spectrum of SHANK3 mutations may extend to RTT-like phenotype in addition to (severe) developmental delay, absence of expressive speech, autistic behaviors and intellectual disability.

  4. Mutations in LMNA Modulate the Lamin A - Nesprin-2 Interaction and Cause LINC Complex Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Munck, Martina; Swaminathan, Karthic; Kapinos, Larisa E.; Noegel, Angelika A.; Neumann, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Background In eukaryotes the genetic material is enclosed by a continuous membrane system, the nuclear envelope (NE). Along the NE specific proteins assemble to form meshworks and mutations in these proteins have been described in a group of human diseases called laminopathies. Laminopathies include lipodystrophies, muscle and cardiac diseases as well as metabolic or progeroid syndromes. Most laminopathies are caused by mutations in the LMNAgene encoding lamins A/C. Together with Nesprins (Nuclear Envelope Spectrin Repeat Proteins) they are core components of the LINC complex (Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton). The LINC complex connects the nucleoskeleton and the cytoskeleton and plays a role in the transfer of mechanically induced signals along the NE into the nucleus, and its components have been attributed functions in maintaining nuclear and cellular organization as well as signal transduction. Results Here we narrowed down the interaction sites between lamin A and Nesprin-2 to aa 403–425 in lamin A and aa 6146–6347 in Nesprin-2. Laminopathic mutations in and around the involved region of lamin A (R401C, G411D, G413C, V415I, R419C, L421P, R427G, Q432X) modulate the interaction with Nesprin-2 and this may contribute to the disease phenotype. The most notable mutation is the lamin A mutation Q432X that alters LINC complex protein assemblies and causes chromosomal and transcription factor rearrangements. Conclusion Mutations in Nesprin-2 and lamin A are characterised by complex genotype phenotype relations. Our data show that each mutation in LMNAanalysed here has a distinct impact on the interaction among both proteins that substantially explains how distinct mutations in widely expressed genes lead to the formation of phenotypically different diseases. PMID:23977161

  5. Mutations in the tail domain of DYNC1H1 cause dominant spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Harms, M.B.; Ori-McKenney, K.M.; Scoto, M.; Tuck, E.P.; Bell, S.; Ma, D.; Masi, S.; Allred, P.; Al-Lozi, M.; Reilly, M.M.; Miller, L.J.; Jani-Acsadi, A.; Pestronk, A.; Shy, M.E.; Muntoni, F.; Vallee, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the gene responsible for 14q32-linked dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED, OMIM 158600). Methods: Target exon capture and next generation sequencing was used to analyze the 73 genes in the 14q32 linkage interval in 3 SMA-LED family members. Candidate gene sequencing in additional dominant SMA families used PCR and pooled target capture methods. Patient fibroblasts were biochemically analyzed. Results: Regional exome sequencing of all candidate genes in the 14q32 interval in the original SMA-LED family identified only one missense mutation that segregated with disease state—a mutation in the tail domain of DYNC1H1 (I584L). Sequencing of DYNC1H1 in 32 additional probands with lower extremity predominant SMA found 2 additional heterozygous tail domain mutations (K671E and Y970C), confirming that multiple different mutations in the same domain can cause a similar phenotype. Biochemical analysis of dynein purified from patient-derived fibroblasts demonstrated that the I584L mutation dominantly disrupted dynein complex stability and function. Conclusions: We demonstrate that mutations in the tail domain of the heavy chain of cytoplasmic dynein (DYNC1H1) cause spinal muscular atrophy and provide experimental evidence that a human DYNC1H1 mutation disrupts dynein complex assembly and function. DYNC1H1 mutations were recently found in a family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (type 2O) and in a child with mental retardation. Both of these phenotypes show partial overlap with the spinal muscular atrophy patients described here, indicating that dynein dysfunction is associated with a range of phenotypes in humans involving neuronal development and maintenance. PMID:22459677

  6. PRIMA1 mutation: a new cause of nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Tankard, Rick; Gazina, Elena V; Damiano, John A; Lawrence, Kate M; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M; Regan, Brigid M; Shearer, Aiden Eliot; Smith, Richard J H; Marini, Carla; Guerrini, Renzo; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Tinuper, Paolo; Lichetta, Laura; Baldassari, Sara; Bisulli, Francesca; Pippucci, Tommaso; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Reid, Christopher A; Petrou, Steven; Bahlo, Melanie; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) can be sporadic or autosomal dominant; some families have nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit mutations. We report a novel autosomal recessive phenotype in a single family and identify the causative gene. Methods Whole exome sequencing data was used to map the family, thereby narrowing exome search space, and then to identify the mutation. Results Linkage analysis using exome sequence data from two affected and two unaffected subjects showed homozygous linkage peaks on chromosomes 7, 8, 13, and 14 with maximum LOD scores between 1.5 and 1.93. Exome variant filtering under these peaks revealed that the affected siblings were homozygous for a novel splice site mutation (c.93+2T>C) in the PRIMA1 gene on chromosome 14. No additional PRIMA1 mutations were found in 300 other NFLE cases. The c.93+2T>C mutation was shown to lead to skipping of the first coding exon of the PRIMA1 mRNA using a minigene system. Interpretation PRIMA1 is a transmembrane protein that anchors acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme hydrolyzing acetycholine, to membrane rafts of neurons. PRiMA knockout mice have reduction of AChE and accumulation of acetylcholine at the synapse; our minigene analysis suggests that the c.93+2T>C mutation leads to knockout of PRIMA1. Mutations with gain of function effects in acetylcholine receptor subunits cause autosomal dominant NFLE. Thus, enhanced cholinergic responses are the likely cause of the severe NFLE and intellectual disability segregating in this family, representing the first recessive case to be reported and the first PRIMA1 mutation implicated in disease. PMID:26339676

  7. EGR2 mutation R359W causes a spectrum of Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Boerkoel, C F; Takashima, H; Bacino, C A; Daentl, D; Lupski, J R

    2001-07-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the early growth response gene 2 (EGR2), which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor that regulates the late stages of myelination, cause myelinopathies including congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy, Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy (DSN), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. We screened 170 unrelated neuropathy patients without mutations involving the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22), the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ), or the gap junction protein beta1 gene (GJB1) and identified two DSN patients with the heterozygous mutation R359W in the alpha-helix domain of the first zinc-finger of EGR2. We now report that this mutation is a recurrent cause of DSN, and that expressivity ranges from that typical for DSN to a more rapidly progressive neuropathy that can cause death by age 6 years. Furthermore, in contrast to patients with typical DSN, patients with the EGR2 R359W mutation have more respiratory compromise and cranial nerve involvement. PMID:11523566

  8. GATA4 mutations cause human congenital heart defects and reveal an interaction with TBX5.

    PubMed

    Garg, Vidu; Kathiriya, Irfan S; Barnes, Robert; Schluterman, Marie K; King, Isabelle N; Butler, Cheryl A; Rothrock, Caryn R; Eapen, Reenu S; Hirayama-Yamada, Kayoko; Joo, Kunitaka; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Cohen, Jonathan C; Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-07-24

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common developmental anomaly and are the leading non-infectious cause of mortality in newborns. Only one causative gene, NKX2-5, has been identified through genetic linkage analysis of pedigrees with non-syndromic CHDs. Here, we show that isolated cardiac septal defects in a large pedigree were linked to chromosome 8p22-23. A heterozygous G296S missense mutation of GATA4, a transcription factor essential for heart formation, was found in all available affected family members but not in any control individuals. This mutation resulted in diminished DNA-binding affinity and transcriptional activity of Gata4. Furthermore, the Gata4 mutation abrogated a physical interaction between Gata4 and TBX5, a T-box protein responsible for a subset of syndromic cardiac septal defects. Conversely, interaction of Gata4 and TBX5 was disrupted by specific human TBX5 missense mutations that cause similar cardiac septal defects. In a second family, we identified a frame-shift mutation of GATA4 (E359del) that was transcriptionally inactive and segregated with cardiac septal defects. These results implicate GATA4 as a genetic cause of human cardiac septal defects, perhaps through its interaction with TBX5. PMID:12845333

  9. Mutations in the interleukin receptor IL11RA cause autosomal recessive Crouzon-like craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Keupp, Katharina; Li, Yun; Vargel, Ibrahim; Hoischen, Alexander; Richardson, Rebecca; Neveling, Kornelia; Alanay, Yasemin; Uz, Elif; Elcioğlu, Nursel; Rachwalski, Martin; Kamaci, Soner; Tunçbilek, Gökhan; Akin, Burcu; Grötzinger, Joachim; Konas, Ersoy; Mavili, Emin; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Collmann, Hartmut; Roscioli, Tony; Buckley, Michael F; Yigit, Gökhan; Gilissen, Christian; Kress, Wolfram; Veltman, Joris; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Akarsu, Nurten A; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-11-01

    We have characterized a novel autosomal recessive Crouzon-like craniosynostosis syndrome in a 12-affected member family from Antakya, Turkey, the presenting features of which include: multiple suture synostosis, midface hypoplasia, variable degree of exophthalmos, relative prognathism, a beaked nose, and conductive hearing loss. Homozygosity mapping followed by targeted next-generation sequencing identified a c.479+6T>G mutation in the interleukin 11 receptor alpha gene (IL11RA) on chromosome 9p21. This donor splice-site mutation leads to a high percentage of aberrant IL11RA mRNA transcripts in an affected individual and altered mRNA splicing determined by in vitro exon trapping. An extended IL11RA mutation screen was performed in a cohort of 79 patients with an initial clinical diagnosis of Crouzon syndrome, pansynostosis, or unclassified syndromic craniosynostosis. We identified mutations segregating with the disease in five families: a German patient of Turkish origin and a Turkish family with three affected sibs all of whom were homozygous for the previously identified IL11RA c.479+6T>G mutation; a family with pansynostosis with compound heterozygous missense mutations, p.Pro200Thr and p.Arg237Pro; and two further Turkish families with Crouzon-like syndrome carrying the homozygous nonsense mutations p.Tyr232* and p.Arg292*. Using transient coexpression in HEK293T and COS7 cells, we demonstrated dramatically reduced IL11-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation for all mutations. Immunofluorescence analysis of mouse Il11ra demonstrated specific protein expression in cranial mesenchyme which was localized around the coronal suture tips and in the lambdoidal suture. In situ hybridization analysis of adult zebrafish also detected zfil11ra expression in the coronal suture between the overlapping frontal and parietal plates. This study demonstrates that mutations in the IL11RA gene cause an autosomal recessive Crouzon-like craniosynostosis. PMID:24498618

  10. Rate of FKS Mutations among Consecutive Candida Isolates Causing Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Shields, Ryan K; Nguyen, M Hong; Press, Ellen G; Cumbie, Richard; Driscoll, Eileen; Pasculle, A William; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2015-12-01

    Precise FKS mutation rates among Candida species are undefined because studies have not systematically screened consecutive, disease-causing isolates. The Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) assay measures echinocandin MICs against Candida with less variability than reference broth microdilution methods. However, clinical breakpoint MICs may overstate caspofungin nonsusceptibility compared to other agents. Our objectives were to determine Candida FKS mutation rates by studying consecutive bloodstream isolates and to determine if discrepant susceptibility results were associated with FKS mutations. FKS hot spots were sequenced in echinocandin-intermediate and -resistant isolates and those from patients with breakthrough candidemia or ≥ 3 days of prior echinocandin exposure. Overall, 453 isolates from 384 patients underwent susceptibility testing; 16% were echinocandin intermediate or resistant. Intermediate susceptibility rates were higher for Candida glabrata than for other species (P < 0.0001) and higher for caspofungin than for other agents (P < 0.0001). Resistance rates were similar between agents. FKS mutations were detected in 5% of sequenced isolates and 2% of isolates overall. Corresponding rates among C. glabrata isolates were 8% and 4%, respectively. Among Candida albicans isolates, rates were 5% and <1%, respectively. Mutations occurred exclusively with prior echinocandin exposure and were not detected in other species. Isolates with discrepant susceptibility results did not harbor FKS mutations. Mutation rates among isolates resistant to ≥ 2, 1, and 0 agents were 75%, 13%, and 0%, respectively. In conclusion, FKS mutations were uncommon among non-C. glabrata species, even with prior echinocandin exposure. Discrepancies in echinocandin susceptibility by SYO testing were not driven by mutations and likely reflect imprecise caspofungin clinical breakpoints.

  11. A novel heterozygous SOX2 mutation causing anophthalmia/microphthalmia with genital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Pedace, Lucia; Castori, Marco; Binni, Francesco; Pingi, Alberto; Grammatico, Barbara; Scommegna, Salvatore; Majore, Silvia; Grammatico, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Anophthalmia/microphthalmia is a rare developmental craniofacial defect, which recognizes a wide range of causes, including chromosomal abnormalities, single-gene mutations as well as environmental factors. Heterozygous mutations in the SOX2 gene are the most common monogenic form of anophthalmia/microphthalmia, as they are reported in up to 10-15% cases. Here, we describe a sporadic patient showing bilateral anophthalmia/microphthalmia and micropenis caused by a novel mutation (c.59_60insGG) in the SOX2 gene. Morphological and endocrinological evaluations excluded any anomaly of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis. Our finding supports the hypothesis that SOX2 is particularly prone to slipped-strand mispairing, which results in a high frequency of point deletions/insertions.

  12. Establishing the precise evolutionary history of a gene improves prediction of disease-causing missense mutations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2016-02-18

    Here, predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are probably benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, whereas inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and, moreover, are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods: We identified major events inmore » NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism s fitness. As a result, removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. In conclusion, the results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well.« less

  13. Establishing Precise Evolutionary History of a Gene Improves Predicting Disease Causing Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are likely benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, while inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and moreover are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods We identified major events in NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism’s fitness. Results Removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. Conclusion The results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well. PMID:26890452

  14. Recurrent spontaneous pneumothoraces and bullous emphysema. A novel mutation causing Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burkett, Andrew; Coffey, Niamh; Tomiak, Eva; Voduc, Nha

    2016-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHDS) is a rare form of classically cystic lung disease that may present with spontaneous pneumothorax. The associated skin manifestations (fibrofolliculomas) are not always present. This article describes a case of spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to bullous emphysema in an otherwise healthy gentleman caused by a novel mutation in the folliculin (FLCN) gene. PMID:27642565

  15. Mutations in the DNA methyltransferase gene DNMT3A cause an overgrowth syndrome with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Seal, Sheila; Ruark, Elise; Harmer, Jenny; Ramsay, Emma; Del Vecchio Duarte, Silvana; Zachariou, Anna; Hanks, Sandra; O'Brien, Eleanor; Aksglaede, Lise; Baralle, Diana; Dabir, Tabib; Gener, Blanca; Goudie, David; Homfray, Tessa; Kumar, Ajith; Pilz, Daniela T; Selicorni, Angelo; Temple, I Karen; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Yachelevich, Naomi; van Montfort, Robert; Rahman, Nazneen

    2014-04-01

    Overgrowth disorders are a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by increased growth parameters and other variable clinical features such as intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. To identify new causes of human overgrowth, we performed exome sequencing in ten proband-parent trios and detected two de novo DNMT3A mutations. We identified 11 additional de novo mutations by sequencing DNMT3A in a further 142 individuals with overgrowth. The mutations alter residues in functional DNMT3A domains, and protein modeling suggests that they interfere with domain-domain interactions and histone binding. Similar mutations were not present in 1,000 UK population controls (13/152 cases versus 0/1,000 controls; P < 0.0001). Mutation carriers had a distinctive facial appearance, intellectual disability and greater height. DNMT3A encodes a DNA methyltransferase essential for establishing methylation during embryogenesis and is commonly somatically mutated in acute myeloid leukemia. Thus, DNMT3A joins an emerging group of epigenetic DNA- and histone-modifying genes associated with both developmental growth disorders and hematological malignancies. PMID:24614070

  16. DEPDC5 mutations are not a frequent cause of familial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Striano, Pasquale; Serioli, Elena; Santulli, Lia; Manna, Ida; Labate, Angelo; Dazzo, Emanuela; Pasini, Elena; Gambardella, Antonio; Michelucci, Roberto; Striano, Salvatore; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the DEPDC5 (DEP domain-containing protein 5) gene are a major cause of familial focal epilepsy with variable foci (FFEVF) and are predicted to account for 12-37% of families with inherited focal epilepsies. To assess the clinical impact of DEPDC5 mutations in familial temporal lobe epilepsy, we screened a collection of Italian families with either autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) or familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (FMTLE). The probands of 28 families classified as ADLTE and 17 families as FMTLE were screened for DEPDC5 mutations by whole exome or targeted massive parallel sequencing. Putative mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing. We identified a DEPDC5 nonsense mutation (c.918C>G; p.Tyr306*) in a family with two affected members, clinically classified as FMTLE. The proband had temporal lobe seizures with prominent psychic symptoms (déjà vu, derealization, and forced thoughts); her mother had temporal lobe seizures, mainly featuring visceral epigastric auras and anxiety. In total, we found a single DEPDC5 mutation in one of (2.2%) 45 families with genetic temporal lobe epilepsy, a proportion much lower than that reported in other inherited focal epilepsies. PMID:26216793

  17. Dominant mutations in GRHL3 cause Van der Woude Syndrome and disrupt oral periderm development.

    PubMed

    Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Kousa, Youssef A; Smith, Tiffany L; Dunnwald, Martine; Magnusson, Måns; Lentz, Brian A; Unneberg, Per; Fransson, Ingegerd; Koillinen, Hannele K; Rautio, Jorma; Pegelow, Marie; Karsten, Agneta; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Gordon, William; Andersen, Bogi; Svensson, Thomas; Murray, Jeffrey C; Cornell, Robert A; Kere, Juha; Schutte, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) account for ∼70% of cases of Van der Woude syndrome (VWS), the most common syndromic form of cleft lip and palate. In 8 of 45 VWS-affected families lacking a mutation in IRF6, we found coding mutations in grainyhead-like 3 (GRHL3). According to a zebrafish-based assay, the disease-associated GRHL3 mutations abrogated periderm development and were consistent with a dominant-negative effect, in contrast to haploinsufficiency seen in most VWS cases caused by IRF6 mutations. In mouse, all embryos lacking Grhl3 exhibited abnormal oral periderm and 17% developed a cleft palate. Analysis of the oral phenotype of double heterozygote (Irf6(+/-);Grhl3(+/-)) murine embryos failed to detect epistasis between the two genes, suggesting that they function in separate but convergent pathways during palatogenesis. Taken together, our data demonstrated that mutations in two genes, IRF6 and GRHL3, can lead to nearly identical phenotypes of orofacial cleft. They supported the hypotheses that both genes are essential for the presence of a functional oral periderm and that failure of this process contributes to VWS. PMID:24360809

  18. Three new PAX6 mutations including one causing an unusual ophthalmic phenotype associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Dansault, Anouk; David, Gabriel; Schwartz, Claire; Jaliffa, Carolina; Vieira, Véronique; de la Houssaye, Guillaume; Bigot, Karine; Catin, Françise; Tattu, Laurent; Chopin, Catherine; Halimi, Philippe; Roche, Olivier; Van Regemorter, Nicole; Munier, Francis; Schorderet, Daniel; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Marsac, Cécile; Ricquier, Daniel; Menasche, Maurice; Penfornis, Alfred

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The PAX6 gene was first described as a candidate for human aniridia. However, PAX6 expression is not restricted to the eye and it appears to be crucial for brain development. We studied PAX6 mutations in a large spectrum of patients who presented with aniridia phenotypes, Peters' anomaly, and anterior segment malformations associated or not with neurological anomalies. Methods Patients and related families were ophthalmologically phenotyped, and in some cases neurologically and endocrinologically examined. We screened the PAX6 gene by direct sequencing in three groups of patients: those affected by aniridia; those with diverse ocular manifestations; and those with Peters' anomaly. Two mutations were investigated by generating crystallographic representations of the amino acid changes. Results Three novel heterozygous mutations affecting three unrelated families were identified: the g.572T>C nucleotide change, located in exon 5, and corresponding to the Leucine 46 Proline amino-acid mutation (L46P); the g.655A>G nucleotide change, located in exon 6, and corresponding to the Serine 74 Glycine amino-acid mutation (S74G); and the nucleotide deletion 579delG del, located in exon 6, which induces a frameshift mutation leading to a stop codon (V48fsX53). The L46P mutation was identified in affected patients presenting bilateral microphthalmia, cataracts, and nystagmus. The S74G mutation was found in a large family that had congenital ocular abnormalities, diverse neurological manifestations, and variable cognitive impairments. The 579delG deletion (V48fsX53) caused in the affected members of the same family bilateral aniridia associated with congenital cataract, foveal hypolasia, and nystagmus. We also detected a novel intronic nucleotide change, IVS2+9G>A (very likely a mutation) in an apparently isolated patient affected by a complex ocular phenotype, characterized primarily by a bilateral microphthalmia. Whether this nucleotide change is indeed pathogenic

  19. Axial Spondylometaphyseal Dysplasia Is Caused by C21orf2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Fujita, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Toru; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Albalwi, Mohammed A.; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Cho, Tae-Joon; Lim, Gye-Yeon; Isidor, Bertrand; David, Albert; Rustad, Cecilie F.; Merckoll, Else; Westvik, Jostein; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Kou, Ikuyo; Nakajima, Masahiro; Ohashi, Hirohumi; Smithson, Sarah; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Axial spondylometaphyseal dysplasia (axial SMD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by dysplasia of axial skeleton and retinal dystrophy. We conducted whole exome sequencing and identified C21orf2 (chromosome 21 open reading frame 2) as a disease gene for axial SMD. C21orf2 mutations have been recently found to cause isolated retinal degeneration and Jeune syndrome. We found a total of five biallelic C21orf2 mutations in six families out of nine: three missense and two splicing mutations in patients with various ethnic backgrounds. The pathogenic effects of the splicing (splice-site and branch-point) mutations were confirmed on RNA level, which showed complex patterns of abnormal splicing. C21orf2 mutations presented with a wide range of skeletal phenotypes, including cupped and flared anterior ends of ribs, lacy ilia and metaphyseal dysplasia of proximal femora. Analysis of patients without C21orf2 mutation indicated genetic heterogeneity of axial SMD. Functional data in chondrocyte suggest C21orf2 is implicated in cartilage differentiation. C21orf2 protein was localized to the connecting cilium of the cone and rod photoreceptors, confirming its significance in retinal function. Our study indicates that axial SMD is a member of a unique group of ciliopathy affecting skeleton and retina. PMID:26974433

  20. TUBA1A mutation can cause a hydranencephaly-like severe form of cortical dysgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Setsuri; Ishihara, Naoko; Miya, Fuyuki; Tsutsumi, Makiko; Yanagihara, Itaru; Fujita, Naoko; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Yamasaki, Mami; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Kojima, Seiji; Saitoh, Shinji; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Natsume, Jun

    2015-01-01

    TUBA1A mutations cause a wide spectrum of lissencephaly and brain malformations. Here, we report two patients with severe cortical dysgeneses, one with an extremely thin cerebral parenchyma apparently looking like hydranencephaly and the other with lissencephaly accompanied by marked hydrocephalus, both harbouring novel de novo missense mutations of TUBA1A. To elucidate how the various TUBA1A mutations affect the severity of the phenotype, we examined the capacity of the mutant protein to incorporate into the endogenous microtubule network in transfected COS7 cells by measuring line density using line extraction in an immunofluorescence study. The mutants responsible for severe phenotypes were found to incorporate extensively into the network. To determine how each mutant alters the microtubule stability, we examined cold-induced microtubule depolymerisation in fibroblasts. The depolymerisation of patients’ fibroblasts occurred earlier than that of control fibroblasts, suggesting that microtubules bearing mutated tubulins are unstable. Both mutations are predicted to participate in lateral interactions of microtubules. Our data suggest that the TUBA1A mutations disrupting lateral interactions have pronounced dominant-negative effects on microtubule dynamics that are associated with the severe end of the lissencephaly spectrum. PMID:26493046

  1. TUBA1A mutation can cause a hydranencephaly-like severe form of cortical dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Setsuri; Ishihara, Naoko; Miya, Fuyuki; Tsutsumi, Makiko; Yanagihara, Itaru; Fujita, Naoko; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Yamasaki, Mami; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Kojima, Seiji; Saitoh, Shinji; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Natsume, Jun

    2015-10-23

    TUBA1A mutations cause a wide spectrum of lissencephaly and brain malformations. Here, we report two patients with severe cortical dysgeneses, one with an extremely thin cerebral parenchyma apparently looking like hydranencephaly and the other with lissencephaly accompanied by marked hydrocephalus, both harbouring novel de novo missense mutations of TUBA1A. To elucidate how the various TUBA1A mutations affect the severity of the phenotype, we examined the capacity of the mutant protein to incorporate into the endogenous microtubule network in transfected COS7 cells by measuring line density using line extraction in an immunofluorescence study. The mutants responsible for severe phenotypes were found to incorporate extensively into the network. To determine how each mutant alters the microtubule stability, we examined cold-induced microtubule depolymerisation in fibroblasts. The depolymerisation of patients' fibroblasts occurred earlier than that of control fibroblasts, suggesting that microtubules bearing mutated tubulins are unstable. Both mutations are predicted to participate in lateral interactions of microtubules. Our data suggest that the TUBA1A mutations disrupting lateral interactions have pronounced dominant-negative effects on microtubule dynamics that are associated with the severe end of the lissencephaly spectrum.

  2. A missense mutation in the beta-2 integrin gene (ITGB2) causes canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kijas, J M; Bauer, T R; Gäfvert, S; Marklund, S; Trowald-Wigh, G; Johannisson, A; Hedhammar, A; Binns, M; Juneja, R K; Hickstein, D D; Andersson, L

    1999-10-01

    Canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) is a fatal immunodeficiency disease found in Irish setters. The clinical manifestations of CLAD are very similar to LAD in humans and BLAD in cattle, which are both caused by mutations in ITGB2 encoding the leukocyte integrin beta-2 subunit (CD18). Sequence analysis of the ITGB2 coding sequence from a CLAD dog and a healthy control revealed a single missense mutation, Cys36Ser. This cysteine residue is conserved among all beta integrins, and the mutation most likely disrupts a disulfide bond. The mutation showed a complete association with CLAD in Irish setters and was not found in a sample of dogs from other breeds. The causative nature of this mutation was confirmed by transduction experiments using retroviral vectors and human LAD EBV B-cells. The normal canine CD18 formed heterodimers with the human CD11 subunit, whereas gene transfer of the mutant CD18 resulted in very low levels of CD11/CD18 expression. The identification of the causative mutation for CLAD now makes it possible to identify carrier animals with a simple diagnostic DNA test, and it forms the basis for using CLAD as a large animal model for the development and evaluation of clinical treatments for human LAD. PMID:10512685

  3. The Polg Mutator Phenotype Does Not Cause Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in DJ-1-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Hauser, David N; Primiani, Christopher T; Langston, Rebekah G; Kumaran, Ravindran; Cookson, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the DJ-1 gene cause autosomal recessive parkinsonism in humans. Several mouse models of DJ-1 deficiency have been developed, but they do not have dopaminergic neuron cell death in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage occurs frequently in the aged human SNpc but not in the mouse SNpc. We hypothesized that the reason DJ-1-deficient mice do not have dopaminergic cell death is due to an absence of mtDNA damage. We tested this hypothesis by crossing DJ-1-deficient mice with mice that have similar amounts of mtDNA damage in their SNpc as aged humans (Polg mutator mice). At 1 year of age, we counted the amount of SNpc dopaminergic neurons in the mouse brains using both colorimetric and fluorescent staining followed by unbiased stereology. No evidence of dopaminergic cell death was observed in DJ-1-deficient mice with the Polg mutator mutation. Furthermore, we did not observe any difference in dopaminergic terminal immunostaining in the striatum of these mice. Finally, we did not observe any changes in the amount of GFAP-positive astrocytes in the SNpc of these mice, indicative of a lack of astrogliosis. Altogether, our findings demonstrate the DJ-1-deficient mice, Polg mutator mice, and DJ-1-deficient Polg mutator mice have intact nigrastriatal pathways. Thus, the lack of mtDNA damage in the mouse SNpc does not underlie the absence of dopaminergic cell death in DJ-1-deficient mice.

  4. Functional Characterization and Categorization of Missense Mutations that Cause Methylmalonyl‐CoA Mutase (MUT) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Forny, Patrick; Froese, D. Sean; Suormala, Terttu

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methylmalonyl‐CoA mutase (MUT) is an essential enzyme in propionate catabolism that requires adenosylcobalamin as a cofactor. Almost 250 inherited mutations in the MUT gene are known to cause the devastating disorder methylmalonic aciduria; however, the mechanism of dysfunction of these mutations, more than half of which are missense changes, has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we examined 23 patient missense mutations covering a spectrum of exonic/structural regions, clinical phenotypes, and ethnic populations in order to determine their influence on protein stability, using two recombinant expression systems and a thermostability assay, and enzymatic function by measuring MUT activity and affinity for its cofactor and substrate. Our data stratify MUT missense mutations into categories of biochemical defects, including (1) reduced protein level due to misfolding, (2) increased thermolability, (3) impaired enzyme activity, and (4) reduced cofactor response in substrate turnover. We further demonstrate the stabilization of wild‐type and thermolabile mutants by chemical chaperones in vitro and in bacterial cells. This in‐depth mutation study illustrates the tools available for MUT enzyme characterization, guides future categorization of further missense mutations, and supports the development of alternative, chaperone‐based therapy for patients not responding to current treatment. PMID:25125334

  5. Axial Spondylometaphyseal Dysplasia Is Caused by C21orf2 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Iida, Aritoshi; Miyake, Noriko; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Fujita, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Toru; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Albalwi, Mohammed A; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Cho, Tae-Joon; Lim, Gye-Yeon; Isidor, Bertrand; David, Albert; Rustad, Cecilie F; Merckoll, Else; Westvik, Jostein; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Kou, Ikuyo; Nakajima, Masahiro; Ohashi, Hirohumi; Smithson, Sarah; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Axial spondylometaphyseal dysplasia (axial SMD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by dysplasia of axial skeleton and retinal dystrophy. We conducted whole exome sequencing and identified C21orf2 (chromosome 21 open reading frame 2) as a disease gene for axial SMD. C21orf2 mutations have been recently found to cause isolated retinal degeneration and Jeune syndrome. We found a total of five biallelic C21orf2 mutations in six families out of nine: three missense and two splicing mutations in patients with various ethnic backgrounds. The pathogenic effects of the splicing (splice-site and branch-point) mutations were confirmed on RNA level, which showed complex patterns of abnormal splicing. C21orf2 mutations presented with a wide range of skeletal phenotypes, including cupped and flared anterior ends of ribs, lacy ilia and metaphyseal dysplasia of proximal femora. Analysis of patients without C21orf2 mutation indicated genetic heterogeneity of axial SMD. Functional data in chondrocyte suggest C21orf2 is implicated in cartilage differentiation. C21orf2 protein was localized to the connecting cilium of the cone and rod photoreceptors, confirming its significance in retinal function. Our study indicates that axial SMD is a member of a unique group of ciliopathy affecting skeleton and retina. PMID:26974433

  6. Exome Sequencing Identifies INPPL1 Mutations as a Cause of Opsismodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Céline; Faqeih, Eissa Ali; Bartholdi, Deborah; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Borochowitz, Zvi; Cavalcanti, Denise P.; Frigo, Amandine; Nitschke, Patrick; Roume, Joelle; Santos, Heloísa G.; Shalev, Stavit A.; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Le Merrer, Martine; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Opsismodysplasia (OPS) is a severe autosomal-recessive chondrodysplasia characterized by pre- and postnatal micromelia with extremely short hands and feet. The main radiological features are severe platyspondyly, squared metacarpals, delayed skeletal ossification, and metaphyseal cupping. In order to identify mutations causing OPS, a total of 16 cases (7 terminated pregnancies and 9 postnatal cases) from 10 unrelated families were included in this study. We performed exome sequencing in three cases from three unrelated families and only one gene was found to harbor mutations in all three cases: inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1 (INPPL1). Screening INPPL1 in the remaining cases identified a total of 12 distinct INPPL1 mutations in the 10 families, present at the homozygote state in 7 consanguinous families and at the compound heterozygote state in the 3 remaining families. Most mutations (6/12) resulted in premature stop codons, 2/12 were splice site, and 4/12 were missense mutations located in the catalytic domain, 5-phosphatase. INPPL1 belongs to the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate 5-phosphatase family, a family of signal-modulating enzymes that govern a plethora of cellular functions by regulating the levels of specific phosphoinositides. Our finding of INPPL1 mutations in OPS, a severe spondylodysplastic dysplasia with major growth plate disorganization, supports a key and specific role of this enzyme in endochondral ossification. PMID:23273569

  7. Dominant β-catenin mutations cause intellectual disability with recognizable syndromic features

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Valter; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Hardy, Andrea; Heise, Ines; Maggi, Silvia; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Hilton, Helen; Esapa, Chris; Simon, Michelle; Buenavista, Maria-Teresa; McGuffin, Liam J.; Vizor, Lucie; Dodero, Luca; Tsaftaris, Sotirios; Romero, Rosario; Nillesen, Willy N.; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Kempers, Marlies J.; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Iqbal, Zafar; Orlando, Marta; Maccione, Alessandro; Lassi, Glenda; Farisello, Pasqualina; Contestabile, Andrea; Tinarelli, Federico; Nieus, Thierry; Raimondi, Andrea; Greco, Barbara; Cantatore, Daniela; Gasparini, Laura; Berdondini, Luca; Bifone, Angelo; Gozzi, Alessandro; Wells, Sara; Nolan, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    The recent identification of multiple dominant mutations in the gene encoding β-catenin in both humans and mice has enabled exploration of the molecular and cellular basis of β-catenin function in cognitive impairment. In humans, β-catenin mutations that cause a spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified. We identified de novo β-catenin mutations in patients with intellectual disability, carefully characterized their phenotypes, and were able to define a recognizable intellectual disability syndrome. In parallel, characterization of a chemically mutagenized mouse line that displays features similar to those of human patients with β-catenin mutations enabled us to investigate the consequences of β-catenin dysfunction through development and into adulthood. The mouse mutant, designated batface (Bfc), carries a Thr653Lys substitution in the C-terminal armadillo repeat of β-catenin and displayed a reduced affinity for membrane-associated cadherins. In association with this decreased cadherin interaction, we found that the mutation results in decreased intrahemispheric connections, with deficits in dendritic branching, long-term potentiation, and cognitive function. Our study provides in vivo evidence that dominant mutations in β-catenin underlie losses in its adhesion-related functions, which leads to severe consequences, including intellectual disability, childhood hypotonia, progressive spasticity of lower limbs, and abnormal craniofacial features in adults. PMID:24614104

  8. A mitochondrial DNA mutation as a cause of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Lott, M T; Wallace, D C

    1989-05-18

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease associated with the late onset of bilateral loss of central vision and cardiac dysrhythmias. The maternal inheritance is explained by the mitochondrial origin of the disease. Analysis of the sequence of a mitochondrial DNA has indicated that a single nucleotide change at position 11778 is associated with this disease. This mutation converts the 340th amino acid of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 from an arginine to a histidine and eliminates an SfaNI endonuclease restriction site. A survey of restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms in the mitochondrial DNA of three independent families with this disease (an American black and two white European families) and 10 controls confirmed that this SfaNI site is associated with the disease. A phylogenetic tree for mitochondrial DNA polymorphism and sequence variants from three probands with Leber's disease and four controls was constructed, and the mutation at position 11778 was found to be associated with two mitochondrial DNA backgrounds--an American black mitochondrial DNA and a European mitochondrial DNA. Thus, this mutation must have arisen twice independently. Since the mutation correlated with symptoms of Leber's disease in both cases, these findings indicate that the mutation is a cause of the disease. This genetic analysis has identified the specific point mutation in the mitochondrial DNA that results in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. PMID:2566116

  9. Axial Spondylometaphyseal Dysplasia Is Caused by C21orf2 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Iida, Aritoshi; Miyake, Noriko; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Fujita, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Toru; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Albalwi, Mohammed A; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Cho, Tae-Joon; Lim, Gye-Yeon; Isidor, Bertrand; David, Albert; Rustad, Cecilie F; Merckoll, Else; Westvik, Jostein; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Kou, Ikuyo; Nakajima, Masahiro; Ohashi, Hirohumi; Smithson, Sarah; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Axial spondylometaphyseal dysplasia (axial SMD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by dysplasia of axial skeleton and retinal dystrophy. We conducted whole exome sequencing and identified C21orf2 (chromosome 21 open reading frame 2) as a disease gene for axial SMD. C21orf2 mutations have been recently found to cause isolated retinal degeneration and Jeune syndrome. We found a total of five biallelic C21orf2 mutations in six families out of nine: three missense and two splicing mutations in patients with various ethnic backgrounds. The pathogenic effects of the splicing (splice-site and branch-point) mutations were confirmed on RNA level, which showed complex patterns of abnormal splicing. C21orf2 mutations presented with a wide range of skeletal phenotypes, including cupped and flared anterior ends of ribs, lacy ilia and metaphyseal dysplasia of proximal femora. Analysis of patients without C21orf2 mutation indicated genetic heterogeneity of axial SMD. Functional data in chondrocyte suggest C21orf2 is implicated in cartilage differentiation. C21orf2 protein was localized to the connecting cilium of the cone and rod photoreceptors, confirming its significance in retinal function. Our study indicates that axial SMD is a member of a unique group of ciliopathy affecting skeleton and retina.

  10. Mutations in DNMT1 cause autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Juliane; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Faraco, Juliette; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Melberg, Atle; Cornelio, Ferdinando; Urban, Alexander E.; Pizza, Fabio; Poli, Francesca; Grubert, Fabian; Wieland, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Hallmayer, Joachim; Strom, Tim M.; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) is characterized by late onset (30–40 years old) cerebellar ataxia, sensory neuronal deafness, narcolepsy–cataplexy and dementia. We performed exome sequencing in five individuals from three ADCA-DN kindreds and identified DNMT1 as the only gene with mutations found in all five affected individuals. Sanger sequencing confirmed the de novo mutation p.Ala570Val in one family, and showed co-segregation of p.Val606Phe and p.Ala570Val, with the ADCA-DN phenotype, in two other kindreds. An additional ADCA-DN kindred with a p.GLY605Ala mutation was subsequently identified. Narcolepsy and deafness were the first symptoms to appear in all pedigrees, followed by ataxia. DNMT1 is a widely expressed DNA methyltransferase maintaining methylation patterns in development, and mediating transcriptional repression by direct binding to HDAC2. It is also highly expressed in immune cells and required for the differentiation of CD4+ into T regulatory cells. Mutations in exon 20 of this gene were recently reported to cause hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSAN1). Our mutations are all located in exon 21 and in very close spatial proximity, suggesting distinct phenotypes depending on mutation location within this gene. PMID:22328086

  11. Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis of the Latin American Mediterranean Lineage, Wrongly Identified as Mycobacterium pinnipedii (Spoligotype International Type 863 [SIT863]), Causing Active Tuberculosis in South Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Sidra E. G.; Esteves, Leonardo S.; Gomes, Harrison M.; Almeida da Silva, Pedro; Perdigão, João; Portugal, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; McNerney, Ruth; Pain, Arnab; Clark, Taane G.; Rastogi, Nalin; Unis, Gisela; Rossetti, Maria Lucia R.

    2015-01-01

    We recently detected the spoligotype patterns of strains of Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, in sputum samples from nine cases with pulmonary tuberculosis residing in Porto Alegre, South Brazil. Because this species is rarely encountered in humans, we further characterized these nine isolates by additional genotyping techniques, including 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing, verification of the loci TbD1, RD9, pks15/1, RDRio, and fbpC, the insertion of IS6110 at a site specific to the M. tuberculosis Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) lineage, and whole-genome sequencing. The combined analysis of these markers revealed that the isolates are in fact M. tuberculosis and more specifically belong to the LAM genotype. Most of these isolates (n = 8) were shown to be multidrug resistant (MDR), which prompted us to perform partial sequencing of the rpoA, rpoB, rpoC, katG, and inhA genes. Seven isolates (77.8%) carried the S315T mutation in katG, and one of these (11%) also presented the C(−17)T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in inhA. Interestingly, six of the MDR isolates also presented an undescribed insertion of 12 nucleotides (CCA GAA CAA CCC) in codon 516 of rpoB. No putative compensatory mutation was found in either rpoA or rpoC. This is the first report of an M. tuberculosis LAM family strain with a convergent M. pinnipedii spoligotype. These spoligotypes are observed in genotype databases at a modest frequency, highlighting that care must be taken when identifying isolates in the M. tuberculosis complex on the basis of single genetic markers. PMID:26400784

  12. A novel recurrent mutation in ATP1A3 causes CAPOS syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We undertook genetic analysis of three affected families to identify the cause of dominantly-inherited CAPOS (cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy and sensorineural hearing loss) syndrome. Methods We used whole-exome sequencing to analyze two families affected with CAPOS syndrome, including the original family reported in 1996, and Sanger sequencing to assess familial segregation of rare variants identified in the probands and in a third, apparently unrelated family with CAPOS syndrome. Results We found an identical heterozygous missense mutation, c.2452G > A (p.(Glu818Lys)), in the Na+/K+ ATPase α3(ATP1A3) gene in the proband and his affected sister and mother, but not in either unaffected maternal grandparent, in the first family. The same mutation was also identified in the proband and three other affected members of the second family and in all three affected members of the third family. This mutation was not found in more than 3600 chromosomes from unaffected individuals. Conclusion Other mutations in ATP1A3 have previously been demonstrated to cause rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (also called dystonia-12) or alternating hemiplegia of childhood. This study shows that an allelic mutation in ATP1A3 produces CAPOS syndrome. PMID:24468074

  13. Hepatoerythropoietic Porphyria Caused by a Novel Homoallelic Mutation in Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase Gene in Egyptian Patients.

    PubMed

    Farrag, M S; Mikula, I; Richard, E; Saudek, V; De Verneuil, H; Martásek, P

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are metabolic disorders resulting from mutations in haem biosynthetic pathway genes. Hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP) is a rare type of porphyria caused by the deficiency of the fifth enzyme (uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase, UROD) in this pathway. The defect in the enzymatic activity is due to biallelic mutations in the UROD gene. Currently, 109 UROD mutations are known. The human disease has an early onset, manifesting in infancy or early childhood with red urine, skin photosensitivity in sun-exposed areas, and hypertrichosis. Similar defects and links to photosensitivity and hepatopathy exist in several animal models, including zebrafish and mice. In the present study, we report a new mutation in the UROD gene in Egyptian patients with HEP. We show that the homozygous c.T163A missense mutation leads to a substitution of a conserved phenylalanine (amino acid 55) for isoleucine in the enzyme active site, causing a dramatic decrease in the enzyme activity (19 % of activity of wild-type enzyme). Inspection of the UROD crystal structure shows that Phe-55 contacts the substrate and is located in the loop that connects helices 2 and 3. Phe-55 is strictly conserved in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic UROD. The F55I substitution likely interferes with the enzyme-substrate interaction.

  14. Recessive mutations in ELOVL4 cause ichthyosis, intellectual disability, and spastic quadriplegia.

    PubMed

    Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Mohamed, Jawahir Y; Alkuraya, Hisham S; Verma, Ishwar C; Puri, Ratna D; Alaiya, Ayodele A; Rizzo, William B; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2011-12-01

    Very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) play important roles in membrane structure and cellular signaling, and their contribution to human health is increasingly recognized. Fatty acid elongases catalyze the first and rate-limiting step in VLCFA synthesis. Heterozygous mutations in ELOVL4, the gene encoding one of the elongases, are known to cause macular degeneration in humans and retinal abnormalities in mice. However, biallelic ELOVL4 mutations have not been observed in humans, and murine models with homozygous mutations die within hours of birth as a result of a defective epidermal water barrier. Here, we report on two human individuals with recessive ELOVL4 mutations revealed by a combination of autozygome analysis and exome sequencing. These individuals exhibit clinical features of ichthyosis, seizures, mental retardation, and spasticity-a constellation that resembles Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) but presents a more severe neurologic phenotype. Our findings identify recessive mutations in ELOVL4 as the cause of a neuro-ichthyotic disease and emphasize the importance of VLCFA synthesis in brain and cutaneous development. PMID:22100072

  15. Functional analysis and in vitro correction of splicing FAH mutations causing tyrosinemia type I.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Carro, R; Sánchez-Alcudia, R; Pérez, B; Navarrete, R; Pérez-Cerdá, C; Ugarte, M; Desviat, L R

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1) is a rare disease caused by a deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) in the tyrosine catabolic pathway, resulting mainly in hepatic alterations due to accumulation of the toxic metabolites fumarylacetoacetate, maleylacetoacetate and succinylacetone. We have characterized using minigenes four splicing mutations affecting exonic or intronic nucleotides of the FAH gene identified in two HT1 patients. Two of the mutations are novel, c.82-1G>A and c.913G>C and the other two have been previously associated with a splicing defect (c.836A>G and c.1062+5G>A). All mutations were confirmed to affect splicing in minigenes, resulting in exon skipping or activation of a cryptic splice site. We have analyzed the effect of different compounds known to modulate splicing (valproic acid, phenyl butyrate, M344, EIPA, and resveratrol) and the overexpression of splice factors of the SR protein family on the transcriptional profile of the mutant minigenes. For the c.836A>G mutation, a partial recovery of the correctly spliced transcript was observed. These results confirm the relevance of performing functional studies for mutations potentially affecting the splicing process and open the possibility of supplementary therapeutic approaches to diseases caused by splicing defects.

  16. Mutations in the PCNA-binding domain of CDKN1C cause IMAGe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arboleda, Valerie A; Lee, Hane; Parnaik, Rahul; Fleming, Alice; Banerjee, Abhik; Ferraz-de-Souza, Bruno; Délot, Emmanuèle C; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Imilce A; Braslavsky, Debora; Bergadá, Ignacio; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C; Nelson, Stanley F; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A; Achermann, John C; Vilain, Eric

    2012-07-01

    IMAGe syndrome (intrauterine growth restriction, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita and genital anomalies) is an undergrowth developmental disorder with life-threatening consequences. An identity-by-descent analysis in a family with IMAGe syndrome identified a 17.2-Mb locus on chromosome 11p15 that segregated in the affected family members. Targeted exon array capture of the disease locus, followed by high-throughput genomic sequencing and validation by dideoxy sequencing, identified missense mutations in the imprinted gene CDKN1C (also known as P57KIP2) in two familial and four unrelated patients. A familial analysis showed an imprinted mode of inheritance in which only maternal transmission of the mutation resulted in IMAGe syndrome. CDKN1C inhibits cell-cycle progression, and we found that targeted expression of IMAGe-associated CDKN1C mutations in Drosophila caused severe eye growth defects compared to wild-type CDKN1C, suggesting a gain-of-function mechanism. All IMAGe-associated mutations clustered in the PCNA-binding domain of CDKN1C and resulted in loss of PCNA binding, distinguishing them from the mutations of CDKN1C that cause Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, an overgrowth syndrome.

  17. Exome sequencing identifies MAX mutations as a cause of hereditary pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Comino-Méndez, Iñaki; Gracia-Aznárez, Francisco J; Schiavi, Francesca; Landa, Iñigo; Leandro-García, Luis J; Letón, Rocío; Honrado, Emiliano; Ramos-Medina, Rocío; Caronia, Daniela; Pita, Guillermo; Gómez-Graña, Alvaro; de Cubas, Aguirre A; Inglada-Pérez, Lucía; Maliszewska, Agnieszka; Taschin, Elisa; Bobisse, Sara; Pica, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Hernández-Lavado, Rafael; Díaz, José A; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; González-Neira, Anna; Roncador, Giovanna; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina; Benítez, Javier; Mannelli, Massimo; Opocher, Giuseppe; Robledo, Mercedes; Cascón, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    Hereditary pheochromocytoma (PCC) is often caused by germline mutations in one of nine susceptibility genes described to date, but there are familial cases without mutations in these known genes. We sequenced the exomes of three unrelated individuals with hereditary PCC (cases) and identified mutations in MAX, the MYC associated factor X gene. Absence of MAX protein in the tumors and loss of heterozygosity caused by uniparental disomy supported the involvement of MAX alterations in the disease. A follow-up study of a selected series of 59 cases with PCC identified five additional MAX mutations and suggested an association with malignant outcome and preferential paternal transmission of MAX mutations. The involvement of the MYC-MAX-MXD1 network in the development and progression of neural crest cell tumors is further supported by the lack of functional MAX in rat PCC (PC12) cells and by the amplification of MYCN in neuroblastoma and suggests that loss of MAX function is correlated with metastatic potential. PMID:21685915

  18. WDR73 mutations cause infantile neurodegeneration and variable glomerular kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Vodopiutz, Julia; Seidl, Rainer; Prayer, Daniela; Khan, M. Imran; Mayr, Johannes A.; Streubel, Berthold; Steiß, Jens-Oliver; Hahn, Andreas; Csaicsich, Dagmar; Castro, Christel; Assoum, Mirna; Müller, Thomas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Mancini, Grazia M. S.; Sadowski, Carolin E.; Levy, Nicolas; Mégarbané, André; Godbole, Koumudi; Schanze, Denny; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Delague, Valérie; Janecke, Andreas R.; Zenker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Infantile-onset cerebellar atrophy (CA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous trait. Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GMS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by microcephaly with brain anomalies including CA in some cases, intellectual disability, and early-infantile-onset nephrotic syndrome. Very recently, WDR73 deficiency was identified as the cause of GMS in five individuals. To evaluate the role of WDR73 mutations as a cause of GMS and other forms of syndromic CA, we performed Sanger or exome sequencing in 51 unrelated patients with CA and variable brain anomalies and in 40 unrelated patients with a diagnosis of GMS. We identified 10 patients from three CA and from two GMS families with WDR73 mutations including the original family described with CA, mental retardation, optic atrophy and skin abnormalities (CAMOS). There were five novel mutations, of which two were truncating and three were missense mutations affecting highly conserved residues. Individuals carrying homozygous WDR73 mutations mainly presented with a pattern of neurological and neuroimaging findings as well as intellectual disability, while kidney involvement was variable. We document postnatal onset of CA, a retinopathy, basal ganglia degeneration, and short stature as novel features of WDR73-related disease, and define WDR73-related disease as a new entity of infantile neurodegeneration. PMID:26123727

  19. Exome sequencing identifies MAX mutations as a cause of hereditary pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Comino-Méndez, Iñaki; Gracia-Aznárez, Francisco J; Schiavi, Francesca; Landa, Iñigo; Leandro-García, Luis J; Letón, Rocío; Honrado, Emiliano; Ramos-Medina, Rocío; Caronia, Daniela; Pita, Guillermo; Gómez-Graña, Alvaro; de Cubas, Aguirre A; Inglada-Pérez, Lucía; Maliszewska, Agnieszka; Taschin, Elisa; Bobisse, Sara; Pica, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Hernández-Lavado, Rafael; Díaz, José A; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; González-Neira, Anna; Roncador, Giovanna; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina; Benítez, Javier; Mannelli, Massimo; Opocher, Giuseppe; Robledo, Mercedes; Cascón, Alberto

    2011-06-19

    Hereditary pheochromocytoma (PCC) is often caused by germline mutations in one of nine susceptibility genes described to date, but there are familial cases without mutations in these known genes. We sequenced the exomes of three unrelated individuals with hereditary PCC (cases) and identified mutations in MAX, the MYC associated factor X gene. Absence of MAX protein in the tumors and loss of heterozygosity caused by uniparental disomy supported the involvement of MAX alterations in the disease. A follow-up study of a selected series of 59 cases with PCC identified five additional MAX mutations and suggested an association with malignant outcome and preferential paternal transmission of MAX mutations. The involvement of the MYC-MAX-MXD1 network in the development and progression of neural crest cell tumors is further supported by the lack of functional MAX in rat PCC (PC12) cells and by the amplification of MYCN in neuroblastoma and suggests that loss of MAX function is correlated with metastatic potential.

  20. A recurrent de novo mutation in KCNC1 causes progressive myoclonus epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Muona, Mikko; Berkovic, Samuel F; Dibbens, Leanne M; Oliver, Karen L; Maljevic, Snezana; Bayly, Marta A; Joensuu, Tarja; Canafoglia, Laura; Franceschetti, Silvana; Michelucci, Roberto; Markkinen, Salla; Heron, Sarah E; Hildebrand, Michael S; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Gambardella, Antonio; Tinuper, Paolo; Licchetta, Laura; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Criscuolo, Chiara; Filla, Alessandro; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Ahmad, Jamil; Ahmad, Adeel; Baykan, Betul; Said, Edith; Topcu, Meral; Riguzzi, Patrizia; King, Mary D; Ozkara, Cigdem; Andrade, Danielle M; Engelsen, Bernt A; Crespel, Arielle; Lindenau, Matthias; Lohmann, Ebba; Saletti, Veronica; Massano, João; Privitera, Michael; Espay, Alberto J; Kauffmann, Birgit; Duchowny, Michael; Møller, Rikke S; Straussberg, Rachel; Afawi, Zaid; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Daly, Mark J; Petrou, Steven; Lerche, Holger; Palotie, Aarno; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina

    2014-01-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of rare, inherited disorders manifesting with action myoclonus, tonic-clonic seizures, and ataxia. We exome-sequenced 84 unrelated PME patients of unknown cause and molecularly solved 26 cases (31%). Remarkably, a recurrent de novo mutation c.959G>A (p.Arg320His) in KCNC1 was identified as a novel major cause for PME. Eleven unrelated exome-sequenced (13%) and two patients in a secondary cohort (7%) had this mutation. KCNC1 encodes KV3.1, a subunit of the KV3 voltage-gated K+ channels, major determinants of high-frequency neuronal firing. Functional analysis of the p.Arg320His mutant channel revealed a dominant-negative loss-of-function effect. Ten patients had pathogenic mutations in known PME-associated genes (NEU1, NHLRC1, AFG3L2, EPM2A, CLN6, SERPINI1). Identification of mutations in PRNP, SACS, and TBC1D24 expand their phenotypic spectrum to PME. These findings provide important insights into the molecular genetic basis of PME and reveal the role of de novo mutations in this disease entity. PMID:25401298

  1. A rational free energy-based approach to understanding and targeting disease-causing missense mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Witham, Shawn; Petukh, Marharita; Moroy, Gautier; Miteva, Maria; Ikeguchi, Yoshihiko; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Background and significance Intellectual disability is a condition characterized by significant limitations in cognitive abilities and social/behavioral adaptive skills and is an important reason for pediatric, neurologic, and genetic referrals. Approximately 10% of protein-encoding genes on the X chromosome are implicated in intellectual disability, and the corresponding intellectual disability is termed X-linked ID (XLID). Although few mutations and a small number of families have been identified and XLID is rare, collectively the impact of XLID is significant because patients usually are unable to fully participate in society. Objective To reveal the molecular mechanisms of various intellectual disabilities and to suggest small molecules which by binding to the malfunctioning protein can reduce unwanted effects. Methods Using various in silico methods we reveal the molecular mechanism of XLID in cases involving proteins with known 3D structure. The 3D structures were used to predict the effect of disease-causing missense mutations on the folding free energy, conformational dynamics, hydrogen bond network and, if appropriate, protein-protein binding free energy. Results It is shown that the vast majority of XLID mutation sites are outside the active pocket and are accessible from the water phase, thus providing the opportunity to alter their effect by binding appropriate small molecules in the vicinity of the mutation site. Conclusions This observation is used to demonstrate, computationally and experimentally, that a particular condition, Snyder-Robinson syndrome caused by the G56S spermine synthase mutation, might be ameliorated by small molecule binding. PMID:23408511

  2. De Novo Mutations in SIK1 Cause a Spectrum of Developmental Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Jeanne; Snow, Chelsi; Tuttle, Emily; Ghoneim, Dalia H.; Yang, Chun-Song; Spencer, Adam; Gunter, Sonya A.; Smyser, Christopher D.; Gurnett, Christina A.; Shinawi, Marwan; Dobyns, William B.; Wheless, James; Halterman, Marc W.; Jansen, Laura A.; Paschal, Bryce M.; Paciorkowski, Alex R.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental epilepsies are age-dependent seizure disorders for which genetic causes have been increasingly identified. Here we report six unrelated individuals with mutations in salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) in a series of 101 persons with early myoclonic encephalopathy, Ohtahara syndrome, and infantile spasms. Individuals with SIK1 mutations had short survival in cases with neonatal epilepsy onset, and an autism plus developmental syndrome after infantile spasms in others. All six mutations occurred outside the kinase domain of SIK1 and each of the mutants displayed autophosphorylation and kinase activity toward HDAC5. Three mutations generated truncated forms of SIK1 that were resistant to degradation and also showed changes in sub-cellular localization compared to wild-type SIK1. We also report the human neuropathologic examination of SIK1-related developmental epilepsy, with normal neuronal morphology and lamination but abnormal SIK1 protein cellular localization. Therefore, these results expand the genetic etiologies of developmental epilepsies by demonstrating SIK1 mutations as a cause of severe developmental epilepsy. PMID:25839329

  3. Clinical spectrum of 4H leukodystrophy caused by POLR3A and POLR3B mutations

    PubMed Central

    Vanderver, Adeline; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M.L.; Schiffmann, Raphael; Brais, Bernard; Bugiani, Marianna; Sistermans, Erik; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene; Kros, Johan M.; Pinto, Pedro Soares; Pohl, Daniela; Tirupathi, Sandya; Strømme, Petter; de Grauw, Ton; Fribourg, Sébastien; Demos, Michelle; Pizzino, Amy; Naidu, Sakkubai; Guerrero, Kether; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Bernard, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical and radiologic spectrum and genotype–phenotype correlation of 4H (hypomyelination, hypodontia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism) leukodystrophy caused by mutations in POLR3A or POLR3B. Methods: We performed a multinational cross-sectional observational study of the clinical, radiologic, and molecular characteristics of 105 mutation-proven cases. Results: The majority of patients presented before 6 years with gross motor delay or regression. Ten percent had an onset beyond 10 years. The disease course was milder in patients with POLR3B than in patients with POLR3A mutations. Other than the typical neurologic, dental, and endocrine features, myopia was seen in almost all and short stature in 50%. Dental and hormonal findings were not invariably present. Mutations in POLR3A and POLR3B were distributed throughout the genes. Except for French Canadian patients, patients from European backgrounds were more likely to have POLR3B mutations than other populations. Most patients carried the common c.1568T>A POLR3B mutation on one allele, homozygosity for which causes a mild phenotype. Systematic MRI review revealed that the combination of hypomyelination with relative T2 hypointensity of the ventrolateral thalamus, optic radiation, globus pallidus, and dentate nucleus, cerebellar atrophy, and thinning of the corpus callosum suggests the diagnosis. Conclusions: 4H is a well-recognizable clinical entity if all features are present. Mutations in POLR3A are associated with a more severe clinical course. MRI characteristics are helpful in addressing the diagnosis, especially if patients lack the cardinal non-neurologic features. PMID:25339210

  4. Exome-Sequencing Confirms DNAJC5 Mutations as Cause of Adult Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Bruno A.; Alvarado, David; Cai, Yefei; Mayo, Kevin; Chakraverty, Sumitra; Norton, Joanne; Morris, John C.; Sands, Mark S.; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    We performed whole-exome sequencing in two autopsy-confirmed cases and an elderly unaffected control from a multigenerational family with autosomal dominant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL). A novel single-nucleotide variation (c.344T>G) in the DNAJC5 gene was identified. Mutational screening in an independent family with autosomal dominant ANCL found an in-frame single codon deletion (c.346_348 delCTC) resulting in a deletion of p.Leu116del. These variants fulfill all genetic criteria for disease-causing mutations: they are found in unrelated families with the same disease, exhibit complete segregation between the mutation and the disease, and are absent in healthy controls. In addition, the associated amino acid substitutions are located in evolutionarily highly conserved residues and are predicted to functionally affect the encoded protein (CSPα). The mutations are located in a cysteine-string domain, which is required for membrane targeting/binding, palmitoylation, and oligomerization of CSPα. We performed a comprehensive in silico analysis of the functional and structural impact of both mutations on CSPα. We found that these mutations dramatically decrease the affinity of CSPα for the membrane. We did not identify any significant effect on palmitoylation status of CSPα. However, a reduction of CSPα membrane affinity may change its palmitoylation and affect proper intracellular sorting. We confirm that CSPα has a strong intrinsic aggregation propensity; however, it is not modified by the mutations. A complementary disease-network analysis suggests a potential interaction with other NCLs genes/pathways. This is the first replication study of the identification of DNAJC5 as the disease-causing gene for autosomal dominant ANCL. The identification of the novel gene in ANCL will allow us to gain a better understanding of the pathological mechanism of ANCLs and constitutes a great advance toward the development of new molecular diagnostic tests and may

  5. A missense mutation in KCTD17 causes autosomal dominant myoclonus-dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mencacci, Niccolo E; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H R; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M P; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P; Wood, Nicholas W

    2015-06-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%-50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  6. A Missense Mutation in KCTD17 Causes Autosomal Dominant Myoclonus-Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M.P.; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R.; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C.; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M.; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%–50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  7. De Novo GMNN Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Primordial Dwarfism Associated with Meier-Gorlin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burrage, Lindsay C.; Charng, Wu-Lin; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Willer, Jason R.; Davis, Erica E.; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zhu, Wenmiao; Leduc, Magalie S.; Akdemir, Zeynep C.; Azamian, Mahshid; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P.; Schoots, Jeroen; de Munnik, Sonja A.; Roepman, Ronald; Pearring, Jillian N.; Jhangiani, Shalini; Katsanis, Nicholas; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Brunner, Han G.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Xia, Fan; Lalani, Seema R.; Lupski, James R.; Bongers, Ernie M.H.F.; Yang, Yaping

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin of DNA replication initiation. To date, only an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been described in individuals with this disorder, with a molecular etiology established in about three-fourths of cases. Here, we report three subjects with MGS and de novo heterozygous mutations in the 5′ end of GMNN, encoding the DNA replication inhibitor geminin. We identified two truncating mutations in exon 2 (the 1st coding exon), c.16A>T (p.Lys6∗) and c.35_38delTCAA (p.Ile12Lysfs∗4), and one missense mutation, c.50A>G (p.Lys17Arg), affecting the second-to-last nucleotide of exon 2 and possibly RNA splicing. Geminin is present during the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and is degraded during the metaphase-anaphase transition by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which recognizes the destruction box sequence near the 5′ end of the geminin protein. All three GMNN mutations identified alter sites 5′ to residue Met28 of the protein, which is located within the destruction box. We present data supporting a gain-of-function mechanism, in which the GMNN mutations result in proteins lacking the destruction box and hence increased protein stability and prolonged inhibition of replication leading to autosomal-dominant MGS. PMID:26637980

  8. Osteogenesis imperfecta caused by PPIB mutation with severe phenotype and congenital hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Eric T.; Caldwell, Kathleen S.; Kreikemeier, Rose M.; Lutz, Richard E.; Esposito, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited disorder of connective tissue typically caused by defects in either COL1A1 or COL1A2. A number of other genes causative of this disorder have been found, including PPIB, which forms one subunit of the prolyl 3-hydroxylase enzyme complex. Patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in this gene have OI with a trend toward lethal or severe phenotype. We present a Native American female with prenatal diagnosis of OI. Long bones were shortened with significant rhizomelia. At birth, fractures were present in ribs, humerii, and femurs. She had significant respiratory disease at birth, and required oxygen throughout her life. She also had recurrent pneumonias, one of which ultimately caused her death at age 16 mo. She also had significant bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Molecular testing showed that the patient was homozygous for a single nucleotide substitution in PPIB (c. 136-2A>G). Patients with OI caused by PPIB mutations have had variable disease, but with majority of either with perinatal lethality or progressively deforming severe disease. Patients with OI due to PPIB mutation have shown some differences in phenotype. There appears to be a trend toward rhizomelic shortening and less severe bowing of the extremities, as compared to patients with comparably severe OI caused by COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutation. Congenital hearing loss may be an inconsistent feature of this condition, or may have co-occurred in our patient for unrelated reasons. Still, patients with OI caused by PPIB mutation should have appropriate early and regular management of their hearing. PMID:27625864

  9. Osteogenesis imperfecta caused by PPIB mutation with severe phenotype and congenital hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T; Caldwell, Kathleen S; Kreikemeier, Rose M; Lutz, Richard E; Esposito, Paul W

    2014-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited disorder of connective tissue typically caused by defects in either COL1A1 or COL1A2. A number of other genes causative of this disorder have been found, including PPIB, which forms one subunit of the prolyl 3-hydroxylase enzyme complex. Patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in this gene have OI with a trend toward lethal or severe phenotype. We present a Native American female with prenatal diagnosis of OI. Long bones were shortened with significant rhizomelia. At birth, fractures were present in ribs, humerii, and femurs. She had significant respiratory disease at birth, and required oxygen throughout her life. She also had recurrent pneumonias, one of which ultimately caused her death at age 16 mo. She also had significant bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Molecular testing showed that the patient was homozygous for a single nucleotide substitution in PPIB (c. 136-2A>G). Patients with OI caused by PPIB mutations have had variable disease, but with majority of either with perinatal lethality or progressively deforming severe disease. Patients with OI due to PPIB mutation have shown some differences in phenotype. There appears to be a trend toward rhizomelic shortening and less severe bowing of the extremities, as compared to patients with comparably severe OI caused by COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutation. Congenital hearing loss may be an inconsistent feature of this condition, or may have co-occurred in our patient for unrelated reasons. Still, patients with OI caused by PPIB mutation should have appropriate early and regular management of their hearing. PMID:27625864

  10. Mutations in COL6A3 Cause Severe and Mild Phenotypes of Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Ercan; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Allamand, Valérie; Ferreiro, Ana; Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Topaloglu, Haluk; Echenne, Bernard; Merlini, Luciano; Guicheney, Pascale

    2002-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by generalized muscular weakness, contractures of multiple joints, and distal hyperextensibility. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations of COL6A2 on chromosome 21q22 have recently been shown to cause UCMD. We performed a genomewide screening with microsatellite markers in a consanguineous family with three sibs affected with UCMD. Linkage of the disease to chromosome 2q37 was found in this family and in two others. We analyzed COL6A3, which encodes the α3 chain of collagen VI, and identified one homozygous mutation per family. In family I, the three sibs carried an A→G transition in the splice-donor site of intron 29 (6930+5A→G), leading to the skipping of exon 29, a partial reduction of collagen VI in muscle biopsy, and an intermediate phenotype. In family II, the patient had an unusual mild phenotype, despite a nonsense mutation, R465X, in exon 5. Analysis of the patient’s COL6A3 transcripts showed the presence of various mRNA species—one of which lacked several exons, including the exon containing the nonsense mutation. The deleted splice variant encodes collagen molecules that have a shorter N-terminal domain but that may assemble with other chains and retain a functional role. This could explain the mild phenotype of the patient who was still ambulant at age 18 years and who showed an unusual combination of hyperlaxity and finger contractures. In family III, the patient had a nonsense mutation, R2342X, causing absence of collagen VI in muscle and fibroblasts, and a severe phenotype, as has been described in patients with UCMD. Mutations in COL6A3 are described in UCMD for the first time and illustrate the wide spectrum of phenotypes which can be caused by collagen VI deficiency. PMID:11992252

  11. Putative Breast Cancer Driver Mutations in TBX3 Cause Impaired Transcriptional Repression

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kathrin; Pflugfelder, Gert O.

    2015-01-01

    The closely related T-box transcription factors TBX2 and TBX3 are frequently overexpressed in melanoma and various types of human cancers, in particular, breast cancer. The overexpression of TBX2 and TBX3 can have several cellular effects, among them suppression of senescence, promotion of epithelial–mesenchymal transition, and invasive cell motility. In contrast, loss of function of TBX3 and most other human T-box genes causes developmental haploinsufficiency syndromes. Stephens and colleagues (1), by exome sequencing of breast tumor samples, identified five different mutations in TBX3, all affecting the DNA-binding T-domain. One in-frame deletion of a single amino acid, p.N212delN, was observed twice. Due to the clustering of these mutations to the T-domain and for statistical reasons, TBX3 was inferred to be a driver gene in breast cancer. Since mutations in the T-domain generally cause loss of function and because the tumorigenic action of TBX3 has generally been attributed to overexpression, we determined whether the putative driver mutations had loss- or gain-of-function properties. We tested two in-frame deletions, one missense, and one frameshift mutant protein for DNA-binding in vitro, and for target gene repression in cell culture. In addition, we performed an in silico analysis of somatic TBX mutations in breast cancer, collected in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Both the experimental and the in silico analysis indicate that the observed mutations predominantly cause loss of TBX3 function. PMID:26579496

  12. The heartstrings mutation in zebrafish causes heart/fin Tbx5 deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Garrity, Deborah M; Childs, Sarah; Fishman, Mark C

    2002-10-01

    Holt-Oram syndrome is one of the autosomal dominant human "heart-hand" disorders, with a combination of upper limb malformations and cardiac defects. Holt-Oram syndrome is caused by mutations in the TBX5 gene, a member of a large family of T-box transcription factors that play important roles in cell-type specification and morphogenesis. In a screen for mutations affecting zebrafish cardiac function, we isolated the recessive lethal mutant heartstrings, which lacks pectoral fins and exhibits severe cardiac dysfunction, beginning with a slow heart rate and progressing to a stretched, non-functional heart. We mapped and cloned the heartstrings mutation and find it to encode the zebrafish ortholog of the TBX5 gene. The heartstrings mutation causes premature termination at amino acid 316. Homozygous mutant embryos never develop pectoral fin buds and do not express several markers of early fin differentiation. The total absence of any fin bud differentiation distinguishes heartstrings from most other mutations that affect zebrafish fin development, suggesting that Tbx5 functions very early in the pectoral fin induction pathway. Moderate reduction of Tbx5 by morpholino causes fin malformations, revealing an additional early requirement for Tbx5 in coordinating the axes of fin outgrowth. The heart of heartstrings mutant embryos appears to form and function normally through the early heart tube stage, manifesting only a slight bradycardia compared with wild-type siblings. However, the heart fails to loop and then progressively deteriorates, a process affecting the ventricle as well as the atrium. Relative to mammals, fish require lower levels of Tbx5 to produce malformed appendages and display whole-heart rather than atrial-predominant cardiac defects. However, the syndromic deficiencies of tbx5 mutation are remarkably well retained between fish and mammals. PMID:12223419

  13. SOFT syndrome caused by compound heterozygous mutations of POC1A and its skeletal manifestation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jung Min; Jung, Soyoon; Seo, Jieun; Shin, Choong Ho; Cheong, Hae Il; Choi, Murim; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2016-06-01

    SOFT syndrome (MIM614813) is an extremely rare primordial dwarfism characterized by short stature, onychodysplasia, facial dysmorphism and hypotrichosis, which is caused by biallelic mutations in the POC1A gene. Only 19 patients with mutation-confirmed SOFT syndrome have been reported to date, all of whom carried homozygous variants that were strongly associated with consanguineous marriages. We report an 8.5-year-old boy with SOFT syndrome showing primordial dwarfism, no effect of growth-hormone therapy and skeletal dysplasia. This is the first report of compound heterozygous variants in POC1A, one previously reported and the other novel. A characteristic skeletal manifestation is reported. PMID:26791357

  14. Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the fibrillin-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Elçioglu, N H; Akalin, F; Elçioglu, M; Comeglio, P; Child, A H

    2004-01-01

    Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the Fibrillin-1 gene: We describe a male infant with severe arachnodactyly, hypermobility of the fingers, flexion contractures of elbows, wrists, hips, and knees, microretrognathia, crumpled ears, rockerbottom feet, loose redundant skin, and lens dislocations. Cardiac valve insufficiency and aortic dilatation resulted in cardiac failure, decompensated with digitalisation and death occurred at the age of 4 months. This case represents the severe end of the clinical spectrum of Marfan syndrome, namely neonatal Marfan syndrome. Molecular diagnostic analyses confirmed a de novo exon 25 mutation in the FBN1 gene. PMID:15287423

  15. A recurring dominant negative mutation causes autosomal dominant growth hormone deficiency - a clinical research center study

    SciTech Connect

    Cogan, J.D.; Prince, M.; Phillips, J.

    1995-12-01

    Familial isolated GH deficiency type II (IGHD-II) is an autosomal dominant disorder that has been previously shown in some patients to be caused by heterogeneous GH gene defects that affect GH messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. We report here our findings of multiple G{r_arrow}A transitions of the first base of the donor splice site of IVS 3 (+1G{r_arrow}A) in IGHD II subjects from three nonrelated kindreds from Sweden, North America, and South Africa. This + 1G{r_arrow}A substitution creates an NlaIII site that was used to demonstrate that all affected individuals in all three families were heterozygous for the mutation. To determine the effect of this mutation of GH mRNA processing, HeLa cells were transfected with expression plasmids containing normal or mutant +1G{r_arrow}A alleles, and complementary DNAs from the resulting GH mRNAs were sequenced. The mutation was found to destroy the GH IVS3 donor splice site, causing skipping of exon 3 and loss of the codons for amino acids 32-71 of the mature GH peptide from the mutant GH mRNA. Our finding of exon 3 skipping in transcripts of the +1G{r_arrow}A mutant allele is identical to our previous report of a different sixth base transition (+6T{r_arrow}C) mutation of the IVS 3 donor splice site that also causes IGHD II. Microsatellite analysis of an affected subjects` DNA from each of the three nonrelated kindreds indicates that the +1G{r_arrow}A mutation arose independently in each family. Finding that neither grandparent has the mutation in the first family suggests that it arose de novo in that family. Our data indicate that (1) +1G{r_arrow}A IVS 3 mutations perturb GH mRNA splicing and cause IGHD II; and (2) these mutations can present as de novo GHD cases. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A Novel GJA8 Mutation (p.V44A) Causing Autosomal Dominant Congenital Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanan; Yu, Hao; Wang, Wei; Gong, Xiaohua; Yao, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the mechanism by which a novel connexin 50 (Cx50) mutation, Cx50 V44A, in a Chinese family causes suture-sparing autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataracts. Methods Family history and clinical data were recorded and direct gene sequencing was used to identify the disease-causing mutation. The Cx50 gene was cloned from a human lens cDNA library. Connexin protein distributions were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. Hemichannel functions were analyzed by dye uptake assay. Formation of functional channels was assessed by dye transfer experiments. Results Direct sequencing of the candidate GJA8 gene revealed a novel c.131T>C transition in exon 2, which cosegregated with the disease in the family and resulted in the substitution of a valine residue with alanine at codon 44 (p. V44A) in the extracellular loop 1 of the Cx50 protein. Both Cx50 and Cx50V44A formed functional gap junctions, as shown by the neurobiotin transfer assay. However, unlike wild-type Cx50, Cx50V44A was unable to form open hemichannels in dye uptake experiments. Conclusion This work identified a unique congenital cataract in the Chinese population, caused by the novel mutation Cx50V44A, and it showed that the V44A mutation specifically impairs the gating of the hemichannels but not the gap junction channels. The dysfunctional hemichannels resulted in the development of human congenital cataracts. PMID:25517998

  17. Mutations in TBX18 Cause Dominant Urinary Tract Malformations via Transcriptional Dysregulation of Ureter Development.

    PubMed

    Vivante, Asaf; Kleppa, Marc-Jens; Schulz, Julian; Kohl, Stefan; Sharma, Amita; Chen, Jing; Shril, Shirlee; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Weiss, Anna-Carina; Kaminski, Michael M; Shukrun, Rachel; Kemper, Markus J; Lehnhardt, Anja; Beetz, Rolf; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Verbitsky, Miguel; Gharavi, Ali G; Stuart, Helen M; Feather, Sally A; Goodship, Judith A; Goodship, Timothy H J; Woolf, Adrian S; Westra, Sjirk J; Doody, Daniel P; Bauer, Stuart B; Lee, Richard S; Adam, Rosalyn M; Lu, Weining; Reutter, Heiko M; Kehinde, Elijah O; Mancini, Erika J; Lifton, Richard P; Tasic, Velibor; Lienkamp, Soeren S; Jüppner, Harald; Kispert, Andreas; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-08-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the most common cause of chronic kidney disease in the first three decades of life. Identification of single-gene mutations that cause CAKUT permits the first insights into related disease mechanisms. However, for most cases the underlying defect remains elusive. We identified a kindred with an autosomal-dominant form of CAKUT with predominant ureteropelvic junction obstruction. By whole exome sequencing, we identified a heterozygous truncating mutation (c.1010delG) of T-Box transcription factor 18 (TBX18) in seven affected members of the large kindred. A screen of additional families with CAKUT identified three families harboring two heterozygous TBX18 mutations (c.1570C>T and c.487A>G). TBX18 is essential for developmental specification of the ureteric mesenchyme and ureteric smooth muscle cells. We found that all three TBX18 altered proteins still dimerized with the wild-type protein but had prolonged protein half life and exhibited reduced transcriptional repression activity compared to wild-type TBX18. The p.Lys163Glu substitution altered an amino acid residue critical for TBX18-DNA interaction, resulting in impaired TBX18-DNA binding. These data indicate that dominant-negative TBX18 mutations cause human CAKUT by interference with TBX18 transcriptional repression, thus implicating ureter smooth muscle cell development in the pathogenesis of human CAKUT. PMID:26235987

  18. Ribosomal mutations cause p53-mediated dark skin and pleiotropic effects.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Kelly A; Li, Jun Z; Park, Christopher Y; Beaudry, Veronica; Tabor, Holly K; Sabnis, Amit J; Zhang, Weibin; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Myers, Richard M; Attardi, Laura D; Barsh, Gregory S

    2008-08-01

    Mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins cause the Minute phenotype in Drosophila and mice, and Diamond-Blackfan syndrome in humans. Here we report two mouse dark skin (Dsk) loci caused by mutations in Rps19 (ribosomal protein S19) and Rps20 (ribosomal protein S20). We identify a common pathophysiologic program in which p53 stabilization stimulates Kit ligand expression, and, consequently, epidermal melanocytosis via a paracrine mechanism. Accumulation of p53 also causes reduced body size and erythrocyte count. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for the diverse collection of phenotypes that accompany reduced dosage of genes encoding ribosomal proteins, and have implications for understanding normal human variation and human disease.

  19. Neurofilament light mutation causes hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with pyramidal signs.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Higuchi, Yujiro; Nomura, Miwa; Nakamura, Tomonori; Arata, Hitoshi; Yuan, Junhui; Yoshimura, Akiko; Okamoto, Yuji; Matsuura, Eiji; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    To identify novel mutations causing hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) with pyramidal signs, a variant of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), we screened 28 CMT and related genes in four members of an affected Japanese family. Clinical features included weakness of distal lower limb muscles, foot deformity, and mild sensory loss, then late onset of progressive spasticity. Electrophysiological studies revealed widespread neuropathy. Electron microscopic analysis showed abnormal mitochondria and mitochondrial accumulation in the neurons and Schwann cells. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an abnormally thin corpus callosum. In all four, microarrays detected a novel heterozygous missense mutation c.1166A>G (p.Y389C) in the gene encoding the light-chain neurofilament protein (NEFL), indicating that NEFL mutations can result in a HMSN with pyramidal signs phenotype. PMID:25583183

  20. HOXA1 mutations are not a common cause of Möbius syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Jessica K; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2010-02-01

    The HOXA1-related syndromes result from autosomal-recessive truncating mutations in the homeobox transcription factor, HOXA1. Limited horizontal gaze and sensorineural deafness are the most common features; affected individuals can also have facial weakness, mental retardation, autism, motor disabilities, central hypoventilation, carotid artery, and/or conotruncal heart defects. Möbius syndrome is also phenotypically heterogeneous, with minimal diagnostic criteria of nonprogressive facial weakness and impaired ocular abduction; mental retardation, autism, motor disabilities, additional eye movements restrictions, hearing loss, hypoventilation, and craniofacial, lingual, and limb abnormalities also occur. We asked, given the phenotypic overlap between these syndromes and the variable expressivity of both disorders, whether individuals with Möbius syndrome might harbor mutations in HOXA1. Our results suggest that HOXA1 mutations are not a common cause of sporadic Möbius syndrome in the general population. PMID:20227628

  1. A novel frameshift mutation in FGF14 causes an autosomal dominant episodic ataxia.

    PubMed

    Choquet, Karine; La Piana, Roberta; Brais, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    Episodic ataxias (EAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders characterized by recurrent attacks of ataxia. Mutations in KCNA1 and CACNA1A account for the majority of EA cases worldwide. We recruited a two-generation family affected with EA of unknown subtype and performed whole-exome sequencing on two affected members. This revealed a novel heterozygous mutation c.211_212insA (p.I71NfsX27) leading to a premature stop codon in FGF14. Mutations in FGF14 are known to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 27 (SCA27). Sanger sequencing confirmed segregation within the family. Our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of SCA27 by underlining the possible episodic nature of this ataxia.

  2. Novel compound heterozygous PIGT mutations caused multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 3.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Mitsuko; Kashii, Hirofumi; Murakami, Yoshiko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Kubota, Masaya; Kinoshita, Taroh; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-08-01

    Recessive mutations in genes of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor synthesis pathway have been demonstrated as causative of GPI deficiency disorders associated with intellectual disability, seizures, and diverse congenital anomalies. We performed whole exome sequencing in a patient with progressive encephalopathies and multiple dysmorphism with hypophosphatasia and identified novel compound heterozygous mutations, c.250G>T (p. Glu84*) and c.1342C>T (p. Arg488Trp), in PIGT encoding a subunit of the GPI transamidase complex. The surface expression of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on patient granulocytes was lower than that of healthy controls. Transfection of the Arg488Trp mutant PIGT construct, but not the Glu84* mutant, into PIGT-deficient cells partially restored the expression of GPI-APs DAF and CD59. These results indicate that PIGT mutations caused neurological impairment and multiple congenital anomalies in this patient.

  3. Nephrocalcinosis (Enamel Renal Syndrome) Caused by Autosomal Recessive FAM20A Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jaureguiberry, Graciana; De la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Parry, David; Quentric, Mickael; Himmerkus, Nina; Koike, Toshiyasu; Poulter, James; Klootwijk, Enriko; Robinette, Steven L.; Howie, Alexander J.; Patel, Vaksha; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Stanescu, Horia C.; Issler, Naomi; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Laing, Christopher; Walsh, Stephen B.; McCredie, David A.; Povey, Sue; Asselin, Audrey; Picard, Arnaud; Coulomb, Aurore; Medlar, Alan J.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Verloes, Alain; Le Caignec, Cedric; Roussey, Gwenaelle; Guiol, Julien; Isidor, Bertrand; Logan, Clare; Shore, Roger; Johnson, Colin; Inglehearn, Christopher; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Schmittbuhl, Matthieu; Clauss, François; Huckert, Mathilde; Laugel, Virginie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Pajarola, Sandra; Spartà, Giuseppina; Bartholdi, Deborah; Rauch, Anita; Addor, Marie-Claude; Yamaguti, Paulo M.; Safatle, Heloisa P.; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; dos Santos Netos, Pedro E.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Gruessel, Sandra; Sandmann, Carolin; Ruehmann, Denise; Langman, Craig B.; Scheinman, Steven J.; Ozdemir-Ozenen, Didem; Hart, Thomas C.; Hart, P. Suzanne; Neugebauer, Ute; Schlatter, Eberhard; Houillier, Pascal; Gahl, William A.; Vikkula, Miikka; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Bleich, Markus; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Unwin, Robert J.; Mighell, Alan; Berdal, Ariane; Kleta, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Calcium homeostasis requires regulated cellular and interstitial systems interacting to modulate the activity and movement of this ion. Disruption of these systems in the kidney results in nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis, important medical problems whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Methods We investigated 25 patients from 16 families with unexplained nephrocalcinosis and characteristic dental defects (amelogenesis imperfecta, gingival hyperplasia, impaired tooth eruption). To identify the causative gene, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis, exome capture, next-generation sequencing, and Sanger sequencing. Results All patients had bi-allelic FAM20A mutations segregating with the disease; 20 different mutations were identified. Conclusions This au-tosomal recessive disorder, also known as enamel renal syndrome, of FAM20A causes nephrocalcinosis and amelogenesis imperfecta. We speculate that all individuals with biallelic FAM20A mutations will eventually show nephrocalcinosis. PMID:23434854

  4. Novel NEK8 Mutations Cause Severe Syndromic Renal Cystic Dysplasia through YAP Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Grampa, Valentina; Odye, Gweltas; Thomas, Sophie; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Filhol, Emilie; Niel, Olivier; Silbermann, Flora; Lebreton, Corinne; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Rouvet, Isabelle; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Devisme, Louise; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Capri, Yline; Khung-Savatovsky, Suonavy; Sigaudy, Sabine; Salomon, Rémi; Antignac, Corinne; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Benmerah, Alexandre; Terzi, Fabiola; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are a group of genetic multi-systemic disorders related to dysfunction of the primary cilium, a sensory organelle present at the cell surface that regulates key signaling pathways during development and tissue homeostasis. In order to identify novel genes whose mutations would cause severe developmental ciliopathies, >500 patients/fetuses were analyzed by a targeted high throughput sequencing approach allowing exome sequencing of >1200 ciliary genes. NEK8/NPHP9 mutations were identified in five cases with severe overlapping phenotypes including renal cystic dysplasia/hypodysplasia, situs inversus, cardiopathy with hypertrophic septum and bile duct paucity. These cases highlight a genotype-phenotype correlation, with missense and nonsense mutations associated with hypodysplasia and enlarged cystic organs, respectively. Functional analyses of NEK8 mutations in patient fibroblasts and mIMCD3 cells showed that these mutations differentially affect ciliogenesis, proliferation/apoptosis/DNA damage response, as well as epithelial morphogenesis. Notably, missense mutations exacerbated some of the defects due to NEK8 loss of function, highlighting their likely gain-of-function effect. We also showed that NEK8 missense and loss-of-function mutations differentially affect the regulation of the main Hippo signaling effector, YAP, as well as the expression of its target genes in patient fibroblasts and renal cells. YAP imbalance was also observed in enlarged spheroids of Nek8-invalidated renal epithelial cells grown in 3D culture, as well as in cystic kidneys of Jck mice. Moreover, co-injection of nek8 MO with WT or mutated NEK8-GFP RNA in zebrafish embryos led to shortened dorsally curved body axis, similar to embryos injected with human YAP RNA. Finally, treatment with Verteporfin, an inhibitor of YAP transcriptional activity, partially rescued the 3D spheroid defects of Nek8-invalidated cells and the abnormalities of NEK8-overexpressing zebrafish embryos

  5. A founder mutation in Anoctamin 5 is a major cause of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Debbie; Sarkozy, A; Muelas, N; Koehler, K; Huebner, A; Hudson, G; Chinnery, P F; Barresi, R; Eagle, M; Polvikoski, T; Bailey, G; Miller, J; Radunovic, A; Hughes, P J; Roberts, R; Krause, S; Walter, M C; Laval, S H; Straub, V; Lochmüller, H; Bushby, K

    2011-01-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies are a group of disorders with wide genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Recently, mutations in the ANO5 gene, which encodes a putative calcium-activated chloride channel belonging to the Anoctamin family of proteins, were identified in five families with one of two previously identified disorders, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2L and non-dysferlin Miyoshi muscular dystrophy. We screened a candidate group of 64 patients from 59 British and German kindreds and found the truncating mutation, c.191dupA in exon 5 of ANO5 in 20 patients, homozygously in 15 and in compound heterozygosity with other ANO5 variants in the rest. An intragenic single nucleotide polymorphism and an extragenic microsatellite marker are in linkage disequilibrium with the mutation, suggesting a founder effect in the Northern European population. We have further defined the clinical phenotype of ANO5-associated muscular dystrophy. Patients show adult onset proximal lower limb weakness with highly raised serum creatine kinase values (average 4500 IU/l) and frequent muscle atrophy and asymmetry of muscle involvement. Onset varies from the early 20 s to 50 s and the weakness is generally slowly progressive, with most patients remaining ambulant for several decades. Distal presentation is much less common but a milder degree of distal lower limb weakness is often observed. Upper limb strength is only mildly affected and cardiac and respiratory function is normal. Females appear less frequently affected. In the North of England population we have identified eight patients with ANO5 mutations, suggesting a minimum prevalence of 0.27/100,000, twice as common as dysferlinopathy. We suggest that mutations in ANO5 represent a relatively common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy with high serum creatine kinase and that mutation screening, particularly of the common mutation c.191dupA, should be an early step in the diagnostic algorithm of adult limb-girdle muscular

  6. A missense mutation in Fgfr1 causes ear and skull defects in hush puppy mice.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Jennifer A; Dedos, Skarlatos G; Hawker, Kelvin; Fleming, Michelle; Lewis, Morag A; Steel, Karen P

    2011-06-01

    The hush puppy mouse mutant has been shown previously to have skull and outer, middle, and inner ear defects, and an increase in hearing threshold. The fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (Fgfr1) gene is located in the region of chromosome 8 containing the mutation. Sequencing of the gene in hush puppy heterozygotes revealed a missense mutation in the kinase domain of the protein (W691R). Homozygotes were found to die during development, at approximately embryonic day 8.5, and displayed a phenotype similar to null mutants. Reverse transcription PCR indicated a decrease in Fgfr1 transcript in heterozygotes and homozygotes. Generation of a construct containing the mutation allowed the function of the mutated receptor to be studied. Immunocytochemistry showed that the mutant receptor protein was present at the cell membrane, suggesting normal expression and trafficking. Measurements of changes in intracellular calcium concentration showed that the mutated receptor could not activate the IP(3) pathway, in contrast to the wild-type receptor, nor could it initiate activation of the Ras/MAP kinase pathway. Thus, the hush puppy mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 appears to cause a loss of receptor function. The mutant protein appears to have a dominant negative effect, which could be due to it dimerising with the wild-type protein and inhibiting its activity, thus further reducing the levels of functional protein. A dominant modifier, Mhspy, which reduces the effect of the hush puppy mutation on pinna and stapes development, has been mapped to the distal end of chromosome 7 and may show imprinting.

  7. Novel mutations in EVC cause aberrant splicing in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lisong; Luo, Chunyan; Ahmed, Mairaj K; Attaie, Ali B; Ye, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate chondrodysplasia, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, dental abnormalities and in a proportion of patients, congenital cardiac malformations. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyers) is another dominantly inherited disorder allelic to EvC syndrome but with milder phenotypes. Both disorders can result from loss-of-function mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene, and phenotypes associated with the two gene mutations are clinically indistinguishable. We present here a clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family manifested specific features of EvC syndrome. Sequencing of both EVC and EVC2 identified two novel heterozygous splice site mutations c.384+5G>C in intron 3 and c.1465-1G>A in intron 10 in EVC, which were inherited from mother and father, respectively. In vitro minigene expression assay, RT-PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that c.384+5G>C mutation abolished normal splice site and created a new cryptic acceptor site within exon 4, whereas c.1465-1G>A mutation affected consensus splice junction site and resulted in full exon 11 skipping. These two aberrant pre-mRNA splicing processes both produced in-frame abnormal transcripts that possibly led to abolishment of important functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of EVC mutations that cause EvC syndrome in Chinese population. Our data revealed that EVC splice site mutations altered splicing pattern and helped elucidate the pathogenesis of EvC syndrome. PMID:26621368

  8. Novel mutations in EVC cause aberrant splicing in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lisong; Luo, Chunyan; Ahmed, Mairaj K; Attaie, Ali B; Ye, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate chondrodysplasia, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, dental abnormalities and in a proportion of patients, congenital cardiac malformations. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyers) is another dominantly inherited disorder allelic to EvC syndrome but with milder phenotypes. Both disorders can result from loss-of-function mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene, and phenotypes associated with the two gene mutations are clinically indistinguishable. We present here a clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family manifested specific features of EvC syndrome. Sequencing of both EVC and EVC2 identified two novel heterozygous splice site mutations c.384+5G>C in intron 3 and c.1465-1G>A in intron 10 in EVC, which were inherited from mother and father, respectively. In vitro minigene expression assay, RT-PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that c.384+5G>C mutation abolished normal splice site and created a new cryptic acceptor site within exon 4, whereas c.1465-1G>A mutation affected consensus splice junction site and resulted in full exon 11 skipping. These two aberrant pre-mRNA splicing processes both produced in-frame abnormal transcripts that possibly led to abolishment of important functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of EVC mutations that cause EvC syndrome in Chinese population. Our data revealed that EVC splice site mutations altered splicing pattern and helped elucidate the pathogenesis of EvC syndrome.

  9. ITGB6 loss-of-function mutations cause autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Choi, Murim; Richardson, Amelia S; Reid, Bryan M; Lin, Brent P; Wang, Susan J; Kim, Jung-Wook; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C

    2014-04-15

    Integrins are cell-surface adhesion receptors that bind to extracellular matrices (ECM) and mediate cell-ECM interactions. Some integrins are known to play critical roles in dental enamel formation. We recruited two Hispanic families with generalized hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Analysis of whole-exome sequences identified three integrin beta 6 (ITGB6) mutations responsible for their enamel malformations. The female proband of Family 1 was a compound heterozygote with an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 4 (g.4545G > A c.427G > A p.Ala143Thr) and an ITGB6 transversion mutation in Exon 6 (g.27415T > A c.825T > A p.His275Gln). The male proband of Family 2 was homozygous for an ITGB6 transition mutation in Exon 11 (g.73664C > T c.1846C > T p.Arg616*) and hemizygous for a transition mutation in Exon 6 of Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS Xp22.13; g.355444T > C c.1697T > C p.Met566Thr). These are the first disease-causing ITGB6 mutations to be reported. Immunohistochemistry of mouse mandibular incisors localized ITGB6 to the distal membrane of differentiating ameloblasts and pre-ameloblasts, and then ITGB6 appeared to be internalized by secretory stage ameloblasts. ITGB6 expression was strongest in the maturation stage and its localization was associated with ameloblast modulation. Our findings demonstrate that early and late amelogenesis depend upon cell-matrix interactions. Our approach (from knockout mouse phenotype to human disease) demonstrates the power of mouse reverse genetics in mutational analysis of human genetic disorders and attests to the need for a careful dental phenotyping in large-scale knockout mouse projects.

  10. A founder mutation in Anoctamin 5 is a major cause of limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Muelas, Nuria; Köehler, Katrin; Huebner, Angela; Hudson, Gavin; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Barresi, Rita; Eagle, Michelle; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Bailey, Geraldine; Miller, James; Radunovic, Aleksander; Hughes, Paul J.; Roberts, Richard; Krause, Sabine; Walter, Maggie C.; Laval, Steven H.; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) are a group of disorders with wide genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Recently, mutations in the ANO5 gene, which encodes a putative calcium-activated chloride channel belonging to the Anoctamin family of proteins, were identified in five families with one of two previously identified disorders, LGMD2L and non-dysferlin Miyoshi muscular dystrophy (MMD3). We screened a candidate group of 64 patients from 59 British and German kindreds and found the truncating mutation, c.191dupA in exon 5 of ANO5 in 20 patients, homozygously in 15 and in compound heterozygosity with other ANO5 variants in the rest. An intragenic SNP and an extragenic microsatellite marker are in linkage disequilibrium with the mutation, suggesting a founder effect in the Northern European population. We have further defined the clinical phenotype of ANO5-associated muscular dystrophy. Patients show adult onset proximal lower limb weakness with highly raised creatinine kinase (CK) values (average 4500 IU/l) and frequent muscle atrophy and asymmetry of muscle involvement. Onset varies from the early 20s to 50s and the weakness is generally slowly progressive, with most patients remaining ambulant for several decades. Distal presentation is much less common but a milder degree of distal lower limb weakness is often observed. Upper limb strength is only mildly affected and cardiac and respiratory function is normal. Females appear less frequently affected. In the North of England population we have identified eight patients with ANO5 mutations, suggesting a minimum prevalence of 0.27/100 000, twice as common as dysferlinopathy. We suggest that mutations in ANO5 represent a relatively common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy with high CK and that mutation screening, particularly of the common mutation c.191dupA, should be an early step in the diagnostic algorithm of adult LGMD patients. PMID:21186264

  11. CASK mutations are frequent in males and cause X-linked nystagmus and variable XLMR phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Anna; Tarpey, Patrick S; Licata, Andrea; Cox, James; Whibley, Annabel; Boyle, Jackie; Rogers, Carolyn; Grigg, John; Partington, Michael; Stevenson, Roger E; Tolmie, John; Yates, John RW; Turner, Gillian; Wilson, Meredith; Futreal, Andrew P; Corbett, Mark; Shaw, Marie; Gecz, Jozef; Raymond, F Lucy; Stratton, Michael R; Schwartz, Charles E; Abidi, Fatima E

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) gene have recently been associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with microcephaly, optic atrophy and brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia, as well as with an X-linked syndrome having some FG-like features. Our group has recently identified four male probands from 358 probable XLMR families with missense mutations (p.Y268H, p.P396S, p.D710G and p.W919R) in the CASK gene. Congenital nystagmus, a rare and striking feature, was present in two of these families. We screened a further 45 probands with either nystagmus or microcephaly and mental retardation (MR), and identified two further mutations, a missense mutation (p.Y728C) and a splice mutation (c.2521-2A>T) in two small families with nystagmus and MR. Detailed clinical examinations of all six families, including an ophthalmological review in four families, were undertaken to further characterise the phenotype. We report on the clinical features of 24 individuals, mostly male, from six families with CASK mutations. The phenotype was variable, ranging from non-syndromic mild MR to severe MR associated with microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features. Carrier females were variably affected. Congenital nystagmus was found in members of four of the families. Our findings reinforce the CASK gene as a relatively frequent cause of XLMR in females and males. We further define the phenotypic spectrum and demonstrate that affected males with missense mutations or in-frame deletions in CASK are frequently associated with congenital nystagmus and XLMR, a striking feature not previously reported. PMID:20029458

  12. CASK mutations are frequent in males and cause X-linked nystagmus and variable XLMR phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Anna; Tarpey, Patrick S; Licata, Andrea; Cox, James; Whibley, Annabel; Boyle, Jackie; Rogers, Carolyn; Grigg, John; Partington, Michael; Stevenson, Roger E; Tolmie, John; Yates, John Rw; Turner, Gillian; Wilson, Meredith; Futreal, Andrew P; Corbett, Mark; Shaw, Marie; Gecz, Jozef; Raymond, F Lucy; Stratton, Michael R; Schwartz, Charles E; Abidi, Fatima E

    2010-05-01

    Mutations of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) gene have recently been associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with microcephaly, optic atrophy and brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia, as well as with an X-linked syndrome having some FG-like features. Our group has recently identified four male probands from 358 probable XLMR families with missense mutations (p.Y268H, p.P396S, p.D710G and p.W919R) in the CASK gene. Congenital nystagmus, a rare and striking feature, was present in two of these families. We screened a further 45 probands with either nystagmus or microcephaly and mental retardation (MR), and identified two further mutations, a missense mutation (p.Y728C) and a splice mutation (c.2521-2A>T) in two small families with nystagmus and MR. Detailed clinical examinations of all six families, including an ophthalmological review in four families, were undertaken to further characterise the phenotype. We report on the clinical features of 24 individuals, mostly male, from six families with CASK mutations. The phenotype was variable, ranging from non-syndromic mild MR to severe MR associated with microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features. Carrier females were variably affected. Congenital nystagmus was found in members of four of the families. Our findings reinforce the CASK gene as a relatively frequent cause of XLMR in females and males. We further define the phenotypic spectrum and demonstrate that affected males with missense mutations or in-frame deletions in CASK are frequently associated with congenital nystagmus and XLMR, a striking feature not previously reported.

  13. Mutational hot spot in the DSPP gene causing dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Wook; Hu, Jan C-C; Lee, Jae-Il; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Young-Jae; Jang, Ki-Taeg; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Chong-Chul; Hahn, Se-Hyun; Simmer, James P

    2005-02-01

    The current system for the classification of hereditary defects of tooth dentin is based upon clinical and radiographic findings and consists of two types of dentin dysplasia (DD) and three types of dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI). However, whether DGI type III should be considered a distinct phenotype or a variation of DGI type II is debatable. In the 30 years since the classification system was first proposed, significant advances have been made regarding the genetic etiologies of inherited dentin defects. DGI type II is recognized as an autosomal dominant disorder with almost complete penetrance and a low frequency of de novo mutations. We have identified a mutation (c.52G-->T, p.V18F) at the first nucleotide of exon 3 of the DSPP (dentin sialophosphoprotein) gene in a Korean family (de novo) and a Caucasian family. This mutation has previously been reported as causing DGI type II in a Chinese family. These findings suggest that this mutation site represents a mutational "hot spot" in the DSPP gene. The clinical and radiographic features of these two families include the classic phenotypes associated with both DGI type II and type III. Finding that a single mutation causes both phenotypic patterns strongly supports the conclusion that DGI type II and DGI type III are not separate diseases but rather the phenotypic variation of a single disease. We propose a modification of the current classification system such that the designation "hereditary opalescent dentin" or "DGI type II" should be used to describe both the DGI type II and type III phenotypes.

  14. Mutations in Dnaaf1 and Lrrc48 Cause Hydrocephalus, Laterality Defects, and Sinusitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seungshin; Lindsay, Anna M; Timms, Andrew E; Beier, David R

    2016-01-01

    We have previously described a forward genetic screen in mice for abnormalities of brain development. Characterization of two hydrocephalus mutants by whole-exome sequencing after whole-genome SNP mapping revealed novel recessive mutations in Dnaaf1 and Lrrc48 Mouse mutants of these two genes have not been previously reported. The Dnaaf1 mutant carries a mutation at the splice donor site of exon 4, which results in abnormal transcripts. The Lrrc48 mutation is a missense mutation at a highly conserved leucine residue, which is also associated with a decrease in Lrrc48 transcription. Both Dnaaf1 and Lrrc48 belong to a leucine-rich repeat-containing protein family and are components of the ciliary axoneme. Their Chlamydomonas orthologs are known to be required for normal ciliary beat frequency or flagellar waveform, respectively. Some Dnaaf1 or Lrrc48 homozygote mutants displayed laterality defects, suggesting a motile cilia defect in the embryonic node. Mucus accumulation and neutrophil infiltration in the maxillary sinuses suggested sinusitis. Dnaaf1 mutants showed postnatal lethality, and none survived to weaning age. Lrrc48 mutants survive to adulthood, but had male infertility. ARL13B immunostaining showed the presence of motile cilia in the mutants, and the distal distribution of DNAH9 in the axoneme of upper airway motile cilia appeared normal. The phenotypic abnormalities suggest that mutations in Dnaaf1 and Lrrc48 cause defects in motile cilia function. PMID:27261005

  15. Welander distal myopathy caused by an ancient founder mutation in TIA1 associated with perturbed splicing.

    PubMed

    Klar, Joakim; Sobol, Maria; Melberg, Atle; Mäbert, Katrin; Ameur, Adam; Johansson, Anna C V; Feuk, Lars; Entesarian, Miriam; Orlén, Hanna; Casar-Borota, Olivera; Dahl, Niklas

    2013-04-01

    Welander distal myopathy (WDM) is an adult onset autosomal dominant disorder characterized by distal limb weakness, which progresses slowly from the fifth decade. All WDM patients are of Swedish or Finnish descent and share a rare chromosome 2p13 haplotype. We restricted the WDM-associated haplotype followed by whole exome sequencing. Within the conserved haplotype, we identified a single heterozygous mutation c.1150G>A (p.E384K) in T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA1) in all WDM patients investigated (n = 43). The TIA1 protein regulates splicing, and translation through direct interaction with mRNA and the p.E384K mutation is located in the C-terminal Q-rich domain that interacts with the U1-C splicing factor. TIA1 has been shown to prevent skipping of SMN2 exon 7, and we show that WDM patients have increased levels of spliced SMN2 in skeletal muscle cells when compared with controls. Immunostaining of WDM muscle biopsies showed accumulation of TIA1 and stress granulae proteins adjacent to intracellular inclusions, a typical finding in WDM. The combined findings strongly suggest that the TIA1 mutation causes perturbed RNA splicing and cellular stress resulting in WDM. The selection against the mutation is likely to be negligible and the age of the TIA1 founder mutation was calculated to approximately 1,050 years, which coincides with the epoch of early seafaring across the Baltic Sea.

  16. A novel fibrinogen mutation (γ Thr277Arg) causes hereditary hypofibrinogenemia in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liqing; Wang, Mingshan; Xie, Haixiao; Jin, Yanhui; Yang, Lihong; Xu, Pengfei

    2013-09-01

    Congenital hypofibrinogenemia is a rare disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in one of the three fibrinogen genes--fibrinogen α-chain (FGA), fibrinogen β-chain (FGB) and fibrinogen γ-chain (FGG)--which code for the Aα, Bβ and γ chains, respectively. In this study, we identified a genetic defect in the FGG underlying the hypofibrinogenemia. The proposita had a prolonged blood clotting time (thrombin time 24.5 s, prothrombin time 16.8 s) and a low level of plasma fibrinogen (0.71 g/l by Clauss method and 0.79 g/l by immunoturbidimetry). DNA screening of the whole fibrinogen gene revealed a heterozygous GC mutation at nucleotide 7482 in her FGG gene. Her father and her half-brother are also heterozygous for this mutation. This mutation contributes to Thr277 → Arg in the γ chain of fibrinogen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such a mutation that is associated with hypofibrinogenemia.

  17. X-linked VACTERL with hydrocephalus syndrome: further delineation of the phenotype caused by FANCB mutations.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Joanna; Masand, Navta; McGowan, Ruth; Rajagopalan, Sulekha; Hunter, Alasdair; Michaud, Jacques L; Gibson, Kate; Robertson, Jeremy; Vaz, Fiona; Abbs, Stephen; Holden, Simon T

    2011-10-01

    X-linked VACTERL-hydrocephalus syndrome (X-linked VACTERL-H) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the gene FANCB which underlies Fanconi Anemia (FA) complementation group B. Cells from affected males have increased chromosome breakage on exposure to DNA cross-linking agents. Only five FANCB mutations found in six affected males, including an affected uncle and nephew, have been reported. We have identified FANCB mutations in a further four affected families. The VACTERL-H phenotype segregates as an X-linked recessive trait in three of these. Each mutation is predicted to truncate the FANCB open reading frame and results in highly skewed X-inactivation in unaffected carrier females. Phenotypic data were available on six affected males. Comparison of the clinical findings in our patients with published clinical data (total 12 patients) shows that ventriculomegaly, bilateral absent thumbs and radii, vertebral defects, renal agenesis, and growth retardation are the major phenotypic signs in affected males. Less frequent are brain, pituitary, ear and eye malformations, gastrointestinal atresias (esophageal, duodenal and anal), tracheoesophageal fistula, lung segmentation defects, and small genitalia. Three of six of our patients survived the perinatal period. One boy lived up to 2 years 10 months but developed aplastic anemia and died of renal failure. These data show that loss-of-function FANCB mutations result in a recognizable, multiple malformation phenotype in hemizygous males for which we propose clinical criteria to aid diagnosis. PMID:21910217

  18. X-linked VACTERL with hydrocephalus syndrome: further delineation of the phenotype caused by FANCB mutations.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Joanna; Masand, Navta; McGowan, Ruth; Rajagopalan, Sulekha; Hunter, Alasdair; Michaud, Jacques L; Gibson, Kate; Robertson, Jeremy; Vaz, Fiona; Abbs, Stephen; Holden, Simon T

    2011-10-01

    X-linked VACTERL-hydrocephalus syndrome (X-linked VACTERL-H) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the gene FANCB which underlies Fanconi Anemia (FA) complementation group B. Cells from affected males have increased chromosome breakage on exposure to DNA cross-linking agents. Only five FANCB mutations found in six affected males, including an affected uncle and nephew, have been reported. We have identified FANCB mutations in a further four affected families. The VACTERL-H phenotype segregates as an X-linked recessive trait in three of these. Each mutation is predicted to truncate the FANCB open reading frame and results in highly skewed X-inactivation in unaffected carrier females. Phenotypic data were available on six affected males. Comparison of the clinical findings in our patients with published clinical data (total 12 patients) shows that ventriculomegaly, bilateral absent thumbs and radii, vertebral defects, renal agenesis, and growth retardation are the major phenotypic signs in affected males. Less frequent are brain, pituitary, ear and eye malformations, gastrointestinal atresias (esophageal, duodenal and anal), tracheoesophageal fistula, lung segmentation defects, and small genitalia. Three of six of our patients survived the perinatal period. One boy lived up to 2 years 10 months but developed aplastic anemia and died of renal failure. These data show that loss-of-function FANCB mutations result in a recognizable, multiple malformation phenotype in hemizygous males for which we propose clinical criteria to aid diagnosis.

  19. Mutations in Dnaaf1 and Lrrc48 Cause Hydrocephalus, Laterality Defects, and Sinusitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seungshin; Lindsay, Anna M.; Timms, Andrew E.; Beier, David R.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously described a forward genetic screen in mice for abnormalities of brain development. Characterization of two hydrocephalus mutants by whole-exome sequencing after whole-genome SNP mapping revealed novel recessive mutations in Dnaaf1 and Lrrc48. Mouse mutants of these two genes have not been previously reported. The Dnaaf1 mutant carries a mutation at the splice donor site of exon 4, which results in abnormal transcripts. The Lrrc48 mutation is a missense mutation at a highly conserved leucine residue, which is also associated with a decrease in Lrrc48 transcription. Both Dnaaf1 and Lrrc48 belong to a leucine-rich repeat-containing protein family and are components of the ciliary axoneme. Their Chlamydomonas orthologs are known to be required for normal ciliary beat frequency or flagellar waveform, respectively. Some Dnaaf1 or Lrrc48 homozygote mutants displayed laterality defects, suggesting a motile cilia defect in the embryonic node. Mucus accumulation and neutrophil infiltration in the maxillary sinuses suggested sinusitis. Dnaaf1 mutants showed postnatal lethality, and none survived to weaning age. Lrrc48 mutants survive to adulthood, but had male infertility. ARL13B immunostaining showed the presence of motile cilia in the mutants, and the distal distribution of DNAH9 in the axoneme of upper airway motile cilia appeared normal. The phenotypic abnormalities suggest that mutations in Dnaaf1 and Lrrc48 cause defects in motile cilia function. PMID:27261005

  20. De Novo Mutations in CHAMP1 Cause Intellectual Disability with Severe Speech Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Maja; Cremer, Kirsten; Ockeloen, Charlotte W.; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D.; Herkert, Johanna C.; Denecke, Jonas; Haack, Tobias B.; Zink, Alexander M.; Becker, Jessica; Wohlleber, Eva; Johannsen, Jessika; Alhaddad, Bader; Pfundt, Rolph; Fuchs, Sigrid; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Strom, Tim M.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Kubisch, Christian; Engels, Hartmut; Lessel, Davor

    2015-01-01

    CHAMP1 encodes a protein with a function in kinetochore-microtubule attachment and in the regulation of chromosome segregation, both of which are known to be important for neurodevelopment. By trio whole-exome sequencing, we have identified de novo deleterious mutations in CHAMP1 in five unrelated individuals affected by intellectual disability with severe speech impairment, motor developmental delay, muscular hypotonia, and similar dysmorphic features including short philtrum and a tented upper and everted lover lip. In addition to two frameshift and one nonsense mutations, we found an identical nonsense mutation, c.1192C>T (p.Arg398∗), in two affected individuals. All mutations, if resulting in a stable protein, are predicted to lead to the loss of the functionally important zinc-finger domains in the C terminus of the protein, which regulate CHAMP1 localization to chromosomes and the mitotic spindle, thereby providing a mechanistic understanding for their pathogenicity. We thus establish deleterious de novo mutations in CHAMP1 as a cause of intellectual disability. PMID:26340335

  1. De novo mutations in KIF1A cause progressive encephalopathy and brain atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeeli Nieh, Sahar; Madou, Maura R Z; Sirajuddin, Minhajuddin; Fregeau, Brieana; McKnight, Dianalee; Lexa, Katrina; Strober, Jonathan; Spaeth, Christine; Hallinan, Barbara E; Smaoui, Nizar; Pappas, John G; Burrow, Thomas A; McDonald, Marie T; Latibashvili, Mariam; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Lev, Dorit; Blumkin, Luba; Vale, Ronald D; Barkovich, Anthony James; Sherr, Elliott H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the cause and course of a novel syndrome with progressive encephalopathy and brain atrophy in children. Methods Clinical whole-exome sequencing was performed for global developmental delay and intellectual disability; some patients also had spastic paraparesis and evidence of clinical regression. Six patients were identified with de novo missense mutations in the kinesin gene KIF1A. The predicted functional disruption of these mutations was assessed in silico to compare the calculated conformational flexibility and estimated efficiency of ATP binding to kinesin motor domains of wild-type (WT) versus mutant alleles. Additionally, an in vitro microtubule gliding assay was performed to assess the effects of de novo dominant, inherited recessive, and polymorphic variants on KIF1A motor function. Results All six subjects had severe developmental delay, hypotonia, and varying degrees of hyperreflexia and spastic paraparesis. Microcephaly, cortical visual impairment, optic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, epilepsy, and movement disorders were also observed. All six patients had a degenerative neurologic course with progressive cerebral and cerebellar atrophy seen on sequential magnetic resonance imaging scans. Computational modeling of mutant protein structures when compared to WT kinesin showed substantial differences in conformational flexibility and ATP-binding efficiency. The de novo KIF1A mutants were nonmotile in the microtubule gliding assay. Interpretation De novo mutations in KIF1A cause a degenerative neurologic syndrome with brain atrophy. Computational and in vitro assays differentiate the severity of dominant de novo heterozygous versus inherited recessive KIF1A mutations. The profound effect de novo mutations have on axonal transport is likely related to the cause of progressive neurologic impairment in these patients. PMID:26125038

  2. Bartter and Gitelman syndromes: Spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by different mutations.

    PubMed

    Al Shibli, Amar; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-06-26

    Bartter and Gitelman syndromes (BS and GS) are inherited disorders resulting in defects in renal tubular handling of sodium, potassium and chloride. Previously considered as genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneous diseases, recent evidence suggests that they constitute a spectrum of disease caused by different genetic mutations with the molecular defects of chloride reabsorption originating at different sites of the nephron in each condition. Although they share some characteristic metabolic abnormalities such as hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus with hyperreninemia, hyperaldosteronism, the clinical and laboratory manifestations may not always allow distinction between them. Diuretics tests, measuring the changes in urinary fractional excretion of chloride from baseline after administration of either hydrochlorothiazide or furosemide show very little change (< 2.3%) in the fractional excretion of chloride from baseline in GS when compared with BS, except when BS is associated with KCNJ1 mutations where a good response to both diuretics exists. The diuretic test is not recommended for infants or young children with suspected BS because of a higher risk of volume depletion in such children. Clinical symptoms and biochemical markers of GS and classic form of BS (type III) may overlap and thus genetic analysis may specify the real cause of symptoms. However, although genetic analysis is available, its use remains limited because of limited availability, large gene dimensions, lack of hot-spot mutations, heavy workup time and costs involved. Furthermore, considerable overlap exists between the different genotypes and phenotypes. Although BS and GS usually have distinct presentations and are associated with specific gene mutations, there remains considerable overlap between their phenotypes and genotypes. Thus, they are better described as a spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by different gene mutations. PMID:26140272

  3. A recurrent germline mutation in the PIGA gene causes Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 2.

    PubMed

    Fauth, Christine; Steindl, Katharina; Toutain, Annick; Farrell, Sandra; Witsch-Baumgartner, Martina; Karall, Daniela; Joset, Pascal; Böhm, Sebastian; Baumer, Alessandra; Maier, Oliver; Zschocke, Johannes; Weksberg, Rosanna; Marshall, Christian R; Rauch, Anita

    2016-02-01

    Hypomorphic germline mutations in the PIGA (phosphatidylinositol glycan class A) gene recently were recognized as the cause of a clinically heterogeneous spectrum of X-linked disorders including (i) early onset epileptic encephalopathy with severe muscular hypotonia, dysmorphism, multiple congenital anomalies, and early death ("MCAHS2"), (ii) neurodegenerative encephalopathy with systemic iron overload (ferro-cerebro-cutaneous syndrome, "FCCS"), and (iii) intellectual disability and seizures without dysmorphism. Previous studies showed that the recurrent PIGA germline mutation c.1234C>T (p.Arg412*) leads to a clinical phenotype at the most severe end of the spectrum associated with early infantile lethality. We identified three additional individuals from two unrelated families with the same PIGA mutation. Major clinical findings include early onset intractable epileptic encephalopathy with a burst-suppression pattern on EEG, generalized muscular hypotonia, structural brain abnormalities, macrocephaly and increased birth weight, joint contractures, coarse facial features, widely spaced eyes, a short nose with anteverted nares, gingival overgrowth, a wide mouth, short limbs with short distal phalanges, and a small penis. Based on the phenotypic overlap with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 2 (SGBS2), we hypothesized that both disorders might have the same underlying cause. We were able to confirm the same c.1234C>T (p.Arg412*) mutation in the DNA sample from an affected fetus of the original family affected with SGBS2. We conclude that the recurrent PIGA germline mutation c.1234C>T leads to a recognizable clinical phenotype with a poor prognosis and is the cause of SGBS2.

  4. Bartter and Gitelman syndromes: Spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by different mutations

    PubMed Central

    Al Shibli, Amar; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Bartter and Gitelman syndromes (BS and GS) are inherited disorders resulting in defects in renal tubular handling of sodium, potassium and chloride. Previously considered as genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneous diseases, recent evidence suggests that they constitute a spectrum of disease caused by different genetic mutations with the molecular defects of chloride reabsorption originating at different sites of the nephron in each condition. Although they share some characteristic metabolic abnormalities such as hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus with hyperreninemia, hyperaldosteronism, the clinical and laboratory manifestations may not always allow distinction between them. Diuretics tests, measuring the changes in urinary fractional excretion of chloride from baseline after administration of either hydrochlorothiazide or furosemide show very little change (< 2.3%) in the fractional excretion of chloride from baseline in GS when compared with BS, except when BS is associated with KCNJ1 mutations where a good response to both diuretics exists. The diuretic test is not recommended for infants or young children with suspected BS because of a higher risk of volume depletion in such children. Clinical symptoms and biochemical markers of GS and classic form of BS (type III) may overlap and thus genetic analysis may specify the real cause of symptoms. However, although genetic analysis is available, its use remains limited because of limited availability, large gene dimensions, lack of hot-spot mutations, heavy workup time and costs involved. Furthermore, considerable overlap exists between the different genotypes and phenotypes. Although BS and GS usually have distinct presentations and are associated with specific gene mutations, there remains considerable overlap between their phenotypes and genotypes. Thus, they are better described as a spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by different gene mutations. PMID:26140272

  5. Biallelic Mutations in UNC80 Cause Persistent Hypotonia, Encephalopathy, Growth Retardation, and Severe Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Cobben, Jan-Maarten; Prescott, Trine E; Lee, Sora; Cang, Chunlei; Aranda, Kimberly; Ahmed, Sohnee; Alders, Marielle; Gerstner, Thorsten; Aslaksen, Kathinka; Tétreault, Martine; Qin, Wen; Hartley, Taila; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Lupski, James R; Ren, Dejian; Yoon, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are required for both the establishment of resting membrane potentials and the generation of action potentials. Hundreds of mutations in genes encoding voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential generation have been found to cause severe neurological diseases. In contrast, the roles of voltage-independent "leak" channels, important for the establishment and maintenance of resting membrane potentials upon which action potentials are generated, are not well established in human disease. UNC80 is a large component of the NALCN sodium-leak channel complex that regulates the basal excitability of the nervous system. Loss-of-function mutations of NALCN cause infantile hypotonia with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies (IHPRF). We report four individuals from three unrelated families who have homozygous missense or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in UNC80 and persistent hypotonia, encephalopathy, growth failure, and severe intellectual disability. Compared to control cells, HEK293T cells transfected with an expression plasmid containing the c.5098C>T (p.Pro1700Ser) UNC80 mutation found in one individual showed markedly decreased NALCN channel currents. Our findings demonstrate the fundamental significance of UNC80 and basal ionic conductance to human health. PMID:26708751

  6. Familial T‐cell non‐Hodgkin lymphoma caused by biallelic MSH2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Richard H; Homfray, Tessa; Huxter, Nicola L; Mitton, Sally G; Nash, Ruth; Potter, Mike N; Lancaster, Donna; Rahman, Nazneen

    2007-01-01

    Familial non‐Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is rare and in most cases, no underlying cause is identifiable. We report homozygous truncating mutations in the mismatch repair gene MSH2 (226C→T; Q76X) in three siblings who each developed T‐cell NHL in early childhood. All three children had hyperpigmented and hypopigmented skin lesions. Constitutional biallelic MSH2 mutations have previously been reported in five individuals, all of whom developed malignancy in childhood. Familial lymphoma has not been reported in this context or in association with biallelic mutations in the other mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH6 or PMS2. In addition, hypopigmented skin lesions have not previously been reported in biallelic MSH2 carriers. Our findings therefore expand the spectrum of phenotypes associated with biallelic MSH2 mutations and identify a new cause of familial lymphoma. Moreover, the diagnosis has important management implications as it allows the avoidance of chemotherapeutic agents likely to be ineffective and mutagenic in the proband, and the provision of cascade genetic testing and tumour screening for relatives. PMID:17601929

  7. Biallelic Mutations in UNC80 Cause Persistent Hypotonia, Encephalopathy, Growth Retardation, and Severe Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Cobben, Jan-Maarten; Prescott, Trine E; Lee, Sora; Cang, Chunlei; Aranda, Kimberly; Ahmed, Sohnee; Alders, Marielle; Gerstner, Thorsten; Aslaksen, Kathinka; Tétreault, Martine; Qin, Wen; Hartley, Taila; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Lupski, James R; Ren, Dejian; Yoon, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are required for both the establishment of resting membrane potentials and the generation of action potentials. Hundreds of mutations in genes encoding voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential generation have been found to cause severe neurological diseases. In contrast, the roles of voltage-independent "leak" channels, important for the establishment and maintenance of resting membrane potentials upon which action potentials are generated, are not well established in human disease. UNC80 is a large component of the NALCN sodium-leak channel complex that regulates the basal excitability of the nervous system. Loss-of-function mutations of NALCN cause infantile hypotonia with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies (IHPRF). We report four individuals from three unrelated families who have homozygous missense or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in UNC80 and persistent hypotonia, encephalopathy, growth failure, and severe intellectual disability. Compared to control cells, HEK293T cells transfected with an expression plasmid containing the c.5098C>T (p.Pro1700Ser) UNC80 mutation found in one individual showed markedly decreased NALCN channel currents. Our findings demonstrate the fundamental significance of UNC80 and basal ionic conductance to human health.

  8. Biallelic Mutations in UNC80 Cause Persistent Hypotonia, Encephalopathy, Growth Retardation, and Severe Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Cobben, Jan-Maarten; Prescott, Trine E.; Lee, Sora; Cang, Chunlei; Aranda, Kimberly; Ahmed, Sohnee; Alders, Marielle; Gerstner, Thorsten; Aslaksen, Kathinka; Tétreault, Martine; Qin, Wen; Hartley, Taila; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; van Karnebeek, Clara D.M.; Lupski, James R.; Ren, Dejian; Yoon, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are required for both the establishment of resting membrane potentials and the generation of action potentials. Hundreds of mutations in genes encoding voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential generation have been found to cause severe neurological diseases. In contrast, the roles of voltage-independent “leak” channels, important for the establishment and maintenance of resting membrane potentials upon which action potentials are generated, are not well established in human disease. UNC80 is a large component of the NALCN sodium-leak channel complex that regulates the basal excitability of the nervous system. Loss-of-function mutations of NALCN cause infantile hypotonia with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies (IHPRF). We report four individuals from three unrelated families who have homozygous missense or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in UNC80 and persistent hypotonia, encephalopathy, growth failure, and severe intellectual disability. Compared to control cells, HEK293T cells transfected with an expression plasmid containing the c.5098C>T (p.Pro1700Ser) UNC80 mutation found in one individual showed markedly decreased NALCN channel currents. Our findings demonstrate the fundamental significance of UNC80 and basal ionic conductance to human health. PMID:26708751

  9. Homozygous and compound-heterozygous mutations in TGDS cause Catel-Manzke syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ehmke, Nadja; Caliebe, Almuth; Koenig, Rainer; Kant, Sarina G; Stark, Zornitza; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hoff, Kirstin; Kawalia, Amit; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Knaus, Alexej; Zhu, Na; Heinrich, Verena; Huber, Celine; Harabula, Izabela; Spielmann, Malte; Horn, Denise; Kornak, Uwe; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter M; Nürnberg, Peter; Siebert, Reiner; Manzke, Hermann; Mundlos, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Catel-Manzke syndrome is characterized by Pierre Robin sequence and a unique form of bilateral hyperphalangy causing a clinodactyly of the index finger. We describe the identification of homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in TGDS in seven unrelated individuals with typical Catel-Manzke syndrome by exome sequencing. Six different TGDS mutations were detected: c.892A>G (p.Asn298Asp), c.270_271del (p.Lys91Asnfs(∗)22), c.298G>T (p.Ala100Ser), c.294T>G (p.Phe98Leu), c.269A>G (p.Glu90Gly), and c.700T>C (p.Tyr234His), all predicted to be disease causing. By using haplotype reconstruction we showed that the mutation c.298G>T is probably a founder mutation. Due to the spectrum of the amino acid changes, we suggest that loss of function in TGDS is the underlying mechanism of Catel-Manzke syndrome. TGDS (dTDP-D-glucose 4,6-dehydrogenase) is a conserved protein belonging to the SDR family and probably plays a role in nucleotide sugar metabolism.

  10. Hypomorphic mutation in mouse Nppc gene causes retarded bone growth due to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Takehito Kondo, Eri; Yasoda, Akihiro; Inamoto, Masataka; Kiyosu, Chiyo; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2008-11-07

    Long bone abnormality (lbab/lbab) is a spontaneous mutant mouse characterized by dwarfism with shorter long bones. A missense mutation was reported in the Nppc gene, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but it has not been confirmed whether this mutation is responsible for the dwarf phenotype. To verify that the mutation causes the dwarfism of lbab/lbab mice, we first investigated the effect of CNP in lbab/lbab mice. By transgenic rescue with chondrocyte-specific expression of CNP, the dwarf phenotype in lbab/lbab mice was completely compensated. Next, we revealed that CNP derived from the lbab allele retained only slight activity to induce cGMP production through its receptor. Histological analysis showed that both proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes in the growth plate of lbab/lbab mice were markedly reduced. Our results demonstrate that lbab/lbab mice have a hypomorphic mutation in the Nppc gene that is responsible for dwarfism caused by impaired endochondral ossification.

  11. Mutations in ERCC4, Encoding the DNA-Repair Endonuclease XPF, Cause Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bogliolo, Massimo; Schuster, Beatrice; Stoepker, Chantal; Derkunt, Burak; Su, Yan; Raams, Anja; Trujillo, Juan P.; Minguillón, Jordi; Ramírez, María J.; Pujol, Roser; Casado, José A.; Baños, Rocío; Rio, Paula; Knies, Kerstin; Zúñiga, Sheila; Benítez, Javier; Bueren, Juan A.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G.J.; Schärer, Orlando D.; de Winter, Johan P.; Schindler, Detlev; Surrallés, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genomic instability disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and predisposition to cancer. FA-associated gene products are involved in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Fifteen FA-associated genes have been identified, but the genetic basis in some individuals still remains unresolved. Here, we used whole-exome and Sanger sequencing on DNA of unclassified FA individuals and discovered biallelic germline mutations in ERCC4 (XPF), a structure-specific nuclease-encoding gene previously connected to xeroderma pigmentosum and segmental XFE progeroid syndrome. Genetic reversion and wild-type ERCC4 cDNA complemented the phenotype of the FA cell lines, providing genetic evidence that mutations in ERCC4 cause this FA subtype. Further biochemical and functional analysis demonstrated that the identified FA-causing ERCC4 mutations strongly disrupt the function of XPF in DNA ICL repair without severely compromising nucleotide excision repair. Our data show that depending on the type of ERCC4 mutation and the resulting balance between both DNA repair activities, individuals present with one of the three clinically distinct disorders, highlighting the multifunctional nature of the XPF endonuclease in genome stability and human disease. PMID:23623386

  12. Multi-systemic involvement in NGLY1-related disorder caused by two novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Heeley, Jennifer; Shinawi, Marwan

    2015-04-01

    NGLY1-related disorder is a newly described autosomal recessive condition characterized by neurological, hepatic, ophthalmological findings and associated with dysmorphic features, constipation and scoliosis. It is caused by mutations in NGLY1, which encodes an enzyme, N-glycanase 1, involved in deglycosylation of glycoproteins, an essential step in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. The disorder has been described in eight patients. We investigated the molecular basis and phenotype of NGLY1-related disorder in an additional patient. The proband is a 14-year-old who presented in early infancy with profound hypotonia and elevated transaminases. Liver biopsy showed lipid accumulation with dilated endoplasmic reticulum. He exhibited global developmental delay, acquired microcephaly, seizures, involuntary body movements, muscle atrophy, absent reflexes, and poor growth. He had multiple procedures for lacrimal duct stenosis and strabismus and had intractable blepharitis. He had severe osteopenia and persistent hypocholesterolemia. Whole exome sequencing revealed two novel variants in NGLY1: a truncating mutation, c.347C > G (p.S116X), and a splicing mutation, c.881 + 5G (p.IVS5 + 5G>T), predicted to abolish the splice donor site of exon 5. This study, along with previously reported cases, suggests that mutations in NGLY1 cause a recognizable phenotype and targeted sequencing should be considered in patients with typical presentation. This study expands the molecular spectrum of NGLY1-related condition and suggests that osteopenia and hypocholesterolemia may be part of the phenotype. PMID:25707956

  13. Mutation spectrum and genotype-phenotype correlation of hearing loss patients caused by SLC26A4 mutations in the Japanese: a large cohort study.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2014-05-01

    Mutations in SLC26A4 cause a broad phenotypic spectrum, from typical Pendred syndrome to nonsyndromic hearing loss associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct. Identification of these mutations is important for accurate diagnosis, proper medical management and appropriate genetic counseling and requires updated information regarding spectrum, clinical characteristics and genotype-phenotype correlations, based on a large cohort. In 100 patients with bilateral enlarged vestibular aqueduct among 1511 Japanese hearing loss probands registered in our gene bank, goiter data were available for 79, of whom 15 had Pendred syndrome and 64 had nonsyndromic hearing loss. We clarified the mutation spectrum for the SLC26A4 mutations and also summarized hearing levels, progression, fluctuation and existence of genotype-phenotype correlation. SLC26A4 mutations were identified in 82 of the 100 patients (82.0%). Of the Pendred syndrome patients, 93% (14/15) were carriers, as were 77% (49/64) of the nonsyndromic hearing loss patients. Clinical characteristics of patients with SLC26A4 mutations were congenital, fluctuating and progressive hearing loss usually associated with vertigo and/or goiter. We found no genotype-phenotype correlations, indicating that, unlike in the case of GJB2 mutations, the phenotype cannot be predicted from the genotype. Our mutation analysis confirmed the importance of mutations in the SLC26A4 gene among hearing loss patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct and revealed the mutation spectrum, essential information when performing genetic testing.

  14. A novel TMPRSS6 mutation that prevents protease auto-activation causes IRIDA

    PubMed Central

    Altamura, Sandro; D'Alessio, Flavia; Selle, Barbara; Muckenthaler, Martina U.

    2010-01-01

    IRIDA (iron-refractory iron-deficiency anaemia) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder hallmarked by hypochromic microcytic anaemia, low transferrin saturation and high levels of the iron-regulated hormone hepcidin. The disease is caused by mutations in the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS6 (transmembrane protease serine 6) that prevent inactivation of HJV (haemojuvelin), an activator of hepcidin transcription. In the present paper, we describe a patient with IRIDA who carries a novel mutation (Y141C) in the SEA domain of the TMPRSS6 gene. Functional characterization of the TMPRSS6(Y141C) mutant protein in cultured cells showed that it localizes to similar subcellular compartments as wild-type TMPRSS6 and binds HJV, but fails to auto-catalytically activate itself. As a consequence, hepcidin mRNA expression is increased, causing the clinical symptoms observed in this IRIDA patient. The present study provides important mechanistic insight into how TMPRSS6 is activated. PMID:20704562

  15. Homozygosity for a novel truncating mutation confirms TBX15 deficiency as the cause of Cousin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dikoglu, Esra; Simsek-Kiper, Pelin Ozlem; Utine, Gulen Eda; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Boduroglu, Koray; Bonafé, Luisa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Unger, Sheila

    2013-12-01

    Cousin syndrome, also called pelviscapular dysplasia (OMIM 260660), is characterized by short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism, and multiple skeletal anomalies. Following its description in two sibs in 1982, no new cases have been observed until the observation of two unrelated cases in 2008 who were homozygous for frameshift mutations in TBX15. We investigated an adult individual with short stature, a complex craniofacial dysmorphism, malformed and rotated ears, short neck, elbow contractures, hypoacusis, and hypoplasia of scapula and pelvis on radiographs. We identified homozygosity for a novel nonsense mutation (c.841C>T) in TBX15 predicted to cause a premature stop (p.Arg281*) with truncation of the protein. This observation confirms that Cousin syndrome is a consistent and clinically recognizable phenotype caused by loss of function of TBX15.

  16. Biallelic Mutations in NBAS Cause Recurrent Acute Liver Failure with Onset in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Tobias B.; Staufner, Christian; Köpke, Marlies G.; Straub, Beate K.; Kölker, Stefan; Thiel, Christian; Freisinger, Peter; Baric, Ivo; McKiernan, Patrick J.; Dikow, Nicola; Harting, Inga; Beisse, Flemming; Burgard, Peter; Kotzaeridou, Urania; Kühr, Joachim; Himbert, Urban; Taylor, Robert W.; Distelmaier, Felix; Vockley, Jerry; Ghaloul-Gonzalez, Lina; Zschocke, Johannes; Kremer, Laura S.; Graf, Elisabeth; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Bader, Daniel M.; Gagneur, Julien; Wieland, Thomas; Terrile, Caterina; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Prokisch, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) in infancy and childhood is a life-threatening emergency. Few conditions are known to cause recurrent acute liver failure (RALF), and in about 50% of cases, the underlying molecular cause remains unresolved. Exome sequencing in five unrelated individuals with fever-dependent RALF revealed biallelic mutations in NBAS. Subsequent Sanger sequencing of NBAS in 15 additional unrelated individuals with RALF or ALF identified compound heterozygous mutations in an additional six individuals from five families. Immunoblot analysis of mutant fibroblasts showed reduced protein levels of NBAS and its proposed interaction partner p31, both involved in retrograde transport between endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We recommend NBAS analysis in individuals with acute infantile liver failure, especially if triggered by fever. PMID:26073778

  17. A cis-regulatory mutation of PDSS2 causes silky-feather in chickens.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chungang; Gao, Yu; Dorshorst, Ben; Song, Chi; Gu, Xiaorong; Li, Qingyuan; Li, Jinxiu; Liu, Tongxin; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Zhao, Yiqiang; Wang, Yanqiang; Fei, Jing; Li, Huifang; Chen, Kuanwei; Qu, Hao; Shu, Dingming; Ashwell, Chris; Da, Yang; Andersson, Leif; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning

    2014-08-01

    Silky-feather has been selected and fixed in some breeds due to its unique appearance. This phenotype is caused by a single recessive gene (hookless, h). Here we map the silky-feather locus to chromosome 3 by linkage analysis and subsequently fine-map it to an 18.9 kb interval using the identical by descent (IBD) method. Further analysis reveals that a C to G transversion located upstream of the prenyl (decaprenyl) diphosphate synthase, subunit 2 (PDSS2) gene is causing silky-feather. All silky-feather birds are homozygous for the G allele. The silky-feather mutation significantly decreases the expression of PDSS2 during feather development in vivo. Consistent with the regulatory effect, the C to G transversion is shown to remarkably reduce PDSS2 promoter activity in vitro. We report a new example of feather structure variation associated with a spontaneous mutation and provide new insight into the PDSS2 function.

  18. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A.; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M.; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R.; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C.; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development. PMID:27380894

  19. A cis-Regulatory Mutation of PDSS2 Causes Silky-Feather in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chungang; Gao, Yu; Dorshorst, Ben; Song, Chi; Gu, Xiaorong; Li, Qingyuan; Li, Jinxiu; Liu, Tongxin; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Zhao, Yiqiang; Wang, Yanqiang; Fei, Jing; Li, Huifang; Chen, Kuanwei; Qu, Hao; Shu, Dingming; Ashwell, Chris; Da, Yang; Andersson, Leif; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Silky-feather has been selected and fixed in some breeds due to its unique appearance. This phenotype is caused by a single recessive gene (hookless, h). Here we map the silky-feather locus to chromosome 3 by linkage analysis and subsequently fine-map it to an 18.9 kb interval using the identical by descent (IBD) method. Further analysis reveals that a C to G transversion located upstream of the prenyl (decaprenyl) diphosphate synthase, subunit 2 (PDSS2) gene is causing silky-feather. All silky-feather birds are homozygous for the G allele. The silky-feather mutation significantly decreases the expression of PDSS2 during feather development in vivo. Consistent with the regulatory effect, the C to G transversion is shown to remarkably reduce PDSS2 promoter activity in vitro. We report a new example of feather structure variation associated with a spontaneous mutation and provide new insight into the PDSS2 function. PMID:25166907

  20. Mutations in the SPTLC1 protein cause mitochondrial structural abnormalities and endoplasmic reticulum stress in lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Myers, Simon J; Malladi, Chandra S; Hyland, Ryan A; Bautista, Tara; Boadle, Ross; Robinson, Phillip J; Nicholson, Garth A

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase long chain subunit 1 (SPTLC1) cause the typical length-dependent axonal degeneration hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 (HSN1). Transmission electron microscopy studies on SPTLC1 mutant lymphoblasts derived from patients revealed specific structural abnormalities of mitochondria. Swollen mitochondria with abnormal cristae were clustered around the nucleus, with some mitochondria being wrapped in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. Total mitochondrial counts revealed a significant change in mitochondrial numbers between healthy and diseased lymphocytes but did not reveal any change in length to width ratios nor were there any changes to cellular function. However, there was a notable change in ER homeostasis, as assessed using key ER stress markers, BiP and ERO1-Lα, displaying reduced protein expression. The observations suggest that SPTLC1 mutations cause mitochondrial abnormalities and ER stress in HSN1 cells. PMID:24673574

  1. Treatable childhood neuronopathy caused by mutations in riboflavin transporter RFVT2

    PubMed Central

    Foley, A. Reghan; Menezes, Manoj P.; Pandraud, Amelie; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Al-Odaib, Ahmad; Abrams, Alexander J.; Sugano, Kumiko; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Burns, Joshua; Hughes, Imelda; McCullagh, B. Gary; Jungbluth, Heinz; Lim, Ming J.; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Megarbane, Andre; Urtizberea, J. Andoni; Shah, Ayaz H.; Antony, Jayne; Webster, Richard; Broomfield, Alexander; Ng, Joanne; Mathew, Ann A.; O’Byrne, James J.; Forman, Eva; Scoto, Mariacristina; Prasad, Manish; O’Brien, Katherine; Olpin, Simon; Oppenheim, Marcus; Hargreaves, Iain; Land, John M.; Wang, Min X.; Carpenter, Kevin; Horvath, Rita; Straub, Volker; Lek, Monkol; Gold, Wendy; Farrell, Michael O.; Brandner, Sebastian; Phadke, Rahul; Matsubara, Kazuo; McGarvey, Michael L.; Scherer, Steven S.; Baxter, Peter S.; King, Mary D.; Clayton, Peter; Rahman, Shamima; Reilly, Mary M.; Ouvrier, Robert A.; Christodoulou, John; Züchner, Stephan; Muntoni, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Childhood onset motor neuron diseases or neuronopathies are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. A particularly severe subgroup first described in 1894, and subsequently called Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome, is characterized by progressive pontobulbar palsy, sensorineural hearing loss and respiratory insufficiency. There has been no treatment for this progressive neurodegenerative disorder, which leads to respiratory failure and usually death during childhood. We recently reported the identification of SLC52A2, encoding riboflavin transporter RFVT2, as a new causative gene for Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome. We used both exome and Sanger sequencing to identify SLC52A2 mutations in patients presenting with cranial neuropathies and sensorimotor neuropathy with or without respiratory insufficiency. We undertook clinical, neurophysiological and biochemical characterization of patients with mutations in SLC52A2, functionally analysed the most prevalent mutations and initiated a regimen of high-dose oral riboflavin. We identified 18 patients from 13 families with compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations in SLC52A2. Affected individuals share a core phenotype of rapidly progressive axonal sensorimotor neuropathy (manifesting with sensory ataxia, severe weakness of the upper limbs and axial muscles with distinctly preserved strength of the lower limbs), hearing loss, optic atrophy and respiratory insufficiency. We demonstrate that SLC52A2 mutations cause reduced riboflavin uptake and reduced riboflavin transporter protein expression, and we report the response to high-dose oral riboflavin therapy in patients with SLC52A2 mutations, including significant and sustained clinical and biochemical improvements in two patients and preliminary clinical response data in 13 patients with associated biochemical improvements in 10 patients. The clinical and biochemical responses of this SLC52A2-specific cohort suggest that riboflavin supplementation can

  2. A novel homozygous LMNA mutation (p.Met540Ile) causes mandibuloacral dysplasia type A.

    PubMed

    Yassaee, Vahid Reza; Khojaste, Arash; Hashemi-Gorji, Feyzollah; Ravesh, Zeinab; Toosi, Parviz

    2016-02-10

    Mandibuloacral dysplasia with type A lipodystrophy (MADA) is a rare genetic disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion characterized by hypoplasia of the mandible and clavicles, acroosteolysis and lipodystrophy due to mutations in the LMNA or ZMPSTE24 genes. In the current study, we have investigated a consanguineous family clinically diagnosed with mandibuloacral dysplasia type A having an affected child for the LMNA gene alteration(s). Mother is now 15weeks pregnant, seeking advice on the health of her fetus. Peripheral blood was obtained from all family members after informed consent was achieved. Genomic DNA was isolated. The sequence of the LMNA gene, including all exons and intron boundaries was analyzed by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Chorionic villus was collected from the placenta to reveal the condition of the fetus. Molecular analysis ascertained a homozygous mutation c.1620G>A (p.M540I) in the proband and heterozygous alteration in the family. Genomic DNA isolated from the CVS was amplified using specific primers for identified deleterious mutation and analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Two pathogenic mutations c.1620G>A and c.1698C>T were identified in the fetus. Genetic counseling as well as justified rapid and sensitive genetic testing can provide reassurance for the families to prevent the high burden of genetic disorders. We have also applied several online tools including PolyPhen2, MUpro, SIFT, PoPMuSiC, Project HOPE and Mutation Taster to predict the impact of p.Met540Ile substitution as a hotspot region within LMNA. All tools showed reduction in the stability of the protein structure. We conclude that p.M540I mutation may causes disease in the homozygous state. PMID:26602028

  3. Observational Cohort Study of Ventricular Arrhythmia in Adults with Marfan Syndrome Caused by FBN1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhzadeh, Sara; Keyser, Britta; Rybczynski, Meike; Sondermann, Claudia; Detter, Christian; Steven, Daniel; Robinson, Peter N.; Berger, Jürgen; Schmidtke, Jörg; Blankenberg, Stefan; Willems, Stephan; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Hoffmann, Boris A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Marfan syndrome is associated with ventricular arrhythmia but risk factors including FBN1 mutation characteristics require elucidation. Methods and Results We performed an observational cohort study of 80 consecutive adults (30 men, 50 women aged 42±15 years) with Marfan syndrome caused by FBN1 mutations. We assessed ventricular arrhythmia on baseline ambulatory electrocardiography as >10 premature ventricular complexes per hour (>10 PVC/h), as ventricular couplets (Couplet), or as non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (nsVT), and during 31±18 months of follow-up as ventricular tachycardia (VT) events (VTE) such as sudden cardiac death (SCD), and sustained ventricular tachycardia (sVT). We identified >10 PVC/h in 28 (35%), Couplet/nsVT in 32 (40%), and VTE in 6 patients (8%), including 3 with SCD (4%). PVC>10/h, Couplet/nsVT, and VTE exhibited increased N-terminal pro–brain natriuretic peptide serum levels(P<.001). All arrhythmias related to increased NT-proBNP (P<.001), where PVC>10/h and Couplet/nsVT also related to increased indexed end-systolic LV diameters (P = .024 and P = .020), to moderate mitral valve regurgitation (P = .018 and P = .003), and to prolonged QTc intervals (P = .001 and P = .006), respectively. Moreover, VTE related to mutations in exons 24–32 (P = .021). Kaplan–Meier analysis corroborated an association of VTE with increased NT-proBNP (P<.001) and with mutations in exons 24–32 (P<.001). Conclusions Marfan syndrome with causative FBN1 mutations is associated with an increased risk for arrhythmia, and affected persons may require life-long monitoring. Ventricular arrhythmia on electrocardiography, signs of myocardial dysfunction and mutations in exons 24–32 may be risk factors of VTE. PMID:24349050

  4. Mutations in GMPPB cause congenital myasthenic syndrome and bridge myasthenic disorders with dystroglycanopathies.

    PubMed

    Belaya, Katsiaryna; Rodríguez Cruz, Pedro M; Liu, Wei Wei; Maxwell, Susan; McGowan, Simon; Farrugia, Maria E; Petty, Richard; Walls, Timothy J; Sedghi, Maryam; Basiri, Keivan; Yue, Wyatt W; Sarkozy, Anna; Bertoli, Marta; Pitt, Matthew; Kennett, Robin; Schaefer, Andrew; Bushby, Kate; Parton, Matt; Lochmüller, Hanns; Palace, Jacqueline; Muntoni, Francesco; Beeson, David

    2015-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are inherited disorders that arise from impaired signal transmission at the neuromuscular junction. Mutations in at least 20 genes are known to lead to the onset of these conditions. Four of these, ALG2, ALG14, DPAGT1 and GFPT1, are involved in glycosylation. Here we identify a fifth glycosylation gene, GMPPB, where mutations cause congenital myasthenic syndrome. First, we identified recessive mutations in seven cases from five kinships defined as congenital myasthenic syndrome using decrement of compound muscle action potentials on repetitive nerve stimulation on electromyography. The mutations were present through the length of the GMPPB, and segregation, in silico analysis, exon trapping, cell transfection followed by western blots and immunostaining were used to determine pathogenicity. GMPPB congenital myasthenic syndrome cases show clinical features characteristic of congenital myasthenic syndrome subtypes that are due to defective glycosylation, with variable weakness of proximal limb muscle groups while facial and eye muscles are largely spared. However, patients with GMPPB congenital myasthenic syndrome had more prominent myopathic features that were detectable on muscle biopsies, electromyography, muscle magnetic resonance imaging, and through elevated serum creatine kinase levels. Mutations in GMPPB have recently been reported to lead to the onset of muscular dystrophy dystroglycanopathy. Analysis of four additional GMPPB-associated muscular dystrophy dystroglycanopathy cases by electromyography found that a defective neuromuscular junction component is not always present. Thus, we find mutations in GMPPB can lead to a wide spectrum of clinical features where deficit in neuromuscular transmission is the major component in a subset of cases. Clinical recognition of GMPPB-associated congenital myasthenic syndrome may be complicated by the presence of myopathic features, but correct diagnosis is important because affected

  5. Mutations in GMPPB cause congenital myasthenic syndrome and bridge myasthenic disorders with dystroglycanopathies

    PubMed Central

    Belaya, Katsiaryna; Rodríguez Cruz, Pedro M.; Liu, Wei Wei; Maxwell, Susan; McGowan, Simon; Farrugia, Maria E.; Petty, Richard; Walls, Timothy J.; Sedghi, Maryam; Basiri, Keivan; Yue, Wyatt W.; Sarkozy, Anna; Bertoli, Marta; Pitt, Matthew; Kennett, Robin; Schaefer, Andrew; Bushby, Kate; Parton, Matt; Lochmüller, Hanns; Palace, Jacqueline; Muntoni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are inherited disorders that arise from impaired signal transmission at the neuromuscular junction. Mutations in at least 20 genes are known to lead to the onset of these conditions. Four of these, ALG2, ALG14, DPAGT1 and GFPT1, are involved in glycosylation. Here we identify a fifth glycosylation gene, GMPPB, where mutations cause congenital myasthenic syndrome. First, we identified recessive mutations in seven cases from five kinships defined as congenital myasthenic syndrome using decrement of compound muscle action potentials on repetitive nerve stimulation on electromyography. The mutations were present through the length of the GMPPB, and segregation, in silico analysis, exon trapping, cell transfection followed by western blots and immunostaining were used to determine pathogenicity. GMPPB congenital myasthenic syndrome cases show clinical features characteristic of congenital myasthenic syndrome subtypes that are due to defective glycosylation, with variable weakness of proximal limb muscle groups while facial and eye muscles are largely spared. However, patients with GMPPB congenital myasthenic syndrome had more prominent myopathic features that were detectable on muscle biopsies, electromyography, muscle magnetic resonance imaging, and through elevated serum creatine kinase levels. Mutations in GMPPB have recently been reported to lead to the onset of muscular dystrophy dystroglycanopathy. Analysis of four additional GMPPB-associated muscular dystrophy dystroglycanopathy cases by electromyography found that a defective neuromuscular junction component is not always present. Thus, we find mutations in GMPPB can lead to a wide spectrum of clinical features where deficit in neuromuscular transmission is the major component in a subset of cases. Clinical recognition of GMPPB-associated congenital myasthenic syndrome may be complicated by the presence of myopathic features, but correct diagnosis is important because affected

  6. Mutations in CIZ1 cause adult-onset primary cervical dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianfeng; Uitti, Ryan J.; Zhao, Yu; Vemula, Satya R.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Maraganore, Demetrius M.; Auburger, Georg; Leube, Barbara; Lehnhoff, Katja; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Primary dystonia is usually of adult onset, can be familial, and frequently involves the cervical musculature. Our goal was to identify the causal mutation in a family with adult-onset, primary cervical dystonia. Methods Linkage and haplotype analyses were combined with solution-based whole-exome capture and massively parallel sequencing in a large Caucasian pedigree with adult-onset, primary cervical dystonia to identify a cosegregating mutation. High-throughput screening and Sanger sequencing were completed in 308 Caucasians with familial or sporadic adult-onset cervical dystonia and matching controls for sequence variants in this mutant gene. Results Exome sequencing led to the identification of an exonic splicing enhancer mutation in Exon 7 of CIZ1 (c.790A>G, p.S264G) which encodes CIZ1, Cip1-interacting zinc finger protein 1. CIZ1 is a p21Cip1/Waf1-interacting zinc finger protein expressed in brain and involved in DNA synthesis and cell-cycle control. Using a minigene assay, we showed that c.790A>G altered CIZ1 splicing patterns. The p.S264G mutation also altered the nuclear localization of CIZ1. Screening in subjects with adult-onset cervical dystonia identified two additional CIZ1 missense mutations (p.P47S and p.R672M). Interpretation Mutations in CIZ1 may cause adult-onset, primary cervical dystonia, possibly by precipitating neurodevelopmental abnormalities that manifest in adults and/or G1/S cell-cycle dysregulation in the mature central nervous system. PMID:22447717

  7. A laminopathic mutation disrupting lamin filament assembly causes disease-like phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bank, Erin M.; Ben-Harush, Kfir; Wiesel-Motiuk, Naama; Barkan, Rachel; Feinstein, Naomi; Lotan, Oren; Medalia, Ohad; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the human LMNA gene underlie many laminopathic diseases, including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD); however, a mechanistic link between the effect of mutations on lamin filament assembly and disease phenotypes has not been established. We studied the ΔK46 Caenorhabditis elegans lamin mutant, corresponding to EDMD-linked ΔK32 in human lamins A and C. Cryo-electron tomography of lamin ΔK46 filaments in vitro revealed alterations in the lateral assembly of dimeric head-to-tail polymers, which causes abnormal organization of tetrameric protofilaments. Green fluorescent protein (GFP):ΔK46 lamin expressed in C. elegans was found in nuclear aggregates in postembryonic stages along with LEM-2. GFP:ΔK46 also caused mislocalization of emerin away from the nuclear periphery, consistent with a decreased ability of purified emerin to associate with lamin ΔK46 filaments in vitro. GFP:ΔK46 animals had motility defects and muscle structure abnormalities. These results show that changes in lamin filament structure can translate into disease-like phenotypes via altering the localization of nuclear lamina proteins, and suggest a model for how the ΔK32 lamin mutation may cause EDMD in humans. PMID:21653823

  8. Three Routes to Suppression of the Neurodegenerative Phenotypes Caused by Kinesin Heavy Chain Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Djagaeva, Inna; Rose, Debra J.; Lim, Angeline; Venter, Chris E.; Brendza, Katherine M.; Moua, Pangkong; Saxton, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Kinesin-1 is a motor protein that moves stepwise along microtubules by employing dimerized kinesin heavy chain (Khc) subunits that alternate cycles of microtubule binding, conformational change, and ATP hydrolysis. Mutations in the Drosophila Khc gene are known to cause distal paralysis and lethality preceded by the occurrence of dystrophic axon terminals, reduced axonal transport, organelle-filled axonal swellings, and impaired action potential propagation. Mutations in the equivalent human gene, Kif5A, result in similar problems that cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) and Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 2 (CMT2) distal neuropathies. By comparing the phenotypes and the complementation behaviors of a large set of Khc missense alleles, including one that is identical to a human Kif5A HSP allele, we identified three routes to suppression of Khc phenotypes: nutrient restriction, genetic background manipulation, and a remarkable intramolecular complementation between mutations known or likely to cause reciprocal changes in the rate of microtubule-stimulated ADP release by kinesin-1. Our results reveal the value of large-scale complementation analysis for gaining insight into protein structure–function relationships in vivo and point to possible paths for suppressing symptoms of HSP and related distal neuropathies. PMID:22714410

  9. Homozygous YME1L1 mutation causes mitochondriopathy with optic atrophy and mitochondrial network fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Bianca; Wai, Timothy; Hu, Hao; MacVicar, Thomas; Musante, Luciana; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Stenzel, Werner; Gräf, Ralph; van den Heuvel, Lambert; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Wienker, Thomas F; Hübner, Christoph; Langer, Thomas; Kaindl, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondriopathies often present clinically as multisystemic disorders of primarily high-energy consuming organs. Assembly, turnover, and surveillance of mitochondrial proteins are essential for mitochondrial function and a key task of AAA family members of metalloproteases. We identified a homozygous mutation in the nuclear encoded mitochondrial escape 1-like 1 gene YME1L1, member of the AAA protease family, as a cause of a novel mitochondriopathy in a consanguineous pedigree of Saudi Arabian descent. The homozygous missense mutation, located in a highly conserved region in the mitochondrial pre-sequence, inhibits cleavage of YME1L1 by the mitochondrial processing peptidase, which culminates in the rapid degradation of YME1L1 precursor protein. Impaired YME1L1 function causes a proliferation defect and mitochondrial network fragmentation due to abnormal processing of OPA1. Our results identify mutations in YME1L1 as a cause of a mitochondriopathy with optic nerve atrophy highlighting the importance of YME1L1 for mitochondrial functionality in humans. PMID:27495975

  10. A frameshift mutation in GRXCR2 causes recessively inherited hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Ayesha; Kohrman, David C; Naz, Sadaf

    2014-05-01

    More than 360 million humans are affected with some degree of hearing loss, either early or later in life. A genetic cause for the disorder is present in a majority of the cases. We mapped a locus (DFNB101) for hearing loss in humans to chromosome 5q in a consanguineous Pakistani family. Exome sequencing revealed an insertion mutation in GRXCR2 as the cause of moderate-to-severe and likely progressive hearing loss in the affected individuals of the family. The frameshift mutation is predicted to affect a conserved, cysteine-rich region of GRXCR2, and to result in an abnormal extension of the C-terminus. Functional studies by cell transfections demonstrated that the mutant protein is unstable and mislocalized relative to wild-type GRXCR2, consistent with a loss-of-function mutation. Targeted disruption of Grxcr2 is concurrently reported to cause hearing loss in mice. The structural abnormalities in this animal model suggest a role for GRXCR2 in the development of stereocilia bundles, specialized structures on the apical surface of sensory cells in the cochlea that are critical for sound detection. Our results indicate that GRXCR2 should be considered in differential genetic diagnosis for individuals with early onset, moderate-to-severe and progressive hearing loss.

  11. Mutation in MRPS34 Compromises Protein Synthesis and Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Tara R.; Ermer, Judith A.; Davies, Stefan M. K.; Perks, Kara L.; Viola, Helena M.; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J.; Hool, Livia C.; Rackham, Oliver; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary divergence of mitochondrial ribosomes from their bacterial and cytoplasmic ancestors has resulted in reduced RNA content and the acquisition of mitochondria-specific proteins. The mitochondrial ribosomal protein of the small subunit 34 (MRPS34) is a mitochondria-specific ribosomal protein found only in chordates, whose function we investigated in mice carrying a homozygous mutation in the nuclear gene encoding this protein. The Mrps34 mutation causes a significant decrease of this protein, which we show is required for the stability of the 12S rRNA, the small ribosomal subunit and actively translating ribosomes. The synthesis of all 13 mitochondrially-encoded polypeptides is compromised in the mutant mice, resulting in reduced levels of mitochondrial proteins and complexes, which leads to decreased oxygen consumption and respiratory complex activity. The Mrps34 mutation causes tissue-specific molecular changes that result in heterogeneous pathology involving alterations in fractional shortening of the heart and pronounced liver dysfunction that is exacerbated with age. The defects in mitochondrial protein synthesis in the mutant mice are caused by destabilization of the small ribosomal subunit that affects the stability of the mitochondrial ribosome with age. PMID:25816300

  12. Homozygous YME1L1 mutation causes mitochondriopathy with optic atrophy and mitochondrial network fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Bianca; Wai, Timothy; Hu, Hao; MacVicar, Thomas; Musante, Luciana; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Stenzel, Werner; Gräf, Ralph; van den Heuvel, Lambert; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Wienker, Thomas F; Hübner, Christoph; Langer, Thomas; Kaindl, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondriopathies often present clinically as multisystemic disorders of primarily high-energy consuming organs. Assembly, turnover, and surveillance of mitochondrial proteins are essential for mitochondrial function and a key task of AAA family members of metalloproteases. We identified a homozygous mutation in the nuclear encoded mitochondrial escape 1-like 1 gene YME1L1, member of the AAA protease family, as a cause of a novel mitochondriopathy in a consanguineous pedigree of Saudi Arabian descent. The homozygous missense mutation, located in a highly conserved region in the mitochondrial pre-sequence, inhibits cleavage of YME1L1 by the mitochondrial processing peptidase, which culminates in the rapid degradation of YME1L1 precursor protein. Impaired YME1L1 function causes a proliferation defect and mitochondrial network fragmentation due to abnormal processing of OPA1. Our results identify mutations in YME1L1 as a cause of a mitochondriopathy with optic nerve atrophy highlighting the importance of YME1L1 for mitochondrial functionality in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16078.001 PMID:27495975

  13. Recessive mutations in PCBD1 cause a new type of early-onset diabetes.

    PubMed

    Simaite, Deimante; Kofent, Julia; Gong, Maolian; Rüschendorf, Franz; Jia, Shiqi; Arn, Pamela; Bentler, Kristi; Ellaway, Carolyn; Kühnen, Peter; Hoffmann, Georg F; Blau, Nenad; Spagnoli, Francesca M; Hübner, Norbert; Raile, Klemens

    2014-10-01

    Mutations in several genes cause nonautoimmune diabetes, but numerous patients still have unclear genetic defects, hampering our understanding of the development of the disease and preventing pathogenesis-oriented treatment. We used whole-genome sequencing with linkage analysis to study a consanguineous family with early-onset antibody-negative diabetes and identified a novel deletion in PCBD1 (pterin-4 α-carbinolamine dehydratase/dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 α), a gene that was recently proposed as a likely cause of diabetes. A subsequent reevaluation of patients with mild neonatal hyperphenylalaninemia due to mutations in PCBD1 from the BIODEF database identified three additional patients who had developed HNF1A-like diabetes in puberty, indicating early β-cell failure. We found that Pcbd1 is expressed in the developing pancreas of both mouse and Xenopus embryos from early specification onward showing colocalization with insulin. Importantly, a morpholino-mediated knockdown in Xenopus revealed that pcbd1 activity is required for the proper establishment of early pancreatic fate within the endoderm. We provide the first genetic evidence that PCBD1 mutations can cause early-onset nonautoimmune diabetes with features similar to dominantly inherited HNF1A-diabetes. This condition responds to and can be treated with oral drugs instead of insulin, which is important clinical information for these patients. Finally, patients at risk can be detected through a newborn screening for phenylketonuria.

  14. A specific mutation in TBL1XR1 causes Pierpont syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Charlotte A; Jongejan, Aldo; Watson, Peter J; Redeker, Bert; Boelen, Anita; Boudzovitch-Surovtseva, Olga; Forzano, Francesca; Hordijk, Roel; Kelley, Richard; Olney, Ann H; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Schaefer, G Bradley; Stewart, Fiona; van Trotsenburg, A S Paul; Fliers, Eric; Schwabe, John W R; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2016-01-01

    Background The combination of developmental delay, facial characteristics, hearing loss and abnormal fat distribution in the distal limbs is known as Pierpont syndrome. The aim of the present study was to detect and study the cause of Pierpont syndrome. Methods We used whole-exome sequencing to analyse four unrelated individuals with Pierpont syndrome, and Sanger sequencing in two other unrelated affected individuals. Expression of mRNA of the wild-type candidate gene was analysed in human postmortem brain specimens, adipose tissue, muscle and liver. Expression of RNA in lymphocytes in patients and controls was additionally analysed. The variant protein was expressed in, and purified from, HEK293 cells to assess its effect on protein folding and function. Results We identified a single heterozygous missense variant, c.1337A>C (p.Tyr446Cys), in transducin β-like 1 X-linked receptor 1 (TBL1XR1) as disease-causing in all patients. TBL1XR1 mRNA expression was demonstrated in pituitary, hypothalamus, white and brown adipose tissue, muscle and liver. mRNA expression is lower in lymphocytes of two patients compared with the four controls. The mutant TBL1XR1 protein assembled correctly into the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR)/ silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptors (SMRT) complex, suggesting a dominant-negative mechanism. This contrasts with loss-of-function germline TBL1XR1 deletions and other TBL1XR1 mutations that have been implicated in autism. However, autism is not present in individuals with Pierpont syndrome. Conclusions This study identifies a specific TBL1XR1 mutation as the cause of Pierpont syndrome. Deletions and other mutations in TBL1XR1 can cause autism. The marked differences between Pierpont patients with the p.Tyr446Cys mutation and individuals with other mutations and whole gene deletions indicate a specific, but as yet unknown, disease mechanism of the TBL1XR1 p.Tyr446Cys mutation. PMID:26769062

  15. A limited spectrum of mutations causes constitutive activation of the yeast alpha-factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Sommers, C M; Martin, N P; Akal-Strader, A; Becker, J M; Naider, F; Dumont, M E

    2000-06-13

    Activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) by binding of ligand is the initial event in diverse cellular signaling pathways. To examine the frequency and diversity of mutations that cause constitutive activation of one particular GPCR, the yeast alpha-factor receptor, we screened libraries of random mutations for constitutive alleles. In initial screens for mutant receptor alleles that exhibit signaling in the absence of added ligand, 14 different point mutations were isolated. All of these 14 mutants could be further activated by alpha-factor. Ten of the mutants also acquired the ability to signal in response to binding of desTrp(1)¿Ala(3)ălpha-factor, a peptide that acts as an antagonist toward normal alpha-factor receptors. Of these 10 mutants, at least eight alleles residing in the third, fifth, sixth, and seventh transmembrane segments exhibit bona fide constitutive signaling. The remaining alleles are hypersensitive to alpha-factor rather than constitutive. They can be activated by low concentrations of endogenous alpha-factor present in MATa cells. The strongest constitutively active receptor alleles were recovered multiple times from the mutational libraries, and extensive mutagenesis of certain regions of the alpha-factor receptor did not lead to recovery of any additional constitutive alleles. Thus, only a limited number of mutations is capable of causing constitutive activation of this receptor. Constitutive and hypersensitive signaling by the mutant receptors is partially suppressed by coexpression of normal receptors, consistent with preferential association of the G protein with unactivated receptors. PMID:10841771

  16. Functional consequences of transferrin receptor-2 mutations causing hereditary hemochromatosis type 3

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ricky; Shvartsman, Maya; Morán, Erica; Lois, Sergi; Aranda, Jessica; Barqué, Anna; de la Cruz, Xavier; Bruguera, Miquel; Vagace, José Manuel; Gervasini, Guillermo; Sanz, Cristina; Sánchez, Mayka

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) type 3 is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism characterized by excessive iron deposition in the liver and caused by mutations in the transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) gene. Here, we describe three new HH type 3 Spanish families with four TFR2 mutations (p.Gly792Arg, c.1606-8A>G, Gln306*, and Gln672*). The missense variation p.Gly792Arg was found in homozygosity in two adult patients of the same family, and in compound heterozygosity in an adult proband that also carries a novel intronic change (c.1606-8A>G). Two new nonsense TFR2 mutations (Gln306* and Gln672*) were detected in a pediatric case. We examine the functional consequences of two TFR2 variants (p.Gly792Arg and c.1606-8A>G) using molecular and computational methods. Cellular protein localization studies using immunofluorescence demonstrated that the plasma membrane localization of p.Gly792Arg TFR2 is impaired. Splicing studies in vitro and in vivo reveal that the c.1606-8A>G mutation leads to the creation of a new acceptor splice site and an aberrant TFR2 mRNA. The reported mutations caused HH type 3 by protein truncation, altering TFR2 membrane localization or by mRNA splicing defect, producing a nonfunctional TFR2 protein and a defective signaling transduction for hepcidin regulation. TFR2 genotyping should be considered in adult but also in pediatric cases with early-onset of iron overload. PMID:26029709

  17. A COL7A1 Mutation Causes Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa in Rotes Höhenvieh Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Menoud, Annie; Welle, Monika; Tetens, Jens; Lichtner, Peter; Drögemüller, Cord

    2012-01-01

    We identified a congenital mechanobullous skin disorder in six calves on a single farm of an endangered German cattle breed in 2010. The condition presented as a large loss of skin distal to the fetlocks and at the mucosa of the muzzle. All affected calves were euthanized on humane grounds due to the severity, extent and progression of the skin and oral lesions. Examination of skin samples under light microscopy revealed detachment of the epidermis from the dermis at the level of the dermo epidermal junction, leading to the diagnosis of a subepidermal bullous dermatosis such as epidermolysis bullosa. The pedigree was consistent with monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance. We localized the causative mutation to an 18 Mb interval on chromosome 22 by homozygosity mapping. The COL7A1 gene encoding collagen type VII alpha 1 is located within this interval and COL7A1 mutations have been shown to cause inherited dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) in humans. A SNP in the bovine COL7A1 exon 49 (c.4756C>T) was perfectly associated with the observed disease. The homozygous mutant T/T genotype was exclusively present in affected calves and their parents were heterozygous C/T confirming the assumed recessive mode of inheritance. All known cases and genotyped carriers were related to a single cow, which is supposed to be the founder animal. The mutant T allele was absent in 63 animals from 24 cattle breeds. The identified mutation causes a premature stop codon which leads to a truncated protein representing a complete loss of COL7A1 function (p.R1586*). We thus have identified a candidate causative mutation for this genetic disease using only three cases to unravel its molecular basis. Selection against this mutation can now be used to eliminate the mutant allele from the Rotes Höhenvieh breed. PMID:22715415

  18. X-linked cone dystrophy caused by mutation of the red and green cone opsins.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jessica C; Webb, Tom R; Kanuga, Naheed; Robson, Anthony G; Holder, Graham E; Stockman, Andrew; Ripamonti, Caterina; Ebenezer, Neil D; Ogun, Olufunmilola; Devery, Sophie; Wright, Genevieve A; Maher, Eamonn R; Cheetham, Michael E; Moore, Anthony T; Michaelides, Michel; Hardcastle, Alison J

    2010-07-01

    X-linked cone and cone-rod dystrophies (XLCOD and XLCORD) are a heterogeneous group of progressive disorders that solely or primarily affect cone photoreceptors. Mutations in exon ORF15 of the RPGR gene are the most common underlying cause. In a previous study, we excluded RPGR exon ORF15 in some families with XLCOD. Here, we report genetic mapping of XLCOD to Xq26.1-qter. A significant LOD score was detected with marker DXS8045 (Z(max) = 2.41 [theta = 0.0]). The disease locus encompasses the cone opsin gene array on Xq28. Analysis of the array revealed a missense mutation (c. 529T>C [p. W177R]) in exon 3 of both the long-wavelength-sensitive (LW, red) and medium-wavelength-sensitive (MW, green) cone opsin genes that segregated with disease. Both exon 3 sequences were identical and were derived from the MW gene as a result of gene conversion. The amino acid W177 is highly conserved in visual and nonvisual opsins across species. We show that W177R in MW opsin and the equivalent W161R mutation in rod opsin result in protein misfolding and retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. We also demonstrate that W177R misfolding, unlike the P23H mutation in rod opsin that causes retinitis pigmentosa, is not rescued by treatment with the pharmacological chaperone 9-cis-retinal. Mutations in the LW/MW cone opsin gene array can, therefore, lead to a spectrum of disease, ranging from color blindness to progressive cone dystrophy (XLCOD5). PMID:20579627

  19. Osteoporosis caused by mutations in PLS3: clinical and bone tissue characteristics.

    PubMed

    Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Majewski, Jacek; Al-Jallad, Hadil; Moffatt, Pierre; Mort, John; Glorieux, Francis H; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Rauch, Frank

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in PLS3 have been identified as a cause of bone fragility in children, but the bone phenotype associated with PLS3 mutations has not been reported in detail. PLS3 is located on the X chromosome and encodes the actin-binding protein plastin 3. Here we describe skeletal findings in 4 boys from 2 families with mutations in PLS3 (c.994_995delGA; p.Asp332* in family 1; c.1433T > C; p.Leu478Pro in family 2). When first evaluated between 4 and 8 years of age, these boys had a history of one to four long-bone fractures. Mild vertebral compression fractures were identified in each boy. No obvious extraskeletal disease manifestations were present. Lumbar spine areal bone mineral density (LS-aBMD) Z-scores ranged from -1.7 to -3.5, but height was normal. Iliac bone histomorphometry in 2 patients showed low trabecular bone volume and a low osteoid maturation time but normal bone formation rate and osteoclast surface. Quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) did not reveal a major abnormality in bone mineralization density distribution. The 2 boys from family 1 received oral alendronate for 6 years, which normalized LS-aBMD. The mothers of the 4 boys did not have a history of fractures and had normal LS-aBMD. However, one of these mothers had low bone mass at the distal radius, as measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). In conclusion, hemizygous mutations in PLS3 are associated with osteoporosis and bone fragility in childhood, but in contrast to bone fragility caused by mutations in collagen type I encoding genes, there is no hypermineralization of mineralized bone matrix.

  20. Mutations in MAP3K7 that Alter the Activity of the TAK1 Signaling Complex Cause Frontometaphyseal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Wade, Emma M; Daniel, Philip B; Jenkins, Zandra A; McInerney-Leo, Aideen; Leo, Paul; Morgan, Tim; Addor, Marie Claude; Adès, Lesley C; Bertola, Debora; Bohring, Axel; Carter, Erin; Cho, Tae-Joon; Duba, Hans-Christoph; Fletcher, Elaine; Kim, Chong A; Krakow, Deborah; Morava, Eva; Neuhann, Teresa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Veenstra-Knol, Irma; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wilson, Louise C; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J; Strom, Tim M; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Brown, Matthew A; Duncan, Emma L; Markie, David M; Robertson, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia (FMD) is a progressive sclerosing skeletal dysplasia affecting the long bones and skull. The cause of FMD in some individuals is gain-of-function mutations in FLNA, although how these mutations result in a hyperostotic phenotype remains unknown. Approximately one half of individuals with FMD have no identified mutation in FLNA and are phenotypically very similar to individuals with FLNA mutations, except for an increased tendency to form keloid scars. Using whole-exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing in 19 FMD-affected individuals with no identifiable FLNA mutation, we identified mutations in two genes-MAP3K7, encoding transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-activated kinase (TAK1), and TAB2, encoding TAK1-associated binding protein 2 (TAB2). Four mutations were found in MAP3K7, including one highly recurrent (n = 15) de novo mutation (c.1454C>T [ p.Pro485Leu]) proximal to the coiled-coil domain of TAK1 and three missense mutations affecting the kinase domain (c.208G>C [p.Glu70Gln], c.299T>A [p.Val100Glu], and c.502G>C [p.Gly168Arg]). Notably, the subjects with the latter three mutations had a milder FMD phenotype. An additional de novo mutation was found in TAB2 (c.1705G>A, p.Glu569Lys). The recurrent mutation does not destabilize TAK1, or impair its ability to homodimerize or bind TAB2, but it does increase TAK1 autophosphorylation and alter the activity of more than one signaling pathway regulated by the TAK1 kinase complex. These findings show that dysregulation of the TAK1 complex produces a close phenocopy of FMD caused by FLNA mutations. Furthermore, they suggest that the pathogenesis of some of the filaminopathies caused by FLNA mutations might be mediated by misregulation of signaling coordinated through the TAK1 signaling complex. PMID:27426733

  1. Mutation Update and Genotype–Phenotype Correlations of Novel and Previously Described Mutations in TPM2 and TPM3 Causing Congenital Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Marttila, Minttu; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Marston, Steven; Nyman, Tuula A.; Barnerias, Christine; Beggs, Alan H.; Bertini, Enrico; Ceyhan-Birsoy, OÖzge; Cintas, Pascal; Gerard, Marion; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Hogue, Jacob S.; Longman, Cheryl; Eymard, Bruno; Frydman, Moshe; Kang, Peter B.; Klinge, Lars; Kolski, Hanna; Lochmüller, Hans; Magy, Laurent; Manel, Véronique; Mayer, Michèle; Mercuri, Eugenio; North, Kathryn N.; Peudenier-Robert, Sylviane; Pihko, Helena; Probst, Frank J.; Reisin, Ricardo; Stewart, Willie; Taratuto, Ana Lia; de Visser, Marianne; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Winer, John; Nowak, Kristen; Laing, Nigel G.; Winder, Tom L.; Monnier, Nicole; Clarke, Nigel F.; Pelin, Katarina; Grönholm, Mikaela; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting skeletal muscle isoforms of the tropomyosin genes may cause nemaline myopathy, cap myopathy, core-rod myopathy, congenital fiber-type disproportion, distal arthrogryposes, and Escobar syndrome. We correlate the clinical picture of these diseases with novel (19) and previously reported (31) mutations of the TPM2 and TPM3 genes. Included are altogether 93 families: 53 with TPM2 mutations and 40 with TPM3 mutations. Thirty distinct pathogenic variants of TPM2 and 20 of TPM3 have been published or listed in the Leiden Open Variant Database (http://www.dmd.nl/). Most are heterozygous changes associated with autosomal-dominant disease. Patients with TPM2 mutations tended to present with milder symptoms than those with TPM3 mutations, DA being present only in the TPM2 group. Previous studies have shown that five of the mutations in TPM2 and one in TPM3 cause increased Ca2+ sensitivity resulting in a hypercontractile molecular phenotype. Patients with hypercontractile phenotype more often had contractures of the limb joints (18/19) and jaw (6/19) than those with nonhypercontractile ones (2/22 and 1/22), whereas patients with the non-hypercontractile molecular phenotype more often (19/22) had axial contractures than the hypercontractile group (7/19). Our in silico predictions show that most mutations affect tropomyosin–actin association or tropomyosin head-to-tail binding. PMID:24692096

  2. Mutation update and genotype-phenotype correlations of novel and previously described mutations in TPM2 and TPM3 causing congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Marttila, Minttu; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Marston, Steven; Nyman, Tuula A; Barnerias, Christine; Beggs, Alan H; Bertini, Enrico; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Cintas, Pascal; Gerard, Marion; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Hogue, Jacob S; Longman, Cheryl; Eymard, Bruno; Frydman, Moshe; Kang, Peter B; Klinge, Lars; Kolski, Hanna; Lochmüller, Hans; Magy, Laurent; Manel, Véronique; Mayer, Michèle; Mercuri, Eugenio; North, Kathryn N; Peudenier-Robert, Sylviane; Pihko, Helena; Probst, Frank J; Reisin, Ricardo; Stewart, Willie; Taratuto, Ana Lia; de Visser, Marianne; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Winer, John; Nowak, Kristen; Laing, Nigel G; Winder, Tom L; Monnier, Nicole; Clarke, Nigel F; Pelin, Katarina; Grönholm, Mikaela; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2014-07-01

    Mutations affecting skeletal muscle isoforms of the tropomyosin genes may cause nemaline myopathy, cap myopathy, core-rod myopathy, congenital fiber-type disproportion, distal arthrogryposes, and Escobar syndrome. We correlate the clinical picture of these diseases with novel (19) and previously reported (31) mutations of the TPM2 and TPM3 genes. Included are altogether 93 families: 53 with TPM2 mutations and 40 with TPM3 mutations. Thirty distinct pathogenic variants of TPM2 and 20 of TPM3 have been published or listed in the Leiden Open Variant Database (http://www.dmd.nl/). Most are heterozygous changes associated with autosomal-dominant disease. Patients with TPM2 mutations tended to present with milder symptoms than those with TPM3 mutations, DA being present only in the TPM2 group. Previous studies have shown that five of the mutations in TPM2 and one in TPM3 cause increased Ca(2+) sensitivity resulting in a hypercontractile molecular phenotype. Patients with hypercontractile phenotype more often had contractures of the limb joints (18/19) and jaw (6/19) than those with nonhypercontractile ones (2/22 and 1/22), whereas patients with the non-hypercontractile molecular phenotype more often (19/22) had axial contractures than the hypercontractile group (7/19). Our in silico predictions show that most mutations affect tropomyosin-actin association or tropomyosin head-to-tail binding. PMID:24692096

  3. Dentin phosphoprotein compound mutation in dentin sialophosphoprotein causes dentinogenesis imperfecta type III.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Gu, TingTing; Jeffords, Leticia; MacDougall, Mary

    2005-01-30

    A rare compound mutation involving a 36 bp deletion and 18 bp insertion within exon 5 of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene has been identified in a family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III (DGI-III). The DSPP gene encodes two major tooth matrix proteins dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). DSPP mutations associated with DGI-III results in an in frame truncation of the serine aspartic acid triplet repeat found in DPP near the highly conserved carboxyl terminal region shortening the protein by six amino acids. Clinically this family presents with discolored amber opalescent teeth and severe attrition of the tooth structure. This study is the first report of a mutation within DPP associated with a genetic dentin disease. Our study indicates that DGI-III is allelic with some forms of DGI-II with and without progressive hearing loss and dentin dysplasia type II that have been shown to be caused by mutations within the DSP coding or signal peptide regions.

  4. Mutations in Either TUBB or MAPRE2 Cause Circumferential Skin Creases Kunze Type.

    PubMed

    Isrie, Mala; Breuss, Martin; Tian, Guoling; Hansen, Andi Harley; Cristofoli, Francesca; Morandell, Jasmin; Kupchinsky, Zachari A; Sifrim, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Celia Maria; Dapena, Elena Porta; Doonanco, Kurston; Leonard, Norma; Tinsa, Faten; Moortgat, Stéphanie; Ulucan, Hakan; Koparir, Erkan; Karaca, Ender; Katsanis, Nicholas; Marton, Valeria; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Davis, Erica E; Cowan, Nicholas J; Keays, David Anthony; Van Esch, Hilde

    2015-12-01

    Circumferential skin creases Kunze type (CSC-KT) is a specific congenital entity with an unknown genetic cause. The disease phenotype comprises characteristic circumferential skin creases accompanied by intellectual disability, a cleft palate, short stature, and dysmorphic features. Here, we report that mutations in either MAPRE2 or TUBB underlie the genetic origin of this syndrome. MAPRE2 encodes a member of the microtubule end-binding family of proteins that bind to the guanosine triphosphate cap at growing microtubule plus ends, and TUBB encodes a β-tubulin isotype that is expressed abundantly in the developing brain. Functional analyses of the TUBB mutants show multiple defects in the chaperone-dependent tubulin heterodimer folding and assembly pathway that leads to a compromised yield of native heterodimers. The TUBB mutations also have an impact on microtubule dynamics. For MAPRE2, we show that the mutations result in enhanced MAPRE2 binding to microtubules, implying an increased dwell time at microtubule plus ends. Further, in vivo analysis of MAPRE2 mutations in a zebrafish model of craniofacial development shows that the variants most likely perturb the patterning of branchial arches, either through excessive activity (under a recessive paradigm) or through haploinsufficiency (dominant de novo paradigm). Taken together, our data add CSC-KT to the growing list of tubulinopathies and highlight how multiple inheritance paradigms can affect dosage-sensitive biological systems so as to result in the same clinical defect. PMID:26637975

  5. Two single mutations commonly cause qualitative change of nonspecific carboxylesterases in insects.

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng; Lin, Zhe; Wang, Hongsheng; Liu, Silu; Chang, Haijing; Reeck, Gerald; Qiao, Chuanling; Raymond, Michel; Kang, Le

    2011-01-01

    Carboxylesterases provide key mechanisms of resistance to insecticides, particularly organophosphates (OPs), in insects. One resistance mechanism is a qualitative change in the properties of a carboxylesterase. Two mutant forms, G151D and W271L, have been observed, mostly in dipteran species, to affect substrate specificity of enzymes. But whether these two single mutations can commonly change character of insect carboxylesterases is unknown. In our study carboxylesterase genes from seven insects distributed among four orders were cloned, mutated at position 151 or 271 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The kinetics of the purified recombinant proteins was examined towards an artificial carboxylester and two OP insecticides. The G/A151D and W271L mutation significantly reduced carboxylesterase activity in 87.5% and 100% cases, respectively, and at the same time conferred OP hydrolase activities in 62.5% and 87.5% cases, respectively. Thus, the change at position 271 is more effective to influence substrate specificity than that at position 151. These results may suggest that these two mutations have the potential to cause insecticide resistance broadly in insects. PMID:20888910

  6. Mutations in AXIN2 cause familial tooth agenesis and predispose to colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Laura; Arte, Sirpa; Somer, Mirja; Jarvinen, Heikki; Lahermo, Paivi; Thesleff, Irma; Pirinen, Sinikka; Nieminen, Pekka

    2004-05-01

    Wnt signaling regulates embryonic pattern formation and morphogenesis of most organs. Aberrations of regulation of Wnt signaling may lead to cancer. Here, we have used positional cloning to identify the causative mutation in a Finnish family in which severe permanent tooth agenesis (oligodontia) and colorectal neoplasia segregate with dominant inheritance. Eleven members of the family lacked at least eight permanent teeth, two of whom developed only three permanent teeth. Colorectal cancer or precancerous lesions of variable types were found in eight of the patients with oligodontia. We show that oligodontia and predisposition to cancer are caused by a nonsense mutation, Arg656Stop, in the Wnt-signaling regulator AXIN2. In addition, we identified a de novo frameshift mutation 1994-1995insG in AXIN2 in an unrelated young patient with severe tooth agenesis. Both mutations are expected to activate Wnt signaling. The results provide the first evidence of the importance of Wnt signaling for the development of dentition in humans and suggest that an intricate control of Wnt-signal activity is necessary for normal tooth development, since both inhibition and stimulation of Wnt signaling may lead to tooth agenesis. Our findings introduce a new gene for hereditary colorectal cancer and suggest that tooth agenesis may be an indicator of cancer susceptibility. PMID:15042511

  7. A mutation causes MuSK reduced sensitivity to agrin and congenital myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Ben Ammar, Asma; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Bauché, Stéphanie; Richard, Pascale; Goillot, Evelyne; Herbst, Ruth; Gaudon, Karen; Huzé, Caroline; Schaeffer, Laurent; Yamanashi, Yuji; Higuchi, Osamu; Taly, Antoine; Koenig, Jeanine; Leroy, Jean-Paul; Hentati, Fayçal; Najmabadi, Hossein; Kahrizi, Kimia; Ilkhani, Manouchehr; Fardeau, Michel; Eymard, Bruno; Hantaï, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. The agrin/muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) pathway is critical for proper development and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We report here an Iranian patient in whom CMS was diagnosed since he presented with congenital and fluctuating bilateral symmetric ptosis, upward gaze palsy and slowly progressive muscle weakness leading to loss of ambulation. Genetic analysis of the patient revealed a homozygous missense mutation c.2503A>G in the coding sequence of MUSK leading to the p.Met835Val substitution. The mutation was inherited from the two parents who were heterozygous according to the notion of consanguinity. Immunocytochemical and electron microscopy studies of biopsied deltoid muscle showed dramatic changes in pre- and post-synaptic elements of the NMJs. These changes induced a process of denervation/reinnervation in native NMJs and the formation, by an adaptive mechanism, of newly formed and ectopic NMJs. Aberrant axonal outgrowth, decreased nerve terminal ramification and nodal axonal sprouting were also noted. In vivo electroporation of the mutated MuSK in a mouse model showed disorganized NMJs and aberrant axonal growth reproducing a phenotype similar to that observed in the patient's biopsy specimen. In vitro experiments showed that the mutation alters agrin-dependent acetylcholine receptor aggregation, causes a constitutive activation of MuSK and a decrease in its agrin- and Dok-7-dependent phosphorylation.

  8. Mutations in AP2S1 cause familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia type 3.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, M Andrew; Hannan, Fadil M; Howles, Sarah A; Reed, Anita A C; Cranston, Treena; Thakker, Clare E; Gregory, Lorna; Rimmer, Andrew J; Rust, Nigel; Graham, Una; Morrison, Patrick J; Hunter, Steven J; Whyte, Michael P; McVean, Gil; Buck, David; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2013-01-01

    Adaptor protein-2 (AP2), a central component of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs), is pivotal in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which internalizes plasma membrane constituents such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). AP2, a heterotetramer of α, β, μ and σ subunits, links clathrin to vesicle membranes and binds to tyrosine- and dileucine-based motifs of membrane-associated cargo proteins. Here we show that missense mutations of AP2 σ subunit (AP2S1) affecting Arg15, which forms key contacts with dileucine-based motifs of CCV cargo proteins, result in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia type 3 (FHH3), an extracellular calcium homeostasis disorder affecting the parathyroids, kidneys and bone. We found AP2S1 mutations in >20% of cases of FHH without mutations in calcium-sensing GPCR (CASR), which cause FHH1. AP2S1 mutations decreased the sensitivity of CaSR-expressing cells to extracellular calcium and reduced CaSR endocytosis, probably through loss of interaction with a C-terminal CaSR dileucine-based motif, whose disruption also decreased intracellular signaling. Thus, our results identify a new role for AP2 in extracellular calcium homeostasis. PMID:23222959

  9. Identification of a novel insertion mutation in FGFR3 that causes thanatophoric dysplasia type 1.

    PubMed

    Lindy, Amanda S; Basehore, Monica J; Munisha, Mumingjiang; Williams, Aimee Leanne; Friez, Michael J; Writzl, Karin; Willems, Patrick; Dougan, Scott T

    2016-06-01

    Thanatophoric dysplasia is a type of short-limbed neonatal dwarfism that is usually lethal in the perinatal period. It is characterized by short limbs, a narrow, bell-shaped thorax, macrocephaly with a prominent forehead, and flattened vertebral bodies. These malformations result from autosomal dominant mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. In this report, we describe a novel FGFR3 insertion mutation in a fetus with shortened limbs, curved femurs, and a narrow thorax. The diagnosis of thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 was suspected clinically, and FGFR3 sequencing showed a c.742_743insTGT variant, which predicts p.R248delinsLC. In vivo studies in zebrafish demonstrated that this mutation resulted in the overexpression of zebrafish Fgfr3, leading to the over-activation of downstream signaling and dorsalized embryos. To date, no insertions or deletions in FGFR3 have been reported to cause thanatophoric dysplasia types 1 or 2; therefore, this represents the first report to describe such a mutation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028100

  10. Mutations in AP2S1 cause familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia type 3.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, M Andrew; Hannan, Fadil M; Howles, Sarah A; Reed, Anita A C; Cranston, Treena; Thakker, Clare E; Gregory, Lorna; Rimmer, Andrew J; Rust, Nigel; Graham, Una; Morrison, Patrick J; Hunter, Steven J; Whyte, Michael P; McVean, Gil; Buck, David; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2013-01-01

    Adaptor protein-2 (AP2), a central component of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs), is pivotal in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which internalizes plasma membrane constituents such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). AP2, a heterotetramer of α, β, μ and σ subunits, links clathrin to vesicle membranes and binds to tyrosine- and dileucine-based motifs of membrane-associated cargo proteins. Here we show that missense mutations of AP2 σ subunit (AP2S1) affecting Arg15, which forms key contacts with dileucine-based motifs of CCV cargo proteins, result in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia type 3 (FHH3), an extracellular calcium homeostasis disorder affecting the parathyroids, kidneys and bone. We found AP2S1 mutations in >20% of cases of FHH without mutations in calcium-sensing GPCR (CASR), which cause FHH1. AP2S1 mutations decreased the sensitivity of CaSR-expressing cells to extracellular calcium and reduced CaSR endocytosis, probably through loss of interaction with a C-terminal CaSR dileucine-based motif, whose disruption also decreased intracellular signaling. Thus, our results identify a new role for AP2 in extracellular calcium homeostasis.

  11. Adult-onset painful axonal polyneuropathy caused by a dominant NAGLU mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tétreault, Martine; Gonzalez, Michael; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Allard, Pierre; Gehring, Kalle; Leblanc, Diane; Leclerc, Nadine; Schondorf, Ronald; Mathieu, Jean; Zuchner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset painful sensory neuropathies are usually acquired conditions associated with common diseases. Adult presentations of known hereditary forms are often accompanied by other organ involvement. We recruited a large French-Canadian family with a dominantly inherited late-onset painful sensory neuropathy. The main clinical feature is recurrent leg pain that progresses to constant painful paraesthesias in the feet and later the hands. As it evolves, some patients develop a mild sensory ataxia. We selected four affected individuals for whole exome sequencing. Analysis of rare variants shared by all cases led to a list of four candidate variants. Segregation analysis in all 45 recruited individuals has shown that only the p.Ile403Thr variant in the α-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) gene segregates with the disease. Recessive NAGLU mutations cause the severe childhood lysosomal disease mucopolysacharidosis IIIB. Family members carrying the mutation showed a significant decrease of the enzymatic function (average 45%). The late-onset and variable severity of the symptoms may have precluded the description of such symptoms in parents of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB cases. The identification of a dominant phenotype associated with a NAGLU mutation supports that some carriers of lysosomal enzyme mutations may develop later in life much milder phenotypes. PMID:25818867

  12. Mutations in Either TUBB or MAPRE2 Cause Circumferential Skin Creases Kunze Type.

    PubMed

    Isrie, Mala; Breuss, Martin; Tian, Guoling; Hansen, Andi Harley; Cristofoli, Francesca; Morandell, Jasmin; Kupchinsky, Zachari A; Sifrim, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Celia Maria; Dapena, Elena Porta; Doonanco, Kurston; Leonard, Norma; Tinsa, Faten; Moortgat, Stéphanie; Ulucan, Hakan; Koparir, Erkan; Karaca, Ender; Katsanis, Nicholas; Marton, Valeria; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Davis, Erica E; Cowan, Nicholas J; Keays, David Anthony; Van Esch, Hilde

    2015-12-01

    Circumferential skin creases Kunze type (CSC-KT) is a specific congenital entity with an unknown genetic cause. The disease phenotype comprises characteristic circumferential skin creases accompanied by intellectual disability, a cleft palate, short stature, and dysmorphic features. Here, we report that mutations in either MAPRE2 or TUBB underlie the genetic origin of this syndrome. MAPRE2 encodes a member of the microtubule end-binding family of proteins that bind to the guanosine triphosphate cap at growing microtubule plus ends, and TUBB encodes a β-tubulin isotype that is expressed abundantly in the developing brain. Functional analyses of the TUBB mutants show multiple defects in the chaperone-dependent tubulin heterodimer folding and assembly pathway that leads to a compromised yield of native heterodimers. The TUBB mutations also have an impact on microtubule dynamics. For MAPRE2, we show that the mutations result in enhanced MAPRE2 binding to microtubules, implying an increased dwell time at microtubule plus ends. Further, in vivo analysis of MAPRE2 mutations in a zebrafish model of craniofacial development shows that the variants most likely perturb the patterning of branchial arches, either through excessive activity (under a recessive paradigm) or through haploinsufficiency (dominant de novo paradigm). Taken together, our data add CSC-KT to the growing list of tubulinopathies and highlight how multiple inheritance paradigms can affect dosage-sensitive biological systems so as to result in the same clinical defect.

  13. Mutations in PNKP cause recessive ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 4.

    PubMed

    Bras, Jose; Alonso, Isabel; Barbot, Clara; Costa, Maria Manuela; Darwent, Lee; Orme, Tatiana; Sequeiros, Jorge; Hardy, John; Coutinho, Paula; Guerreiro, Rita

    2015-03-01

    Hereditary autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. We used homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to study a cohort of nine Portuguese families who were identified during a nationwide, population-based, systematic survey as displaying a consistent phenotype of recessive ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA). The integration of data from these analyses led to the identification of the same homozygous PNKP (polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase) mutation, c.1123G>T (p.Gly375Trp), in three of the studied families. When analyzing this particular gene in the exome sequencing data from the remaining cohort, we identified homozygous or compound-heterozygous mutations in five other families. PNKP is a dual-function enzyme with a key role in different pathways of DNA-damage repair. Mutations in this gene have previously been associated with an autosomal-recessive syndrome characterized by microcephaly; early-onset, intractable seizures; and developmental delay (MCSZ). The finding of PNKP mutations associated with recessive AOA extends the phenotype associated with this gene and identifies a fourth locus that causes AOA. These data confirm that MCSZ and some forms of ataxia share etiological features, most likely reflecting the role of PNKP in DNA-repair mechanisms. PMID:25728773

  14. Muenke syndrome mutation, FgfR3P²⁴⁴R, causes TMJ defects.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Nah, H D; Laurita, J; Kinumatsu, T; Shibukawa, Y; Shibutani, T; Minugh-Purvis, N; Pacifici, M; Koyama, E

    2012-07-01

    Muenke syndrome is characterized by various craniofacial deformities and is caused by an autosomal-dominant activating mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3(P250R) ). Here, using mice carrying a corresponding mutation (FgfR3(P244R) ), we determined whether the mutation affects temporomandibular joint (TMJ) development and growth. In situ hybridization showed that FgfR3 was expressed in condylar chondroprogenitors and maturing chondrocytes that also expressed the Indian hedgehog (Ihh) receptor and transcriptional target Patched 1(Ptch1). In FgfR3(P244R) mutants, the condyles displayed reduced levels of Ihh expression, H4C-positive proliferating chondroprogenitors, and collagen type II- and type X-expressing chondrocytes. Primary bone spongiosa formation was also disturbed and was accompanied by increased osteoclastic activity and reduced trabecular bone formation. Treatment of wild-type condylar explants with recombinant FGF2/FGF9 decreased Ptch1 and PTHrP expression in superficial/polymorphic layers and proliferation in chondroprogenitors. We also observed early degenerative changes of condylar articular cartilage, abnormal development of the articular eminence/glenoid fossa in the TMJ, and fusion of the articular disc. Analysis of our data indicates that the activating FgfR3(P244R) mutation disturbs TMJ developmental processes, likely by reducing hedgehog signaling and endochondral ossification. We suggest that a balance between FGF and hedgehog signaling pathways is critical for the integrity of TMJ development and for the maintenance of cellular organization. PMID:22622662

  15. Muenke Syndrome Mutation, FgfR3P244R, Causes TMJ Defects

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, T.; Nah, H.D.; Laurita, J.; Kinumatsu, T.; Shibukawa, Y.; Shibutani, T.; Minugh-Purvis, N.; Pacifici, M.; Koyama, E.

    2012-01-01

    Muenke syndrome is characterized by various craniofacial deformities and is caused by an autosomal-dominant activating mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3P250R). Here, using mice carrying a corresponding mutation (FgfR3P244R), we determined whether the mutation affects temporomandibular joint (TMJ) development and growth. In situ hybridization showed that FgfR3 was expressed in condylar chondroprogenitors and maturing chondrocytes that also expressed the Indian hedgehog (Ihh) receptor and transcriptional target Patched 1(Ptch1). In FgfR3P244R mutants, the condyles displayed reduced levels of Ihh expression, H4C-positive proliferating chondroprogenitors, and collagen type II- and type X-expressing chondrocytes. Primary bone spongiosa formation was also disturbed and was accompanied by increased osteoclastic activity and reduced trabecular bone formation. Treatment of wild-type condylar explants with recombinant FGF2/FGF9 decreased Ptch1 and PTHrP expression in superficial/polymorphic layers and proliferation in chondroprogenitors. We also observed early degenerative changes of condylar articular cartilage, abnormal development of the articular eminence/glenoid fossa in the TMJ, and fusion of the articular disc. Analysis of our data indicates that the activating FgfR3P244R mutation disturbs TMJ developmental processes, likely by reducing hedgehog signaling and endochondral ossification. We suggest that a balance between FGF and hedgehog signaling pathways is critical for the integrity of TMJ development and for the maintenance of cellular organization. PMID:22622662

  16. A novel mutation in the AGXT gene causing primary hyperoxaluria type I: genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    M'Dimegh, Saoussen; Aquaviva-Bourdain, Cécile; Omezzine, Asma; M'Barek, Ibtihel; Souche, Geneviéve; Zellama, Dorsaf; Abidi, Kamel; Achour, Abdelattif; Gargah, Tahar; Abroug, Saoussen; Bouslama, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I (PH1) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by inherited mutations in the AGXT gene encoding liver peroxisomal alanine : glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) which is deficient or mistargeted to mitochondria. PH1 shows considerable phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity. The incidence and severity of PH1 varies in different geographic regions. DNA samples of the affected members from two unrelated Tunisian families were tested by amplifying and sequencing each of the AGXT exons and intron-exon junctions. We identified a novel frameshift mutation in the AGXT gene, the c.406_410dupACTGC resulting in a truncated protein (p.Gln137Hisfs*19). It is found in homozygous state in two nonconsanguineous unrelated families from Tunisia. These molecular findings provide genotype/phenotype correlations in the intrafamilial phenotypic and permit accurate carrier detection, and prenatal diagnosis. The novel p.Gln137Hisfs*19 mutation detected in our study extend the spectrum of known AGXT gene mutations in Tunisia. PMID:27659337

  17. Biallelic PPA2 Mutations Cause Sudden Unexpected Cardiac Arrest in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Guimier, Anne; Gordon, Christopher T; Godard, François; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Oufadem, Myriam; Vasnier, Christelle; Rambaud, Caroline; Nitschke, Patrick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Masson, Cécile; Dauger, Stéphane; Longman, Cheryl; Laing, Nigel G; Kugener, Béatrice; Bonnet, Damien; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Di Filippo, Sylvie; Probst, Vincent; Redon, Richard; Charron, Philippe; Rötig, Agnès; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Dautant, Alain; de Pontual, Loïc; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Delahodde, Agnès; Amiel, Jeanne

    2016-09-01

    Sudden unexpected death in infancy occurs in apparently healthy infants and remains largely unexplained despite thorough investigation. The vast majority of cases are sporadic. Here we report seven individuals from three families affected by sudden and unexpected cardiac arrest between 4 and 20 months of age. Whole-exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous missense mutations in PPA2 in affected infants of each family. PPA2 encodes the mitochondrial pyrophosphatase, which hydrolyzes inorganic pyrophosphate into two phosphates. This is an essential activity for many biosynthetic reactions and for energy metabolism of the cell. We show that deletion of the orthologous gene in yeast (ppa2Δ) compromises cell viability due to the loss of mitochondria. Expression of wild-type human PPA2, but not PPA2 containing the mutations identified in affected individuals, preserves mitochondrial function in ppa2Δ yeast. Using a regulatable (doxycycline-repressible) gene expression system, we found that the pathogenic PPA2 mutations rapidly inactivate the mitochondrial energy transducing system and prevent the maintenance of a sufficient electrical potential across the inner membrane, which explains the subsequent disappearance of mitochondria from the mutant yeast cells. Altogether these data demonstrate that PPA2 is an essential gene in yeast and that biallelic mutations in PPA2 cause a mitochondrial disease leading to sudden cardiac arrest in infants. PMID:27523598

  18. First case report of an adrenocortical carcinoma caused by a BRCA2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    El Ghorayeb, Nada; Grunenwald, Solange; Nolet, Serge; Primeau, Vanessa; Côté, Stéphanie; Maugard, Christine M.; Lacroix, André; Gaboury, Louis; Bourdeau, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) may rarely be a component of inherited cancer syndromes such as Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. ACC caused by a BRCA2 mutation has never been reported. Methods: Nucleotide sequencing of BRCA2 in lymphocyte and tumoral DNA of a 50-year-old male who presented with an androgen-secreting ACC and a strong family history of breast, ovarian, and pancreatic cancers. Results: A germline BRCA2 2 bp heterozygous deletion at nucleotide 8765 (8765delAG) leading to a frameshift mutation (p.Glu2846GlyfsX23) was detected. Only the BRCA2 deleted allele was retained in the ACC tumoral DNA compared with the control DNA supporting a loss of heterozygosity in the tumor. Conclusion: This is the first reported case of a patient with ACC associated with a BRCA2 germline mutation. Loss of heterozygosity in ACC DNA suggests a causal link with the BRCA2 8765delAG mutation. PMID:27603373

  19. A Mutation Causes MuSK Reduced Sensitivity to Agrin and Congenital Myasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ammar, Asma; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Bauché, Stéphanie; Richard, Pascale; Goillot, Evelyne; Herbst, Ruth; Gaudon, Karen; Huzé, Caroline; Schaeffer, Laurent; Yamanashi, Yuji; Higuchi, Osamu; Taly, Antoine; Koenig, Jeanine; Leroy, Jean-Paul; Hentati, Fayçal; Najmabadi, Hossein; Kahrizi, Kimia; Ilkhani, Manouchehr; Fardeau, Michel; Eymard, Bruno; Hantaï, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. The agrin/muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) pathway is critical for proper development and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We report here an Iranian patient in whom CMS was diagnosed since he presented with congenital and fluctuating bilateral symmetric ptosis, upward gaze palsy and slowly progressive muscle weakness leading to loss of ambulation. Genetic analysis of the patient revealed a homozygous missense mutation c.2503A>G in the coding sequence of MUSK leading to the p.Met835Val substitution. The mutation was inherited from the two parents who were heterozygous according to the notion of consanguinity. Immunocytochemical and electron microscopy studies of biopsied deltoid muscle showed dramatic changes in pre- and post-synaptic elements of the NMJs. These changes induced a process of denervation/reinnervation in native NMJs and the formation, by an adaptive mechanism, of newly formed and ectopic NMJs. Aberrant axonal outgrowth, decreased nerve terminal ramification and nodal axonal sprouting were also noted. In vivo electroporation of the mutated MuSK in a mouse model showed disorganized NMJs and aberrant axonal growth reproducing a phenotype similar to that observed in the patient’s biopsy specimen. In vitro experiments showed that the mutation alters agrin-dependent acetylcholine receptor aggregation, causes a constitutive activation of MuSK and a decrease in its agrin- and Dok-7-dependent phosphorylation. PMID:23326516

  20. Mutations in AXIN2 cause familial tooth agenesis and predispose to colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Laura; Arte, Sirpa; Somer, Mirja; Jarvinen, Heikki; Lahermo, Paivi; Thesleff, Irma; Pirinen, Sinikka; Nieminen, Pekka

    2004-05-01

    Wnt signaling regulates embryonic pattern formation and morphogenesis of most organs. Aberrations of regulation of Wnt signaling may lead to cancer. Here, we have used positional cloning to identify the causative mutation in a Finnish family in which severe permanent tooth agenesis (oligodontia) and colorectal neoplasia segregate with dominant inheritance. Eleven members of the family lacked at least eight permanent teeth, two of whom developed only three permanent teeth. Colorectal cancer or precancerous lesions of variable types were found in eight of the patients with oligodontia. We show that oligodontia and predisposition to cancer are caused by a nonsense mutation, Arg656Stop, in the Wnt-signaling regulator AXIN2. In addition, we identified a de novo frameshift mutation 1994-1995insG in AXIN2 in an unrelated young patient with severe tooth agenesis. Both mutations are expected to activate Wnt signaling. The results provide the first evidence of the importance of Wnt signaling for the development of dentition in humans and suggest that an intricate control of Wnt-signal activity is necessary for normal tooth development, since both inhibition and stimulation of Wnt signaling may lead to tooth agenesis. Our findings introduce a new gene for hereditary colorectal cancer and suggest that tooth agenesis may be an indicator of cancer susceptibility.

  1. Mutations in the RPGR gene cause X-linked cone dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenglin; Peachey, Neal S; Moshfeghi, Darius M; Thirumalaichary, Sukanya; Chorich, Lou; Shugart, Yin Y; Fan, Keke; Zhang, Kang

    2002-03-01

    X-linked cone dystrophy is a type of hereditary retinal degeneration characterized by a progressive dysfunction of the day vision or photopic (cone) system with preservation of night vision or scotopic (rod) function. The disease presents with a triad of photophobia, loss of color vision and reduced central vision. This phenotype is distinct from retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in which there are prominent night and peripheral vision disturbances. X-linked cone dystrophy is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, with linkage to loci on Xp11.4--Xp21.1 (COD1, OMIM 304020) and Xq27 (COD2, OMIM 303800). COD1 maps to a region that harbors the RPGR gene, mutations in which account for >70% of patients with X-linked RP. The majority of these mutations reside in one purine-rich exon, ORF15, encoding 567 amino acids with a repetitive domain rich in glutamic acid residues. We mapped two families with X-linked cone dystrophy to the COD1 locus and identified two distinct mutations in ORF15 in the RPGR gene (ORF15+1343_1344delGG and ORF15+694_708del15) leading to a frame-shift and premature termination of translation in one case and a deletion of five amino acids in another. Consistent with expression of RPGR in rods and cones, our results show that mutations in RPGR, in addition to X-linked RP, can also cause cone-specific degeneration.

  2. Mutations in PNKP cause recessive ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 4.

    PubMed

    Bras, Jose; Alonso, Isabel; Barbot, Clara; Costa, Maria Manuela; Darwent, Lee; Orme, Tatiana; Sequeiros, Jorge; Hardy, John; Coutinho, Paula; Guerreiro, Rita

    2015-03-01

    Hereditary autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. We used homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to study a cohort of nine Portuguese families who were identified during a nationwide, population-based, systematic survey as displaying a consistent phenotype of recessive ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA). The integration of data from these analyses led to the identification of the same homozygous PNKP (polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase) mutation, c.1123G>T (p.Gly375Trp), in three of the studied families. When analyzing this particular gene in the exome sequencing data from the remaining cohort, we identified homozygous or compound-heterozygous mutations in five other families. PNKP is a dual-function enzyme with a key role in different pathways of DNA-damage repair. Mutations in this gene have previously been associated with an autosomal-recessive syndrome characterized by microcephaly; early-onset, intractable seizures; and developmental delay (MCSZ). The finding of PNKP mutations associated with recessive AOA extends the phenotype associated with this gene and identifies a fourth locus that causes AOA. These data confirm that MCSZ and some forms of ataxia share etiological features, most likely reflecting the role of PNKP in DNA-repair mechanisms.

  3. Mutations in PNKP Cause Recessive Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia Type 4

    PubMed Central

    Bras, Jose; Alonso, Isabel; Barbot, Clara; Costa, Maria Manuela; Darwent, Lee; Orme, Tatiana; Sequeiros, Jorge; Hardy, John; Coutinho, Paula; Guerreiro, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. We used homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to study a cohort of nine Portuguese families who were identified during a nationwide, population-based, systematic survey as displaying a consistent phenotype of recessive ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA). The integration of data from these analyses led to the identification of the same homozygous PNKP (polynucleotide kinase 3′-phosphatase) mutation, c.1123G>T (p.Gly375Trp), in three of the studied families. When analyzing this particular gene in the exome sequencing data from the remaining cohort, we identified homozygous or compound-heterozygous mutations in five other families. PNKP is a dual-function enzyme with a key role in different pathways of DNA-damage repair. Mutations in this gene have previously been associated with an autosomal-recessive syndrome characterized by microcephaly; early-onset, intractable seizures; and developmental delay (MCSZ). The finding of PNKP mutations associated with recessive AOA extends the phenotype associated with this gene and identifies a fourth locus that causes AOA. These data confirm that MCSZ and some forms of ataxia share etiological features, most likely reflecting the role of PNKP in DNA-repair mechanisms. PMID:25728773

  4. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a questionnaire based study to delineate the different phenotypes caused by endoglin and ALK1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Berg, J; Porteous, M; Reinhardt, D; Gallione, C; Holloway, S; Umasunthar, T; Lux, A; McKinnon, W; Marchuk, D; Guttmacher, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant vascular dysplasia characterised by mucocutaneous telangiectasis, epistaxis, gastrointestinal haemorrhage, and arteriovenous malformations in the lung and brain. Causative mutations for HHT have been identified in two genes, endoglin and ALK1, which encode proteins involved in serine-threonine kinase signalling in the endothelial cell. Methods: A number of people affected with HHT had completed a postal questionnaire as part of an international study to delineate the HHT phenotype. We identified questionnaires completed by subjects in whom we had identified a mutation in endoglin or ALK1. Further questionnaires were sent to families with known mutations. Data were only included from questionnaires returned by people known to carry disease causing mutations. Results: Questionnaires were completed by 83 subjects with known mutations. Of these, 49 had endoglin mutations (HHT1) and 34 had ALK1 mutations (HHT2). Subjects with HHT1 reported an earlier onset of epistaxis (p=0.01) and telangiectasis (p=0.0001) than those with HHT2. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations were only reported in the endoglin mutation group in our study (p<0.001). Conclusions: Our questionnaire based study provides evidence that the HHT phenotype caused by mutations in endoglin (HHT1) is distinct from, and more severe than, HHT caused by mutations in ALK1 (HHT2). This has significant implications for diagnosis, screening, and treatment in the two different forms of HHT, as well as for understanding the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:12920067

  5. MFN2 mutations cause severe phenotypes in most patients with CMT2A

    PubMed Central

    Feely, S.M.E.; Laura, M.; Siskind, C.E.; Sottile, S.; Davis, M.; Gibbons, V.S.; Reilly, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A (CMT2A), the most common form of CMT2, is caused by mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2), a nuclear encoded gene essential for mitochondrial fusion and tethering the endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria. Published CMT2A phenotypes have differed widely in severity. Methods: To determine the prevalence and phenotypes of CMT2A within our clinics we performed genetic testing on 99 patients with CMT2 evaluated at Wayne State University in Detroit and on 27 patients with CMT2 evaluated in the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London. We then preformed a cross-sectional analysis on our patients with CMT2A. Results: Twenty-one percent of patients had MFN2 mutations. Most of 27 patients evaluated with CMT2A had an earlier onset and more severe impairment than patients without CMT2A. CMT2A accounted for 91% of all our severely impaired patients with CMT2 but only 11% of mildly or moderately impaired patients. Twenty-three of 27 patients with CMT2A were nonambulatory prior to age 20 whereas just one of 78 non-CMT2A patients was nonambulatory after this age. Eleven patients with CMT2A had a pure motor neuropathy while another 5 also had profound proprioception loss. MFN2 mutations were in the GTPase domain, the coiled-coil domains, or the highly conserved R3 domain of the protein. Conclusions: We find MFN2 mutations particularly likely to cause severe neuropathy that may be primarily motor or motor accompanied by prominent proprioception loss. Disruption of functional domains of the protein was particularly likely to cause neuropathy. PMID:21508331

  6. CAV3 mutations causing exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis: Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies.

    PubMed

    Scalco, Renata Siciliani; Gardiner, Alice R; Pitceathly, Robert D S; Hilton-Jones, David; Schapira, Anthony H; Turner, Chris; Parton, Matt; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Barresi, Rita; Marsh, Julie; Manzur, Adnan Y; Childs, Anne-Marie; Feng, Lucy; Murphy, Elaine; Lamont, Phillipa J; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Wallefeld, William; Davis, Mark R; Laing, Nigel G; Holton, Janice L; Fialho, Doreen; Bushby, Kate; Hanna, Michael G; Phadke, Rahul; Jungbluth, Heinz; Houlden, Henry; Quinlivan, Ros

    2016-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is often due to a combination of environmental trigger(s) and genetic predisposition; however, the underlying genetic cause remains elusive in many cases. Mutations in CAV3 lead to various neuromuscular phenotypes with partial overlap, including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD1C), rippling muscle disease, distal myopathy and isolated hyperCKemia. Here we present a series of eight patients from seven families presenting with exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis caused by mutations in CAV3 diagnosed by next generation sequencing (NGS) (n = 6). Symptoms included myalgia (n = 7), exercise intolerance (n = 7) and episodes of rhabdomyolysis (n = 2). Percussion-induced rapid muscle contractions (PIRCs) were seen in five out of six patients examined. A previously reported heterozygous mutation in CAV3 (p.T78M) and three novel variants (p.V14I, p.F41S, p.F54V) were identified. Caveolin-3 immunolabeling in muscle was normal in 3/4 patients; however, immunoblotting showed more than 50% reduction of caveolin-3 in five patients compared with controls. This case series demonstrates that exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis may be caused by CAV3 mutations and broadens the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies. In our series, immunoblotting was a more sensitive method to detect reduced caveolin-3 levels than immunohistochemistry in skeletal muscle. Patients presenting with muscle pain, exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis should be routinely tested for PIRCs as this may be an important clinical clue for caveolinopathies, even in the absence of other "typical" features. The use of NGS may expand current knowledge concerning inherited diseases, and unexpected/atypical phenotypes may be attributed to well-known human disease genes. PMID:27312022

  7. A molecular platform for the diagnosis of multidrug-resistant and pre-extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis based on single nucleotide polymorphism mutations present in Colombian isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Luz Maira Wintaco; Castro, Gloria Puerto; Guerrero, Martha Inírida

    2016-01-01

    Developing a fast, inexpensive, and specific test that reflects the mutations present in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates according to geographic region is the main challenge for drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) control. The objective of this study was to develop a molecular platform to make a rapid diagnosis of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant TB based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations present in therpoB, katG, inhA,ahpC, and gyrA genes from Colombian M. tuberculosis isolates. The amplification and sequencing of each target gene was performed. Capture oligonucleotides, which were tested before being used with isolates to assess the performance, were designed for wild type and mutated codons, and the platform was standardised based on the reverse hybridisation principle. This method was tested on DNA samples extracted from clinical isolates from 160 Colombian patients who were previously phenotypically and genotypically characterised as having susceptible or MDR M. tuberculosis. For our method, the kappa index of the sequencing results was 0,966, 0,825, 0,766, 0,740, and 0,625 forrpoB, katG, inhA,ahpC, and gyrA, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were ranked between 90-100% compared with those of phenotypic drug susceptibility testing. Our assay helps to pave the way for implementation locally and for specifically adapted methods that can simultaneously detect drug resistance mutations to first and second-line drugs within a few hours. PMID:26841047

  8. Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome is caused by mutations in the 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Waterham, H R; Wijburg, F A; Hennekam, R C; Vreken, P; Poll-The, B T; Dorland, L; Duran, M; Jira, P E; Smeitink, J A; Wevers, R A; Wanders, R J

    1998-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome is a frequently occurring autosomal recessive developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, mental retardation, and multiple congenital anomalies. Biochemically, the disorder is caused by deficient activity of 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase, which catalyzes the final step in the cholesterol-biosynthesis pathway-that is, the reduction of the Delta7 double bond of 7-dehydrocholesterol to produce cholesterol. We identified a partial transcript coding for human 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase by searching the database of expressed sequence tags with the amino acid sequence for the Arabidopsis thaliana sterol Delta7-reductase and isolated the remaining 5' sequence by the "rapid amplification of cDNA ends" method, or 5'-RACE. The cDNA has an open reading frame of 1,425 bp coding for a polypeptide of 475 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 54.5 kD. Heterologous expression of the cDNA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed that it codes for 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase. Chromosomal mapping experiments localized the gene to chromosome 11q13. Sequence analysis of fibroblast 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase cDNA from three patients with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome revealed distinct mutations, including a 134-bp insertion and three different point mutations, each of which was heterozygous in cDNA from the respective parents. Our data demonstrate that Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome is caused by mutations in the gene coding for 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase. PMID:9683613

  9. A mutation causing Alport syndrome with tardive hearing loss is common in the western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, D.F.; Denison, J.C.; Atkin, C.L.

    1996-06-01

    Mutations in the COL4A5 gene, located at Xq22, cause Alport syndrome (AS), a nephritis characterized by progressive deterioration of the glomerular basement membrane and usually associated with progressive hearing loss. We have identified a novel mutation, L1649R, present in 9 of 121 independently ascertained families. Affected males shared the same haplotype of eight polymorphic markers tightly linked to COL4A5, indicating common ancestry. Genealogical studies place the birth of this ancestor >200 years ago. The L1649R mutation is a relatively common cause of Alport syndrome in the western United States, in part because of the rapid growth and migratory expansion of mid-nineteenth-century pioneer populations carrying the gene. L1649R affects a highly conserved residue in the NC1 domain, which is involved in key inter- and intramolecular interactions, but results in a relatively mild disease phenotype. Renal failure in an L1649R male typically occurs in the 4th or 5th decade and precedes the onset of significant hearing loss by {approximately}10 years. 45 refs., 5 figs.

  10. FAN1 mutations cause karyomegalic interstitial nephritis, linking chronic kidney failure to defective DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weibin; Otto, Edgar A; Cluckey, Andrew; Airik, Rannar; Hurd, Toby W; Chaki, Moumita; Diaz, Katrina; Lach, Francis P; Bennett, Geoffrey R; Gee, Heon Yung; Ghosh, Amiya K; Natarajan, Sivakumar; Thongthip, Supawat; Veturi, Uma; Allen, Susan J; Janssen, Sabine; Ramaswami, Gokul; Dixon, Joanne; Burkhalter, Felix; Spoendlin, Martin; Moch, Holger; Mihatsch, Michael J; Verine, Jerome; Reade, Richard; Soliman, Hany; Godin, Michel; Kiss, Denes; Monga, Guido; Mazzucco, Gianna; Amann, Kerstin; Artunc, Ferruh; Newland, Ronald C; Wiech, Thorsten; Zschiedrich, Stefan; Huber, Tobias B; Friedl, Andreas; Slaats, Gisela G; Joles, Jaap A; Goldschmeding, Roel; Washburn, Joseph; Giles, Rachel H; Levy, Shawn; Smogorzewska, Agata; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2012-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents a major health burden. Its central feature of renal fibrosis is not well understood. By exome sequencing, we identified mutations in FAN1 as a cause of karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN), a disorder that serves as a model for renal fibrosis. Renal histology in KIN is indistinguishable from that of nephronophthisis, except for the presence of karyomegaly. The FAN1 protein has nuclease activity and acts in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair within the Fanconi anemia DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. We show that cells from individuals with FAN1 mutations have sensitivity to the ICL-inducing agent mitomycin C but do not exhibit chromosome breakage or cell cycle arrest after diepoxybutane treatment, unlike cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia. We complemented ICL sensitivity with wild-type FAN1 but not with cDNA having mutations found in individuals with KIN. Depletion of fan1 in zebrafish caused increased DDR, apoptosis and kidney cysts. Our findings implicate susceptibility to environmental genotoxins and inadequate DNA repair as novel mechanisms contributing to renal fibrosis and CKD.

  11. CCDC103 mutations cause primary ciliary dyskinesia by disrupting assembly of ciliary dynein arms.

    PubMed

    Panizzi, Jennifer R; Becker-Heck, Anita; Castleman, Victoria H; Al-Mutairi, Dalal A; Liu, Yan; Loges, Niki T; Pathak, Narendra; Austin-Tse, Christina; Sheridan, Eamonn; Schmidts, Miriam; Olbrich, Heike; Werner, Claudius; Häffner, Karsten; Hellman, Nathan; Chodhari, Rahul; Gupta, Amar; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Olale, Felix; Burdine, Rebecca D; Schier, Alexander F; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Chung, Eddie M K; Reinhardt, Richard; Mitchison, Hannah M; King, Stephen M; Omran, Heymut; Drummond, Iain A

    2012-06-01

    Cilia are essential for fertilization, respiratory clearance, cerebrospinal fluid circulation and establishing laterality. Cilia motility defects cause primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD, MIM244400), a disorder affecting 1:15,000-30,000 births. Cilia motility requires the assembly of multisubunit dynein arms that drive ciliary bending. Despite progress in understanding the genetic basis of PCD, mutations remain to be identified for several PCD-linked loci. Here we show that the zebrafish cilia paralysis mutant schmalhans (smh(tn222)) encodes the coiled-coil domain containing 103 protein (Ccdc103), a foxj1a-regulated gene product. Screening 146 unrelated PCD families identified individuals in six families with reduced outer dynein arms who carried mutations in CCDC103. Dynein arm assembly in smh mutant zebrafish was rescued by wild-type but not mutant human CCDC103. Chlamydomonas Ccdc103/Pr46b functions as a tightly bound, axoneme-associated protein. These results identify Ccdc103 as a dynein arm attachment factor that causes primary ciliary dyskinesia when mutated. PMID:22581229

  12. Missense mutations in the perforin (PRF1) gene as a cause of hereditary cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Mohammed S; Gilmour, Kimberly C; House, Imran G; Layton, Mark; Panoskaltsis, Nicki; Sohal, Mamta; Trapani, Joseph A; Voskoboinik, Ilia

    2016-07-01

    Perforin, a pore-forming toxin released from secretory granules of NK cells and CTLs, is essential for their cytotoxic activity against infected or cancerous target cells. Bi-allelic loss-of-function mutations in the perforin gene are invariably associated with a fatal immunoregulatory disorder, familial haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 2 (FHL2), in infants. More recently, it has also been recognized that partial loss of perforin function can cause disease in later life, including delayed onset FHL2 and haematological malignancies. Herein, we report a family in which a wide range of systemic inflammatory and neoplastic manifestations have occurred across three generations. We found that disease was linked to two missense perforin gene mutations (encoding A91V, R410W) that cause protein misfolding and partial loss of activity. These cases link the partial loss of perforin function with some solid tumors that are known to be controlled by the immune system, as well as haematological cancers. Our findings also demonstrate that perforin gene mutations can contribute to hereditary cancer predisposition. PMID:27622035

  13. CCDC103 mutations cause primary ciliary dyskinesia by disrupting assembly of ciliary dynein arms

    PubMed Central

    Panizzi, Jennifer R.; Becker-Heck, Anita; Castleman, Victoria H.; Al-Mutairi, Dalal; Liu, Yan; Loges, Niki T.; Pathak, Narendra; Austin-Tse, Christina; Sheridan, Eamonn; Schmidts, Miriam; Olbrich, Heike; Werner, Claudius; Häffner, Karsten; Hellman, Nathan; Chodhari, Rahul; Gupta, Amar; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Olale, Felix; Burdine, Rebecca D.; Schier, Alexander F.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Chung, Eddie MK; Reinhardt, Richard; Mitchison, Hannah M.; King, Stephen M.; Omran, Heymut; Drummond, Iain A.

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are essential for fertilization, respiratory clearance, cerebrospinal fluid circulation, and to establish laterality1. Cilia motility defects cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, MIM 242650), a disorder affecting 1:15-30,000 births. Cilia motility requires the assembly of multisubunit dynein arms that drive cilia bending2. Despite progress in understanding the genetic basis of PCD, mutations remain to be identified for several PCD linked loci3. Here we show that the zebrafish cilia paralysis mutant schmalhanstn222 (smh) mutant encodes the coiled-coil domain containing 103 protein (Ccdc103), a foxj1a regulated gene. Screening 146 unrelated PCD families identified patients in six families with reduced outer dynein arms, carrying mutations in CCDC103. Dynein arm assembly in smh mutant zebrafish was rescued by wild-type but not mutant human CCDC103. Chlamydomonas Ccdc103 functions as a tightly bound, axoneme-associated protein. The results identify Ccdc103 as a novel dynein arm attachment factor that when mutated causes Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. PMID:22581229

  14. Germline NLRP1 Mutations Cause Skin Inflammatory and Cancer Susceptibility Syndromes via Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Franklin L; Mamaï, Ons; Sborgi, Lorenzo; Boussofara, Lobna; Hopkins, Richard; Robinson, Kim; Szeverényi, Ildikó; Takeichi, Takuya; Balaji, Reshmaa; Lau, Aristotle; Tye, Hazel; Roy, Keya; Bonnard, Carine; Ahl, Patricia J; Jones, Leigh Ann; Baker, Paul; Lacina, Lukas; Otsuka, Atsushi; Fournie, Pierre R; Malecaze, François; Lane, E Birgitte; Akiyama, Masashi; Kabashima, Kenji; Connolly, John E; Masters, Seth L; Soler, Vincent J; Omar, Salma Samir; McGrath, John A; Nedelcu, Roxana; Gribaa, Moez; Denguezli, Mohamed; Saad, Ali; Hiller, Sebastian; Reversade, Bruno

    2016-09-22

    Inflammasome complexes function as key innate immune effectors that trigger inflammation in response to pathogen- and danger-associated signals. Here, we report that germline mutations in the inflammasome sensor NLRP1 cause two overlapping skin disorders: multiple self-healing palmoplantar carcinoma (MSPC) and familial keratosis lichenoides chronica (FKLC). We find that NLRP1 is the most prominent inflammasome sensor in human skin, and all pathogenic NLRP1 mutations are gain-of-function alleles that predispose to inflammasome activation. Mechanistically, NLRP1 mutations lead to increased self-oligomerization by disrupting the PYD and LRR domains, which are essential in maintaining NLRP1 as an inactive monomer. Primary keratinocytes from patients experience spontaneous inflammasome activation and paracrine IL-1 signaling, which is sufficient to cause skin inflammation and epidermal hyperplasia. Our findings establish a group of non-fever inflammasome disorders, uncover an unexpected auto-inhibitory function for the pyrin domain, and provide the first genetic evidence linking NLRP1 to skin inflammatory syndromes and skin cancer predisposition. PMID:27662089

  15. Haploinsufficiency caused by a nonsense mutation in NCSTN underlying hidradenitis suppurativa in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Yang, J-Q; Wu, X-J; Dou, T-T; Jiao, T; Chen, X-B; Min, M; Cai, S-Q; Zheng, M

    2015-12-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic disease of follicular occlusion. It involves the axilla, groin, perianal and perineal regions, and is characterized by recurrent draining sinuses, skin abscesses and disfiguring scars. Loss-of-function mutations in the genes encoding γ-secretase have been identified as a cause of HS. We collected skin samples from three patients with HS from a Chinese family carrying a NCSTN mutation (c.1258C>T (p.Q420X)) and three unrelated healthy controls (HCs). Expression level of nicastrin in skin tissue and cultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts of patients and HCs was determined by real-time quantitative PCR and western blotting. We found that the mRNA and protein levels of nicastrin were significantly reduced in the whole skin, epidermis, dermis, and cultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts compared with HCs. Therefore, we conclude that haploinsufficiency of the NCSTN gene caused by the nonsense mutation c.1258C>T (p.Q420X) contributes to the occurrence of HS in this family.

  16. A mutation abolishing the ZMPSTE24 cleavage site in prelamin A causes a progeroid disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Shaw, Jessica E; Lu, Jonathan T; Östlund, Cecilia; Shin, Ji-Yeon; Clark, Lorraine N; Gundersen, Gregg G; Nagy, Peter L; Worman, Howard J

    2016-05-15

    In 1994 in the Journal of Cell Science, Hennekes and Nigg reported that changing valine to arginine at the endoproteolytic cleavage site in chicken prelamin A abolishes its conversion to lamin A. The consequences of this mutation in an organism have remained unknown. We now report that the corresponding mutation in a human subject leads to accumulation of prelamin A and causes a progeroid disorder. Next generation sequencing of the subject and her parents' exomes identified a de novo mutation in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) that resulted in a leucine to arginine amino acid substitution at residue 647 in prelamin A. The subject's fibroblasts accumulated prelamin A, a farnesylated protein, which led to an increased percentage of cultured cells with morphologically abnormal nuclei. Treatment with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor improved abnormal nuclear morphology. This case demonstrates that accumulation of prelamin A, independent of the loss of function of ZMPSTE24 metallopeptidase that catalyzes processing of prelamin A, can cause a progeroid disorder and that a cell biology assay could be used in precision medicine to identify a potential therapy. PMID:27034136

  17. Heterozygous mutations in HSD17B4 cause juvenile peroxisomal D-bifunctional protein deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Amor, David J.; Marsh, Ashley P.L.; Storey, Elsdon; Tankard, Rick; Gillies, Greta; Delatycki, Martin B.; Pope, Kate; Bromhead, Catherine; Leventer, Richard J.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic cause of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in 5 patients from 3 different families. Methods: The patients comprised 2 sib pairs and 1 sporadic patient. Clinical assessment included history, physical examination, and brain MRI. Linkage analysis was performed separately on the 2 sets of sib pairs using single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays, followed by analysis of the intersection of the regions. Exome sequencing was performed on 1 affected patient with variant filtering and prioritization undertaken using these intersected regions. Results: Using a combination of sequencing technologies, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in HSD17B4 in all 5 affected patients. In all 3 families, peroxisomal D-bifunctional protein (DBP) deficiency was caused by compound heterozygosity for 1 nonsense/deletion mutation and 1 missense mutation. Conclusions: We describe 5 patients with juvenile DBP deficiency from 3 different families, bringing the total number of reported patients to 14, from 8 families. This report broadens and consolidates the phenotype associated with juvenile DBP deficiency. PMID:27790638

  18. Choline acetyltransferase mutations causing congenital myasthenic syndrome: molecular findings and genotype-phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, Juan; Lara, Marian; Gospe, Sídney M.; Mazia, Claudio G.; Vaccarezza, Maria; Garcia-Erro, Marcela; Bowe, Constance; Chang, Celia; Mezei, Michelle; Maselli, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase catalyzes the synthesis of acetylcholine at cholinergic nerves. Mutations in human CHAT cause a congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) due to impaired synthesis of ACh; this severe variant of the disease is frequently associated with unexpected episodes of potentially fatal apnea. The severity of this condition varies remarkably, and the molecular factors determining this variability are poorly understood. Furthermore, genotype–phenotype correlations have been difficult to establish in patients with biallelic mutations. We analyzed the protein expression of seven ChAT mutations, p.Val136Met, p.Arg207His, p.Arg186Trp, p.Val194Leu, p.Pro211Ala, p.Arg566Cys and p.Ser694Cys, in HEK-293 cells to phosphorylated ChAT, determined their enzyme kinetics and thermal instability, and examined their structural changes. Three mutations, p.Arg207His, p.Arg186Trp and p.Arg566Cys, are novel, and p.Val136Met and p.Arg207His are homozygous in three families and associated with severe disease. The characterization of mutants showed a decrease in the overall catalytic efficiency of ChAT; in particular, those located near the active-site tunnel produced the most seriously disruptive phenotypic effects. On the other hand, p.Val136Met is located far from both active and substrate-binding sites produced the most drastic reduction of ChAT expression. Overall, CHAT mutations producing low enzyme expression and severe kinetic effects are associated with the most severe phenotypes. PMID:26080897

  19. Short-Rib Polydactyly and Jeune Syndromes Are Caused by Mutations in WDR60

    PubMed Central

    McInerney-Leo, Aideen M.; Schmidts, Miriam; Cortés, Claudio R.; Leo, Paul J.; Gener, Blanca; Courtney, Andrew D.; Gardiner, Brooke; Harris, Jessica A.; Lu, Yeping; Marshall, Mhairi; Scambler, Peter J.; Beales, Philip L.; Brown, Matthew A.; Zankl, Andreas; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Duncan, Emma L.; Wicking, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Short-rib polydactyly syndromes (SRPS I–V) are a group of lethal congenital disorders characterized by shortening of the ribs and long bones, polydactyly, and a range of extraskeletal phenotypes. A number of other disorders in this grouping, including Jeune and Ellis-van Creveld syndromes, have an overlapping but generally milder phenotype. Collectively, these short-rib dysplasias (with or without polydactyly) share a common underlying defect in primary cilium function and form a subset of the ciliopathy disease spectrum. By using whole-exome capture and massive parallel sequencing of DNA from an affected Australian individual with SRPS type III, we detected two novel heterozygous mutations in WDR60, a relatively uncharacterized gene. These mutations segregated appropriately in the unaffected parents and another affected family member, confirming compound heterozygosity, and both were predicted to have a damaging effect on the protein. Analysis of an additional 54 skeletal ciliopathy exomes identified compound heterozygous mutations in WDR60 in a Spanish individual with Jeune syndrome of relatively mild presentation. Of note, these two families share one novel WDR60 missense mutation, although haplotype analysis suggested no shared ancestry. We further show that WDR60 localizes at the base of the primary cilium in wild-type human chondrocytes, and analysis of fibroblasts from affected individuals revealed a defect in ciliogenesis and aberrant accumulation of the GLI2 transcription factor at the centrosome or basal body in the absence of an obvious axoneme. These findings show that WDR60 mutations can cause skeletal ciliopathies and suggest a role for WDR60 in ciliogenesis. PMID:23910462

  20. Neurofibromin in neurofibromatosis type 1 - mutations in NF1gene as a cause of disease.

    PubMed

    Abramowicz, Anna; Gos, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is a disease associated with the presence of benign neurofibromas and malignant tumours of the central and peripheral nervous system, that are accompanied by characteristic changes in the skin, such as café-au-lait spots or axillary freckling. In 50% of NF1 patients, the clinical symptoms become apparent below 1st year and in 97%, before the age of 8 years. The disease is mainly caused by the presence of mutation in the NF1 gene that encodes neurofibromin - a protein involved in the regulation of several cellular signaling pathways responsible for cell proliferation and differentiation. Neurofibromin is necessary for embryonic development and involved mainly in the differentiation of neural crest derived cells, mesenchymal cells, neural cells, melanocytes and bone cells. Type I neurofibromatosis is inherited in autosomal dominant manner, nevertheless about 50% of detected mutations are de novo ones. The mutations have full penetrance, although they also have significant pleiotropic effect. Over 1485 different mutations have been identified in the NF1 gene so far, most of which lead to a synthesis of truncated, non-functional protein. It is estimated that the point mutations are responsible for approximately 90% of cases of NF1. The remaining 5-7% of NF1 cases are associated with the presence of a single exon or whole NF1 gene deletion (17q11.2 microdeletion syndrome). The article discusses the role of neurofibromin in cell signaling with the special attention to RAS/MAPK pathway regulation as well as in organism development. Also the basic methods of molecular analysis of NF1 gene are presented in the context of their application in the diagnosis and clinical differentiation of the disease.

  1. DVL1 frameshift mutations clustering in the penultimate exon cause autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Gambin, Tomasz; Alcino, Michele Calijorne; Penney, Samantha; Saraiva, Jorge M; Hove, Hanne; Skovby, Flemming; Kayserili, Hülya; Estrella, Elicia; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Steehouwer, Marloes; Muzny, Donna M; Sutton, V Reid; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Brunner, Han G; van Bon, Bregje W M; Carvalho, Claudia M B

    2015-04-01

    Robinow syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features and for which both autosomal-recessive and autosomal-dominant inheritance patterns have been described. Causative variants in the non-canonical signaling gene WNT5A underlie a subset of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome (DRS) cases, but most individuals with DRS remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated DRS-affected individuals without coding mutations in WNT5A and found heterozygous DVL1 exon 14 mutations in three of them. Targeted Sanger sequencing in additional subjects with DRS uncovered DVL1 exon 14 mutations in five individuals, including a pair of monozygotic twins. In total, six distinct frameshift mutations were found in eight subjects, and all were heterozygous truncating variants within the penultimate exon of DVL1. In five families in which samples from unaffected parents were available, the variants were demonstrated to represent de novo mutations. All variant alleles are predicted to result in a premature termination codon within the last exon, escape nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), and most likely generate a C-terminally truncated protein with a distinct -1 reading-frame terminus. Study of the transcripts extracted from affected subjects' leukocytes confirmed expression of both wild-type and variant alleles, supporting the hypothesis that mutant mRNA escapes NMD. Genomic variants identified in our study suggest that truncation of the C-terminal domain of DVL1, a protein hypothesized to have a downstream role in the Wnt-5a non-canonical pathway, is a common cause of DRS. PMID:25817016

  2. Xerocytosis is caused by mutations that alter the kinetics of the mechanosensitive channel PIEZO1.

    PubMed

    Bae, Chilman; Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Nicolai, Chris; Sachs, Frederick; Gottlieb, Philip A

    2013-03-19

    Familial xerocytosis (HX) in humans is an autosomal disease that causes dehydration of red blood cells resulting in hemolytic anemia which has been traced to two individual mutations in the mechanosensitive ion channel, PIEZO1. Each mutation alters channel kinetics in ways that can explain the clinical presentation. Both mutations slowed inactivation and introduced a pronounced latency for activation. A conservative substitution of lysine for arginine (R2456K) eliminated inactivation and also slowed deactivation, indicating that this mutant's loss of charge is not responsible for HX. Fitting the current vs. pressure data to Boltzmann distributions showed that the half-activation pressure, P1/2, for M2225R was similar to that of WT, whereas mutations at position 2456 were left shifted. The absolute stress sensitivity was calibrated by cotransfection and comparison with MscL, a well-characterized mechanosensitive channel from bacteria that is driven by bilayer tension. The slope sensitivity of WT and mutant human PIEZO1 (hPIEZO1) was similar to that of MscL implying that the in-plane area increased markedly, by ∼6-20 nm(2) during opening. In addition to the behavior of individual channels, groups of hPIEZO1 channels could undergo simultaneous changes in kinetics including a loss of inactivation and a long (∼200 ms), silent latency for activation. These observations suggest that hPIEZO1 exists in spatial domains whose global properties can modify channel gating. The mutations that create HX affect cation fluxes in two ways: slow inactivation increases the cation flux, and the latency decreases it. These data provide a direct link between pathology and mechanosensitive channel dysfunction in nonsensory cells. PMID:23487776

  3. Phenotypic variability of CLDN14 mutations causing DFNB29 hearing loss in the Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Zil-e-Huma; Latief, Noreen; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Iqbal, Farheena; Riazuddin, S. Amer; Khan, Shaheen N.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-01-01

    Human hereditary deafness at the DFNB29 autosomal locus on chromosome 21q22.1 is caused by recessive mutations of CLDN14, encoding claudin 14. This tight junction protein is tetra-membrane spanning that localizes to the apical tight junctions of organ of Corti hair cells and in many other tissues. Typically, the DFNB29 phenotype is characterized by pre-lingual, bi-lateral, sensorineural hearing loss. The goal of this study was to define the identity and frequency of CLDN14 mutations and associated inner ear phenotypes in a cohort of 800 Pakistani families segregating deafness. Hearing loss in 15 multi-generational families was found to co-segregate with CLDN14-linked STR markers. The sequence of the six exons and regions flanking the introns of CLDN14 in these 15 families revealed five likely pathogenic alleles. Two are novel missense substitutions (p.Ser87Ile and p.Ala94Val) while p.Arg81His, p.Val85Asp and p.Met133ArgfsX23 have been reported previously. Haplotype analyses indicate that p.Val85Asp and p.Met133ArgfsX23 are founder mutations. The p.Val85Asp accounts for approximately 67% of the mutant alleles of CLDN14 in our cohort. Combined with previously reported data, CLDN14 mutations were identified in 18 of 800 Pakistani families (2.25%; 95% CI, 1.4-3.5%). Hearing loss in the affected individuals homozygous for CLDN14 mutations varied from moderate to profound. This phenotypic variability may be due to environmental factors (e.g. drug and noise exposure) and/or genetic modifiers. PMID:23235333

  4. A HAND2 Loss-of-Function Mutation Causes Familial Ventricular Septal Defect and Pulmonary Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu-Min; Wang, Jun; Qiu, Xing-Biao; Yuan, Fang; Li, Ruo-Gu; Xu, Ying-Jia; Qu, Xin-Kai; Shi, Hong-Yu; Hou, Xu-Min; Huang, Ri-Tai; Xue, Song; Yang, Yi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common developmental abnormality, and is the leading noninfectious cause of mortality in neonates. Increasing evidence demonstrates that genetic defects play an important role in the pathogenesis of CHD. However, CHD exhibits substantial heterogeneity, and the genetic determinants for CHD remain unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. In the current study, the coding exons and flanking introns of the HAND2 gene, which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor essential for normal cardiovascular development, were sequenced in 192 unrelated patients with CHD, and a novel heterozygous mutation, p.S65I, was identified in a patient with congenital ventricular septal defect (VSD). Genetic analysis of the index patient’s pedigree revealed that the mutation was present in all seven affected family members available, but absent in the 13 unaffected family members examined. Besides, in addition to VSD, five of the proband’s close relatives also had pulmonary stenosis (PS), and the proband’s son also had double outlet right ventricle (DORV). The missense mutation, which altered an evolutionarily conserved amino acid, was absent in 300 unrelated, ethnically matched healthy individuals. Biological analyses using a dual-luciferase reporter assay system showed that the mutant HAND2 was associated with significantly diminished transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the mutation abolished the synergistic activation between HAND2 and GATA4, as well as NKX2.5—two other cardiac core transcriptional factors that have been causally linked to CHD. These findings indicate that HAND2 loss-of-function mutation contributes to human CHD, perhaps via its interaction with GATA4 and NKX2.5. PMID:26865696

  5. Mutations in POFUT1, Encoding Protein O-fucosyltransferase 1, Cause Generalized Dowling-Degos Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Cheng, Ruhong; Liang, Jianying; Yan, Heng; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Lijia; Li, Chengrang; Jiao, Qingqing; Lu, Zhiyong; He, Jianhui; Ji, Jin; Shen, Zhu; Li, Chunqi; Hao, Fei; Yu, Hong; Yao, Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD), or reticular pigmented anomaly of the flexures, is a type of rare autosomal-dominant genodermatosis characterized by reticular hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation of the flexures, such as the neck, axilla, and areas below the breasts and groin, and shows considerable heterogeneity. Loss-of-function mutations of keratin 5 (KRT5) have been identified in DDD individuals. In this study, we collected DNA samples from a large Chinese family affected by generalized DDD and found no mutation of KRT5. We performed a genome-wide linkage analysis of this family and mapped generalized DDD to a region between rs1293713 and rs244123 on chromosome 20. By exome sequencing, we identified nonsense mutation c.430G>T (p.Glu144∗) in POFUT1, which encodes protein O-fucosyltransferase 1, in the family. Study of an additional generalized DDD individual revealed the heterozygous deletion mutation c.482delA (p.Lys161Serfs∗42) in POFUT1. Knockdown of POFUT1 reduces the expression of NOTCH1, NOTCH2, HES1, and KRT5 in HaCaT cells. Using zebrafish, we showed that pofut1 is expressed in the skin and other organs. Morpholino knockdown of pofut1 in zebrafish produced a phenotype characteristic of hypopigmentation at 48 hr postfertilization (hpf) and abnormal melanin distribution at 72 hpf, replicating the clinical phenotype observed in our DDD individuals. At 48 and 72 hpf, tyrosinase activities decreased by 33% and 45%, respectively, and melanin protein contents decreased by 20% and 25%, respectively. Our findings demonstrate that POFUT1 mutations cause generalized DDD. These results strongly suggest that the protein product of POFUT1 plays a significant and conserved role in melanin synthesis and transport. PMID:23684010

  6. A new AURKC mutation causing macrozoospermia: implications for human spermatogenesis and clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ben Khelifa, Mariem; Zouari, Raoudha; Harbuz, Radu; Halouani, Lazhar; Arnoult, Christophe; Lunardi, Joël; Ray, Pierre F.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of close to 100% large-headed multi-tailed spermatozoa in the ejaculate has been described as a rare phenotype of male infertility with a very poor prognosis. We demonstrated previously that most cases were caused by a homozygous mutation (c.144delC) in the Aurora Kinase C gene (AURKC) leading to the absence or the production of a nonfunctional protein. AURKC deficiency in these patients blocked meiosis and resulted in the production of tetraploid spermatozoa unsuitable for fertilization. We describe here the study of two brothers presenting with large-headed spermatozoa. Molecular analysis of the AURKC gene was carried out in two brothers presenting with a typical large headed spermatozoa phenotype. Both affected brothers were heterozygous for the c.144delC mutation. After complete sequencing of the gene a new heterozygous variant, c.436-2A>G, was identified in both patients. This mutation is located in the acceptor consensus splice site of exon 5. AURKC transcripts were extracted from one of the patient’s leukocytes and Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) could be realised showing the presence of a truncated transcript indicating that c.436-2A>G leads to the skipping of exon 5. These results indicate that AURKC molecular analysis of patients with large-headed spermatozoa should not be stopped in the absence of a homozygous recurrent mutation on exon 3 but complete sequence analysis should be performed. This diagnosis is important as the identification of AURKC mutations in patients indicates that all spermatozoa will be chromosomally abnormal and that ICSI should not be attempted. PMID:21733974

  7. Mutations in CEP120 cause Joubert syndrome as well as complex ciliopathy phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Marta; Isrie, Mala; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Micalizzi, Alessia; Musaev, Damir; Mazza, Tommaso; Al-gazali, Lihadh; Altunoglu, Umut; Boltshauser, Eugen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; De Keersmaecker, Bart; Kayserili, Hülya; Brandenberger, Sarah; Kraoua, Ichraf; Mark, Paul R; McKanna, Trudy; Van Keirsbilck, Joachim; Moerman, Philippe; Poretti, Andrea; Puri, Ratna; Van Esch, Hilde; Gleeson, Joseph G; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Ciliopathies are an extensive group of autosomal recessive or X-linked disorders with considerable genetic and clinical overlap, which collectively share multiple organ involvement and may result in lethal or viable phenotypes. In large numbers of cases the genetic defect remains yet to be determined. The aim of this study is to describe the mutational frequency and phenotypic spectrum of the CEP120 gene. Methods Exome sequencing was performed in 145 patients with Joubert syndrome (JS), including 15 children with oral-facial-digital syndrome type VI (OFDVI) and 21 Meckel syndrome (MKS) fetuses. Moreover, exome sequencing was performed in one fetus with tectocerebellar dysraphia with occipital encephalocele (TCDOE), molar tooth sign and additional skeletal abnormalities. As a parallel study, 346 probands with a phenotype consistent with JS or related ciliopathies underwent next-generation sequencing-based targeted sequencing of 120 previously described and candidate ciliopathy genes. Results We present six probands carrying nine distinct mutations (of which eight are novel) in the CEP120 gene, previously found mutated only in Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD). The CEP120-associated phenotype ranges from mild classical JS in four patients to more severe conditions in two fetuses, with overlapping features of distinct ciliopathies that include TCDOE, MKS, JATD and OFD syndromes. No obvious correlation is evident between the type or location of identified mutations and the ciliopathy phenotype. Conclusion Our findings broaden the spectrum of phenotypes caused by CEP120 mutations that account for nearly 1% of patients with JS as well as for more complex ciliopathy phenotypes. The lack of clear genotype–phenotype correlation highlights the relevance of comprehensive genetic analyses in the diagnostics of ciliopathies. PMID:27208211

  8. Nosocomial infection caused by vancomycin-susceptible multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis over a long period in a university hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Michiaki; Nomura, Takahiro; Yomoda, Sachie; Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2014-11-01

    Compared with other developed countries, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are not widespread in clinical environments in Japan. There have been no VRE outbreaks and only a few VRE strains have sporadically been isolated in our university hospital in Gunma, Japan. To examine the drug susceptibility of Enterococcus faecalis and nosocomial infection caused by non-VRE strains, a retrospective surveillance was conducted in our university hospital. Molecular epidemiological analyses were performed on 1711 E. faecalis clinical isolates collected in our hospital over a 6-year period [1998-2003]. Of these isolates, 1241 (72.5%) were antibiotic resistant and 881 (51.5%) were resistant to two or more drugs. The incidence of multidrug resistant E. faecalis (MDR-Ef) isolates in the intensive care unit increased after enlargement and restructuring of the hospital. The major group of MDR-Ef strains consisted of 209 isolates (12.2%) resistant to the five drug combination tetracycline/erythromycin/kanamycin/streptomycin/gentamicin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of the major MDR-Ef isolates showed that nosocomial infections have been caused by MDR-Ef over a long period (more than 3 years). Multilocus sequence typing showed that these strains were mainly grouped into ST16 (CC58) or ST64 (CC8). Mating experiments suggested that the drug resistances were encoded on two conjugative transposons (integrative conjugative elements), one encoded tetracycline-resistance and the other erythromycin/kanamycin/streptomycin/gentamicin-resistance. To our knowledge, this is the first report of nosocomial infection caused by vancomycin-susceptible MDR-Ef strains over a long period in Japan.

  9. Next-Generation Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Sequential Outbreaks Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii at a Large Academic Burn Center

    PubMed Central

    Parobek, Christian M.; Weber, David J.; van Duin, David; Rutala, William A.; Cairns, Bruce A.; Juliano, Jonathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis has emerged as a promising molecular epidemiological method for investigating health care-associated outbreaks. Here, we used NGS to investigate a 3-year outbreak of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) at a large academic burn center. A reference genome from the index case was generated using de novo assembly of PacBio reads. Forty-six MDRAB isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequenced using an Illumina platform. After mapping to the index case reference genome, four samples were excluded due to low coverage, leaving 42 samples for further analysis. Multilocus sequence types (MLST) and the presence of acquired resistance genes were also determined from the sequencing data. A transmission network was inferred from genomic and epidemiological data using a Bayesian framework. Based on single-nucleotide variant (SNV) differences, this MDRAB outbreak represented three sequential outbreaks caused by distinct clones. The first and second outbreaks were caused by sequence type 2 (ST2), while the third outbreak was caused by ST79. For the second outbreak, the MLST and PFGE results were discordant. However, NGS-based SNV typing detected a recombination event and consequently enabled a more accurate phylogenetic analysis. The distribution of resistance genes varied among the three outbreaks. The first- and second-outbreak strains possessed a blaOXA-23-like group, while the third-outbreak strains harbored a blaOXA-40-like group. NGS-based analysis demonstrated the superior resolution of outbreak transmission networks for MDRAB and provided insight into the mechanisms of strain diversification between sequential outbreaks through recombination. PMID:26643351

  10. Mutations in the FUS/TLS gene on chromosome 16 cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, T J; Bosco, D A; Leclerc, A L; Tamrazian, E; Vanderburg, C R; Russ, C; Davis, A; Gilchrist, J; Kasarskis, E J; Munsat, T; Valdmanis, P; Rouleau, G A; Hosler, B A; Cortelli, P; de Jong, P J; Yoshinaga, Y; Haines, J L; Pericak-Vance, M A; Yan, J; Ticozzi, N; Siddique, T; McKenna-Yasek, D; Sapp, P C; Horvitz, H R; Landers, J E; Brown, R H

    2009-02-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal degenerative motor neuron disorder. Ten percent of cases are inherited; most involve unidentified genes. We report here 13 mutations in the fused in sarcoma/translated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS) gene on chromosome 16 that were specific for familial ALS. The FUS/TLS protein binds to RNA, functions in diverse processes, and is normally located predominantly in the nucleus. In contrast, the mutant forms of FUS/TLS accumulated in the cytoplasm of neurons, a pathology that is similar to that of the gene TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP43), whose mutations also cause ALS. Neuronal cytoplasmic protein aggregation and defective RNA metabolism thus appear to be common pathogenic mechanisms involved in ALS and possibly in other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19251627

  11. Frequent Imprecise Excision among Reversions of a P Element-Caused Lethal Mutation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Voelker, Robert A.; Greenleaf, Arno L.; Gyurkovics, Henrik; Wisely, G. Bruce; Huang, Shu-Mei; Searles, Lillie L.

    1984-01-01

    RpII215D50 (= D50) is a lethal mutation caused by the insertion of a 1.3-kb P element 5' to sequences encoding the largest (215 kilodaltons) subunit of Drosophila RNA polymerase II. In dysgenic males D50 reverted to nonlethality at frequencies ranging from 2.6 to 6.5%. These reversions resulted from loss of P element sequences. Genetic tests of function and restriction enzyme analysis of revertant DNAs revealed that 35% or more of the reversion events were imprecise excisions. Two meiotic mutations that perturb excision repair and postreplication repair (mei-9a and mei-41D5, respectively) had no influence on reversion frequency but may have increased the proportion of imprecise excisions. We suggest that these excisions are by-products of, rather than intermediates in, the transposition process. PMID:17246216

  12. A mitochondrial tRNA aspartate mutation causing isolated mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Sara; Goemans, Nathalie; Van Coster, Rudy; Givron, Patrice; Reybrouck, Tony; Sciot, Raf; Meulemans, Ann; Smet, Joel; Van Hove, Johan L K

    2005-08-30

    Several mutations in mitochondrial transfer RNA (tRNA) genes can cause mitochondrial myopathy. We describe a young girl who presented with pronounced exercise intolerance. The anaerobic threshold and the maximal oxygen consumption were decreased. She had decreased complex I and IV enzyme activity and ragged red fibers on muscle biopsy. An A to G transition at nucleotide position 7526 in tRNA Aspartate (tRNA(Asp)) gene was heteroplasmic in several of the patient's tissues. We were unable to detect the mutation in muscle tissue from the patient's mother. This case adds a new genetic etiology for mitochondrial myopathy. It also illustrates for patients with combined deficiency of the complex I and IV enzyme activity the value of sequencing in the affected tissue muscle, and not only in blood, all mitochondrial tRNA genes including those not commonly affected, such as in this case mt tRNA(Asp).

  13. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  14. Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia caused by mutations in a putative LDL receptor adaptor protein.

    PubMed

    Garcia, C K; Wilund, K; Arca, M; Zuliani, G; Fellin, R; Maioli, M; Calandra, S; Bertolini, S; Cossu, F; Grishin, N; Barnes, R; Cohen, J C; Hobbs, H H

    2001-05-18

    Atherogenic low density lipoproteins are cleared from the circulation by hepatic low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR). Two inherited forms of hypercholesterolemia result from loss of LDLR activity: autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), caused by mutations in the LDLR gene, and autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH), of unknown etiology. Here we map the ARH locus to an approximately 1-centimorgan interval on chromosome 1p35 and identify six mutations in a gene encoding a putative adaptor protein (ARH). ARH contains a phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain, which in other proteins binds NPXY motifs in the cytoplasmic tails of cell-surface receptors, including the LDLR. ARH appears to have a tissue-specific role in LDLR function, as it is required in liver but not in fibroblasts. PMID:11326085

  15. A form of albinism in cattle is caused by a tyrosinase frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Sheila M; Berryere, Tom G; Ciobanu, Daniel C; Mileham, Alan J; Schmidtz, Barbara H; Fredholm, Merete

    2004-01-01

    We used PCR amplification of cDNA prepared from skin biopsies to determine the full-length protein-coding sequence of tyrosinase ( TYR) in cattle of several coat colors. An insertion of a cytosine was detected in an albino Braunvieh calf, which resulted in a frameshift which caused a premature stop codon at residue 316. This insertion was found in the homozygous state in this calf and the genomic DNA of two related albino calves. All six parents of these calves were heterozygous for this insertion. However, an albino Holstein calf did not have this insertion, nor was any other mutation detected in the partial TYR sequence obtained from the genomic DNA available. Diagnostic genotyping tests were developed to detect this mutation in Braunvieh cattle.

  16. Muscle dysfunction caused by a KATP channel mutation in neonatal diabetes is neuronal in origin.

    PubMed

    Clark, Rebecca H; McTaggart, James S; Webster, Richard; Mannikko, Roope; Iberl, Michaela; Sim, Xiu Li; Rorsman, Patrik; Glitsch, Maike; Beeson, David; Ashcroft, Frances M

    2010-07-23

    Gain-of-function mutations in Kir6.2 (KCNJ11), the pore-forming subunit of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel, cause neonatal diabetes. Many patients also suffer from hypotonia (weak and flaccid muscles) and balance problems. The diabetes arises from suppressed insulin secretion by overactive KATP channels in pancreatic beta-cells, but the source of the motor phenotype is unknown. By using mice carrying a human Kir6.2 mutation (Val59-->Met59) targeted to either muscle or nerve, we show that analogous motor impairments originate in the central nervous system rather than in muscle or peripheral nerves. We also identify locomotor hyperactivity as a feature of KATP channel overactivity. These findings suggest that drugs targeted against neuronal, rather than muscle, KATP channels are needed to treat the motor deficits and that such drugs require high blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:20595581

  17. De novo MEIS2 mutation causes syndromic developmental delay with persistent gastro-esophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Atsushi; Isidor, Bertrand; Piloquet, Hugues; Corre, Pierre; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-09-01

    MEIS2 aberrations are considered to be the cause of intellectual disability, cleft palate and cardiac septal defect, as MEIS2 copy number variation is often observed with these phenotypes. To our knowledge, only one nucleotide-level change-specifically, an in-frame MEIS2 deletion-has so far been reported. Here, we report a female patient with a de novo nonsense mutation (c.611C>G, p.Ser204*) in MEIS2. She showed severe intellectual disability, moderate motor/verbal developmental delay, cleft palate, cardiac septal defect, hypermetropia, severe feeding difficulties with gastro-esophageal reflux and constipation. By reviewing this patient and previous patients with MEIS2 point mutations, we found that feeding difficulty with gastro-esophageal reflux appears to be one of the core clinical features of MEIS2 haploinsufficiency, in addition to intellectual disability, cleft palate and cardiac septal defect.

  18. Ataxia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism with Intrafamilial Variability Caused by RNF216 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Alqwaifly, Mohammed; Bohlega, Saeed

    2016-06-15

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a distinct phenotype of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia, characterized by ataxia, dementia, reproductive defects and hypogonadism; it has been recently found to be associated with RNF216 mutation. We performed whole-exome sequencing and filtered the resulting novel variants by the coordinates of the shared autozygome. We identified a novel splicing variant in RNF216 that is likely to abolish the canonical splice site at the junction of exon/intron 13 (NM_207111.3:c.2061G>A). We herein report two patients with GHS caused by a novel RNF216 mutation as the first follow up report on RNF216-related GHS, and show interfamilial variability of phenotype supporting the previously reported RNF216-related cases. PMID:27441066

  19. A Mutation in PMP2 Causes Dominant Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Young Se; Kwak, Geon; Choi, Yu-Ri; Yeo, Ha Kyung; Jwa, Dong Hwan; Kim, Eun Ja; Mo, Won Min; Nam, Soo Hyun; Kim, Sung Min; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Park, Hwan Tae; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies with diverse genetic causes. In this study, we identified p.I43N mutation in PMP2 from a family exhibiting autosomal dominant demyelinating CMT neuropathy by whole exome sequencing and characterized the clinical features. The age at onset was the first to second decades and muscle atrophy started in the distal portion of the leg. Predominant fatty replacement in the anterior and lateral compartment was similar to that in CMT1A caused by PMP22 duplication. Sural nerve biopsy showed onion bulbs and degenerating fibers with various myelin abnormalities. The relevance of PMP2 mutation as a genetic cause of dominant CMT1 was assessed using transgenic mouse models. Transgenic mice expressing wild type or mutant (p.I43N) PMP2 exhibited abnormal motor function. Electrophysiological data revealed that both mice had reduced motor nerve conduction velocities (MNCV). Electron microscopy revealed that demyelinating fibers and internodal lengths were shortened in both transgenic mice. These data imply that overexpression of wild type as well as mutant PMP2 also causes the CMT1 phenotype, which has been documented in the PMP22. This report might expand the genetic and clinical features of CMT and a further mechanism study will enhance our understanding of PMP2-associated peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26828946

  20. Mutations in SOX2 cause anophthalmia-esophageal-genital (AEG) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Kathleen A; Hever, Ann M; Rainger, Joe; Rogers, R Curtis; Magee, Alex; Fiedler, Zdenek; Keng, Wee Teik; Sharkey, Freddie H; McGill, Niolette; Hill, Clare J; Schneider, Adele; Messina, Mario; Turnpenny, Peter D; Fantes, Judy A; van Heyningen, Veronica; FitzPatrick, David R

    2006-05-01

    We report heterozygous, loss-of-function SOX2 mutations in three unrelated individuals with Anophthalmia-Esophageal-Genital (AEG) syndrome. One previously reported case [Rogers, R.C. (1988) Unknown cases. Proceedings of the Greenwood Genetic Center. 7, 57.] has a 2.7 Mb deletion encompassing SOX2 and associated with a cryptic translocation t(3;7)(q28;p21.3). The deletion and translocation breakpoints on chromosome 3q are >8.6 Mb apart and both chromosome rearrangements have occurred de novo. Another published case [Petrackova et al. (2004) Association of oesophageal atresia, anophthalmia and renal duplex. Eur. J. Pediatr., 163, 333-334.] has a de novo nonsense mutation, Q55X. A previously unreported case with severe bilateral microphthalmia and oesophageal atresia has a de novo missense mutation, R74P, that alters a highly evolutionarily conserved residue within the high mobility group domain, which is critical for DNA-binding of SOX2. In a yeast one-hybrid assay, this mutation abolishes Sox2-induced activation of the chick delta-crystallin DC5 enhancer. Four other reported AEG syndrome cases were extensively screened and do not have detectable SOX2 mutations. Two of these cases have unilateral eye malformations. SOX2 mutations are known to cause severe bilateral eye malformations but this is the first report implicating loss of function mutations in this transcription factor in oesophageal malformations. SOX2 is expressed in the developing foregut in mouse and zebrafish embryos and an apparently normal pattern of expression is maintained in Shh-/- mouse embryos, suggesting either that Sox2 acts upstream of Shh or functions in a different pathway. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the major morphological events in the developing foregut and eye from Carnegie Stages 12 and 13 human embryos are presented and compared with the data from model organisms. SOX2, with NMYC and CHD7, is now the third transcriptional regulator known to be critical for normal oesophageal

  1. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene that cause glycogen storage disease type 1a

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Lei, K.J.; Shelly, L.L.

    1994-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type la (von Gierke disease) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. The disease presents with clinical manifestations of severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, growth retardation, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperuricemia. We have succeeded in isolating a murine G6Pase cDNA from a normal mouse liver cDNA library by differentially screening method. We then isolated the human G6Pase cDNA and gene. To date, we have characterized the G6Pase genes of twelve GSD type la patients and uncovered a total of six different mutations. The mutations are comprised of R83C (an Arg at codon 83 to a Cys), Q347X (a Gly at codon 347 to a stop codon), 459insTA (a two basepair insertion at nucleotide 459 yielding a truncated G6Pase of 129 residues), R295C (an Arg at codon 295 to a Cys), G222R (a Gly at codon 222 to an Arg) and {delta}F327 (a codon deletion for Phe-327 at nucleotides 1058 to 1060). The relative incidences of these mutations are 37.5% (R83C), 33.3% (Q347X), 16.6% (459insTA), 4.2% (G222R), 4.2% (R295C) and 4.2% ({delta}F327). Site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression assays demonstrated that the R83C, Q347X, R295C, and {delta}F327 mutations abolished whereas the G222R mutation greatly reduced G6Pase activity. We further characterized the structure-function requirements of amino acids 83, 222, and 295 in G6Pase catalysis. The identification of mutations in GSD type la patients has unequivocally established the molecular basis of the type la disorder. Knowledge of the mutations may be applied to prenatal diagnosis and opens the way for developing and evaluating new therapeutic approaches.

  2. Mexiletine differentially restores the trafficking defects caused by two brugada syndrome mutations.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Adrien; Keller, Dagmar I; Huang, Hai; Fressart, Véronique; Schmied, Christian; Timour, Quadiri; Chahine, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The human cardiac sodium channel Na(v)1.5 encoded by the SCN5A gene plays a critical role in cardiac excitability and the propagation of action potentials. Na(v)1.5 dysfunctions due to mutations cause cardiac diseases such as the LQT3 form of long QT syndrome, conduction disorders, and Brugada syndrome (BrS). They have also recently been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. BrS is characterized by coved ST-segment elevation on surface ECGs and lethal ventricular arrhythmias in an apparently structurally normal heart. Na(v)1.5 mutations that cause BrS result in a loss of channel function. Our aim was to functionally characterize two novel Na(v)1.5 mutations (A124D and V1378M) in BrS patients. Wild-type (WT) and mutant Na(v)1.5 channels were expressed in tsA201 cells in the presence of the β(1)-auxiliary subunit. The patch-clamp technique and immunocytochemistry approaches were used to study the mutant channels and their cellular localization. The two mutant channels displayed a dramatic reduction in current density but had normal gating properties. The reduction in current density was caused by the retention of channel proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mutant channel retention could be partially reversed by incubating transfected cells at 25°C and by treating them with mexiletine (for V1378M but not A124D), or with curcumin or thapsigargin, two drugs that target ER resident proteins. It is likely that the clinical phenotypes observed in these two BrS patients were related to a surface expression defect caused by ER retention. PMID:22529811

  3. Expanding the phenotype of mutations in DICER1: mosaic missense mutations in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1 cause GLOW syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Steven; Lee, Hane; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Kempert, Pamela; Ischander, Mariam; Teitell, Michael A; Nelson, Stanley F; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2015-01-01

    Background Constitutional DICER1 mutations have been associated with pleuropulmonary blastoma, cystic nephroma, Sertoli-Leydig tumours and multinodular goitres, while somatic DICER1 mutations have been reported in additional tumour types. Here we report a novel syndrome termed GLOW, an acronym for its core phenotypic findings, which include Global developmental delay, Lung cysts, Overgrowth and Wilms tumour caused by mutations in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1. Methods and results We performed whole exome sequencing on peripheral mononuclear blood cells of an affected proband and identified a de novo missense mutation in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1. We confirmed an additional de novo missense mutation in the same domain of an unrelated case by Sanger sequencing. These missense mutations in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1 are suspected to affect one of four metal binding sites located within this domain. Pyrosequencing was used to determine the relative abundance of mutant alleles in various tissue types. The relative mutation abundance is highest in Wilms tumour and unaffected kidney samples when compared with blood, confirming that the mutation is mosaic. Finally, we performed bioinformatic analysis of microRNAs expressed in murine cells carrying specific Dicer1 RNase IIIb domain metal binding site-associated mutations. We have identified a subset of 3p microRNAs that are overexpressed whose target genes are over-represented in mTOR, MAPK and TGF-β signalling pathways. Conclusions We propose that mutations affecting the metal binding sites of the DICER1 RNase IIIb domain alter the balance of 3p and 5p microRNAs leading to deregulation of these growth signalling pathways, causing a novel human overgrowth syndrome. PMID:24676357

  4. Myopathic lamin mutations cause reductive stress and activate the nrf2/keap-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Dialynas, George; Shrestha, Om K; Ponce, Jessica M; Zwerger, Monika; Thiemann, Dylan A; Young, Grant H; Moore, Steven A; Yu, Liping; Lammerding, Jan; Wallrath, Lori L

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in the human LMNA gene cause muscular dystrophy by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The LMNA gene encodes A-type lamins, intermediate filaments that form a network underlying the inner nuclear membrane, providing structural support for the nucleus and organizing the genome. To better understand the pathogenesis caused by mutant lamins, we performed a structural and functional analysis on LMNA missense mutations identified in muscular dystrophy patients. These mutations perturb the tertiary structure of the conserved A-type lamin Ig-fold domain. To identify the effects of these structural perturbations on lamin function, we modeled these mutations in Drosophila Lamin C and expressed the mutant lamins in muscle. We found that the structural perturbations had minimal dominant effects on nuclear stiffness, suggesting that the muscle pathology was not accompanied by major structural disruption of the peripheral nuclear lamina. However, subtle alterations in the lamina network and subnuclear reorganization of lamins remain possible. Affected muscles had cytoplasmic aggregation of lamins and additional nuclear envelope proteins. Transcription profiling revealed upregulation of many Nrf2 target genes. Nrf2 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm by Keap-1. Under oxidative stress Nrf2 dissociates from Keap-1, translocates into the nucleus, and activates gene expression. Unexpectedly, biochemical analyses revealed high levels of reducing agents, indicative of reductive stress. The accumulation of cytoplasmic lamin aggregates correlated with elevated levels of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, which also binds Keap-1, abrogating Nrf2 cytoplasmic sequestration, allowing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and target gene activation. Elevated p62/SQSTM1 and nuclear enrichment of Nrf2 were identified in muscle biopsies from the corresponding muscular dystrophy patients, validating the disease relevance of our Drosophila model. Thus, novel connections were made

  5. Myopathic Lamin Mutations Cause Reductive Stress and Activate the Nrf2/Keap-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dialynas, George; Shrestha, Om K.; Ponce, Jessica M.; Zwerger, Monika; Thiemann, Dylan A.; Young, Grant H.; Moore, Steven A.; Yu, Liping; Lammerding, Jan; Wallrath, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the human LMNA gene cause muscular dystrophy by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The LMNA gene encodes A-type lamins, intermediate filaments that form a network underlying the inner nuclear membrane, providing structural support for the nucleus and organizing the genome. To better understand the pathogenesis caused by mutant lamins, we performed a structural and functional analysis on LMNA missense mutations identified in muscular dystrophy patients. These mutations perturb the tertiary structure of the conserved A-type lamin Ig-fold domain. To identify the effects of these structural perturbations on lamin function, we modeled these mutations in Drosophila Lamin C and expressed the mutant lamins in muscle. We found that the structural perturbations had minimal dominant effects on nuclear stiffness, suggesting that the muscle pathology was not accompanied by major structural disruption of the peripheral nuclear lamina. However, subtle alterations in the lamina network and subnuclear reorganization of lamins remain possible. Affected muscles had cytoplasmic aggregation of lamins and additional nuclear envelope proteins. Transcription profiling revealed upregulation of many Nrf2 target genes. Nrf2 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm by Keap-1. Under oxidative stress Nrf2 dissociates from Keap-1, translocates into the nucleus, and activates gene expression. Unexpectedly, biochemical analyses revealed high levels of reducing agents, indicative of reductive stress. The accumulation of cytoplasmic lamin aggregates correlated with elevated levels of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, which also binds Keap-1, abrogating Nrf2 cytoplasmic sequestration, allowing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and target gene activation. Elevated p62/SQSTM1 and nuclear enrichment of Nrf2 were identified in muscle biopsies from the corresponding muscular dystrophy patients, validating the disease relevance of our Drosophila model. Thus, novel connections were made

  6. Sporadic congenital nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism caused by P639S mutation in thyrotropin receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Agretti, Patrizia; De Marco, Giuseppina; Biagioni, Martina; Iannilli, Antonio; Marigliano, Marco; Pinchera, Aldo; Vitti, Paolo; Cherubini, Valentino; Tonacchera, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    Germline mutations of thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) gene determining a constitutive activation of the receptor were identified as a molecular cause of familial or sporadic congenital nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism (OMIM: 609152) (Nat Genet 7:396-401, 1994; N Engl J Med 332:150-154, 1995; Acta Endocrinol (Copenh) 100:512-518, 1982). We report the case of an Italian child subjected to the first clinical investigation at 24 months for an increased growth velocity; biochemical investigation showed high FT4 and FT3 serum values and undetectable thyrotropin in the absence of anti-thyroid antibodies; the thyroid gland was normal at ultrasound examination. Treatment with methimazole was started at the age of 30 months when her growth velocity was high and the bone age was advanced. DNA was extracted from her parents', brother's, and the patient's blood. Exons 9 and 10 of the TSHR gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to direct sequencing. In proband, a heterozygous substitution of cytosine to thymine determining a proline to serine change at position 639 (P639S) of the TSHR was detected while the parents and brothers of the propositus, all euthyroid, showed only the wild-type sequence of the TSHR gene. This mutation was previously described as somatic in patients affected by hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules and as germline in a single Chinese family affected by thyrotoxicosis and mitral valve prolapse. This constitutively activating mutation is able to activate both the cyclic AMP and the inositol phosphate metabolic pathways when expressed in a heterologous system. In conclusion, we describe the first case of sporadic congenital nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism caused by de novo germinal P639S mutation of TSHR. PMID:22371259

  7. HANAC Syndrome Col4a1 Mutation Causes Neonate Glomerular Hyperpermeability and Adult Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyong; Migeon, Tiffany; Verpont, Marie-Christine; Zaidan, Mohamad; Sado, Yoshikazu; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Ronco, Pierre; Plaisier, Emmanuelle

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary angiopathy, nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps (HANAC) syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in COL4A1 that encodes the α1 chain of collagen IV, a major component of basement membranes. Patients present with cerebral small vessel disease, retinal tortuosity, muscle cramps, and kidney disease consisting of multiple renal cysts, chronic kidney failure, and sometimes hematuria. Mutations producing HANAC syndrome localize within the integrin binding site containing CB3[IV] fragment of the COL4A1 protein. To investigate the pathophysiology of HANAC syndrome, we generated mice harboring the Col4a1 p.Gly498Val mutation identified in a family with the syndrome. Col4a1 G498V mutation resulted in delayed glomerulogenesis and podocyte differentiation without reduction of nephron number, causing albuminuria and hematuria in newborns. The glomerular defects resolved within the first month, but glomerular cysts developed in 3-month-old mutant mice. Abnormal structure of Bowman's capsule was associated with metalloproteinase induction and activation of the glomerular parietal epithelial cells that abnormally expressed CD44,α-SMA, ILK, and DDR1. Inflammatory infiltrates were observed around glomeruli and arterioles. Homozygous Col4a1 G498V mutant mice additionally showed dysmorphic papillae and urinary concentration defects. These results reveal a developmental role for the α1α1α2 collagen IV molecule in the embryonic glomerular basement membrane, affecting podocyte differentiation. The observed association between molecular alteration of the collagenous network in Bowman's capsule of the mature kidney and activation of parietal epithelial cells, matrix remodeling, and inflammation may account for glomerular cyst development and CKD in patients with COL4A1-related disorders.

  8. Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Nicole A; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel genes cause several types of human epilepsies. Often, individuals with the same sodium channel mutation exhibit diverse phenotypes. This suggests that factors beyond the primary mutation influence disease severity, including genetic modifiers. Mouse epilepsy models with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations exhibit strain-dependent phenotype variability, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn2a(Q54) (Q54) mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Q54 mice on the C57BL/6J (B6) strain exhibit delayed seizure onset and improved survival compared to [B6xSJL/J]F1.Q54 mice. We previously mapped two dominant modifier loci that influence Q54 seizure susceptibility and identified Hlf (hepatic leukemia factor) as a candidate modifier gene at one locus. Hlf and other PAR bZIP transcription factors had previously been associated with spontaneous seizures in mice thought to be caused by down-regulation of the pyridoxine pathway. An Hlf targeted knockout mouse model was used to evaluate the effect of Hlf deletion on Q54 phenotype severity. Hlf(KO/KO);Q54 double mutant mice exhibited elevated frequency and reduced survival compared to Q54 controls. To determine if direct modulation of the pyridoxine pathway could alter the Q54 phenotype, mice were maintained on a pyridoxine-deficient diet for 6 weeks. Dietary pyridoxine deficiency resulted in elevated seizure frequency and decreased survival in Q54 mice compared to control diet. To determine if Hlf could modify other epilepsies, Hlf(KO/+) mice were crossed with the Scn1a(KO/+) Dravet syndrome mouse model to examine the effect on premature lethality. Hlf(KO/+);Scn1a(KO/+) offspring exhibited decreased survival compared to Scn1a(KO/+) controls. Together these results demonstrate that Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations and that modulation of the pyridoxine pathway can also influence phenotype

  9. Four common glomulin mutations cause two thirds of glomuvenous malformations ("familial glomangiomas"): evidence for a founder effect

    PubMed Central

    Brouillard, P; Ghassibe, M; Penington, A; Boon, L; Dompmartin, A; Temple, I; Cordisco, M; Adams, D; Piette, F; Harper, J; Syed, S; Boralevi, F; Taieb, A; Danda, S; Baselga, E; Enjolras, O; Mulliken, J; Vikkula, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Glomuvenous malformation (GVM) ("familial glomangioma") is a localised cutaneous vascular lesion histologically characterised by abnormal smooth muscle-like "glomus cells" in the walls of distended endothelium lined channels. Inheritable GVM has been linked to chromosome 1p21-22 and is caused by truncating mutations in glomulin. A double hit mutation was identified in one lesion. This finding suggests that GVM results from complete localised loss of function and explains the paradominant mode of inheritance. Objective: To report on the identification of a mutation in glomulin in 23 additional families with GVM. Results: Three mutations are new; the others have been described previously. Among the 17 different inherited mutations in glomulin known up to now in 43 families, the 157delAAGAA mutation is the most common and was present in 21 families (48.8%). Mutation 108C→A was found in five families (11.8%), and the mutations 554delA+556delCCT and 1179delCAA were present together in two families (4.7% each). Polymorphic markers suggested a founder effect for all four mutations. Conclusions: Screening for these mutations should lead to a genetic diagnosis in about 70% of patients with inherited GVM. So far, a mutation in glomulin has been found in all GVM families tested, thus demonstrating locus homogeneity. PMID:15689436

  10. Case report: vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1 caused by a novel CYP27B1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Füchtbauer, Laila; Brusgaard, Klaus; Ledaal, Pål; Frost, Morten; Frederiksen, Anja L

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1 VDDR-1 is a recessive inherited disorder with impaired activation of vitamin D, caused by mutations in CYP27B1. We present long-time follow-up of a case with a novel mutation including high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography of the bone. Adequate treatment resulted in a normalized phenotype.

  11. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013–2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread

  12. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C D

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013-2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread of

  13. Palladin Mutation Causes Familial Pancreatic Cancer and Suggests a New Cancer Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bronner, Mary P; Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana; Moyes, Kara White; Dowen, Sally; Otey, Carol A; Crispin, David A; George, Ryan D; Whitcomb, David C; Brentnall, Teresa A

    2006-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease. Discovery of the mutated genes that cause the inherited form(s) of the disease may shed light on the mechanism(s) of oncogenesis. Previously we isolated a susceptibility locus for familial pancreatic cancer to chromosome location 4q32–34. In this study, our goal was to discover the identity of the familial pancreatic cancer gene on 4q32 and determine the function of that gene. Methods and Findings A customized microarray of the candidate chromosomal region affecting pancreatic cancer susceptibility revealed the greatest expression change in palladin (PALLD), a gene that encodes a component of the cytoskeleton that controls cell shape and motility. A mutation causing a proline (hydrophobic) to serine (hydrophilic) amino acid change (P239S) in a highly conserved region tracked with all affected family members and was absent in the non-affected members. The mutational change is not a known single nucleotide polymorphism. Palladin RNA, measured by quantitative RT-PCR, was overexpressed in the tissues from precancerous dysplasia and pancreatic adenocarcinoma in both familial and sporadic disease. Transfection of wild-type and P239S mutant palladin gene constructs into HeLa cells revealed a clear phenotypic effect: cells expressing P239S palladin exhibited cytoskeletal changes, abnormal actin bundle assembly, and an increased ability to migrate. Conclusions These observations suggest that the presence of an abnormal palladin gene in familial pancreatic cancer and the overexpression of palladin protein in sporadic pancreatic cancer cause cytoskeletal changes in pancreatic cancer and may be responsible for or contribute to the tumor's strong invasive and migratory abilities. PMID:17194196

  14. Mutation of NLRC4 causes a syndrome of enterocolitis and autoinflammation.

    PubMed

    Romberg, Neil; Al Moussawi, Khatoun; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Stiegler, Amy L; Loring, Erin; Choi, Murim; Overton, John; Meffre, Eric; Khokha, Mustafa K; Huttner, Anita J; West, Brian; Podoltsev, Nikolai A; Boggon, Titus J; Kazmierczak, Barbara I; Lifton, Richard P

    2014-10-01

    Upon detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, innate immune receptors initiate inflammatory responses. These receptors include cytoplasmic NOD-like receptors (NLRs) whose stimulation recruits and proteolytically activates caspase-1 within the inflammasome, a multiprotein complex. Caspase-1 mediates the production of interleukin-1 family cytokines (IL1FCs), leading to fever and inflammatory cell death (pyroptosis). Mutations that constitutively activate these pathways underlie several autoinflammatory diseases with diverse clinical features. We describe a family with a previously unreported syndrome featuring neonatal-onset enterocolitis, periodic fever, and fatal or near-fatal episodes of autoinflammation. We show that the disease is caused by a de novo gain-of-function mutation in NLRC4 encoding a p.Val341Ala substitution in the HD1 domain of the protein that cosegregates with disease. Mutant NLRC4 causes constitutive IL1FC production and macrophage cell death. Infected macrophages from affected individuals are polarized toward pyroptosis and exhibit abnormal staining for inflammasome components. These findings identify and describe the cause of a life-threatening but treatable autoinflammatory disease that underscores the divergent roles of the NLRC4 inflammasome.

  15. Characterisation of the Cullin-3 mutation that causes a severe form of familial hypertension and hyperkalaemia

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Frances-Rose; Siew, Keith; Zhang, Jinwei; Johnson, Clare; Wood, Nicola; Cleary, Sarah E; Al Maskari, Raya S; Ferryman, James T; Hardege, Iris; Figg, Nichola L; Enchev, Radoslav; Knebel, Axel; O’Shaughnessy, Kevin M; Kurz, Thimo

    2015-01-01

    Deletion of exon 9 from Cullin-3 (CUL3, residues 403–459: CUL3Δ403–459) causes pseudohypoaldosteronism type IIE (PHA2E), a severe form of familial hyperkalaemia and hypertension (FHHt). CUL3 binds the RING protein RBX1 and various substrate adaptors to form Cullin-RING-ubiquitin-ligase complexes. Bound to KLHL3, CUL3-RBX1 ubiquitylates WNK kinases, promoting their ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. Since WNK kinases activate Na/Cl co-transporters to promote salt retention, CUL3 regulates blood pressure. Mutations in both KLHL3 and WNK kinases cause PHA2 by disrupting Cullin-RING-ligase formation. We report here that the PHA2E mutant, CUL3Δ403–459, is severely compromised in its ability to ubiquitylate WNKs, possibly due to altered structural flexibility. Instead, CUL3Δ403–459 auto-ubiquitylates and loses interaction with two important Cullin regulators: the COP9-signalosome and CAND1. A novel knock-in mouse model of CUL3WT/Δ403–459 closely recapitulates the human PHA2E phenotype. These mice also show changes in the arterial pulse waveform, suggesting a vascular contribution to their hypertension not reported in previous FHHt models. These findings may explain the severity of the FHHt phenotype caused by CUL3 mutations compared to those reported in KLHL3 or WNK kinases. PMID:26286618

  16. Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy caused by a homozygous mutation in TSPAN12 in a cystic fibrosis infant.

    PubMed

    Savarese, Marco; Spinelli, Elide; Gandolfo, Federico; Lemma, Valentina; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Padoan, Rita; Morescalchi, Francesco; D'Agostino, Massimo; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Semeraro, Francesco; Nigro, Vincenzo; Bonatti, Stefano

    2014-09-01

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is a genetic disease affecting the vascularization of the peripheral retina. The clinical manifestations are very heterogeneous, ranging from mildly affected patients, who could present no visual defects, to severe conditions which can also cause complete blindness at birth or in the first decade. FEVR can be inherited in all the three genetic forms: dominant, recessive and X-linked. To date, four genes have been associated with the condition: TSPAN12. NDP. FDZ4 and LRP5. Interestingly, mutations in TSPAN12 have been considered causative of both a dominant and recessive inheritance and a FEVR phenotype sensitive to the number of TSPAN12 mutations has been supposed. Here we describe a case of a female infant affected by cystic fibrosis and by a severe form of exudative vitreoretinopathy. In particular, we have detected the homozygous missense mutation c.668 T > C in TSPAN12. Neither of the heterozygous parents has ocular manifestations of the disease, suggesting a classic recessive mendelian pattern of inheritance.

  17. A compound heterozygous mutation in GPD1 causes hepatomegaly, steatohepatitis, and hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mugdha; Eagan, Jacqueline; Desai, Nirav K; Newton, Stephanie A; Towne, Meghan C; Marinakis, Nicholas S; Esteves, Kristyn M; De Ferranti, Sarah; Bennett, Michael J; McIntyre, Adam; Beggs, Alan H; Berry, Gerard T; Agrawal, Pankaj B

    2014-10-01

    The constellation of clinico-pathological and laboratory findings including massive hepatomegaly, steatosis, and marked hypertriglyceridemia in infancy is extremely rare. We describe a child who is presented with the above findings, and despite extensive diagnostic testing no cause could be identified. Whole exome sequencing was performed on the patient and parents' DNA. Mutations in GPD1 encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that catalyzes the reversible redox reaction of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and NADH to glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and NAD(+) were identified. The proband inherited a GPD1 deletion from the father determined using copy number analysis and a missense change p.(R229Q) from the mother. GPD1 protein was absent in the patient's liver biopsy on western blot. Low normal activity of carnitine palmitoyl transferases, CPT1 and CPT2, was present in the patient's skin fibroblasts, without mutations in genes encoding for these proteins. This is the first report of compound heterozygous mutations in GPD1 associated with a lack of GPD1 protein and reduction in CPT1 and CPT2 activity.

  18. Biallelic RFX6 mutations can cause childhood as well as neonatal onset diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Francis H; Kirel, Birgül; Caswell, Richard; Lango Allen, Hana; Flanagan, Sarah E; Hattersley, Andrew T; Ellard, Sian; Shaw-Smith, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal diabetes is a highly genetically heterogeneous disorder. There are over 20 distinct syndromic and non-syndromic forms, including dominant, recessive and X-linked subtypes. Biallelic truncating or mis-sense mutations in the DNA-binding domain of the RFX6 transcription factor cause an autosomal recessive, syndromic form of neonatal diabetes previously described as Mitchell–Riley syndrome. In all, eight cases have been reported, with the age at onset of diabetes in the first 2 weeks of life. Here we report two individuals born to double first cousins in whom intestinal atresias consistent with a diagnosis of Mitchell–Riley syndrome were diagnosed at birth, but in whom diabetes did not present until the ages of 3 and 6 years. Novel compound heterozygous RFX6 nonsense mutations (p.Arg726X/p.Arg866X) were identified at the 3′ end of the gene. The later onset of diabetes in these patients may be due to incomplete inactivation of RFX6. Genetic testing for RFX6 mutations should be considered in patients presenting with intestinal atresias in the absence of neonatal diabetes. PMID:26264437

  19. Dominant Mutations in KAT6A Cause Intellectual Disability with Recognizable Syndromic Features

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Emma; Lindstrand, Anna; Santani, Avni; Malmgren, Helena; Nesbitt, Addie; Dubbs, Holly A.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Parker, Michael J.; Millan, Francisca; Rosenbaum, Kenneth; Wilson, Golder N.; Nordgren, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Through a multi-center collaboration study, we here report six individuals from five unrelated families, with mutations in KAT6A/MOZ detected by whole-exome sequencing. All five different de novo heterozygous truncating mutations were located in the C-terminal transactivation domain of KAT6A: NM_001099412.1: c.3116_3117 delCT, p.(Ser1039∗); c.3830_3831insTT, p.(Arg1278Serfs∗17); c.3879 dupA, p.(Glu1294Argfs∗19); c.4108G>T p.(Glu1370∗) and c.4292 dupT, p.(Leu1431Phefs∗8). An additional subject with a 0.23 MB microdeletion including the entire KAT6A reading frame was identified with genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization. Finally, by detailed clinical characterization we provide evidence that heterozygous mutations in KAT6A cause a distinct intellectual disability syndrome. The common phenotype includes hypotonia, intellectual disability, early feeding and oromotor difficulties, microcephaly and/or craniosynostosis, and cardiac defects in combination with subtle facial features such as bitemporal narrowing, broad nasal tip, thin upper lip, posteriorly rotated or low-set ears, and microretrognathia. The identification of human subjects complements previous work from mice and zebrafish where knockouts of Kat6a/kat6a lead to developmental defects. PMID:25728777

  20. A Novel Splice-Site Mutation in the GJB2 Gene Causing Mild Postlingual Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, Marta; del Castillo, Francisco J.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Francisco J.; Garrido, Gema; Villamar, Manuela; Calderón, Manuela; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A.; Moreno, Felipe; del Castillo, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The DFNB1 subtype of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, caused by mutations affecting the GJB2 (connection-26) gene, is highly prevalent in most populations worldwide. DFNB1 hearing impairment is mostly severe or profound and usually appears before the acquisition of speech (prelingual onset), though a small number of hypomorphic missense mutations result in mild or moderate deafness of postlingual onset. We identified a novel GJB2 splice-site mutation, c. -22-2A>C, in three siblings with mild postlingual hearing impairment that were compound heterozygous for c. -22-2A>C and c.35delG. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments performed on total RNA extracted from saliva samples from one of these siblings confirmed that c. -22-2A>C abolished the acceptor splice site of the single GJB2 intron, resulting in the absence of normally processed transcripts from this allele. However, we did isolate transcripts from the c. -22-2A>C allele that keep an intact GJB2 coding region and that were generated by use of an alternative acceptor splice site previously unknown. The residual expression of wild-type connection-26 encoded by these transcripts probably underlies the mild severity and late onset of the hearing impairment of these subjects. PMID:24039984

  1. AIP mutation identified in a patient with acromegaly caused by pituitary somatotroph adenoma with neuronal choristoma.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, H; Fukuoka, H; Iguchi, G; Inoshita, N; Yamada, S; Takahashi, Y

    2013-05-01

    Pituitary adenoma with neuronal choristoma (PANCH) is a rare condition that includes ganglion cells and GH-producing tumor that is characterized by sparsely granulated somatotroph cell type. However, the pathophysiology of this condition remains to be elucidated. We report a case of 46-year-old woman with acromegaly caused by PANCH. The patient had a large and invasive macroadenoma that was resistant to preoperative therapy with somatostatin analogue (SSA) and dopamine agonist. Histological examination showed typical diffuse, chromophobe-type adenoma containing ganglion cells, and sparsely granulated somatotroph cell type, which were consistent with PANCH. Genetic analysis showed heterozygous germline missense mutation in the AIP gene that results in Y261X amino acid substitution. The clinical characteristics of acromegaly associated with AIP mutations are reportedly macroadenomas with tumor extension and invasion, lower decreases in GH and IGF-I and less tumor shrinkage with SSA treatment, and sparsely granulated somatotroph cell type, which are comparable with those observed in PANCH. Taken together, the mutation in AIP gene may explain the clinical characteristics and pathogenesis of PANCH.

  2. DCDC2 Mutations Cause a Renal-Hepatic Ciliopathy by Disrupting Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schueler, Markus; Braun, Daniela A.; Chandrasekar, Gayathri; Gee, Heon Yung; Klasson, Timothy D.; Halbritter, Jan; Bieder, Andrea; Porath, Jonathan D.; Airik, Rannar; Zhou, Weibin; LoTurco, Joseph J.; Che, Alicia; Otto, Edgar A.; Böckenhauer, Detlef; Sebire, Neil J.; Honzik, Tomas; Harris, Peter C.; Koon, Sarah J.; Gunay-Aygun, Meral; Saunier, Sophie; Zerres, Klaus; Bruechle, Nadina Ortiz; Drenth, Joost P.H.; Pelletier, Laurence; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Lifton, Richard P.; Giles, Rachel H.; Kere, Juha; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies (NPHP-RC) are recessive diseases characterized by renal dysplasia or degeneration. We here identify mutations of DCDC2 as causing a renal-hepatic ciliopathy. DCDC2 localizes to the ciliary axoneme and to mitotic spindle fibers in a cell-cycle-dependent manner. Knockdown of Dcdc2 in IMCD3 cells disrupts ciliogenesis, which is rescued by wild-type (WT) human DCDC2, but not by constructs that reflect human mutations. We show that DCDC2 interacts with DVL and DCDC2 overexpression inhibits β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling in an effect additive to Wnt inhibitors. Mutations detected in human NPHP-RC lack these effects. A Wnt inhibitor likewise restores ciliogenesis in 3D IMCD3 cultures, emphasizing the importance of Wnt signaling for renal tubulogenesis. Knockdown of dcdc2 in zebrafish recapitulates NPHP-RC phenotypes, including renal cysts and hydrocephalus, which is rescued by a Wnt inhibitor and by WT, but not by mutant, DCDC2. We thus demonstrate a central role of Wnt signaling in the pathogenesis of NPHP-RC, suggesting an avenue for potential treatment of NPHP-RC. PMID:25557784

  3. A CHRNE frameshift mutation causes congenital myasthenic syndrome in young Jack Russell Terriers.

    PubMed

    Rinz, Caitlin J; Lennon, Vanda A; James, Fiona; Thoreson, James B; Tsai, Kate L; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Humphries, H Dale; Guo, Ling T; Palmer, Anthony C; Clark, Leigh Anne; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-12-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a group of rare genetic disorders of the neuromuscular junction resulting in structural or functional causes of fatigable weakness that usually begins early in life. Mutations in pre-synaptic, synaptic and post-synaptic proteins have been demonstrated in human cases, with more than half involving aberrations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits. CMS was first recognized in dogs in 1974 as an autosomal recessive trait in Jack Russell Terriers (JRTs). A deficiency of junctional AChRs was demonstrated. Here we characterize a CMS in 2 contemporary cases of JRT littermates with classic clinical and electromyographic findings, and immunochemical confirmation of an approximately 90% reduction in AChR protein content. Loci encoding the 5 AChR subunits were evaluated using microsatellite markers, and CHRNB1 and CHRNE were identified as candidate genes. Sequences of the splice sites and exons of both genes revealed a single base insertion in exon 7 of CHRNE that predicts a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon. We further demonstrated this pathogenic mutation in CHRNE in archival tissues from unrelated JRTs studied 34 years ago.

  4. Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin cause ichthyosis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Smith, Frances J D; Irvine, Alan D; Terron-Kwiatkowski, Ana; Sandilands, Aileen; Campbell, Linda E; Zhao, Yiwei; Liao, Haihui; Evans, Alan T; Goudie, David R; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Arseculeratne, Gehan; Munro, Colin S; Sergeant, Ann; O'Regan, Gráinne; Bale, Sherri J; Compton, John G; DiGiovanna, John J; Presland, Richard B; Fleckman, Philip; McLean, W H Irwin

    2006-03-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris (OMIM 146700) is the most common inherited disorder of keratinization and one of the most frequent single-gene disorders in humans. The most widely cited incidence figure is 1 in 250 based on a survey of 6,051 healthy English schoolchildren. We have identified homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations R501X and 2282del4 in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) as the cause of moderate or severe ichthyosis vulgaris in 15 kindreds. In addition, these mutations are semidominant; heterozygotes show a very mild phenotype with incomplete penetrance. The mutations show a combined allele frequency of approximately 4% in populations of European ancestry, explaining the high incidence of ichthyosis vulgaris. Profilaggrin is the major protein of keratohyalin granules in the epidermis. During terminal differentiation, it is cleaved into multiple filaggrin peptides that aggregate keratin filaments. The resultant matrix is cross-linked to form a major component of the cornified cell envelope. We find that loss or reduction of this major structural protein leads to varying degrees of impaired keratinization.

  5. Mutations in DYNC2LI1 disrupt cilia function and cause short rib polydactyly syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, S. Paige; Dantas, Tiago J.; Duran, Ivan; Wu, Sulin; Lachman, Ralph S.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Vallee, Richard B.; Krakow, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The short rib polydactyly syndromes (SRPS) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive, perinatal-lethal skeletal disorders characterized primarily by short, horizontal ribs, short limbs, and poly-dactyly. Mutations in several genes affecting intraflagellar transport (IFT) cause SRPS but they do not account for all cases. Here we identify additional SRPS genes and further unravel the functional basis for IFT. We perform whole exome sequencing and identify mutations in a new disease-producing gene, cytoplasmic dynein-2 light intermediate chain 1, DYNC2LI1, segregating with disease in three families. Using primary fibroblasts, we show that DYNC2LI1 is essential for dynein-2 complex stability and that mutations in DYNC2LI1 result in variable-length, including hyperelongated, cilia, Hedgehog pathway impairment, and ciliary IFT accumulations. The findings in this study expand our understanding of SRPS locus heterogeneity and demonstrate the importance of DYNC2LI1 in dynein-2 complex stability, cilium function, Hedgehog regulation, and skeletogenesis. PMID:26077881

  6. dBRWD3 Regulates Tissue Overgrowth and Ectopic Gene Expression Caused by Polycomb Group Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Hsueh-Tzu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kwei-Yan; Shih, Zong-Siou; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hsieh, Paul-Chen; Kuo, Kuan-Lin; Huang, Kuo-How; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Ya-Wen; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai

    2016-01-01

    To maintain a particular cell fate, a unique set of genes should be expressed while another set is repressed. One way to repress gene expression is through Polycomb group (PcG) proteins that compact chromatin into a silent configuration. In addition to cell fate maintenance, PcG proteins also maintain normal cell physiology, for example cell cycle. In the absence of PcG, ectopic activation of the PcG-repressed genes leads to developmental defects and malignant tumors. Little is known about the molecular nature of ectopic gene expression; especially what differentiates expression of a given gene in the orthotopic tissue (orthotopic expression) and the ectopic expression of the same gene due to PcG mutations. Here we present that ectopic gene expression in PcG mutant cells specifically requires dBRWD3, a negative regulator of HIRA/Yemanuclein (YEM)-mediated histone variant H3.3 deposition. dBRWD3 mutations suppress both the ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth in PcG mutants through a YEM-dependent mechanism. Our findings identified dBRWD3 as a critical regulator that is uniquely required for ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth caused by PcG mutations. PMID:27588417

  7. Mutations in TAX1BP3 cause dilated cardiomyopathy with septo-optic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Eyal; Orvin, Katia; Tayeb-Fligelman, Einav; Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Tzur, Shay; Pimienta, Allen L; Bazak, Lily; Bengal, Tuvia; Cohen, Lior; Gaton, Dan D; Bormans, Concetta; Landau, Meytal; Kornowski, Ran; Shohat, Mordechai; Behar, Doron M

    2015-04-01

    We describe a Bedouin family with a novel autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy and septo-optic dysplasia. Genetic analysis revealed a homozygous missense mutation in TAX1BP3, which encodes a small PDZ domain containing protein implicated in regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, as the causative mutation. The mutation affects a conserved residue located at the core of TAX1BP3 binding pocket and is predicted to impair the nature of a crucial hydrophobic patch, thereby interrupting the structure and stability of the protein, and its ability to interact with other proteins. TAX1BP3 is highly expressed in heart and brain and consistent with the clinical findings observed in our patients; a knockdown of TAX1BP3 causes elongation defects, enlarged pericard, and enlarged head structures in zebrafish embryos. Thus, we describe a new genetic disorder that expands the monogenic cardiomyopathy disease spectrum and suggests that TAX1BP3 is essential for heart and brain development.

  8. XPR1 mutations are a rare cause of primary familial brain calcification.

    PubMed

    Anheim, Mathieu; López-Sánchez, Uriel; Giovannini, Donatella; Richard, Anne-Claire; Touhami, Jawida; N'Guyen, Ludovic; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Thibault-Stoll, Anne; Frebourg, Thierry; Hannequin, Didier; Campion, Dominique; Battini, Jean-Luc; Sitbon, Marc; Nicolas, Gaël

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in XPR1, a gene encoding an inorganic phosphate exporter, have recently been identified in patients with primary familial brain calcification (PFBC). Using Sanger sequencing, we screened XPR1 in 18 unrelated patients with PFBC and no SLC20A2, PDGFB, or PDGFRB mutation. XPR1 variants were tested in an in vitro physiological complementation assay and patient blood cells were assessed ex vivo for phosphate export. We identified a novel c.260T > C, p.(Leu87Pro) XPR1 variant in a 41-year-old man complaining of micrographia and dysarthria and demonstrating mild parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and executive dysfunction. Brain (123)I-Ioflupane scintigraphy showed marked dopaminergic neuron loss. Peripheral blood cells from the patient exhibited decreased phosphate export. XPR1 in which we introduced the mutation was not detectable at the cell surface and did not lead to phosphate export. These results confirm that loss of XPR1-mediated phosphate export function causes PFBC, occurring in less than 8 % of cases negative for the other genes, and may be responsible for parkinsonism.

  9. Mutations in TMEM216 perturb ciliogenesis and cause Joubert, Meckel and related syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Enza Maria; Logan, Clare V.; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Lee, Jeong Ho; Silhavy, Jennifer L.; Brancati, Francesco; Iannicelli, Miriam; Travaglini, Lorena; Romani, Sveva; Illi, Barbara; Adams, Matthew; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Mazzotta, Annalisa; Lee, Ji Eun; Tolentino, Jerlyn C.; Swistun, Dominika; Salpietro, Carmelo D.; Fede, Carmelo; Gabriel, Stacey; Russ, Carsten; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sougnez, Carrie; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Otto, Edgar A.; Held, Susanne; Diplas, Bill H.; Davis, Erica; Mikula, Mario; Strom, Charles M.; Ben-Ze’ev, Bruria; Lev, Dorit; Sagie, Tally Lerman; Michelson, Marina; Yaron, Yuval; Krause, Amanda; Boltshauser, Eugen; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Roume, Joelle; Shalev, Stavit; Munnich, Arnold; Saunier, Sophie; Inglehearn, Chris; Saad, Ali; Alkindy, Adila; Thomas, Sophie; Vekemans, Michel; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Katsanis, Nicholas; Johnson, Colin A.; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2010-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JBTS), related disorders (JSRD) and Meckel syndrome (MKS) are ciliopathies. We now report that MKS2 and JBTS2 loci are allelic and due to mutations in TMEM216, encoding an uncharacterized tetraspan transmembrane protein. JBTS2 patients displayed frequent nephronophthisis and polydactytly, and two cases conformed to the Oro-Facio-Digital type VI phenotype, whereas skeletal dysplasia was common in MKS fetuses. A single p.R73L mutation was identified in all patients of Ashkenazi Jewish descent (n=10). TMEM216 localized to the base of primary cilia, and loss of TMEM216 in patient fibroblasts or following siRNA knockdown caused defective ciliogenesis and centrosomal docking, with concomitant hyperactivation of RhoA and Dishevelled. TMEM216 complexed with Meckelin, encoded by a gene also mutated in JSRD and MKS. Abrogation of tmem216 expression in zebrafish led to gastrulation defects that overlap with other ciliary morphants. The data implicate a new family of proteins in the ciliopathies, and further support allelism between ciliopathy disorders. PMID:20512146

  10. A CHRNE frameshift mutation causes congenital myasthenic syndrome in young Jack Russell Terriers.

    PubMed

    Rinz, Caitlin J; Lennon, Vanda A; James, Fiona; Thoreson, James B; Tsai, Kate L; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Humphries, H Dale; Guo, Ling T; Palmer, Anthony C; Clark, Leigh Anne; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-12-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a group of rare genetic disorders of the neuromuscular junction resulting in structural or functional causes of fatigable weakness that usually begins early in life. Mutations in pre-synaptic, synaptic and post-synaptic proteins have been demonstrated in human cases, with more than half involving aberrations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits. CMS was first recognized in dogs in 1974 as an autosomal recessive trait in Jack Russell Terriers (JRTs). A deficiency of junctional AChRs was demonstrated. Here we characterize a CMS in 2 contemporary cases of JRT littermates with classic clinical and electromyographic findings, and immunochemical confirmation of an approximately 90% reduction in AChR protein content. Loci encoding the 5 AChR subunits were evaluated using microsatellite markers, and CHRNB1 and CHRNE were identified as candidate genes. Sequences of the splice sites and exons of both genes revealed a single base insertion in exon 7 of CHRNE that predicts a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon. We further demonstrated this pathogenic mutation in CHRNE in archival tissues from unrelated JRTs studied 34 years ago. PMID:26429099

  11. Human CalDAG-GEFI gene (RASGRP2) mutation affects platelet function and causes severe bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Canault, Matthias; Ghalloussi, Dorsaf; Grosdidier, Charlotte; Guinier, Marie; Perret, Claire; Chelghoum, Nadjim; Germain, Marine; Raslova, Hana; Peiretti, Franck; Morange, Pierre E.; Saut, Noemie; Pillois, Xavier; Nurden, Alan T.; Cambien, François; Pierres, Anne; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Tregouet, David-Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The nature of an inherited platelet disorder was investigated in three siblings affected by severe bleeding. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified the culprit mutation (cG742T) in the RAS guanyl-releasing protein-2 (RASGRP2) gene coding for calcium- and DAG-regulated guanine exchange factor-1 (CalDAG-GEFI). Platelets from individuals carrying the mutation present a reduced ability to activate Rap1 and to perform proper αIIbβ3 integrin inside-out signaling. Expression of CalDAG-GEFI mutant in HEK293T cells abolished Rap1 activation upon stimulation. Nevertheless, the PKC- and ADP-dependent pathways allow residual platelet activation in the absence of functional CalDAG-GEFI. The mutation impairs the platelet’s ability to form thrombi under flow and spread normally as a consequence of reduced Rac1 GTP-binding. Functional deficiencies were confined to platelets and megakaryocytes with no leukocyte alteration. This contrasts with the phenotype seen in type III leukocyte adhesion deficiency caused by the absence of kindlin-3. Heterozygous did not suffer from bleeding and have normal platelet aggregation; however, their platelets mimicked homozygous ones by failing to undergo normal adhesion under flow and spreading. Rescue experiments on cultured patient megakaryocytes corrected the functional deficiency after transfection with wild-type RASGRP2. Remarkably, the presence of a single normal allele is sufficient to prevent bleeding, making CalDAG-GEFI a novel and potentially safe therapeutic target to prevent thrombosis. PMID:24958846

  12. ANO10 mutations cause ataxia and coenzyme Q₁₀ deficiency.

    PubMed

    Balreira, Andrea; Boczonadi, Veronika; Barca, Emanuele; Pyle, Angela; Bansagi, Boglarka; Appleton, Marie; Graham, Claire; Hargreaves, Iain P; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Lochmüller, Hanns; Griffin, Helen; Taylor, Robert W; Naini, Ali; Chinnery, Patrick F; Hirano, Michio; Quinzii, Catarina M; Horvath, Rita

    2014-11-01

    Inherited ataxias are heterogeneous disorders affecting both children and adults, with over 40 different causative genes, making molecular genetic diagnosis challenging. Although recent advances in next-generation sequencing have significantly improved mutation detection, few treatments exist for patients with inherited ataxia. In two patients with adult-onset cerebellar ataxia and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency in muscle, whole exome sequencing revealed mutations in ANO10, which encodes anoctamin 10, a member of a family of putative calcium-activated chloride channels, and the causative gene for autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-10 (SCAR10). Both patients presented with slowly progressive ataxia and dysarthria leading to severe disability in the sixth decade. Epilepsy and learning difficulties were also present in one patient, while retinal degeneration and cataract were present in the other. The detection of mutations in ANO10 in our patients indicate that ANO10 defects cause secondary low CoQ10 and SCAR10 patients may benefit from CoQ10 supplementation.

  13. Congenital myopathy caused by a novel missense mutation in the CFL2 gene.

    PubMed

    Ockeloen, C W; Gilhuis, H J; Pfundt, R; Kamsteeg, E J; Agrawal, P B; Beggs, A H; Dara Hama-Amin, A; Diekstra, A; Knoers, N V A M; Lammens, M; van Alfen, N

    2012-07-01

    Nemaline myopathy and myofibrillar myopathy are heterogeneous myopathies that both comprise early-onset forms. We present two sisters from a consanguineous Iraqi Kurdish family with predominant axial and limb girdle weakness. Muscle biopsies showed features of both nemaline myopathy and myofibrillar myopathy. We performed homozygosity mapping in both siblings using an Affymetrix 250K Nspl SNP array. One of the overlapping homozygous regions harbored the gene CFL2. Because a mutation in CFL2 was identified in a family with nemaline myopathy, we performed sequence analysis of the gene and a novel homozygous missense mutation in exon 2 (c.19G>A, p.Val7Met) of CFL2 was identified in both siblings. CFL2 encodes the protein cofilin-2, which plays an important role in regulation of sarcomeric actin filaments. To our knowledge, this is the second family in which a mutation in CFL2 causes an autosomal recessive form of congenital myopathy with features of both nemaline and myofibrillar myopathy. Given the clinical variability and the multitude of histological features of congenital myopathies, CFL2 sequence analysis should be considered in patients presenting with an autosomal recessive form of congenital myopathy. PMID:22560515

  14. Further evidence of POP1 mutations as the cause of anauxetic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Laarabi, Fatima Zahra; Mansouri, Maria; Mrani, Nidal Alaoui; Nishimura, Gen; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2016-09-01

    Anauxetic dysplasia (AAD, OMIM 607095) is a rare skeletal dysplasia inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, which is caused by mutations in RMRP and allelic to a more common disorder, cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH). CHH is a multi-system disorder with a variety of extraskeletal changes. Whereas AAD is a bone-restricted disorder with a more severe skeletal phenotype: affected individuals are extremely short and complicated by orthopedic morbidity, and the radiological changes include modification of the vertebral bodies and epiphyseal dysplasia of the hip, as well as generalized metaphyseal dysplasia and severe brachydactyly. Recently, genetic heterogeneity for AAD was proposed, because a familial case (two affected sibs) with an AAD-identical phenotype had compound heterozygous mutations in POP1, encoding a molecule functionally related to the gene product of RMRP. We report here a 5-year-old boy with the same phenotype born to a consanguineous couple. We identified a novel homozygous POP1 mutation (c.1744C>T, p.P582S) in the boy and the heterozygosity in the parents. It may be rational to coin the POP1-associated skeletal phenotype AAD type 2. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27380734

  15. A deleterious mutation in SAMD9 causes normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Orit; Indelman, Margarita; Chefetz, Ilana; Geiger, Dan; Metzker, Aryeh; Altschuler, Yoram; Choder, Mordechai; Bercovich, Dani; Uitto, Jouni; Bergman, Reuven; Richard, Gabriele; Sprecher, Eli

    2006-10-01

    Familial tumoral calcinosis (FTC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the progressive deposition of calcified masses in cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues, which results in painful ulcerative lesions and severe skin and bone infections. Two major types of FTC have been recognized: hyperphosphatemic FTC (HFTC) and normophosphatemic FTC (NFTC). HFTC was recently shown to result from mutations in two different genes: GALNT3, which codes for a glycosyltransferase, and FGF23, which codes for a potent phosphaturic protein. To determine the molecular cause of NFTC, we performed homozygosity mapping in five affected families of Jewish Yemenite origin and mapped NFTC to 7q21-7q21.3. Mutation analysis revealed a homozygous mutation in the SAMD9 gene (K1495E), which was found to segregate with the disease in all families and to interfere with the protein expression. Our data suggest that SAMD9 is involved in the regulation of extraosseous calcification, a process of considerable importance in a wide range of diseases as common as atherosclerosis and autoimmune disorders.

  16. dBRWD3 Regulates Tissue Overgrowth and Ectopic Gene Expression Caused by Polycomb Group Mutations.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsueh-Tzu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kwei-Yan; Shih, Zong-Siou; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hsieh, Paul-Chen; Kuo, Kuan-Lin; Huang, Kuo-How; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Ya-Wen; Chan, Shih-Peng; Lee, Hsiu-Hsiang; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai

    2016-09-01

    To maintain a particular cell fate, a unique set of genes should be expressed while another set is repressed. One way to repress gene expression is through Polycomb group (PcG) proteins that compact chromatin into a silent configuration. In addition to cell fate maintenance, PcG proteins also maintain normal cell physiology, for example cell cycle. In the absence of PcG, ectopic activation of the PcG-repressed genes leads to developmental defects and malignant tumors. Little is known about the molecular nature of ectopic gene expression; especially what differentiates expression of a given gene in the orthotopic tissue (orthotopic expression) and the ectopic expression of the same gene due to PcG mutations. Here we present that ectopic gene expression in PcG mutant cells specifically requires dBRWD3, a negative regulator of HIRA/Yemanuclein (YEM)-mediated histone variant H3.3 deposition. dBRWD3 mutations suppress both the ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth in PcG mutants through a YEM-dependent mechanism. Our findings identified dBRWD3 as a critical regulator that is uniquely required for ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth caused by PcG mutations. PMID:27588417

  17. A mutation in FRIZZLED2 impairs Wnt signaling and causes autosomal dominant omodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Saal, Howard M.; Prows, Cynthia A.; Guerreiro, Iris; Donlin, Milene; Knudson, Luke; Sund, Kristen L.; Chang, Ching-Fang; Brugmann, Samantha A.; Stottmann, Rolf W.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant omodysplasia is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by short humeri, radial head dislocation, short first metacarpals, facial dysmorphism and genitourinary anomalies. We performed next-generation whole-exome sequencing and comparative analysis of a proband with omodysplasia, her unaffected parents and her affected daughter. We identified a de novo mutation in FRIZZLED2 (FZD2) in the proband and her daughter that was not found in unaffected family members. The FZD2 mutation (c.1644G>A) changes a tryptophan residue at amino acid 548 to a premature stop (p.Trp548*). This altered protein is still produced in vitro, but we show reduced ability of this mutant form of FZD2 to interact with its downstream target DISHEVELLED. Furthermore, expressing the mutant form of FZD2 in vitro is not able to facilitate the cellular response to canonical Wnt signaling like wild-type FZD2. We therefore conclude that the FRIZZLED2 mutation is a de novo, novel cause for autosomal dominant omodysplasia. PMID:25759469

  18. An inactivating mutation in the SOD 1 gene causes familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pramatarova, A.; Rouleau, G.A.; Goto, J.

    1994-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by highly selective death of large motor neurons in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The familial form of ALS (FALS) accounts for approximately 10% of the cases and is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. Recently the defective gene causing chromosome 21-linked FALS was shown to be the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD 1). However, the precise mechanism of neurotoxicity seen in FALS with SOD 1 mutations is still unknown. Until now all SOD 1 mutations reported were single base pair substitutions (missense). We have identified a nonsense mutation in exon 5 of the SOD 1 gene in a FALS kindred. This two base pair deletion provokes a frameshift and a predicted premature truncation of the protein. The region affected has a very important structural and functional role: it contains part of the active loop and is involved in dimer contact. We would predict that the loss of these structures would impair the functioning of the enzyme.

  19. Candidate gene associated with a mutation causing recessive polycystic kidney disease in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, J.H.; Lee-Tischler, M.J.; Kwon, H.Y.; Schrick, J.J. ); Avner, E.D.; Sweeney, W.E. ); Godfrey, V.L.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Woychik, R.P. ); Wilkinson, J.E. )

    1994-05-27

    A line of transgenic mice was generated that contains an insertional mutation causing a phenotype similar to human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Homozygotes displayed a complex phenotype that included bilateral polycystic kidneys and an unusual liver lesion. The mutant locus was cloned and characterized through use of the transgene as a molecular marker. Additionally, a candidate polycystic kidney disease (PKD) gene was identified whose structure and expression are directly associated with the mutant locus. A complementary DNA derived from this gene predicted a peptide containing a motif that was originally identified in several genes involved in cell cycle control.

  20. Mosaic parental germline mutations causing recurrent forms of malformations of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Zillhardt, Julia Lauer; Poirier, Karine; Broix, Loïc; Lebrun, Nicolas; Elmorjani, Adrienne; Martinovic, Jelena; Saillour, Yoann; Muraca, Giuseppe; Nectoux, Juliette; Bessieres, Bettina; Fallet-Bianco, Catherine; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Dulac, Olivier; Odent, Sylvie; Rejeb, Imen; Ben Jemaa, Lamia; Rivier, Francois; Pinson, Lucile; Geneviève, David; Musizzano, Yuri; Bigi, Nicole; Leboucq, Nicolas; Giuliano, Fabienne; Philip, Nicole; Vilain, Catheline; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Maurey, Hélène; Beldjord, Cherif; Artiguenave, François; Boland, Anne; Olaso, Robert; Masson, Cécile; Nitschké, Patrick; Deleuze, Jean-François; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Chelly, Jamel

    2016-04-01

    To unravel missing genetic causes underlying monogenic disorders with recurrence in sibling, we explored the hypothesis of parental germline mosaic mutations in familial forms of malformation of cortical development (MCD). Interestingly, four families with parental germline variants, out of 18, were identified by whole-exome sequencing (WES), including a variant in a new candidate gene, syntaxin 7. In view of this high frequency, revision of diagnostic strategies and reoccurrence risk should be considered not only for the recurrent forms, but also for the sporadic cases of MCD.

  1. Nature and frequency of mutations in the [alpha]-galactosidase A gene that cause Fabry disease

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, C.M.; Resnick-Silverman, L.A.; Niehaus, D.J.; Astrin, K.H.; Desnick, R.J. )

    1993-12-01

    To determine the nature and frequency of the molecular lesions causing the classical and milder-variant Fabry phenotypes, and for precise carrier detection in Fabry families, the [alpha]-Gal A transcripts or genomic sequences from unrelated Fabry hemizygotes were analyzed. In patients with the classical phenotype, 18 new mutations were identified: N34S, C56G, W162R, R227Q, R227X, D264V, D266V, S297F, D313Y, G328A, W340X, E398X, IVS2+2, IVS5[delta]-2,3, 773[delta]2, 954[delta]5, 1016[delta]11, and 1123[delta]53. Unrelated asymptomatic or mildly affected patients with symptoms confined to the heart had a missense mutation, N215S, that expressed residual enzymatic activity. Related, moderately affected patients with late-onset cardiac and pulmonary manifestations had a small deletion, 1208[delta]3, that predicted the in-frame deletion of arginine 404 near the terminus of the 429 residue enzyme polypeptide. In addition, five small gene rearrangements involving exonic sequences were identified in unrelated classically affected patients. Two small deletions and one small duplication had short direct repeats at their respective breakpoint junctions and presumably resulted from slipped mispairing. A deletion occurred at a potential polymerase [alpha] arrest site, while the breakpoints of another deletion occurred at an inverted tetranucleotide repeat. Screening of unrelated Fabry patients with allele-specific oligonucleotides for seven mutations revealed that these were private, with the notable exception of N215S, R227Q, and R227X, which were each found in several unrelated families from different ethnic backgrounds. The CpG dinucleotide at codon 227 was the most common site of mutation, having been altered in 5% of the 148 unrelated Fabry alleles. These studies revealed that most [alpha]-Gal A lesions were private, that codon 227 was a mutational hot spot, and that certain mutations predicted a milder disease phenotype. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Molecular insights on pathogenic effects of mutations causing phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chiarelli, Laurent R; Morera, Simone M; Bianchi, Paola; Fermo, Elisa; Zanella, Alberto; Galizzi, Alessandro; Valentini, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) catalyzes an important ATP-generating step in glycolysis. PGK1 deficiency is an uncommon X-linked inherited disorder, generally characterized by various combinations of non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia, neurological dysfunctions, and myopathies. Patients rarely exhibit all three clinical features. To provide a molecular framework to the different pathological manifestations, all known mutations were reviewed and 16 mutant enzymes, obtained as recombinant forms, were functionally and structurally characterized. Most mutations heavily affect thermal stability and to a different extent catalytic efficiency, in line with the remarkably low PGK activity clinically observed in the patients. Mutations grossly impairing protein stability, but moderately affecting kinetic properties (p.I47N, p.L89P, p.C316R, p.S320N, and p.A354P) present the most homogeneous correlation with the clinical phenotype. Patients carrying these mutations display hemolytic anemia and neurological disorders, and,except for p.A354P variant, no myopaty. Variants highly perturbed in both catalytic efficiency (p.G158V, p.D164V, p.K191del, D285V, p.D315N, and p.T378P) and heat stability (all, but p.T378P) result to be mainly associated with myopathy alone. Finally, mutations faintly affecting molecular properties (p.R206P, p.E252A, p.I253T, p.V266M, and p.D268N) correlate with a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms. These are the first studies that correlate the clinical symptoms with the molecular properties of the mutant enzymes. All findings indicate that the different clinical manifestations associated with PGK1 deficiency chiefly depend on the distinctive type of perturbations caused by mutations in the PGK1 gene, highlighting the need for determination of the molecular properties of PGK variants to assist in prognosis and genetic counseling. However, the clinical symptoms can not be understood only on the bases of molecular properties of the mutant enzyme. Different

  3. Tuberculosis Case Fatality and Other Causes of Death among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in a High HIV Prevalence Setting, 2000-2008, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction South Africa has the highest reported rates of multi-drug resistant TB in Africa, typified by poor treatment outcomes, attributable mainly to high default and death rates. Concomitant HIV has become the strongest predictor of death among MDR-TB patients, while anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically reduced mortality. TB Case fatality rate (CFR) is an indicator that specifically reports on deaths due to TB. Aim The aim of this paper was to investigate causes of death amongst MDR-TB patients, the contribution of conditions other than TB to deaths, and to determine if causes differ between HIV-uninfected patients, HIV-infected patients receiving ART and those without ART. Methods We carried out a retrospective review of data captured from the register of the MDR-TB programme of the North West Province, South Africa. We included 671 patients treated between 2000–2008; 59% of the cohort was HIV-infected and 33% had received ART during MDR treatment. The register contained data on treatment outcomes and causes of death. Results Treatment outcomes between HIV-uninfected cases, HIV-infected cases receiving ART and HIV-infected without ART differed significantly (p<0.000). The cohort death rate was 24%, 13% for HIV-uninfected cases and 31% for HIV-infected cases. TB caused most of the deaths, resulting in a cohort CFR of 15%, 9% for HIV-uninfected cases and 20% for HIV-infected cases. Cohort mortality rate due to other conditions was 2%. AIDS-conditions rather than TB caused significantly more deaths among HIV-infected cases receiving ART than those not (p = 0.02). Conclusions The deaths among HIV-infected individuals contribute substantially to the high death rate. ART co-therapy protected HIV-infected cases from death due to TB and AIDS-conditions. Mechanisms need to be in place to ensure that HIV-infected individuals are retained in care upon completion of their MDR-TB treatment. PMID:26950554

  4. Myelin-associated glycoprotein gene mutation causes Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease-like disorder

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Nimrod; Lerer, Israela; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Fellig, Yakov; Glick, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Bat-El; Azulay, Haim; Dotan, Shlomo; Goldberg, Sharon; Gomori, John M.; Ponger, Penina; Newman, J. P.; Marreed, Hodaifah; Steck, Andreas J.; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Mor, Nofar; Harel, Michal; Geiger, Tamar; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Peles, Elior

    2015-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease is an X-linked hypomyelinating leukodystrophy caused by mutations or rearrangements in PLP1. It presents in infancy with nystagmus, jerky head movements, hypotonia and developmental delay evolving into spastic tetraplegia with optic atrophy and variable movement disorders. A clinically similar phenotype caused by recessive mutations in GJC2 is known as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. Both genes encode proteins associated with myelin. We describe three siblings of a consanguineous family manifesting the typical infantile-onset Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease-like phenotype slowly evolving into a form of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia with mental retardation, dysarthria, optic atrophy and peripheral neuropathy in adulthood. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy were consistent with a demyelinating leukodystrophy. Using genetic linkage and exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense c.399C>G; p.S133R mutation in MAG. This gene, previously associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia, encodes myelin-associated glycoprotein, which is involved in myelin maintenance and glia-axon interaction. This mutation is predicted to destabilize the protein and affect its tertiary structure. Examination of the sural nerve biopsy sample obtained in childhood in the oldest sibling revealed complete absence of myelin-associated glycoprotein accompanied by ill-formed onion-bulb structures and a relatively thin myelin sheath of the affected axons. Immunofluorescence, cell surface labelling, biochemical analysis and mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies in a variety of cell types demonstrated a devastating effect of the mutation on post-translational processing, steady state expression and subcellular localization of myelin-associated glycoprotein. In contrast to the wild-type protein, the p.S133R mutant was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and was subjected to endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation by the

  5. Recessive Mutations in KCNJ13, Encoding an Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel Subunit, Cause Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Davidson, Alice E.; Mackay, Donna S.; Li, Zheng; Yang, Xu; Plagnol, Vincent; Moore, Anthony T.; Webster, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations, including retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), comprise a group of disorders showing high genetic and allelic heterogeneity. The determination of a full catalog of genes that can, when mutated, cause human retinal disease is a powerful means to understand the molecular physiology and pathology of the human retina. As more genes are found, remaining ones are likely to be rarer and/or unexpected candidates. Here, we identify a family in which all known RP/LCA-related genes are unlikely to be associated with their disorder. A combination of homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identifies a homozygous nonsense mutation, c.496C>T (p.Arg166X), in a gene, KCNJ13, encoding a potassium channel subunit Kir7.1. A screen of a further 333 unrelated individuals with recessive retinal degeneration identified an additional proband, homozygous for a missense mutation, c.722T>C (p.Leu241Pro), in the same gene. The three affected members of the two families have been diagnosed with LCA. All have a distinct and unusual retinal appearance and a similar early onset of visual loss, suggesting both impaired retinal development and progressive retinal degeneration, involving both rod and cone pathways. Examination of heterozygotes revealed no ocular disease. This finding implicates Kir7.1 as having an important role in human retinal development and maintenance. This disorder adds to a small diverse group of diseases consequent upon loss or reduced function of inwardly rectifying potassium channels affecting various organs. The distinct retinal phenotype that results from biallelic mutations in KCNJ13 should facilitate the molecular diagnosis in further families. PMID:21763485

  6. Mutations in the human CYP11B2 (aldosterone synthase) gene causing corticosterone methyloxidase II deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Pascoe, L; Curnow, K M; Slutsker, L; Rösler, A; White, P C

    1992-01-01

    Corticosterone methyloxidase II (CMO-II) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of aldosterone biosynthesis, characterized by an elevated ratio of 18-hydroxycorticosterone to aldosterone in serum. It is genetically linked to the CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 genes that, respectively, encode two cytochrome P450 isozymes, P450XIB1 and P450XIB2. Whereas P450XIB1 only catalyzes hydroxylation at position 11 beta of 11-deoxycorticosterone and 11-deoxycortisol, P450XIB2 catalyzes the synthesis of aldosterone from deoxycorticosterone, a process that successively requires hydroxylation at positions 11 beta and 18 and oxidation at position 18. To determine the molecular genetic basis of CMO-II deficiency, seven kindreds of Iranian-Jewish origin were studied in which members suffered from CMO-II deficiency. No mutations were found in the CYP11B1 genes, but two candidate mutations, R181W and V386A, were found in the CYP11B2 genes. When these mutations were individually introduced into CYP11B2 cDNA and expressed in cultured cells, R181W reduced 18-hydroxylase and abolished 18-oxidase activities but left 11 beta-hydroxylase activity intact, whereas V386A caused a small but consistent reduction in the production of 18-hydroxycorticosterone. All individuals affected with CMO-II deficiency were homozygous for both mutations, whereas eight asymptomatic subjects were homozygous for R181W alone and three were homozygous for V386A alone. These findings confirm that P450XIB2 is the major enzyme mediating oxidation at position 18 in the adrenal and suggest that a small amount of residual activity undetectable in in vitro assays is sufficient to synthesize normal amounts of aldosterone. Images PMID:1594605

  7. ALS-associated mutation FUS-R521C causes DNA damage and RNA splicing defects.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Haiyan; Lee, Sebum; Shang, Yulei; Wang, Wen-Yuan; Au, Kin Fai; Kamiya, Sherry; Barmada, Sami J; Finkbeiner, Steven; Lui, Hansen; Carlton, Caitlin E; Tang, Amy A; Oldham, Michael C; Wang, Hejia; Shorter, James; Filiano, Anthony J; Roberson, Erik D; Tourtellotte, Warren G; Chen, Bin; Tsai, Li-Huei; Huang, Eric J

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations of the RNA/DNA binding protein FUS are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS); however, it is not clear how FUS mutations cause neurodegeneration. Using transgenic mice expressing a common FALS-associated FUS mutation (FUS-R521C mice), we found that mutant FUS proteins formed a stable complex with WT FUS proteins and interfered with the normal interactions between FUS and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). Consequently, FUS-R521C mice exhibited evidence of DNA damage as well as profound dendritic and synaptic phenotypes in brain and spinal cord. To provide insights into these defects, we screened neural genes for nucleotide oxidation and identified brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) as a target of FUS-R521C-associated DNA damage and RNA splicing defects in mice. Compared with WT FUS, mutant FUS-R521C proteins formed a more stable complex with Bdnf RNA in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Stabilization of the FUS/Bdnf RNA complex contributed to Bdnf splicing defects and impaired BDNF signaling through receptor TrkB. Exogenous BDNF only partially restored dendrite phenotype in FUS-R521C neurons, suggesting that BDNF-independent mechanisms may contribute to the defects in these neurons. Indeed, RNA-seq analyses of FUS-R521C spinal cords revealed additional transcription and splicing defects in genes that regulate dendritic growth and synaptic functions. Together, our results provide insight into how gain-of-function FUS mutations affect critical neuronal functions.

  8. Mutations in CKAP2L, the Human Homolog of the Mouse Radmis Gene, Cause Filippi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Muhammad Sajid; Battaglia, Agatino; Szczepanski, Sandra; Kaygusuz, Emrah; Toliat, Mohammad Reza; Sakakibara, Shin-ichi; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Moosa, Shahida; Yigit, Gökhan; Beleggia, Filippo; Tinschert, Sigrid; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Vasudevan, Pradeep; Urquhart, Jill E.; Donnai, Dian; Fryer, Alan; Percin, Ferda; Brancati, Francesco; Dobbie, Angus; Śmigiel, Robert; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Wollnik, Bernd; Noegel, Angelika Anna; Newman, William G.; Nürnberg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Filippi syndrome is a rare, presumably autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by microcephaly, pre- and postnatal growth failure, syndactyly, and distinctive facial features, including a broad nasal bridge and underdeveloped alae nasi. Some affected individuals have intellectual disability, seizures, undescended testicles in males, and teeth and hair abnormalities. We performed homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a Sardinian family with two affected children and identified a homozygous frameshift mutation, c.571dupA (p.Ile191Asnfs∗6), in CKAP2L, encoding the protein cytoskeleton-associated protein 2-like (CKAP2L). The function of this protein was unknown until it was rediscovered in mice as Radmis (radial fiber and mitotic spindle) and shown to play a pivotal role in cell division of neural progenitors. Sanger sequencing of CKAP2L in a further eight unrelated individuals with clinical features consistent with Filippi syndrome revealed biallelic mutations in four subjects. In contrast to wild-type lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), dividing LCLs established from the individuals homozygous for the c.571dupA mutation did not show CKAP2L at the spindle poles. Furthermore, in cells from the affected individuals, we observed an increase in the number of disorganized spindle microtubules owing to multipolar configurations and defects in chromosome segregation. The observed cellular phenotypes are in keeping with data from in vitro and in vivo knockdown studies performed in human cells and mice, respectively. Our findings show that loss-of-function mutations in CKAP2L are a major cause of Filippi syndrome. PMID:25439729

  9. Nonsense Mutations in AAGAB Cause Punctate Palmoplantar Keratoderma Type Buschke-Fischer-Brauer

    PubMed Central

    Giehl, Kathrin A.; Eckstein, Gertrud N.; Pasternack, Sandra M.; Praetzel-Wunder, Silke; Ruzicka, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Seidl, Kerstin; Rogers, Mike; Graf, Elisabeth; Langbein, Lutz; Braun-Falco, Markus; Betz, Regina C.; Strom, Tim M.

    2012-01-01

    Punctate palmoplantar keratodermas (PPKPs) are rare autosomal-dominant inherited skin diseases that are characterized by multiple hyperkeratotic plaques distributed on the palms and soles. To date, two different loci in chromosomal regions 15q22-15q24 and 8q24.13-8q24.21 have been reported. Pathogenic mutations, however, have yet to be identified. In order to elucidate the genetic cause of PPKP type Buschke-Fischer-Brauer (PPKP1), we performed exome sequencing in five affected individuals from three families, and we identified in chromosomal region 15q22.33-q23 two heterozygous nonsense mutations—c.370C>T (p.Arg124∗) and c.481C>T (p.Arg161∗)—in AAGAB in all affected individuals. Using immunoblot analysis, we showed that both mutations result in premature termination of translation and truncated protein products. Analyses of mRNA of affected individuals revealed that the disease allele is either not detectable or only detectable at low levels. To assess the consequences of the mutations in skin, we performed immunofluorescence analyses. Notably, the amount of granular staining in the keratinocytes of affected individuals was lower in the cytoplasm but higher around the nucleus than it was in the keratinocytes of control individuals. AAGAB encodes the alpha-and gamma-adaptin-binding protein p34 and might play a role in membrane traffic as a chaperone. The identification of mutations, along with the results from additional studies, defines the genetic basis of PPKP1 and provides evidence that AAGAB plays an important role in skin integrity. PMID:23000146

  10. A Novel Homozygous Mutation in FOXC1 Causes Axenfeld Rieger Syndrome with Congenital Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Micheal, Shazia; Villanueva-Mendoza, Cristina; Cortés-González, Vianney; Khan, Muhammad Imran; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) disorders are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous phenotypes in which frequently cornea, iris, and lens are affected. This study aimed to identify novel mutations in PAX6, PITX2 and FOXC1 in families with anterior segment dysgenesis disorders. Methods We studied 14 Pakistani and one Mexican family with Axenfeld Rieger syndrome (ARS; n = 10) or aniridia (n = 5). All affected and unaffected family members underwent full ophthalmologic and general examinations. Total genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood. PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed for the exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FOXC1, PAX6, and PITX2 genes. Results Mutations were identified in five of the 15 probands; four variants were novel and one variant was described previously. A novel de novo variant (c.225C>A; p.Tyr75*) was identified in the PAX6 gene in two unrelated probands with aniridia. In addition, a known variant (c.649C>T; p.Arg217*) in PAX6 segregated in a family with aniridia. In the FOXC1 gene, a novel heterozygous variant (c.454T>C; p.Trp152Arg) segregated with the disease in a Mexican family with ARS. A novel homozygous variant (c.92_100del; p.Ala31_Ala33del) in the FOXC1 gene segregated in a Pakistani family with ARS and congenital glaucoma. Conclusions Our study expands the mutation spectrum of the PAX6 and FOXC1 genes in individuals with anterior segment dysgenesis disorders. In addition, our study suggests that FOXC1 mutations, besides typical autosomal dominant ARS, can also cause ARS with congenital glaucoma through an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. Our results thus expand the disease spectrum of FOXC1, and may lead to a better understanding of the role of FOXC1 in development. PMID:27463523

  11. An X-Linked Cobalamin Disorder Caused by Mutations in Transcriptional Coregulator HCFC1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hung-Chun; Sloan, Jennifer L.; Scharer, Gunter; Brebner, Alison; Quintana, Anita M.; Achilly, Nathan P.; Manoli, Irini; Coughlin, Curtis R.; Geiger, Elizabeth A.; Schneck, Una; Watkins, David; Suormala, Terttu; Van Hove, Johan L.K.; Fowler, Brian; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Rosenblatt, David S.; Venditti, Charles P.; Shaikh, Tamim H.

    2013-01-01

    Derivatives of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) are essential cofactors for enzymes required in intermediary metabolism. Defects in cobalamin metabolism lead to disorders characterized by the accumulation of methylmalonic acid and/or homocysteine in blood and urine. The most common inborn error of cobalamin metabolism, combined methylmalonic acidemia and hyperhomocysteinemia, cblC type, is caused by mutations in MMACHC. However, several individuals with presumed cblC based on cellular and biochemical analysis do not have mutations in MMACHC. We used exome sequencing to identify the genetic basis of an X-linked form of combined methylmalonic acidemia and hyperhomocysteinemia, designated cblX. A missense mutation in a global transcriptional coregulator, HCFC1, was identified in the index case. Additional male subjects were ascertained through two international diagnostic laboratories, and 13/17 had one of five distinct missense mutations affecting three highly conserved amino acids within the HCFC1 kelch domain. A common phenotype of severe neurological symptoms including intractable epilepsy and profound neurocognitive impairment, along with variable biochemical manifestations, was observed in all affected subjects compared to individuals with early-onset cblC. The severe reduction in MMACHC mRNA and protein within subject fibroblast lines suggested a role for HCFC1 in transcriptional regulation of MMACHC, which was further supported by the identification of consensus HCFC1 binding sites in MMACHC. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of HCFC1 expression resulted in the coordinate downregulation of MMACHC mRNA. This X-linked disorder demonstrates a distinct disease mechanism by which transcriptional dysregulation leads to an inborn error of metabolism with a complex clinical phenotype. PMID:24011988

  12. Homozygous SALL1 Mutation Causes a Novel Multiple Congenital Anomaly—Mental Retardation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vodopiutz, Julia; Zoller, Heinz; Fenwick, Aimée L.; Arnhold, Richard; Schmid, Max; Prayer, Daniela; Müller, Thomas; Repa, Andreas; Pollak, Arnold; Aufricht, Christoph; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.; Janecke, Andreas R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To delineate a novel autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly-mental retardation (MCA-MR) syndrome in 2 female siblings of a consanguineous pedigree and to identify the disease-causing mutation. Study design Both siblings were clinically characterized and homozygosity mapping and sequencing of candidate genes were applied. The contribution of nonsense-mediated messenger RNA (mRNA) decay to the expression of mutant mRNA in fibroblasts of a healthy carrier and a control was studied by pyrosequencing. Results We identified the first homozygous SALL1 mutation, c.3160C > T (p.R1054*), in 2 female siblings presenting with multiple congenital anomalies, central nervous system defects, cortical blindness, and absence of psychomotor development (ie, a novel recognizable, autosomal recessive MCA