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Sample records for mutations uncouple reproductive

  1. Temporal Uncoupling between Energy Acquisition and Allocation to Reproduction in a Herbivorous-Detritivorous Fish

    PubMed Central

    Villamarín, Francisco; Magnusson, William E.; Jardine, Timothy D.; Valdez, Dominic; Woods, Ryan; Bunn, Stuart E.

    2016-01-01

    Although considerable knowledge has been gathered regarding the role of fish in cycling and translocation of nutrients across ecosystem boundaries, little information is available on how the energy obtained from different ecosystems is temporally allocated in fish bodies. Although in theory, limitations on energy budgets promote the existence of a trade-off between energy allocated to reproduction and somatic growth, this trade-off has rarely been found under natural conditions. Combining information on RNA:DNA ratios and carbon and nitrogen stable-isotope analyses we were able to achieve novel insights into the reproductive allocation of diamond mullet (Liza alata), a catadromous, widely distributed herbivorous-detritivorous fish. Although diamond mullet were in better condition during the wet season, most reproductive allocation occurred during the dry season when resources are limited and fish have poorer body condition. We found a strong trade-off between reproductive and somatic investment. Values of δ13C from reproductive and somatic tissues were correlated, probably because δ13C in food resources between dry and wet seasons do not differ markedly. On the other hand, data for δ15N showed that gonads are more correlated to muscle, a slow turnover tissue, suggesting long term synthesis of reproductive tissues. In combination, these lines of evidence suggest that L. alata is a capital breeder which shows temporal uncoupling of resource ingestion, energy storage and later allocation to reproduction. PMID:26938216

  2. Temporal Uncoupling between Energy Acquisition and Allocation to Reproduction in a Herbivorous-Detritivorous Fish.

    PubMed

    Villamarín, Francisco; Magnusson, William E; Jardine, Timothy D; Valdez, Dominic; Woods, Ryan; Bunn, Stuart E

    2016-01-01

    Although considerable knowledge has been gathered regarding the role of fish in cycling and translocation of nutrients across ecosystem boundaries, little information is available on how the energy obtained from different ecosystems is temporally allocated in fish bodies. Although in theory, limitations on energy budgets promote the existence of a trade-off between energy allocated to reproduction and somatic growth, this trade-off has rarely been found under natural conditions. Combining information on RNA:DNA ratios and carbon and nitrogen stable-isotope analyses we were able to achieve novel insights into the reproductive allocation of diamond mullet (Liza alata), a catadromous, widely distributed herbivorous-detritivorous fish. Although diamond mullet were in better condition during the wet season, most reproductive allocation occurred during the dry season when resources are limited and fish have poorer body condition. We found a strong trade-off between reproductive and somatic investment. Values of δ13C from reproductive and somatic tissues were correlated, probably because δ13C in food resources between dry and wet seasons do not differ markedly. On the other hand, data for δ15N showed that gonads are more correlated to muscle, a slow turnover tissue, suggesting long term synthesis of reproductive tissues. In combination, these lines of evidence suggest that L. alata is a capital breeder which shows temporal uncoupling of resource ingestion, energy storage and later allocation to reproduction. PMID:26938216

  3. Temporal Uncoupling between Energy Acquisition and Allocation to Reproduction in a Herbivorous-Detritivorous Fish.

    PubMed

    Villamarín, Francisco; Magnusson, William E; Jardine, Timothy D; Valdez, Dominic; Woods, Ryan; Bunn, Stuart E

    2016-01-01

    Although considerable knowledge has been gathered regarding the role of fish in cycling and translocation of nutrients across ecosystem boundaries, little information is available on how the energy obtained from different ecosystems is temporally allocated in fish bodies. Although in theory, limitations on energy budgets promote the existence of a trade-off between energy allocated to reproduction and somatic growth, this trade-off has rarely been found under natural conditions. Combining information on RNA:DNA ratios and carbon and nitrogen stable-isotope analyses we were able to achieve novel insights into the reproductive allocation of diamond mullet (Liza alata), a catadromous, widely distributed herbivorous-detritivorous fish. Although diamond mullet were in better condition during the wet season, most reproductive allocation occurred during the dry season when resources are limited and fish have poorer body condition. We found a strong trade-off between reproductive and somatic investment. Values of δ13C from reproductive and somatic tissues were correlated, probably because δ13C in food resources between dry and wet seasons do not differ markedly. On the other hand, data for δ15N showed that gonads are more correlated to muscle, a slow turnover tissue, suggesting long term synthesis of reproductive tissues. In combination, these lines of evidence suggest that L. alata is a capital breeder which shows temporal uncoupling of resource ingestion, energy storage and later allocation to reproduction.

  4. Uncoupling of myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity from troponin I phosphorylation by mutations can be reversed by Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate

    PubMed Central

    Papadaki, Maria; Vikhorev, Petr G.; Marston, Steven B.; Messer, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Heart muscle contraction is regulated via the β-adrenergic response that leads to phosphorylation of Troponin I (TnI) at Ser22/23, which changes the Ca2+-sensitivity of the cardiac myofilament. Mutations in thin filament proteins that cause Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) and some mutations that cause Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) abolish the relationship between TnI phosphorylation and Ca2+-sensitivity (uncoupling). Small molecule Ca2+-sensitisers and Ca2+-desensitisers that act upon troponin alter the Ca2+-sensitivity of the thin filament but their relationship with TnI phosphorylation has never been studied before. Methods and Results Quantitative in vitro motility assay showed that 30 μM EMD57033 and 100 μM Bepridil increase Ca2+-sensitivity of phosphorylated cardiac thin filaments by 3.1 and 2.8-fold respectively. Additionally they uncoupled Ca2+-sensitivity from TnI phosphorylation, mimicking the effect of HCM mutations. EGCG decreased Ca2+-sensitivity of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated wild-type thin filaments equally (by 2.15±0.45 and 2.80±0.48-fold respectively), retaining the coupling. Moreover, EGCG also reduced Ca2+-sensitivity of phosphorylated but not unphosphorylated thin filaments containing DCM and HCM-causing mutations, thus the dependence of Ca2+-sensitivity upon TnI phosphorylation of uncoupled mutant thin filaments was restored in every case. In single mouse heart myofibrils, EGCG reduced Ca2+-sensitivity of force and kACT and also preserved coupling. Myofibrils from the ACTC E361G (DCM) mouse were uncoupled; EGCG reduced Ca2+-sensitivity more for phosphorylated than unphosphorylated myofibrils, thus restoring coupling. Conclusion We conclude that it is possible to both mimic and reverse the pathological defects in troponin caused by cardiomyopathy mutations pharmacologically. Re-coupling by EGCG may be of potential therapeutic significance for treating cardiomyopathies. PMID:26109583

  5. Mutation-selection balance and mixed mating with asexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Marriage, Tara N; Orive, Maria E

    2012-09-01

    The effects of asexual reproduction on both the number of deleterious mutations per gamete and the mean fitness under mutation-selection balance are investigated. We use two simulation models, considering both finite and infinite populations. The two models incorporate asexual reproduction with varying levels of outcrossing and selfing, degrees of dominance and selection coefficients. The values for mean fitness and number of deleterious mutations per gamete are compared within and among finite and infinite populations to identify the effect of asexual reproduction on levels of load, and how asexual reproduction may interact with genetic drift (population size). Increasing asexual reproduction resulted in an increase in mean fitness and a decrease in the average number of deleterious mutations per gamete for both nearly recessive and additive alleles in both the infinite and finite simulations. Increased mean fitness with increasing asexuality is possibly due to two interacting forces: a greater opportunity for selection to act on heterozygous versus homozygous mutations and the shielding of a proportion of the population from meiotic mutations due to asexual reproduction. The results found here highlight the need to consider asexual reproduction along with mixed mating in models of genetic load and mutation-selection balance.

  6. A mutation uncouples the tubulin conformational and GTPase cycles, revealing allosteric control of microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Elisabeth A; Burns, Alexander; Lalonde, Beth A; Ye, Xuecheng; Piedra, Felipe-Andres; Huffaker, Tim C; Rice, Luke M

    2015-10-06

    Microtubule dynamic instability depends on the GTPase activity of the polymerizing αβ-tubulin subunits, which cycle through at least three distinct conformations as they move into and out of microtubules. How this conformational cycle contributes to microtubule growing, shrinking, and switching remains unknown. Here, we report that a buried mutation in αβ-tubulin yields microtubules with dramatically reduced shrinking rate and catastrophe frequency. The mutation causes these effects by suppressing a conformational change that normally occurs in response to GTP hydrolysis in the lattice, without detectably changing the conformation of unpolymerized αβ-tubulin. Thus, the mutation weakens the coupling between the conformational and GTPase cycles of αβ-tubulin. By showing that the mutation predominantly affects post-GTPase conformational and dynamic properties of microtubules, our data reveal that the strength of the allosteric response to GDP in the lattice dictates the frequency of catastrophe and the severity of rapid shrinking.

  7. The effect of the reproductive system on mutation load.

    PubMed

    Hopf, F A; Michod, R E; Sanderson, M J

    1988-06-01

    J. B. S. Haldane (Amer. Nat. 71, 337-349, 1937) argued that, in equilibrium populations, the effect of deleterious mutation on average fitness depends primarily on the mutation rate and is independent of the severity of the mutations. Specifically, the equilibrium population fitness is e-microH, where microH is the haploid genomic mutation rate. Here we extend Haldane's result to a variety of reproductive systems. Using an analysis based on the frequency of classes of individuals with a specified number of mutations, we show that Haldane's principle holds exactly for haploid sex, haploid apomixis, and facultative haploid sex. In the cases of diploid automixis with terminal fusion, diploid automixis with central fusion, and diploid selfing, Haldane's principle holds exactly for recessive mutations and approximately for mutations with some heterozygous effect. In the cases of K-ploid apomixis, diploid endomitosis, and haplodiploidy, we show that Haldane's principle holds exactly for recessive lethal mutations. In addition we extend Haldane's result to various mixtures of the above-mentioned reproductive systems. In the case of diploid out-crossing sexuals, we do not obtain an exact analytic result, but present arguments and computer simulations which show that Haldane's result extends to this case as well in the limit as the number of loci becomes large. Although diverse reproductive systems are equally fit at equilibrium, different reproductive systems harbor vastly different numbers of recessive genes at equilibrium and we provide estimates of these numbers. These different numbers of mutations may create transient selective pressures on individuals with reproductive systems different from that of the equilibrium population. PMID:3232115

  8. Mutation Load under Vegetative Reproduction and Cytoplasmic Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashov, A. S.

    1994-01-01

    For reasons that remain unclear, even multicellular organisms usually originate from a single cell. Here I consider the balance between deleterious mutations and selection against them in a population with obligate vegetative reproduction, when every offspring is initiated by more than one cell of a parent. The mutation load depends on the genomic deleterious mutation rate U, strictness of selection, number of cells which initiate an offspring n, and the relatedness among the initial cells. The load grows with increasing U, n and strictness of selection, and declines when an offspring is initiated by more closely related cells. If Un >> 1, the load under obligate vegetative reproduction may be substantially higher than under sexual or asexual reproduction, which may account for its rarity. In nature obligate vegetative reproduction seems to be more common and long term in taxa whose cytological features ensure a relatively low load under it. The same model also describes the mutation load under two other modes of inheritance: (1) uniparental transmission of organelles and (2) reproduction by division of multinuclear cells, where each daughter cell receives many nuclei. The load declines substantially when the deleterious mutation rate per organelle genome gets lower or when the number of nuclei in a cell sometimes drops. This may explain the small sizes of organelle genomes in sexual lineages and the presence of karyonic cycles in asexual unicellular multinuclear eukaryotes. PMID:8056318

  9. A mutation that uncouples allosteric regulation of carbamyl phosphate synthetase in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Simmons, A J; Rawls, J M; Piskur, J; Davidson, J N

    1999-03-26

    In animals, UTP feedback inhibition of carbamyl phosphate synthetase II (CPSase) controls pyrimidine biosynthesis. Suppressor of black (Su(b) or rSu(b)) mutants of Drosophila melanogaster have elevated pyrimidine pools, and this mutation has been mapped to the rudimentary locus. We report that rSu(b) is a missense mutation resulting in a glutamate to lysine substitution within the second ATP binding site (i.e. CPS.B2 domain) of CPSase. This residue corresponds to Glu780 in the Escherichia coli enzyme (Glu1153 in hamster CAD) and is universally conserved among CPSases. When a transgene expressing the Glu-->Lys substitution was introduced into Drosophila lines homozygous for the black mutation, the resulting flies exhibited the Su(b) phenotype. Partially purified CPSase from rSu(b) and transgenic flies carrying this substitution exhibited a dramatic reduction in UTP feedback inhibition. The slight UTP inhibition observed with the Su(b) enzyme in vitro was due mainly to chelation of Mg2+ by UTP. However, the Km values for glutamate, bicarbonate, and ATP obtained from the Su(b) enzyme were not significantly different from wild-type values. From these experiments, we conclude that this residue plays an essential role in the UTP allosteric response, probably in propagating the response between the effector binding site and the ATP binding site. This is the first CPSase mutation found to abolish feedback inhibition without significantly affecting other enzyme catalytic parameters. PMID:10080891

  10. Insulin resistance uncoupled from dyslipidemia due to C-terminal PIK3R1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Huang-Doran, Isabel; Tomlinson, Patsy; Payne, Felicity; Gast, Alexandra; Sleigh, Alison; Bottomley, William; Harris, Julie; Daly, Allan; Rocha, Nuno; Rudge, Simon; Clark, Jonathan; Kwok, Albert; Romeo, Stefano; McCann, Emma; Müksch, Barbara; Dattani, Mehul; Zucchini, Stefano; Wakelam, Michael; Foukas, Lazaros C.; Savage, David B.; Murphy, Rinki; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Semple, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related insulin resistance is associated with fatty liver, dyslipidemia, and low plasma adiponectin. Insulin resistance due to insulin receptor (INSR) dysfunction is associated with none of these, but when due to dysfunction of the downstream kinase AKT2 phenocopies obesity-related insulin resistance. We report 5 patients with SHORT syndrome and C-terminal mutations in PIK3R1, encoding the p85α/p55α/p50α subunits of PI3K, which act between INSR and AKT in insulin signaling. Four of 5 patients had extreme insulin resistance without dyslipidemia or hepatic steatosis. In 3 of these 4, plasma adiponectin was preserved, as in insulin receptor dysfunction. The fourth patient and her healthy mother had low plasma adiponectin associated with a potentially novel mutation, p.Asp231Ala, in adiponectin itself. Cells studied from one patient with the p.Tyr657X PIK3R1 mutation expressed abundant truncated PIK3R1 products and showed severely reduced insulin-stimulated association of mutant but not WT p85α with IRS1, but normal downstream signaling. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, mutant p85α overexpression attenuated insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation and adipocyte differentiation. Thus, PIK3R1 C-terminal mutations impair insulin signaling only in some cellular contexts and produce a subphenotype of insulin resistance resembling INSR dysfunction but unlike AKT2 dysfunction, implicating PI3K in the pathogenesis of key components of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27766312

  11. An ancient founder mutation in PROKR2 impairs human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Avbelj Stefanija, Magdalena; Jeanpierre, Marc; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P; Young, Jacques; Quinton, Richard; Abreu, Ana Paula; Plummer, Lacey; Au, Margaret G; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Dwyer, Andrew A; Florez, Jose C; Cheetham, Timothy; Pearce, Simon H; Purushothaman, Radhika; Schinzel, Albert; Pugeat, Michel; Jacobson-Dickman, Elka E; Ten, Svetlana; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Gusella, James F; Dode, Catherine; Crowley, William F; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2012-10-01

    Congenital gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency manifests as absent or incomplete sexual maturation and infertility. Although the disease exhibits marked locus and allelic heterogeneity, with the causal mutations being both rare and private, one causal mutation in the prokineticin receptor, PROKR2 L173R, appears unusually prevalent among GnRH-deficient patients of diverse geographic and ethnic origins. To track the genetic ancestry of PROKR2 L173R, haplotype mapping was performed in 22 unrelated patients with GnRH deficiency carrying L173R and their 30 first-degree relatives. The mutation's age was estimated using a haplotype-decay model. Thirteen subjects were informative and in all of them the mutation was present on the same ~123 kb haplotype whose population frequency is ≤10%. Thus, PROKR2 L173R represents a founder mutation whose age is estimated at approximately 9000 years. Inheritance of PROKR2 L173R-associated GnRH deficiency was complex with highly variable penetrance among carriers, influenced by additional mutations in the other PROKR2 allele (recessive inheritance) or another gene (digenicity). The paradoxical identification of an ancient founder mutation that impairs reproduction has intriguing implications for the inheritance mechanisms of PROKR2 L173R-associated GnRH deficiency and for the relevant processes of evolutionary selection, including potential selective advantages of mutation carriers in genes affecting reproduction.

  12. Spontaneous mutational effects on reproductive traits of arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, R G; Byers, D L; Darmo, E

    2000-01-01

    A study of spontaneous mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana was initiated from a single inbred Columbia founder; 120 lines were established and advanced 17 generations by single-seed descent. Here, we report an assay of reproductive traits in a random set of 40 lines from generations 8 and 17, grown together at the same time with plants representing generation 0. For three reproductive traits, mean number of seeds per fruit, number of fruits, and dry mass of the infructescence, the means did not differ significantly among generations. Nevertheless, by generation 17, significant divergence among lines was detected for each trait, indicating accumulation of mutations in some lines. Standardized measures of mutational variance accord with those obtained for other organisms. These findings suggest that the distribution of mutational effects for these traits is approximately symmetric, in contrast to the usual assumption that mutations have predominantly negative effects on traits directly related to fitness. Because distinct generations were grown contemporaneously, each line was represented by three sublines, and seeds were equal in age, these estimates are free of potentially substantial sources of bias. The finding of an approximately symmetric distribution of mutational effects invalidates the standard approach for inferring properties of spontaneous mutation and necessitates further development of more general approaches that avoid restrictions on the distribution of mutational effects. PMID:10790410

  13. Suppression of Injuries Caused by a Lytic RNA Virus (Mengovirus) and Their Uncoupling from Viral Reproduction by Mutual Cell/Virus Disarmament

    PubMed Central

    Mikitas, Olga V.; Ivin, Yuri Y.; Golyshev, Sergey A.; Povarova, Natalia V.; Galkina, Svetlana I.; Pletjushkina, Olga Y.; Nadezhdina, Elena S.; Gmyl, Anatoly P.

    2012-01-01

    Viruses often elicit cell injury (cytopathic effect [CPE]), a major cause of viral diseases. CPE is usually considered to be a prerequisite for and/or consequence of efficient viral growth. Recently, we proposed that viral CPE may largely be due to host defensive and viral antidefensive activities. This study aimed to check the validity of this proposal by using as a model HeLa cells infected with mengovirus (MV). As we showed previously, infection of these cells with wild-type MV resulted in necrosis, whereas a mutant with incapacitated antidefensive (“security”) viral leader (L) protein induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that several major morphological and biochemical signs of CPE (e.g., alterations in cellular and nuclear shape, plasma membrane, cytoskeleton, chromatin, and metabolic activity) in cells infected with L− mutants in the presence of an apoptosis inhibitor were strongly suppressed or delayed for long after completion of viral reproduction. These facts demonstrate that the efficient reproduction of a lytic virus may not directly require development of at least some pathological alterations normally accompanying infection. They also imply that L protein is involved in the control of many apparently unrelated functions. The results also suggest that the virus-activated program with competing necrotic and apoptotic branches is host encoded, with the choice between apoptosis and necrosis depending on a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic conditions. Implementation of this defensive suicidal program could be uncoupled from the viral reproduction. The possibility of such uncoupling has significant implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of viral diseases. PMID:22438537

  14. Suppression of injuries caused by a lytic RNA virus (mengovirus) and their uncoupling from viral reproduction by mutual cell/virus disarmament.

    PubMed

    Mikitas, Olga V; Ivin, Yuri Y; Golyshev, Sergey A; Povarova, Natalia V; Galkina, Svetlana I; Pletjushkina, Olga Y; Nadezhdina, Elena S; Gmyl, Anatoly P; Agol, Vadim I

    2012-05-01

    Viruses often elicit cell injury (cytopathic effect [CPE]), a major cause of viral diseases. CPE is usually considered to be a prerequisite for and/or consequence of efficient viral growth. Recently, we proposed that viral CPE may largely be due to host defensive and viral antidefensive activities. This study aimed to check the validity of this proposal by using as a model HeLa cells infected with mengovirus (MV). As we showed previously, infection of these cells with wild-type MV resulted in necrosis, whereas a mutant with incapacitated antidefensive ("security") viral leader (L) protein induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that several major morphological and biochemical signs of CPE (e.g., alterations in cellular and nuclear shape, plasma membrane, cytoskeleton, chromatin, and metabolic activity) in cells infected with L(-) mutants in the presence of an apoptosis inhibitor were strongly suppressed or delayed for long after completion of viral reproduction. These facts demonstrate that the efficient reproduction of a lytic virus may not directly require development of at least some pathological alterations normally accompanying infection. They also imply that L protein is involved in the control of many apparently unrelated functions. The results also suggest that the virus-activated program with competing necrotic and apoptotic branches is host encoded, with the choice between apoptosis and necrosis depending on a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic conditions. Implementation of this defensive suicidal program could be uncoupled from the viral reproduction. The possibility of such uncoupling has significant implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of viral diseases.

  15. The consequences of mutations in the reproductive endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Donchan

    2012-12-01

    The reproductive activity in male mammals is well known to be regulated by the hypothalamus-pituitary- gonad axis. The hypothalamic neurons secreting gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) govern the reproductive neuroendocrine system by integrating all the exogenous information impinging on themselves. The GnRH synthesized and released from the hypothalamus arrives at the anterior pituitary through the portal vessels, provoking the production of the gonadotropins(follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH)) at the same time. The gonadotropins affect the gonads to promote spermatogenesis and to secret testosterone. Testosterone acts on the GnRH neurons by a feedback loop through the circulatory system, resulting in the balance of all the hormones by regulating reproductive activities. These hormones exert their effects by acting on their own receptors, which are included in the signal transduction pathways as well. Unexpected aberrants are arised during this course of action of each hormone. This review summarizes these abnormal phenomena, including various mutations of molecules and their actions related to the reproductive function.

  16. The Consequences of Mutations in the Reproductive Endocrine System

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Donchan

    2012-01-01

    The reproductive activity in male mammals is well known to be regulated by the hypothalamus-pituitary- gonad axis. The hypothalamic neurons secreting gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) govern the reproductive neuroendocrine system by integrating all the exogenous information impinging on themselves. The GnRH synthesized and released from the hypothalamus arrives at the anterior pituitary through the portal vessels, provoking the production of the gonadotropins(follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH)) at the same time. The gonadotropins affect the gonads to promote spermatogenesis and to secret testosterone. Testosterone acts on the GnRH neurons by a feedback loop through the circulatory system, resulting in the balance of all the hormones by regulating reproductive activities. These hormones exert their effects by acting on their own receptors, which are included in the signal transduction pathways as well. Unexpected aberrants are arised during this course of action of each hormone. This review summarizes these abnormal phenomena, including various mutations of molecules and their actions related to the reproductive function. PMID:25949097

  17. Universal distribution of mutational effects on protein stability, uncoupling of protein robustness from sequence evolution and distinct evolutionary modes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Guilhem; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-05-01

    Robustness to destabilizing effects of mutations is thought of as a key factor of protein evolution. The connections between two measures of robustness, the relative core size and the computationally estimated effect of mutations on protein stability (ΔΔG), protein abundance and the selection pressure on protein-coding genes (dN/dS) were analyzed for the organisms with a large number of available protein structures including four eukaryotes, two bacteria and one archaeon. The distribution of the effects of mutations in the core on protein stability is universal and indistinguishable in eukaryotes and bacteria, centered at slightly destabilizing amino acid replacements, and with a heavy tail of more strongly destabilizing replacements. The distribution of mutational effects in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus gammatolerans is significantly shifted toward strongly destabilizing replacements which is indicative of stronger constraints that are imposed on proteins in hyperthermophiles. The median effect of mutations is strongly, positively correlated with the relative core size, in evidence of the congruence between the two measures of protein robustness. However, both measures show only limited correlations to the expression level and selection pressure on protein-coding genes. Thus, the degree of robustness reflected in the universal distribution of mutational effects appears to be a fundamental, ancient feature of globular protein folds whereas the observed variations are largely neutral and uncoupled from short term protein evolution. A weak anticorrelation between protein core size and selection pressure is observed only for surface residues in prokaryotes but a stronger anticorrelation is observed for all residues in eukaryotic proteins. This substantial difference between proteins of prokaryotes and eukaryotes is likely to stem from the demonstrable higher compactness of prokaryotic proteins.

  18. Universal distribution of mutational effects on protein stability, uncoupling of protein robustness from sequence evolution and distinct evolutionary modes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Faure, Guilhem; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-04-30

    Robustness to destabilizing effects of mutations is thought of as a key factor of protein evolution. The connections between two measures of robustness, the relative core size and the computationally estimated effect of mutations on protein stability (ΔΔG), protein abundance and the selection pressure on protein-coding genes (dN/dS) were analyzed for the organisms with a large number of available protein structures including four eukaryotes, two bacteria and one archaeon. The distribution of the effects of mutations in the core on protein stability is universal and indistinguishable in eukaryotes and bacteria, centered at slightly destabilizing amino acid replacements, and with a heavy tail of more strongly destabilizing replacements. The distribution of mutational effects in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus gammatolerans is significantly shifted toward strongly destabilizing replacements which is indicative of stronger constraints that are imposed on proteins in hyperthermophiles. The median effect of mutations is strongly, positively correlated with the relative core size, in evidence of the congruence between the two measures of protein robustness. However, both measures show only limited correlations to the expression level and selection pressure on protein-coding genes. Thus, the degree of robustness reflected in the universal distribution of mutational effects appears to be a fundamental, ancient feature of globular protein folds whereas the observed variations are largely neutral and uncoupled from short term protein evolution. A weak anticorrelation between protein core size and selection pressure is observed only for surface residues in prokaryotes but a stronger anticorrelation is observed for all residues in eukaryotic proteins. This substantial difference between proteins of prokaryotes and eukaryotes is likely to stem from the demonstrable higher compactness of prokaryotic proteins.

  19. A gain-of-function mutation of plastidic invertase alters nuclear gene expression with sucrose treatment partially via GENOMES UNCOUPLED1-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Takanori; Miyazaki, Nozomi; Nosaka, Ryota; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Padilla-Chacon, Daniel; Otori, Kumi; Kimura, Ayako; Tanabe, Noriaki; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Tamoi, Masahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2015-05-01

    Plastid gene expression (PGE) is one of the signals that regulate the expression of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) via GENOMES UNCOUPLED1 (GUN1)-dependent retrograde signaling. We recently isolated Arabidopsis sugar-inducible cotyledon yellow-192 (sicy-192), a gain-of-function mutant of plastidic invertase, and showed that following the treatment of this mutant with sucrose, the expression of PhANGs as well as PGE decreased, suggesting that the sicy-192 mutation activates a PGE-evoked and GUN1-mediated retrograde pathway. To clarify the relationship between the sicy-192 mutation, PGE, and GUN1-mediated pathway, plastid and nuclear gene expression in a double mutant of sicy-192 and gun1-101, a null mutant of GUN1 was studied. Plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP)-dependent PGE was markedly suppressed in the sicy-192 mutant by the sucrose treatment, but the suppression as well as cotyledon yellow phenotype was not mitigated by GUN1 disruption. Microarray analysis revealed that the altered expression of nuclear genes such as PhANG in the sucrose-treated sicy-192 mutant was largely dependent on GUN1. The present findings demonstrated that the sicy-192 mutation alters nuclear gene expression with sucrose treatment via GUN1, which is possibly followed by inhibiting PEP-dependent PGE, providing a new insight into the role of plastid sugar metabolism in nuclear gene expression.

  20. PIK3CA mutation uncouples tumor growth and Cyclin D1 regulation from MEK/ERK and mutant KRAS signaling

    PubMed Central

    Halilovic, Ensar; She, Qing-Bai; Ye, Qing; Pagliarini, Raymond; Sellers, William R.; Solit, David B.; Rosen, Neal

    2010-01-01

    Mutational activation of KRAS is a common event in human tumors. Identification of the key signaling pathways downstream of mutant KRAS is essential for our understanding of how to pharmacologically target these cancers in patients. We show that PD0325901, a small molecule MEK inhibitor, decreases MEK/ERK pathway signaling, and destabilizes Cyclin D1, resulting in significant anti-cancer activity in a subset of KRAS mutant tumors in vitro and in vivo. Mutational activation of PIK3CA, which commonly co-occurs with KRAS mutation, provides resistance to MEK inhibition through reactivation of AKT signaling. Genetic ablation of the mutant PIK3CA allele in MEK inhibitor-resistant cells restores MEK pathway sensitivity, and re-expression of mutant PIK3CA reinstates the resistance, highlighting the importance of this mutation in resistance to therapy in human cancers. In KRAS mutant tumors, PIK3CA mutation restores Cyclin D1 expression and G1/S cell cycle progression so that they are no longer dependent on KRAS and MEK/ERK signaling. Furthermore, the growth of KRAS mutant tumors with coexistent PIK3CA mutations in vivo is profoundly inhibited with combined pharmacologic inhibition of MEK and AKT. These data suggest that tumors with both KRAS and PI3K mutations are unlikely to respond to inhibition of the MEK pathway alone but will require effective inhibition of both MEK and PI3K/AKT pathway signaling. PMID:20699365

  1. Uncoupling Flight and Reproduction in Ants: Evolution of Ergatoid Queens in Two Lineages of Megalomyrmex (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Christian; Adams, Rachelle M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Megalomyrmex Forel (Myrmicinae: Solenopsidini) consists of 44 species with diverse life history strategies. Most species are predatory and may also tend honeydew-producing insects. A morphologically derived group of species are social parasites that consume the brood and fungus garden within fungus-growing ant nests. The reproductive strategies of Megalomyrmex queens are somewhat aligned with these life-style patterns. Predatory species in the leoninus species group are large in body size and have ergatoid (i.e., permanently wingless) queens whereas the social parasitic species are smaller and typically have winged queens. We examined two ergatoid phenotypes of Megalomyrmex foreli Emery and Megalomyrmex wallacei Mann and compared them to winged species, one a social lestobiotic or “thief ant” parasite (Megalomyrmex mondabora Brandão) and the other a predator (Megalomyrmex modestus Emery). Megalomyrmex foreli colonies have a single queen with an enlarged gaster that is morphologically distinct from workers. Megalomyrmex wallacei colonies have several queens that are similar in body size to workers. Queens in both species showed a simplification of the thorax, but there was a dramatic difference in the number of ovarioles. Megalomyrmex foreli had 60–80 ovarioles compared to eight in M. wallacei and M. mondabora and M. modestus had 22–28. Along with flight loss in queens, there is an obligate shift to dependent colony founding (also called budding or fission) consequently influencing dispersal patterns. These constraints in life history traits may help explain the variation in nesting biology among Megalomyrmex species. PMID:27620557

  2. Uncoupling Flight and Reproduction in Ants: Evolution of Ergatoid Queens in Two Lineages of Megalomyrmex (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Christian; Adams, Rachelle M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Megalomyrmex Forel (Myrmicinae: Solenopsidini) consists of 44 species with diverse life history strategies. Most species are predatory and may also tend honeydew-producing insects. A morphologically derived group of species are social parasites that consume the brood and fungus garden within fungus-growing ant nests. The reproductive strategies of Megalomyrmex queens are somewhat aligned with these life-style patterns. Predatory species in the leoninus species group are large in body size and have ergatoid (i.e., permanently wingless) queens whereas the social parasitic species are smaller and typically have winged queens. We examined two ergatoid phenotypes of Megalomyrmex foreli Emery and Megalomyrmex wallacei Mann and compared them to winged species, one a social lestobiotic or “thief ant” parasite (Megalomyrmex mondabora Brandão) and the other a predator (Megalomyrmex modestus Emery). Megalomyrmex foreli colonies have a single queen with an enlarged gaster that is morphologically distinct from workers. Megalomyrmex wallacei colonies have several queens that are similar in body size to workers. Queens in both species showed a simplification of the thorax, but there was a dramatic difference in the number of ovarioles. Megalomyrmex foreli had 60–80 ovarioles compared to eight in M. wallacei and M. mondabora and M. modestus had 22–28. Along with flight loss in queens, there is an obligate shift to dependent colony founding (also called budding or fission) consequently influencing dispersal patterns. These constraints in life history traits may help explain the variation in nesting biology among Megalomyrmex species.

  3. Uncoupling Flight and Reproduction in Ants: Evolution of Ergatoid Queens in Two Lineages of Megalomyrmex (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Peeters, Christian; Adams, Rachelle M M

    2016-01-01

    Megalomyrmex Forel (Myrmicinae: Solenopsidini) consists of 44 species with diverse life history strategies. Most species are predatory and may also tend honeydew-producing insects. A morphologically derived group of species are social parasites that consume the brood and fungus garden within fungus-growing ant nests. The reproductive strategies of Megalomyrmex queens are somewhat aligned with these life-style patterns. Predatory species in the leoninus species group are large in body size and have ergatoid (i.e., permanently wingless) queens whereas the social parasitic species are smaller and typically have winged queens. We examined two ergatoid phenotypes of Megalomyrmex foreli Emery and Megalomyrmex wallacei Mann and compared them to winged species, one a social lestobiotic or "thief ant" parasite (Megalomyrmex mondabora Brandão) and the other a predator (Megalomyrmex modestus Emery). Megalomyrmex foreli colonies have a single queen with an enlarged gaster that is morphologically distinct from workers. Megalomyrmex wallacei colonies have several queens that are similar in body size to workers. Queens in both species showed a simplification of the thorax, but there was a dramatic difference in the number of ovarioles. Megalomyrmex foreli had 60-80 ovarioles compared to eight in M. wallacei and M. mondabora and M. modestus had 22-28. Along with flight loss in queens, there is an obligate shift to dependent colony founding (also called budding or fission) consequently influencing dispersal patterns. These constraints in life history traits may help explain the variation in nesting biology among Megalomyrmex species. PMID:27620557

  4. Contribution of PPi-Hydrolyzing Function of Vacuolar H+-Pyrophosphatase in Vegetative Growth of Arabidopsis: Evidenced by Expression of Uncoupling Mutated Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Asaoka, Mariko; Segami, Shoji; Ferjani, Ali; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The vacuolar-type H+-pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase) catalyzes a coupled reaction of pyrophosphate (PPi) hydrolysis and active proton translocation across the tonoplast. Overexpression of H+-PPase improves growth in various plant species, and loss-of-function mutants (fugu5s) of H+-PPase in Arabidopsis thaliana have post-germinative developmental defects. Here, to further clarify the physiological significance of this important enzyme, we newly generated three varieties of H+-PPase overexpressing lines with different levels of activity that we analyzed together with the loss-of-function mutant fugu5-3. The H+-PPase overexpressors exhibited enhanced activity of H+-PPase during vegetative growth, but no change in the activity of vacuolar H+-ATPase. Overexpressors with high enzymatic activity grew more vigorously with fresh weight increased by more than 24 and 44%, compared to the wild type and fugu5-3, respectively. Consistently, the overexpressors had larger rosette leaves and nearly 30% more cells in leaves than the wild type. When uncoupling mutated variants of H+-PPase, that could hydrolyze PPi but could not translocate protons, were introduced into the fugu5-3 mutant background, shoot growth defects recovered to the same levels as when a normal H+-PPase was introduced. Taken together, our findings clearly demonstrate that additional expression of H+-PPase improves plant growth by increasing cell number, predominantly as a consequence of the PPi-hydrolyzing activity of the enzyme. PMID:27066051

  5. Contribution of PPi-Hydrolyzing Function of Vacuolar H(+)-Pyrophosphatase in Vegetative Growth of Arabidopsis: Evidenced by Expression of Uncoupling Mutated Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Mariko Mariko Asaoka; Segami, Shoji; Ferjani, Ali; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The vacuolar-type H(+)-pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase) catalyzes a coupled reaction of pyrophosphate (PPi) hydrolysis and active proton translocation across the tonoplast. Overexpression of H(+)-PPase improves growth in various plant species, and loss-of-function mutants (fugu5s) of H(+)-PPase in Arabidopsis thaliana have post-germinative developmental defects. Here, to further clarify the physiological significance of this important enzyme, we newly generated three varieties of H(+)-PPase overexpressing lines with different levels of activity that we analyzed together with the loss-of-function mutant fugu5-3. The H(+)-PPase overexpressors exhibited enhanced activity of H(+)-PPase during vegetative growth, but no change in the activity of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. Overexpressors with high enzymatic activity grew more vigorously with fresh weight increased by more than 24 and 44%, compared to the wild type and fugu5-3, respectively. Consistently, the overexpressors had larger rosette leaves and nearly 30% more cells in leaves than the wild type. When uncoupling mutated variants of H(+)-PPase, that could hydrolyze PPi but could not translocate protons, were introduced into the fugu5-3 mutant background, shoot growth defects recovered to the same levels as when a normal H(+)-PPase was introduced. Taken together, our findings clearly demonstrate that additional expression of H(+)-PPase improves plant growth by increasing cell number, predominantly as a consequence of the PPi-hydrolyzing activity of the enzyme.

  6. Mutations in NLRP5 are associated with reproductive wastage and multilocus imprinting disorders in humans

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, Louise E.; Rezwan, Faisal I.; Poole, Rebecca L.; Turner, Claire L. S.; Kivuva, Emma; Maher, Eamonn R.; Smithson, Sarah F.; Hamilton-Shield, Julian P.; Patalan, Michal; Gizewska, Maria; Peregud-Pogorzelski, Jaroslaw; Beygo, Jasmin; Buiting, Karin; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Soellner, Lukas; Begemann, Matthias; Eggermann, Thomas; Baple, Emma; Mansour, Sahar; Temple, I. Karen; Mackay, Deborah J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Human-imprinting disorders are congenital disorders of growth, development and metabolism, associated with disturbance of parent of origin-specific DNA methylation at imprinted loci across the genome. Some imprinting disorders have higher than expected prevalence of monozygotic twinning, of assisted reproductive technology among parents, and of disturbance of multiple imprinted loci, for which few causative trans-acting mutations have been found. Here we report mutations in NLRP5 in five mothers of individuals affected by multilocus imprinting disturbance. Maternal-effect mutations of other human NLRP genes, NLRP7 and NLRP2, cause familial biparental hydatidiform mole and multilocus imprinting disturbance, respectively. Offspring of mothers with NLRP5 mutations have heterogenous clinical and epigenetic features, but cases include a discordant monozygotic twin pair, individuals with idiopathic developmental delay and autism, and families affected by infertility and reproductive wastage. NLRP5 mutations suggest connections between maternal reproductive fitness, early zygotic development and genomic imprinting. PMID:26323243

  7. Uncoupling PIP2-calmodulin regulation of Kv7.2 channels by an assembly destabilizing epileptogenic mutation.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, Araitz; Gomis-Perez, Carolina; Bernardo-Seisdedos, Ganeko; Alaimo, Alessandro; Malo, Covadonga; Aldaregia, Juncal; Lopez-Robles, Carlos; Areso, Pilar; Butz, Elisabeth; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2015-11-01

    We show that the combination of an intracellular bi-partite calmodulin (CaM)-binding site and a distant assembly region affect how an ion channel is regulated by a membrane lipid. Our data reveal that regulation by phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate (PIP2) and stabilization of assembled Kv7.2 subunits by intracellular coiled-coil regions far from the membrane are coupled molecular processes. Live-cell fluorescence energy transfer measurements and direct binding studies indicate that remote coiled-coil formation creates conditions for different CaM interaction modes, each conferring different PIP2 dependency to Kv7.2 channels. Disruption of coiled-coil formation by epilepsy-causing mutation decreases apparent CaM-binding affinity and interrupts CaM influence on PIP2 sensitivity.

  8. Mutations in Encephalomyocarditis Virus 3A Protein Uncouple the Dependency of Genome Replication on Host Factors Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase IIIα and Oxysterol-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dorobantu, Cristina M.; Albulescu, Lucian; Lyoo, Heyrhyoung; van Kampen, Mirjam; De Francesco, Raffaele; Lohmann, Volker; Harak, Christian; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Strating, Jeroen R. P. M.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Positive-strand RNA [(+)RNA] viruses are true masters of reprogramming host lipid trafficking and synthesis to support virus genome replication. Via their membrane-associated 3A protein, picornaviruses of the genus Enterovirus (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and rhinovirus) subvert Golgi complex-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ (PI4KB) to generate “replication organelles” (ROs) enriched in phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P). PI4P lipids serve to accumulate oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), which subsequently transfers cholesterol to the ROs in a PI4P-dependent manner. Single-point mutations in 3A render enteroviruses resistant to both PI4KB and OSBP inhibition, indicating coupled dependency on these host factors. Recently, we showed that encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a picornavirus that belongs to the Cardiovirus genus, also builds PI4P/cholesterol-enriched ROs. Like the hepatitis C virus (HCV) of the Flaviviridae family, it does so by hijacking the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIα (PI4KA). Here we provide genetic evidence for the critical involvement of EMCV protein 3A in this process. Using a genetic screening approach, we selected EMCV mutants with single amino acid substitutions in 3A, which rescued RNA virus replication upon small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of PI4KA. In the presence of PI4KA inhibitors, the mutants no longer induced PI4P, OSBP, or cholesterol accumulation at ROs, which aggregated into large cytoplasmic clusters. In contrast to the enterovirus escape mutants, we observed little if any cross-resistance of EMCV mutants to OSBP inhibitors, indicating an uncoupled level of dependency of their RNA replication on PI4KA and OSBP activities. This report may contribute to a better understanding of the roles of PI4KA and OSBP in membrane modifications induced by (+)RNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Positive-strand RNA viruses modulate lipid

  9. Mutations in Encephalomyocarditis Virus 3A Protein Uncouple the Dependency of Genome Replication on Host Factors Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase IIIα and Oxysterol-Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Dorobantu, Cristina M; Albulescu, Lucian; Lyoo, Heyrhyoung; van Kampen, Mirjam; De Francesco, Raffaele; Lohmann, Volker; Harak, Christian; van der Schaar, Hilde M; Strating, Jeroen R P M; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2016-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA [(+)RNA] viruses are true masters of reprogramming host lipid trafficking and synthesis to support virus genome replication. Via their membrane-associated 3A protein, picornaviruses of the genus Enterovirus (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and rhinovirus) subvert Golgi complex-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ (PI4KB) to generate "replication organelles" (ROs) enriched in phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P). PI4P lipids serve to accumulate oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), which subsequently transfers cholesterol to the ROs in a PI4P-dependent manner. Single-point mutations in 3A render enteroviruses resistant to both PI4KB and OSBP inhibition, indicating coupled dependency on these host factors. Recently, we showed that encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a picornavirus that belongs to the Cardiovirus genus, also builds PI4P/cholesterol-enriched ROs. Like the hepatitis C virus (HCV) of the Flaviviridae family, it does so by hijacking the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIα (PI4KA). Here we provide genetic evidence for the critical involvement of EMCV protein 3A in this process. Using a genetic screening approach, we selected EMCV mutants with single amino acid substitutions in 3A, which rescued RNA virus replication upon small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of PI4KA. In the presence of PI4KA inhibitors, the mutants no longer induced PI4P, OSBP, or cholesterol accumulation at ROs, which aggregated into large cytoplasmic clusters. In contrast to the enterovirus escape mutants, we observed little if any cross-resistance of EMCV mutants to OSBP inhibitors, indicating an uncoupled level of dependency of their RNA replication on PI4KA and OSBP activities. This report may contribute to a better understanding of the roles of PI4KA and OSBP in membrane modifications induced by (+)RNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Positive-strand RNA viruses modulate lipid homeostasis to

  10. Modes of reproduction and the accumulation of deleterious mutations with multiplicative fitness effects.

    PubMed Central

    Haccou, Patsy; Schneider, Maria Victoria

    2004-01-01

    Mutational load depends not only on the number and nature of mutations but also on the reproductive mode. Traditionally, only a few specific reproductive modes are considered in the search of explanations for the maintenance of sex. There are, however, many alternatives. Including these may give radically different conclusions. The theory on deterministic deleterious mutations states that in large populations segregation and recombination may lead to a lower load of deleterious mutations, provided that there are synergistic interactions. Empirical research suggests that effects of deleterious mutations are often multiplicative. Such situations have largely been ignored in the literature, since recombination and segregation have no effect on mutation load in the absence of epistasis. However, this is true only when clonal reproduction and sexual reproduction with equal male and female ploidy are considered. We consider several alternative reproductive modes that are all known to occur in insects: arrhenotoky, paternal genome elimination, apomictic thelytoky, and automictic thelytoky with different cytological mechanisms to restore diploidy. We give a method that is based on probability-generating functions, which provides analytical and numerical results on the distributions of deleterious mutations. Using this, we show that segregation and recombination do make a difference. Furthermore, we prove that a modified form of Haldane's principle holds more generally for thelytokous reproduction. We discuss the implications of our results for evolutionary transitions between different reproductive modes in insects. Since the strength of Muller's ratchet is reduced considerably for several forms of automictic thelytoky, many of our results are expected to be also valid for initially small populations. PMID:15020489

  11. Mutations along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis affecting male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Alevizaki, Maria

    2007-12-01

    Disorders in male reproductive function are caused by mutations of key genes at all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary- testicular axis. They may affect the ontogeny and function of the hypothalamic centres governing gonadotrophin synthesis and secretion, the development of the anterior pituitary gland, the production of gonadotrophins and the function of their receptor genes, and finally the genes responsible for testicular hormone production and gametogenesis. This review focuses on mutations that affect the synthesis and secretion of hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone, as well as their testicular receptors, thus covering a selected group of genetic causes of hypo- and hypergonadotrophic male hypogonadism.

  12. Site-directed mutation of arginine 282 to glutamate uncouples the movement of peptides and protons by the rabbit proton-peptide cotransporter PepT1.

    PubMed

    Meredith, David

    2004-04-16

    A conserved positive residue in the seventh transmembrane domain of the mammalian proton-coupled di- and tripeptide transporter PepT1 has been shown by site-directed mutagenesis to be a key residue for protein function. Substitution of arginine 282 with a glutamate residue (R282E-PepT1) gave a protein at the plasma membrane of Xenopus laevis oocytes that was able to transport the non-hydrolyzable dipeptide [3H]d-Phe-l-Gln, although unlike the wild type, the rate of transport by R282E-PepT1 was independent of the extracellular pH level, and the substrate could not be accumulated above equilibrium. The binding affinity of the mutant transport protein was unchanged from the wild type. Thus, R282E-Pept1 appears to have been changed from a proton-driven to a facilitated transporter for peptides. In addition, peptide transport by R282E-PepT1 still induced depolarization as measured by microelectrode recordings of membrane potential. A more detailed study by two-electrode voltage clamping revealed that R282E-PepT1 behaved as a peptide-gated non-selective cation channel with the ion selectivity series lithium > sodium > N-methyl-d-glucamine at pH 7.4. There was also a proton conductance (comparing pH 7.4 and 8.4), and at pH 5.5 the predominant conductance was for potassium ions. Therefore, it can be concluded that changing arginine 282 to a glutamate not only uncouples the cotransport of protons and peptides of the wild-type PepT1 but also creates a peptide-gated cation channel in the protein.

  13. Mutations and polymorphisms in FSH receptor: functional implications in human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Desai, Swapna S; Roy, Binita Sur; Mahale, Smita D

    2013-12-01

    FSH brings about its physiological actions by activating a specific receptor located on target cells. Normal functioning of the FSH receptor (FSHR) is crucial for follicular development and estradiol production in females and for the regulation of Sertoli cell function and spermatogenesis in males. In the last two decades, the number of inactivating and activating mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and spliced variants of FSHR gene has been identified in selected infertile cases. Information on genotype-phenotype correlation and in vitro functional characterization of the mutants has helped in understanding the possible genetic cause for female infertility in affected individuals. The information is also being used to dissect various extracellular and intracellular events involved in hormone-receptor interaction by studying the differences in the properties of the mutant receptor when compared with WT receptor. Studies on polymorphisms in the FSHR gene have shown variability in clinical outcome among women treated with FSH. These observations are being explored to develop molecular markers to predict the optimum dose of FSH required for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. Pharmacogenetics is an emerging field in this area that aims at designing individual treatment protocols for reproductive abnormalities based on FSHR gene polymorphisms. The present review discusses the current knowledge of various genetic alterations in FSHR and their impact on receptor function in the female reproductive system.

  14. Uncoupling of Obesity from Insulin Resistance Through a Targeted Mutation in aP2, the Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Johnson, Randall S.; Distel, Robert J.; Ellis, Ramsey; Papaioannou, Virginia E.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1996-11-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are small cytoplasmic proteins that are expressed in a highly tissue-specific manner and bind to fatty acids such as oleic and retinoic acid. Mice with a null mutation in aP2, the gene encoding the adipocyte FABP, were developmentally and metabolically normal. The aP2-deficient mice developed dietary obesity but, unlike control mice, they did not develop insulin resistance or diabetes. Also unlike their obese wild-type counterparts, obese aP2-/- animals failed to express in adipose tissue tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a molecule implicated in obesity-related insulin resistance. These results indicate that aP2 is central to the pathway that links obesity to insulin resistance, possibly by linking fatty acid metabolism to expression of TNF-α.

  15. NGS-Based Assay for the Identification of Individuals Carrying Recessive Genetic Mutations in Reproductive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Abulí, Anna; Boada, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Coroleu, Buenaventura; Veiga, Anna; Armengol, Lluís; Barri, Pedro N; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the capacity of carrier screening in gamete donation (GD) programs. We have developed and validated an NGS carrier-screening test (qCarrier test) that includes 200 genes associated with 368 disorders (277 autosomal recessive and 37 X-linked). Carrier screening is performed on oocyte donation candidates and the male partner of oocyte recipient. Carriers of X-linked conditions are excluded from the GD program, whereas donors are chosen who do not carry mutations for the same gene/disease as the recipients. The validation phase showed a high sensitivity (>99% sensitivity) detecting all single-nucleotide variants, 13 indels, and 25 copy-number variants included in the validation set. A total of 1,301 individuals were analysed with the qCarrier test, including 483 candidate oocyte donors and 635 receptor couples, 105 females receiving sperm donation, and 39 couples seeking pregnancy. We identified 56% of individuals who are carriers for at least one genetic condition and 1.7% of female donors who were excluded from the program due to a carrier state of X-linked conditions. Globally, 3% of a priori assigned donations had a high reproductive risk that could be minimized after testing. Genetic counselling at different stages is essential for helping to facilitate a successful and healthy pregnancy.

  16. NGS-Based Assay for the Identification of Individuals Carrying Recessive Genetic Mutations in Reproductive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Abulí, Anna; Boada, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Coroleu, Buenaventura; Veiga, Anna; Armengol, Lluís; Barri, Pedro N; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the capacity of carrier screening in gamete donation (GD) programs. We have developed and validated an NGS carrier-screening test (qCarrier test) that includes 200 genes associated with 368 disorders (277 autosomal recessive and 37 X-linked). Carrier screening is performed on oocyte donation candidates and the male partner of oocyte recipient. Carriers of X-linked conditions are excluded from the GD program, whereas donors are chosen who do not carry mutations for the same gene/disease as the recipients. The validation phase showed a high sensitivity (>99% sensitivity) detecting all single-nucleotide variants, 13 indels, and 25 copy-number variants included in the validation set. A total of 1,301 individuals were analysed with the qCarrier test, including 483 candidate oocyte donors and 635 receptor couples, 105 females receiving sperm donation, and 39 couples seeking pregnancy. We identified 56% of individuals who are carriers for at least one genetic condition and 1.7% of female donors who were excluded from the program due to a carrier state of X-linked conditions. Globally, 3% of a priori assigned donations had a high reproductive risk that could be minimized after testing. Genetic counselling at different stages is essential for helping to facilitate a successful and healthy pregnancy. PMID:26990548

  17. A domestication related mutation in the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene (TSHR) modulates photoperiodic response and reproduction in chickens.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Anna-Carin; Fallahshahroudi, Amir; Johnsen, Hanna; Hagenblad, Jenny; Wright, Dominic; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per

    2016-03-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene (TSHR) has been suggested to be a "domestication locus" in the chicken. A strong selective sweep over TSHR in domestic breeds together with significant effects of a mutation in the gene on several domestication related traits, indicate that the gene has been important for chicken domestication. TSHR plays a key role in the signal transduction of seasonal reproduction, which is characteristically less strict in domestic animals. We used birds from an advanced intercross line between ancestral Red Junglefowl (RJF) and domesticated White Leghorn (WL) to investigate effects of the mutation on reproductive traits as well as on TSHB, TSHR, DIO2 and DIO3 gene expression during altered day length (photoperiod). We bred chickens homozygous for either the mutation (d/d) or wild type allele (w/w), allowing assessment of the effect of genotype at this locus while also controlling for background variation in the rest of the genome. TSHR gene expression in brain was significantly lower in both d/d females and males and d/d females showed a faster onset of egg laying at sexual maturity than w/w. Furthermore, d/d males showed a reduced testicular size response to decreased day length, and lower levels of TSHB and DIO3 expression. Additionally, purebred White Leghorn females kept under natural short day length in Sweden during December had active ovaries and lower levels of TSHR and DIO3 expression compared to Red Junglefowl females kept under similar conditions. Our study indicates that the TSHR mutation affects photoperiodic response in chicken by reducing dependence of seasonal reproduction, a typical domestication feature, and may therefore have been important for chicken domestication. PMID:26873630

  18. The Role of the Prokineticin 2 Pathway in Human Reproduction: Evidence from the Study of Human and Murine Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Cecilia; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Dwyer, Andrew A.; Au, Margaret G.; Sidis, Yisrael; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Pitteloud, Nelly; Zhou, Qun-Yong

    2011-01-01

    A widely dispersed network of hypothalamic GnRH neurons controls the reproductive axis in mammals. Genetic investigation of the human disease model of isolated GnRH deficiency has revealed several key genes crucial for GnRH neuronal ontogeny and GnRH secretion. Among these genes, prokineticin 2 (PROK2), and PROK2 receptor (PROKR2) have recently emerged as critical regulators of reproduction in both mice and humans. Both prok2- and prokr2-deficient mice recapitulate the human Kallmann syndrome phenotype. Additionally, PROK2 and PROKR2 mutations are seen in humans with Kallmann syndrome, thus implicating this pathway in GnRH neuronal migration. However, PROK2/PROKR2 mutations are also seen in normosmic GnRH deficiency, suggesting a role for the prokineticin signaling system in GnRH biology that is beyond neuronal migration. This observation is particularly surprising because mature GnRH neurons do not express PROKR2. Moreover, mutations in both PROK2 and PROKR2 are predominantly detected in the heterozygous state with incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity frequently seen within and across pedigrees. In some of these pedigrees, a “second hit” or oligogenicity has been documented. Besides reproduction, a pleiotropic physiological role for PROK2 is now recognized, including regulation of pain perception, circadian rhythms, hematopoiesis, and immune response. Therefore, further detailed clinical studies of patients with PROK2/PROKR2 mutations will help to map the broader biological role of the PROK2/PROKR2 pathway and identify other interacting genes/proteins that mediate its molecular effects in humans. PMID:21037178

  19. A domestication related mutation in the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene (TSHR) modulates photoperiodic response and reproduction in chickens.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Anna-Carin; Fallahshahroudi, Amir; Johnsen, Hanna; Hagenblad, Jenny; Wright, Dominic; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per

    2016-03-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene (TSHR) has been suggested to be a "domestication locus" in the chicken. A strong selective sweep over TSHR in domestic breeds together with significant effects of a mutation in the gene on several domestication related traits, indicate that the gene has been important for chicken domestication. TSHR plays a key role in the signal transduction of seasonal reproduction, which is characteristically less strict in domestic animals. We used birds from an advanced intercross line between ancestral Red Junglefowl (RJF) and domesticated White Leghorn (WL) to investigate effects of the mutation on reproductive traits as well as on TSHB, TSHR, DIO2 and DIO3 gene expression during altered day length (photoperiod). We bred chickens homozygous for either the mutation (d/d) or wild type allele (w/w), allowing assessment of the effect of genotype at this locus while also controlling for background variation in the rest of the genome. TSHR gene expression in brain was significantly lower in both d/d females and males and d/d females showed a faster onset of egg laying at sexual maturity than w/w. Furthermore, d/d males showed a reduced testicular size response to decreased day length, and lower levels of TSHB and DIO3 expression. Additionally, purebred White Leghorn females kept under natural short day length in Sweden during December had active ovaries and lower levels of TSHR and DIO3 expression compared to Red Junglefowl females kept under similar conditions. Our study indicates that the TSHR mutation affects photoperiodic response in chicken by reducing dependence of seasonal reproduction, a typical domestication feature, and may therefore have been important for chicken domestication.

  20. ‘My funky genetics’: BRCA1/2 mutation carriers’ understanding of genetic inheritance and reproductive merger in the context of new repro-genetic technologies

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Doyle, Maya; Stern, Rikki; Savin, Katie; Hurley, Karen; Sagi, Michal

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Deleterious mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes elevate lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Each child of a mutation-positive parent has a 50% chance of inheriting it. Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) permits prospective parents to avoid transmitting a BRCA1/2 mutation to a child, introducing predictability into a process historically defined by chance. This investigation explored how BRCA1/2 mutation carriers understand genetic inheritance and consider a child’s inheritance of a BRCA1/2 mutation, given the opportunities that exist to pursue PGD. METHOD 39 female and male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers of reproductive age were recruited from urban cancer and reproductive medical centers. Participants completed a standardized educational presentation on PGD and prenatal diagnosis, with pre- and post-test assessments. An interdisciplinary team of qualitative researchers analyzed data using grounded theory techniques. FINDINGS Participants expressed the belief that reproduction yields children with unique genetic strengths and challenges, including the BRCA1/2 mutation, family traits for which predictive tests do not exist, and hypothetical genetic risks. Participants expressed preference for biologically-related children, yet stated their genetically ‘well’ partner’s lineage would be marred through reproductive merger, requiring the well partner to assume the burden of the BRCA1/2 mutation via their children. Participants expressed diverse views of genetically ‘well’ partners’ participation in family planning and risk management decisions. DISCUSSION Pressure to use reprogenetic technology may grow as genetic susceptibility testing becomes more widely available. Work with individuals and couples across the disease spectrum must be attuned to they ways beliefs about genetic inheritance play into reproductive decision making. PMID:22709328

  1. Mutations within the nuclear localization signal of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein attenuate virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhee; Hodgins, Douglas; Calvert, Jay G.; Welch, Siao-Kun W.; Jolie, Rika; Yoo, Dongwan . E-mail: dyoo@uoguelph.ca

    2006-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an RNA virus replicating in the cytoplasm, but the nucleocapsid (N) protein is specifically localized to the nucleus and nucleolus in virus-infected cells. A 'pat7' motif of 41-PGKK(N/S)KK has previously been identified in the N protein as the functional nuclear localization signal (NLS); however, the biological consequences of N protein nuclear localization are unknown. In the present study, the role of N protein nuclear localization during infection was investigated in pigs using an NLS-null mutant virus. When two lysines at 43 and 44 at the NLS locus were substituted to glycines, the modified NLS with 41-PGGGNKK restricted the N protein to the cytoplasm. This NLS-null mutation was introduced into a full-length infectious cDNA clone of PRRSV. Upon transfection of cells, the NLS-null full-length clone induced cytopathic effects and produced infectious progeny. The NLS-null virus grew to a titer 100-fold lower than that of wild-type virus. To examine the response to NLS-null PRRSV in the natural host, three groups of pigs, consisting of seven animals per group, were intranasally inoculated with wild-type, placebo, or NLS-null virus, and the animals were maintained for 4 weeks. The NLS-null-infected pigs had a significantly shorter mean duration of viremia than wild-type-infected pigs but developed significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Mutations occurred at the NLS locus in one pig during viremia, and four types of mutations were identified: 41-PGRGNKK, 41-PGGRNKK, and 41-PGRRNKK, and 41-PGKKSKK. Both wild-type and NLS-null viruses persisted in the tonsils for at least 4 weeks, and the NLS-null virus persisting in the tonsils was found to be mutated to either 41-PGRGNKK or 41-PGGRNKK in all pigs. No other mutation was found in the N gene. All types of reversions which occurred during viremia and persistence were able to translocate the mutated N proteins to the nucleus, indicating a

  2. Identification of a Nonsense Mutation in CWC15 Associated with Decreased Reproductive Efficiency in Jersey Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Sonstegard, Tad S.; Cole, John B.; VanRaden, Paul M.; Van Tassell, Curtis P.; Null, Daniel J.; Schroeder, Steven G.; Bickhart, Derek; McClure, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    With the recent advent of genomic tools for cattle, several recessive conditions affecting fertility have been identified and selected against, such as deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase, complex vertebral malformation, and brachyspina. The current report refines the location of a recessive haplotype affecting fertility in Jersey cattle using crossover haplotypes, discovers the causative mutation using whole genome sequencing, and examines the gene’s role in embryo loss. In an attempt to identify unknown recessive lethal alleles in the current dairy population, a search using deep Mendelian sampling of 5,288 Jersey cattle was conducted for high-frequency haplotypes that have a deficit of homozygotes at the population level. This search led to the discovery of a putative recessive lethal in Jersey cattle on Bos taurus autosome 15. The haplotype, denoted JH1, was associated with reduced fertility, and further investigation identified one highly-influential Jersey bull as the putative source ancestor. By combining SNP analysis of whole-genome sequences aligned to the JH1 interval and subsequent SNP validation a nonsense mutation in CWC15 was identified as the likely causative mutation underlying the fertility phenotype. No homozygous recessive individuals were found in 749 genotyped animals, whereas all known carriers and carrier haplotypes possessed one copy of the mutant allele. This newly identified lethal has been responsible for a substantial number of spontaneous abortions in Jersey dairy cattle throughout the past half-century. With the mutation identified, selection against the deleterious allele in breeding schemes will aid in reducing the incidence of this defect in the population. These results also show that carrier status can be imputed with high accuracy. Whole-genome resequencing proved to be a powerful strategy to rapidly identify a previously mapped deleterious mutation in a known carrier of a recessive lethal allele. PMID:23349982

  3. Synchronizing noisy nonidentical oscillators by transient uncoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, Aditya; Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Timme, Marc; Chakraborty, Sagar

    2016-09-01

    Synchronization is the process of achieving identical dynamics among coupled identical units. If the units are different from each other, their dynamics cannot become identical; yet, after transients, there may emerge a functional relationship between them—a phenomenon termed "generalized synchronization." Here, we show that the concept of transient uncoupling, recently introduced for synchronizing identical units, also supports generalized synchronization among nonidentical chaotic units. Generalized synchronization can be achieved by transient uncoupling even when it is impossible by regular coupling. We furthermore demonstrate that transient uncoupling stabilizes synchronization in the presence of common noise. Transient uncoupling works best if the units stay uncoupled whenever the driven orbit visits regions that are locally diverging in its phase space. Thus, to select a favorable uncoupling region, we propose an intuitive method that measures the local divergence at the phase points of the driven unit's trajectory by linearizing the flow and subsequently suppresses the divergence by uncoupling.

  4. Achromatic and uncoupled medical gantry

    DOEpatents

    Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Kayran, Dmitry; Litvinenko, Vladimir; MacKay, William W.

    2011-11-22

    A medical gantry that focus the beam from the beginning of the gantry to the exit of the gantry independent of the rotation angle of the gantry by keeping the beam achromatic and uncoupled, thus, avoiding the use of collimators or rotators, or additional equipment to control the beam divergence, which may cause beam intensity loss or additional time in irradiation of the patient, or disadvantageously increase the overall gantry size inapplicable for the use in the medical treatment facility.

  5. Mitochondrial uncouplers with an extraordinary dynamic range

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Phing-How; Hansen, Birgit S.; Olsen, Preben H.; Tullin, Søren; Murphy, Michael P.; Brand, Martin D.

    2007-01-01

    We have discovered that some weak uncouplers (typified by butylated hydroxytoluene) have a dynamic range of more than 106 in vitro: the concentration giving measurable uncoupling is less than one millionth of the concentration causing full uncoupling. They achieve this through a high-affinity interaction with the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase that causes significant but limited uncoupling at extremely low uncoupler concentrations, together with more conventional uncoupling at much higher concentrations. Uncoupling at the translocase is not by a conventional weak acid/anion cycling mechanism since it is also caused by substituted triphenylphosphonium molecules, which are not anionic and cannot protonate. Covalent attachment of the uncoupler to a mitochondrially targeted hydrophobic cation sensitizes it to membrane potential, giving a small additional effect. The wide dynamic range of these uncouplers in isolated mitochondria and intact cells reveals a novel allosteric activation of proton transport through the adenine nucleotide translocase and provides a promising starting point for designing safer uncouplers for obesity therapy. PMID:17608618

  6. Brca1 Mutations Enhance Mouse Reproductive Functions by Increasing Responsiveness to Male-Derived Scent

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Pike, Malcolm C.; Wu, Nancy; Lin, Yvonne G.; Mucowski, Sara; Punj, Vasu; Tang, Yuan; Yen, Hai-Yun; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Enbom, Elena; Austria, Theresa; Widschwendter, Martin; Maxson, Robert; Dubeau, Louis

    2015-01-01

    We compared the gene expression profiles of ovarian granulosa cells harboring either mutant or wild type Brca1 to follow up on our earlier observation that absence of a functional Brca1 in these important regulators of menstrual/estrous cycle progression leads to prolongation of the pre-ovulatory phase of the estrous cycle and to increased basal levels of circulating estradiol. Here we show that ovarian granulosa cells from mice carrying a conditional Brca1 gene knockout express substantially higher levels of olfactory receptor mRNA than granulosa cells from wild type littermates. This led us to hypothesize that reproductive functions in mutant female mice might be more sensitive to male-derived scent than in wild type female mice. Indeed, it is well established that isolation from males leads to complete cessation of mouse estrous cycle activity while exposure to olfactory receptor ligands present in male urine leads to resumption of such activity. We found that Brca1-/- female mice rendered anovulatory by unisexual isolation resumed ovulatory activity more rapidly than their wild type littermates when exposed to bedding from cages where males had been housed. The prime mediator of this increased responsiveness appears to be the ovary and not olfactory neurons. This conclusion is supported by the fact that wild type mice in which endogenous ovaries had been replaced by Brca1-deficient ovarian transplants responded to male-derived scent more robustly than mutant mice in which ovaries had been replaced by wild type ovarian transplants. Our findings not only have important implications for our understanding of the influence of olfactory signals on reproductive functions, but also provide insights into mechanisms whereby genetic risk factors for breast and extra uterine Müllerian carcinomas may influence menstrual activity in human, which is itself an independent risk factor for these cancers. PMID:26488398

  7. Novel Mutation in Exon 1 of the BMP15 Gene and its Association with Reproduction Traits in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Nadri, S; Zamani, P; Ahmadi, A

    2016-10-01

    The BMP15 gene is a growth factor and a member of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily, specifically expressed in oocytes. In the present study, polymorphism of BMP15 gene exon 1 was studied using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and direct DNA sequencing methods in 170 Mehraban and Lori sheep ewes. A 231-bp fragment in BMP15 exon 1 was amplified by PCR reactions. Two genotypes (GG and AG) with a new point mutation at position 121 bp of the studied fragment (c.379G>A in reference GenBank number AF236078.1 sequence), deducing an amino acid exchange in the codified amino acid sequence (p.Glu41Lys) were identified in the studied populations. The AG and GG frequencies were 74.4% and 25.6% in Mehraban and 44.7% and 55.3% in Lori sheep, respectively. Frequencies of the A and G alleles were 37.2% and 62.8% in Mehraban and 22.4% and 77.6% in Lori sheep, respectively. Two different secondary structures of protein were predicted for encoded precursor protein. The genotypes GG and AG did not have any significant association with the studied reproductive traits, but the AA genotype is likely to have a lethal or sterility effect.

  8. Novel Mutation in Exon 1 of the BMP15 Gene and its Association with Reproduction Traits in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Nadri, S; Zamani, P; Ahmadi, A

    2016-10-01

    The BMP15 gene is a growth factor and a member of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily, specifically expressed in oocytes. In the present study, polymorphism of BMP15 gene exon 1 was studied using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and direct DNA sequencing methods in 170 Mehraban and Lori sheep ewes. A 231-bp fragment in BMP15 exon 1 was amplified by PCR reactions. Two genotypes (GG and AG) with a new point mutation at position 121 bp of the studied fragment (c.379G>A in reference GenBank number AF236078.1 sequence), deducing an amino acid exchange in the codified amino acid sequence (p.Glu41Lys) were identified in the studied populations. The AG and GG frequencies were 74.4% and 25.6% in Mehraban and 44.7% and 55.3% in Lori sheep, respectively. Frequencies of the A and G alleles were 37.2% and 62.8% in Mehraban and 22.4% and 77.6% in Lori sheep, respectively. Two different secondary structures of protein were predicted for encoded precursor protein. The genotypes GG and AG did not have any significant association with the studied reproductive traits, but the AA genotype is likely to have a lethal or sterility effect. PMID:27565869

  9. Mechanism of uncoupling in mitochondria: uncouplers as ionophores for cycling cations and protons.

    PubMed

    Kessler, R J; Tyson, C A; Green, D E

    1976-09-01

    Classical uncouplers such as 2,4-dinitrophenol have been shown to be ionophores with the capability for transporting monovalent or divalent cations with equal efficiency. The conditions appropriate for the maximal expression of this ionophoric capability have been explored. Two critical factors are the polarity of the organic phase and the pH of the aqueous phase that is equilibrated with the organic phase. The demonstrated cationic ionophoric capability of uncouplers, taken in conjunction with the known ability of uncouplers to cycle protons across a membrane phase, provides the experimental basis for the thesis that uncoupling of electron flow from ATP synthesis via classical uncouplers involves the substitution of one coupled process by another. Uncoupling thus reduces to the replacement of one driven reaction (ATP synthesis) by the driven reaction (cyclical transport) mediated by the uncoupler.

  10. Leptin's metabolic and immune functions can be uncoupled at the ligand/receptor interaction level.

    PubMed

    Zabeau, Lennart; Jensen, Cathy J; Seeuws, Sylvie; Venken, Koen; Verhee, Annick; Catteeuw, Dominiek; van Loo, Geert; Chen, Hui; Walder, Ken; Hollis, Jacob; Foote, Simon; Morris, Margaret J; Van der Heyden, José; Peelman, Frank; Oldfield, Brian J; Rubio, Justin P; Elewaut, Dirk; Tavernier, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The adipocyte-derived cytokine leptin acts as a metabolic switch, connecting the body's metabolism to high-energy consuming processes such as reproduction and immune responses. We here provide genetic and biochemical evidence that the metabolic and immune functions of leptin can be uncoupled at the receptor level. First, homozygous mutant fatt/fatt mice carry a spontaneous splice mutation causing deletion of the leptin receptor (LR) immunoglobulin-like domain (IGD) in all LR isoforms. These mice are hyperphagic and morbidly obese, but display only minimal changes in size and cellularity of the thymus, and cellular immune responses are unaffected. These animals also displayed liver damage in response to concavalin A comparable to wild-type and heterozygous littermates. Second, treatment of healthy mice with a neutralizing nanobody targeting IGD induced weight gain and hyperinsulinaemia, but completely failed to block development of experimentally induced autoimmune diseases. These data indicate that leptin receptor deficiency or antagonism profoundly affects metabolism, with little concomitant effects on immune functions. PMID:25098352

  11. Uncoupling reproduction from metabolism extends chronological lifespan in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Saisubramanian; Kruckeberg, Arthur L; Schmidt, Karen H; Kroll, Evgueny; Hamilton, Morgan; McInnerney, Kate; Summers, Ryan; Taylor, Timothy; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2014-04-15

    Studies of replicative and chronological lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have advanced understanding of longevity in all eukaryotes. Chronological lifespan in this species is defined as the age-dependent viability of nondividing cells. To date this parameter has only been estimated under calorie restriction, mimicked by starvation. Because postmitotic cells in higher eukaryotes often do not starve, we developed a model yeast system to study cells as they age in the absence of calorie restriction. Yeast cells were encapsulated in a matrix consisting of calcium alginate to form ∼3 mm beads that were packed into bioreactors and fed ad libitum. Under these conditions cells ceased to divide, became heat shock and zymolyase resistant, yet retained high fermentative capacity. Over the course of 17 d, immobilized yeast cells maintained >95% viability, whereas the viability of starving, freely suspended (planktonic) cells decreased to <10%. Immobilized cells exhibited a stable pattern of gene expression that differed markedly from growing or starving planktonic cells, highly expressing genes in glycolysis, cell wall remodeling, and stress resistance, but decreasing transcription of genes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and genes that regulate the cell cycle, including master cyclins CDC28 and CLN1. Stress resistance transcription factor MSN4 and its upstream effector RIM15 are conspicuously up-regulated in the immobilized state, and an immobilized rim15 knockout strain fails to exhibit the long-lived, growth-arrested phenotype, suggesting that altered regulation of the Rim15-mediated nutrient-sensing pathway plays an important role in extending yeast chronological lifespan under calorie-unrestricted conditions. PMID:24706810

  12. Uncoupling reproduction from metabolism extends chronological lifespan in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Saisubramanian; Kruckeberg, Arthur L; Schmidt, Karen H; Kroll, Evgueny; Hamilton, Morgan; McInnerney, Kate; Summers, Ryan; Taylor, Timothy; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2014-04-15

    Studies of replicative and chronological lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have advanced understanding of longevity in all eukaryotes. Chronological lifespan in this species is defined as the age-dependent viability of nondividing cells. To date this parameter has only been estimated under calorie restriction, mimicked by starvation. Because postmitotic cells in higher eukaryotes often do not starve, we developed a model yeast system to study cells as they age in the absence of calorie restriction. Yeast cells were encapsulated in a matrix consisting of calcium alginate to form ∼3 mm beads that were packed into bioreactors and fed ad libitum. Under these conditions cells ceased to divide, became heat shock and zymolyase resistant, yet retained high fermentative capacity. Over the course of 17 d, immobilized yeast cells maintained >95% viability, whereas the viability of starving, freely suspended (planktonic) cells decreased to <10%. Immobilized cells exhibited a stable pattern of gene expression that differed markedly from growing or starving planktonic cells, highly expressing genes in glycolysis, cell wall remodeling, and stress resistance, but decreasing transcription of genes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and genes that regulate the cell cycle, including master cyclins CDC28 and CLN1. Stress resistance transcription factor MSN4 and its upstream effector RIM15 are conspicuously up-regulated in the immobilized state, and an immobilized rim15 knockout strain fails to exhibit the long-lived, growth-arrested phenotype, suggesting that altered regulation of the Rim15-mediated nutrient-sensing pathway plays an important role in extending yeast chronological lifespan under calorie-unrestricted conditions.

  13. Uncoupling reproduction from metabolism extends chronological lifespan in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Saisubramanian; Kruckeberg, Arthur L.; Schmidt, Karen H.; Kroll, Evgueny; Hamilton, Morgan; McInnerney, Kate; Summers, Ryan; Taylor, Timothy; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Studies of replicative and chronological lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have advanced understanding of longevity in all eukaryotes. Chronological lifespan in this species is defined as the age-dependent viability of nondividing cells. To date this parameter has only been estimated under calorie restriction, mimicked by starvation. Because postmitotic cells in higher eukaryotes often do not starve, we developed a model yeast system to study cells as they age in the absence of calorie restriction. Yeast cells were encapsulated in a matrix consisting of calcium alginate to form ∼3 mm beads that were packed into bioreactors and fed ad libitum. Under these conditions cells ceased to divide, became heat shock and zymolyase resistant, yet retained high fermentative capacity. Over the course of 17 d, immobilized yeast cells maintained >95% viability, whereas the viability of starving, freely suspended (planktonic) cells decreased to <10%. Immobilized cells exhibited a stable pattern of gene expression that differed markedly from growing or starving planktonic cells, highly expressing genes in glycolysis, cell wall remodeling, and stress resistance, but decreasing transcription of genes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and genes that regulate the cell cycle, including master cyclins CDC28 and CLN1. Stress resistance transcription factor MSN4 and its upstream effector RIM15 are conspicuously up-regulated in the immobilized state, and an immobilized rim15 knockout strain fails to exhibit the long-lived, growth-arrested phenotype, suggesting that altered regulation of the Rim15-mediated nutrient-sensing pathway plays an important role in extending yeast chronological lifespan under calorie-unrestricted conditions. PMID:24706810

  14. A mitochondrial uncoupling artifact can be caused by expression of uncoupling protein 1 in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, J A; Harper, J A; Brindle, K M; Jekabsons, M B; Brand, M D

    2001-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) from mouse was expressed in yeast and the specific (GDP-inhibitable) and artifactual (GDP-insensitive) effects on mitochondrial uncoupling were assessed. UCP1 provides a GDP-inhibitable model system to help interpret the uncoupling effects of high expression in yeast of other members of the mitochondrial carrier protein family, such as the UCP1 homologues UCP2 and UCP3. Yeast expressing UCP1 at modest levels (approx. 1 microg/mg of mitochondrial protein) showed no growth defect, normal rates of chemically uncoupled respiration and an increased non-phosphorylating proton conductance that was completely GDP-sensitive. The catalytic-centre activity of UCP1 in these yeast mitochondria was similar to that in mammalian brown-adipose-tissue mitochondria. However, yeast expressing UCP1 at higher levels (approx. 11 microg/mg of mitochondrial protein) showed a growth defect. Their mitochondria had depressed chemically uncoupled respiration rates and an increased proton conductance that was partly GDP-insensitive. Thus, although UCP1 shows native behaviour at modest levels of expression in yeast, higher levels (or rates) of expression can lead to an uncoupling that is not a physiological property of the native protein and is therefore artifactual. This observation might be important in the interpretation of results from experiments in which the functions of UCP1 homologues are verified by their ability to uncouple yeast mitochondria. PMID:11389685

  15. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Busiello, Rosa A.; Savarese, Sabrina; Lombardi, Assunta

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the metabolic factors that contribute to energy metabolism (EM) is critical for the development of new treatments for obesity and related diseases. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is not perfectly coupled to ATP synthesis, and the process of proton-leak plays a crucial role. Proton-leak accounts for a significant part of the resting metabolic rate (RMR) and therefore enhancement of this process represents a potential target for obesity treatment. Since their discovery, uncoupling proteins have stimulated great interest due to their involvement in mitochondrial-inducible proton-leak. Despite the widely accepted uncoupling/thermogenic effect of uncoupling protein one (UCP1), which was the first in this family to be discovered, the reactions catalyzed by its homolog UCP3 and the physiological role remain under debate. This review provides an overview of the role played by UCP1 and UCP3 in mitochondrial uncoupling/functionality as well as EM and suggests that they are a potential therapeutic target for treating obesity and its related diseases such as type II diabetes mellitus. PMID:25713540

  16. 49 CFR 215.125 - Defective uncoupling device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defective uncoupling device. 215.125 Section 215... System § 215.125 Defective uncoupling device. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if the car has an uncoupling device without sufficient vertical and lateral clearance to prevent—...

  17. 30 CFR 56.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 56.14215 Section... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and then moved at...

  18. 30 CFR 57.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 57.14215 Section... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and...

  19. 30 CFR 56.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 56.14215 Section... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and then moved at...

  20. 30 CFR 56.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 56.14215 Section... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and then moved at...

  1. 30 CFR 57.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 57.14215 Section... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and...

  2. 30 CFR 57.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 57.14215 Section... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and...

  3. 30 CFR 56.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 56.14215 Section... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and then moved at...

  4. 30 CFR 57.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 57.14215 Section... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and...

  5. 30 CFR 56.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 56.14215 Section... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and then moved at...

  6. 30 CFR 57.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 57.14215 Section... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and...

  7. A New Uncoupled Viscoplastic Constitutive Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, W. L.; Yuen, S.

    1983-01-01

    A new uncoupled viscoplastic model has been proposed along with experiments and analysis to define the various material constraints. Distinguishing between rate sensitive and rate insensitive strain allows the rate sensitive strain to be modelled over a wide range of temperatures with very little variation in the stress component 'n'. Furthermore, it allows the rounded corners on stress-strain hysteresis loops to be achieved very naturally.

  8. Crystal Structures of Mutant Forms of the Yeast F[subscript 1] ATPase Reveal Two Modes of Uncoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenieva, Diana; Symersky, Jindrich; Wang, Yamin; Pagadala, Vijayakanth; Mueller, David M.

    2010-11-15

    The mitochondrial ATP synthase couples the flow of protons with the phosphorylation of ADP. A class of mutations, the mitochondrial genome integrity (mgi) mutations, has been shown to uncouple this process in the yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase. Four mutant forms of the yeast F{sub 1} ATPase with mgi mutations were crystallized; the structures were solved and analyzed. The analysis identifies two mechanisms of structural uncoupling: one in which the empty catalytic site is altered and in doing so, apparently disrupts substrate (phosphate) binding, and a second where the steric hindrance predicted between {gamma}Leu83 and {beta}{sub DP} residues, Leu-391 and Glu-395, located in Catch 2 region, is reduced allowing rotation of the {gamma}-subunit with less impedance. Overall, the structures provide key insights into the critical interactions in the yeast ATP synthase involved in the coupling process.

  9. Targeted mutations in a highly conserved motif of the nsp1β protein impair the interferon antagonizing activity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhua; Zhu, Longchao; Lawson, Steven R; Fang, Ying

    2013-09-01

    Non-structural protein 1β (nsp1β) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) contains a papain-like cysteine protease (PLPβ) domain and has been identified as the main viral protein antagonizing the host innate immune response. In this study, nsp1β was determined to suppress the expression of reporter genes as well as to suppress 'self-expression' in transfected cells, and this activity appeared to be associated with its interferon (IFN) antagonist function. To knock down the effect of nsp1β on IFN activity, a panel of site-specific mutations in nsp1β was analysed. Double mutations K130A/R134A (type 1 PRRSV) or K124A/R128A (type 2 PRRSV) targeting a highly conserved motif of nsp1β, GKYLQRRLQ (in bold), impaired the ability of nsp1β to suppress IFN-β and reporter gene expression, as well as to suppress 'self-expression' in vitro. Subsequently, viable recombinant viruses vSD01-08-K130A/R134A and vSD95-21-K124A/R128A, containing double mutations in the GKYLQRRLQ motif were generated using reverse genetics. In comparison with WT viruses, these nsp1β mutants showed impaired growth ability in infected cells, but the PLPβ cleavage function was not directly affected. The expression of selected innate immune genes was determined in vSD95-21-K124A/R128A mutant-infected cells. The results consistently showed that gene expression levels of IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated gene 15 were upregulated in cells that were infected with the vSD95-21-K124A/R128A compared with that of WT virus. These data suggest that PRRSV nsp1β may selectively suppress cellular gene expression, including expression of genes involved in the host innate immune function. Modifying the key residues in the highly conserved GKYLQRRLQ motif could attenuate virus growth and improve the cellular innate immune responses. PMID:23761406

  10. Mutations in a Highly Conserved Motif of nsp1β Protein Attenuate the Innate Immune Suppression Function of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhua; Shyu, Duan-Liang; Shang, Pengcheng; Bai, Jianfa; Ouyang, Kang; Dhakal, Santosh; Hiremath, Jagadish; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nonstructural protein 1β (nsp1β) is a multifunctional viral protein, which is involved in suppressing the host innate immune response and activating a unique −2/−1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) signal for the expression of frameshifting products. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis analysis showed that the R128A or R129A mutation introduced into a highly conserved motif (123GKYLQRRLQ131) reduced the ability of nsp1β to suppress interferon beta (IFN-β) activation and also impaired nsp1β's function as a PRF transactivator. Three recombinant viruses, vR128A, vR129A, and vRR129AA, carrying single or double mutations in the GKYLQRRLQ motif were characterized. In comparison to the wild-type (WT) virus, vR128A and vR129A showed slightly reduced growth abilities, while the vRR129AA mutant had a significantly reduced growth ability in infected cells. Consistent with the attenuated growth phenotype in vitro, pigs infected with nsp1β mutants had lower levels of viremia than did WT virus-infected pigs. Compared to the WT virus in infected cells, all three mutated viruses stimulated high levels of IFN-α expression and exhibited a reduced ability to suppress the mRNA expression of selected interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). In pigs infected with nsp1β mutants, IFN-α production was increased in the lungs at early time points postinfection, which was correlated with increased innate NK cell function. Furthermore, the augmented innate response was consistent with the increased production of IFN-γ in pigs infected with mutated viruses. These data demonstrate that residues R128 and R129 are critical for nsp1β function and that modifying these key residues in the GKYLQRRLQ motif attenuates virus growth ability and improves the innate and adaptive immune responses in infected animals. IMPORTANCE PRRSV infection induces poor antiviral innate IFN and cytokine responses, which results in

  11. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins in unicellular eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Antos-Krzeminska, Nina; Sluse, Francis E

    2010-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are members of the mitochondrial anion carrier protein family that are present in the mitochondrial inner membrane and mediate free fatty acid (FFA)-activated, purine nucleotide (PN)-inhibited proton conductance. Since 1999, the presence of UCPs has been demonstrated in some non-photosynthesising unicellular eukaryotes, including amoeboid and parasite protists, as well as in non-fermentative yeast and filamentous fungi. In the mitochondria of these organisms, UCP activity is revealed upon FFA-induced, PN-inhibited stimulation of resting respiration and a decrease in membrane potential, which are accompanied by a decrease in membranous ubiquinone (Q) reduction level. UCPs in unicellular eukaryotes are able to divert energy from oxidative phosphorylation and thus compete for a proton electrochemical gradient with ATP synthase. Our recent work indicates that membranous Q is a metabolic sensor that might utilise its redox state to release the PN inhibition of UCP-mediated mitochondrial uncoupling under conditions of phosphorylation and resting respiration. The action of reduced Q (QH2) could allow higher or complete activation of UCP. As this regulatory feature was demonstrated for microorganism UCPs (A. castellanii UCP), plant and mammalian UCP1 analogues, and UCP1 in brown adipose tissue, the process could involve all UCPs. Here, we discuss the functional connection and physiological role of UCP and alternative oxidase, two main energy-dissipating systems in the plant-type mitochondrial respiratory chain of unicellular eukaryotes, including the control of cellular energy balance as well as preventive action against the production of reactive oxygen species.

  12. Molecular studies of the uncoupling protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ricquier, D.; Casteilla, L.; Bouillaud, F. )

    1991-06-01

    The uncoupling protein (UCP) is a proton/anion transporter found in the inner mitochondrial membrane of brown adipocyte. Although UCP has nor been detected in mitochondria from any other tissue, it shares structural and catalytic properties with several other mitochondrial carrier proteins. Although UCP was discovered only recently it is one of the most extensively studied mitochondrial carrier proteins.More recently, the mouse, rat, and human genes encoding for UCP have been isolated and sequenced. The availability of these various tools has led to several significant observations. UCP gene expression is strongly controlled at the level of transcription by signals that are activated after the stimulation of brown adipocytes by norepinephrine. The comparison of UCP gene with the genes encoding the adenine nucleotide translocator revealed the existence of structural and evolutionary homologies. Moreover, in humans the UCP gene and one form of adenine nucleotide translocator gene are located on the same chromosome. Recently, the expression of functional UCp in various heterologous systems was achieved (Xenopus oocytes, CHO cells, yeasts). These data will facilitate studies of the structure/function relationship in UCP (identification of residues involved in H{sup +} transport, Cl{sup {minus}} transport, nucleotide binding, mitochondrial targeting). Another aspect of the present research on UCP is the understanding of mechanisms that control UCP gene and the differentiated commitment of adipose precursor cells to thermogenic brown adipocytes.

  13. Uncoupled thermoelasticity solutions applied on beam dumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzia, A.; Antonakakis, T.

    2016-06-01

    In particle accelerators the process of beam absorption is vital. At CERN particle beams are accelerated at energies of the order of TeV. In the event of a system failure or following collisions, the beam needs to be safely absorbed by dedicated protecting blocks. The thermal shock caused by the rapid energy deposition within the absorbing block causes thermal stresses that may rise above critical levels. The present paper provides a convenient expression of such stresses under hypotheses described hereafter. The temperature field caused by the beam energy deposition is assumed to be Gaussian. Such a field models a non-diffusive heat deposition. These effects are described as thermoelastic as long as the stresses remain below the proportional limit and can be analytically modeled by the coupled equations of thermoelasticity. The analytical solution to the uncoupled thermoelastic problem in an infinite domain is presented herein and matched with a finite unit radius sphere. The assumption of zero diffusion as well as the validity of the match with a finite geometry is quantified such that the obtained solutions can be rigorously applied to real problems. Furthermore, truncated series solutions, which are not novel, are used for comparison purposes. All quantities are nondimensional and the problem reduces to a dependence of five dimensionless parameters. The equations of elasticity are presented in the potential formulation where the shear potential is assumed to be nil due to the source being a gradient and the absence of boundaries. Nevertheless equivalent three-dimensional stresses are computed using the compressive potential and optimized using standard analytical optimization methods. An alternative algorithm for finding the critical points of the three-dimensional stress function is presented. Finally, a case study concerning the proton synchrotron booster dump is presented where the aforementioned analytical solutions are used and the preceding assumptions

  14. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics/molecular mechanics (CPMD/MM) simulation study of coupling and uncoupling mechanisms of Cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Lian, Peng; Li, Jue; Wang, Dong-Qi; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2013-07-01

    The relevance of the pathway through which the second proton is delivered to the active site of P450cam and the subsequent coupling/uncoupling reactions has been investigated using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics/molecular mechanics (CPMD/MM) dynamics simulations. Five models have been prepared, representing delivery pathways in the wild-type enzyme and its mutants in which Thr252 mutated into other residues with different side-chain length and hydrophobicity. In the simulations, coupling reaction is observed in the wild-type enzyme (Model A) and its T252S mutant (Model B), while the uncoupling products are obtained in the other three models (C, D, and E). Different from previous studies, a dynamic process of the last stage of coupling/uncoupling was observed. We found that the peroxide bond cleavage in coupling, the Fe-O bond stretching in uncoupling, proton transfer, and electron delivery take place spontaneously. Moreover, besides the intrinsic chemical differences between the two peroxide oxygen atoms, water molecules in the active site and the proton transfer pathway may play an important role in the determination of coupling/uncoupling. We conclude that by maintaining a specific proton transfer channel, Asp251-Thr252 channel, the wild-type enzyme could efficiently deliver the second proton to the ideal position for coupling reaction. PMID:23742631

  15. eNOS-uncoupling in age-related erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J M; Bivalacqua, T J; Lagoda, G A; Burnett, A L; Musicki, B

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with ED. Although age-related ED is attributed largely to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the penis, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully defined. We evaluated whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the aged rat penis is a contributing mechanism. Correlatively, we evaluated the effect of replacement with eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) on erectile function in the aged rats. Male Fischer 344 'young' (4-month-old) and 'aged' (19-month-old) rats were treated with a BH(4) precursor sepiapterin (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle for 4 days. After 1-day washout, erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Endothelial dysfunction (eNOS uncoupling) and oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) were measured by conducting western blot in penes samples. Erectile response was significantly reduced in aged rats, whereas eNOS uncoupling and TBARS production were significantly increased in the aged rat penis compared with young rats. Sepiapterin significantly improved erectile response in aged rats and prevented increase in TBARS production, but did not affect eNOS uncoupling in the penis of aged rats. These findings suggest that aging induces eNOS uncoupling in the penis, resulting in increased oxidative stress and ED. PMID:21289638

  16. eNOS-uncoupling in age-related erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, JM; Bivalacqua, TJ; Lagoda, GA; Burnett, AL; Musicki, B

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with ED. Although age-related ED is attributed largely to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the penis, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully defined. We evaluated whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the aged rat penis is a contributing mechanism. Correlatively, we evaluated the effect of replacement with eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) on erectile function in the aged rats. Male Fischer 344 ‘young’ (4-month-old) and ‘aged’ (19-month-old) rats were treated with a BH4 precursor sepiapterin (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle for 4 days. After 1-day washout, erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Endothelial dysfunction (eNOS uncoupling) and oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) were measured by conducting western blot in penes samples. Erectile response was significantly reduced in aged rats, whereas eNOS uncoupling and TBARS production were significantly increased in the aged rat penis compared with young rats. Sepiapterin significantly improved erectile response in aged rats and prevented increase in TBARS production, but did not affect eNOS uncoupling in the penis of aged rats. These findings suggest that aging induces eNOS uncoupling in the penis, resulting in increased oxidative stress and ED. PMID:21289638

  17. Sludge reduction by uncoupling metabolism: SBR tests with para-nitrophenol and a commercial uncoupler.

    PubMed

    Zuriaga-Agustí, E; Mendoza-Roca, J A; Bes-Piá, A; Alonso-Molina, J L; Amorós-Muñoz, I

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays cost reduction is a very important issue in wastewater treatment plants. One way, is to minimize the sludge production. Microorganisms break down the organic matter into inorganic compounds through catabolism. Uncoupling metabolism is a method which promote catabolism reactions instead of anabolism ones, where adenosine triphosphate synthesis is inhibited. In this work, the influence of the addition of para-nitrophenol and a commercial reagent to a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) on sludge production and process performance has been analyzed. Three laboratory SBRs were operated in parallel to compare the effect of the addition of both reagents with a control reactor. SBRs were fed with synthetic wastewater and were operated with the same conditions. Results showed that sludge production was slightly reduced for the tested para-nitrophenol concentrations (20 and 25 mg/L) and for a LODOred dose of 1 mL/day. Biological process performance was not influenced and high COD removals were achieved. PMID:27505165

  18. Sludge reduction by uncoupling metabolism: SBR tests with para-nitrophenol and a commercial uncoupler.

    PubMed

    Zuriaga-Agustí, E; Mendoza-Roca, J A; Bes-Piá, A; Alonso-Molina, J L; Amorós-Muñoz, I

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays cost reduction is a very important issue in wastewater treatment plants. One way, is to minimize the sludge production. Microorganisms break down the organic matter into inorganic compounds through catabolism. Uncoupling metabolism is a method which promote catabolism reactions instead of anabolism ones, where adenosine triphosphate synthesis is inhibited. In this work, the influence of the addition of para-nitrophenol and a commercial reagent to a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) on sludge production and process performance has been analyzed. Three laboratory SBRs were operated in parallel to compare the effect of the addition of both reagents with a control reactor. SBRs were fed with synthetic wastewater and were operated with the same conditions. Results showed that sludge production was slightly reduced for the tested para-nitrophenol concentrations (20 and 25 mg/L) and for a LODOred dose of 1 mL/day. Biological process performance was not influenced and high COD removals were achieved.

  19. Pleiotropy and life history evolution in Drosophila melanogaster: uncoupling life span and early fecundity.

    PubMed

    Khazaeli, Aziz A; Curtsinger, James W

    2013-05-01

    Populations of Drosophila melanogaster that have been artificially selected for late age of reproduction evolve longer life spans and, in some cases, reduced early fecundity. The negative correlation is widely interpreted as evidence of antagonistic pleiotropy. Here, we show that the correlation breaks down in recombinant genomes. A major quantitative trait locus that increases adult life span by 20% has no detectable effect on early fecundity. Several recombinant genotypes are superflies, exhibiting both elevated early fecundity and long life. The genetic correlation of early fecundity and life span is not different from zero, while the midlife fecundity correlation is positive and statistically significant, suggesting age-specific adaptation. The results are not consistent with a dominant role for negative pleiotropy, but can be understood in terms of a mixture of pleiotropic and recombining nonpleiotropic elements. Life span and early fecundity can be genetically uncoupled.

  20. Identification of a nonsense mutation in APAF1 that is likely causal for a decrease in reproductive efficiency in Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Adams, Heather A; Sonstegard, Tad S; VanRaden, Paul M; Null, Daniel J; Van Tassell, Curt P; Larkin, Denis M; Lewin, Harris A

    2016-08-01

    The HH1 haplotype on chromosome 5 is associated with a reduced conception rate and a deficit of homozygotes at the population level in Holstein cattle. The source HH1 haplotype was traced to the bull Pawnee Farm Arlinda Chief (Chief), who was born in 1962 and has sired more than 16,000 daughters. We identified a nonsense mutation in APAF1 (apoptotic protease activating factor 1;APAF1 p.Q579X) within HH1 using whole-genome resequencing of Chief and 3 of his sons. This mutation is predicted to truncate 670 AA (53.7%) of the encoded APAF1 protein that contains a WD40 domain critical to protein-protein interactions. Initial screening revealed no homozygous individuals for the mutation in 758 animals previously genotyped, whereas all 497 HH1 carriers possessed 1 copy of the mutant allele. Subsequent commercial genotyping of 246,773 Holsteins revealed 5,299 APAF1 heterozygotes and zero homozygotes for the mutation. The causative role of this mutation is also supported by functional data in mice that have demonstrated Apaf1 to be an essential molecule in the cytochrome-c-mediated apoptotic cascade and directly implicated in developmental and neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, most Apaf1 homozygous knockouts die by day 16.5 of development. We thus propose that the APAF1 p.Q579X nonsense mutation is the functional equivalent of the Apaf1 knockout. This mutation has caused an estimated 525,000 spontaneous abortions worldwide over the past 35 years, accounting for approximately $420 million in losses. With the mutation identified, selection against the deleterious allele in breeding schemes has aided in eliminating this defect from the population, reducing carrier frequency from 8% in past decades to 2% in 2015. PMID:27289157

  1. Molecular cloning of amphioxus uncoupling protein and assessment of its uncoupling activity using a yeast heterologous expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kun; Sun, Guoxun; Lv, Zhiyuan; Wang, Chen; Jiang, Xueyuan; Li, Donghai; Zhang, Chenyu

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Invertebrates, for example amphioxus, do express uncoupling proteins. {yields} Both the sequence and the uncoupling activity of amphioxus UCP resemble UCP2. {yields} UCP1 is the only UCP that can form dimer on yeast mitochondria. -- Abstract: The present study describes the molecular cloning of a novel cDNA fragment from amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) encoding a 343-amino acid protein that is highly homologous to human uncoupling proteins (UCP), this protein is therefore named amphioxus UCP. This amphioxus UCP shares more homology with and is phylogenetically more related to mammalian UCP2 as compared with UCP1. To further assess the functional similarity of amphioxus UCP to mammalian UCP1 and -2, the amphioxus UCP, rat UCP1, and human UCP2 were separately expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the recombinant yeast mitochondria were isolated and assayed for the state 4 respiration rate and proton leak, using pYES2 empty vector as the control. UCP1 increased the state 4 respiration rate by 2.8-fold, and the uncoupling activity was strongly inhibited by GDP, while UCP2 and amphioxus UCP only increased the state 4 respiration rate by 1.5-fold and 1.7-fold in a GDP-insensitive manner, moreover, the proton leak kinetics of amphioxus UCP was very similar to UCP2, but much different from UCP1. In conclusion, the amphioxus UCP has a mild, unregulated uncoupling activity in the yeast system, which resembles mammalian UCP2, but not UCP1.

  2. Amyloid precursor protein mutation disrupts reproductive experience-enhanced normal cognitive development in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Jothishankar, Balaji; He, Ping; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Shen, Yong; Li, Rena

    2013-01-01

    Women experience dramatic changes in hormones, mood and cognition through different periods of their reproductive lives, particularly during pregnancy and giving birth. While limited human studies of early pregnancy and motherhood showed alteration of cognitive functions in later life, researches on rodents showed a persistent improvement of learning and memory performance in females with history of giving birth compared to virgin controls. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common dementia in elderly, is more prevalent in women than in men. One of the risk factors is related to the sharp reduction of estrogen in aged women. It is unknown whether the history of fertility activity plays any roles in altering risk of AD in females, such as altering cognitive function. Would reproductive experience alter the risk of AD in females? If so, what might be the mechanisms of the change? In this study, we examined the effects of reproductive experience on cognitive function in an AD transgenic mouse model (APP23) and age-matched wild-type non-transgenic control mice (WT). Our data showed an age-dependent effect of reproductive experience on learning and memory activity between breeders (had 1 or more litters) and non-breeders (virgins). More importantly, our data, for the first time, demonstrated a genotype-dependent effect of parity on cognitive function between APP23 and WT mice. At the age of 12 months, WT breeders outperform non-breeders in spatial working and reference memory while APP23 breeders performed worse in spatial learning and memory than age-matched APP23 non-breeders. These genotype- and age-dependent effects of reproductive activity on cognitions are significantly associated with changes of neuropathology of AD in the APP23 mice, expression of proteins related to synaptic plasticity and cognitive functions in the brain. PMID:23853041

  3. Alternative oxidase and uncoupling protein: thermogenesis versus cell energy balance.

    PubMed

    Jarmuszkiewicz, W; Sluse-Goffart, C M; Vercesi, A E; Sluse, F E

    2001-04-01

    The physiological role of an alternative oxidase and an uncoupling protein in plant and protists is discussed in terms of thermogenesis and energy metabolism balance in the cell. It is concluded that thermogenesis is restricted not only by a lower-limit size but also by a kinetically-limited stimulation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  4. Variation in Fetal Outcome, Viral Load and ORF5 Sequence Mutations in a Large Scale Study of Phenotypic Responses to Late Gestation Exposure to Type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ladinig, Andrea; Wilkinson, Jamie; Ashley, Carolyn; Detmer, Susan E.; Lunney, Joan K.; Plastow, Graham; Harding, John C. S.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of extensive research, the mechanisms of reproductive disease associated with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) are still poorly understood. The objectives of this large scale study were to evaluate associations between viral load and fetal preservation, determine the impact of type 2 PRRSv on fetal weights, and investigate changes in ORF5 PRRSv genome in dams and fetuses during a 21-day period following challenge. At gestation day 85 (±1), 114 gilts were experimentally infected with type 2 PRRSv, while 19 gilts served as reference controls. At necropsy, fetuses were categorized according to their preservation status and tissue samples were collected. PRRSv RNA concentrations were measured in gilt serum collected on days 0, 2, 6, and 21 post-infection, as well as in gilt and fetal tissues collected at termination. Fetal mortality was 41±22.8% in PRRS infected litters. Dead fetuses appeared to cluster in some litters but appeared solitary or random in others. Nine percent of surviving piglets were meconium-stained. PRRSv RNA concentration in fetal thymus, fetal serum and endometrium differed significantly across preservation category and was greatest in tissues of meconium-stained fetuses. This, together with the virtual absence of meconium staining in non-infected litters indicates it is an early pathological condition of reproductive PRRS. Viral load in fetal thymus and in fetal serum was positively associated with viral load in endometrium, suggesting the virus exploits dynamic linkages between individual maternal-fetal compartments. Point mutations in ORF5 sequences from gilts and fetuses were randomly located in 20 positions in ORF5, but neither nucleotide nor amino acid substitutions were associated with fetal preservation. PRRSv infection decreased the weights of viable fetuses by approximately 17%. The considerable variation in gilt and fetal outcomes provides tremendous opportunity for more detailed investigations of

  5. Robots Would Couple And Uncouple Fluid And Electrical Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Castillo, Eduardo Lopez; Davis, Virgil; Ferguson, Bob; Reichle, Garland

    1992-01-01

    Robots make and break connections between umbilical plates and mating connectors on rockets about to be launched. Sensing and control systems include vision, force, and torque subsystems. Enhances safety by making it possible to couple and uncouple umbilical plates quickly, without exposing human technicians to hazards of leaking fuels and oxidizers. Significantly reduces time spent to manually connect umbilicals. Robots based on similar principles used in refueling of National AeroSpace Plane (NASP) and satellites and orbital transfer vehicles in space.

  6. Uncoupling proteins: a complex journey to function discovery.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Federica; Senese, Rosalba; de Lange, Pieter; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia; Lombardi, Assunta

    2009-01-01

    Since their discovery, uncoupling proteins have aroused great interest due to the crucial importance of energy-dissipating system for cellular physiology. The uncoupling effect and the physiological role of UCP1 (the first-described uncoupling protein) are well established. However, the reactions catalyzed by UCP1 homologues (UCPs), and their physiological roles are still under debate, with the literature containing contrasting results. Current hypothesis propose several physiological functions for novel UCPs, such as: (i) attenuation of reactive oxygen species production and protection against oxidative damage, (ii) thermogenic function, although UCPs do not generally seem to affect thermogenesis, UCP3 can be thermogenic under certain conditions, (iii) involvement in fatty acid handling and/or transport, although recent experimental evidence argues against the previously hypothesized role for UCPs in the export of fatty acid anions, (iv) fatty acid hydroperoxide export, although this function, due to the paucity of the experimental evidence, remains hypothetical, (v) Ca(2+) uptake, although results for and against a role in Ca(2+) uptake are still emerging, (vi) a signaling role in pancreatic beta cells, where it attenuates glucose-induced insulin secretion. From the above, it is evident that more research will be needed to establish universally accepted functions for UCPs.

  7. Loss of UCP2 attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction without altering ROS production and uncoupling activity.

    PubMed

    Kukat, Alexandra; Dogan, Sukru Anil; Edgar, Daniel; Mourier, Arnaud; Jacoby, Christoph; Maiti, Priyanka; Mauer, Jan; Becker, Christina; Senft, Katharina; Wibom, Rolf; Kudin, Alexei P; Hultenby, Kjell; Flögel, Ulrich; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Ricquier, Daniel; Kunz, Wolfram S; Trifunovic, Aleksandra

    2014-06-01

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction is often accompanied by excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, we previously showed that an increase in random somatic mtDNA mutations does not result in increased oxidative stress. Normal levels of ROS and oxidative stress could also be a result of an active compensatory mechanism such as a mild increase in proton leak. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) was proposed to play such a role in many physiological situations. However, we show that upregulation of UCP2 in mtDNA mutator mice is not associated with altered proton leak kinetics or ROS production, challenging the current view on the role of UCP2 in energy metabolism. Instead, our results argue that high UCP2 levels allow better utilization of fatty acid oxidation resulting in a beneficial effect on mitochondrial function in heart, postponing systemic lactic acidosis and resulting in longer lifespan in these mice. This study proposes a novel mechanism for an adaptive response to mitochondrial cardiomyopathy that links changes in metabolism to amelioration of respiratory chain deficiency and longer lifespan. PMID:24945157

  8. Functional and immunochemical characterization of a mutant of Escherichia coli energy uncoupled for lactose transport

    SciTech Connect

    Herzlinger, D.; Carrasco, N.; Kaback, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Right-side-out cytoplasmic membrane vesicles from Escherichia coli ML 308-22, a mutant ''uncoupled'' for beta-galactoside/H/sup +/ symport are specifically defective in the ability to catalyze accumulation of methyl 1-thio-beta-D-galactopyranoside (TMG) in the presence of an H/sup +/ electrochemical gradient (interior negative and alkaline). Furthermore, the rate of carrier-mediated efflux under nonenergized conditions is slow and unaffected by ambient pH from pH 5.5 to 7.5, and TMG-induced H/sup +/ influx is only about 15% of that observed in vesicles containing wild-type lac permease (ML 308-225). Alternatively, ML 308-22 vesicles bind p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside and monoclonal antibody 4B1 to the same extent as ML 308-225 vesicles and catalyze facilitated diffusion and equilibrium exchange as well as ML 308-225 vesicles. When entrance counterflow is studied with external substrate at saturating and subsaturating concentrations, it is apparent that the mutation simulates the effects of deuterium oxide. That is, the mutation has no effect on the rate or extent of counterflow when external substrate is saturating but stimulates the efficiency of counterflow when external substrate is below the apparent K/sub m/. Moreover, although replacement of protium with deuterium stimulates counterflow in ML 308-225 vesicles when external substrate is subsaturating, the isotope has no effect on the mutant vesicles under the same conditions.

  9. Loss of UCP2 attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction without altering ROS production and uncoupling activity.

    PubMed

    Kukat, Alexandra; Dogan, Sukru Anil; Edgar, Daniel; Mourier, Arnaud; Jacoby, Christoph; Maiti, Priyanka; Mauer, Jan; Becker, Christina; Senft, Katharina; Wibom, Rolf; Kudin, Alexei P; Hultenby, Kjell; Flögel, Ulrich; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Ricquier, Daniel; Kunz, Wolfram S; Trifunovic, Aleksandra

    2014-06-01

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction is often accompanied by excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, we previously showed that an increase in random somatic mtDNA mutations does not result in increased oxidative stress. Normal levels of ROS and oxidative stress could also be a result of an active compensatory mechanism such as a mild increase in proton leak. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) was proposed to play such a role in many physiological situations. However, we show that upregulation of UCP2 in mtDNA mutator mice is not associated with altered proton leak kinetics or ROS production, challenging the current view on the role of UCP2 in energy metabolism. Instead, our results argue that high UCP2 levels allow better utilization of fatty acid oxidation resulting in a beneficial effect on mitochondrial function in heart, postponing systemic lactic acidosis and resulting in longer lifespan in these mice. This study proposes a novel mechanism for an adaptive response to mitochondrial cardiomyopathy that links changes in metabolism to amelioration of respiratory chain deficiency and longer lifespan.

  10. Loss of UCP2 Attenuates Mitochondrial Dysfunction without Altering ROS Production and Uncoupling Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kukat, Alexandra; Dogan, Sukru Anil; Edgar, Daniel; Mourier, Arnaud; Jacoby, Christoph; Maiti, Priyanka; Mauer, Jan; Becker, Christina; Senft, Katharina; Wibom, Rolf; Kudin, Alexei P.; Hultenby, Kjell; Flögel, Ulrich; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Ricquier, Daniel; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Trifunovic, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction is often accompanied by excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, we previously showed that an increase in random somatic mtDNA mutations does not result in increased oxidative stress. Normal levels of ROS and oxidative stress could also be a result of an active compensatory mechanism such as a mild increase in proton leak. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) was proposed to play such a role in many physiological situations. However, we show that upregulation of UCP2 in mtDNA mutator mice is not associated with altered proton leak kinetics or ROS production, challenging the current view on the role of UCP2 in energy metabolism. Instead, our results argue that high UCP2 levels allow better utilization of fatty acid oxidation resulting in a beneficial effect on mitochondrial function in heart, postponing systemic lactic acidosis and resulting in longer lifespan in these mice. This study proposes a novel mechanism for an adaptive response to mitochondrial cardiomyopathy that links changes in metabolism to amelioration of respiratory chain deficiency and longer lifespan. PMID:24945157

  11. Reproductive Hazards

    MedlinePlus

    ... and female reproductive systems play a role in pregnancy. Problems with these systems can affect fertility and ... a reproductive hazard can cause different effects during pregnancy, depending on when she is exposed. During the ...

  12. A novel loss-of-function mutation in Npr2 clarifies primary role in female reproduction and reveals a potential therapy for acromesomelic dysplasia, Maroteaux type

    PubMed Central

    Geister, Krista A.; Brinkmeier, Michelle L.; Hsieh, Minnie; Faust, Susan M.; Karolyi, I. Jill; Perosky, Joseph E.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Conti, Marco; Camper, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    We discovered a new spontaneous mutant allele of Npr2 named peewee (pwe) that exhibits severe disproportionate dwarfism and female infertility. The pwe phenotype is caused by a four base-pair deletion in exon 3 that generates a premature stop codon at codon 313 (L313X). The Npr2pwe/pwe mouse is a model for the human skeletal dysplasia acromesomelic dysplasia, Maroteaux type (AMDM). We conducted a thorough analysis of the female reproductive tract and report that the primary cause of Npr2pwe/pwe female infertility is premature oocyte meiotic resumption, while the pituitary and uterus appear to be normal. Npr2 is expressed in chondrocytes and osteoblasts. We determined that the loss of Npr2 causes a reduction in the hypertrophic and proliferative zones of the growth plate, but mineralization of skeletal elements is normal. Mutant tibiae have increased levels of the activated form of ERK1/2, consistent with the idea that natriuretic peptide receptor type 2 (NPR2) signaling inhibits the activation of the MEK/ERK mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Treatment of fetal tibiae explants with mitogen activated protein kinase 1 and 2 inhibitors U0126 and PD325901 rescues the Npr2pwe/pwe growth defect, providing a promising foundation for skeletal dysplasia therapeutics. PMID:23065701

  13. Stress-induced protein CSP 310: a third uncoupling system in plants.

    PubMed

    Kolesnichenko, A V; Pobezhimova, T P; Grabelnych, O I; Voinikov, V K

    2002-06-01

    Addition of the cold-stress-related protein CSP 310 to mitochondria isolated from winter wheat ( Triticum aestivum L. cv. Zalarinka), winter rye ( Secale cereale L. cv. Dymka), maize ( Zea mays L. cv. VIR 36) and pea ( Pisum sativum L. cv. Marat) caused an increase in non-phosphorylative respiration. This increase was inhibited by KCN, indicating that the protein is not a CN-resistant alternative oxidase. Unlike plant mitochondrial uncoupling proteins such as PUMP, the uncoupling action of CSP 310 did not depend on the presence of free fatty acids in the incubation medium. We propose that the mechanism of the uncoupling action of CSP 310 differs from that of other known plant uncoupling systems and that the CSP 310 uncoupling system is a third uncoupling system in cereals.

  14. Mutation of FVS1, encoding a protein with a sterile alpha motif domain, affects asexual reproduction in the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Iida, Yuichiro; Fujiwara, Kazuki; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Tsuge, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    Fusarium oxysporum produces three kinds of asexual spores: microconidia, macroconidia and chlamydospores. We previously analysed expressed sequence tags during vegetative growth and conidiation in F. oxysporum and found 42 genes that were markedly upregulated during conidiation compared to vegetative growth. One of the genes, FVS1, encodes a protein with a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain, which functions in protein-protein interactions that are involved in transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation and signal transduction. Here, we made FVS1-disrupted mutants from the melon wilt pathogen F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis. Although the mutants produced all three kinds of asexual spores with normal morphology, they formed markedly fewer microconidia and macroconidia than the wild type. The mutants appeared to have a defect in the development of the conidiogenesis cells, conidiophores and phialides, required for the formation of microconidia and macroconidia. In contrast, chlamydospore formation was dramatically promoted in the mutants. The growth rates of the mutants on media were slightly reduced, indicating that FVS1 is also involved in, but not essential for, vegetative growth. We also observed that mutation of FVS1 caused defects in conidial germination and virulence, suggesting that the Fvs1 has pleiotropic functions in F. oxysporum.

  15. Ischaemia-induced cellular electrical uncoupling and ventricular fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    Sudden death resulting from ventricular fibrillation (VF) during acute myocardial ischaemia forms an important contribution to mortality associated with infarction. Its temporal distribution is not known, but 30% of mortality occurs within the first 60 minutes. Two distinct phases of arrhythmias have been demonstrated in laboratory animals subjected to coronary occlusion. The mechanism of the second, 1B phase (which is associated with more lethal events than the first, 1A phase) is largely unknown but appears to be related to cellular uncoupling, i.e. the closure of gap junctions. Gap junctions are intercellular communication channels that are permeable for ions and metabolites and are necessary for normal propagation of electrical activation. It has been suggested that closure of gap junctions results in a largely inhomogeneous substrate in which microreentry forms the electrophysiological mechanism for VF. However, there is growing support for the hypothesis that arrhythmias relate to the persistence of residual coupling rather than to the occurrence of uncoupling. With this, the ischaemic midmyocardium can depress the intrinsically viable tissue of the ischaemic subepicardium and subendocardium and cause conduction slowing and block leading to arrhythmias. Progression of uncoupling terminates this interaction and allows the subepicardium and subendocardium to recover. Indeed, electrophysiological properties recover subepicardially whereas the midmyocardial tissue becomes inexcitable. In addition, activation patterns during VF become restricted to the two-dimensional plane of the subepicardium. These observations support the hypothesis of residual coupling as an arrhythmogenic mechanism during the delayed phase of acute ischaemia. Whether this mechanism is equally important in patients with remodelled and failing hearts can at this time only be speculated upon. However, modifying intercellular coupling might turn out a new antiarrhythmic therapy. ImagesFigure 1

  16. Unisexual reproduction reverses Muller's ratchet.

    PubMed

    Roach, Kevin C; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic basidiomycetous fungus that engages in outcrossing, inbreeding, and selfing forms of unisexual reproduction as well as canonical sexual reproduction between opposite mating types. Long thought to be clonal, >99% of sampled environmental and clinical isolates of C. neoformans are MATα, limiting the frequency of opposite mating-type sexual reproduction. Sexual reproduction allows eukaryotic organisms to exchange genetic information and shuffle their genomes to avoid the irreversible accumulation of deleterious changes that occur in asexual populations, known as Muller's ratchet. We tested whether unisexual reproduction, which dispenses with the requirement for an opposite mating-type partner, is able to purge the genome of deleterious mutations. We report that the unisexual cycle can restore mutant strains of C. neoformans to wild-type genotype and phenotype, including prototrophy and growth rate. Furthermore, the unisexual cycle allows attenuated strains to purge deleterious mutations and produce progeny that are returned to wild-type virulence. Our results show that unisexual populations of C. neoformans are able to avoid Muller's ratchet and loss of fitness through a unisexual reproduction cycle involving α-α cell fusion, nuclear fusion, and meiosis. Similar types of unisexual reproduction may operate in other pathogenic and saprobic eukaryotic taxa.

  17. Selective advantage for sexual reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2006-06-01

    This paper develops a simplified model for sexual reproduction within the quasispecies formalism. The model assumes a diploid genome consisting of two chromosomes, where the fitness is determined by the number of chromosomes that are identical to a given master sequence. We also assume that there is a cost to sexual reproduction, given by a characteristic time τseek during which haploid cells seek out a mate with which to recombine. If the mating strategy is such that only viable haploids can mate, then when τseek=0 , it is possible to show that sexual reproduction will always out compete asexual reproduction. However, as τseek increases, sexual reproduction only becomes advantageous at progressively higher mutation rates. Once the time cost for sex reaches a critical threshold, the selective advantage for sexual reproduction disappears entirely. The results of this paper suggest that sexual reproduction is not advantageous in small populations per se, but rather in populations with low replication rates. In this regime, the cost for sex is sufficiently low that the selective advantage obtained through recombination leads to the dominance of the strategy. In fact, at a given replication rate and for a fixed environment volume, sexual reproduction is selected for in high populations because of the reduced time spent finding a reproductive partner.

  18. Seasonal uncoupling of demographic processes in a marine clonal plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascaró, O.; Romero, J.; Pérez, M.

    2014-04-01

    In temperate regions, climatic factors impose a general seasonal pattern on seagrass growth that can be observed in leaf growth rates and, in small species, also in shoot density. Large variations in shoot density suggest a strong temporal uncoupling between shoot recruitment and shoot mortality, and the dependence of each of these processes on different drivers. Here we examine seasonal patterns of recruitment and mortality in the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa, one of the species most sensitive to seasonal forcing in the Mediterranean. We sampled two local populations submitted to different nutrient availability in Alfacs Bay (NW Mediterranean) and determined recruitment and mortality rates, as well as other plant traits, on a monthly basis. Our results confirm the hypothesized uncoupling, with maximum mortality 2 months after maximum recruitment. Whereas timing of recruitment was associated with light availability, and was supported by carbohydrate remobilisation, mortality was related to high water temperatures and probably also to light limitation in late summer due to self-shading. In the high-nutrient population, algal overgrowth caused further light deprivation, with mortality rates higher than in the low-nutrient population. It is emphasised that the demographic balance of the studied populations was negative for most of the year, with the exception of August and September. Therefore, caution is necessary when overall population trends are inferred from single annual sampling events.

  19. Focal gap junction uncoupling and spontaneous ventricular ectopy.

    PubMed

    Gutstein, David E; Danik, Stephan B; Lewitton, Steve; France, David; Liu, Fangyu; Chen, Franklin L; Zhang, Jie; Ghodsi, Newsha; Morley, Gregory E; Fishman, Glenn I

    2005-09-01

    Genetic studies in the mouse have demonstrated that conditional cardiac-restricted loss of connexin43 (Cx43), the major ventricular gap junction protein, is highly arrhythmogenic. However, whether more focal gap junction remodeling, as is commonly seen in acquired cardiomyopathies, influences the propensity for arrhythmogenesis is not known. We examined electrophysiological properties and the frequency of spontaneous and inducible arrhythmias in genetically engineered chimeric mice derived from injection of Cx43-deficient embryonic stem cells into wild-type recipient blastocysts. Chimeric mice had numerous well-circumscribed microscopic Cx43-negative foci in their hearts, comprising approximately 15% of the total surface area as determined by immunohistochemical analysis. Systolic function in the chimeric mice was significantly depressed as measured echocardiographically (19.0% decline in fractional shortening compared with controls, P < 0.05) and by invasive hemodynamics (17.6% reduction in change of pressure over time, P < 0.01). Chimeras had significantly more spontaneous arrhythmic events than controls (P < 0.01), including frequent runs of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in some of the chimeric mice. However, in contrast to mice with conditional cardiac-resricted loss of Cx43 in the heart, no sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias were observed. We conclude that focal areas of uncoupling in the myocardium increase the likelihood of arrhythmic triggers, but more widespread uncoupling is required to support sustained arrhythmias. PMID:15894579

  20. Focal gap junction uncoupling and spontaneous ventricular ectopy

    PubMed Central

    Gutstein, David E.; Danik, Stephan B.; Lewitton, Steve; France, David; Liu, Fangyu; Chen, Franklin L.; Zhang, Jie; Ghodsi, Newsha; Morley, Gregory E.; Fishman, Glenn I.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic studies in the mouse have demonstrated that conditional cardiac-restricted loss of connexin43 (Cx43), the major ventricular gap junction protein, is highly arrhythmogenic. However, whether more focal gap junction remodeling, as is commonly seen in acquired cardiomyopathies, influences the propensity for arrhythmogenesis is not known. We examined electrophysiological properties and the frequency of spontaneous and inducible arrhythmias in genetically engineered chimeric mice derived from injection of Cx43-deficient embryonic stem cells into wild-type recipient blastocysts. Chimeric mice had numerous well-circumscribed microscopic Cx43-negative foci in their hearts, comprising ~15% of the total surface area as determined by immunohistochemical analysis. Systolic function in the chimeric mice was significantly depressed as measured echocardiographically (19.0% decline in fractional shortening compared with controls, P < 0.05) and by invasive hemodynamics (17.6% reduction in change of pressure over time, P < 0.01). Chimeras had significantly more spontaneous arrhythmic events than controls (P < 0.01), including frequent runs of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in some of the chimeric mice. However, in contrast to mice with conditional cardiac-resticted loss of Cx43 in the heart, no sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias were observed. We conclude that focal areas of uncoupling in the myocardium increase the likelihood of arrhythmic triggers, but more widespread uncoupling is required to support sustained arrhythmias. PMID:15894579

  1. RNA structure-dependent uncoupling of substrate recognition and cleavage by Escherichia coli ribonuclease III

    PubMed Central

    Calin-Jageman, Irina; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2003-01-01

    Members of the ribonuclease III superfamily of double-strand-specific endoribonucleases participate in diverse RNA maturation and decay pathways. Ribonuclease III of the gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli processes rRNA and mRNA precursors, and its catalytic action can regulate gene expression by controlling mRNA translation and stability. It has been proposed that E.coli RNase III can function in a non-catalytic manner, by binding RNA without cleaving phosphodiesters. However, there has been no direct evidence for this mode of action. We describe here an RNA, derived from the T7 phage R1.1 RNase III substrate, that is resistant to cleavage in vitro by E.coli RNase III but retains comparable binding affinity. R1.1[CL3B] RNA is recognized by RNase III in the same manner as R1.1 RNA, as revealed by the similar inhibitory effects of a specific mutation in both substrates. Structure-probing assays and Mfold analysis indicate that R1.1[CL3B] RNA possesses a bulge– helix–bulge motif in place of the R1.1 asymmetric internal loop. The presence of both bulges is required for uncoupling. The bulge–helix–bulge motif acts as a ‘catalytic’ antideterminant, which is distinct from recognition antideterminants, which inhibit RNase III binding. PMID:12711683

  2. Developmental stress can uncouple relationships between physiology and behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Careau, Vincent; Buttemer, William A.; Buchanan, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic correlations (rP) have frequently been observed between physiological and behavioural traits, and the nature of these associations has been shown to be modulated by a range of environmental stressors. Studies to date have examined the effects of acute stressors on physiology–behaviour interrelations, but the potential for permanent changes induced by exposure to stress during development remains unexplored. We exposed female zebra finches to dietary restriction during the nestling stage and tested how this affected rP among a variety of physiological traits (haematocrit, stress-induced corticosterone level and basal metabolic rate (BMR)) and behavioural traits (activity and feeding rates in novel and familiar environments). Developmental stress completely uncoupled the relationship between activity in a novel environment and two physiological traits: haematocrit and BMR. This suggests that nutritionally based developmental stress has provoked changes in the energy budget that alleviate the trade-off between maintenance (BMR) and locomotor activities. PMID:25519754

  3. Uncoupling binding of substrate CO from turnover by vanadium nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chung; Fay, Aaron W.; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Krest, Courtney M.; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W.

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalysis by nitrogenase, particularly the reduction of N2 and CO by this enzyme, has tremendous significance in environment- and energy-related areas. Elucidation of the detailed mechanism of nitrogenase has been hampered by the inability to trap substrates or intermediates in a well-defined state. Here, we report the capture of substrate CO on the resting-state vanadium-nitrogenase in a catalytically competent conformation. The close resemblance of this active CO-bound conformation to the recently described structure of CO-inhibited molybdenum-nitrogenase points to the mechanistic relevance of sulfur displacement to the activation of iron sites in the cofactor for CO binding. Moreover, the ability of vanadium-nitrogenase to bind substrate in the resting-state uncouples substrate binding from subsequent turnover, providing a platform for generation of defined intermediate(s) of both CO and N2 reduction. PMID:26515097

  4. Uncoupling primer and releaser responses to pheromone in honey bees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozinger, Christina M.; Fischer, Patrick; Hampton, Jacob E.

    2007-05-01

    Pheromones produce dramatic behavioral and physiological responses in a wide variety of species. Releaser pheromones elicit rapid responses within seconds or minutes, while primer pheromones produce long-term changes which may take days to manifest. Honeybee queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) elicits multiple distinct behavioral and physiological responses in worker bees, as both a releaser and primer, and thus produces responses on vastly different time scales. In this study, we demonstrate that releaser and primer responses to QMP can be uncoupled. First, treatment with the juvenile hormone analog methoprene leaves a releaser response (attraction to QMP) intact, but modulates QMP’s primer effects on sucrose responsiveness. Secondly, two components of QMP (9-ODA and 9-HDA) do not elicit a releaser response (attraction) but are as effective as QMP at modulating a primer response, downregulation of foraging-related brain gene expression. These results suggest that different responses to a single pheromone may be produced via distinct pathways.

  5. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial uncoupling in a murine cancer cachexia model.

    PubMed

    Tzika, A Aria; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely Cristine; Shestov, Alexander A; Constantinou, Caterina; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Righi, Valeria; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Busquets, Silvia; Lopez-Soriano, Francisco J; Milot, Sylvain; Lepine, Francois; Mindrinos, Michael N; Rahme, Laurence G; Argiles, Josep M

    2013-09-01

    Approximately half of all cancer patients present with cachexia, a condition in which disease-associated metabolic changes lead to a severe loss of skeletal muscle mass. Working toward an integrated and mechanistic view of cancer cachexia, we investigated the hypothesis that cancer promotes mitochondrial uncoupling in skeletal muscle. We subjected mice to in vivo phosphorous-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy and subjected murine skeletal muscle samples to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The mice used in both experiments were Lewis lung carcinoma models of cancer cachexia. A novel 'fragmented mass isotopomer' approach was used in our dynamic analysis of 13C mass isotopomer data. Our 31P NMR and GC/MS results indicated that the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis rate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux were reduced by 49% and 22%, respectively, in the cancer-bearing mice (p<0.008; t-test vs. controls). The ratio of ATP synthesis rate to the TCA cycle flux (an index of mitochondrial coupling) was reduced by 32% in the cancer-bearing mice (p=0.036; t-test vs. controls). Genomic analysis revealed aberrant expression levels for key regulatory genes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the muscle fiber, consistent with the presence of abnormal, giant mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggest that mitochondrial uncoupling occurs in cancer cachexia and thus point to the mitochondria as a potential pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cachexia. These findings may prove relevant to elucidating the mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle wasting observed in other chronic diseases, as well as in aging.

  6. Reproductive health.

    PubMed

    1999-04-01

    This article explores the reproductive health status of China. Since 1990, China has stepped up its efforts in promoting reproductive health and maternal and child health. Several studies demonstrated a remarkable progress made in this area. By 1997, maternal and infant mortality rates have declined, while the penetration rate for the immunization program and inpatient delivery rate increased. Despite these achievements, however, much remains to be done such as the lack of client-centered approaches to meet the increasingly diverse needs of the population for family planning services. A survey conducted in 1995 showed that the country's family planning program was focused primarily on demographic issues while little attention was given to reproductive health objectives. The situation improved when the State Planning Commission implemented its pilot program called the Quality of Care in Family Planning in China. The program yielded encouraging results including a reoriented philosophy towards reproductive health services, enhanced service facilities, informed choices for family planning methods, and the development of an operational information system. Another strategy adopted to address fertility and reproductive health issues was the implementation of adolescent reproductive health education as a required course for senior middle schools. Lastly, this article provided a brief overview of China's HIV/AIDS situation.

  7. Invasion of novel habitats uncouples haplo-diplontic life cycles.

    PubMed

    Krueger-Hadfield, Stacy A; Kollars, Nicole M; Byers, James E; Greig, Thomas W; Hammann, Mareike; Murray, David C; Murren, Courtney J; Strand, Allan E; Terada, Ryuta; Weinberger, Florian; Sotka, Erik E

    2016-08-01

    Baker's Law predicts uniparental reproduction will facilitate colonization success in novel habitats. While evidence supports this prediction among colonizing plants and animals, few studies have investigated shifts in reproductive mode in haplo-diplontic species in which both prolonged haploid and diploid stages separate meiosis and fertilization in time and space. Due to this separation, asexual reproduction can yield the dominance of one of the ploidy stages in colonizing populations. We tested for shifts in ploidy and reproductive mode across native and introduced populations of the red seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla. Native populations in the northwest Pacific Ocean were nearly always attached by holdfasts to hard substrata and, as is characteristic of the genus, haploid-diploid ratios were slightly diploid-biased. In contrast, along North American and European coastlines, introduced populations nearly always floated atop soft-sediment mudflats and were overwhelmingly dominated by diploid thalli without holdfasts. Introduced populations exhibited population genetic signals consistent with extensive vegetative fragmentation, while native populations did not. Thus, the ecological shift from attached to unattached thalli, ostensibly necessitated by the invasion of soft-sediment habitats, correlated with shifts from sexual to asexual reproduction and slight to strong diploid bias. We extend Baker's Law by predicting other colonizing haplo-diplontic species will show similar increases in asexuality that correlate with the dominance of one ploidy stage. Labile mating systems likely facilitate colonization success and subsequent range expansion, but for haplo-diplontic species, the long-term eco-evolutionary impacts will depend on which ploidy stage is lost and the degree to which asexual reproduction is canalized. PMID:27286564

  8. Invasion of novel habitats uncouples haplo-diplontic life cycles.

    PubMed

    Krueger-Hadfield, Stacy A; Kollars, Nicole M; Byers, James E; Greig, Thomas W; Hammann, Mareike; Murray, David C; Murren, Courtney J; Strand, Allan E; Terada, Ryuta; Weinberger, Florian; Sotka, Erik E

    2016-08-01

    Baker's Law predicts uniparental reproduction will facilitate colonization success in novel habitats. While evidence supports this prediction among colonizing plants and animals, few studies have investigated shifts in reproductive mode in haplo-diplontic species in which both prolonged haploid and diploid stages separate meiosis and fertilization in time and space. Due to this separation, asexual reproduction can yield the dominance of one of the ploidy stages in colonizing populations. We tested for shifts in ploidy and reproductive mode across native and introduced populations of the red seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla. Native populations in the northwest Pacific Ocean were nearly always attached by holdfasts to hard substrata and, as is characteristic of the genus, haploid-diploid ratios were slightly diploid-biased. In contrast, along North American and European coastlines, introduced populations nearly always floated atop soft-sediment mudflats and were overwhelmingly dominated by diploid thalli without holdfasts. Introduced populations exhibited population genetic signals consistent with extensive vegetative fragmentation, while native populations did not. Thus, the ecological shift from attached to unattached thalli, ostensibly necessitated by the invasion of soft-sediment habitats, correlated with shifts from sexual to asexual reproduction and slight to strong diploid bias. We extend Baker's Law by predicting other colonizing haplo-diplontic species will show similar increases in asexuality that correlate with the dominance of one ploidy stage. Labile mating systems likely facilitate colonization success and subsequent range expansion, but for haplo-diplontic species, the long-term eco-evolutionary impacts will depend on which ploidy stage is lost and the degree to which asexual reproduction is canalized.

  9. Genipin Suppresses NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation Through Uncoupling Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Rajanbabu, Venugopal; Galam, Lakshmi; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Enciso, Juan; Tadikonda, Pratima; Lane, Troy N.; Bandyopadhyay, Sayantani; Parthasarathy, Prasanna Tamarapu; Cho, Young; Cho, Seong Ho; Lee, Yong Chul; Lockey, Richard F.; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2015-01-01

    Incomplete clearance of apoptotic cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) release are known to trigger inflammasome activation causing severe inflammation in acute lung injury and various metabolic and autoimmune diseases. Moreover, it has been reported that apoptotic cell clearance and ROS-mediated apoptosis critically depend on mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2). However, the relationship between UCP2 and inflammasome activation has not been studied. This report investigates the role of UCP2 in the expression and activation of NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome in human macrophages. We found that UCP2 overexpression significantly enhanced the expression levels of NLRP3. The NLRP3 expression levels were significantly suppressed in THP1 cells treated with genipin, a UCP2 inhibitor, compared to controls. In addition, genipin altered adenosine triphosphate (ATP)- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) secretion and significantly suppressed caspase-1 activity in inflammasome-activated human macrophages. Taken together, our results suggest that genipin modulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation and ATP- or H2O2-mediated IL-1β release. PMID:26123077

  10. Gravitropic microtubule reorientation can be uncoupled from growth.

    PubMed

    Himmelspach, R; Nick, P

    2001-01-01

    The causal relationship between gravitropic growth responses and microtubule reorientation has been studied. Growth and microtubule reorientation have been uncoupled during the gravitropic response of maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles. Microtubule orientation and growth were measured under three different conditions: (i) a gravitropic stimulation where the growth response was allowed to be expressed (intact seedlings were displaced from the vertical position by 90 degrees), (ii) a gravitropic stimulation where the growth response was suppressed (coleoptiles were attached to microscope slides and kept in a horizontal position), (iii) suppression of growth in the absence of gravitropic stimulation (coleoptiles were attached to microscope slides and kept in a vertical position). It was found that (i) gravitropic stimulation can induce a microtubular reorientation from transverse to longitudinal in the upper (slower growing) flank of the coleoptile, and an inhibition of growth; (ii) the reorientation of microtubules precedes the inhibition of growth; (iii) the gravitropic response of microtubules is weaker, not elevated, when the inhibition of growth is artificially enhanced by attaching the coleoptiles to a slide; and (iv) artificial inhibition of growth in the absence of gravitropic stimulation cannot induce a microtubular response. Thus, the extent of microtubule reorientation is not correlated with the extent of growth inhibition. Moreover, these findings demonstrate that microtubules do not reorient passively after growth changes, but actively in response to gravitropic stimulation. PMID:11216838

  11. Reversible uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation at low oxygen tension.

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, R S; Pearlstein, R D

    1983-01-01

    The stoichiometry of oxidative phosphorylation at low oxygen tension (less than 3 torr; O2 less than 5 microM) has been measured in rat liver mitochondria. In a steady-state model in which respiration rate was experimentally controlled by either oxygen or substrate (succinate) limitation, flux-dependent variation in the phosphorylation efficiency (P/O ratio) of stimulated mitochondrial respiration was evaluated. P/O ratio remained constant over a wide range of respiration rates in mitochondria limited only by substrate availability. In contrast, oxygen-limited mitochondria demonstrated a continuous decline in P/O ratio as respiration was increasingly restricted. Significant differences in the two test conditions were demonstrated throughout the range of analysis. The effect of oxygen limitation on phosphorylation efficiency was shown to be completely reversed by restoring zero-order kinetics associated with high oxygen tension. These findings are discussed in regard to a proposed uncoupling of mitochondrial coupling site II at low oxygen tension arising as a consequence of energy-dissipating electron flux through the ubiquinone-cytochrome b-c1 region of the respiratory chain (complex III). PMID:6577456

  12. Hepatic ATGL knockdown uncouples glucose intolerance from liver TAG accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kuok Teong; Mashek, Mara T; Bu, So Young; Mashek, Douglas G

    2013-01-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the predominant triacylglycerol (TAG) hydrolase in mammals; however, the tissue-specific effects of ATGL outside of adipose tissue have not been well characterized. Hence, we tested the contribution of hepatic ATGL on mediating glucose tolerance and insulin action. Glucose or insulin tolerance tests and insulin signaling were performed in C57BL/6 mice administered control (nongene specific shRNA) or Atgl shRNA adenoviruses. Glucose and lipid metabolism assays were conducted in primary hepatocytes isolated from mice transduced with control or Atgl shRNA adenoviruses. Knocking down hepatic ATGL completely abrogated the increase in serum insulin following either 1 or 12 wk of feeding a high-fat (HF) diet despite higher hepatic TAG content. Glucose tolerance tests demonstrated that ATGL knockdown normalized glucose tolerance in HF-diet-fed mice. The observed improvements in glucose tolerance were present despite unaltered hepatic insulin signaling and increased liver TAG. Mice with suppressed hepatic ATGL had reduced hepatic glucose production in vivo, and hepatocytes isolated from Atgl shRNA-treated mice displayed a 26% decrease in glucose production and a 38% increase in glucose oxidation compared to control cells. Taken together, these data suggest that hepatic ATGL knockdown enhances glucose tolerance by increasing hepatic glucose utilization and uncouples impairments in insulin action from hepatic TAG accumulation.

  13. Stochastic calculus for uncoupled continuous-time random walks.

    PubMed

    Germano, Guido; Politi, Mauro; Scalas, Enrico; Schilling, René L

    2009-06-01

    The continuous-time random walk (CTRW) is a pure-jump stochastic process with several applications not only in physics but also in insurance, finance, and economics. A definition is given for a class of stochastic integrals driven by a CTRW, which includes the Itō and Stratonovich cases. An uncoupled CTRW with zero-mean jumps is a martingale. It is proved that, as a consequence of the martingale transform theorem, if the CTRW is a martingale, the Itō integral is a martingale too. It is shown how the definition of the stochastic integrals can be used to easily compute them by Monte Carlo simulation. The relations between a CTRW, its quadratic variation, its Stratonovich integral, and its Itō integral are highlighted by numerical calculations when the jumps in space of the CTRW have a symmetric Lévy alpha -stable distribution and its waiting times have a one-parameter Mittag-Leffler distribution. Remarkably, these distributions have fat tails and an unbounded quadratic variation. In the diffusive limit of vanishing scale parameters, the probability density of this kind of CTRW satisfies the space-time fractional diffusion equation (FDE) or more in general the fractional Fokker-Planck equation, which generalizes the standard diffusion equation, solved by the probability density of the Wiener process, and thus provides a phenomenologic model of anomalous diffusion. We also provide an analytic expression for the quadratic variation of the stochastic process described by the FDE and check it by Monte Carlo.

  14. Mutations in troponin T associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy increase Ca(2+)-sensitivity and suppress the modulation of Ca(2+)-sensitivity by troponin I phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Messer, Andrew E; Bayliss, Christopher R; El-Mezgueldi, Mohammed; Redwood, Charles S; Ward, Douglas G; Leung, Man-Ching; Papadaki, Maria; Dos Remedios, Cristobal; Marston, Steven B

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effect of 7 Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)-causing mutations in troponin T (TnT) on troponin function in thin filaments reconstituted with actin and human cardiac tropomyosin. We used the quantitative in vitro motility assay to study Ca(2+)-regulation of unloaded movement and its modulation by troponin I phosphorylation. Troponin from a patient with the K280N TnT mutation showed no difference in Ca(2+)-sensitivity when compared with donor heart troponin and the Ca(2+)-sensitivity was also independent of the troponin I phosphorylation level (uncoupled). The recombinant K280N TnT mutation increased Ca(2+)-sensitivity 1.7-fold and was also uncoupled. The R92Q TnT mutation in troponin from transgenic mouse increased Ca(2+)-sensitivity and was also completely uncoupled. Five TnT mutations (Δ14, Δ28 + 7, ΔE160, S179F and K273E) studied in recombinant troponin increased Ca(2+)-sensitivity and were all fully uncoupled. Thus, for HCM-causing mutations in TnT, Ca(2+)-sensitisation together with uncoupling in vitro is the usual response and both factors may contribute to the HCM phenotype. We also found that Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can restore coupling to all uncoupled HCM-causing TnT mutations. In fact the combination of Ca(2+)-desensitisation and re-coupling due to EGCG completely reverses both the abnormalities found in troponin with a TnT HCM mutation suggesting it may have therapeutic potential. PMID:27036851

  15. Proton uptake and pKa changes in the uncoupled Asn139Cys variant of cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ann-Louise; Carlsson, Jens; Högbom, Martin; Hosler, Jonathan P; Gennis, Robert B; Brzezinski, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) is a membrane-bound enzyme that links electron transfer from cytochrome c to O(2) to proton pumping across the membrane. Protons are transferred through specific pathways that connect the protein surface with the catalytic site as well as the proton input with the proton output sides. Results from earlier studies have shown that one site within the so-called D proton pathway, Asn139, located ~10 Å from the protein surface, is particularly sensitive to mutations that uncouple the O(2) reduction reaction from the proton pumping activity. For example, none of the Asn139Asp (charged) or Asn139Thr (neutral) mutant CytcOs pump protons, although the proton-uptake rates are unaffected. Here, we have investigated the Asn139Cys and Asn139Cys/Asp132Asn mutant CytcOs. In contrast to other structural variants investigated to date, the Cys side chain may be either neutral or negatively charged in the experimentally accessible pH range. The data show that the Asn139Cys and Asn139Asp mutations result in the same changes of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters associated with the proton transfer. The similarity is not due to introduction of charge at position 139, but rather introduction of a protonatable group that modulates the proton connectivity around this position. These results illuminate the mechanism by which CytcO couples electron transfer to proton pumping.

  16. Reproductive physiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Russman, S.E.; Ellis, David H.; Gee, George F.; Mirande, Claire M.

    1996-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the general pattern of avian physiology applies to cranes, we have identified many physiological mechanisms (e.g., effects of disturbance) that need further study. Studies with cranes are expensive compared to those done with domestic fowl because of the crane's larger size, low reproductive rate, and delayed sexual maturity. To summarize, the crane reproductive system is composed of physiological and anatomical elements whose function is controlled by an integrated neural-endocrine system. Males generally produce semen at a younger age than when females lay eggs. Eggs are laid in clutches of two (1 to 3), and females will lay additional clutches if the preceding clutches are removed. Both sexes build nests and incubate the eggs. Molt begins during incubation and body molt may be completed annually in breeding pairs. However, remiges are replaced sequentially over 2 to 3 years, or abruptly every 2 to 3 years in other species. Most immature birds replace their juvenal remiges over a 2 to 3 year period. Stress interferes with reproduction in cranes by reducing egg production or terminating the reproductive effort. In other birds, stress elevates corticosterone levels and decreases LHRH release. We know little about the physiological response of cranes to stress.

  17. Reproductive hacking

    PubMed Central

    Dustin Rubinstein, C; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2014-01-01

    Seminal proteins are critical for reproductive success in all animals that have been studied. Although seminal proteins have been identified in many taxa, and female reproductive responses to receipt of these proteins have been documented in several, little is understood about the mechanisms by which seminal proteins affect female reproductive physiology. To explore this topic, we investigated how a Drosophila seminal protein, ovulin, increases ovulation rate in mated females. Ovulation is a relatively simple physiological process, with known female regulators: previous studies have shown that ovulation rate is promoted by the neuromodulator octopamine (OA) in D. melanogaster and other insects. We found that ovulin stimulates ovulation by increasing OA signaling in the female. This finding supports a model in which a male seminal protein acts through “hacking” a well-conserved, regulatory system females use to adjust reproductive output, rather than acting downstream of female mechanisms of control or in parallel pathways altogether. We also discuss similarities between 2 forms of intersexual control of behavior through chemical communication: seminal proteins and pheromones. PMID:25483253

  18. Do mutator mutations fuel tumorigenesis?

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward J; Prindle, Marc J; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2013-12-01

    The mutator phenotype hypothesis proposes that the mutation rate of normal cells is insufficient to account for the large number of mutations found in human cancers. Consequently, human tumors exhibit an elevated mutation rate that increases the likelihood of a tumor acquiring advantageous mutations. The hypothesis predicts that tumors are composed of cells harboring hundreds of thousands of mutations, as opposed to a small number of specific driver mutations, and that malignant cells within a tumor therefore constitute a highly heterogeneous population. As a result, drugs targeting specific mutated driver genes or even pathways of mutated driver genes will have only limited anticancer potential. In addition, because the tumor is composed of such a diverse cell population, tumor cells harboring drug-resistant mutations will exist prior to the administration of any chemotherapeutic agent. We present recent evidence in support of the mutator phenotype hypothesis, major arguments against this concept, and discuss the clinical consequences of tumor evolution fueled by an elevated mutation rate. We also consider the therapeutic possibility of altering the rate of mutation accumulation. Most significantly, we contend that there is a need to fundamentally reconsider current approaches to personalized cancer therapy. We propose that targeting cellular pathways that alter the rate of mutation accumulation in tumors will ultimately prove more effective than attempting to identify and target mutant driver genes or driver pathways.

  19. Female Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Female Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Teens > Female Reproductive System Print A ... and female reproductive systems. continue What Is the Female Reproductive System? Most species have two sexes: male and female. ...

  20. Rethinking reproductive "tourism" as reproductive "exile".

    PubMed

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Patrizio, Pasquale

    2009-09-01

    Whereas reproductive "tourism" implies leisure travel, reproductive "exile" bespeaks the numerous difficulties and constraints faced by infertile patients who are "forced" to travel globally for assisted reproduction. Given this reality, it is time to rethink the language of "reproductive tourism," replacing it with more accurate and patient-centered terms. PMID:19249025

  1. Identification of a novel mitochondrial uncoupler that does not depolarize the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kenwood, Brandon M; Weaver, Janelle L; Bajwa, Amandeep; Poon, Ivan K; Byrne, Frances L; Murrow, Beverley A; Calderone, Joseph A; Huang, Liping; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Tomsig, Jose L; Okabe, Kohki; Lo, Ryan H; Cameron Coleman, G; Columbus, Linda; Yan, Zhen; Saucerman, Jeffrey J; Smith, Jeffrey S; Holmes, Jeffrey W; Lynch, Kevin R; Ravichandran, Kodi S; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Santos, Webster L; Rogers, George W; Okusa, Mark D; Bayliss, Douglas A; Hoehn, Kyle L

    2014-04-01

    Dysregulation of oxidative phosphorylation is associated with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and some of the most prevalent human diseases including obesity, cancer, diabetes, neurodegeneration, and heart disease. Chemical 'mitochondrial uncouplers' are lipophilic weak acids that transport protons into the mitochondrial matrix via a pathway that is independent of ATP synthase, thereby uncoupling nutrient oxidation from ATP production. Mitochondrial uncouplers also lessen the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane and thereby increase the rate of mitochondrial respiration while decreasing production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mitochondrial uncouplers are valuable chemical tools that enable the measurement of maximal mitochondrial respiration and they have been used therapeutically to decrease mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. However, the most widely used protonophore uncouplers such as carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and 2,4-dinitrophenol have off-target activity at other membranes that lead to a range of undesired effects including plasma membrane depolarization, mitochondrial inhibition, and cytotoxicity. These unwanted properties interfere with the measurement of mitochondrial function and result in a narrow therapeutic index that limits their usefulness in the clinic. To identify new mitochondrial uncouplers that lack off-target activity at the plasma membrane we screened a small molecule chemical library. Herein we report the identification and validation of a novel mitochondrial protonophore uncoupler (2-fluorophenyl){6-[(2-fluorophenyl)amino](1,2,5-oxadiazolo[3,4-e]pyrazin-5-yl)}amine, named BAM15, that does not depolarize the plasma membrane. Compared to FCCP, an uncoupler of equal potency, BAM15 treatment of cultured cells stimulates a higher maximum rate of mitochondrial respiration and is less cytotoxic. Furthermore, BAM15 is bioactive in vivo and dose

  2. [NOS UNCOUPLING IS ACCOMPANIED WITH INDUCTION OF THE OXIDATIVE STRESS AND THE CARDIOHEMODYNAMICS DISTURBANCES IN HYPERTENSION].

    PubMed

    Kotsuruba, A V; Dorofeyeva, N A; Sagach, V F

    2015-01-01

    We compared the performance of cardiaohemodynamics and indicators of oxidative and nitrosative stress in the heart and aorta in normotensive Wistar rats (WKR) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). On the basis of experimentally determined parameters to calculate cNOS uncoupling index and biochemical index of function (BIF) in these organs of the cardiovascular system. In the heart, and especially in the aorta of SHR develop a combined oxidative and nitrosative stress that leads to cNOS uncoupling, BIF lowering that correlate with lowering of systolic and diastolic functions, inhibition of the efficiency Frank-Starling mechanism, oxygen consumption of the heart and increasing arterial stiffness. We made the assumption of the existence of the vicious circle of enhancing oxidative stress in organs of the cardiovascular system due to additional superoxide generation by uncoupling cNOS. PMID:26495730

  3. N-Terminally Glutamate-Substituted Analogue of Gramicidin A as Protonophore and Selective Mitochondrial Uncoupler

    PubMed Central

    Sorochkina, Alexandra I.; Plotnikov, Egor Y.; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I.; Kovalchuk, Sergei I.; Kotova, Elena A.; Sychev, Sergei V.; Zorov, Dmitry B.; Antonenko, Yuri N.

    2012-01-01

    Limited uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation could be beneficial for cells by preventing excessive generation of reactive oxygen species. Typical uncouplers are weak organic acids capable of permeating across membranes with a narrow gap between efficacy and toxicity. Aimed at designing a nontoxic uncoupler, the protonatable amino acid residue Glu was substituted for Val at the N-terminus of the pentadecapeptide gramicidin A (gA). The modified peptide [Glu1]gA exhibited high uncoupling activity in isolated mitochondria, in particular, abolishing membrane potential at the inner mitochondrial membrane with the same or even larger efficacy as gA. With mitochondria in cell culture, the depolarizing activity of [Glu1]gA was observed at concentrations by an order of magnitude lower than those of gA. On the contrary, [Glu1]gA was much less potent in forming proton channels in planar lipid bilayers than gA. Remarkably, at uncoupling concentrations, [Glu1]gA did not alter cell morphology and was nontoxic in MTT test, in contrast to gA showing high toxicity. The difference in the behavior of [Glu1]gA and gA in natural and artificial membranes could be ascribed to increased capability of [Glu1]gA to permeate through membranes and/or redistribute between different membranes. Based on the protective role of mild uncoupling, [Glu1]gA and some other proton-conducting gA analogues may be considered as prototypes of prospective therapeutic agents. PMID:22911866

  4. Renal transplantation induces mitochondrial uncoupling, increased kidney oxygen consumption, and decreased kidney oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Papazova, Diana A; Friederich-Persson, Malou; Joles, Jaap A; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an acknowledged pathway to renal injury and ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) and is known to reduce renal oxygen tension (Po2). We hypothesized that renal I/R increases oxidative damage and induces mitochondrial uncoupling, resulting in increased oxygen consumption and hence kidney hypoxia. Lewis rats underwent syngenic renal transplantation (TX) and contralateral nephrectomy. Controls were uninephrectomized (1K-CON) or left untreated (2K-CON). After 7 days, urinary excretion of protein and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were measured, and after 14 days glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal blood flow, whole kidney Qo2, cortical Po2, kidney cortex mitochondrial uncoupling, renal oxidative damage, and tubulointerstitial injury were assessed. TX, compared with 1K-CON, resulted in mitochondrial uncoupling mediated via uncoupling protein-2 (16 ± 3.3 vs. 0.9 ± 0.4 pmol O2 · s(-1)· mg protein(-1), P < 0.05) and increased whole kidney Qo2 (55 ± 16 vs. 33 ± 10 μmol O2/min, P < 0.05). Corticomedullary Po2 was lower in TX compared with 1K-CON (30 ± 13 vs. 47 ± 4 μM, P < 0.05) whereas no significant difference was observed between 2K-CON and 1K-CON rats. Proteinuria, oxidative damage, and the tubulointerstitial injury score were not significantly different in 1K-CON and TX. Treatment of donors for 5 days with mito-TEMPO reduced mitochondrial uncoupling but did not affect renal hemodynamics, Qo2, Po2, or injury. Collectively, our results demonstrate increased mitochondrial uncoupling as an early event after experimental renal transplantation associated with increased oxygen consumption and kidney hypoxia in the absence of increases in markers of damage.

  5. N-terminally glutamate-substituted analogue of gramicidin A as protonophore and selective mitochondrial uncoupler.

    PubMed

    Sorochkina, Alexandra I; Plotnikov, Egor Y; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Kovalchuk, Sergei I; Kotova, Elena A; Sychev, Sergei V; Zorov, Dmitry B; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2012-01-01

    Limited uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation could be beneficial for cells by preventing excessive generation of reactive oxygen species. Typical uncouplers are weak organic acids capable of permeating across membranes with a narrow gap between efficacy and toxicity. Aimed at designing a nontoxic uncoupler, the protonatable amino acid residue Glu was substituted for Val at the N-terminus of the pentadecapeptide gramicidin A (gA). The modified peptide [Glu1]gA exhibited high uncoupling activity in isolated mitochondria, in particular, abolishing membrane potential at the inner mitochondrial membrane with the same or even larger efficacy as gA. With mitochondria in cell culture, the depolarizing activity of [Glu1]gA was observed at concentrations by an order of magnitude lower than those of gA. On the contrary, [Glu1]gA was much less potent in forming proton channels in planar lipid bilayers than gA. Remarkably, at uncoupling concentrations, [Glu1]gA did not alter cell morphology and was nontoxic in MTT test, in contrast to gA showing high toxicity. The difference in the behavior of [Glu1]gA and gA in natural and artificial membranes could be ascribed to increased capability of [Glu1]gA to permeate through membranes and/or redistribute between different membranes. Based on the protective role of mild uncoupling, [Glu1]gA and some other proton-conducting gA analogues may be considered as prototypes of prospective therapeutic agents.

  6. Genetic segregation and the maintenance of sexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, M; Jenkins, C D

    1989-05-25

    Sexual reproduction confronts evolutionary biology with a paradox: other things being equal, an asexual (all-female) population will have twice the reproductive potential of a competing sexual population and therefore should rapidly drive the sexual population to extinction. Thus, the persistence of sexual reproduction in most life forms implies a compensatory advantage to sexual reproduction. Work on this problem has emphasized the evolutionary advantages produced by the genetic recombination that accompanies sexual reproduction. Here we show that genetic segregation produces an advantage to sexual reproduction even in the absence of an advantage from recombination. Segregation in a diploid sexual population allows selection to carry a single advantageous mutation to a homozygous state, whereas two separate mutations are required in a parthenogenetic population. The complete fixation of advantageous mutations is thus delayed in a heterozygous state in asexual populations. Calculation of the selective load incurred suggests that it may offset the intrinsic twofold reproductive advantage of asexual reproduction and maintain sexual reproduction in diploid populations.

  7. Coevolution of robustness, epistasis, and recombination favors asexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    MacCarthy, Thomas; Bergman, Aviv

    2007-07-31

    The prevalence of sexual reproduction remains one of the most perplexing phenomena in evolutionary biology. The deterministic mutation hypothesis postulates that sexual reproduction will be advantageous under synergistic epistasis, a condition in which mutations cause a greater reduction in fitness when combined than would be expected from their individual effects. The inverse condition, antagonistic epistasis, correspondingly is predicted to favor asexual reproduction. To assess this hypothesis, we introduce a finite population evolutionary process that combines a recombination modifier formalism with a gene-regulatory network model. We demonstrate that when reproductive mode and epistasis are allowed to coevolve, asexual reproduction outcompetes sexual reproduction. In addition, no correlation is found between the level of synergistic epistasis and the fixation time of the asexual mode. However, a significant correlation is found between the level of antagonistic epistasis and asexual mode fixation time. This asymmetry can be explained by the greater reduction in fitness imposed by sexual reproduction as compared with asexual reproduction. Our findings present evidence and suggest plausible explanations that challenge both the deterministic mutation hypothesis and recent arguments asserting the importance of emergent synergistic epistasis in the maintenance of sexual reproduction.

  8. A critical tyrosine residue determines the uncoupling protein-like activity of the yeast mitochondrial oxaloacetate carrier.

    PubMed

    Luévano-Martínez, Luis A; Barba-Ostria, Carlos; Araiza-Olivera, Daniela; Chiquete-Félix, Natalia; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Rial, Eduardo; Georgellis, Dimitris; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador

    2012-04-01

    The mitochondrial Oac (oxaloacetate carrier) found in some fungi and plants catalyses the uptake of oxaloacetate, malonate and sulfate. Despite their sequence similarity, transport specificity varies considerably between Oacs. Indeed, whereas ScOac (Saccharomyces cerevisiae Oac) is a specific anion-proton symporter, the YlOac (Yarrowia lipolytica Oac) has the added ability to transport protons, behaving as a UCP (uncoupling protein). Significantly, we identified two amino acid changes at the matrix gate of YlOac and ScOac, tyrosine to phenylalanine and methionine to leucine. We studied the role of these amino acids by expressing both wild-type and specifically mutated Oacs in an Oac-null S. cerevisiae strain. No phenotype could be associated with the methionine to leucine substitution, whereas UCP-like activity was dependent on the presence of the tyrosine residue normally expressed in the YlOac, i.e. Tyr-ScOac mediated proton transport, whereas Phe-YlOac lost its protonophoric activity. These findings indicate that the UCP-like activity of YlOac is determined by the tyrosine residue at position 146.

  9. Uncoupling protein expression in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue in response to in vivo porcine somatotropin treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The uncoupling proteins are thought to be involved in waste heat production, reducing the energy efficiency of growth in animals. Previous studies have detected their presence in swine and their regulation by the endocrine system. This study attempted to determine whether the uncoupling proteins 2...

  10. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... gamete, the egg or ovum , meet in the female's reproductive system to create a new individual. Both the male and female reproductive systems are essential for reproduction. Humans, like other organisms, ...

  11. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... gamete, the egg or ovum, meet in the female's reproductive system to create a baby. Both the male and female reproductive systems are essential for reproduction. Humans pass certain characteristics ...

  12. Normal Female Reproductive Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the female reproductive system; drawing shows the uterus, myometrium (muscular outer layer ...

  13. Female Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Female Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Parents > Female Reproductive System Print A ... the egg or sperm. continue Components of the Female Reproductive System Unlike the male, the human female has a ...

  14. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  15. Receptor antagonism/agonism can be uncoupled from pharmacoperone activity.

    PubMed

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Spicer, Timothy P; Smith, Emery; Bannister, Thomas D; Kenakin, Terry; Scampavia, Louis; Conn, P Michael

    2016-10-15

    Pharmacoperones rescue misrouted mutants of the vasopressin receptor type 2 (V2R) and enable them to traffic to the correct biological locus where they function. Previously, a library of nearly 645,000 structures was interrogated with a high throughput screen; pharmacoperones were identified for V2R mutants with a view toward correcting the underlying mutational defects in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In the present study, an orthologous assay was used to evaluate hits from the earlier study. We found no consistent relation between antagonism or agonism and pharmacoperone activity. Active pharmacoperones were identified which had minimal antagonistic activity. This increases the therapeutic reach of these drugs, since virtually all pharmacoperone drugs reported to date were selected from peptidomimetic antagonists. Such mixed-activity drugs have a complex pharmacology limiting their therapeutic utility and requiring their removal prior to stimulation of the receptor with agonist. PMID:27389877

  16. [Medical genetics in reproductive medicine].

    PubMed

    Macek, M; Vilímová, S; Potuzníková, P; Yurov, Y; Vorsanova, S; Diblík, J; Krebsová, A; Machatková, M; Koudová, M; Alánová, R; Matĕjcková, M; Hladíková, E; Broucková, M; Hüttelová, R; Vincenciová, R; Paulasová, P; Brandjeská, M; Uhrová, E; Kratĕnová, A; Smetanová, I; Novotná, D; Chudoba, D; Kulovaný, E; Krutílková, V; Hromadníková, I; Mardesic, T; Macek, M

    2002-01-01

    Reproductive genetics (RG) is another new field of medical genetics, integrated with reproductive medicine, assisted reproduction and developmental genetic. RG is closely linked to the perioconceptional prevention, perinatology, ultrasound and biochemical screening in the end of the first and beginning of the second trimesters. RG is based on the system of specialized genetic counseling, clinical cytogenetics, molecular cytogenetics and molecular genetics to provide prefertilization, preimplantation and classical prenatal diagnosis in the Ist to IIIrd trimesters. Thus, RG is part of the fetal medicine and therapy. The six years experience with RG is summarized. A system of the specialized health care, organized, if possible in one integrated center of RG and reproductive medicine (RM) is presented. Reproductive medicine provides all necessary clinical gynecological and andrological surveillance, with assisted reproduction and further obstetrical ultrasound examinations, including nuchal translucency measurements and 2D, 3D ultrasound, echocardiography examinations, if indicated, as well as the invasive method of prenatal diagnosis and perinatology care. Specialized genetic counseling and cytogenetic analysis, if indicated, should be offered to all partners with reproductive disorders as well as to oocyte donors. Chromosome anomalies are disclosed in 6% of men with abnormal sperm analysis as well as in women with severe reproductive disorders. In males with severe oligo, azoospermia, the sperm aneuploidy analysis by molecular cytogenetic methods is recommended. Advised is also the molecular genetic detection of Y chromosome microdeletions, which is detected in 9% of our azoospermic men with deletions in AZFb region. CFTR gene mutations and intron 8 and 10 polymorphism examination is provided not only in men with obstructive azoospermia (CBAVD), but also if severe oligospermy with less than 1 x 10(6) sperm/ml is detected. Molecular genetic analysis of thrombophilic

  17. A novel amino acid and metabolomics signature in mice overexpressing muscle uncoupling protein 3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and is known to lower mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and promote fatty acid oxidation; however, the global impact of UCP3 activity on skeletal muscle and whole body metabolism has not been extensively studied. We utilized unt...

  18. Role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 in cancer cell resistance to gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Fiorini, Claudia; Dando, Ilaria; Menegazzi, Marta; Sgarbossa, Anna; Costanzo, Chiara; Palmieri, Marta; Donadelli, Massimo

    2012-10-01

    Cancer cells exhibit an endogenous constitutive oxidative stress higher than that of normal cells, which renders tumours vulnerable to further reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) can mitigate oxidative stress by increasing the influx of protons into the mitochondrial matrix and reducing electron leakage and mitochondrial superoxide generation. Here, we demonstrate that chemical uncouplers or UCP2 over-expression strongly decrease mitochondrial superoxide induction by the anticancer drug gemcitabine (GEM) and protect cancer cells from GEM-induced apoptosis. Moreover, we show that GEM IC(50) values well correlate with the endogenous level of UCP2 mRNA, suggesting a critical role for mitochondrial uncoupling in GEM resistance. Interestingly, GEM treatment stimulates UCP2 mRNA expression suggesting that mitochondrial uncoupling could have a role also in the acquired resistance to GEM. Conversely, UCP2 inhibition by genipin or UCP2 mRNA silencing strongly enhances GEM-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and apoptosis, synergistically inhibiting cancer cell proliferation. These events are significantly reduced by the addition of the radical scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine or MnSOD over-expression, demonstrating a critical role of the oxidative stress. Normal primary fibroblasts are much less sensitive to GEM/genipin combination. Our results demonstrate for the first time that UCP2 has a role in cancer cell resistance to GEM supporting the development of an anti-cancer therapy based on UCP2 inhibition associated to GEM treatment.

  19. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by curcumin: Implication of its cellular mechanism of action

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Han Wern; Lim, Hwee Ying; Wong, Kim Ping

    2009-11-06

    Curcumin is a phytochemical isolated from the rhizome of turmeric. Recent reports have shown curcumin to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties as well as affecting the 5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), mTOR and STAT-3 signaling pathways. We provide evidence that curcumin acts as an uncoupler. Well-established biochemical techniques were performed on isolated rat liver mitochondria in measuring oxygen consumption, F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase activity and ATP biosynthesis. Curcumin displays all the characteristics typical of classical uncouplers like fccP and 2,4-dinitrophenol. In addition, at concentrations higher than 50 {mu}M, curcumin was found to inhibit mitochondrial respiration which is a characteristic feature of inhibitory uncouplers. As a protonophoric uncoupler and as an activator of F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase, curcumin causes a decrease in ATP biosynthesis in rat liver mitochondria. The resulting change in ATP:AMP could disrupt the phosphorylation status of the cell; this provides a possible mechanism for its activation of AMPK and its downstream mTOR and STAT-3 signaling.

  20. Hyperthyroidism increases the uncoupled ATPase activity and heat production by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Ana Paula; Da-Silva, Wagner S; Carvalho, Denise P; De Meis, Leopoldo

    2003-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase is able to modulate the distribution of energy released during ATP hydrolysis, so that a portion of energy is used for Ca2+ transport (coupled ATPase activity) and a portion is converted into heat (uncoupled ATPase activity). In this report it is shown that T4 administration to rabbits promotes an increase in the rates of both the uncoupled ATPase activity and heat production in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, and that the degree of activation varies depending on the muscle type used. In white muscles hyperthyroidism promotes a 0.8-fold increase of the uncoupled ATPase activity and in red muscle a 4-fold increase. The yield of vesicles from hyperthyroid muscles is 3-4-fold larger than that obtained from normal muscles; thus the rate of heat production by the Ca2+-ATPase expressed in terms of g of muscle in hyperthyroidism is increased by a factor of 3.6 in white muscles and 12.0 in red muscles. The data presented suggest that the Ca2+-ATPase uncoupled activity may represent one of the heat sources that contributes to the enhanced thermogenesis noted in hyperthyroidism. PMID:12887329

  1. Lichen acids as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation of mouse-liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Abo-Khatwa, A N; al-Robai, A A; al-Jawhari, D A

    1996-01-01

    Three lichen acids-namely, (+)usnic acid, vulpinic acid, and atranorin-were isolated from three lichen species (Usnea articulata, Letharia vulpina, and Parmelia tinctorum, respectively). The effects of these lichen products on mice-liver mitochondrial oxidative functions in various respiratory states and on oxidative phosphorylation were studied polarographically in vitro. The lichen acids exhibited characteristics of the 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a classical uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, they released respiratory control and oligomycin inhibited respiration, hindered ATP synthesis, and enhanced Mg(+2)-ATPase activity. (+)Usnic acid at a concentration of 0.75 microM inhibited ADP/O ratio by 50%, caused maximal stimulation of both state-4 respiration (100%) and ATPase activity (300%). Atranorin was the only lichen acid with no significant effect on ATPase. The uncoupling effect was dose-dependent in all cases. The minimal concentrations required to cause complete uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation were as follows: (+)usnic acid (1 microM), vulpinic acid, atranorin (5 microM) and DNP (50 microM). It was postulated that the three lichen acids induce uncoupling by acting on the inner mitochondrial membrane through their lipophilic properties and protonophoric activities. PMID:8726330

  2. Retinoids activate proton transport by the uncoupling proteins UCP1 and UCP2.

    PubMed

    Rial, E; González-Barroso, M; Fleury, C; Iturrizaga, S; Sanchis, D; Jiménez-Jiménez, J; Ricquier, D; Goubern, M; Bouillaud, F

    1999-11-01

    In mammalian brown adipose tissue, thermogenesis is explained by uncoupling mitochondrial respiration from ATP synthesis. Uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) is responsible for this uncoupled state, because it allows proton re-entry into the matrix and thus dissipates the proton gradient generated by the respiratory chain. Proton transport by UCP1 is regulated negatively by nucleotides and positively by fatty acids. Adrenergic stimulation of brown adipocytes stimulates lipolysis and therefore enhances uncoupling and thermogenesis. Adrenergic stimulation also boosts ucp1 gene transcription. Since retinoic acid also promotes ucp1 gene transcription and its structure makes it a possible activator of UCP1, we hypothesized that retinoic acid, like noradrenaline, could have a dual action and trigger the activity of the protein UCP1 itself. Here we show that retinoic acid strongly increases proton transport by UCP1 in brown adipose tissue mitochondria and that it is much more potent than fatty acids. These data are corroborated with yeast mitochondria where UCP1 was introduced by genetic manipulation. The yeast expression system allows the comparison of the UCP1 with the newly described homologues UCP2 and UCP3. The search for regulators of UCP2 has demonstrated that it is positively regulated by retinoids in a pH-dependent manner.

  3. Estrogen down-regulates uncoupling proteins and increases oxidative stress in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Valle, Adamo; Company, Maria Margarita; Garau, Isabel; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2010-02-15

    Oxidative stress has been postulated as one of the mechanisms underlying the estrogen carcinogenic effect in breast cancer. Estrogens are known to increase mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) by an unknown mechanism. Given that uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are key regulators of mitochondrial energy efficiency and ROS production, our aim was to check the presence and activity of UCPs in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-negative breast cancer cells and tumors, as well as their relation to oxidative stress. Estrogen (1 nM) induced higher oxidative stress in the ER-positive MCF-7 cell line, showing increased mitochondrial membrane potential, H(2)O(2) levels, and DNA and protein damage compared to ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. All isoforms of uncoupling proteins were highly expressed in ER-positive breast cancer cells and tumors compared to negative ones. ROS production in mitochondria isolated from MCF-7 was increased by inhibition of UCPs with GDP, but not in mitochondria from MDA-MB-231. Estrogen treatment decreased uncoupling protein and catalase levels in MCF-7 and decreased GDP-dependent ROS production in isolated mitochondria. On the whole, these results suggest that estrogens, through an ER-dependent mechanism, may increase mitochondrial ROS production by repressing uncoupling proteins, which offers a new perspective on the understanding of why estrogens are a risk factor for breast cancer.

  4. Sex and deleterious mutations.

    PubMed

    Gordo, Isabel; Campos, Paulo R A

    2008-05-01

    The evolutionary advantage of sexual reproduction has been considered as one of the most pressing questions in evolutionary biology. While a pluralistic view of the evolution of sex and recombination has been suggested by some, here we take a simpler view and try to quantify the conditions under which sex can evolve given a set of minimal assumptions. Since real populations are finite and also subject to recurrent deleterious mutations, this minimal model should apply generally to all populations. We show that the maximum advantage of recombination occurs for an intermediate value of the deleterious effect of mutations. Furthermore we show that the conditions under which the biggest advantage of sex is achieved are those that produce the fastest fitness decline in the corresponding asexual population and are therefore the conditions for which Muller's ratchet has the strongest effect. We also show that the selective advantage of a modifier of the recombination rate depends on its strength. The quantification of the range of selective effects that favors recombination then leads us to suggest that, if in stressful environments the effect of deleterious mutations is enhanced, a connection between sex and stress could be expected, as it is found in several species.

  5. Simulated coevolution in a mutating ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá Martins, J. S.

    2000-03-01

    The bit-string Penna model is used to simulate the competition between an asexual parthenogenetic and a sexual population sharing the same environment. A newborn of either population can mutate and become a part of the other with some probability. In a stable environment the sexual population soon dies out. When an infestation by rapidly mutating genetically coupled parasites is introduced, however, sexual reproduction prevails, as predicted by the so-called Red Queen hypothesis for the evolution of sex.

  6. Investigation of connexin 43 uncoupling and prolongation of the cardiac QRS complex in preclinical and marketed drugs

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, M P; Sharpe, P M; Garner, C; Hughes, R; Pollard, C E; Bowes, J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prolongation of the cardiac QRS complex is linked to increased mortality and may result from drug-induced inhibition of cardiac sodium channels (hNaV1.5). There has been no systematic evaluation of preclinical and marketed drugs for their additional potential to cause QRS prolongation via gap junction uncoupling. Experimental Approach Using the human cardiac gap junction connexin 43 (hCx43), a dye transfer ‘parachute’ assay to determine IC50 values for compound ranking was validated with compounds known to uncouple gap junctions. Uncoupling activity (and hNaV1.5 inhibition by automated patch clamp) was determined in a set of marketed drugs and preclinical candidate drugs, each with information regarding propensity to prolong QRS. Key Results The potency of known gap junction uncouplers to uncouple hCx43 was ranked (according to IC50) as phorbol ester>digoxin>meclofenamic acid>carbenoxolone>heptanol. Among the drugs associated with QRS prolongation, 29% were found to uncouple hCx43 (IC50 < 50 μM), whereas no uncoupling activity was observed in drugs not associated with QRS prolongation. In preclinical candidate drugs, hCx43 and hNaV1.5 IC50 values were similar (within threefold). No consistent margin over preclinical Cmax (free) was apparent for QRS prolongation associated with Cx43 inhibition. However, instances were found of QRS prolonging compounds that uncoupled hCx43 with significantly less activity at hNaV1.5. Conclusion and Implications These results demonstrate that off-target uncoupling activity is apparent in drug and drug-like molecules. Although the full ramifications of Cx inhibition remain to be established, screening for hCx43 off-target activity could reduce the likelihood of developing candidate drugs with a risk of causing QRS prolongation. PMID:24328991

  7. Influences of clonality on plant sexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Spencer C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Flowering plants possess an unrivaled diversity of mechanisms for achieving sexual and asexual reproduction, often simultaneously. The commonest type of asexual reproduction is clonal growth (vegetative propagation) in which parental genotypes (genets) produce vegetative modules (ramets) that are capable of independent growth, reproduction, and often dispersal. Clonal growth leads to an expansion in the size of genets and increased fitness because large floral displays increase fertility and opportunities for outcrossing. Moreover, the clonal dispersal of vegetative propagules can assist “mate finding,” particularly in aquatic plants. However, there are ecological circumstances in which functional antagonism between sexual and asexual reproductive modes can negatively affect the fitness of clonal plants. Populations of heterostylous and dioecious species have a small number of mating groups (two or three), which should occur at equal frequency in equilibrium populations. Extensive clonal growth and vegetative dispersal can disrupt the functioning of these sexual polymorphisms, resulting in biased morph ratios and populations with a single mating group, with consequences for fertility and mating. In populations in which clonal propagation predominates, mutations reducing fertility may lead to sexual dysfunction and even the loss of sex. Recent evidence suggests that somatic mutations can play a significant role in influencing fitness in clonal plants and may also help explain the occurrence of genetic diversity in sterile clonal populations. Highly polymorphic genetic markers offer outstanding opportunities for gaining novel insights into functional interactions between sexual and clonal reproduction in flowering plants. PMID:26195747

  8. Influences of clonality on plant sexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Spencer C H

    2015-07-21

    Flowering plants possess an unrivaled diversity of mechanisms for achieving sexual and asexual reproduction, often simultaneously. The commonest type of asexual reproduction is clonal growth (vegetative propagation) in which parental genotypes (genets) produce vegetative modules (ramets) that are capable of independent growth, reproduction, and often dispersal. Clonal growth leads to an expansion in the size of genets and increased fitness because large floral displays increase fertility and opportunities for outcrossing. Moreover, the clonal dispersal of vegetative propagules can assist "mate finding," particularly in aquatic plants. However, there are ecological circumstances in which functional antagonism between sexual and asexual reproductive modes can negatively affect the fitness of clonal plants. Populations of heterostylous and dioecious species have a small number of mating groups (two or three), which should occur at equal frequency in equilibrium populations. Extensive clonal growth and vegetative dispersal can disrupt the functioning of these sexual polymorphisms, resulting in biased morph ratios and populations with a single mating group, with consequences for fertility and mating. In populations in which clonal propagation predominates, mutations reducing fertility may lead to sexual dysfunction and even the loss of sex. Recent evidence suggests that somatic mutations can play a significant role in influencing fitness in clonal plants and may also help explain the occurrence of genetic diversity in sterile clonal populations. Highly polymorphic genetic markers offer outstanding opportunities for gaining novel insights into functional interactions between sexual and clonal reproduction in flowering plants.

  9. Influences of clonality on plant sexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Spencer C H

    2015-07-21

    Flowering plants possess an unrivaled diversity of mechanisms for achieving sexual and asexual reproduction, often simultaneously. The commonest type of asexual reproduction is clonal growth (vegetative propagation) in which parental genotypes (genets) produce vegetative modules (ramets) that are capable of independent growth, reproduction, and often dispersal. Clonal growth leads to an expansion in the size of genets and increased fitness because large floral displays increase fertility and opportunities for outcrossing. Moreover, the clonal dispersal of vegetative propagules can assist "mate finding," particularly in aquatic plants. However, there are ecological circumstances in which functional antagonism between sexual and asexual reproductive modes can negatively affect the fitness of clonal plants. Populations of heterostylous and dioecious species have a small number of mating groups (two or three), which should occur at equal frequency in equilibrium populations. Extensive clonal growth and vegetative dispersal can disrupt the functioning of these sexual polymorphisms, resulting in biased morph ratios and populations with a single mating group, with consequences for fertility and mating. In populations in which clonal propagation predominates, mutations reducing fertility may lead to sexual dysfunction and even the loss of sex. Recent evidence suggests that somatic mutations can play a significant role in influencing fitness in clonal plants and may also help explain the occurrence of genetic diversity in sterile clonal populations. Highly polymorphic genetic markers offer outstanding opportunities for gaining novel insights into functional interactions between sexual and clonal reproduction in flowering plants. PMID:26195747

  10. Endurance training increases stimulation of uncoupling of skeletal muscle mitochondria in humans by non-esterified fatty acids: an uncoupling-protein-mediated effect?

    PubMed Central

    Tonkonogi, M; Krook, A; Walsh, B; Sahlin, K

    2000-01-01

    Uncoupled respiration (UCR) is an essential property of muscle mitochondria and has several functions in the cell. We hypothesized that endurance training may alter the magnitude and properties of UCR in human muscle. Isolated mitochondria from muscle biopsies taken before and after 6 weeks of endurance exercise training (n=8) were analysed for UCR. To investigate the role of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) and UCP3 in UCR, the sensitivity of UCR to UCP-regulating ligands (non-esterified fatty acids and purine nucleotides) and UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression in muscle were examined. Oleate increased the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate, an effect that was not attenuated by GDP and/or cyclosporin A. The effect of oleate was significantly greater after compared with before training. Training had no effect on UCP2 or UCP3 mRNA levels, but after training the relative increase in respiration rate induced by oleate was positively correlated with the UCP2 mRNA level. In conclusion, we show that the sensitivity of UCR to non-esterified fatty acids is up-regulated by endurance training. This suggests that endurance training causes intrinsic changes in mitochondrial function, which may enhance the potential for regulation of aerobic energy production, prevent excess free radical generation and contribute to a higher basal metabolic rate. PMID:11042137

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Human Brown Adipose Tissue Reveals Utilization of Coupled and Uncoupled Energy Expenditure Pathways.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastian; Balaz, Miroslav; Stefanicka, Patrik; Varga, Lukas; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ukropec, Jozef; Wollscheid, Bernd; Wolfrum, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become an attractive target to combat the current epidemical spread of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Currently, information on its functional role is primarily derived from rodent studies. Here, we present the first comparative proteotype analysis of primary human brown adipose tissue versus adjacent white adipose tissue, which reveals significant quantitative differences in protein abundances and in turn differential functional capabilities. The majority of the 318 proteins with increased abundance in BAT are associated with mitochondrial metabolism and confirm the increased oxidative capacity. In addition to uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), the main functional effector for uncoupled respiration, we also detected the mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1A/B, CKMT2), as effective modulators of ATP synthase coupled respiration, to be exclusively expressed in BAT. The abundant expression and utilization of both energy expenditure pathways in parallel highlights the complex functional involvement of BAT in human physiology. PMID:27418403

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Human Brown Adipose Tissue Reveals Utilization of Coupled and Uncoupled Energy Expenditure Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Sebastian; Balaz, Miroslav; Stefanicka, Patrik; Varga, Lukas; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ukropec, Jozef; Wollscheid, Bernd; Wolfrum, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become an attractive target to combat the current epidemical spread of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Currently, information on its functional role is primarily derived from rodent studies. Here, we present the first comparative proteotype analysis of primary human brown adipose tissue versus adjacent white adipose tissue, which reveals significant quantitative differences in protein abundances and in turn differential functional capabilities. The majority of the 318 proteins with increased abundance in BAT are associated with mitochondrial metabolism and confirm the increased oxidative capacity. In addition to uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), the main functional effector for uncoupled respiration, we also detected the mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1A/B, CKMT2), as effective modulators of ATP synthase coupled respiration, to be exclusively expressed in BAT. The abundant expression and utilization of both energy expenditure pathways in parallel highlights the complex functional involvement of BAT in human physiology. PMID:27418403

  13. Uncoupling of reading and IQ over time: empirical evidence for a definition of dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Emilio; Shaywitz, Bennett A; Holahan, John M; Marchione, Karen; Shaywitz, Sally E

    2010-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is defined as an unexpected difficulty in reading in individuals who otherwise possess the intelligence and motivation considered necessary for fluent reading, and who also have had reasonable reading instruction. Identifying factors associated with normative and impaired reading development has implications for diagnosis, intervention, and prevention. We show that in typical readers, reading and IQ development are dynamically linked over time. Such mutual interrelationships are not perceptible in dyslexic readers, which suggests that reading and cognition develop more independently in these individuals. To our knowledge, these findings provide the first empirical demonstration of a coupling between cognition and reading in typical readers and a developmental uncoupling between cognition and reading in dyslexic readers. This uncoupling was the core concept of the initial description of dyslexia and remains the focus of the current definitional model of this learning disability.

  14. Forming limits in the hole-flanging process by coupled and uncoupled damage models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacem, A.; Jégat, A.; Krichen, A.; Manach, P. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to identify the limits of the hole-flanging process under different conditions. A 3D finite element model was developed to predict failure in hole-flanging process for sheet aluminium alloys. The Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) coupled damage model and the Bao-Wierzbicki (BW) uncoupled damage model were used. The parameters of both coupled and uncoupled models were identified by inverse analysis based on uniaxial tensile test. Experiments were conducted to analyse the types of failure that appear during the process. Numerical results were compared with experimental datas to check the validity of both models in predicting failure during the hole-flanging process. The comparative study showed that the GTN model predicts more accurately almost all types of failure while fracture occurrence can be only predicted by the BW model.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Human Brown Adipose Tissue Reveals Utilization of Coupled and Uncoupled Energy Expenditure Pathways.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastian; Balaz, Miroslav; Stefanicka, Patrik; Varga, Lukas; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ukropec, Jozef; Wollscheid, Bernd; Wolfrum, Christian

    2016-07-15

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become an attractive target to combat the current epidemical spread of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Currently, information on its functional role is primarily derived from rodent studies. Here, we present the first comparative proteotype analysis of primary human brown adipose tissue versus adjacent white adipose tissue, which reveals significant quantitative differences in protein abundances and in turn differential functional capabilities. The majority of the 318 proteins with increased abundance in BAT are associated with mitochondrial metabolism and confirm the increased oxidative capacity. In addition to uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), the main functional effector for uncoupled respiration, we also detected the mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1A/B, CKMT2), as effective modulators of ATP synthase coupled respiration, to be exclusively expressed in BAT. The abundant expression and utilization of both energy expenditure pathways in parallel highlights the complex functional involvement of BAT in human physiology.

  16. Temperature controls oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production through uncoupling in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Koziel, Agnieszka; Majerczak, Joanna; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory and phosphorylation activities, mitochondrial uncoupling, and hydrogen peroxide formation were studied in isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria during experimentally induced hypothermia (25 °C) and hyperthermia (42 °C) compared to the physiological temperature of resting muscle (35 °C). For nonphosphorylating mitochondria, increasing the temperature from 25 to 42 °C led to a decrease in membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide production, and quinone reduction levels. For phosphorylating mitochondria, no temperature-dependent changes in these mitochondrial functions were observed. However, the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation decreased, whereas the oxidation and phosphorylation rates and oxidative capacities of the mitochondria increased, with increasing assay temperature. An increase in proton leak, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed with increasing assay temperature, which could explain the reduced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species production.

  17. Chronic Alcohol Consumption Leads to a Tissue Specific Expression of Uncoupling Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Graw, Jan A.; von Haefen, Clarissa; Poyraz, Deniz; Möbius, Nadine; Sifringer, Marco; Spies, Claudia D.

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are anion channels that can decouple the mitochondrial respiratory chain. "Mild uncoupling" of internal respiration reduces free radical production and oxidative cell stress. Chronic alcohol consumption is a potent inducer of oxidative stress in multiple tissues and regulates UCP-2 and -4 expression in the brain. To analyse the impact of chronic alcohol intake on UCP-2 expression in tissues with high endogenous UCP-2 contents, male Wistar rats (n=34) were treated with a 12-week 5% alcohol diet. In the lungs and the spleen of rats with a chronic alcohol diet cytochrome c release from mitochondria was significantly increased. Both organs did not show any altered gene and protein expression of UCP-2. Different to cerebral tissue chronic alcohol consumption has no regulatory effect on UCP-2 gene and protein expression in organs with a high endogenous UCP-2 content. Therefore, chronic alcohol consumption leads to a tissue specific expression of UCP-2. PMID:26664262

  18. Chronic Alcohol Consumption Leads to a Tissue Specific Expression of Uncoupling Protein-2.

    PubMed

    Graw, Jan A; von Haefen, Clarissa; Poyraz, Deniz; Möbius, Nadine; Sifringer, Marco; Spies, Claudia D

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are anion channels that can decouple the mitochondrial respiratory chain. "Mild uncoupling" of internal respiration reduces free radical production and oxidative cell stress. Chronic alcohol consumption is a potent inducer of oxidative stress in multiple tissues and regulates UCP-2 and -4 expression in the brain. To analyse the impact of chronic alcohol intake on UCP-2 expression in tissues with high endogenous UCP-2 contents, male Wistar rats (n=34) were treated with a 12-week 5% alcohol diet. In the lungs and the spleen of rats with a chronic alcohol diet cytochrome c release from mitochondria was significantly increased. Both organs did not show any altered gene and protein expression of UCP-2. Different to cerebral tissue chronic alcohol consumption has no regulatory effect on UCP-2 gene and protein expression in organs with a high endogenous UCP-2 content. Therefore, chronic alcohol consumption leads to a tissue specific expression of UCP-2. PMID:26664262

  19. [Sexual reproduction in animals].

    PubMed

    Jordana, R; Herrea, L

    1974-01-01

    Both asexual and sexual reproduction are described, with most attention given the latter, and all basic aspects of reproduction are discussed including gender, gametogenesis, genes and chromosomes, fecundation, and hormonal control. Female and male reproductive hormones and their modes of operation are given special attention. Innate reproductive and sexual behavior in various species is detailed and a discussion of the role of sexual attraction in human and animal reproduction is included. Contraception and abortion are described as human efforts to separate sexuality and reproduction unique in the biological world.

  20. Augmenting energy expenditure by mitochondrial uncoupling: a role of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Susanne; Keipert, Susanne; Rossmeisl, Martin; Kopecky, Jan

    2012-07-01

    Strategies to prevent and treat obesity aim to decrease energy intake and/or increase energy expenditure. Regarding the increase of energy expenditure, two key intracellular targets may be considered (1) mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, the major site of ATP production, and (2) AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), the master regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. Experiments performed mainly in transgenic mice revealed a possibility to ameliorate obesity and associated disorders by mitochondrial uncoupling in metabolically relevant tissues, especially in white adipose tissue (WAT), skeletal muscle (SM), and liver. Thus, ectopic expression of brown fat-specific mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) elicited major metabolic effects both at the cellular/tissue level and at the whole-body level. In addition to expected increases in energy expenditure, surprisingly complex phenotypic effects were detected. The consequences of mitochondrial uncoupling in WAT and SM are not identical, showing robust and stable obesity resistance accompanied by improvement of lipid metabolism in the case of ectopic UCP1 in WAT, while preservation of insulin sensitivity in the context of high-fat feeding represents the major outcome of muscle UCP1 expression. These complex responses could be largely explained by tissue-specific activation of AMPK, triggered by a depression of cellular energy charge. Experimental data support the idea that (1) while being always activated in response to mitochondrial uncoupling and compromised intracellular energy status in general, AMPK could augment energy expenditure and mediate local as well as whole-body effects; and (2) activation of AMPK alone does not lead to induction of energy expenditure and weight reduction. PMID:22139637

  1. Induction of endogenous uncoupling protein 3 suppresses mitochondrial oxidant emission during fatty acid-supported respiration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ethan J; Yamazaki, Hanae; Neufer, P Darrell

    2007-10-26

    Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) expression increases dramatically in skeletal muscle under metabolic states associated with elevated lipid metabolism, yet the function of UCP3 in a physiological context remains controversial. Here, in situ mitochondrial H(2)O(2) emission and respiration were measured in permeabilized fiber bundles prepared from both rat and mouse (wild-type) gastrocnemius muscle after a single bout of exercise plus 18 h of recovery (Ex/R) that induced a approximately 2-4-fold increase in UCP3 protein. Elevated uncoupling activity (i.e. GDP inhibitable) was evident in Ex/R fibers only upon the addition of palmitate (known activator of UCP3) or under substrate conditions eliciting substantial rates of H(2)O(2) production (i.e. respiration supported by succinate or palmitoyl-L-carnitine/malate but not pyruvate/malate), indicative of UCP3 activation by endogenous reactive oxygen species. In mice completely lacking UCP3 (ucp3(-/-)), Ex/R failed to induce uncoupling activity. Surprisingly, when UCP3 activity was inhibited by GDP (rats) or in the absence of UCP3 (ucp3(-/-)), H(2)O(2) emission was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in Ex/R versus non-exercised control fibers. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the oxidant emitting potential of mitochondria is increased in skeletal muscle during recovery from exercise, possibly as a consequence of prolonged reliance on lipid metabolism and/or altered mitochondrial biochemistry/morphology and that induction of UCP3 in vivo mediates an increase in uncoupling activity that restores mitochondrial H(2)O(2) emission to non-exercised, control levels.

  2. Muscle Mitochondrial Uncoupling Dismantles Neuromuscular Junction and Triggers Distal Degeneration of Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Luc; Gonzalez de Aguilar, Jose-Luis; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Eschbach, Judith; Rene, Frédérique; Oudart, Hugues; Halter, Benoit; Huze, Caroline; Schaeffer, Laurent; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most frequent adult onset motor neuron disease, is associated with hypermetabolism linked to defects in muscle mitochondrial energy metabolism such as ATP depletion and increased oxygen consumption. It remains unknown whether muscle abnormalities in energy metabolism are causally involved in the destruction of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and subsequent motor neuron degeneration during ALS. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied transgenic mice with muscular overexpression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), a potent mitochondrial uncoupler, as a model of muscle restricted hypermetabolism. These animals displayed age-dependent deterioration of the NMJ that correlated with progressive signs of denervation and a mild late-onset motor neuron pathology. NMJ regeneration and functional recovery were profoundly delayed following injury of the sciatic nerve and muscle mitochondrial uncoupling exacerbated the pathology of an ALS animal model. Conclusions/Significance These findings provide the proof of principle that a muscle restricted mitochondrial defect is sufficient to generate motor neuron degeneration and suggest that therapeutic strategies targeted at muscle metabolism might prove useful for motor neuron diseases. PMID:19404401

  3. Stable expression of functional mitochondrial uncoupling protein in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Casteilla, L; Blondel, O; Klaus, S; Raimbault, S; Diolez, P; Moreau, F; Bouillaud, F; Ricquier, D

    1990-01-01

    The mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP) is a membranous proton carrier exclusively synthesized in brown adipocytes. The cDNA for the rat UCP was placed in an expression vector and transfected into mammalian cells. Its expression was tested in transiently transfected CHO cells. In these cells the UCP was detected in mitochondria by using antibodies. Permanent expression of the UCP was achieved in stable transformed CHO cell lines. In these cells the UCP was characterized in mitochondrial membranes, by using antibodies and hydroxyapatite purification. The protein expressed in CHO cells displayed the functional characteristics of brown adipocyte UCP. It induced the uncoupling of respiration in isolated CHO mitochondria. The membrane potential of transformed mitochondria was also significantly lowered, as a result of the proton translocating activity of the UCP. GDP is known to inhibit the proton pathway in brown fat mitochondria. Addition of GDP to CHO mitochondria containing UCP resulted in a recoupling of respiration and an increase in membrane potential. Thus we conclude that functional UCP is expressed in CHO cells and that the insertion of the UCP alone in any mitochondria is sufficient to induce the uncoupling of respiration. This approach should allow studies on the structure-function relationship of the UCP and of several other related mitochondrial carriers. Images PMID:2367527

  4. [Synergistic effects of nano-sized magnetic particles and uncoupler to the characteristics of activated sludge].

    PubMed

    Gao, Li-ying; Tang, Bing; Liang, Ling-yan; Huang, Shao-song; Fu, Feng-lian; Luo, Jian-zhong

    2012-08-01

    For improving the performance and sludge settling property of an activated sludge reduction process with uncoupler, in this investigation, uncoupler and nano-sized magnetic particles were added simultaneously to a sequencing batch reactor for exploring their synergistic effects to the characteristics of activated sludge. The results showed that the volume reduction of sludge reached 41% with single 2,4,5-Trichlorophenol (TCP) Comparing with the control experiment, the biodegradability and settling properties of the activated sludge decreased. Under the actions of TCP combined with nano-sized magnetic particles, the volume reduction of sludge reached 34%, the removal efficiencies of COD, nitrogen, and phosphorus as well as the sludge settling property were not significantly influenced. After 31 d's operation, the dehydrogenase activity was improved by 10%-18% and exhibited an accumulative effect over time. It was observed with an optical microscope that the species and amounts of protozoon and metazoan increased and a compact structure of sludge floc was formed. The results also indicated that using nano-sized magnetic particles and uncoupler could restrict the yield of excess sludge and improve the performance of an activated sludge system. PMID:23213903

  5. Dopamine-stimulated dephosphorylation of connexin 36 mediates AII amacrine cell uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Kothmann, W Wade; Massey, Stephen C; O'Brien, John

    2009-11-25

    Gap junction proteins form the substrate for electrical coupling between neurons. These electrical synapses are widespread in the CNS and serve a variety of important functions. In the retina, connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions couple AII amacrine cells and are a requisite component of the high-sensitivity rod photoreceptor pathway. AII amacrine cell coupling strength is dynamically regulated by background light intensity, and uncoupling is thought to be mediated by dopamine signaling via D(1)-like receptors. One proposed mechanism for this uncoupling involves dopamine-stimulated phosphorylation of Cx36 at regulatory sites, mediated by protein kinase A. Here we provide evidence against this hypothesis and demonstrate a direct relationship between Cx36 phosphorylation and AII amacrine cell coupling strength. Dopamine receptor-driven uncoupling of the AII network results from protein kinase A activation of protein phosphatase 2A and subsequent dephosphorylation of Cx36. Protein phosphatase 1 activity negatively regulates this pathway. We also find that Cx36 gap junctions can exist in widely different phosphorylation states within a single neuron, implying that coupling is controlled at the level of individual gap junctions by locally assembled signaling complexes. This kind of synapse-by-synapse plasticity allows for precise control of neuronal coupling, as well as cell-type-specific responses dependent on the identity of the signaling complexes assembled.

  6. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for weak acid respiratory uncouplers to Vibrio fisheri

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.; Cronin, M.T.D.

    1997-02-01

    Acute toxicity values of 16 organic compounds thought to elicit their response via the weak acid respiratory uncoupling mechanism of toxic action were secured from the literature. Regression analysis of toxicities revealed that a measured 5-min V. fisheri potency value can be used as a surrogate for the 30-min value. Regression analysis of toxicity versus hydrophobicity, measured as the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient (log K{sub ow}), was used to formulate a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR). The equation log pT{sub 30}{sup {minus}1} = 0.489(log K{sub ow}) + 0.126 was found to be a highly predictive model. This V. fisheri QSAR is statistically similar to QSARs generated from weak acid uncoupler potency data for Pimephales promelas survivability and Tetrahymena pyriformis population growth impairment. This work, therefore, suggests that the weak acid respiratory uncoupling mechanism of toxic action is present in V. fisheri, and as such is not restricted to mitochondria-containing organisms.

  7. Uncoupling RARA transcriptional activation and degradation clarifies the bases for APL response to therapies.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Leiva, Magdalena; Peres, Laurent; Fonsart, Julien; Anthony, Elodie; de Thé, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    In PML/RARA-driven acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), retinoic acid (RA) induces leukemia cell differentiation and transiently clears the disease. Molecularly, RA activates PML/RARA-dependent transcription and also initiates its proteasome-mediated degradation. In contrast, arsenic, the other potent anti-APL therapy, only induces PML/RARA degradation by specifically targeting its PML moiety. The respective contributions of RA-triggered transcriptional activation and proteolysis to clinical response remain disputed. Here, we identify synthetic retinoids that potently activate RARA- or PML/RARA-dependent transcription, but fail to down-regulate RARA or PML/RARA protein levels. Similar to RA, these uncoupled retinoids elicit terminal differentiation, but unexpectedly fail to impair leukemia-initiating activity of PML/RARA-transformed cells ex vivo or in vivo. Accordingly, the survival benefit conferred by uncoupled retinoids in APL mice is dramatically lower than the one provided by RA. Differentiated APL blasts sorted from uncoupled retinoid-treated mice retain PML/RARA expression and reinitiate APL in secondary transplants. Thus, differentiation is insufficient for APL eradication, whereas PML/RARA loss is essential. These observations unify the modes of action of RA and arsenic and shed light on the potency of their combination in mice or patients.

  8. Mutant Allele-Specific Uncoupling of PENETRATION3 Functions Reveals Engagement of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter in Distinct Tryptophan Metabolic Pathways1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xunli; Dittgen, Jan; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Molina, Antonio; Schneider, Bernd; Doubský, Jan; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PENETRATION (PEN) genes quantitatively contribute to the execution of different forms of plant immunity upon challenge with diverse leaf pathogens. PEN3 encodes a plasma membrane-resident pleiotropic drug resistance-type ATP-binding cassette transporter and is thought to act in a pathogen-inducible and PEN2 myrosinase-dependent metabolic pathway in extracellular defense. This metabolic pathway directs the intracellular biosynthesis and activation of tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolates for subsequent PEN3-mediated efflux across the plasma membrane at pathogen contact sites. However, PEN3 also functions in abiotic stress responses to cadmium and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-mediated auxin homeostasis in roots, raising the possibility that PEN3 exports multiple functionally unrelated substrates. Here, we describe the isolation of a pen3 allele, designated pen3-5, that encodes a dysfunctional protein that accumulates in planta like wild-type PEN3. The specific mutation in pen3-5 uncouples PEN3 functions in IBA-stimulated root growth modulation, callose deposition induced with a conserved peptide epitope of bacterial flagellin (flg22), and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation from PEN3 activity in extracellular defense, indicating the engagement of multiple PEN3 substrates in different PEN3-dependent biological processes. We identified 4-O-β-d-glucosyl-indol-3-yl formamide (4OGlcI3F) as a pathogen-inducible, tryptophan-derived compound that overaccumulates in pen3 leaf tissue and has biosynthesis that is dependent on an intact PEN2 metabolic pathway. We propose that a precursor of 4OGlcI3F is the PEN3 substrate in extracellular pathogen defense. These precursors, the shared indole core present in IBA and 4OGlcI3F, and allele-specific uncoupling of a subset of PEN3 functions suggest that PEN3 transports distinct indole-type metabolites in distinct biological processes. PMID:26023163

  9. Crystallographic findings on the internally uncoupled and near-rigor states of myosin: Further insights into the mechanics of the motor

    PubMed Central

    Himmel, D. M.; Gourinath , S.; Reshetnikova, L.; Shen, Y.; Szent-Györgyi, A. G.; Cohen, C.

    2002-01-01

    Here we report a 2.3-Å crystal structure of scallop myosin S1 complexed with ADP⋅BeFx, as well as three additional structures (at 2.8–3.8 Å resolution) for this S1 complexed with ATP analogs, some of which are cross-linked by para-phenyl dimaleimide, a short intramolecular cross-linker. In all cases, the complexes are characterized by an unwound SH1 helix first seen in an unusual 2.5-Å scallop myosin-MgADP structure and described as corresponding to a previously unrecognized actin-detached internally uncoupled state. The unwinding of the SH1 helix effectively uncouples the converter/lever arm module from the motor and allows cross-linking by para-phenyl dimaleimide, which has been shown to occur only in weak actin-binding states of the molecule. Mutations near the metastable SH1 helix that disable the motor can be accounted for by viewing this structural element as a clutch controlling the transmission of torque to the lever arm. We have also determined a 3.2-Å nucleotide-free structure of scallop myosin S1, which suggests that in the near-rigor state there are two conformations in the switch I loop, depending on whether nucleotide is present. Analysis of the subdomain motions in the weak actin-binding states revealed by x-ray crystallography, together with recent electron microscopic results, clarify the mechanical roles of the parts of the motor in the course of the contractile cycle and suggest how strong binding to actin triggers both the power stroke and product release. PMID:12297624

  10. Mutant Allele-Specific Uncoupling of PENETRATION3 Functions Reveals Engagement of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter in Distinct Tryptophan Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xunli; Dittgen, Jan; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Molina, Antonio; Schneider, Bernd; Svatoš, Aleš; Doubský, Jan; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Weigel, Detlef; Bednarek, Paweł; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) penetration (PEN) genes quantitatively contribute to the execution of different forms of plant immunity upon challenge with diverse leaf pathogens. PEN3 encodes a plasma membrane-resident pleiotropic drug resistance-type ATP-binding cassette transporter and is thought to act in a pathogen-inducible and PEN2 myrosinase-dependent metabolic pathway in extracellular defense. This metabolic pathway directs the intracellular biosynthesis and activation of tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolates for subsequent PEN3-mediated efflux across the plasma membrane at pathogen contact sites. However, PEN3 also functions in abiotic stress responses to cadmium and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-mediated auxin homeostasis in roots, raising the possibility that PEN3 exports multiple functionally unrelated substrates. Here, we describe the isolation of a pen3 allele, designated pen3-5, that encodes a dysfunctional protein that accumulates in planta like wild-type PEN3. The specific mutation in pen3-5 uncouples PEN3 functions in IBA-stimulated root growth modulation, callose deposition induced with a conserved peptide epitope of bacterial flagellin (flg22), and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation from PEN3 activity in extracellular defense, indicating the engagement of multiple PEN3 substrates in different PEN3-dependent biological processes. We identified 4-O-β-D-glucosyl-indol-3-yl formamide (4OGlcI3F) as a pathogen-inducible, tryptophan-derived compound that overaccumulates in pen3 leaf tissue and has biosynthesis that is dependent on an intact PEN2 metabolic pathway. We propose that a precursor of 4OGlcI3F is the PEN3 substrate in extracellular pathogen defense. These precursors, the shared indole core present in IBA and 4OGlcI3F, and allele-specific uncoupling of a subset of PEN3 functions suggest that PEN3 transports distinct indole-type metabolites in distinct biological processes.

  11. Mitochondrial uncoupling as a regulator of life-history trajectories in birds: an experimental study in the zebra finch.

    PubMed

    Stier, Antoine; Bize, Pierre; Roussel, Damien; Schull, Quentin; Massemin, Sylvie; Criscuolo, François

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria have a fundamental role in the transduction of energy from food into ATP. The coupling between food oxidation and ATP production is never perfect, but may nevertheless be of evolutionary significance. The 'uncoupling to survive' hypothesis suggests that 'mild' mitochondrial uncoupling evolved as a protective mechanism against the excessive production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Because resource allocation and ROS production are thought to shape animal life histories, alternative life-history trajectories might be driven by individual variation in the degree of mitochondrial uncoupling. We tested this hypothesis in a small bird species, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), by treating adults with the artificial mitochondrial uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) over a 32-month period. In agreement with our expectations, the uncoupling treatment increased metabolic rate. However, we found no evidence that treated birds enjoyed lower oxidative stress levels or greater survival rates, in contrast to previous results in other taxa. In vitro experiments revealed lower sensitivity of ROS production to DNP in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscles of zebra finch than mouse. In addition, we found significant reductions in the number of eggs laid and in the inflammatory immune response in treated birds. Altogether, our data suggest that the 'uncoupling to survive' hypothesis may not be applicable for zebra finches, presumably because of lower effects of mitochondrial uncoupling on mitochondrial ROS production in birds than in mammals. Nevertheless, mitochondrial uncoupling appeared to be a potential life-history regulator of traits such as fecundity and immunity at adulthood, even with food supplied ad libitum. PMID:25063856

  12. Mitochondrial uncoupling as a regulator of life-history trajectories in birds: an experimental study in the zebra finch.

    PubMed

    Stier, Antoine; Bize, Pierre; Roussel, Damien; Schull, Quentin; Massemin, Sylvie; Criscuolo, François

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria have a fundamental role in the transduction of energy from food into ATP. The coupling between food oxidation and ATP production is never perfect, but may nevertheless be of evolutionary significance. The 'uncoupling to survive' hypothesis suggests that 'mild' mitochondrial uncoupling evolved as a protective mechanism against the excessive production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Because resource allocation and ROS production are thought to shape animal life histories, alternative life-history trajectories might be driven by individual variation in the degree of mitochondrial uncoupling. We tested this hypothesis in a small bird species, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), by treating adults with the artificial mitochondrial uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) over a 32-month period. In agreement with our expectations, the uncoupling treatment increased metabolic rate. However, we found no evidence that treated birds enjoyed lower oxidative stress levels or greater survival rates, in contrast to previous results in other taxa. In vitro experiments revealed lower sensitivity of ROS production to DNP in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscles of zebra finch than mouse. In addition, we found significant reductions in the number of eggs laid and in the inflammatory immune response in treated birds. Altogether, our data suggest that the 'uncoupling to survive' hypothesis may not be applicable for zebra finches, presumably because of lower effects of mitochondrial uncoupling on mitochondrial ROS production in birds than in mammals. Nevertheless, mitochondrial uncoupling appeared to be a potential life-history regulator of traits such as fecundity and immunity at adulthood, even with food supplied ad libitum.

  13. Reproductive systems and evolution in vascular plants

    PubMed Central

    Holsinger, Kent E.

    2000-01-01

    Differences in the frequency with which offspring are produced asexually, through self-fertilization and through sexual outcrossing, are a predominant influence on the genetic structure of plant populations. Selfers and asexuals have fewer genotypes within populations than outcrossers with similar allele frequencies, and more genetic diversity in selfers and asexuals is a result of differences among populations than in sexual outcrossers. As a result of reduced levels of diversity, selfers and asexuals may be less able to respond adaptively to changing environments, and because genotypes are not mixed across family lineages, their populations may accumulate deleterious mutations more rapidly. Such differences suggest that selfing and asexual lineages may be evolutionarily short-lived and could explain why they often seem to be of recent origin. Nonetheless, the origin and maintenance of different reproductive modes must be linked to individual-level properties of survival and reproduction. Sexual outcrossers suffer from a cost of outcrossing that arises because they do not contribute to selfed or asexual progeny, whereas selfers and asexuals may contribute to outcrossed progeny. Selfing and asexual reproduction also may allow reproduction when circumstances reduce opportunities for a union of gametes produced by different individuals, a phenomenon known as reproductive assurance. Both the cost of outcrossing and reproductive assurance lead to an over-representation of selfers and asexuals in newly formed progeny, and unless sexual outcrossers are more likely to survive and reproduce, they eventually will be displaced from populations in which a selfing or asexual variant arises. PMID:10860968

  14. Reproductive Information and Reproductive Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Mehlman, Maxwell J

    2015-01-01

    Opponents of reproductive choice are attempting to limit reproductive decisions based on certain underlying reasons. This commentary explores the rationales for these limitations and the objections to them. It concludes that reasoned-based limitations are unsupportable and unenforceable. PMID:26242944

  15. Reproductive tract microbiome in assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Franasiak, Jason M; Scott, Richard T

    2015-12-01

    The human microbiome has gained much attention recently for its role in health and disease. This interest has come as we have begun to scratch the surface of the complexity of what has been deemed to be our "second genome" through initiatives such as the Human Microbiome Project. Microbes have been hypothesized to be involved in the physiology and pathophysiology of assisted reproduction since before the first success in IVF. Although the data supporting or refuting this hypothesis remain somewhat sparse, thanks to sequencing data from the 16S rRNA subunit, we have begun to characterize the microbiome in the male and female reproductive tracts and understand how this may play a role in reproductive competence. In this review, we discuss what is known about the microbiome of the reproductive tract as it pertains to assisted reproductive technologies.

  16. Accelerated mutation accumulation in asexual lineages of a freshwater snail.

    PubMed

    Neiman, Maurine; Hehman, Gery; Miller, Joseph T; Logsdon, John M; Taylor, Douglas R

    2010-04-01

    Sexual reproduction is both extremely costly and widespread relative to asexual reproduction, meaning that it must also confer profound advantages in order to persist. One theorized benefit of sex is that it facilitates the clearance of harmful mutations, which would accumulate more rapidly in the absence of recombination. The extent to which ineffective purifying selection and mutation accumulation are direct consequences of asexuality and whether the accelerated buildup of harmful mutations in asexuals can occur rapidly enough to maintain sex within natural populations, however, remain as open questions. We addressed key components of these questions by estimating the rate of mutation accumulation in the mitochondrial genomes of multiple sexual and asexual representatives of Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand snail characterized by mixed sexual/asexual populations. We found that increased mutation accumulation is associated with asexuality and occurs rapidly enough to be detected in recently derived asexual lineages of P. antipodarum. Our results demonstrate that increased mutation accumulation in asexuals can differentially affect coexisting and ecologically similar sexual and asexual lineages. The accelerated rate of mutation accumulation observed in asexual P. antipodarum provides some of the most direct evidence to date for a link between asexuality and mutation accumulation and implies that mutational buildup could be rapid enough to contribute to the short-term evolutionary mechanisms that favor sexual reproduction.

  17. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Reproductive System » Male Reproductive System Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  18. Men's Reproductive Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Men's Reproductive Health: Overview Skip sharing on social media ... Content Reproductive health is an important component of men's overall health and well-being. Too often, males ...

  19. Acupuncture for reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Lin, J H; Panzer, R

    1992-03-01

    The use of acupuncture to treat reproductive disorders can produce excellent results. Two proposed physiologic mechanisms for its effects on the reproductive system include an endorphin-mediated mechanism affecting the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis and a direct effect on gonadal paracrine and autocrine control of steroidogenesis. This chapter discusses reproductive disorders from both western and traditional Chinese perspectives, and details the use of acupuncture for the treatment of eight specific categories of reproductive dysfunction.

  20. Coupled and uncoupled hydrogeophysical inversions using ensemble Kalman filter assimilation of ERT-monitored tracer test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, Matteo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Deiana, Rita; Salandin, Paolo; Binley, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in geophysical methods have been increasingly exploited as inverse modeling tools in groundwater hydrology. In particular, several attempts to constrain the hydrogeophysical inverse problem to reduce inversion errors have been made using time-lapse geophysical measurements through both coupled and uncoupled (also known as sequential) inversion approaches. Despite the appeal and popularity of coupled inversion approaches, their superiority over uncoupled methods has not been proved conclusively; the goal of this work is to provide an objective comparison between the two approaches within a specific inversion modeling framework based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). Using EnKF and a model of Lagrangian transport, we compare the performance of a fully coupled and uncoupled inversion method for the reconstruction of heterogeneous saturated hydraulic conductivity fields through the assimilation of ERT-monitored tracer test data. The two inversion approaches are tested in a number of different scenarios, including isotropic and anisotropic synthetic aquifers, where we change the geostatistical parameters used to generate the prior ensemble of hydraulic conductivity fields. Our results show that the coupled approach outperforms the uncoupled when the prior statistics are close to the ones used to generate the true field. Otherwise, the coupled approach is heavily affected by "filter inbreeding" (an undesired effect of variance underestimation typical of EnKF), while the uncoupled approach is more robust, being able to correct biased prior information, thanks to its capability of capturing the solute travel times even in presence of inversion artifacts such as the violation of mass balance. Furthermore, the coupled approach is more computationally intensive than the uncoupled, due to the much larger number of forward runs required by the electrical model. Overall, we conclude that the relative merit of the coupled versus the uncoupled approach cannot

  1. Justification of sexual reproduction by modified Penna model of ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá Martins, J. S.; Stauffer, D.

    2001-05-01

    We generalize the standard Penna bit-string model of biological ageing by assuming that each deleterious mutation diminishes the survival probability in every time interval by a small percentage. This effect is added to the usual lethal but age-dependent effect of the same mutation. We then find strong advantages or disadvantages of sexual reproduction (with males and females) compared to asexual cloning, depending on parameters.

  2. Reproduction (II): Human Control of Reproductive Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jost, Alfred

    1970-01-01

    Describes methods of intervening in reproduction of animals and humans (artificial insemination, contraception, ovular and blastodisc transplants, pre selection of sex, cloning) and discusses the social implications of their use with humans. (AL)

  3. Simulated emergence of cyclic sexual-asexual reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá Martins, J. S.; Racco, A.

    2001-08-01

    Motivated by the cyclic pattern of reproductive regimes observed in some species of green flies (“ aphids”), we simulate the evolution of a population enduring harsh seasonal conditions for survival. The reproductive regime of each female is also seasonal in principle and genetically acquired, and can mutate for each newborn with some small probability. The results show a sharp transition at a critical value of the survival probability in the winter, between a reproductive regime in the fall that is predominantly sexual, for low values of this probability, or asexual, for high values.

  4. Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail of the lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor prevents agonist-induced uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Yagüe, J; Rodríguez, M C; Segaloff, D L; Ascoli, M

    1992-04-15

    An agonist-induced change in the functional properties of a constant number of receptors seems to be a ubiquitous phenomenon involved in the regulation of cell surface receptors. Although the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon (called uncoupling or desensitization) have been studied in detail using beta 2-adrenergic receptors it is unclear if the models derived from these studies are applicable to other members of the family of G protein-coupled receptors. Since it has been shown previously that truncation of the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor results in a delay in the onset of agonist-induced uncoupling (Bouvier, M., Hausdorff, W.P., De Blasi, A., O'Dowd, B.F., Kobilka, B.K., Caron , M.G., and Lefkowitz, R.J. (1988) Nature 333, 370-373), we now present experiments designed to test the effects of a similar truncation of the lutropin/choriogonadotropin (LH/CG) receptor on its functional properties. The results presented herein show that (i) clonal lines of human embryonic kidney cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding for the wild-type (rLHR-wt) or a mutant receptor truncated at amino acid residue 631 (rLHR-t631) express functional LH/CG receptors as judged by their ability to bind hCG and to respond to it with increased cAMP accumulation; (ii) a preincubation of the cells expressing rLHR-wt with hCG leads to a reduction in the ability of hCG to activate adenylylcyclase; and (iii) this reduction is severely blunted in cells expressing rLHR-t631. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the LH/CG receptor is necessary for agonist-induced uncoupling.

  5. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins: from mitochondria to the regulation of energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Ricquier, Daniel; Bouillaud, Frédéric

    2000-01-01

    The coupling of oxygen consumption to ADP phosphorylation is incomplete, as is particularly evident in brown adipocyte mitochondria which use a regulated uncoupling mechanism to dissipate heat produced by substrate oxidation. In brown adipose tissue, uncoupling is effected by a specific protein in the inner mitochondrial membrane referred to as uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1). UCP1 gene disruption in mice has confirmed UCP1's role in cold-induced thermogenesis. Genetic analysis of human cohorts has suggested that UCP1 plays a minor role in the control of fat content and body weight. The recent cloning of UCP2 and UCP3, two homologues of UCP1, has boosted research on the importance of respiration control in metabolic processes, metabolic diseases and energy balance. UCP2 is widely expressed in different organs whereas UCP3 is mainly present in skeletal muscle. The chromosomal localization of UCP2 as well as UCP2 mRNA induction by a lipid-rich diet in obesity-resistant mice suggested that UCP2 is involved in diet-induced thermogenesis. A strong linkage between markers in the vicinity of human UCP2 and UCP3 (which are adjacent genes) and resting metabolic rate was calculated. UCPs are known or supposed to participate in basal and regulatory thermogenesis, but their exact biochemical and physiological functions have yet to be elucidated. UCPs may constitute novel targets in the development of drugs designed to modulate substrate oxidation. However, very recent data suggest an important role for the UCPs in the control of production of free radicals by mitochondria, and in response to oxidants. PMID:11080246

  6. Diesel exhaust exposure enhances venoconstriction via uncoupling of eNOS

    SciTech Connect

    Knuckles, Travis L.; Lund, Amie K.; Lucas, Selita N.; Campen, Matthew J.

    2008-08-01

    Environmental air pollution is associated with adverse cardiovascular events, including increased hospital admissions due to heart failure and myocardial infarction. The exact mechanism(s) by which air pollution affects the heart and vasculature is currently unknown. Recent studies have found that exposure to air pollution enhances arterial vasoconstriction in humans and animal models. Work in our laboratory has shown that diesel emissions (DE) enhance vasoconstriction of mouse coronary arteries. Thus, we hypothesized that DE could enhance vasoconstriction in arteries and veins through uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). To test this hypothesis, we first bubbled DE through a physiological saline solution and exposed isolated mesenteric veins. Second, we exposed animals, whole body, to DE at 350 {mu}g/m{sup 3} for 4 h, after which mesenteric arteries and veins were isolated. Results from these experiments show that saline bubbled with DE as well as inhaled DE enhances vasoconstriction in veins but not arteries. Exposure to several representative volatile organic compounds found in the DE-exposed saline did not enhance arterial constriction. L-nitro-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME), an eNOS inhibitor, normalized the control vessels to the DE-exposed vessels implicating an uncoupling of eNOS as a mechanism for enhanced vasoconstriction. The principal conclusions of this research are 1) veins exhibit endothelial dysfunction following in vivo and ex vivo exposures to DE, 2) veins appear to be more sensitive to DE effects than arteries, and 3) DE components most likely induce endothelial dysfunction through the uncoupling of eNOS.

  7. Inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liatsikos, Spyros A.; Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Manav, Bachar; Csorba, Roland; von Tempelhoff, Georg Friedrich; Galazios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Apart from its established role in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE), inherited thrombophilia has been proposed as a possible cause of pregnancy loss and vascular gestational complications. There is a lot of controversy in the literature on the relationship between inherited prothrombotic defects and these obstetric complications. This is a review of the literature on inherited thrombophilia and reproductive disorders. Factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutation, and protein S deficiency seem to be associated with late and recurrent early pregnancy loss, while their impact on other pregnancy complications is conflicting. No definite association has been established between protein C and antithrombin deficiency and adverse pregnancy outcome, primarily due to their low prevalence. Screening is suggested only for women with early recurrent loss or late pregnancy loss. Anticoagulant treatment during pregnancy should be considered for women with complications who were tested positive for thrombophilia. PMID:27026779

  8. The evolution and consequences of sex-specific reproductive variance.

    PubMed

    Mullon, Charles; Reuter, Max; Lehmann, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection favors alleles that increase the number of offspring produced by their carriers. But in a world that is inherently uncertain within generations, selection also favors alleles that reduce the variance in the number of offspring produced. If previous studies have established this principle, they have largely ignored fundamental aspects of sexual reproduction and therefore how selection on sex-specific reproductive variance operates. To study the evolution and consequences of sex-specific reproductive variance, we present a population-genetic model of phenotypic evolution in a dioecious population that incorporates previously neglected components of reproductive variance. First, we derive the probability of fixation for mutations that affect male and/or female reproductive phenotypes under sex-specific selection. We find that even in the simplest scenarios, the direction of selection is altered when reproductive variance is taken into account. In particular, previously unaccounted for covariances between the reproductive outputs of different individuals are expected to play a significant role in determining the direction of selection. Then, the probability of fixation is used to develop a stochastic model of joint male and female phenotypic evolution. We find that sex-specific reproductive variance can be responsible for changes in the course of long-term evolution. Finally, the model is applied to an example of parental-care evolution. Overall, our model allows for the evolutionary analysis of social traits in finite and dioecious populations, where interactions can occur within and between sexes under a realistic scenario of reproduction.

  9. Stochastic dynamics of uncoupled neural oscillators: Fokker-Planck studies with the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Galan, Roberto F.; Urban, Nathaniel N.; Ermentrout, G. Bard

    2007-11-15

    We have investigated the effect of the phase response curve on the dynamics of oscillators driven by noise in two limit cases that are especially relevant for neuroscience. Using the finite element method to solve the Fokker-Planck equation we have studied (i) the impact of noise on the regularity of the oscillations quantified as the coefficient of variation, (ii) stochastic synchronization of two uncoupled phase oscillators driven by correlated noise, and (iii) their cross-correlation function. We show that, in general, the limit of type II oscillators is more robust to noise and more efficient at synchronizing by correlated noise than type I.

  10. Physiological Features of Perigonadal Adipose Tissue Containing Uncoupling Protein UCP1 in ICR Mice.

    PubMed

    Elsukova, E I; Medvedev, L N; Mizonova, O V

    2016-07-01

    Immunoreactive uncoupling protein UCP1 was found in the perigonadal fat of only twothirds of 14-week-old male ICR mice. The presence of UCP1 had no effect on the rate of O2 consumption by the adipose tissue. The cellularity of perigonadal fat estimated by the DNA content was significantly higher in tissue containing UCP1 than in samples without this protein. This regularity was also observed after adaptation of mice to moderate cold (10oC) over 8 weeks. PMID:27496031

  11. Noncyclic Notch activity in the presomitic mesoderm demonstrates uncoupling of somite compartmentalization and boundary formation

    PubMed Central

    Feller, Juliane; Schneider, Andre; Schuster-Gossler, Karin; Gossler, Achim

    2008-01-01

    To test the significance of cyclic Notch activity for somite formation in mice, we analyzed embryos expressing activated Notch (NICD) throughout the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Embryos expressing NICD formed up to 18 somites. Expression in the PSM of Hes7, Lfng, and Spry2 was no longer cyclic, whereas Axin2 was expressed dynamically. NICD expression led to caudalization of somites, and loss of Notch activity to their rostralization. Thus, segmentation and anterior–posterior somite patterning can be uncoupled, differential Notch signaling is not required to form segment borders, and Notch is unlikely to be the pacemaker of the segmentation clock. PMID:18708576

  12. Inhibition of electron transfer and uncoupling effects by emodin and emodinanthrone in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Ubbink-Kok, T.; Anderson, J.A.; Konings, W.N.

    1986-07-01

    The anthraquinones emodin (1,3,delta-trihydroxy-6-methylanthraquinone) and emodinanthrone (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methylanthrone) inhibited respiration-driven solute transport at micromolar concentrations in membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli. This inhibition was enhanced by Ca ions. The inhibitory action on solute transport is caused by inhibition of electron flow in the respiratory chain, most likely at the level between ubiquinone and cytochrome b, and by dissipation of the proton motive force. The uncoupling action was confirmed by studies on the proton motive force in beef heart cytochrome oxidase proteoliposomes. These two effects on energy transduction in cytoplasmic membranes explain the antibiotic properties of emodin and emodinanthrone.

  13. De novo mutations in human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Veltman, Joris A; Brunner, Han G

    2012-08-01

    New mutations have long been known to cause genetic disease, but their true contribution to the disease burden can only now be determined using family-based whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing approaches. In this Review we discuss recent findings suggesting that de novo mutations play a prominent part in rare and common forms of neurodevelopmental diseases, including intellectual disability, autism and schizophrenia. De novo mutations provide a mechanism by which early-onset reproductively lethal diseases remain frequent in the population. These mutations, although individually rare, may capture a significant part of the heritability for complex genetic diseases that is not detectable by genome-wide association studies. PMID:22805709

  14. Influence of a Small Fraction of Individuals with Enhanced Mutations on a Population Genetic Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebrat, S.; Stauffer, D.

    It has been observed that a higher mutation load could be introduced into the genomes of children conceived by assisted reproduction technology (fertilization in-vitro). This generates two effects — slightly higher mutational pressure on the whole genetic pool of population and inhomogeneity of mutation distributions in the genetic pool. Computer simulations of the Penna ageing model suggest that already a small fraction of births with enhanced number of new mutations can negatively influence the whole population.

  15. Bubaline versus bovine reproduction.

    PubMed

    Drost, M

    2007-08-01

    Fertility in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is considerably lower than that in cattle (Bos taurus and Bos indicus). Poor breeding efficiency is attributed to late onset of puberty, seasonality, poor estrus expression, and long calving intervals. Accurate estrus detection is a prerequisite for efficient reproductive management. Established reproductive management techniques in cattle can be successfully applied to water buffalo because of the similarities in the anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology of reproduction between the two genera.

  16. Advances in reproductive biotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, K K; Kavya, K M; Jerome, A; Sharma, R K

    2016-04-01

    In recent times, reproductive biotechnologies have emerged and started to replace the conventional techniques. It is noteworthy that for sustained livestock productivity, it is imperative to start using these techniques for facing the increasing challenges for productivity, reproduction and health with impending environment conditions. These recent biotechniques, both in male and female, have revolutionized and opened avenues for studying and manipulating the reproductive process both in vitro and in vivo in various livestock species for improving tis efficiency. This review attempts to highlight pros and cons, on the recent developments in reproductive biotechnologies, both in male and female in livestock species. PMID:27182135

  17. Advances in reproductive biotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, K K; Kavya, K M; Jerome, A; Sharma, R K

    2016-04-01

    In recent times, reproductive biotechnologies have emerged and started to replace the conventional techniques. It is noteworthy that for sustained livestock productivity, it is imperative to start using these techniques for facing the increasing challenges for productivity, reproduction and health with impending environment conditions. These recent biotechniques, both in male and female, have revolutionized and opened avenues for studying and manipulating the reproductive process both in vitro and in vivo in various livestock species for improving tis efficiency. This review attempts to highlight pros and cons, on the recent developments in reproductive biotechnologies, both in male and female in livestock species.

  18. Advances in reproductive biotechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, K. K.; Kavya, K. M.; Jerome, A.; Sharma, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, reproductive biotechnologies have emerged and started to replace the conventional techniques. It is noteworthy that for sustained livestock productivity, it is imperative to start using these techniques for facing the increasing challenges for productivity, reproduction and health with impending environment conditions. These recent biotechniques, both in male and female, have revolutionized and opened avenues for studying and manipulating the reproductive process both in vitro and in vivo in various livestock species for improving tis efficiency. This review attempts to highlight pros and cons, on the recent developments in reproductive biotechnologies, both in male and female in livestock species. PMID:27182135

  19. Uncouplers stimulate photosynthesis in intact chloroplasts by enhancing light-activation of enzymes regulated by the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system.

    PubMed

    Rosa, L; Whatley, F R

    1981-08-01

    Some uncouplers stimulate CO(2)-dependent O(2) evolution by intact spinach chloroplasts at pH 8.6. This effect is not due to alkalinization of the stroma. The stimulation is observed only when photosynthesis has been partly inhibited by the presence of H(2)O(2), generated in a Mehler-type reaction by the broken chloroplasts which always contaminate the intact chloroplast preparations. The addition of methyl viologen increases the Mehler-type reaction and results in greater inhibition of photosynthesis. The addition of excess catalase stimulates photosynthesis by preventing accumulation of H(2)O(2). The uncouplers stimulate photosynthesis primarily by enhancing the light-activation of enzymes that are regulated by the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system, and this effect results from the influence of the uncouplers on the redox poising of the ferredoxin in the intact chloroplasts.

  20. Focal physiological uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism during somatosensory stimulation in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.T.; Raichle, M.E.

    1986-02-01

    Coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) was studied using multiple sequential administrations of VO-labeled radiotracers and positron emission tomography. In the resting state an excellent correlation between CBF and CMRO2 was found when paired measurements of CBF and CMRO2 from multiple (30-48) brain regions were tested in each of 33 normal subjects. Regional uncoupling of CBF and CMRO2 was found, however, during neuronal activation induced by somatosensory stimulation. Stimulus-induced focal augmentation of cerebral blood flow (29% mean) far exceeded the concomitant local increase in tissue metabolic rate (mean, 5%), when resting-state and stimulated-state measurements were obtained in each of 9 subjects. Stimulus duration had no significant effect on response magnitude or on the degree of CBF-CMRO2 uncoupling observed. Dynamic, physiological regulation of CBF by a mechanism (neuronal or biochemical) dependent on neuronal firing per se, but independent of the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen, is hypothesized.

  1. Synchrony of two uncoupled neurons under half wave sine current stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yueping; Wang, Jue; Jian, Zhong

    2009-04-01

    Two uncoupled Hindmarsh-Rose neurons under different initial discharge patterns are stimulated by the half wave sine current; and the synchronization mechanism of the two neurons is discussed by analyzing their membrane potentials and their interspike interval (ISI) distribution. Under the half wave sine current stimulation, the two uncoupled neurons under different initial conditions, whose parameter r (the parameter r is related to the membrane penetration of calcium ion, and reflects the changing speed of the slow adaptation current) is different or the same, can realize discharge synchronization (phase synchronization) or the full synchronization (state synchronization). The synchronization characteristics are mainly related to the frequency and the amplitude of the half wave sine current, and are little related to the parameter r and the initial state of the two neurons. This investigation shows the mechanism of the current's amplitude and its frequency affecting the synchronization process of neurons, and the neurons' discharge patterns and synchronization process can be adjusted and controlled by the current's amplitude and its frequency. This result is of far reaching importance to study synchronization and encode of many neurons or neural network, and provides the theoretic basis for studying the mechanism of some nervous diseases such as epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease by the slow wave of EEG.

  2. Novel reptilian uncoupling proteins: molecular evolution and gene expression during cold acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Tonia S; Murray, Shauna; Seebacher, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Many animals upregulate metabolism in response to cold. Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) increase proton conductance across the mitochondrial membrane and can thereby alleviate damage from reactive oxygen species that may form as a result of metabolic upregulation. Our aim in this study was to determine whether reptiles (Crocodylus porosus) possess UCP genes. If so, we aimed to place reptilian UCP genes within a phylogenetic context and to determine whether the expression of UCP genes is increased during cold acclimation. We provide the first evidence that UCP2 and UCP3 genes are present in reptiles. Unlike in other vertebrates, UCP2 and UPC3 are expressed in liver and skeletal muscle of the crocodile, and both are upregulated in liver during cold acclimation but not in muscle. We identified two transcripts of UCP3, one of which produces a truncated protein similar to the UCP3S transcript in humans, and the resulting protein lacks the predicted nucleotide-binding regulatory domain. Our molecular phylogeny suggests that uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) is ancestral and has been lost in archosaurs. In birds, UCP3 may have assumed a similar function as UCP1 in mammals, which has important ramifications for understanding endothermic heat production. PMID:18230589

  3. The Secreted Enzyme PM20D1 Regulates Lipidated Amino Acid Uncouplers of Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Long, Jonathan Z; Svensson, Katrin J; Bateman, Leslie A; Lin, Hua; Kamenecka, Theodore; Lokurkar, Isha A; Lou, Jesse; Rao, Rajesh R; Chang, Mi Ra; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Paulo, Joao A; Gygi, Steven P; Griffin, Patrick R; Nomura, Daniel K; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-07-14

    Brown and beige adipocytes are specialized cells that express uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and dissipate chemical energy as heat. These cells likely possess alternative UCP1-independent thermogenic mechanisms. Here, we identify a secreted enzyme, peptidase M20 domain containing 1 (PM20D1), that is enriched in UCP1(+) versus UCP1(-) adipocytes. We demonstrate that PM20D1 is a bidirectional enzyme in vitro, catalyzing both the condensation of fatty acids and amino acids to generate N-acyl amino acids and also the reverse hydrolytic reaction. N-acyl amino acids directly bind mitochondria and function as endogenous uncouplers of UCP1-independent respiration. Mice with increased circulating PM20D1 have augmented respiration and increased N-acyl amino acids in blood. Lastly, administration of N-acyl amino acids to mice improves glucose homeostasis and increases energy expenditure. These data identify an enzymatic node and a family of metabolites that regulate energy homeostasis. This pathway might be useful for treating obesity and associated disorders. PMID:27374330

  4. Mitochondrial uncouplers inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis largely through cytoplasmic acidification

    PubMed Central

    Dejonghe, Wim; Kuenen, Sabine; Mylle, Evelien; Vasileva, Mina; Keech, Olivier; Viotti, Corrado; Swerts, Jef; Fendrych, Matyáš; Ortiz-Morea, Fausto Andres; Mishev, Kiril; Delang, Simon; Scholl, Stefan; Zarza, Xavier; Heilmann, Mareike; Kourelis, Jiorgos; Kasprowicz, Jaroslaw; Nguyen, Le Son Long; Drozdzecki, Andrzej; Van Houtte, Isabelle; Szatmári, Anna-Mária; Majda, Mateusz; Baisa, Gary; Bednarek, Sebastian York; Robert, Stéphanie; Audenaert, Dominique; Testerink, Christa; Munnik, Teun; Van Damme, Daniël; Heilmann, Ingo; Schumacher, Karin; Winne, Johan; Friml, Jiří; Verstreken, Patrik; Russinova, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    ATP production requires the establishment of an electrochemical proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondrial uncouplers dissipate this proton gradient and disrupt numerous cellular processes, including vesicular trafficking, mainly through energy depletion. Here we show that Endosidin9 (ES9), a novel mitochondrial uncoupler, is a potent inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in different systems and that ES9 induces inhibition of CME not because of its effect on cellular ATP, but rather due to its protonophore activity that leads to cytoplasm acidification. We show that the known tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostinA23, which is routinely used to block CME, displays similar properties, thus questioning its use as a specific inhibitor of cargo recognition by the AP-2 adaptor complex via tyrosine motif-based endocytosis signals. Furthermore, we show that cytoplasm acidification dramatically affects the dynamics and recruitment of clathrin and associated adaptors, and leads to reduction of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate from the plasma membrane. PMID:27271794

  5. PSD-95 Uncouples Dopamine-Glutamate Interaction in the D1/PSD-95/NMDA Receptor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingping; Xu, Tai-Xiang; Hallett, Penelope J.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Grant, Seth G. N.; Isacson, Ole; Yao, Wei-Dong

    2008-01-01

    Classical dopaminergic signaling paradigms and emerging studies on direct physical interactions between the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor and the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor predict a reciprocally facilitating, positive feedback loop. This loop, if not controlled, may cause concomitant overactivation of both D1 and NMDA receptors, triggering neurotoxicity. Endogenous protective mechanisms must exist. Here we show that PSD-95, a prototypical structural and signaling scaffold in the postsynaptic density, inhibits D1-NMDA receptor association and uncouples NMDA receptor-dependent enhancement of D1 signaling. This uncoupling is achieved, at least in part, via a disinhibition mechanism by which PSD-95 abolishes NMDA receptor-dependent inhibition of D1 internalization. Knockdown of PSD-95 immobilizes D1 receptors on the cell surface and escalates NMDA receptor-dependent D1 cAMP signaling in neurons. Thus, in addition to its role in receptor stabilization and synaptic plasticity, PSD-95 acts as a brake on the D1-NMDA receptor complex and dampens the interaction between them. PMID:19261890

  6. Spectroscopic elucidation of uncoupled transition energies in the major photosynthetic light-harvesting complex, LHCII

    PubMed Central

    Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Calhoun, Tessa R.; Ginsberg, Naomi S.; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic couplings between chromophores in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes, and interactions of pigments with the surrounding protein environment, produce a complicated energy landscape of delocalized excited states. The resultant electronic structure absorbs light and gives rise to energy transfer steps that direct the excitation toward a site of charge separation with near unity quantum efficiency. Knowledge of the transition energies of the uncoupled chromophores is required to describe how the wave functions of the individual pigments combine to form this manifold of delocalized excited states that effectively harvests light energy. In an investigation of the major light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCII), we develop a method based on polarized 2D electronic spectroscopy to experimentally access the energies of the S0–S1 transitions in the chromophore site basis. Rotating the linear polarization of the incident laser pulses reveals previously hidden off-diagonal features. We exploit the polarization dependence of energy transfer peaks to find the angles between the excited state transition dipole moments. We show that these angles provide a spectroscopic method to directly inform on the relationship between the delocalized excitons and the individual chlorophylls through the site energies of the uncoupled chromophores. PMID:20622154

  7. Uncoupled transport of chlorofluorocarbons and anthropogenic carbon in the subpolar North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Marta; Gourcuff, Claire

    2010-07-01

    Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) 11 and 12 transports across the transoceanic World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) A25 section in the subpolar North Atlantic are derived from an inverse model using hydrographic and ADCP data ( Lherminier et al., 2007). CFC and anthropogenic carbon ( CANT) advective transports contrary to expected are uncoupled: CANT is transported northeastwards (82±39 kmol s -1) mainly within the overturning circulation, while CFC-11 and CFC-12 are transported southwestwards (-24±4 and -11±2 mol s -1, respectively) as part of the large-scale horizontal circulation. The main reason for this uncoupled behaviour is the complex CFC vs. CANT relation in the ocean, which stems from the contrasting temperature relation for both tracers: more CANT dissolves in warmer waters with a low Revelle factor, while CFC's solubility is higher in cold waters. These results point to CANT and CFC having different routes of uptake, accumulation and transport within the ocean, and hence: CANT transport would be more sensitive to changes in the overturning circulation strength, while CFC to changes in the East Greenland Current and Labrador Sea Water formation in the Irminger Sea. Additionally, CANT and CFCs would have different sensitivities to circulation and climate changes derived from global warming as the slowdown of the overturning circulation, increase stratification due to warming and changes in wind stress.

  8. Uncoupling proteins--a new family of proteins with unknown function.

    PubMed

    Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2002-02-01

    Uncoupling proteins are inner mitochondrial membrane proteins, which dissipate the proton gradient, releasing the stored energy as heat. Five proteins have been cloned, named UCP1, UCP2, UCP3, UCP4 and UCP5/BMCP1. These proteins are structurally related but differ in tissue expression. UCP1 is expressed uniquely in the brown adipose tissue, while UCP2 is widely distributed, UCP3 is mainly restricted to skeletal muscle and UCP4 and UCP5/BMCP1 expressed in the brain. The properties and regulation of the uncoupling proteins and their exact function has been the focus of an intense research during recent years. This review briefly summarizes the actual knowledge of the properties and function of this new family of proteins. While UCP1 has a clear role in energy homeostasis, the newcomers UCP2-UCP5 may have more delicate physiological importance acting as free radical oxygen scavengers and in the regulation of ATP-dependent processes, such as secretion.

  9. Uncoupled surface spin induced exchange bias in α-MnO2 nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenxian; Zeng, Rong; Sun, Ziqi; Tian, Dongliang; Dou, Shixue

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the microstructure, surface states, valence fluctuations, magnetic properties, and exchange bias effect in MnO2 nanowires. High purity α-MnO2 rectangular nanowires were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method with microwave-assisted procedures. The microstructure analysis indicates that the nanowires grow in the [0 0 1] direction with the (2 1 0) plane as the surface. Mn3+ and Mn2+ ions are not found in the system by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effective magnetic moment of the manganese ions fits in with the theoretical and experimental values of Mn4+ very well. The uncoupled spins in 3d3 orbitals of the Mn4+ ions in MnO6 octahedra on the rough surface are responsible for the net magnetic moment. Spin glass behavior is observed through magnetic measurements. Furthermore, the exchange bias effect is observed for the first time in pure α-MnO2 phase due to the coupling of the surface spin glass with the antiferromagnetic α-MnO2 matrix. These α-MnO2 nanowires, with a spin-glass-like behavior and with an exchange bias effect excited by the uncoupled surface spins, should therefore inspire further study concerning the origin, theory, and applicability of surface structure induced magnetism in nanostructures. PMID:25319531

  10. Asiatic acid uncouples respiration in isolated mouse liver mitochondria and induces HepG2 cells death.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yapeng; Liu, Siyuan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Dang; Gao, Jing; Zhu, Li

    2016-09-01

    Asiatic acid, one of the triterpenoid components isolated from Centella asiatica, has received increasing attention due to a wide variety of biological activities. To date, little is known about its mechanisms of action. Here we examined the cytotoxic effect of asiatic acid on HepG2 cells and elucidated some of the underlying mechanisms. Asiatic acid induced rapid cell death, as well as mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) dissipation, ATP depletion and cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. In mitochondria isolated from mouse liver, asiatic acid treatment significantly stimulated the succinate-supported state 4 respiration rate, dissipated the MMP, increased Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria, decreased ATP content and promoted cytochrome c release, indicating the uncoupling effect of asiatic acid. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by succinate-supported mitochondrial respiration was also significantly inhibited by asiatic acid. In addition, asiatic acid inhibited Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial swelling but did not induce mitochondrial swelling in hyposmotic potassium acetate medium which suggested that asiatic acid may not act as a protonophoric uncoupler. Inhibition of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) or blockade of adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) attenuated the effect of asiatic acid on MMP dissipation, Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial respiration and HepG2 cell death. When combined inhibition of UCPs and ANT, asiatic acid-mediated uncoupling effect was noticeably alleviated. These results suggested that both UCPs and ANT partially contribute to the uncoupling properties of asiatic acid. In conclusion, asiatic acid is a novel mitochondrial uncoupler and this property is potentially involved in its toxicity on HepG2 cells.

  11. Muller's ratchet, epistasis and mutation effects.

    PubMed

    Butcher, D

    1995-09-01

    In this study, computer simulation is used to show that despite synergistic epistasis for fitness, Muller's ratchet can lead to lethal fitness loss in a population of asexuals through the accumulation of deleterious mutations. This result contradicts previous work that indicated that epistasis will halt the ratchet. The present results show that epistasis will not halt the ratchet provided that rather than a single deleterious mutation effect, there is a distribution of deleterious mutation effects with sufficient density near zero. In addition to epistasis and mutation distribution, the ability of Muller's ratchet to lead to the extinction of an asexual population under epistasis for fitness depends strongly on the expected number of offspring that survive to reproductive age. This strong dependence is not present in the nonepistatic model and suggests that interpreting the population growth parameter as fecundity is inadequate. Because a continuous distribution of mutation effects is used in this model, an emphasis is placed on the dynamics of the mutation effect distribution rather than on the dynamics of the number of least mutation loaded individuals. This perspective suggests that current models of gene interaction are too simple to apply directly to long-term prediction for populations undergoing the ratchet.

  12. Sexual Reproduction and Breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the second edition of Plant Propagation Concepts and Laboratory Exercises, we have combined the first edition chapters 36: Sexual Reproduction in Angiosperms and 37: Breeding Horticultural Plants into the present single chapter Sexual Reproduction and Breeding. These topics are so closely relate...

  13. Reproductive Physiology of Marsupials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, G. B.

    1970-01-01

    Describes some unique features of marsupial reproduction which include (1) chromosomal sex determination, (2) reproductive system, (3) birth, (4) location, and (5) embryonic diapause. These features suggest that viviparity evolved separately in eutherian and marsupial stocks after their derivation from a common oviparous ancestor. Bibliography.…

  14. Aerial photographic reproductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1971-01-01

    Geological Survey vertical aerial photography is obtained primarily for topographic and geologic mapping. Reproductions from this photography are usually satisfactory for general use. Because reproductions are not stocked, but are custom processed for each order, they cannot be returned for credit or refund.

  15. The Reproduction of Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisenberg, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Although a negative relationship between fertility and education has been described consistently in most countries of the world, less is known about the relationship between intelligence and reproductive outcomes. Also the paths through which intelligence influences reproductive outcomes are uncertain. The present study uses the NLSY79 to analyze…

  16. Work and Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Prossin, Albert

    1986-01-01

    This article presents a short overview of the area of work effects on reproduction. Much speculation and confusion exist in this area of the relationship between the physical and social effects of work and the health of the elements of reproduction. Fulfilling the need for increased resources for research in this challenging and interesting area is most desirable. PMID:21267324

  17. Pkd1 is Required for Male Reproductive tract Development

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xuguang; Arend, Lois J.

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive tract abnormalities and male infertility have higher incidence in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients than in general population. In this work, we revealed that Pkd1, whose mutations account for 85% of ADPKD cases, is essential for male reproductive tract development. Disruption of Pkd1 caused a spectrum of defects in the murine male reproductive tract. The earliest visible defect in Pkd1-/- reproductive tract was cystic dilation of the efferent ducts, which are derivatives of the mesonephric tubules. Epididymis development was delayed or arrested in the Pkd1-/- mice. No sign of epididymal coiling was seen in the Pkd1 null mice. Disruption of Pkd1 in epithelia alone using the Pax2-cre mice was sufficient to cause efferent duct dilation and coiling defect in the epididymis, suggesting that Pkd1 is critical for epithelial development and maintenance in male reproductive tract. In-depth analysis showed that Pkd1 is required to maintain tubulin cytoskeleton and important for Tgf-β/Bmp signal transduction in the epithelia of male reproductive tract. Altogether, our results provide the first direct evidence for developmental roles of Pkd1 in male reproductive tract and provide new insights in reproductive tract abnormalities and infertility in ADPKD patients. PMID:23933588

  18. Assessment of Male Reproductive Toxicity##

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers all aspects of male reproductive toxicology. It begins with an overview of male reproductive biology and then transitions to the considerations of conducting male reproductive toxicology studies. We discuss multigenerational study as proposed in EPAs harmoniz...

  19. Parton branching in the color mutation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa, Rudolph C.; Wu, Yuanfang

    1999-11-01

    The soft production problem in hadronic collisions as described in the eikonal color mutation branching model is improved in the way that the initial parton distribution is treated. Furry branching of the partons is considered as a means of describing the nonperturbative process of parton reproduction in the soft interaction. The values of all the moments, and Cq, for q=2,...,5, as well as their energy dependences, can be correctly determined by the use of only two parameters.

  20. Octanol, a gap junction uncoupling agent, changes intracellular [H+] in rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pappas, C A; Rioult, M G; Ransom, B R

    1996-01-01

    Octanol rapidly closes gap junction channels but its mechanism of action is not known. Because intracellular [H+], pHi, also affects the conductance of gap junctions, we studied octanol's effects on pHi in cultured rat astrocytes, which are highly coupled cells. Octanol (1 mM) caused an acid shift in the pHi of 90% of rat hippocampal astrocytes which averaged -0.19 +/- 0.09 pH units in magnitude. In 58% of the cells tested, a biphasic change in pHi was seen; octanol produced an initial acidification lasting approximately 10 min that was followed by a persistent alkalinization. The related gap junction uncoupling agent, heptanol, had similar effects on pHi. Octanol-induced changes in pHi were similar in nominally HCO(3-)-free and HCO(3-)-containing solutions, although the rate of initial acidification was significantly greater in the presence of HCO3-. The initial acidification was inhibited in the presence of the stilbene DIDS, an inhibitor of Na+/HCO3- cotransport, indicating that octanol caused acidification by blocking this powerful acid extruder. The alkalinization was inhibited by amiloride which blocks the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE), an acid extruder, suggesting that the alkaline shift induced by octanol was caused by stimulation of NHE. As expected, octanol's effects on astrocytic pHi were prevented by removal of external Na+, which blocks both Na+/HCO3- cotransport and NHE. Octanol had only small effects on intracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+i) in astrocytes. Hepatocytes which, like astrocytes, are strongly coupled to one another, showed no change in pHi with octanol application. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was used to study the effect of changes in astrocyte pHi on degree of coupling in hippocampal astrocytes. Coupling was decreased by intracellular acid shifts approximately -0.2 pH units in size. Octanol's effects on astrocyte pHi were complex but a prompt initial acidification was nearly always seen and could contribute to the uncoupling action of

  1. Oxidase uncoupling in heme monooxygenases: Human cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 in Nanodiscs

    SciTech Connect

    Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; McLean, Mark A.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► Substantial reducing equivalents are lost in human P450 CYP3A4 via an oxidase channel. ► Substrate binding has a pronounced effect on uncoupling in cytochrome P450. ► Anionic phospholipids improve the overall coupling in CYP3A4 Nanodiscs. -- Abstract: The normal reaction mechanism of cytochrome P450 operates by utilizing two reducing equivalents to reduce atmospheric dioxygen, producing one molecule of water and an oxygenated product in an overall stoichiometry of 2 electrons:1 dioxygen:1 product. However, three alternate unproductive pathways exist where the intermediate iron–oxygen states in the catalytic cycle can yield reduced oxygen products without substrate metabolism. The first involves release of superoxide from the oxygenated intermediate while the second occurs after input of the second reducing equivalent. Superoxide rapidly dismutates and hence both processes produce hydrogen peroxide that can be cytotoxic to the organism. In both cases, the formation of hydrogen peroxide involves the same overall stoichiometry as oxygenases catalysis. The key step in the catalytic cycle of cytochrome P450 involves scission of the oxygen–oxygen bond of atmospheric dioxygen to produce a higher valent iron-oxo state termed “Compound I”. This intermediate initiates a radical reaction in the oxygenase pathway but also can uptake two additional reducing equivalents from reduced pyridine nucleotide (NADPH) and the flavoprotein reductase to produce a second molecule of water. This non-productive decay of Compound I thus yields an overall oxygen to NADPH ratio of 1:2 and does not produce hydrocarbon oxidation. This water uncoupling reaction provides one of a limited means to study the reactivity of the critical Compound I intermediate in P450 catalysis. We measured simultaneously the rates of NADPH and oxygen consumption as a function of substrate concentration during the steady-state hydroxylation of testosterone catalyzed by human P450 CYP3A4

  2. Marked over expression of uncoupling protein-2 in beta cells exerts minor effects on mitochondrial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hals, Ingrid K.; Ogata, Hirotaka; Pettersen, Elin; Ma, Zuheng; Bjoerklund, Anneli; Skorpen, Frank; Egeberg, Kjartan Wollo; Grill, Valdemar

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The impact of UCP-2 over expression on mitochondrial function is controversial. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested mitochondrial functions at defined levels of overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find minor increases of fatty acid oxidation and uncoupling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects were seen only at high level (fourfold) of over expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hence it is doubtful whether these effects are of importance in diabetes. -- Abstract: Evidence is conflicting as to the impact of elevated levels of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) on insulin-producing beta cells. Here we investigated effects of a fourfold induction of UCP-2 protein primarily on mitochondrial parameters and tested for replication of positive findings at a lower level of induction. We transfected INS-1 cells to obtain a tet-on inducible cell line. A 48 h exposure to 1 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (dox) induced UCP-2 fourfold (424 {+-} 113%, mean {+-} SEM) and 0.1 {mu}g/ml twofold (178 {+-} 29%, n = 3). Fourfold induced cells displayed normal viability (MTT, apoptosis), normal cellular insulin contents and, glucose-induced insulin secretion (+27 {+-} 11%) as well as D-[U-{sup 14}C]-glucose oxidation (+5 {+-} 9% at 11 mM glucose). Oxidation of [1-{sup 14}C]-oleate was increased from 4088 to 5797 fmol/{mu}g prot/2 h at 3.3 mM glucose, p < 0.03. Oxidation of L-[{sup 14}C(U)]-glutamine was unaffected. Induction of UCP-2 did not significantly affect measures of mitochondrial membrane potential (Rhodamine 123) or mitochondrial mass (Mitotracker Green) and did not affect ATP levels. Oligomycin-inhibited oxygen consumption (a measure of mitochondrial uncoupling) was marginally increased, the effect being significant in comparison with dox-only treated cells, p < 0.05. Oxygen radicals, assessed by dichlorofluorescin diacetate, were decreased by 30%, p < 0.025. Testing for the lower level of UCP-2 induction did not reproduce any of the

  3. Reproductive decisions after fetal genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Pergament, Eugene; Pergament, Deborah

    2012-10-01

    A broad range of testing modalities for fetal genetic disease has been established. These include carrier screening for single-gene mutations, first-trimester and second-trimester screening for chromosome abnormalities and open neural-tube defects, prenatal diagnosis by means of chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Reproductive decisions before and after fetal genetic counselling represent the culmination of a dynamic interaction between prospective parents, obstetrician and genetic counsellor. The decision to undergo genetic testing before and after genetic counselling is influenced by a host of interrelated factors, including patient-partner and family relationships, patient-physician communication, societal mores, religious beliefs, and the media. Because of the complexity of personal and societal factors involved, it is not surprising that genetic counselling concerning reproductive decision-making must be individualised. A limited number of principles, guidelines and standards apply when counselling about testing for fetal genetic disease. These principles are that genetic counselling should be non-directive and unbiased and that parental decisions should be supported regardless of the reproductive choice. A critical responsibility of the obstetrician and genetic counsellor is to provide accurate and objective information about the implications, advantages, disadvantages and consequences of any genetic testing applied to prospective parents and their fetuses. These principles and responsibilities will be tested as newer technologies, such as array comparative genome hybridisation, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis and sequencing of the entire genome are introduced into the field of reproductive genetics and become routine practice.

  4. Macrophages: important accessory cells for reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Cohen, P E; Nishimura, K; Zhu, L; Pollard, J W

    1999-11-01

    Macrophages are found throughout reproductive tissues. To determine their role(s), we have studied mice homozygous for a null mutation (Csfm(op)) in the gene encoding the major macrophage growth factor, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1). Both male and female Csfm(op)/Csfm(op) mice have fertility defects. Males have low sperm number and libido as a consequence of dramatically reduced circulating testosterone. Females have extended estrous cycles and poor ovulation rates. CSF-1 is the principal growth factor regulating macrophage populations in the testis, male accessory glands, ovary, and uterus. However, analyses of CSF-1 nullizygous mice suggest that the primary reproductive defect is in the development of feedback regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Although not correlating with deficiencies of microglia populations, electrophysiological investigations indicate an impairment of neuronal responses. This suggests that microglia, under the influence of CSF-1, act to organize neuronal connectivity during development and that the absence of this function results in a perturbation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Macrophages also appear to have functions in the differentiated tissues of the reproductive system, including having a positive influence on steroidogenic cells. These data suggest that macrophages, through their trophic functions, can be considered as essential accessory cells for normal reproductive functioning.

  5. Relaxin and related peptides in male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2007-01-01

    The relaxin hormone is renowned for its function in pregnancy, parturition and other aspects of female reproduction. At the same time, the role of relaxin in male reproduction is still debated. Relaxin is prominently expressed in prostate and its receptors are found in several male reproductive organs; however, the data indicative of its contribution to differentiation and functioning of prostate or testis are contradictory. Prostate relaxin is a main source of this peptide in the seminal plasma. The relaxin effects on sperm motility and fertilization have been reported. The expression of other relaxin related peptides, such as INSL5 and INSL6 was described in testis; yet, currently there are no experimental data to pinpoint their biological functions. The other member of relaxin peptide family, insulin-like 3 peptide (INSL3), is a major player in male development. The INSL3 peptide is expressed in testicular fetal and adult Leydig cells and is directly responsible for the process of abdominal testicular descent (migration of the testes towards the scrotum during male development). Genetic targeting of the Insl3 gene or INSL3 GPCR receptor Lgr8/Rxfp2 causes high intra-abdominal cryptorchidism due to a differentiation failure of testicular ligaments, the gubernacula. Several mutations of these two genes rendering nonfunctional proteins have been described in human patients with testicular maldescent. Thus, in this chapter we review the data related to the expression and function of relaxin and related peptides in male reproduction.

  6. A Novel Mutation of DAX-1 Associated with Secretory Azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lihua; Liu, Yuchen; Diao, Ruiying; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Honggang; Gui, Yaoting

    2015-01-01

    Secretory azoospermia is a severe form of male infertility caused by unknown factors. DAX-1 is predominantly expressed in mammalian reproductive tissues and plays an important role in spermatogenesis because Dax-1 knockout male mice show spermatogenesis defects. To examine whether DAX-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory azoospermia in humans, we sequenced all of the exons of DAX-1 in 776 patients diagnosed with secretory azoospermia and 709 proven fertile men. A number of coding mutations unique to the patient group, including two synonymous mutations and six missense mutations, were identified. Of the missense mutations, our functional assay demonstrated that the V385L mutation caused the reduced functioning of DAX-1. This novel mutation (p. V385L) of DAX-1 is the first to be identified in association with secretory azoospermia, thereby highlighting the important role of DAX-1 in spermatogenesis. PMID:26207377

  7. Male mutation rates and the cost of sex for females

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Rosemary J.

    1994-05-01

    ALTHOUGH we do not know why sex evolved, the twofold cost of meiosis for females provides a standard against which postulated benefits of sex can be evaluated1. The most reliable benefit is sex's ability to reduce the impact of deleterious mutations2,3. But deleterious mutations may themselves generate a large and previously overlooked female-specific cost of sex. DNA sequence comparisons have confirmed Haldane's suggestion that most mutations arise in the male germ line4,5; recent estimates of α, the ratio of male to female mutation rates, are ten, six and two in humans, primates and rodents, respectively6-8. Consequently, male gametes may give progeny more mutations than the associated sexual recombination eliminates. Here I describe computer simulations showing that the cost of male mutations can easily exceed the benefits of recombination, causing females to produce fitter progeny by parthenogenesis than by mating. The persistence of sexual reproduction by females thus becomes even more problematic.

  8. A Novel Mutation of DAX-1 Associated with Secretory Azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Mou, Lisha; Xie, Nie; Yang, Lihua; Liu, Yuchen; Diao, Ruiying; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Honggang; Gui, Yaoting

    2015-01-01

    Secretory azoospermia is a severe form of male infertility caused by unknown factors. DAX-1 is predominantly expressed in mammalian reproductive tissues and plays an important role in spermatogenesis because Dax-1 knockout male mice show spermatogenesis defects. To examine whether DAX-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory azoospermia in humans, we sequenced all of the exons of DAX-1 in 776 patients diagnosed with secretory azoospermia and 709 proven fertile men. A number of coding mutations unique to the patient group, including two synonymous mutations and six missense mutations, were identified. Of the missense mutations, our functional assay demonstrated that the V385L mutation caused the reduced functioning of DAX-1. This novel mutation (p. V385L) of DAX-1 is the first to be identified in association with secretory azoospermia, thereby highlighting the important role of DAX-1 in spermatogenesis. PMID:26207377

  9. Expression of uncoupling proteins-1, -2 and -3 mRNA is induced by an adenocarcinoma-derived lipid-mobilizing factor

    PubMed Central

    Bing, C; Russell, S T; Beckett, E E; Collins, P; Taylor, S; Barraclough, R; Tisdale, M J; Williams, G

    2002-01-01

    The abnormalities of lipid metabolism observed in cancer cachexia may be induced by a lipid-mobilizing factor produced by adenocarcinomas. The specific molecules and metabolic pathways that mediate the actions of lipid-mobilizing factor are not known. The mitochondrial uncoupling proteins-1, -2 and -3 are suggested to play essential roles in energy dissipation and disposal of excess lipid. Here, we studied the effects of lipid-mobilizing factor on the expression of uncoupling proteins-1, -2 and -3 in normal mice. Lipid-mobilizing factor isolated from the urine of cancer patients was injected intravenously into mice over a 52-h period, while vehicle was similarly given to controls. Lipid-mobilizing factor caused significant reductions in body weight (−10%, P=0.03) and fat mass (−20%, P<0.01) accompanied by a marked decrease in plasma leptin (−59%, P<0.01) and heavy lipid deposition in the liver. In brown adipose tissue, uncoupling protein-1 mRNA levels were elevated in lipid-mobilizing factor-treated mice (+96%, P<0.01), as were uncoupling proteins-2 and -3 (+57% and +37%, both P<0.05). Lipid-mobilizing factor increased uncoupling protein-2 mRNA in both skeletal muscle (+146%, P<0.05) and liver (+142%, P=0.03). The protein levels of uncoupling protein-1 in brown adipose tissue and uncoupling protein-2 in liver were also increased with lipid-mobilizing factor administration (+49% and +67%, both P=0.02). Upregulation by lipid-mobilizing factor of uncoupling proteins-1, -2 and -3 in brown adipose tissue, and of uncoupling protein-2 in skeletal muscle and liver, suggests that these uncoupling proteins may serve to utilize excess lipid mobilized during fat catabolism in cancer cachexia. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 612–618. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600101 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11870545

  10. Leptin in reproduction.

    PubMed

    Caprio, M; Fabbrini, E; Isidori, A M; Aversa, A; Fabbri, A

    2001-03-01

    In mammals, the function of the reproductive system is dependent on the availability of energy in the environment. It is well established that acute modifications of energy balance modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In several species, fasting and caloric restriction have been shown to cause the suppression of pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion, via an inhibition of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulse generator. Such a mechanism probably prevents energy being wasted for reproduction. By contrast, excessive energy storage and obesity interfere with the correct regulation of the reproductive axis. The identification of leptin and leptin receptors, along with studies performed in animal models of leptin deficiency and resistance, has focused attention on the role of this molecule in reproduction, and disclosed new aspects of the relationship between energy stores, adipose tissue and reproductive function. Here, we discuss the central and peripheral effects of leptin on reproductive tissues, and try to fit a complex reality into a simplified model. In particular, the roles of leptin in reproduction at different anatomical levels and in various clinical and experimental settings are discussed.

  11. Reproductive strategies in snakes.

    PubMed Central

    Shine, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Snakes of both sexes display remarkable flexibility and diversity in their reproductive tactics. Many features of reproduction in female snakes (such as reproductive mode and frequency, seasonality and multiple mating) allow flexible maternal control. For example, females can manipulate not only the genotypes of their offspring (through mate choice or enhanced sperm competition) but also the phenotypes of their offspring (through allocation 'decisions', behavioural and physiological thermoregulation, and nest-site selection). Reliance on stored energy ('capital') to fuel breeding results in low frequencies of female reproduction and, in extreme cases, semelparity. A sophisticated vomeronasal system not only allows male snakes to locate reproductive females by following scent trails, but also facilitates pheromonally mediated mate choice by males. Male-male rivalry takes diverse forms, including female mimicry and mate guarding; combat bouts impose strong selection for large body size in males of some species. Intraspecific (geographical) variation and phenotypic plasticity in a wide array of reproductive traits (offspring size and number; reproductive frequency; incidence of multiple mating; male tactics such as mate guarding and combat; mate choice criteria) provide exceptional opportunities for future studies. PMID:12803888

  12. In vivo beta-adrenergic induction of the unmasking of the uncoupling protein in rat brown fat.

    PubMed

    Goubern, M; Chapey, M F; Laury, M C; Portet, R

    1993-09-01

    1. In 28 degrees C adapted rats (WA) both cold stress and norepinephrine (NE) led to a 4-fold increase of uncoupling protein dependent proton conductance which was abolished by propranolol (PRO). 2. In 4-day warm re-exposed rats (after 10 days at 5 degrees C) (WR) the same uncoupling by cold stress was observed but the NE effect was lower. Uncoupling by cold stress was not abolished by PRO. 3. In WR rats, uncoupling was not due to the involvement of an alpha-adrenergic pathway. 4. Both beta-agonist isoproterenol and beta 3-agonists BRL 35135A and ICI D7114 led to high levels of unmasking. 5. Interscapular brown adipose tissue surgical denervation, which abolished cold stress unmasking both in WA and, WR rats, indicates a mediation by direct sympathetic innervation. 6. Depending on the thermal history of the rat, the possibility that unmasking by cold stress could be mediated by different types of beta-receptors is discussed. PMID:7903611

  13. Relationship between expression of muscle-specific uncoupling protein 2 messenger RNA and genetic selection toward growth in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uncoupling protein 2 is a member of the mitochondrial channel proteins that regulate the flow of hydrogen ions and ATP generation. The relationship between UCP2 and nutrient metabolism has been well-defined in humans but unclear in fish. We hypothesized that increased muscle growth in channel catf...

  14. Coherent population transfer between uncoupled or weakly coupled states in ladder-type superconducting qutrits.

    PubMed

    Xu, H K; Song, C; Liu, W Y; Xue, G M; Su, F F; Deng, H; Tian, Ye; Zheng, D N; Han, Siyuan; Zhong, Y P; Wang, H; Liu, Yu-xi; Zhao, S P

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage offers significant advantages for coherent population transfer between uncoupled or weakly coupled states and has the potential of realizing efficient quantum gate, qubit entanglement and quantum information transfer. Here we report on the realization of the process in the superconducting Xmon and phase qutrits--two ladder-type three-level systems in which the ground state population is coherently transferred to the second excited state via the dark state subspace. We demonstrate that the population transfer efficiency is no less than 96% and 67% for the two devices, which agree well with the numerical simulation of the master equation. Population transfer via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage is significantly more robust against variations of the experimental parameters compared with that via the conventional resonant π pulse method. Our work opens up a new venue for exploring the process for quantum information processing using the superconducting artificial atoms. PMID:27009972

  15. An improved finite-difference analysis of uncoupled vibrations of tapered cantilever beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1983-01-01

    An improved finite difference procedure for determining the natural frequencies and mode shapes of tapered cantilever beams undergoing uncoupled vibrations is presented. Boundary conditions are derived in the form of simple recursive relations involving the second order central differences. Results obtained by using the conventional first order central differences and the present second order central differences are compared, and it is observed that the present second order scheme is more efficient than the conventional approach. An important advantage offered by the present approach is that the results converge to exact values rapidly, and thus the extrapolation of the results is not necessary. Consequently, the basic handicap with the classical finite difference method of solution that requires the Richardson's extrapolation procedure is eliminated. Furthermore, for the cases considered herein, the present approach produces consistent lower bound solutions.

  16. UNCOUPLING PROTEIN-2 MODULATES THE LIPID METABOLIC RESPONSE TO FASTING IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Anthony R.; Fülöp, Péter; Derdák, Zoltán; Kassai, Andrea; Sabo, Edmond; Mark, Nicholas M.; Paragh, György; Wands, Jack R.; Baffy, György

    2008-01-01

    Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) regulates insulin secretion by controlling ATP levels in β cells. While UCP2 deficiency improves glycemic control in mice, increased expression of UCP2 interferes with glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These observations link UCP2 to β cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes with a perplexing evolutionary role. We found higher residual serum insulin levels and blunted lipid metabolic responses in fasted ucp2−/− mice, supporting the concept that UCP2 evolved to suppress insulin effects and to accommodate the fuel switch to fatty acids during starvation. In the absence of UCP2, fasting initially promotes peripheral lipolysis and hepatic fat accumulation at less than expected rates, but culminates in protracted steatosis indicating diminished hepatic utilization and clearance of fatty acids. We conclude that UCP2-mediated control of insulin secretion is a physiologically relevant mechanism of the metabolic response to fasting. PMID:18292186

  17. Uncoupling proteins (UCP) in unicellular eukaryotes: true UCPs or UCP1-like acting proteins?

    PubMed

    Luévano-Martínez, Luis Alberto

    2012-04-01

    Uncoupling proteins belong to the superfamily of mitochondrial anion carriers. They are apparently present throughout the Eukarya domain in which only some members have an established physiological function, i.e. UCP1 from brown adipose tissue is involved in non-shivering thermogenesis. However, the proteins responsible for the phenotype observed in unicellular organisms have not been characterized. In this report we analyzed functional evidence concerning unicellular UCPs and found that true UCPs are restricted to some taxonomical groups while proteins conferring a UCP1-like phenotype to fungi and most protists are the result of a promiscuous activity exerted by other mitochondrial anion carriers. We describe a possible evolutionary route followed by these proteins by which they acquire this promiscuous mechanism.

  18. Application of an Uncoupled Elastic-plastic-creep Constitutive Model to Metals at High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    A uniaxial, uncoupled constitutive model to predict the response of thermal and rate dependent elastic-plastic material behavior is presented. The model is based on an incremental classicial plasticity theory extended to account for thermal, creep, and transient temperature conditions. Revisions to he combined hardening rule of the theory allow for better representation of cyclic phenomenon including the high rate of strain hardening upon cyclic reyield and cyclic saturation. An alternative approach is taken to model the rate dependent inelastic deformation which utilizes hysteresis loops and stress relaxation test data at various temperatures. The model is evaluated and compared to experiments which involve various thermal and mechanical load histories on 5086 aluminum alloy, 304 stainless steel and Hastelloy-X.

  19. Evidence that bacteriophage λ lysogens may induce in response to the proton motive force uncoupler CCCP.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Lynn C; Court, Donald L

    2016-02-01

    We describe a genetic β-galactoside reporter system using a disk diffusion assay on MacConkey Lactose agar petri plates to monitor maintenance of the bacteriophage λ prophage state and viral induction in Escherichia coli K-12. Evidence is presented that the phage λ major lytic promoters, pL and pR, are activated when cells containing the reporters are exposed to the energy poison carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine, CCCP. This uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation inhibits ATP synthesis by collapsing the proton motive force. Expression of the λ lytic promoters in response to CCCP requires host RecA function and an autocleavable CI repressor, as does SOS induction of the λ prophage that occurs by a DNA damage-dependent pathway. λ Cro function is required for CCCP-mediated activation of the λ lytic promoters. CCCP does not induce an sfi-lacZ SOS reporter. PMID:26705574

  20. Coherent population transfer between uncoupled or weakly coupled states in ladder-type superconducting qutrits

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H. K.; Song, C.; Liu, W. Y.; Xue, G. M.; Su, F. F.; Deng, H.; Tian, Ye; Zheng, D. N.; Han, Siyuan; Zhong, Y. P.; Wang, H.; Liu, Yu-xi; Zhao, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage offers significant advantages for coherent population transfer between uncoupled or weakly coupled states and has the potential of realizing efficient quantum gate, qubit entanglement and quantum information transfer. Here we report on the realization of the process in the superconducting Xmon and phase qutrits—two ladder-type three-level systems in which the ground state population is coherently transferred to the second excited state via the dark state subspace. We demonstrate that the population transfer efficiency is no less than 96% and 67% for the two devices, which agree well with the numerical simulation of the master equation. Population transfer via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage is significantly more robust against variations of the experimental parameters compared with that via the conventional resonant π pulse method. Our work opens up a new venue for exploring the process for quantum information processing using the superconducting artificial atoms. PMID:27009972

  1. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress, antioxidant levels and uncoupling protein expression in striped hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si-Si; Cao, Li-Li; Xu, Wei-Dong; Cao, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-11-01

    According to the rate of living-free radical hypothesis, higher metabolic rates should increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the "uncoupling to survive" hypothesis postulates that uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can decrease ROS production by lowering the potential of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in which case the correlation between metabolic rate and ROS levels would be a negative rather than positive. In this study, we examined energy intake, oxidative stress levels, antioxidant activity and the expression of UCPs in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and in the liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain, of striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) acclimated to either 5 °C or 32.5 °C. The energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 5 °C increased by 70.7%, whereas the energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 32.5 °C decreased by 31.3%, relative to hamsters kept at room temperature (21 °C) (P<0.05). Malonadialdehyde (MDA) levels, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity in BAT significantly decreased in 5 °C group, but increased in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. Neither ROS levels (i.e. H2O2 levels), nor antioxidants in skeletal muscle, liver, heart or brain tissue, were affected by temperature. UCP1 expression in BAT was significantly up-regulated in 5 °C group, but down-regulated in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. UCP3 expression of skeletal muscle was also up-regulated significantly in hamsters acclimated to 5 °C. These results suggest that the relationship between ROS levels and metabolic rate was negative, rather than positive. UCP1 expression in BAT may have played a role in lowering ROS levels. PMID:26244518

  2. Apoptosis-associated uncoupling of bone formation and resorption in osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Ian

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the destruction of bone tissue in osteomyelitis are only now being elucidated. While some of the tissue damage associated with osteomyelitis likely results from the direct actions of bacteria and infiltrating leukocytes, perhaps exacerbated by bacterial manipulation of leukocyte survival pathways, infection-induced bone loss predominantly results from an uncoupling of the activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Bacteria or their products can directly increase osteoclast formation and activity, and the inflammatory milieu at sites of infection can further promote bone resorption. In addition, osteoclast activity is critically regulated by osteoblasts that can respond to bacterial pathogens and foster both inflammation and osteoclastogenesis. Importantly, bone loss during osteomyelitis is also brought about by a decline in new bone deposition due to decreased bone matrix synthesis and by increased rates of osteoblast apoptosis. Extracellular bacterial components may be sufficient to reduce osteoblast viability, but the causative agents of osteomyelitis are also capable of inducing continuous apoptosis of these cells by activating intrinsic and extrinsic cell death pathways to further uncouple bone formation and resorption. Interestingly, bacterial internalization appears to be required for maximal osteoblast apoptosis, and cytosolic inflammasome activation may act in concert with autocrine/paracrine death receptor-ligand signaling to induce cell death. The manipulation of apoptotic pathways in infected bone cells could be an attractive new means to limit inflammatory damage in osteomyelitis. However, the mechanism that is the most important in bacterium-induced bone loss has not yet been identified. Furthermore, it remains to be determined whether the host would be best served by preventing osteoblast cell death or by promoting apoptosis in infected cells. PMID:24392356

  3. Uncoupling protein-2: a novel gene linked to obesity and hyperinsulinemia.

    PubMed

    Fleury, C; Neverova, M; Collins, S; Raimbault, S; Champigny, O; Levi-Meyrueis, C; Bouillaud, F; Seldin, M F; Surwit, R S; Ricquier, D; Warden, C H

    1997-03-01

    A mitochondrial protein called uncoupling protein (UCP1) plays an important role in generating heat and burning calories by creating a pathway that allows dissipation of the proton electrochemical gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane in brown adipose tissue, without coupling to any other energy-consuming process. This pathway has been implicated in the regulation of body temperature, body composition and glucose metabolism. However, UCP1-containing brown adipose tissue is unlikely to be involved in weight regulation in adult large-size animals and humans living in a thermoneutral environment (one where an animal does not have to increase oxygen consumption or energy expenditure to lose or gain heat to maintain body temperature), as there is little brown adipose tissue present. We now report the discovery of a gene that codes for a novel uncoupling protein, designated UCP2, which has 59% amino-acid identity to UCP1, and describe properties consistent with a role in diabetes and obesity. In comparison with UCP1, UCP2 has a greater effect on mitochondrial membrane potential when expressed in yeast. Compared to UCP1, the gene is widely expressed in adult human tissues, including tissues rich in macrophages, and it is upregulated in white fat in response to fat feeding. Finally, UCP2 maps to regions of human chromosome 11 and mouse chromosome 7 that have been linked to hyperinsulinaemia and obesity. Our findings suggest that UCP2 has a unique role in energy balance, body weight regulation and thermoregulation and their responses to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:9054939

  4. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress, antioxidant levels and uncoupling protein expression in striped hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si-Si; Cao, Li-Li; Xu, Wei-Dong; Cao, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-11-01

    According to the rate of living-free radical hypothesis, higher metabolic rates should increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the "uncoupling to survive" hypothesis postulates that uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can decrease ROS production by lowering the potential of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in which case the correlation between metabolic rate and ROS levels would be a negative rather than positive. In this study, we examined energy intake, oxidative stress levels, antioxidant activity and the expression of UCPs in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and in the liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain, of striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) acclimated to either 5 °C or 32.5 °C. The energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 5 °C increased by 70.7%, whereas the energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 32.5 °C decreased by 31.3%, relative to hamsters kept at room temperature (21 °C) (P<0.05). Malonadialdehyde (MDA) levels, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity in BAT significantly decreased in 5 °C group, but increased in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. Neither ROS levels (i.e. H2O2 levels), nor antioxidants in skeletal muscle, liver, heart or brain tissue, were affected by temperature. UCP1 expression in BAT was significantly up-regulated in 5 °C group, but down-regulated in 32.5 °C group, relative to the 21 °C group. UCP3 expression of skeletal muscle was also up-regulated significantly in hamsters acclimated to 5 °C. These results suggest that the relationship between ROS levels and metabolic rate was negative, rather than positive. UCP1 expression in BAT may have played a role in lowering ROS levels.

  5. Overexpression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) induces a hypoxic response in Nicotiana tabacum leaves

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Pedro; Okura, Vagner; Pena, Izabella A.; Maia, Renato; Maia, Ivan G.; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) decreases reactive oxygen species production under stress conditions by uncoupling the electrochemical gradient from ATP synthesis. This study combined transcriptome profiling with experimentally induced hypoxia to mechanistically dissect the impact of Arabidopsis thaliana UCP1 (AtUCP1) overexpression in tobacco. Transcriptomic analysis of AtUCP1-overexpressing (P07) and wild-type (WT) plants was carried out using RNA sequencing. Metabolite and carbohydrate profiling of hypoxia-treated plants was performed using 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. The transcriptome of P07 plants revealed a broad induction of stress-responsive genes that were not strictly related to the mitochondrial antioxidant machinery, suggesting that overexpression of AtUCP1 imposes a strong stress response within the cell. In addition, transcripts that mapped into carbon fixation and energy expenditure pathways were broadly altered. It was found that metabolite markers of hypoxic adaptation, such as alanine and tricarboxylic acid intermediates, accumulated in P07 plants under control conditions at similar rates to WT plants under hypoxia. These findings indicate that constitutive overexpression of AtUCP1 induces a hypoxic response. The metabolites that accumulated in P07 plants are believed to be important in signalling for an improvement in carbon assimilation and induction of a hypoxic response. Under these conditions, mitochondrial ATP production is less necessary and fermentative glycolysis becomes critical to meet cell energy demands. In this scenario, the more flexible energy metabolism along with an intrinsically activated hypoxic response make these plants better adapted to face several biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:26494730

  6. Uncoupling protein 3 expression and intramyocellular lipid accumulation by NMR following local burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qunhao; Cao, Haihui; Astrakas, Loukas G; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Mindrinos, Michael N; Schulz, John; Tompkins, Ronald G; Rahme, Laurence G; Tzika, A Aria

    2006-12-01

    Burn trauma is a clinical condition accompanied by muscle wasting that severely impedes rehabilitation in burn survivors. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is uniformly expressed in myoskeletal mitochondria and its expression has been found to increase in other clinical syndromes that, like burn trauma, are associated with muscle wasting (e.g., starvation, fasting, cancer, sepsis). The aim of this study was to explore the effects of burn trauma on UCP3 expression, intramyocellular lipids, and plasma-free fatty acids. Mice were studied at 6 h, 1 d and 3 d after nonlethal hindlimb burn trauma. Intramyocellular lipids in hindlimb skeletal muscle samples collected from burned and normal mice were measured using 1H NMR spectroscopy on a Bruker 14.1 Tesla spectrometer at 4 degrees C. UCP3 mRNA and protein levels were also measured in these samples. Plasma-free fatty acids were measured in burned and normal mice. Local burn trauma was found to result in: 1) upregulation of UCP3 mRNA and protein expression in hindlimb myoskeletal mitochondria by 6 h postburn; 2) increased intramyocellular lipids; and 3) increased plasma-free fatty acids. Our findings show that the increase in UCP3 after burn trauma may be linked to burn-induced alterations in lipid metabolism. Such a link could reveal novel insights into how processes related to energy metabolism are controlled in burn and suggest that induction of UCP3 by burn in skeletal muscle is protective by either activating cellular redox signaling and/or mitochondrial uncoupling. PMID:17089030

  7. An evaluation of upper-body muscle activation during coupled and uncoupled instability resistance training.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Brian M; Kutz, Matt R; Morgan, Amy L; Fullenkamp, Adam M; Ballenger, Ryan

    2014-07-01

    Recently, there has been a growth in the popularity of resistance exercises performed on unstable surfaces. However, the relationship between unstable surface training and load coupling on muscle activation is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in muscle activation during a barbell (BB) (coupled) and dumbbell (DB) (uncoupled) chest press exercise performed on an unstable surface. The 3 specific chest press conditions included 50% 1 repetition maximum (RM) with BB (50% BB), 50% 1RM with DBs (50% DB), and 25% 1RM with DBs (25% DB). Ten male subjects participated in the study (age, 23.9 ± 2.6 years; body weight, 82.8 ± 10.2 kg). During testing, mean electromyographic activity was assessed for pectoralis major (PM), triceps brachii, anterior deltoid (AD), and rectus abdominis (RA) and was presented as a percent change across the lifting conditions. It was observed that muscle activation increased by 15% in both the PM and RA from the 50% BB condition to the 50% DB condition. Also, the greatest percent difference in muscle activation between the 50 and 25% DB conditions occurred for PM and AD (+54% during 50% DB). These results suggest that demands on the core musculature to provide stability are increased with the use of DBs (uncoupled) as opposed to a BB (coupled). Where instability training provides a sufficient hypertrophy stimulus in prime mover muscle groups, there may be the added benefit of core stability training. Specifically, this type of training may benefit both untrained persons and those engaged in active rehabilitation.

  8. Human reproduction: Jewish perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schenker, Joseph G

    2013-11-01

    Developments in science and technology and corresponding clinical applications raise new religious questions, often without clear answers. The role of theology in bioethics is integral to clarify perceived attitudes toward these developments for different religious communities. The Jewish attitude towards procreation is derived from the first commandment of God to Adam to 'Be fruitful and multiply'. Judaism allows the practice of all techniques of assisted reproduction when the oocyte and spermatozoon originate from the wife and husband respectively. This paper presents the attitude of Jewish Law -- Halacha to therapeutic procedures, such as IVF-embryo transfer, spermatozoa, oocytes, embryo donation, cryopreservation of genetic material, surrogacy, posthumous reproduction, gender preselection, reproductive and therapeutic cloning.

  9. Sexual reproduction selects for robustness and negative epistasis in artificial gene networks.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ricardo B R; Lohaus, Rolf; Srinivasan, Suraj; Dang, Kristen K; Burch, Christina L

    2006-03-01

    The mutational deterministic hypothesis for the origin and maintenance of sexual reproduction posits that sex enhances the ability of natural selection to purge deleterious mutations after recombination brings them together into single genomes. This explanation requires negative epistasis, a type of genetic interaction where mutations are more harmful in combination than expected from their separate effects. The conceptual appeal of the mutational deterministic hypothesis has been offset by our inability to identify the mechanistic and evolutionary bases of negative epistasis. Here we show that negative epistasis can evolve as a consequence of sexual reproduction itself. Using an artificial gene network model, we find that recombination between gene networks imposes selection for genetic robustness, and that negative epistasis evolves as a by-product of this selection. Our results suggest that sexual reproduction selects for conditions that favour its own maintenance, a case of evolution forging its own path.

  10. Melanocortins and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Schiöth, Helgi B; Watanobe, Hajime

    2002-02-01

    Obesity, anorexia and general body weight fluctuations cause a variety of effects on the reproductive system. Our understanding of the neuro-biological mechanisms of the connections between body weight and the reproductive axis is not especially developed despite a number of interesting physiological observations. Several reports suggest that leptin could play a key role in connecting energy balance and reproduction. The melanocortin system, involving melanocyte stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, agouti related peptide and the central melanocortin 3 and 4 receptors, plays a major role in the hypothalamic regulation of energy balance. The melanocortins have also been suggested to participate in possible downstream events of the adipose cell derived hormone, leptin. Leptin has importance for several aspects of reproduction including regulation of luteinizing hormone and prolactin release. This review discusses the interplay of hypothalamic regulation of food intake and the hormones involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis with special emphasis on putative roles of the melanocortin system.

  11. Programming and reproductive functioning.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J; Norman, Robert J

    2002-11-01

    Here, we explore the influence of fetal programming and early life exposures on lifelong reproductive health through modification of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. A range of programming issues are considered with examples from the literature demonstrating that environmental or nutritive exposures have a crucial role in reproductive performance, fetal growth, postnatal development and reproduction-related disease risk. We pay particular attention to recent research on associations between indicators of fetal and postnatal growth and the etiology of polycystic ovary syndrome in women. We conclude that the concept of programming can be applied to reproductive development and related health outcomes, and that the complex potential for interactions between parameters controlling fetal development and postnatal exposures invokes a need to adopt a perspective across the life course of an individual.

  12. My Reproductive Life Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers My Reproductive Life Plan Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... use with their patients. How to Make a Plan First, think about your goals for school, for ...

  13. Teaching Plant Reproduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolman, Marvin N., Ed.; Hardy, Garry R., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Recommends using Amaryllis hippeastrum to teach young children about plant reproduction. Provides tips for growing these plants, discusses the fast growing rate of the plant, and explains the anatomy. (YDS)

  14. Strong sexual selection in males against a mutation load that reduces offspring production in seed beetles.

    PubMed

    Grieshop, K; Stångberg, J; Martinossi-Allibert, I; Arnqvist, G; Berger, D

    2016-06-01

    Theory predicts that sexual reproduction can increase population viability relative to asexual reproduction by allowing sexual selection in males to remove deleterious mutations from the population without large demographic costs. This requires that selection acts more strongly in males than females and that mutations affecting male reproductive success have pleiotropic effects on population productivity, but empirical support for these assumptions is mixed. We used the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus to implement a three-generation breeding design where we induced mutations via ionizing radiation (IR) in the F0 generation and measured mutational effects (relative to nonirradiated controls) on an estimate of population productivity in the F1 and effects on sex-specific competitive lifetime reproductive success (LRS) in the F2 . Regardless of whether mutations were induced via F0 males or females, they had strong negative effects on male LRS, but a nonsignificant influence on female LRS, suggesting that selection is more efficient in removing deleterious alleles in males. Moreover, mutations had seemingly shared effects on population productivity and competitive LRS in both sexes. Thus, our results lend support to the hypothesis that strong sexual selection on males can act to remove the mutation load on population viability, thereby offering a benefit to sexual reproduction. PMID:26991346

  15. Avian reproductive physiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Gibbons, Edward F.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Demarest, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  16. BRCA Mutations, DNA Repair Deficiency, and Ovarian Aging1

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Kutluk; Turan, Volkan; Titus, Shiny; Stobezki, Robert; Liu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte aging has a significant impact on reproductive outcomes both quantitatively and qualitatively. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the age-related decline in reproductive success have not been fully addressed. BRCA is known to be involved in homologous DNA recombination and plays an essential role in double-strand DNA break repair. Given the growing body of laboratory and clinical evidence, we performed a systematic review on the current understanding of the role of DNA repair in human reproduction. We find that BRCA mutations negatively affect ovarian reserve based on convincing evidence from in vitro and in vivo results and prospective studies. Because decline in the function of the intact gene occurs at an earlier age, women with BRCA1 mutations exhibit accelerated ovarian aging, unlike those with BRCA2 mutations. However, because of the still robust function of the intact allele in younger women and because of the masking of most severe cases by prophylactic oophorectomy or cancer, it is less likely one would see an effect of BRCA mutations on fertility until later in reproductive age. The impact of BRCA2 mutations on reproductive function may be less visible because of the delayed decline in the function of normal BRCA2 allele. BRCA1 function and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-mediated DNA repair may also be important in the pathogenesis of age-induced increase in aneuploidy. BRCA1 is required for meiotic spindle assembly, and cohesion function between sister chromatids is also regulated by ATM family member proteins. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest the implication of BRCA and DNA repair malfunction in ovarian aging. PMID:26224004

  17. Asexual Reproduction in Holothurians

    PubMed Central

    Dolmatov, Igor Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of asexual reproduction in holothurians are discussed. Holothurians are significant as fishery and aquaculture items and have high commercial value. The last review on holothurian asexual reproduction was published 18 years ago and included only 8 species. An analysis of the available literature shows that asexual reproduction has now been confirmed in 16 holothurian species. Five additional species are also most likely capable of fission. The recent discovery of new fissiparous holothurian species indicates that this reproduction mode is more widespread in Holothuroidea than previously believed. New data about the history of the discovery of asexual reproduction in holothurians, features of fission, and regeneration of anterior and posterior fragments are described here. Asexual reproduction is obviously controlled by the integrated systems of the organism, primarily the nervous system. Special molecular mechanisms appear to determine the location where fission occurs along the anterior-posterior axis of the body. Alteration of the connective tissue strength of the body wall may play an important role during fission of holothurians. The basic mechanism of fission is the interaction of matrix metalloproteinases, their inhibitors, and enzymes forming cross-link complexes between fibrils of collagen. The population dynamics of fissiparous holothurians are discussed. PMID:25405228

  18. Asexual reproduction in holothurians.

    PubMed

    Dolmatov, Igor Yu

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of asexual reproduction in holothurians are discussed. Holothurians are significant as fishery and aquaculture items and have high commercial value. The last review on holothurian asexual reproduction was published 18 years ago and included only 8 species. An analysis of the available literature shows that asexual reproduction has now been confirmed in 16 holothurian species. Five additional species are also most likely capable of fission. The recent discovery of new fissiparous holothurian species indicates that this reproduction mode is more widespread in Holothuroidea than previously believed. New data about the history of the discovery of asexual reproduction in holothurians, features of fission, and regeneration of anterior and posterior fragments are described here. Asexual reproduction is obviously controlled by the integrated systems of the organism, primarily the nervous system. Special molecular mechanisms appear to determine the location where fission occurs along the anterior-posterior axis of the body. Alteration of the connective tissue strength of the body wall may play an important role during fission of holothurians. The basic mechanism of fission is the interaction of matrix metalloproteinases, their inhibitors, and enzymes forming cross-link complexes between fibrils of collagen. The population dynamics of fissiparous holothurians are discussed.

  19. Reproduction in the water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Presicce, G A

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, an account of various aspects related to buffalo reproduction are given. Fundamental concepts of the reproductive physiology as well as manipulation of the reproductive function will be presented. This will include an overview of the most recent developments of the oestrous cycle and the ovulation control, new strategies of reproductive management for the improvement of genetic gain and the application of newly developed reproductive technologies, such as in vitro embryo production, embryo and sperm sexing and cloning.

  20. Nonequilibrium model for estimating parameters of deleterious mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordo, Isabel; Dionisio, Francisco

    2005-03-01

    Deleterious mutations are of extreme evolutionary importance because, even though they are eliminated by natural selection, their continuous pressure creates a pool of variability in natural populations. They are of potential relevance for the existence of several features in evolution, such as sexual reproduction, and pose a risk to small asexual populations. Despite their extreme importance, the deleterious mutation rate and the effects of each mutation on fitness are poorly known quantities. Here we analyze a simple model that can be applied to simple experiments, in microorganisms, aiming at the quantification of these values.

  1. Parental age affects somatic mutation rates in the progeny of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Bashir, Tufail; Sailer, Christian; Gurumoorthy, Viswanathan; Ramakrishnan, Anantha Maharasi; Dhanapal, Shanmuhapreya; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-05-01

    In humans, it is well known that the parental reproductive age has a strong influence on mutations transmitted to their progeny. Meiotic nondisjunction is known to increase in older mothers, and base substitutions tend to go up with paternal reproductive age. Hence, it is clear that the germinal mutation rates are a function of both maternal and paternal ages in humans. In contrast, it is unknown whether the parental reproductive age has an effect on somatic mutation rates in the progeny, because these are rare and difficult to detect. To address this question, we took advantage of the plant model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), where mutation detector lines allow for an easy quantitation of somatic mutations, to test the effect of parental age on somatic mutation rates in the progeny. Although we found no significant effect of parental age on base substitutions, we found that frameshift mutations and transposition events increased in the progeny of older parents, an effect that is stronger through the maternal line. In contrast, intrachromosomal recombination events in the progeny decrease with the age of the parents in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner. Our results clearly show that parental reproductive age affects somatic mutation rates in the progeny and, thus, that some form of age-dependent information, which affects the frequency of double-strand breaks and possibly other processes involved in maintaining genome integrity, is transmitted through the gametes. PMID:25810093

  2. Glucocorticoid Regulation of Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Anna C; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that stress, measured by increased glucocorticoid secretion, leads to profound reproductive dysfunction. In times of stress, glucocorticoids activate many parts of the fight or flight response, mobilizing energy and enhancing survival, while inhibiting metabolic processes that are not necessary for survival in the moment. This includes reproduction, an energetically costly procedure that is very finely regulated. In the short term, this is meant to be beneficial, so that the organism does not waste precious energy needed for survival. However, long-term inhibition can lead to persistent reproductive dysfunction, even if no longer stressed. This response is mediated by the increased levels of circulating glucocorticoids, which orchestrate complex inhibition of the entire reproductive axis. Stress and glucocorticoids exhibits both central and peripheral inhibition of the reproductive hormonal axis. While this has long been recognized as an issue, understanding the complex signaling mechanism behind this inhibition remains somewhat of a mystery. What makes this especially difficult is attempting to differentiate the many parts of both of these hormonal axes, and new neuropeptide discoveries in the last decade in the reproductive field have added even more complexity to an already complicated system. Glucocorticoids (GCs) and other hormones within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis (as well as contributors in the sympathetic system) can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at all levels-GCs can inhibit release of GnRH from the hypothalamus, inhibit gonadotropin synthesis and release in the pituitary, and inhibit testosterone synthesis and release from the gonads, while also influencing gametogenesis and sexual behavior. This chapter is not an exhaustive review of all the known literature, however is aimed at giving a brief look at both the central and peripheral effects of glucocorticoids on the reproductive function.

  3. Transgenic models in the study of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Lau, A; Matzuk, M M

    1999-05-01

    The development of techniques to manipulate genes within mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells has allowed investigators to study the functions of many genes in vivo. We have used these techniques to functionally mutate genes to study how the loss of the gene affects development, oncogenesis, and reproduction. Genes affecting development include members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily and their signaling pathway. We have shown that mutations in this complicated signaling network affect a wide range of embryonic developmental processes including craniofacial morphogenesis, dentition and muscle development. One specific member of TGF-beta family, inhibin alpha, has been identified as a novel tumor suppressor in the testes, ovaries, and adrenal glands. Another focus of research in the laboratory is the analysis of roles of proteins in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the affect of disrupting this pathway on reproductive function. We have demonstrated that several genes expressed in the pituitary and gonads are required for folliculogenesis leading to female infertility and in two cases are important for Sertoli cell proliferation in males. The studies using ES cell technology has enabled us to dissect two complex networks in animal models.

  4. Rethinking progesterone regulation of female reproductive cyclicity

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kaiyu; Cui, Wei; Dhakal, Pramod; Wolfe, Michael W.; Rumi, M. A. Karim; Vivian, Jay L.; Roby, Katherine F.; Soares, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PGR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor with key roles in the regulation of female fertility. Much has been learned of the actions of PGR signaling through the use of pharmacologic inhibitors and genetic manipulation, using mouse mutagenesis. Characterization of rats with a null mutation at the Pgr locus has forced a reexamination of the role of progesterone in the regulation of the female reproductive cycle. We generated two Pgr mutant rat models, using genome editing. In both cases, deletions yielded a null mutation resulting from a nonsense frame-shift and the emergence of a stop codon. Similar to Pgr null mice, Pgr null rats were infertile because of deficits in sexual behavior, ovulation, and uterine endometrial differentiation. However, in contrast to the reported phenotype of female mice with disruptions in Pgr signaling, Pgr null female rats exhibit robust estrous cycles. Cyclic changes in vaginal cytology, uterine histology, serum hormone levels, and wheel running activity were evident in Pgr null female rats, similar to wild-type controls. Furthermore, exogenous progesterone treatment inhibited estrous cycles in wild-type female rats but not in Pgr-null female rats. As previously reported, pharmacologic antagonism supports a role for PGR signaling in the regulation of the ovulatory gonadotropin surge, a result at variance with experimentation using genetic ablation of PGR signaling. To conclude, our findings in the Pgr null rat challenge current assumptions and prompt a reevaluation of the hormonal control of reproductive cyclicity. PMID:27035990

  5. Modulation of acto-myosin contractility in skeletal muscle myoblasts uncouples growth arrest from differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Jyotsna; Helfman, David M

    2004-08-01

    Cell-substratum interactions trigger key signaling pathways that modulate growth control and tissue-specific gene expression. We have previously shown that abolishing adhesive interactions by suspension culture results in G(0) arrest of myoblasts. We report that blocking intracellular transmission of adhesion-dependent signals in adherent cells mimics the absence of adhesive contacts. We investigated the effects of pharmacological inhibitors of acto-myosin contractility on growth and differentiation of C2C12 myogenic cells. ML7 (5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl homopiperazine) and BDM (2,3, butanedione monoxime) are specific inhibitors of myosin light chain kinase, and myosin heavy chain ATPase, respectively. ML7 and BDM affected cell shape by reducing focal adhesions and stress fibers. Both inhibitors rapidly blocked DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent, reversible fashion. Furthermore, both ML7 and BDM suppressed expression of MyoD and myogenin, induced p27(kip1) but not p21(cip1), and inhibited differentiation. Thus, as with suspension-arrest, inhibition of acto-myosin contractility in adherent cells led to arrest uncoupled from differentiation. Over-expression of inhibitors of the small GTPase RhoA (dominant negative RhoA and C3 transferase) mimicked the effects of myosin inhibitors. By contrast, wild-type RhoA induced arrest, maintained MyoD and activated myogenin and p21 expression. The Rho effector kinase ROCK did not appear to mediate Rho's effects on MyoD. Thus, ROCK and MLCK play different roles in the myogenic program. Signals regulated by MLCK are critical, since inhibition of MLCK suppressed MyoD expression but inhibition of ROCK did not. Inhibition of contractility suppressed MyoD but did not reduce actin polymer levels. However, actin depolymerization with latrunculin B inhibited MyoD expression. Taken together, our observations indicate that actin polymer status and contractility regulate MyoD expression. We suggest that in myoblasts, the Rho pathway and

  6. Franchising Reproductive Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Rob; Tsui, Amy Ong; Sulzbach, Sara; Bardsley, Phil; Bekele, Getachew; Giday, Tilahun; Ahmed, Rehana; Gopalkrishnan, Gopi; Feyesitan, Bamikale

    2004-01-01

    Objectives Networks of franchised health establishments, providing a standardized set of services, are being implemented in developing countries. This article examines associations between franchise membership and family planning and reproductive health outcomes for both the member provider and the client. Methods Regression models are fitted examining associations between franchise membership and family planning and reproductive health outcomes at the service provider and client levels in three settings. Results Franchising has a positive association with both general and family planning client volumes, and the number of family planning brands available. Similar associations with franchise membership are not found for reproductive health service outcomes. In some settings, client satisfaction is higher at franchised than other types of health establishments, although the association between franchise membership and client outcomes varies across the settings. Conclusions Franchise membership has apparent benefits for both the provider and the client, providing an opportunity to expand access to reproductive health services, although greater attention is needed to shift the focus from family planning to a broader reproductive health context. PMID:15544644

  7. Adipokines in human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Joëlle; Pollet-Villard, Xavier; Reverchon, Maxime; Mellouk, Namya; Levy, Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Adipose tissue communicates with other central and peripheral organs by the synthesis and release of substances called adipokines. The most studied adipokine is leptin but others have been recently identified including resistin, adiponectin, chemerin, omentin and visfatin. These adipokines have a critical role in the development of obesity-related complications and inflammatory conditions. However, they are also involved in other functions in the organism including reproductive functions. Indeed, many groups have demonstrated that adipokine receptors, such as adiponectin and chemerin, but also adipokines themselves (adiponectin, chemerin, resistin, visfatin and omentin) are expressed in human peripheral reproductive tissues and that these adipokines are likely to exert direct effects on these tissues. After a brief description of these new adipokines, an overview of their actions in different human reproductive organs (hypothalamus, pituitary, ovary, testis, uterus and placenta) will be presented. Finally, comments will be made on the eventual alterations of these adipokines in reproductive disorders, with special attention to polycystic ovary syndrome, a disease characterized by dysfunction of gonadal axis and systemic nerve endocrine metabolic network with a prevalence of up to 10% in women of reproductive age.

  8. Melatonin and male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunjin; Zhou, Xu

    2015-06-15

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland whose concentrations in the body are regulated by both the dark-light and seasonal cycles. The reproductive function of seasonal breeding animals is clearly influenced by the circadian variation in melatonin levels. Moreover, a growing body of evidence indicates that melatonin has important effects in the reproduction of some non-seasonal breeding animals. In males, melatonin affects reproductive regulation in three main ways. First, it regulates the secretion of two key neurohormones, GnRH and LH. Second, it regulates testosterone synthesis and testicular maturation. Third, as a potent free radical scavenger that is both lipophilic and hydrophilic, it prevents testicular damage caused by environmental toxins or inflammation. This review summarizes the existing data on the possible biological roles of melatonin in male reproduction. Overall, the literature data indicate that melatonin affects the secretion of both gonadotropins and testosterone while also improving sperm quality. This implies that it has important effects on the regulation of testicular development and male reproduction.

  9. Speeding the reproductive revolution.

    PubMed

    Robey, B; Upadhyay, U

    1999-01-01

    In 1994, at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) held in Cairo, the international community set the goal of ensuring universal access to reproductive health care by 2015 and agreed to finance its costs. Few governments and donor countries, however, have made good on commitments made at the ICPD. Reproductive health is not improving and may actually be getting worse. Specific goals to be reached by 2015 include meeting all unmet need for family planning, reducing maternal mortality by 75% compared with 1990 levels, and reducing infant mortality to lower than 35 deaths/1000 births. Reaching these and the related reproductive health goals of the ICPD was calculated to cost about US$17 billion/year until 2000, then to increase to $22 billion/year by 2015 (in constant 1993 US dollars). Developing countries agreed to pay 66% of the cost, while donor countries paid the remainder. Immediately after the ICPD, reproductive health funding increased substantially, then declined again, with most donor countries failing to meet their funding commitments. Failure to deliver on the promised financial support for the ICPD goals will result in higher levels of unintended pregnancies, induced abortions, cases of maternal mortality, and infant deaths. Governments need to be convinced that paying for reproductive health programs is an urgent priority and that developing countries, donor countries, and multilateral institutions all have much to gain from reaching the ICPD goals. PMID:12322000

  10. Selective advantage for sexual reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2006-03-01

    We develop a simplified model for sexual replication within the quasispecies formalism. We assume that the genomes of the replicating organisms are two-chromosomed and diploid, and that the fitness is determined by the number of chromosomes that are identical to a given master sequence. We also assume that there is a cost to sexual replication, given by a characteristic time τseek during which haploid cells seek out a mate with which to recombine. If the mating strategy is such that only viable haploids can mate, then when τseek= 0 , it is possible to show that sexual replication will always outcompete asexual replication. However, as τseek increases, sexual replication only becomes advantageous at progressively higher mutation rates. Once the time cost for sex reaches a critical threshold, the selective advantage for sexual replication disappears entirely. The results of this talk suggest that sexual replication is not advantageous in small populations per se, but rather in populations with low replication rates. In this regime, the cost for sex is sufficiently low that the selective advantage obtained through recombination leads to the dominance of the strategy. In fact, at a given replication rate and for a fixed environment volume, sexual replication is selected for in high populations because of the reduced time spent finding a reproductive partner.

  11. A perspective on the importance of reproductive mode in astrobiology.

    PubMed

    Van Doninck, Karine; Schön, Isa; Martens, Koen

    2003-01-01

    Reproduction is a vital characteristic of life, and sex is the most common reproductive mode in the eukaryotic world. Sex and reproduction are not necessarily linked mechanisms: Sexuality without reproduction exists, while several forms of asexual reproduction are known. The occurrence of sexuality itself is paradoxical, as it is very costly in evolutionary terms. Most of the hypotheses (more than 20) attempting to explain the prevalence of sex fall into two categories: Sex either creates good gene combinations for adaptation to environments or eliminates bad gene combinations counteracting the accumulation of mutations. In spite of this apparent wealth of beneficial effects of sex, asexuality is not rare. Most eukaryotic, asexual lineages are short-lived and can only persist through the presence of sexual roots, but at least two animal groups, bdelloid rotifers and darwinulid ostracods, seem to claim the status of ancient asexuals. Research on (a)sexuality is relevant to astrobiology in a number of ways. First, strong relationships between the origin and persistence of life in extreme environments and reproductive mode are known. Second, the "habitability" of nonterrestrial environments to life greatly depends on reproductive mode. Whereas asexuals can do equally well or better in harsh environments, they fail to adapt fast enough to changing abiotic and biotic environments. Third, it has been shown that plants reproduce mainly asexually in space, and sperm production and motility in some vertebrates are hampered. Both findings indicate that extraterrestrial life under conditions different from Earth might be dominated by asexual reproduction. Finally, for exchange of biological material between planets, the choice of reproductive mode will be important.

  12. A Perspective on the Importance of Reproductive Mode in Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Doninck, Karine; Schön, Isa; Martens, Koen

    2003-12-01

    Reproduction is a vital characteristic of life, and sex is the most common reproductive mode in the eukaryotic world. Sex and reproduction are not necessarily linked mechanisms: Sexuality without reproduction exists, while several forms of asexual reproduction are known. The occurrence of sexuality itself is paradoxical, as it is very costly in evolutionary terms. Most of the hypotheses (more than 20) attempting to explain the prevalence of sex fall into two categories: Sex either creates good gene combinations for adaptation to environments or eliminates bad gene combinations counteracting the accumulation of mutations. In spite of this apparent wealth of beneficial effects of sex, asexuality is not rare. Most eukaryotic, asexual lineages are short-lived and can only persist through the presence of sexual roots, but at least two animal groups, bdelloid rotifers and darwinulid ostracods, seem to claim the status of ancient asexuals. Research on (a)sexuality is relevant to astrobiology in a number of ways. First, strong relationships between the origin and persistence of life in extreme environments and reproductive mode are known. Second, the "habitability" of nonterrestrial environments to life greatly depends on reproductive mode. Whereas asexuals can do equally well or better in harsh environments, they fail to adapt fast enough to changing abiotic and biotic environments. Third, it has been shown that plants reproduce mainly asexually in space, and sperm production and motility in some vertebrates are hampered. Both findings indicate that extraterrestrial life under conditions different from Earth might be dominated by asexual reproduction. Finally, for exchange of biological material between planets, the choice of reproductive mode will be important.

  13. Does reproductive isolation evolve faster in larger populations via sexually antagonistic coevolution?

    PubMed

    Gay, L; Eady, P E; Vasudev, R; Hosken, D J; Tregenza, T

    2009-10-23

    Sexual conflict over reproductive investment can lead to sexually antagonistic coevolution and reproductive isolation. It has been suggested that, unlike most models of allopatric speciation, the evolution of reproductive isolation through sexually antagonistic coevolution will occur faster in large populations as these harbour greater levels of standing genetic variation, receive larger numbers of mutations and experience more intense sexual selection. We tested this in bruchid beetle populations (Callosobruchus maculatus) by manipulating population size and standing genetic variability in replicated lines derived from founders that had been released from sexual conflict for 90 generations. We found that after 19 generations of reintroduced sexual conflict, none of our treatments had evolved significant overall reproductive isolation among replicate lines. However, as predicted, measures of reproductive isolation tended to be greater among larger populations. We discuss our methodology, arguing that reproductive isolation is best examined by performing a matrix of allopatric and sympatric crosses whereas measurement of divergence requires crosses with a tester line.

  14. Biofluidmechanics of Reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauci, Lisa J.; Dillon, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian fertilization requires the coordinated activity of motile spermatozoa, muscular contractions of the uterus and oviduct, as well as ciliary beating. These elastic structures generate forces that drive fluid motion, but their configurations are, in turn, determined by the fluid dynamics. We review the basic fluid mechanical aspects of reproduction, including flagellar/ciliary beating and peristalsis. We report on recent biological studies that have shed light on the relative importance of the mechanical ingredients of reproduction. In particular, we examine sperm motility in the reproductive tract, ovum pickup and transport in the oviduct, as well as sperm-egg interactions. We review recent advances in understanding the internal mechanics of cilia and flagella, flagellar surface interaction, sperm motility in complex fluids, and the role of fluid dynamics in embryo transfer. We outline promising computational fluid dynamics frameworks that may be used to investigate these complex, fluid-structure interactions.

  15. Biotechnology in reproductive medicine.

    PubMed

    Illmensee, Karl

    2002-01-01

    In this review I am summarizing the past and current progress in the field of pharmaceutical, diagnostic, therapeutic, and reproductive cloning in mammals. Several human gene products can be pharmaceutically explored in transgenic farm animals and employed for medical applications. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is utilizing modern molecular cloning techniques to detect genetic and chromosomal aberrations in early embryos originating from patients with inborn errors at risk for hereditary diseases or age-related risk for abnormal karyotype. Stem cell engineering from early human embryos is creating new and promising but also controversial applications for therapeutic and regenerative medicine. Potential risk factors for reproductive cloning are presented and discussed in the context of possible developmental malformations, frequently observed after embryo culture and cloning in farm animals. Future extension of biotechnology to human reproductive cloning is currently under worldwide dispute.

  16. Human reproduction: Jewish perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schenker, Joseph G

    2013-11-01

    Developments in science and technology and corresponding clinical applications raise new religious questions, often without clear answers. The role of theology in bioethics is integral to clarify perceived attitudes toward these developments for different religious communities. The Jewish attitude towards procreation is derived from the first commandment of God to Adam to 'Be fruitful and multiply'. Judaism allows the practice of all techniques of assisted reproduction when the oocyte and spermatozoon originate from the wife and husband respectively. This paper presents the attitude of Jewish Law -- Halacha to therapeutic procedures, such as IVF-embryo transfer, spermatozoa, oocytes, embryo donation, cryopreservation of genetic material, surrogacy, posthumous reproduction, gender preselection, reproductive and therapeutic cloning. PMID:24000935

  17. [Reproduction of beef cattle].

    PubMed

    de Kruif, A; Mijten, P; Van den Branden, J; Opsomer, G

    1992-03-01

    The literature on the reproduction of beef cattle is reviewed in the present paper. To begin with the differences between dairy and beef cattle are elucidated. Secondly, the most important reproductive problems of beef cows are discussed. Items discussed include: the arrival of puberty, the interval between parturition and the first service and infertility. In Belgium, where nearly all beef cows belong to the double muscled White and Blue breed and have to be delivered by caesarean sections, many fertility problems are due to adhesions between the uterus and the surrounding tissues. Besides the quality of the semen of many of the bulls used is rather poor. This is probably caused by the extreme selection for beef production. Finally, the criteria which should be used to determine the reproductive efficiency of beef cows are discussed. Such as the percentage of pregnant cows, the proportion of live and weaned calves and the calving interval. PMID:1542865

  18. Introduction: Communicating Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Nick; Jones, Peter Murray; Kassell, Lauren; Secord, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Communication should be central to histories of reproduction, because it has structured how people do and do not reproduce. Yet communication has been so pervasive, and so various, that it is often taken for granted and the historical specificities overlooked. Making communication a frame for histories of reproduction can draw a fragmented field together, including by putting the promotion of esoteric ideas on a par with other practical activities. Paying communication close attention can revitalize the history of reproduction over the long term by highlighting continuities as well as the complex connections between new technologies and new approaches. Themes such as the power of storytelling, the claiming and challenging of expertise, and relations between knowledge and ignorance, secrecy and propriety also invite further study. PMID:26521666

  19. Introduction: Communicating Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Nick; Jones, Peter Murray; Kassell, Lauren; Secord, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Communication should be central to histories of reproduction, because it has structured how people do and do not reproduce. Yet communication has been so pervasive, and so various, that it is often taken for granted and the historical specificities overlooked. Making communication a frame for histories of reproduction can draw a fragmented field together, including by putting the promotion of esoteric ideas on a par with other practical activities. Paying communication close attention can revitalize the history of reproduction over the long term by highlighting continuities as well as the complex connections between new technologies and new approaches. Themes such as the power of storytelling, the claiming and challenging of expertise, and relations between knowledge and ignorance, secrecy and propriety also invite further study.

  20. Dinosaur Reproduction and Parenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, John R.

    Non-avian dinosaur reproductive and parenting behaviors were mostly similar to those of extant archosaurs. Non-avian dinosaurs were probably sexually dimorphic and some may have engaged in hierarchical rituals. Non-avian coelurosaurs (e.g. Troodontidae, Oviraptorosauria) had two active oviducts, each of which produced single eggs on a daily or greater time scale. The eggs of non-coelurosaurian dinosaurs (e.g. Ornithischia, Sauropoda) were incubated in soils, whereas the eggs of non-avian coelurosaurs (e.g. Troodon, Oviraptor) were incubated with a combination of soil and direct parental contact. Parental attention to the young was variable, ranging from protection from predators to possible parental feeding of nest-bound hatchlings. Semi-altricial hadrosaur hatchlings exited their respective nests near the time of their first linear doubling. Some reproductive behaviors, once thought exclusive to Aves, arose first in non-avian dinosaurs. The success of the Dinosauria may be related to reproductive strategies.

  1. Tribbles role in reproduction.

    PubMed

    Basatvat, Shaghayegh; Carter, Deborah Angela Louise; Kiss-Toth, Endre; Fazeli, Alireza

    2015-10-01

    Tribbles (TRIB) proteins, a family of evolutionary conserved psuedokinase proteins, modulate various signalling pathways within the cell. The regulatory roles of TRIB make them an important part of a number of biological processes ranging from cell proliferation to metabolism, immunity, inflammation and carcinogenesis. Innate immune system plays a pivotal role during the regulation of reproductive processes that allows successful creation of an offspring. Its involvement initiates from fertilization of the oocyte by spermatozoon and lasts throughout early embryonic development, pregnancy and labour. Therefore, there is a close cooperation between the reproductive system and the innate immune system. Evidence from our lab has demonstrated that improper activation of the innate immune system can reduce embryo implantation, thus leading to infertility. Therefore, control mechanisms regulating the innate immune system function can be critical for successful reproductive events.

  2. Solving Modal Equations of Motion with Initial Conditions Using MSC/NASTRAN DMAP. Part 2; Coupled Versus Uncoupled Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Alan R.; Ibrahim, Omar M.; Abdallah, Ayman A.; Sullivan, Timothy L.

    1993-01-01

    By utilizing MSC/NASTRAN DMAP (Direct Matrix Abstraction Program) in an existing NASA Lewis Research Center coupled loads methodology, solving modal equations of motion with initial conditions is possible using either coupled (Newmark-Beta) or uncoupled (exact mode superposition) integration available within module TRD1. Both the coupled and newly developed exact mode superposition methods have been used to perform transient analyses of various space systems. However, experience has shown that in most cases, significant time savings are realized when the equations of motion are integrated using the uncoupled solver instead of the coupled solver. Through the results of a real-world engineering analysis, advantages of using the exact mode superposition methodology are illustrated.

  3. Double-inhibitor and uncoupler-inhibitor titrations. 1. Analysis with a linear model of chemiosmotic energy coupling.

    PubMed

    Pietrobon, D; Caplan, S R

    1986-11-18

    The results of double-inhibitor and uncoupler-inhibitor titrations have been simulated and analyzed with a linear model of delocalized protonic coupling using linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. A detailed analysis of the changes of the intermediate delta muH induced by different combinations of inhibitors of the proton pumps has been performed. It is shown that with linear flow-force relationships the published experimental results of uncoupler-inhibitor titrations are not necessarily inconsistent with, and those of double-inhibitor titrations are inconsistent with, a delocalized chemiosmotic model of energy coupling in the presence of a negligible leak. Also shown and discussed are how the results are affected by a nonnegligible leak and to what extent the shape of the titration curves can be used to discriminate between localized and delocalized mechanisms of energy coupling.

  4. [Uncoupling proteins and their role in the regulation of brain and heart tolerance to impact of ischemia and reperfusion].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Lishmanov, Iu B; Khaliulin, I G; Griffiths, E J; Wang, H; Pei, J-M

    2011-08-01

    Experimental data indicate that moderate uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation induces reduction in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and promotes an increase in survival of neurons and cardiomyocytes under hypoxia and re-oxygenation conditions. Uncoupling proteins (UCP) are expressed by cardiomyocytes and neurons. These proteins are involved in the thermogenesis, inhibit ROS generation by mitochondria, reduce deltaphi, elevate respiration rate of these organelles. It was established that UCP contributed to the elevation of cardiomyocyte and neuron tolerance of an impact of hypoxia and re-oxygenation. They also promote cell resistance to oxidative stress. Experimental data indicate the important role of the UCP in the neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects of ischemic preconditioning. At the same time, real contribution of the UCP in preconditioning is still to be verified. PMID:21961301

  5. Analysis of variation for apomictic reproduction in diploid Paspalum rufum

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Luciana; Galdeano, Florencia; Sartor, María E.; Quarin, Camilo L.; Espinoza, Francisco; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The diploid cytotype of Paspalum rufum (Poaceae) reproduces sexually and is self-sterile; however, recurrent autopolyploidization through 2n + n fertilization and the ability for reproduction via apomixis have been documented in one genotype of the species. The objectives of this work were to analyse the variation in the functionality of apomixis components in diploid genotypes of P. rufum and to identify individuals with contrasting reproductive behaviours. Methods Samples of five individuals from each of three natural populations of P. rufum (designated R2, R5 and R6) were used. Seeds were obtained after open pollination, selfing, conspecific interploidy crosses and interspecific interploidy self-pollination induction. The reproductive behaviour of each plant was determined by using the flow cytometric seed screen (FCSS) method. Embryo sacs were cleared using a series of ethanol and methyl salicylate solutions and observed microscopically. Key Results In open pollination, all genotypes formed seeds by sexual means and no evidence of apomeiotic reproduction was detected. However, in conspecific interploidy crosses and interspecific interploidy self-pollination induction, variations in the reproductive pathways were observed. While all plants from populations R2 and R6 formed seeds exclusively by sexual means, three genotypes from the R5 population developed seeds from both meiotic and aposporous embryo sacs, and one of them (R5#49) through the complete apomictic pathway (apospory + parthenogenesis + pseudogamy). Cytoembryological observations revealed the presence of both meiotic and aposporous embryo sacs in all the genotypes analysed, suggesting that parthenogenesis could be uncoupled from apospory in some genotypes. Conclusions The results presented demonstrate the existence of variation in the functionality of apomixis components in natural diploid genotypes of P. rufum and have identified individuals with contrasting reproductive

  6. Kisspeptin: a critical regulator of puberty and reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Sam, Amir H; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2010-08-01

    Kisspeptin has emerged as a critical player in the initiation of puberty and reproductive function. In humans, inactivating mutations of the kisspeptin receptor result in hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and kisspeptin receptor activating mutations cause precocious puberty. Kisspeptin potently stimulates the release of gonadotrophins predominantly through the release of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Here we review the data from animal and human studies exploring the role of kisspeptin in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Kisspeptin signalling presents a novel target for therapeutic manipulation of the HPG axis.

  7. Feminism and reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Joan C

    1994-01-01

    ... Rowland is a social scientist and a radical feminist, and she has undertaken the task of making readers think twice about reproductive technologies. If a reader isn't thinking twice, it will not do to blame it on Rowland and the shortcomings of her book. She has a good deal to say that is extremely important and that needs to be considered by anyone who is interested in the moral issues, in general, and the issues for women and children, in particular, that are raised by the new and emerging reproductive technologies. Her book should be widely read. And it should generate the worries it is written to generate. PMID:11644539

  8. Diverse Roles of Strigolactone Signaling in Maize Architecture and the Uncoupling of a Branching-Specific Subnetwork1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jiahn Chou; Koch, Karen E.; Suzuki, Masaharu; Wu, Shan; Latshaw, Susan; Petruff, Tanya; Goulet, Charles; Klee, Harry J.; McCarty, Donald R.

    2012-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) control lateral branching in diverse species by regulating transcription factors orthologous to Teosinte branched1 (Tb1). In maize (Zea mays), however, selection for a strong central stalk during domestication is attributed primarily to the Tb1 locus, leaving the architectural roles of SLs unclear. To determine how this signaling network is altered in maize, we first examined effects of a knockout mutation in an essential SL biosynthetic gene that encodes CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE8 (CCD8), then tested interactions between SL signaling and Tb1. Comparative genome analysis revealed that maize depends on a single CCD8 gene (ZmCCD8), unlike other panicoid grasses that have multiple CCD8 paralogs. Function of ZmCCD8 was confirmed by transgenic complementation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) max4 (ccd8) and by phenotypic rescue of the maize mutant (zmccd8::Ds) using a synthetic SL (GR24). Analysis of the zmccd8 mutant revealed a modest increase in branching that contrasted with prominent pleiotropic changes that include (1) marked reduction in stem diameter, (2) reduced elongation of internodes (independent of carbon supply), and (3) a pronounced delay in development of the centrally important, nodal system of adventitious roots. Analysis of the tb1 zmccd8 double mutant revealed that Tb1 functions in an SL-independent subnetwork that is not required for the other diverse roles of SL in development. Our findings indicate that in maize, uncoupling of the Tb1 subnetwork from SL signaling has profoundly altered the balance between conserved roles of SLs in branching and diverse aspects of plant architecture. PMID:22961131

  9. The role of mild uncoupling and non-coupled respiration in the regulation of hydrogen peroxide generation by plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Casolo, V; Braidot, E; Chiandussi, E; Macrì, F; Vianello, A

    2000-05-26

    The roles of mild uncoupling caused by free fatty acids (mediated by plant uncoupling mitochondrial protein (PUMP) and ATP/ADP carrier (AAC)) and non-coupled respiration (alternative oxidase (AO)) on H(2)O(2) formation by plant mitochondria were examined. Both laurate and oleate prevent H(2)O(2) formation dependent on the oxidation of succinate. Conversely, these free fatty acids (FFA) only slightly affect that dependent on malate plus glutamate oxidation. Carboxyatractylate (CAtr), an inhibitor of AAC, completely inhibits oleate- or laurate-stimulated oxygen consumption linked to succinate oxidation, while GDP, an inhibitor of PUMP, caused only a 30% inhibition. In agreement, CAtr completely restores the oleate-inhibited H(2)O(2) formation, while GDP induces only a 30% restoration. Both oleate and laurate cause a mild uncoupling of the electrical potential (generated by succinate), which is then followed by a complete collapse with a sigmoidal kinetic. FFA also inhibit the succinate-dependent reverse electron transfer. Diamide, an inhibitor of AO, favors the malate plus glutamate-dependent H(2)O(2) formation, while pyruvate (a stimulator of AO) inhibits it. These results show that the succinate-dependent H(2)O(2) formation occurs at the level of Complex I by a reverse electron transport. This generation appears to be prevented by mild uncoupling mediated by FFA. The anionic form of FFA appears to be shuttled by AAC rather than PUMP. The malate plus glutamate-dependent H(2)O(2) formation is, conversely, mainly prevented by non-coupled respiration (AO).

  10. Availability of the key metabolic substrates dictates the respiratory response of cancer cells to the mitochondrial uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Alexander V; Waters, Alicia H C; Golubeva, Anna V; Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2014-01-01

    Active glycolysis and glutaminolysis provide bioenergetic stability of cancer cells in physiological conditions. Under hypoxia, metabolic and mitochondrial disorders, or pharmacological treatment, a deficit of key metabolic substrates may become life-threatening to cancer cells. We analysed the effects of mitochondrial uncoupling by FCCP on the respiration of cells fed by different combinations of Glc, Gal, Gln and Pyr. In cancer PC12 and HCT116 cells, a large increase in O2 consumption rate (OCR) upon uncoupling was only seen when Gln was combined with either Glc or Pyr. Inhibition of glutaminolysis with BPTES abolished this effect. Despite the key role of Gln, addition of FCCP inhibited respiration and induced apoptosis in cells supplied with Gln alone or Gal/Gln. For all substrate combinations, amplitude of respiratory responses to FCCP did not correlate with Akt, Erk and AMPK phosphorylation, cellular ATP, and resting OCR, mitochondrial Ca(2+) or membrane potential. However, we propose that proton motive force could modulate respiratory response to FCCP by regulating mitochondrial transport of Gln and Pyr, which decreases upon mitochondrial depolarisation. As a result, an increase in respiration upon uncoupling is abolished in cells, deprived of Gln or Pyr (Glc). Unlike PC12 or HCT116 cells, mouse embryonic fibroblasts were capable of generating pronounced response to FCCP when deprived of Gln, thus exhibiting lower dependence on glutaminolysis. Overall, the differential regulation of the respiratory response to FCCP by metabolic environment suggests that mitochondrial uncoupling has a potential for substrate-specific inhibition of cell function, and can be explored for selective cancer treatment.

  11. Uncoupling between dinitrogen fixation and primary productivity in the eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahav, Eyal; Herut, Barak; Stambler, Noga; Bar-Zeev, Edo; Mulholland, Margaret R.; Berman-Frank, Ilana

    2013-03-01

    In the nitrogen (N)-impoverished photic zones of many oceanic regions, prokaryotic organisms fixing atmospheric dinitrogen (N2; diazotrophs) supply an essential source of new nitrogen and fuel primary production. We measured dinitrogen fixation and primary productivity (PP) during the thermally stratified summer period in different water regimes of the oligotrophic eastern Mediterranean Sea, including the Cyprus Eddy and the Rhodes Gyre. Low N2 fixation rates were measured (0.8-3.2 µmol N m-2 d-1) excluding 10-fold higher rates in the Rhodes Gyre and Cyprus Eddy (~20 µmol N m-2 d-1). The corresponding PP increased from east to west (200-2500 µmol C m-2 d-1), with relatively higher productivity recorded in the Rhodes Gyre and Cyprus Eddy (2150 and 2300 µmol C m-2 d-1, respectively). These measurements demonstrate that N2 fixation in the photic zone of the eastern Mediterranean Sea contributes only negligibly by direct inputs to PP (i.e., cyanobacterial diazotrophs) and is in fact uncoupled from PP. By contrast, N2 fixation is significantly coupled to bacterial productivity and to net heterotrophic areas, suggesting that heterotrophic N2 fixation may in fact be significant in this ultraoligotrophic system. This is further substantiated by the high N2 fixation rates we measured from aphotic depths and by the results of phylogenetic analysis in other studies showing an abundance of heterotrophic diazotrophs.

  12. Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Emanuela; Monda, Vincenzo; Messina, Antonietta; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Tafuri, Domenico; Cibelli, Giuseppe; De Luca, Bruno; Messina, Giovanni; Monda, Marcellino

    2016-01-01

    Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD), which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs) 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect. PMID:27468234

  13. A Distinct Gene Module for Dysfunction Uncoupled from Activation in Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells.

    PubMed

    Singer, Meromit; Wang, Chao; Cong, Le; Marjanovic, Nemanja D; Kowalczyk, Monika S; Zhang, Huiyuan; Nyman, Jackson; Sakuishi, Kaori; Kurtulus, Sema; Gennert, David; Xia, Junrong; Kwon, John Y H; Nevin, James; Herbst, Rebecca H; Yanai, Itai; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Regev, Aviv; Anderson, Ana C

    2016-09-01

    Reversing the dysfunctional T cell state that arises in cancer and chronic viral infections is the focus of therapeutic interventions; however, current therapies are effective in only some patients and some tumor types. To gain a deeper molecular understanding of the dysfunctional T cell state, we analyzed population and single-cell RNA profiles of CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and used genetic perturbations to identify a distinct gene module for T cell dysfunction that can be uncoupled from T cell activation. This distinct dysfunction module is downstream of intracellular metallothioneins that regulate zinc metabolism and can be identified at single-cell resolution. We further identify Gata-3, a zinc-finger transcription factor in the dysfunctional module, as a regulator of dysfunction, and we use CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to show that it drives a dysfunctional phenotype in CD8(+) TILs. Our results open novel avenues for targeting dysfunctional T cell states while leaving activation programs intact. PMID:27610572

  14. Seismic Assessment of Buildings: Proposal of a New Modified Uncoupled Modal Response History Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jerez, Sandra; Mebarki, Ahmed

    2010-05-21

    This paper develops a new modified uncoupled modal response history analysis (M-UMRHA) in order to study the seismic behavior of structures. It aims to provide an acceptable accuracy with reduced calculation duration in comparison to complete analysis, i.e. the THA. The proposed method improves the existing UMRHA, developed by Chopra and Goel [1], by considering an energy based approach to build the capacity curve [2] and a pseudo-adaptive feature to account for changes in modal shapes after yielding, motivated by an adaptive method [3]. Validation is made by comparison with NLTHA as well as other simplified methods. Low and medium-rise RC buildings were analyzed under real ground motion records. Results show good estimates of structural parameters and give good correlation between damage and story displacements as well as drifts. Like other simplified methods, accuracy decreases in the inelastic domain. However, this procedure gives acceptable estimates of structural response with a few additional calculations and it has the potential to be used in large scale studies, and probabilistic approaches.

  15. Weight loss by Ppc-1, a novel small molecule mitochondrial uncoupler derived from slime mold.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Ogura, Masato; Homma, Miwako K; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Homma, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in diverse processes including ATP synthesis and apoptosis. Mitochondrial function can be studied using inhibitors of respiration, and new agents are valuable for discovering novel mechanisms involved in mitochondrial regulation. Here, we screened small molecules derived from slime molds and other microorganisms for their effects on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. We identified Ppc-1 as a novel molecule which stimulates oxygen consumption without adverse effects on ATP production. The kinetic behavior of Ppc-1 suggests its function as a mitochondrial uncoupler. Serial administration of Ppc-1 into mice suppressed weight gain with no abnormal effects on liver or kidney tissues, and no evidence of tumor formation. Serum fatty acid levels were significantly elevated in mice treated with Ppc-1, while body fat content remained low. After a single administration, Ppc-1 distributes into various tissues of individual animals at low levels. Ppc-1 stimulates adipocytes in culture to release fatty acids, which might explain the elevated serum fatty acids in Ppc-1-treated mice. The results suggest that Ppc-1 is a unique mitochondrial regulator which will be a valuable tool for mitochondrial research as well as the development of new drugs to treat obesity.

  16. Uncoupling protein 2 in the glial response to stress: implications for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Hass, Daniel T; Barnstable, Colin J

    2016-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are free radicals thought to mediate the neurotoxic effects of several neurodegenerative disorders. In the central nervous system, ROS can also trigger a phenotypic switch in both astrocytes and microglia that further aggravates neurodegeneration, termed reactive gliosis. Negative regulators of ROS, such as mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) are neuroprotective factors that decrease neuron loss in models of stroke, epilepsy, and parkinsonism. However, it is unclear whether UCP2 acts purely to prevent ROS production, or also to prevent gliosis. In this review article, we discuss published evidence supporting the hypothesis that UCP2 is a neuroprotective factor both through its direct effects in decreasing mitochondrial ROS and through its effects in astrocytes and microglia. A major effect of UCP2 activation in glia is a change in the spectrum of secreted cytokines towards a more anti-inflammatory spectrum. There are multiple mechanisms that can control the level or activity of UCP2, including a variety of metabolites and microRNAs. Understanding these mechanisms will be key to exploitingthe protective effects of UCP2 in therapies for multiple neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:27651753

  17. Autoregulation of free radicals via uncoupling protein control in pancreatic beta-cell mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Heuett, William J; Periwal, Vipul

    2010-01-20

    Pancreatic beta-cells sense the ambient blood-glucose concentration and secrete insulin to signal other tissues to take up glucose. Mitochondria play a key role in this response as they metabolize nutrients to produce ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS), both of which are involved in insulin secretion signaling. Based on data available in the literature and previously developed mathematical models, we present a model of glucose-stimulated mitochondrial respiration, ATP synthesis, and ROS production and control in beta-cells. The model is consistent with a number of experimental observations reported in the literature. Most notably, it captures the nonlinear rise in the proton leak rate at high membrane potential and the increase in this leak due to uncoupling protein (UCP) activation by ROS. The functional forms used to model ROS production and UCP regulation yield insight into these mechanisms, as many details have not yet been unraveled in the experimental literature. We examine short- and long-term effects of UCP activation inhibition and changes in the mitochondrial density on mitochondrial responses to glucose. Results suggest increasing mitochondrial density while decreasing UCP activity may be an effective way to increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion while decreasing oxidative stress.

  18. Weight loss by Ppc-1, a novel small molecule mitochondrial uncoupler derived from slime mold.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Ogura, Masato; Homma, Miwako K; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Homma, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in diverse processes including ATP synthesis and apoptosis. Mitochondrial function can be studied using inhibitors of respiration, and new agents are valuable for discovering novel mechanisms involved in mitochondrial regulation. Here, we screened small molecules derived from slime molds and other microorganisms for their effects on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. We identified Ppc-1 as a novel molecule which stimulates oxygen consumption without adverse effects on ATP production. The kinetic behavior of Ppc-1 suggests its function as a mitochondrial uncoupler. Serial administration of Ppc-1 into mice suppressed weight gain with no abnormal effects on liver or kidney tissues, and no evidence of tumor formation. Serum fatty acid levels were significantly elevated in mice treated with Ppc-1, while body fat content remained low. After a single administration, Ppc-1 distributes into various tissues of individual animals at low levels. Ppc-1 stimulates adipocytes in culture to release fatty acids, which might explain the elevated serum fatty acids in Ppc-1-treated mice. The results suggest that Ppc-1 is a unique mitochondrial regulator which will be a valuable tool for mitochondrial research as well as the development of new drugs to treat obesity. PMID:25668511

  19. Synthesis of mitochondrial uncoupling protein in brown adipocytes differentiated in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kopecky, J.; Baudysova, M.; Zanotti, F.; Janikova, D.; Pavelka, S.; Houstek, J. )

    1990-12-25

    In order to characterize the biogenesis of unique thermogenic mitochondria of brown adipose tissue, differentiation of precursor cells isolated from mouse brown adipose tissue was studied in cell culture. Synthesis of mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP), F1-ATPase, and cytochrome oxidase was examined by L-(35S)methionine labeling and immunoblotting. For the first time, synthesis of physiological amounts of the UCP, a key and tissue-specific component of thermogenic mitochondria, was observed in cultures at about confluence (day 6), indicating that a complete differentiation of brown adipocytes was achieved in vitro. In postconfluent cells (day 8) the content of UCP decreased rapidly, in contrast to some other mitochondrial proteins (beta subunit of F1-ATPase, cytochrome oxidase). In these cells, it was possible, by using norepinephrine, to induce specifically the synthesis of the UCP but not of F1-ATPase or cytochrome oxidase. The maximal response was observed at 0.1 microM norepinephrine and the synthesis of UCP remained activated for at least 24 h. Detailed analysis revealed a major role of the beta-adrenergic receptors and elevated intracellular concentration of cAMP in stimulation of UCP synthesis. A quantitative recovery of the newly synthesized UCP in the mitochondrial fraction indicated completed biogenesis of functionally competent thermogenic mitochondria.

  20. Calculation of Coupled Vibroacoustics Response Estimates from a Library of Available Uncoupled Transfer Function Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Hunt, Ron; Fulcher, Clay; Towner, Robert; McDonald, Emmett

    2012-01-01

    The design and theoretical basis of a new database tool that quickly generates vibroacoustic response estimates using a library of transfer functions (TFs) is discussed. During the early stages of a launch vehicle development program, these response estimates can be used to provide vibration environment specification to hardware vendors. The tool accesses TFs from a database, combines the TFs, and multiplies these by input excitations to estimate vibration responses. The database is populated with two sets of uncoupled TFs; the first set representing vibration response of a bare panel, designated as H(sup s), and the second set representing the response of the free-free component equipment by itself, designated as H(sup c). For a particular configuration undergoing analysis, the appropriate H(sup s) and H(sup c) are selected and coupled to generate an integrated TF, designated as H(sup s +c). This integrated TF is then used with the appropriate input excitations to estimate vibration responses. This simple yet powerful tool enables a user to estimate vibration responses without directly using finite element models, so long as suitable H(sup s) and H(sup c) sets are defined in the database libraries. The paper discusses the preparation of the database tool and provides the assumptions and methodologies necessary to combine H(sup s) and H(sup c) sets into an integrated H(sup s + c). An experimental validation of the approach is also presented.

  1. Cell Death and Heart Failure in Obesity: Role of Uncoupling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ramírez, Angélica; López-Acosta, Ocarol; Barrios-Maya, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes are often characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondrial respiratory complexes, associated with fat accumulation in cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, and hepatocytes. Several rodents studies showed that lipid accumulation in cardiac myocytes produces lipotoxicity that causes apoptosis and leads to heart failure, a dynamic pathological process. Meanwhile, several tissues including cardiac tissue develop an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress and lipotoxicity by overexpressing uncoupling proteins (UCPs), specific mitochondrial membrane proteins. In heart from rodent and human with obesity, UCP2 and UCP3 may protect cardiomyocytes from death and from a state progressing to heart failure by downregulating programmed cell death. UCP activation may affect cytochrome c and proapoptotic protein release from mitochondria by reducing ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Therefore the aim of this review is to discuss recent findings regarding the role that UCPs play in cardiomyocyte survival by protecting against ROS generation and maintaining bioenergetic metabolism homeostasis to promote heart protection.

  2. Superoxide-mediated activation of uncoupling protein 2 causes pancreatic β cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Stefan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Scorrano, Luca; Dalgaard, Louise T.; St-Pierre, Julie; Grey, Shane T.; Lowell, Bradford B.

    2003-01-01

    Failure to secrete adequate amounts of insulin in response to increasing concentrations of glucose is an important feature of type 2 diabetes. The mechanism for loss of glucose responsiveness is unknown. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), by virtue of its mitochondrial proton leak activity and consequent negative effect on ATP production, impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Of interest, it has recently been shown that superoxide, when added to isolated mitochondria, activates UCP2-mediated proton leak. Since obesity and chronic hyperglycemia increase mitochondrial superoxide production, as well as UCP2 expression in pancreatic β cells, a superoxide-UCP2 pathway could contribute importantly to obesity- and hyperglycemia-induced β cell dysfunction. This study demonstrates that endogenously produced mitochondrial superoxide activates UCP2-mediated proton leak, thus lowering ATP levels and impairing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Furthermore, hyperglycemia- and obesity-induced loss of glucose responsiveness is prevented by reduction of mitochondrial superoxide production or gene knockout of UCP2. Importantly, reduction of superoxide has no beneficial effect in the absence of UCP2, and superoxide levels are increased further in the absence of UCP2, demonstrating that the adverse effects of superoxide on β cell glucose sensing are caused by activation of UCP2. Therefore, superoxide-mediated activation of UCP2 could play an important role in the pathogenesis of β cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes. PMID:14679178

  3. TALEN-engineered AR gene rearrangements reveal endocrine uncoupling of androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nyquist, Michael D; Li, Yingming; Hwang, Tae Hyun; Manlove, Luke S; Vessella, Robert L; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Voytas, Daniel F; Dehm, Scott M

    2013-10-22

    Androgen receptor (AR) target genes direct development and survival of the prostate epithelial lineage, including prostate cancer (PCa). Thus, endocrine therapies that inhibit the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) are effective in treating PCa. AR transcriptional reactivation is central to resistance, as evidenced by the efficacy of AR retargeting in castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) with next-generation endocrine therapies abiraterone and enzalutamide. However, resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide limits this efficacy in most men, and PCa remains the second-leading cause of male cancer deaths. Here we show that AR gene rearrangements in CRPC tissues underlie a completely androgen-independent, yet AR-dependent, resistance mechanism. We discovered intragenic AR gene rearrangements in CRPC tissues, which we modeled using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated genome engineering. This modeling revealed that these AR gene rearrangements blocked full-length AR synthesis, but promoted expression of truncated AR variant proteins lacking the AR ligand-binding domain. Furthermore, these AR variant proteins maintained the constitutive activity of the AR transcriptional program and a CRPC growth phenotype independent of full-length AR or androgens. These findings demonstrate that AR gene rearrangements are a unique resistance mechanism by which AR transcriptional activity can be uncoupled from endocrine regulation in CRPC.

  4. Uncoupling Angiogenesis and Inflammation in Peripheral Artery Disease with Therapeutic Peptide-loaded Microgels

    PubMed Central

    Zachman, Angela L.; Wang, Xintong; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Fitzpatrick, Sean T.; Lee, Sue H.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Skala, Melissa C.; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized by vessel occlusion and ischemia in the limbs. Treatment for PAD with surgical interventions has been showing limited success. Moreover, recent clinical trials with treatment of angiogenic growth factors proved ineffective as increased angiogenesis triggered severe inflammation in a proportionally coupled fashion. Hence, the overarching goal of this research was to address this issue by developing a biomaterial system that enables controlled, dual delivery of pro-angiogenic C16 and anti-inflammatory Ac-SDKP peptides in a minimally-invasive way. To achieve the goal, a peptide-loaded injectable microgel system was developed and tested in a mouse model of PAD. When delivered through multiple, low volume injections, the combination of C16 and Ac-SDKP peptides promoted angiogenesis, muscle regeneration, and perfusion recovery, while minimizing detrimental inflammation. Additionally, this peptide combination regulated inflammatory TNF-α pathways independently of MMP-9 mediated pathways of angiogenesis in vitro, suggesting a potential mechanism by which angiogenic and inflammatory responses can be uncoupled in the context of PAD. This study demonstrates a translatable potential of the dual peptide-loaded injectable microgel system for PAD treatment. PMID:25154665

  5. Uncoupling angiogenesis and inflammation in peripheral artery disease with therapeutic peptide-loaded microgels.

    PubMed

    Zachman, Angela L; Wang, Xintong; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M; Fitzpatrick, Sean T; Lee, Sue H; Guelcher, Scott A; Skala, Melissa C; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized by vessel occlusion and ischemia in the limbs. Treatment for PAD with surgical interventions has been showing limited success. Moreover, recent clinical trials with treatment of angiogenic growth factors proved ineffective as increased angiogenesis triggered severe inflammation in a proportionally coupled fashion. Hence, the overarching goal of this research was to address this issue by developing a biomaterial system that enables controlled, dual delivery of pro-angiogenic C16 and anti-inflammatory Ac-SDKP peptides in a minimally-invasive way. To achieve the goal, a peptide-loaded injectable microgel system was developed and tested in a mouse model of PAD. When delivered through multiple, low volume injections, the combination of C16 and Ac-SDKP peptides promoted angiogenesis, muscle regeneration, and perfusion recovery, while minimizing detrimental inflammation. Additionally, this peptide combination regulated inflammatory TNF-α pathways independently of MMP-9 mediated pathways of angiogenesis in vitro, suggesting a potential mechanism by which angiogenic and inflammatory responses can be uncoupled in the context of PAD. This study demonstrates a translatable potential of the dual peptide-loaded injectable microgel system for PAD treatment. PMID:25154665

  6. Investigation of Surface Flux Feedbacks for Coupled and Uncoupled Atmosphere-Ocean Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, F. R.

    2010-01-01

    Variability in the atmosphere and ocean are linked through coupled processes via the surface exchanges of heat, moisture, and momentum. This coupling can occur predominantly via one-way (ocean forcing atmosphere or atmosphere forcing ocean) or two-way interactions. The dominant type of interaction can vary both regionally and with season. The existence of the coupled variability can act to enhance the persistence of anomalies and therefore may be important to seasonal (and longer) forecasts. The leading components of surface exchange that regulate the damping of the atmospheric and oceanic anomalies most likely also varies regionally and seasonally. This study seeks to elucidate the roles of the various surface flux components using satellite based data sets. Using dynamical relationships expected for one-way forcing regimes, coupled and uncoupled variability is isolated and used in conjunction with composite-type analyses to reveal the nature of these coupling mechanisms and their variation in space and time. Results of this study can be useful in examining the veracity of general circulation model output by understanding how the coupling mechanisms are replicated as found in satellite based observations.

  7. Reelin-dependent ApoER2 downregulation uncouples newborn neurons from progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martínez, F. Javier; Luque-Río, Álvaro; Sakakibara, Akira; Hattori, Mitsuharu; Miyata, Takaki; Luque, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Reelin and its receptor machinery are well known to be required for the migration and positioning of neocortical projection neurons. More recently, reelin has been shown both necessary and sufficient to determine the rate of neocortical neurogenesis. The molecular links underlying its seemingly distinct proliferative and post-proliferative functions remain unknown. Here we reveal an enriched expression of functional reelin receptors, largely of Apolipoprotein E Receptor 2 (ApoER2), in radial glia basal processes and intermediate progenitor cells during mid/late cortical development. In vivo, ApoER2 overexpression inhibits neuronal migration. In contrast, precluding excessive levels of ApoER2 in reelin-deficient cortices, by either ApoER2 knock-down or the transgenic expression of reelin in neural progenitor cells, improves neuronal migration and positioning. Our study provides groundwork for the highly orchestrated clearance of neocortical neurons from their birth site, suggesting that a reelin-dependent ApoER2 downregulation mechanism uncouples newborn neurons from progenitor cells, thereby enabling neurons to migrate. PMID:23259060

  8. Low-level lasers affect uncoupling protein gene expression in skin and skeletal muscle tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Paoli, F.; Mencalha, A. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses of biological tissues to low-level lasers. Free radicals are involved in these responses acting as second messengers in intracellular signaling processes. Irradiated cells present defenses against these chemical species to avoid unwanted effects, such as uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which are part of protective mechanisms and minimize the effects of free radical generation in mitochondria. In this work UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA gene relative expression in the skin and skeletal muscle tissues of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Samples of the skin and skeletal muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and the evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression was differently altered in skin and skeletal muscle tissues exposed to lasers in a wavelength-dependent effect, with the UCP3 mRNA expression dose-dependent. Alteration on UCP gene expression could be part of the biostimulation effect and is necessary to make cells exposed to red and infrared low-level lasers more resistant or capable of adapting in damaged tissues or diseases.

  9. Uncoupling protein 2 in the glial response to stress: implications for neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Daniel T.; Barnstable, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are free radicals thought to mediate the neurotoxic effects of several neurodegenerative disorders. In the central nervous system, ROS can also trigger a phenotypic switch in both astrocytes and microglia that further aggravates neurodegeneration, termed reactive gliosis. Negative regulators of ROS, such as mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) are neuroprotective factors that decrease neuron loss in models of stroke, epilepsy, and parkinsonism. However, it is unclear whether UCP2 acts purely to prevent ROS production, or also to prevent gliosis. In this review article, we discuss published evidence supporting the hypothesis that UCP2 is a neuroprotective factor both through its direct effects in decreasing mitochondrial ROS and through its effects in astrocytes and microglia. A major effect of UCP2 activation in glia is a change in the spectrum of secreted cytokines towards a more anti-inflammatory spectrum. There are multiple mechanisms that can control the level or activity of UCP2, including a variety of metabolites and microRNAs. Understanding these mechanisms will be key to exploitingthe protective effects of UCP2 in therapies for multiple neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:27651753

  10. Uncoupling the Structure-Activity Relationships of β2 Adrenergic Receptor Ligands from Membrane Binding.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Callum J; Hornak, Viktor; Velez-Vega, Camilo; McKay, Daniel J J; Reilly, John; Sandham, David A; Shaw, Duncan; Fairhurst, Robin A; Charlton, Steven J; Sykes, David A; Pearlstein, Robert A; Duca, Jose S

    2016-06-23

    Ligand binding to membrane proteins may be significantly influenced by the interaction of ligands with the membrane. In particular, the microscopic ligand concentration within the membrane surface solvation layer may exceed that in bulk solvent, resulting in overestimation of the intrinsic protein-ligand binding contribution to the apparent/measured affinity. Using published binding data for a set of small molecules with the β2 adrenergic receptor, we demonstrate that deconvolution of membrane and protein binding contributions allows for improved structure-activity relationship analysis and structure-based drug design. Molecular dynamics simulations of ligand bound membrane protein complexes were used to validate binding poses, allowing analysis of key interactions and binding site solvation to develop structure-activity relationships of β2 ligand binding. The resulting relationships are consistent with intrinsic binding affinity (corrected for membrane interaction). The successful structure-based design of ligands targeting membrane proteins may require an assessment of membrane affinity to uncouple protein binding from membrane interactions. PMID:27239696

  11. The role of uncoupling protein 3 regulating calcium ion uptake into mitochondria during sarcopenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Choi, Inho; Haruna, Marie; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maita Ohno, Ayako; Kondo Teshima, Shigetada

    Overloaded mitochondrial calcium concentration contributes to progression of mitochondrial dysfunction in aged muscle, leading to sarcopenia. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is primarily expressed in the inner membrane of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Recently, it has been reported that UCP3 is associated with calcium uptake into mitochondria. However, the mechanisms by which UCP3 regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake are not well understood. Here we report that UCP3 interacts with HS-1 associated protein X-1 (Hax-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that is localized in mitochondria, which is involved in cellular responses to calcium ion. The hydrophilic sequences within the loop 2, matrix-localized hydrophilic domain of mouse UCP3 are necessary for binding to Hax-1 of the C-terminal domain in adjacent to mitochondrial innermembrane. Interestingly, these proteins interaction occur the calcium-dependent manner. Indeed, overexpression of UCP3 significantly enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myoblasts. In addition, Hax-1 knock-down enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on both UCP3 and Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myotubes, but not myoblasts. Finally, the dissociation of UCP3 and Hax-1 enhances calcium uptake into mitochondria in aged muscle. These studies identify a novel UCP3-Hax-1 complex regulates the influx of calcium ion into mitochondria in muscle. Thus, the efficacy of UCP3-Hax-1 in mitochondrial calcium regulation may provide a novel therapeutic approach against mitochondrial dysfunction-related disease containing sarcopenia.

  12. Batrachotoxin uncouples gating charge immobilization from fast Na inactivation in squid giant axons.

    PubMed Central

    Tanguy, J; Yeh, J Z

    1988-01-01

    The fast inactivation of sodium currents and the immobolization of sodium gating charge are thought to be closely coupled to each other. This notion was tested in the squid axon in which kinetics and steady-state properties of the gating charge movement were compared before and after removal of the Na inactivation by batrachotoxin (BTX), pronase, or chloramine-T. The immobilization of gating charge was determined by measuring the total charge movement (QON) obtained by integrating the ON gating current (Ig,ON) using a double pulse protocol. After removal of the fast inactivation with pronase or chloramine-T, the gating charge movement was no longer immobilized. In contrast, after BTX modification, the channels still exhibited an immobilization of the gating charge (QON) with an onset time course and voltage dependence similar to that for the activation process. These results show that BTX can uncouple the charge immobilization from the fast Na inactivation mechanism, suggesting that the Na gating charge movement can be immobilized independently of the inactivation of the channel. PMID:2852036

  13. Cell Death and Heart Failure in Obesity: Role of Uncoupling Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ramírez, Angélica; López-Acosta, Ocarol; Barrios-Maya, Miguel Angel; El-Hafidi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes are often characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondrial respiratory complexes, associated with fat accumulation in cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, and hepatocytes. Several rodents studies showed that lipid accumulation in cardiac myocytes produces lipotoxicity that causes apoptosis and leads to heart failure, a dynamic pathological process. Meanwhile, several tissues including cardiac tissue develop an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress and lipotoxicity by overexpressing uncoupling proteins (UCPs), specific mitochondrial membrane proteins. In heart from rodent and human with obesity, UCP2 and UCP3 may protect cardiomyocytes from death and from a state progressing to heart failure by downregulating programmed cell death. UCP activation may affect cytochrome c and proapoptotic protein release from mitochondria by reducing ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Therefore the aim of this review is to discuss recent findings regarding the role that UCPs play in cardiomyocyte survival by protecting against ROS generation and maintaining bioenergetic metabolism homeostasis to promote heart protection. PMID:27642497

  14. Cyanobacterial Light-Harvesting Phycobilisomes Uncouple From Photosystem I During Dark-To-Light Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Chukhutsina, Volha; Bersanini, Luca; Aro, Eva-Mari; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms cope with changes in light quality by balancing the excitation energy flow between photosystems I (PSI) and II (PSII) through a process called state transitions. Energy redistribution has been suggested to be achieved by movement of the light-harvesting phycobilisome between PSI and PSII, or by nanometre scale rearrangements of the recently discovered PBS-PSII-PSI megacomplexes. The alternative ‘spillover’ model, on the other hand, states that energy redistribution is achieved by mutual association/dissociation of PSI and PSII. State transitions have always been studied by changing the redox state of the electron carriers using electron transfer inhibitors, or by applying illumination conditions with different colours. However, the molecular events during natural dark-to-light transitions in cyanobacteria have largely been overlooked and still remain elusive. Here we investigated changes in excitation energy transfer from phycobilisomes to the photosystems upon dark-light transitions, using picosecond fluorescence spectroscopy. It appears that megacomplexes are not involved in these changes, and neither does spillover play a role. Instead, the phycobilisomes partly energetically uncouple from PSI in the light but hardly couple to PSII. PMID:26388233

  15. The (un)coupling between viruses and prokaryotes in the Gulf of Trieste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuza, Ana; Umani, Serena Fonda; Del Negro, Paola

    2012-12-01

    Viruses and prokaryotes represent the smallest and the most abundant biological entities in marine environments. The interest for viruses and their interactions with marine organisms is continuously rising but the studies are generally limited to short-time investigations. This study conducted in the Gulf of Trieste on monthly resolution investigates for the very first time relationships between viruses and prokaryotes (both heterotrophs-HP and autotrophs-AP) over ten years (2000-2010). From our results emerged that no clear relationship between the abundances of viruses and prokaryotes is observed unless for rather restricted time intervals. Some of the sporadic peaks of viral abundances can be attributable to infections occurred during the autumn phytoplankton blooms, thus probably contributing to the end of the bloom. We infer that the general uncoupling between viruses and prokaryotes in the Gulf of Trieste is due to the variety of factors that regulate viral infection, proliferation and persistence such as the diversity of viral life cycles that are determined by environmental factors, the abundance and the physiological status of their hosts.

  16. Menin uncouples Elk-1, JunD and c-Jun phosphorylation from MAP kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Adriana; Cuozzo, Concetta; Esposito, Ilaria; Maggiolini, Marcello; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Vivacqua, Adele; Garramone, Maria; Weiss, Carsten; Bohmann, Dirk; Musti, Anna Maria

    2002-09-19

    Menin, a nuclear protein encoded by the tumor suppressor gene MEN1, interacts with the AP-1 transcription factor JunD and inhibits its transcriptional activity. In addition, overexpression of Menin counteracts Ras-induced tumorigenesis. We show that Menin inhibits ERK-dependent phosphorylation and activation of both JunD and the Ets-domain transcription factor Elk-1. We also show that Menin represses the inducible activity of the c-fos promoter. Furthermore, Menin expression inhibits Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated phosphorylation of both JunD and c-Jun. Kinase assays show that Menin overexpression does not interfere with activation of either ERK2 or JNK1, suggesting that Menin acts at a level downstream of MAPK activation. An N-terminal deletion mutant of Menin that cannot inhibit JunD phosphorylation by JNK, can still repress JunD phosphorylation by ERK2, suggesting that Menin interferes with ERK and JNK pathways through two distinct inhibitory mechanisms. Taken together, our data suggest that Menin uncouples ERK and JNK activation from phosphorylation of their nuclear targets Elk-1, JunD and c-Jun, hence inhibiting accumulation of active Fos/Jun heterodimers. This study provides new molecular insights into the tumor suppressor function of Menin and suggests a mechanism by which Menin may interfere with Ras-dependent cell transformation and oncogenesis. PMID:12226747

  17. Constitutive Mad1 targeting to kinetochores uncouples checkpoint signalling from chromosome biorientation.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Maria; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2011-04-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation depends on biorientation, whereby sister chromatids attach to microtubules from opposite spindle poles. The spindle-assembly checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that inhibits anaphase until all chromosomes have bioriented. In present models, the recruitment of the spindle-assembly checkpoint protein Mad2, through Mad1, to non-bioriented kinetochores is needed to stop cell-cycle progression. However, it is unknown whether Mad1-Mad2 targeting to kinetochores is sufficient to block anaphase. Furthermore, it is unclear whether regulators of biorientation (for example, Aurora kinases) have checkpoint functions downstream of Mad1-Mad2 recruitment or whether they act upstream to quench the primary error signal. Here, we engineered a Mad1 construct that localizes to bioriented kinetochores. We show that the kinetochore localization of Mad1 is sufficient for a metaphase arrest that depends on Mad1-Mad2 binding. By uncoupling the checkpoint from its primary error signal, we show that Aurora, Mps1 and BubR1 kinases, but not Polo-like kinase, are needed to maintain checkpoint arrest when Mad1 is present on kinetochores. Together, our data suggest a model in which the biorientation errors, which recruit Mad1-Mad2 to kinetochores, may be signalled not only through Mad2 template dynamics, but also through the activity of widely conserved kinases, to ensure the fidelity of cell division.

  18. A quinoxaline urea analog uncouples inflammatory and pro-survival functions of IKKβ.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Dulce; Rana, Sandeep; Mukhopadhyay, Chandrani; Natarajan, Amarnath; Naramura, Mayumi

    2015-12-01

    Activation of the NF-κB pathway is causally linked to initiation and progression of diverse cancers. Therefore, IKKβ, the key regulatory kinase of the canonical NF-κB pathway, should be a logical target for cancer treatment. However, existing IKKβ inhibitors are known to induce paradoxical immune activation, which limits their clinical usefulness. Recently, we identified a quinoxaline urea analog 13-197 as a novel IKKβ inhibitor that delays tumor growth without significant adverse effects in xenograft tumor models. In the present study, we found that 13-197 had little effect on LPS-induced NF-κB target gene induction by primary mouse macrophages while maintaining considerable anti-proliferative activities. These characteristics may explain absence of inflammatory side effects in animals treated with 13-197. Our data also demonstrate that the inflammation and proliferation-related functions of IKKβ can be uncoupled, and highlight the utility of 13-197 to dissect these downstream pathways.

  19. Hydrodynamical simulations of coupled and uncoupled quintessence models - II. Galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Knebe, Alexander; Lewis, Geraint F.; Yepes, Gustavo

    2014-04-01

    We study the z = 0 properties of clusters (and large groups) of galaxies within the context of interacting and non-interacting quintessence cosmological models, using a series of adiabatic SPH simulations. Initially, we examine the average properties of groups and clusters, quantifying their differences in ΛCold Dark Matter (ΛCDM), uncoupled Dark Energy (uDE) and coupled Dark Energy (cDE) cosmologies. In particular, we focus upon radial profiles of the gas density, temperature and pressure, and we also investigate how the standard hydrodynamic equilibrium hypothesis holds in quintessence cosmologies. While we are able to confirm previous results about the distribution of baryons, we also find that the main discrepancy (with differences up to 20 per cent) can be seen in cluster pressure profiles. We then switch attention to individual structures, mapping each halo in quintessence cosmology to its ΛCDM counterpart. We are able to identify a series of small correlations between the coupling in the dark sector and halo spin, triaxiality and virialization ratio. When looking at spin and virialization of dark matter haloes, we find a weak (5 per cent) but systematic deviation in fifth force scenarios from ΛCDM.

  20. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 and pancreatic cancer: a new potential target therapy.

    PubMed

    Donadelli, Massimo; Dando, Ilaria; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Palmieri, Marta

    2015-03-21

    Overall 5-years survival of pancreatic cancer patients is nearly 5%, making this cancer type one of the most lethal neoplasia. Furthermore, the incidence rate of pancreatic cancer has a growing trend that determines a constant increase in the number of deceases caused by this pathology. The poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer is mainly caused by delayed diagnosis, early metastasis of tumor, and resistance to almost all tested cytotoxic drugs. In this respect, the identification of novel potential targets for new and efficient therapies should be strongly encouraged in order to improve the clinical management of pancreatic cancer. Some studies have shown that the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer as compared to adjacent normal tissues. In addition, recent discoveries established a key role of UCP2 in protecting cancer cells from an excessive production of mitochondrial superoxide ions and in the promotion of cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, including aerobic glycolysis stimulation, promotion of cancer progression. These observations together with the demonstration that UCP2 repression can synergize with standard chemotherapy to inhibit pancreatic cancer cell growth provide the molecular rationale to consider UCP2 as a potential therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. In this editorial, recent advances describing the relationship between cancer development and mitochondrial UCP2 activity are critically provided.

  1. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 and pancreatic cancer: A new potential target therapy

    PubMed Central

    Donadelli, Massimo; Dando, Ilaria; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Palmieri, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Overall 5-years survival of pancreatic cancer patients is nearly 5%, making this cancer type one of the most lethal neoplasia. Furthermore, the incidence rate of pancreatic cancer has a growing trend that determines a constant increase in the number of deceases caused by this pathology. The poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer is mainly caused by delayed diagnosis, early metastasis of tumor, and resistance to almost all tested cytotoxic drugs. In this respect, the identification of novel potential targets for new and efficient therapies should be strongly encouraged in order to improve the clinical management of pancreatic cancer. Some studies have shown that the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer as compared to adjacent normal tissues. In addition, recent discoveries established a key role of UCP2 in protecting cancer cells from an excessive production of mitochondrial superoxide ions and in the promotion of cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, including aerobic glycolysis stimulation, promotion of cancer progression. These observations together with the demonstration that UCP2 repression can synergize with standard chemotherapy to inhibit pancreatic cancer cell growth provide the molecular rationale to consider UCP2 as a potential therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. In this editorial, recent advances describing the relationship between cancer development and mitochondrial UCP2 activity are critically provided. PMID:25805929

  2. Cell Death and Heart Failure in Obesity: Role of Uncoupling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ramírez, Angélica; López-Acosta, Ocarol; Barrios-Maya, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes are often characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondrial respiratory complexes, associated with fat accumulation in cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, and hepatocytes. Several rodents studies showed that lipid accumulation in cardiac myocytes produces lipotoxicity that causes apoptosis and leads to heart failure, a dynamic pathological process. Meanwhile, several tissues including cardiac tissue develop an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress and lipotoxicity by overexpressing uncoupling proteins (UCPs), specific mitochondrial membrane proteins. In heart from rodent and human with obesity, UCP2 and UCP3 may protect cardiomyocytes from death and from a state progressing to heart failure by downregulating programmed cell death. UCP activation may affect cytochrome c and proapoptotic protein release from mitochondria by reducing ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Therefore the aim of this review is to discuss recent findings regarding the role that UCPs play in cardiomyocyte survival by protecting against ROS generation and maintaining bioenergetic metabolism homeostasis to promote heart protection. PMID:27642497

  3. Uncoupled Geographical Variation between Leaves and Flowers in a South-Andean Proteaceae

    PubMed Central

    Chalcoff, Vanina R.; Ezcurra, Cecilia; Aizen, Marcelo A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Geographical variation in foliar and floral traits and their degree of coupling can provide relevant information on the relative importance of abiotic, biotic and even neutral factors acting at geographical scales as generators of evolutionary novelty. Geographical variation was studied in leaves and flowers of Embothrium coccineum, a species that grows along abrupt environmental gradients and exhibits contrasting pollinator assemblages in the southern Andes. Methods Five foliar and eight floral morphological characters were considered from 32 populations, and their patterns of variation and covariation were analysed within and among populations, together with their relationship with environmental variables, using both univariate and multivariate methods. The relationships between foliar and floral morphological variation and geographical distance between populations were compared with Mantel permutation tests. Key Results Leaf and flower traits were clearly uncoupled within populations and weakly associated among populations. Whereas geographical variation in foliar traits was mostly related to differences in precipitation associated with geographical longitude, variation in floral traits was not. Conclusions These patterns suggest that leaves and flowers responded to different evolutionary forces, environmental (i.e. rainfall) in the case of leaves, and biotic (i.e. pollinators) or genetic drift in the case of flowers. This study supports the view that character divergence at a geographical scale can be moulded by different factors acting in an independent fashion. PMID:18436551

  4. Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, Emanuela; Monda, Vincenzo; Messina, Antonietta; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Tafuri, Domenico; Cibelli, Giuseppe; De Luca, Bruno; Messina, Giovanni; Monda, Marcellino

    2016-01-01

    Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD), which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs) 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect. PMID:27468234

  5. The Nuclear Receptor FXR Uncouples the Actions of miR-33 from SREBP-2

    PubMed Central

    Tarling, Elizabeth J.; Ahn, Hannah; de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determined whether activation of FXR alters cellular and plasma cholesterol homeostasis as a result of regulation of Srebp-2 and miR-33. Approach and Results ChIP-seq data identified an FXR-response element within intron 10 of the Srebp-2 gene. Consistent with this observation, treatment of mice with FXR-specific agonists (GSK2324 or GW4064) rapidly increased hepatic levels of Srebp-2 mRNA, pSREBP-2 protein, and miR-33. Further, miR-33 targets, that include ABCA1, NSF and CPT1, were all reduced in GSK2324-treated mice. In contrast, neither nSREBP-2 protein, nor SREBP-2 target genes were induced following FXR activation. The inability to process pSREBP-2 to nSREBP-2 is likely a consequence of induction of INSIG-2a by FXR agonists. Finally, we show that FXR-dependent induction of both Srebp-2 and miR-33 is ablated in Scap−/− mice that lack nSREBP-2. Conclusions We demonstrate that activation of FXR uncouples the expression of nSREBP-2 and miR-33, and the regulation of their respective target genes. Further, we conclude that the FXR agonist-dependent increase in miR-33 requires transcription of the Srebp-2 gene. PMID:25593129

  6. Mechanisms of excitation-contraction uncoupling relevant to activity-induced muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Graham D

    2009-06-01

    If the free [Ca2+] in the cytoplasm of a skeletal muscle fiber is raised substantially for a period of seconds to minutes or to high levels just briefly, it leads to disruption of the normal excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling process and a consequent long-lasting decrease in force production. It appears that the disruption to the coupling occurs at the triad junction, where the voltage-sensor molecules (dihydropyridine receptors) normally interact with and open the Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors) in the adjacent sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). This disruption results in inadequate release of SR Ca2+ upon stimulation. Such E-C uncoupling may underlie the long-duration low-frequency fatigue that can occur after various types of exercise, as well as possibly being a contributing factor to the muscle weakness in certain muscle diseases. The process or processes causing the disruption of the coupling between the voltage sensors and the release channels is not known with certainty, but might be associated with structural changes at the triad junction, possibly caused by activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease, micro-calpain.

  7. Cell Death and Heart Failure in Obesity: Role of Uncoupling Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ramírez, Angélica; López-Acosta, Ocarol; Barrios-Maya, Miguel Angel; El-Hafidi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes are often characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondrial respiratory complexes, associated with fat accumulation in cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, and hepatocytes. Several rodents studies showed that lipid accumulation in cardiac myocytes produces lipotoxicity that causes apoptosis and leads to heart failure, a dynamic pathological process. Meanwhile, several tissues including cardiac tissue develop an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress and lipotoxicity by overexpressing uncoupling proteins (UCPs), specific mitochondrial membrane proteins. In heart from rodent and human with obesity, UCP2 and UCP3 may protect cardiomyocytes from death and from a state progressing to heart failure by downregulating programmed cell death. UCP activation may affect cytochrome c and proapoptotic protein release from mitochondria by reducing ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Therefore the aim of this review is to discuss recent findings regarding the role that UCPs play in cardiomyocyte survival by protecting against ROS generation and maintaining bioenergetic metabolism homeostasis to promote heart protection.

  8. Phytanic acid, a novel activator of uncoupling protein-1 gene transcription and brown adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Agatha; Barberá, Maria José; Iglesias, Roser; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a phytol-derived branched-chain fatty acid present in dietary products. Phytanic acid increased uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA expression in brown adipocytes differentiated in culture. Phytanic acid induced the expression of the UCP1 gene promoter, which was enhanced by co-transfection with a retinoid X receptor (RXR) expression vector but not with other expression vectors driving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPARgamma or a form of RXR devoid of ligand-dependent sensitivity. The effect of phytanic acid on the UCP1 gene required the 5' enhancer region of the gene and the effects of phytanic acid were mediated in an additive manner by three binding sites for RXR. Moreover, phytanic acid activates brown adipocyte differentiation: long-term exposure of brown preadipocytes to phytanic acid promoted the acquisition of the brown adipocyte morphology and caused a co-ordinate induction of the mRNAs for gene markers of brown adipocyte differentiation, such as UCP1, adipocyte lipid-binding protein aP2, lipoprotein lipase, the glucose transporter GLUT4 or subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, phytanic acid is a natural product of phytol metabolism that activates brown adipocyte thermogenic function. It constitutes a potential nutritional signal linking dietary status to adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:11829740

  9. Uncoupling Charge Movement from Channel Opening in Voltage-gated Potassium Channels by Ruthenium Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Ishida, Itzel G.; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E.; Espinosa-Jalapa, Noel; Pérez-Guzmán, José A.; Elías-Viñas, David; Le Lagadec, Ronan; Rosenbaum, Tamara; Islas, León D.

    2011-01-01

    The Kv2.1 channel generates a delayed-rectifier current in neurons and is responsible for modulation of neuronal spike frequency and membrane repolarization in pancreatic β-cells and cardiomyocytes. As with other tetrameric voltage-activated K+-channels, it has been proposed that each of the four Kv2.1 voltage-sensing domains activates independently upon depolarization, leading to a final concerted transition that causes channel opening. The mechanism by which voltage-sensor activation is coupled to the gating of the pore is still not understood. Here we show that the carbon-monoxide releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) is an allosteric inhibitor of the Kv2.1 channel and that its inhibitory properties derive from the CORM-2 ability to largely reduce the voltage dependence of the opening transition, uncoupling voltage-sensor activation from the concerted opening transition. We additionally demonstrate that CORM-2 modulates Shaker K+-channels in a similar manner. Our data suggest that the mechanism of inhibition by CORM-2 may be common to voltage-activated channels and that this compound should be a useful tool for understanding the mechanisms of electromechanical coupling. PMID:21454671

  10. Growth cessation uncouples isotopic signals in leaves and tree rings of drought-exposed oak trees.

    PubMed

    Pflug, Ellen E; Siegwolf, R; Buchmann, N; Dobbertin, M; Kuster, T M; Günthardt-Goerg, M S; Arend, M

    2015-10-01

    An increase in temperature along with a decrease in summer precipitation in Central Europe will result in an increased frequency of drought events and gradually lead to a change in species composition in forest ecosystems. In the present study, young oaks (Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) were transplanted into large mesocosms and exposed for 3 years to experimental warming and a drought treatment with yearly increasing intensities. Carbon and oxygen isotopic (δ(13)C and δ(18)O) patterns were analysed in leaf tissue and tree-ring cellulose and linked to leaf physiological measures and tree-ring growth. Warming had no effect on the isotopic patterns in leaves and tree rings, while drought increased δ(18)O and δ(13)C. Under severe drought, an unexpected isotopic pattern, with a decrease in δ(18)O, was observed in tree rings but not in leaves. This decrease in δ(18)O could not be explained by concurrent physiological analyses and is not supported by current physiological knowledge. Analysis of intra-annual tree-ring growth revealed a drought-induced growth cessation that interfered with the record of isotopic signals imprinted on recently formed leaf carbohydrates. This missing record indicates isotopic uncoupling of leaves and tree rings, which may have serious implications for the interpretation of tree-ring isotopes, particularly from trees that experienced growth-limiting stresses. PMID:26377873

  11. Uncoupled organic matter burial and quality in boreal lake sediments over the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmiel, Hannah E.; Niggemann, Jutta; Kokic, Jovana; Ferland, Marie-Ève; Dittmar, Thorsten; Sobek, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    Boreal lake sediments are important sites of organic carbon (OC) storage, which have accumulated substantial amounts of OC over the Holocene epoch; the temporal evolution and the strength of this Holocene carbon (C) sink is, however, not well constrained. In this study we investigated the temporal record of carbon mass accumulation rates (CMARs) and assessed qualitative changes of terrestrially derived OC in the sediment profiles of seven Swedish boreal lakes, in order to evaluate the variability of boreal lake sediments as a C sink over time. CMARs were resolved on a short-term (centennial) and long-term (i.e., over millennia of the Holocene) timescale, using radioactive lead (210Pb) and carbon (14C) isotope dating. Sources and degradation state of terrestrially derived OC were identified and characterized by molecular analyses of lignin phenols. We found that CMARs varied substantially on both short-term and long-term scales and that the variability was mostly attributed to sedimentation rates and uncoupled from the OC content in the sediment profiles. The lignin phenol analyses revealed that woody material from gymnosperms was a dominant and constant OC source to the sediments over the Holocene. Furthermore, lignin-based degradation indices, such as acid-to-aldehyde ratios, indicated that postdepositional degradation in the sediments was very limited on longer timescales, implying that terrestrial OC is stabilized in the sediments on a permanent basis.

  12. Growth cessation uncouples isotopic signals in leaves and tree rings of drought-exposed oak trees.

    PubMed

    Pflug, Ellen E; Siegwolf, R; Buchmann, N; Dobbertin, M; Kuster, T M; Günthardt-Goerg, M S; Arend, M

    2015-10-01

    An increase in temperature along with a decrease in summer precipitation in Central Europe will result in an increased frequency of drought events and gradually lead to a change in species composition in forest ecosystems. In the present study, young oaks (Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) were transplanted into large mesocosms and exposed for 3 years to experimental warming and a drought treatment with yearly increasing intensities. Carbon and oxygen isotopic (δ(13)C and δ(18)O) patterns were analysed in leaf tissue and tree-ring cellulose and linked to leaf physiological measures and tree-ring growth. Warming had no effect on the isotopic patterns in leaves and tree rings, while drought increased δ(18)O and δ(13)C. Under severe drought, an unexpected isotopic pattern, with a decrease in δ(18)O, was observed in tree rings but not in leaves. This decrease in δ(18)O could not be explained by concurrent physiological analyses and is not supported by current physiological knowledge. Analysis of intra-annual tree-ring growth revealed a drought-induced growth cessation that interfered with the record of isotopic signals imprinted on recently formed leaf carbohydrates. This missing record indicates isotopic uncoupling of leaves and tree rings, which may have serious implications for the interpretation of tree-ring isotopes, particularly from trees that experienced growth-limiting stresses.

  13. Mitochondrial uncoupling does not decrease reactive oxygen species production after ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Quarrie, Ricardo; Lee, Daniel S; Reyes, Levy; Erdahl, Warren; Pfeiffer, Douglas R; Zweier, Jay L; Crestanello, Juan A

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (IR) leads to myocardial dysfunction by increasing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial H(+) leak decreases ROS formation; it has been postulated that increasing H(+) leak may be a mechanism of decreasing ROS production after IR. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) decreases ROS formation after IR, but the mechanism is unknown. We hypothesize that pharmacologically increasing mitochondrial H(+) leak would decrease ROS production after IR. We further hypothesize that IPC would be associated with an increase in the rate of H(+) leak. Isolated male Sprague-Dawley rat hearts were subjected to either control or IPC. Mitochondria were isolated at end equilibration, end ischemia, and end reperfusion. Mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔΨ) was measured using a tetraphenylphosphonium electrode. Mitochondrial uncoupling was achieved by adding increasing concentrations of FCCP. Mitochondrial ROS production was measured by fluorometry using Amplex-Red. Pyridine dinucleotide levels were measured using HPLC. Before IR, increasing H(+) leak decreased mitochondrial ROS production. After IR, ROS production was not affected by increasing H(+) leak. H(+) leak increased at end ischemia in control mitochondria. IPC mitochondria showed no change in the rate of H(+) leak throughout IR. NADPH levels decreased after IR in both IPC and control mitochondria while NADH increased. Pharmacologically, increasing H(+) leak is not a method of decreasing ROS production after IR. Replenishing the NADPH pool may be a means of scavenging the excess ROS thereby attenuating oxidative damage after IR.

  14. Activity and functional interaction of alternative oxidase and uncoupling protein in mitochondria from tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Sluse, F E; Jarmuszkiewicz, W

    2000-03-01

    Cyanide-resistant alternative oxidase (AOX) is not limited to plant mitochondria and is widespread among several types of protists. The uncoupling protein (UCP) is much more widespread than previously believed, not only in tissues of higher animals but also in plants and in an amoeboid protozoan. The redox energy-dissipating pathway (AOX) and the proton electrochemical gradient energy-dissipating pathway (UCP) lead to the same final effect, i.e., a decrease in ATP synthesis and an increase in heat production. Studies with green tomato fruit mitochondria show that both proteins are present simultaneously in the membrane. This raises the question of a specific physiological role for each energy-dissipating system and of a possible functional connection between them (shared regulation). Linoleic acid, an abundant free fatty acid in plants which activates UCP, strongly inhibits cyanide-resistant respiration mediated by AOX. Moreover, studies of the evolution of AOX and UCP protein expression and of their activities during post-harvest ripening of tomato fruit show that AOX and plant UCP work sequentially: AOX activity decreases in early post-growing stages and UCP activity is decreased in late ripening stages. Electron partitioning between the alternative oxidase and the cytochrome pathway as well as H+ gradient partitioning between ATP synthase and UCP can be evaluated by the ADP/O method. This method facilitates description of the kinetics of energy-dissipating pathways and of ATP synthase when state 3 respiration is decreased by limitation of oxidizable substrate.

  15. Cyanobacterial Light-Harvesting Phycobilisomes Uncouple From Photosystem I During Dark-To-Light Transitions.

    PubMed

    Chukhutsina, Volha; Bersanini, Luca; Aro, Eva-Mari; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2015-09-21

    Photosynthetic organisms cope with changes in light quality by balancing the excitation energy flow between photosystems I (PSI) and II (PSII) through a process called state transitions. Energy redistribution has been suggested to be achieved by movement of the light-harvesting phycobilisome between PSI and PSII, or by nanometre scale rearrangements of the recently discovered PBS-PSII-PSI megacomplexes. The alternative 'spillover' model, on the other hand, states that energy redistribution is achieved by mutual association/dissociation of PSI and PSII. State transitions have always been studied by changing the redox state of the electron carriers using electron transfer inhibitors, or by applying illumination conditions with different colours. However, the molecular events during natural dark-to-light transitions in cyanobacteria have largely been overlooked and still remain elusive. Here we investigated changes in excitation energy transfer from phycobilisomes to the photosystems upon dark-light transitions, using picosecond fluorescence spectroscopy. It appears that megacomplexes are not involved in these changes, and neither does spillover play a role. Instead, the phycobilisomes partly energetically uncouple from PSI in the light but hardly couple to PSII.

  16. Uncoupling protein 2 regulates metabolic reprogramming and fate of antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Leena; Srivastava, Rupesh K; Kos, Ferdynand; Shrikant, Protul A

    2016-07-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) employing ex vivo-generated tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells shows tumor efficacy when the transferred cells possess both effector and memory functions. New strategies based on understanding of mechanisms that balance CD8+ T cell differentiation toward effector and memory responses are highly desirable. Emerging information confirms a central role for antigen-induced metabolic reprogramming in CD8+ T cell differentiation and clonal expansion. The mitochondrial protein uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is induced by antigen stimulation of CD8+ T cells; however, its role in metabolic reprogramming underlying differentiation and clonal expansion has not been reported. Employing genetic (siRNA) and pharmacologic (Genipin) approaches, we note that antigen-induced UCP2 expression reduces glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and production of reactive oxygen species to balance differentiation with survival of effector CD8+ T cells. Inhibition of UCP2 promotes CD8+ T cell terminal differentiation into short-lived effector cells (CD62L(lo)KLRG1(Hi)IFNγ(Hi)) that undergo clonal contraction. These findings are the first to reveal a role for antigen-induced UCP2 expression in balancing CD8+ T cell differentiation and survival. Targeting UCP2 to regulate metabolic reprogramming of CD8+ T cells is an attractive new approach to augment efficacy of tumor therapy by ACT. PMID:27271549

  17. Uncoupling the Functions of CALM in VAMP Sorting and Clathrin-Coated Pit Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sahlender, Daniela A.; Kozik, Patrycja; Miller, Sharon E.; Peden, Andrew A.; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2013-01-01

    CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid leukemia protein) is a cargo-selective adaptor for the post-Golgi R-SNAREs VAMPs 2, 3, and 8, and it also regulates the size of clathrin-coated pits and vesicles at the plasma membrane. The present study has two objectives: to determine whether CALM can sort additional VAMPs, and to investigate whether VAMP sorting contributes to CALM-dependent vesicle size regulation. Using a flow cytometry-based endocytosis efficiency assay, we demonstrate that CALM is also able to sort VAMPs 4 and 7, even though they have sorting signals for other clathrin adaptors. CALM homologues are present in nearly every eukaryote, suggesting that the CALM family may have evolved as adaptors for retrieving all post-Golgi VAMPs from the plasma membrane. Using a knockdown/rescue system, we show that wild-type CALM restores normal VAMP sorting in CALM-depleted cells, but that two non-VAMP-binding mutants do not. However, when we assayed the effect of CALM depletion on coated pit morphology, using a fluorescence microscopy-based assay, we found that the two mutants were as effective as wild-type CALM. Thus, we can uncouple the sorting function of CALM from its structural role. PMID:23741335

  18. Uncoupling the functions of CALM in VAMP sorting and clathrin-coated pit formation.

    PubMed

    Sahlender, Daniela A; Kozik, Patrycja; Miller, Sharon E; Peden, Andrew A; Robinson, Margaret S

    2013-01-01

    CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid leukemia protein) is a cargo-selective adaptor for the post-Golgi R-SNAREs VAMPs 2, 3, and 8, and it also regulates the size of clathrin-coated pits and vesicles at the plasma membrane. The present study has two objectives: to determine whether CALM can sort additional VAMPs, and to investigate whether VAMP sorting contributes to CALM-dependent vesicle size regulation. Using a flow cytometry-based endocytosis efficiency assay, we demonstrate that CALM is also able to sort VAMPs 4 and 7, even though they have sorting signals for other clathrin adaptors. CALM homologues are present in nearly every eukaryote, suggesting that the CALM family may have evolved as adaptors for retrieving all post-Golgi VAMPs from the plasma membrane. Using a knockdown/rescue system, we show that wild-type CALM restores normal VAMP sorting in CALM-depleted cells, but that two non-VAMP-binding mutants do not. However, when we assayed the effect of CALM depletion on coated pit morphology, using a fluorescence microscopy-based assay, we found that the two mutants were as effective as wild-type CALM. Thus, we can uncouple the sorting function of CALM from its structural role.

  19. Rewiring of jasmonate and phytochrome B signalling uncouples plant growth-defense tradeoffs.

    PubMed

    Campos, Marcelo L; Yoshida, Yuki; Major, Ian T; de Oliveira Ferreira, Dalton; Weraduwage, Sarathi M; Froehlich, John E; Johnson, Brendan F; Kramer, David M; Jander, Georg; Sharkey, Thomas D; Howe, Gregg A

    2016-01-01

    Plants resist infection and herbivory with innate immune responses that are often associated with reduced growth. Despite the importance of growth-defense tradeoffs in shaping plant productivity in natural and agricultural ecosystems, the molecular mechanisms that link growth and immunity are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that growth-defense tradeoffs mediated by the hormone jasmonate are uncoupled in an Arabidopsis mutant (jazQ phyB) lacking a quintet of Jasmonate ZIM-domain transcriptional repressors and the photoreceptor phyB. Analysis of epistatic interactions between jazQ and phyB reveal that growth inhibition associated with enhanced anti-insect resistance is likely not caused by diversion of photoassimilates from growth to defense but rather by a conserved transcriptional network that is hardwired to attenuate growth upon activation of jasmonate signalling. The ability to unlock growth-defense tradeoffs through relief of transcription repression provides an approach to assemble functional plant traits in new and potentially useful ways. PMID:27573094

  20. GMP reductase and genetic uncoupling of adenylate and guanylate metabolism in Leishmania donovani parasites.

    PubMed

    Boitz, Jan M; Jardim, Armando; Ullman, Buddy

    2016-08-01

    Purine acquisition is an essential nutritional process for Leishmania. Although purine salvage into adenylate nucleotides has been investigated in detail, little attention has been focused on the guanylate branch of the purine pathway. To characterize guanylate nucleotide metabolism in Leishmania and create a cell culture model in which the pathways for adenylate and guanylate nucleotide synthesis can be genetically uncoupled for functional studies in intact cells, we created and characterized null mutants of L. donovani that were deficient in either GMP reductase alone (Δgmpr) or in both GMP reductase and its paralog IMP dehydrogenase (Δgmpr/Δimpdh). Whereas wild type parasites were capable of utilizing virtually any purine nucleobase/nucleoside, the Δgmpr and Δgmpr/Δimpdh null lines exhibited highly restricted growth phenotypes. The Δgmpr single mutant could not grow in xanthine, guanine, or their corresponding nucleosides, while no purine on its own could support the growth of Δgmpr/Δimpdh cells. Permissive growth conditions for the Δgmpr/Δimpdh necessitated both xanthine, guanine, or the corresponding nucleosides, and additionally, a second purine that could serve as a source for adenylate nucleotide synthesis. Interestingly, GMPR, like its paralog IMPDH, is compartmentalized to the leishmanial glycosome, a process mediated by its COOH-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal. The restricted growth phenotypes displayed by the L. donovani Δgmpr and Δgmpr/Δimpdh null mutants confirms the importance of GMPR in the purine interconversion processes of this parasite.

  1. Uncoupling of reactive oxygen species accumulation and defence signalling in the metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Fones, Helen N; Eyles, Chris J; Bennett, Mark H; Smith, J Andrew C; Preston, Gail M

    2013-09-01

    The metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens is protected from disease by the accumulation of high concentrations of metals in its aerial tissues, which are toxic to many pathogens. As these metals can lead to the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), metal hyperaccumulator plants have developed highly effective ROS tolerance mechanisms, which might quench ROS-based signals. We therefore investigated whether metal accumulation alters defence signalling via ROS in this plant. We studied the effect of zinc (Zn) accumulation by N. caerulescens on pathogen-induced ROS production, salicylic acid accumulation and downstream defence responses, such as callose deposition and pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression, to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. The accumulation of Zn caused increased superoxide production in N. caerulescens, but inoculation with P. syringae did not elicit the defensive oxidative burst typical of most plants. Defences dependent on signalling through ROS (callose and PR gene expression) were also modified or absent in N. caerulescens, whereas salicylic acid production in response to infection was retained. These observations suggest that metal hyperaccumulation is incompatible with defence signalling through ROS and that, as metal hyperaccumulation became effective as a form of elemental defence, normal defence responses became progressively uncoupled from ROS signalling in N. caerulescens. PMID:23758201

  2. Uncoupling protein 2 in the glial response to stress: implications for neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Daniel T.; Barnstable, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are free radicals thought to mediate the neurotoxic effects of several neurodegenerative disorders. In the central nervous system, ROS can also trigger a phenotypic switch in both astrocytes and microglia that further aggravates neurodegeneration, termed reactive gliosis. Negative regulators of ROS, such as mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) are neuroprotective factors that decrease neuron loss in models of stroke, epilepsy, and parkinsonism. However, it is unclear whether UCP2 acts purely to prevent ROS production, or also to prevent gliosis. In this review article, we discuss published evidence supporting the hypothesis that UCP2 is a neuroprotective factor both through its direct effects in decreasing mitochondrial ROS and through its effects in astrocytes and microglia. A major effect of UCP2 activation in glia is a change in the spectrum of secreted cytokines towards a more anti-inflammatory spectrum. There are multiple mechanisms that can control the level or activity of UCP2, including a variety of metabolites and microRNAs. Understanding these mechanisms will be key to exploitingthe protective effects of UCP2 in therapies for multiple neurodegenerative conditions.

  3. Cellulose-Microtubule Uncoupling Proteins Prevent Lateral Displacement of Microtubules during Cellulose Synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengyu; Schneider, Rene; Kesten, Christopher; Zhang, Yi; Somssich, Marc; Zhang, Youjun; Fernie, Alisdair R; Persson, Staffan

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth and is the major contributor to plant morphogenesis. Cellulose is synthesized by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs). Nascent cellulose microfibrils become entangled in the cell wall, and further catalysis therefore drives the CSC forward through the membrane: a process guided by cortical microtubules via the protein CSI1/POM2. Still, it is unclear how the microtubules can withstand the forces generated by the motile CSCs to effectively direct CSC movement. Here, we identified a family of microtubule-associated proteins, the cellulose synthase-microtubule uncouplings (CMUs), that located as static puncta along cortical microtubules. Functional disruption of the CMUs caused lateral microtubule displacement and compromised microtubule-based guidance of CSC movement. CSCs that traversed the microtubules interacted with the microtubules via CSI1/POM2, which prompted the lateral microtubule displacement. Hence, we have revealed how microtubules can withstand the propulsion of the CSCs during cellulose biosynthesis and thus sustain anisotropic plant cell growth. PMID:27477947

  4. Copy number variation and mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Brian; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean numberof genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  5. Expression of uncoupling protein 1 in skeletal muscle decreases muscle energy efficiency and affects thermoregulation and substrate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Susanne; Rudolph, Bettina; Dohrmann, Cord; Wehr, Roland

    2005-04-14

    Skeletal muscle uncoupling by ectopic expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) has been shown to result in a lean phenotype in mice characterized by increased energy expenditure (EE), resistance to diet-induced obesity, and improved glucose tolerance. Here, we investigated in detail the effect of ectopic UCP1 expression in skeletal muscle on thermoregulation and energy homeostasis in HSA-mUCP1 transgenic mice. Thermoneutrality was determined to be approximately 30 degrees C for both wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice. EE, body temperature (Tb), activity, and respiratory quotient (RQ) were then measured over 24 h at ambient temperatures (Ta) of 30, 22, and 5 degrees C. HSA-mUCP1 transgenic mice showed increased activity-related EE and heat loss but similar basal metabolic rate compared with WT. Tb at resting periods was progressively decreased with declining Ta in HSA-mUCP1 transgenic mice but not in WT. Compared with WT littermates, the transgenic HSA-mUCP1 mice displayed increased RQ levels during night time, indicative of increased overall glucose oxidation, and failed to decrease their RQ levels with declining Ta. Thus increased EE caused by skeletal muscle uncoupling is clearly due to a decreased muscle energy efficiency during activity combined with increased glucose oxidation and a compromised thermoregulation associated with increased overall heat loss. At Tas below thermoneutrality, this puts increasing energy demands on the animals, whereas at thermoneutrality most differences in energy metabolism are not apparent any more.

  6. eNOS uncoupling in the cerebellum after BBB disruption by exposure to Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom.

    PubMed

    Soares, Edilene Siqueira; Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2015-09-15

    Numerous studies have shown that the venom of Phoneutria nigriventer (PNV) armed-spider causes excitotoxic signals and blood-brain barrier breakdown (BBBb) in rats. Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule which has a role in endothelium homeostasis and vascular health. The present study investigated the relevance of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) uncoupling to clinical neurotoxic evolution induced by PNV. eNOS immunoblotting of cerebellum lysates processed through low-temperature SDS-PAGE revealed significant increased monomerization of the enzyme at critical periods of severe envenoming (1-2 h), whereas eNOS dimerization reversal paralleled to amelioration of animals condition (5-72 h). Moreover, eNOS uncoupling was accompanied by increased expression in calcium-sensing calmodulin protein and calcium-binding calbindin-D28 protein in cerebellar neurons. It is known that greater eNOS monomers than dimers implies the inability of eNOS to produce NO leading to superoxide production and endothelial/vascular barrier dysfunction. We suggest that transient eNOS deactivation and disturbances in calcium handling reduce NO production and enhance production of free radicals thus contributing to endothelial dysfunction in the cerebellum of envenomed rats. In addition, eNOS uncoupling compromises the enzyme capacity to respond to shear stress contributing to perivascular edema and it is one of the mechanisms involved in the BBBb promoted by PNV.

  7. The uncoupling protein homologues: UCP1, UCP2, UCP3, StUCP and AtUCP.

    PubMed Central

    Ricquier, D; Bouillaud, F

    2000-01-01

    Animal and plant uncoupling protein (UCP) homologues form a subfamily of mitochondrial carriers that are evolutionarily related and possibly derived from a proton/anion transporter ancestor. The brown adipose tissue (BAT) UCP1 has a marked and strongly regulated uncoupling activity, essential to the maintenance of body temperature in small mammals. UCP homologues identified in plants are induced in a cold environment and may be involved in resistance to chilling. The biochemical activities and biological functions of the recently identified mammalian UCP2 and UCP3 are not well known. However, recent data support a role for these UCPs in State 4 respiration, respiration uncoupling and proton leaks in mitochondria. Moreover, genetic studies suggest that UCP2 and UCP3 play a part in energy expenditure in humans. The UCPs may also be involved in adaptation of cellular metabolism to an excessive supply of substrates in order to regulate the ATP level, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio and various metabolic pathways, and to contain superoxide production. A major goal will be the analysis of mice that either lack the UCP2 or UCP3 gene or overexpress these genes. Other aims will be to investigate the possible roles of UCP2 and UCP3 in response to oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, inflammatory processes, fever and regulation of temperature in certain specific parts of the body. PMID:10620491

  8. Application of a personal computer for the uncoupled vibration analysis of wind turbine blade and counterweight assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. R.; Little, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    A research effort was undertaken to develop personal computer based software for vibrational analysis. The software was developed to analytically determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes for the uncoupled lateral vibrations of the blade and counterweight assemblies used in a single bladed wind turbine. The uncoupled vibration analysis was performed in both the flapwise and chordwise directions for static rotor conditions. The effects of rotation on the uncoupled flapwise vibration of the blade and counterweight assemblies were evaluated for various rotor speeds up to 90 rpm. The theory, used in the vibration analysis codes, is based on a lumped mass formulation for the blade and counterweight assemblies. The codes are general so that other designs can be readily analyzed. The input for the codes is generally interactive to facilitate usage. The output of the codes is both tabular and graphical. Listings of the codes are provided. Predicted natural frequencies of the first several modes show reasonable agreement with experimental results. The analysis codes were originally developed on a DEC PDP 11/34 minicomputer and then downloaded and modified to run on an ITT XTRA personal computer. Studies conducted to evaluate the efficiency of running the programs on a personal computer as compared with the minicomputer indicated that, with the proper combination of hardware and software options, the efficiency of using a personal computer exceeds that of a minicomputer.

  9. Sestrin 2 and AMPK Connect Hyperglycemia to Nox4-Dependent Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling and Matrix Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Assaad A.; Lee, Doug-Yoon; Roman, Linda J.; Khazim, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Mesangial matrix accumulation is an early feature of glomerular pathology in diabetes. Oxidative stress plays a critical role in hyperglycemia-induced glomerular injury. Here, we demonstrate that, in glomerular mesangial cells (MCs), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is uncoupled upon exposure to high glucose (HG), with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased production of nitric oxide. Peroxynitrite mediates the effects of HG on eNOS dysfunction. HG upregulates Nox4 protein, and inhibition of Nox4 abrogates the increase in ROS and peroxynitrite generation, as well as the eNOS uncoupling triggered by HG, demonstrating that Nox4 functions upstream from eNOS. Importantly, this pathway contributes to HG-induced MC fibronectin accumulation. Nox4-mediated eNOS dysfunction was confirmed in glomeruli of a rat model of type 1 diabetes. Sestrin 2-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation attenuates HG-induced MC fibronectin synthesis through blockade of Nox4-dependent ROS and peroxynitrite generation, with subsequent eNOS uncoupling. We also find that HG negatively regulates sestrin 2 and AMPK, thereby promoting Nox4-mediated eNOS dysfunction and increased fibronectin. These data identify a protective function for sestrin 2/AMPK and potential targets for intervention to prevent fibrotic injury in diabetes. PMID:23816887

  10. Overexpression of uncoupling protein-2 in cancer: metabolic and heat changes, inhibition and effects on drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the role of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) in cancer. UCP2 is overexpressed in cancer. This overexpression results in uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and a shift in production of ATP from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to cytosolic aerobic glycolysis. UCP2 overexpression results in the following changes. Mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) is decreased and lactate accumulates. There is a diminished production of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis is inhibited post-exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. There is an increase in heat and entropy production and a departure from the stationary state of non-cancerous tissue. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation may also be caused by protonophores and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. UCP2 requires activation by superoxide and lipid peroxidation derivatives. As vitamin E inhibits lipid peroxidation, it might be expected that vitamin E would act as a chemotherapeutic agent against cancer. A recent study has shown that vitamin E and another anti-oxidant accelerate cancer progression. UCP2 is inhibited by genipin, chromane compounds and short interfering RNAs (siRNA). Genipin, chromanes and siRNA are taken up by both cancer and non-cancerous cells. Targeting the uptake of these agents by cancer cells by the enhanced permeability and retention effect is considered. Inhibition of UCP2 enhances the action of several anti-cancer agents. PMID:26542482

  11. 8-oxoguanine causes spontaneous de novo germline mutations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Mizuki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Furuichi, Masato; Iwasaki, Yuki; Hokama, Masaaki; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Gondo, Yoichi; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous germline mutations generate genetic diversity in populations of sexually reproductive organisms, and are thus regarded as a driving force of evolution. However, the cause and mechanism remain unclear. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is a candidate molecule that causes germline mutations, because it makes DNA more prone to mutation and is constantly generated by reactive oxygen species in vivo. We show here that endogenous 8-oxoG caused de novo spontaneous and heritable G to T mutations in mice, which occurred at different stages in the germ cell lineage and were distributed throughout the chromosomes. Using exome analyses covering 40.9 Mb of mouse transcribed regions, we found increased frequencies of G to T mutations at a rate of 2 × 10−7 mutations/base/generation in offspring of Mth1/Ogg1/Mutyh triple knockout (TOY-KO) mice, which accumulate 8-oxoG in the nuclear DNA of gonadal cells. The roles of MTH1, OGG1, and MUTYH are specific for the prevention of 8-oxoG-induced mutation, and 99% of the mutations observed in TOY-KO mice were G to T transversions caused by 8-oxoG; therefore, we concluded that 8-oxoG is a causative molecule for spontaneous and inheritable mutations of the germ lineage cells. PMID:24732879

  12. Mutational Robustness of Morphological Traits in the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hongan; Zufall, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Ciliate nuclear architecture, in particular the sequestration of a transcriptionally silent germline genome, allows for the accumulation of mutations that are "hidden" from selection during many rounds of asexual reproduction. After sexual conjugation, these mutations are expressed, potentially resulting in highly variable phenotypes. Morphological traits are widely used in ciliate taxonomy, however, the extent to which the values of these traits are robust to change in the face of mutation is largely unknown. In this study, we examine the effects of mutations accumulated in the germline genome to test the mutational robustness of four traits commonly used in ciliate morphological taxonomy (number of somatic kineties, number of post-oral kineties, macronuclear size, and cell size). We find that the number of post-oral kineties is robust to mutation, confirming that it should be preferentially used in taxonomy. By contrast, we find that, as in other unicellular and multicellular species, cell/macronucleus size changes in response to mutation. Thus, we argue that cell/macronucleus sizes, which are widely used in taxonomy, should be treated cautiously for species identification. Finally, we find evidence of correlations between cell and macronucleus sizes and fitness, suggesting possible mutational pleiotropy. This study demonstrates the importance of, and methods for, determining mutational robustness to guide morphological taxonomy in ciliates. PMID:25227613

  13. Defective Expression of the Mitochondrial-tRNA Modifying Enzyme GTPBP3 Triggers AMPK-Mediated Adaptive Responses Involving Complex I Assembly Factors, Uncoupling Protein 2, and the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier

    PubMed Central

    Esteve, Juan M.; Villarroya, Magda; Aguado, Carmen; Enríquez, J. Antonio; Knecht, Erwin; Armengod, M.-Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    GTPBP3 is an evolutionary conserved protein presumably involved in mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) modification. In humans, GTPBP3 mutations cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with lactic acidosis, and have been associated with a defect in mitochondrial translation, yet the pathomechanism remains unclear. Here we use a GTPBP3 stable-silencing model (shGTPBP3 cells) for a further characterization of the phenotype conferred by the GTPBP3 defect. We experimentally show for the first time that GTPBP3 depletion is associated with an mt-tRNA hypomodification status, as mt-tRNAs from shGTPBP3 cells were more sensitive to digestion by angiogenin than tRNAs from control cells. Despite the effect of stable silencing of GTPBP3 on global mitochondrial translation being rather mild, the steady-state levels and activity of Complex I, and cellular ATP levels were 50% of those found in the controls. Notably, the ATPase activity of Complex V increased by about 40% in GTPBP3 depleted cells suggesting that mitochondria consume ATP to maintain the membrane potential. Moreover, shGTPBP3 cells exhibited enhanced antioxidant capacity and a nearly 2-fold increase in the uncoupling protein UCP2 levels. Our data indicate that stable silencing of GTPBP3 triggers an AMPK-dependent retrograde signaling pathway that down-regulates the expression of the NDUFAF3 and NDUFAF4 Complex I assembly factors and the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC), while up-regulating the expression of UCP2. We also found that genes involved in glycolysis and oxidation of fatty acids are up-regulated. These data are compatible with a model in which high UCP2 levels, together with a reduction in pyruvate transport due to the down-regulation of MPC, promote a shift from pyruvate to fatty acid oxidation, and to an uncoupling of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. These metabolic alterations, and the low ATP levels, may negatively affect heart function. PMID:26642043

  14. Mutational landscape of yeast mutator strains.

    PubMed

    Serero, Alexandre; Jubin, Claire; Loeillet, Sophie; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Nicolas, Alain G

    2014-02-01

    The acquisition of mutations is relevant to every aspect of genetics, including cancer and evolution of species on Darwinian selection. Genome variations arise from rare stochastic imperfections of cellular metabolism and deficiencies in maintenance genes. Here, we established the genome-wide spectrum of mutations that accumulate in a WT and in nine Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutator strains deficient for distinct genome maintenance processes: pol32Δ and rad27Δ (replication), msh2Δ (mismatch repair), tsa1Δ (oxidative stress), mre11Δ (recombination), mec1Δ tel1Δ (DNA damage/S-phase checkpoints), pif1Δ (maintenance of mitochondrial genome and telomere length), cac1Δ cac3Δ (nucleosome deposition), and clb5Δ (cell cycle progression). This study reveals the diversity, complexity, and ultimate unique nature of each mutational spectrum, composed of punctual mutations, chromosomal structural variations, and/or aneuploidies. The mutations produced in clb5Δ/CCNB1, mec1Δ/ATR, tel1Δ/ATM, and rad27Δ/FEN1 strains extensively reshape the genome, following a trajectory dependent on previous events. It comprises the transmission of unstable genomes that lead to colony mosaicisms. This comprehensive analytical approach of mutator defects provides a model to understand how genome variations might accumulate during clonal evolution of somatic cell populations, including tumor cells.

  15. Mutation accumulation and fitness in mutator subpopulations of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Ram P; Liu, Bin; Li, Yang; Reeves, Peter R; Wang, Lei; Ferenci, Thomas

    2013-02-23

    Bacterial populations in clinical and laboratory settings contain a significant proportion of mutants with elevated mutation rates (mutators). Mutators have a particular advantage when multiple beneficial mutations are needed for fitness, as in antibiotic resistance. Nevertheless, high mutation rates potentially lead to increasing numbers of deleterious mutations and subsequently to the decreased fitness of mutators. To test how fitness changed with mutation accumulation, genome sequencing and fitness assays of nine Escherichia coli mutY mutators were undertaken in an evolving chemostat population at three time points. Unexpectedly, the fitness in members of the mutator subpopulation became constant despite a growing number of mutations over time. To test if the accumulated mutations affected fitness, we replaced each of the known beneficial mutations with wild-type alleles in a mutator isolate. We found that the other 25 accumulated mutations were not deleterious. Our results suggest that isolates with deleterious mutations are eliminated by competition in a continuous culture, leaving mutators with mostly neutral mutations. Interestingly, the mutator-non-mutator balance in the population reversed after the fitness plateau of mutators was reached, suggesting that the mutator-non-mutator ratio in populations has more to do with competition between members of the population than the accumulation of deleterious mutations.

  16. Male Reproductive Toxicology: Environmental Exposures vs Reproductive Competence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Like the lecture this chapter begins with an overview of male reproductive biology and transitions into male reproductive toxicology. It ends with a brief discussion of the strengths and weaknesses in male reproductive toxicology and epidemiology today. This chapter is highly il...

  17. Reproduction in domestic buffalo.

    PubMed

    Perera, B M A O

    2008-07-01

    The domestic buffalo is an indispensable livestock resource to millions of smallholder farmers in developing countries, particularly in Asia. Although its reproductive biology is basically similar to that of cattle, there are important differences and unique characteristics that need to be considered in order to apply modern reproductive technologies to improve its productivity. Under most smallholder production systems, the reproductive efficiency of buffalo is compromised by factors related to climate, management, nutrition and diseases. However, when managed and fed properly, buffalo can have good fertility and provide milk, calves and draught power over a long productive life. The basic technical problems associated with artificial insemination in buffalo were largely overcome two decades ago, but the technology has not had the expected impact in some developing countries, because largely of infrastructural and logistic problems. Approaches involving the use of hormones for treating anoestrus and for synchronizing oestrus have had varying rates of success, depending on the protocols used and the incidence of underlying problems that cause infertility. Embryo technologies such as multiple ovulation embryo transfer, in vitro embryo production, cryopreservation and cloning are being intensively studied but have had far lower success rates than in cattle. Improving the productivity of buffalo requires an understanding of their potential and limitations under each farming system, development of simple intervention strategies to ameliorate deficiencies in management, nutrition and healthcare, followed by judicious application of reproductive technologies that are sustainable with the resources available to buffalo farmers.

  18. Female Reproductive System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, N. J.

    This autoinstructional lesson can be used with health education and/or biology classes in a high school curriculum. It deals with the study of human development with emphasis on the female reproductive organs and cycles. The behavioral objectives are given, and the materials and equipment needed to gain these objectives are itemized. Fifteen…

  19. Melatonin and female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Akihisa; Taketani, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Manabu; Lee, Lifa; Tamura, Isao; Maekawa, Ryo; Aasada, Hiromi; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Sugino, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is secreted during the dark hours at night by the pineal gland. After entering the circulation, melatonin acts as an endocrine factor and a chemical messenger of light and darkness. It regulates a variety of important central and peripheral actions related to circadian rhythms and reproduction. It also affects the brain, immune, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal, bone and endocrine functions and acts as an oncostatic and anti-aging molecule. Many of melatonin's actions are mediated through interactions with specific membrane-bound receptors expressed not only in the central nervous system, but also in peripheral tissues. Melatonin also acts through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms, for example serving as a scavenger for reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. At both physiological and pharmacological concentrations, melatonin attenuates and counteracts oxidative stress and regulates cellular metabolism. Growing scientific evidence of reproductive physiology supports the role of melatonin in human reproduction. This review was conducted to investigate the effects of melatonin on female reproduction and to summarize our findings in this field.

  20. Male Reproductive System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkington, B. A.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of the human body with emphasis on the life process of reproduction. It is a learning activity included in high school biology or health education classes. The behavioral objectives are listed and the equipment and materials needed to help the student gain these objectives are also included in the…

  1. Drug abuse and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, C G; Asch, R H

    1987-09-01

    It is clear that a number of CNS agents, including drugs of abuse, can inhibit reproductive function. Figure 1 shows the chemical diversity of some of the drug groups that affect reproductive hormones. Their structural dissimilarity to the steroid hormones is also readily apparent in the figure. These chemically diverse drugs share an important pharmacologic property: they are highly potent neuroactive drugs, and they can disrupt hypothalamic-pituitary function. Although it is frequently difficult to distinguish between direct drug actions on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and subsequent effects on gonadal hormones and sex accessory gland function, the distinction is an important one. Most neuroactive drugs produce only transient effects on the central nervous pathways necessary for normal gonadotropin secretion. The disruptive effects of these drugs are likely to be transient and completely reversible, and tolerance to the inhibitory drug effects may occur even with continued drug use. Under these circumstances, normal adults may experience only subtle changes in sexual function. However, individuals with compromised reproductive function may exhibit major problems. It is also likely that adolescents may be at substantial risk for reproductive damage from these neuroactive drugs since the endocrine events associated with puberty are dependent on the normal development of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  2. Ethics of Reproductive Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buuck, R. John

    1977-01-01

    Artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization, artificial placentas, and cloning are examined from a ethical viewpoint. The moral, social, and legal implications of reproductive engineering are considered important to biology as well as medicine. The author suggests that these ethical issues should be included in the biology curriculum and lists…

  3. Reproduction in domestic buffalo.

    PubMed

    Perera, B M A O

    2008-07-01

    The domestic buffalo is an indispensable livestock resource to millions of smallholder farmers in developing countries, particularly in Asia. Although its reproductive biology is basically similar to that of cattle, there are important differences and unique characteristics that need to be considered in order to apply modern reproductive technologies to improve its productivity. Under most smallholder production systems, the reproductive efficiency of buffalo is compromised by factors related to climate, management, nutrition and diseases. However, when managed and fed properly, buffalo can have good fertility and provide milk, calves and draught power over a long productive life. The basic technical problems associated with artificial insemination in buffalo were largely overcome two decades ago, but the technology has not had the expected impact in some developing countries, because largely of infrastructural and logistic problems. Approaches involving the use of hormones for treating anoestrus and for synchronizing oestrus have had varying rates of success, depending on the protocols used and the incidence of underlying problems that cause infertility. Embryo technologies such as multiple ovulation embryo transfer, in vitro embryo production, cryopreservation and cloning are being intensively studied but have had far lower success rates than in cattle. Improving the productivity of buffalo requires an understanding of their potential and limitations under each farming system, development of simple intervention strategies to ameliorate deficiencies in management, nutrition and healthcare, followed by judicious application of reproductive technologies that are sustainable with the resources available to buffalo farmers. PMID:18638124

  4. Preparing for Assisted Reproductive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) What Is ART Patient Resources Preparing for ...

  5. Evolution of Population with Sexual and Asexual Reproduction in Changing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mingfeng; Yu, Changliang; Ruan, Hongbo; Yao, Lei

    Using a lattice model based on Monte Carlo simulations, we study the role of the reproduction pattern on the fate of an evolving population. Each individual is under the selection pressure from the environment and random mutations. The habitat ("climate") is changing periodically. Evolutions of populations following two reproduction patterns are compared, asexual and sexual. We show, via Monte Carlo simulations, that sexual reproduction by keeping more diversified populations gives them better chances to adapt themselves to the changing environment. However, in order to obtain a greater chance to mate, the birth rate should be high. In the case of low birth rate and high mutation probability there is a preference for the asexual reproduction.

  6. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  7. Reproductive conflict and the separation of reproductive generations in humans

    PubMed Central

    Cant, Michael A.; Johnstone, Rufus A.

    2008-01-01

    An enduring puzzle of human life history is why women cease reproduction midway through life. Selection can favor postreproductive survival because older females can help their offspring to reproduce. But the kin-selected fitness gains of helping appear insufficient to outweigh the potential benefits of continued reproduction. Why then do women cease reproduction in the first place? Here, we suggest that early reproductive cessation in humans is the outcome of reproductive competition between generations, and we present a simple candidate model of how this competition will be resolved. We show that among primates exhibiting a postreproductive life span, humans exhibit an extraordinarily low degree of reproductive overlap between generations. The rapid senescence of the human female reproductive system coincides with the age at which, in natural fertility populations, women are expected to encounter reproductive competition from breeding females of the next generation. Several lines of evidence suggest that in ancestral hominids, this younger generation typically comprised immigrant females. In these circumstances, relatedness asymmetries within families are predicted to give younger females a decisive advantage in reproductive conflict with older females. A model incorporating both the costs of reproductive competition and the benefits of grandmothering can account for the timing of reproductive cessation in humans and so offers an improved understanding of the evolution of menopause. PMID:18378891

  8. Reproductive rights approach to reproductive health in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Vijayan K.; Gupta, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Background Research on reproductive health in developing countries focuses mostly on the role of economic development on various components of reproductive health. Cross-sectional and empirical research studies in particular on the effects of non-economic factors such as reproductive rights remain few and far between. Objective This study investigates the influence of two components of an empowerment strategy, gender equality, and reproductive rights on women's reproductive health in developing countries. The empowerment strategy for improving reproductive health is theoretically situated on a number of background factors such as economic and social development. Design Cross-national socioeconomic and demographic data from a number of international organizations on 142 developing countries are used to test a model of reproductive rights and reproductive health. Results The findings suggest that both economic and democratic development have significant positive effects on levels of gender equality. The level of social development plays a prominent role in promoting reproductive rights. It is found that reproductive rights channel the influences of social structural factors and gender equality on reproductive health. PMID:22184501

  9. Uncoupling clutch size, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone using experimental egg removal.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Calen P; Dawson, Alistair; Sharp, Peter J; Williams, Tony D

    2015-03-01

    Clutch size is a key avian fitness and life history trait. A physiological model for clutch size determination (CSD), involving an anti-gonadal effect of prolactin (PRL) via suppression of luteinizing hormone (LH), was proposed over 20 years ago, but has received scant experimental attention since. The few studies looking at a PRL-based mechanistic hypothesis for CSD have been equivocal, but recent experiments utilizing a pharmacological agent to manipulate PRL in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) found no support for a role of this hormone in clutch size determination. Here, we take a complementary approach by manipulating clutch size through egg removal, examining co-variation in PRL and LH between two breeding attempts, as well as through experimentally-extended laying. Clutch size increased for egg removal females, but not controls, but this was not correlated with changes in PRL or LH. There were also no differences in PRL between egg removal females and controls, nor did PRL levels during early, mid- or late-laying of supra-normal clutches predict clutch size. By uncoupling PRL, LH and clutch size in our study, several key predictions of the PRL-based mechanistic model for CSD were not supported. However, a positive correlation between PRL levels late in laying and days relative to the last egg (clutch completion) provides an alternative explanation for the equivocal results surrounding the conventional PRL-based physiological model for CSD. We suggest that females coordinate PRL-mediated incubation onset with clutch completion to minimize hatching asynchrony and sibling hierarchy, a behavior that is amplified in females laying larger clutches.

  10. Uncoupled Embryonic and Extra-Embryonic Tissues Compromise Blastocyst Development after Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Degrelle, Séverine A.; Jaffrezic, Florence; Campion, Evelyne; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh; Le Bourhis, Daniel; Richard, Christophe; Rodde, Nathalie; Fleurot, Renaud; Everts, Robin E.; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Heyman, Yvan; Vignon, Xavier; Tian, Xiuchun C.; Lewin, Harris A.; Renard, Jean-Paul; Hue, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is the most efficient cell reprogramming technique available, especially when working with bovine species. Although SCNT blastocysts performed equally well or better than controls in the weeks following embryo transfer at Day 7, elongation and gastrulation defects were observed prior to implantation. To understand the developmental implications of embryonic/extra-embryonic interactions, the morphological and molecular features of elongating and gastrulating tissues were analysed. At Day 18, 30 SCNT conceptuses were compared to 20 controls (AI and IVP: 10 conceptuses each); one-half of the SCNT conceptuses appeared normal while the other half showed signs of atypical elongation and gastrulation. SCNT was also associated with a high incidence of discordance in embryonic and extra-embryonic patterns, as evidenced by morphological and molecular “uncoupling”. Elongation appeared to be secondarily affected; only 3 of 30 conceptuses had abnormally elongated shapes and there were very few differences in gene expression when they were compared to the controls. However, some of these differences could be linked to defects in microvilli formation or extracellular matrix composition and could thus impact extra-embryonic functions. In contrast to elongation, gastrulation stages included embryonic defects that likely affected the hypoblast, the epiblast, or the early stages of their differentiation. When taking into account SCNT conceptus somatic origin, i.e. the reprogramming efficiency of each bovine ear fibroblast (Low: 0029, Med: 7711, High: 5538), we found that embryonic abnormalities or severe embryonic/extra-embryonic uncoupling were more tightly correlated to embryo loss at implantation than were elongation defects. Alternatively, extra-embryonic differences between SCNT and control conceptuses at Day 18 were related to molecular plasticity (high efficiency/high plasticity) and subsequent pregnancy loss. Finally, because it alters

  11. Uncoupling Protein 2 Polymorphisms as Risk Factors for Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Adam; Pangilinan, Faith; VanderMeer, Julie; Molloy, Anne M.; Troendle, James; Conley, Mary; Kirke, Peadar N.; Scott, John M.; Brody, Lawrence C.; Mills, James L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both environmental and genetic factors are involved in the etiology of neural tube defects (NTDs). Inadequate folate intake and obesity are important environmental risk factors. Several folate-related genetic variants have been identified as risk factors; however, little is known about how genetic variants relate to the increased risk seen in obese women. Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) is an attractive candidate to screen for NTD risk because of its possible role in obesity as well as energy metabolism, type-2 diabetes, and the regulation of reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, a previous study found that a common UCP2 compound homozygous genotype was associated with a threefold increase in NTD risk. METHODS: We evaluated three polymorphisms, −866G>A, A55V, and the 3′UTR 45bp insertion/deletion, as risk factors for NTDs in Irish NTD cases (N=169), their mothers (N=163), their fathers (N=167) and normal control subjects (N=332). RESULTS: Allele and genotype frequencies were not significantly different when comparing NTD mothers, NTD fathers, or affected children to controls. Additionally, the previously reported risk genotype (combined homozygosity of 55VV and 3′UTR 45bp deletion/deletion) was not present at a higher frequency in any NTD group when compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: In our Irish study population, UCP2 polymorphisms do not influence NTD risk. Moreover, the prevalence of this allele in other populations was similar to the Irish prevalence but far lower than reported in the previous NTD study, suggesting that this previous finding of an association with NTDs might have been due to an unrepresentative study sample. PMID:19137581

  12. Spironolactone Prevents Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling and Vascular Dysfunction Induced by β-Adrenergic Overstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Victorio, Jamaira A.; Clerici, Stefano P.; Palacios, Roberto; Alonso, María J.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Rossoni, Luciana V.

    2016-01-01

    Sustained stimulation of β-adrenoceptors (β-ARs) and activation of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system are common features of cardiovascular diseases with rising sympathetic activation, including essential hypertension, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. In this study, we investigated the role of AT1 receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the vascular alterations caused by β-AR overstimulation. β-AR overstimulation with associated cardiac hypertrophy and increased vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine in aorta were modeled in rats by 7-day isoproterenol treatment. The increased vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine in this model was blunted by the MR antagonist spironolactone, but not by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan, despite the blunting of cardiac hypertrophy with both drugs. Spironolactone, but not losartan, restored NO bioavailability in association with lower endothelial nitric oxide synthase–derived superoxide production, increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase dimerization, and aortic HSP90 upregulation. MR genomic and nongenomic functions were activated in aortas from isoproterenol-treated rats. Isoproterenol did not modify plasma levels of MR ligands aldosterone and corticosterone but rather increased perivascular adipose tissue–derived corticosterone in association with increased expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1. The anticontractile effect of aortic perivascular adipose tissue was impaired by β-AR overstimulation and restored by MR blockade. These results suggest that activation of vascular MR signaling contributes to the vascular dysfunction induced by β-AR overstimulation associated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling. These findings reveal an additional explanation for the protective effects of MR antagonists in cardiovascular disorders with sympathetic activation. PMID:27432866

  13. Uncoupling protein-2 mRNA expression in mice subjected to intermittent hypoxia*

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Luciana Rodrigues; Martinez, Denis; Forgiarini, Luiz Felipe; da Rosa, Darlan Pase; de Muñoz, Gustavo Alfredo Ochs; Fagundes, Micheli; Martins, Emerson Ferreira; Montanari, Carolina Caruccio; Fiori, Cintia Zappe

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of intermittent hypoxia-a model of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)-on pancreatic expression of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2), as well as on glycemic and lipid profiles, in C57BL mice. Methods: For 8 h/day over a 35-day period, male C57BL mice were exposed to intermittent hypoxia (hypoxia group) or to a sham procedure (normoxia group). The intermittent hypoxia condition involved exposing mice to an atmosphere of 92% N and 8% CO2 for 30 s, progressively reducing the fraction of inspired oxygen to 8 ± 1%, after which they were exposed to room air for 30 s and the cycle was repeated (480 cycles over the 8-h experimental period). Pancreases were dissected to isolate the islets. Real-time PCR was performed with TaqMan assays. Results: Expression of UCP2 mRNA in pancreatic islets was 20% higher in the normoxia group than in the hypoxia group (p = 0.11). Fasting serum insulin was higher in the hypoxia group than in the normoxia group (p = 0.01). The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance indicated that, in comparison with the control mice, the mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia showed 15% lower insulin resistance (p = 0.09) and 21% higher pancreatic β-cell function (p = 0.01). Immunohistochemical staining of the islets showed no significant differences between the two groups in terms of the area or intensity of α- and β-cell staining for insulin and glucagon. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effect of intermittent hypoxia on UCP2 expression. Our findings suggest that UCP2 regulates insulin production in OSA. Further study of the role that UCP2 plays in the glycemic control of OSA patients is warranted. PMID:25909153

  14. Fruit calcium accumulation coupled and uncoupled from its transpiration in kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Giuseppe; Dichio, Bartolomeo; Lang, Alexander; Mininni, Alba N; Xiloyannis, Cristos

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of Ca in several fleshy fruit is often supposed to depend, among others, by climatic variables driving fruit transpiration. This study tests the whole causal chain hypothesis: VPD → fruit transpiration → Ca accumulation. Also there are evidences that relationship between fruit transpiration and Ca content is not always clear, hence the hypothesis that low VPD reduces the fraction of xylemic water destined to transpiration was tested by examining the water budget of fruit. Attached fruits of Actinidia deliciosa were subjected to Low (L) and High (H) VPD. Their transpiration was measured from early after fruit-set to day 157 after full bloom (DAFB). Fruits were picked at 70, 130 and 157 DAFB for Ca and K determinations and for water budget analysis. Cumulative transpired water was ∼ 70 g and ∼ 16 g H2O f(-1) in HVPD and LVPD, respectively. Calcium accumulated linearly (R(2) = 0.71) with cumulative transpiration when VPD was high, while correlation was weaker (R(2) = 0.24) under LVPD. Under low VPD the fraction of xylem stream destined to transpiration declined to 40-50%. Results suggest that Ca accumulation is coupled to cumulative transpiration under high VPD because under that condition cumulative transpiration equals xylem stream (which carry the nutrient). At LVPD, Ca gain by fruit is uncoupled from transpiration because ∼ 60% of the xylemic water is needed to sustain fruit growth. Results will apply to most fruits (apples, tomatoes, capsicum, grapes etc.) since most suffer Ca deficiency disorders and grow in changing environments with variable VPD, also they could be supportive for the implementation of fruit quality models accounting also for mineral compositions and for a reinterpretation of certain field practices aimed at naturally improve fruit Ca content.

  15. Uncoupling High Light Responses from Singlet Oxygen Retrograde Signaling and Spatial-Temporal Systemic Acquired Acclimation.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Melanie; Crisp, Peter A; d'Alessandro, Stefano; Ganguly, Diep; Gordon, Matthew; Havaux, Michel; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica; Pogson, Barry J

    2016-07-01

    Distinct ROS signaling pathways initiated by singlet oxygen ((1)O2) or superoxide and hydrogen peroxide have been attributed to either cell death or acclimation, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that more complex antagonistic and synergistic relationships exist within and between these pathways. As specific chloroplastic ROS signals are difficult to study, rapid systemic signaling experiments using localized high light (HL) stress or ROS treatments were used in this study to uncouple signals required for direct HL and ROS perception and distal systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). A qPCR approach was chosen to determine local perception and distal signal reception. Analysis of a thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase mutant (tapx), the (1)O2-retrograde signaling double mutant (ex1/ex2), and an apoplastic signaling double mutant (rbohD/F) revealed that tAPX and EXECUTER 1 are required for both HL and systemic acclimation stress perception. Apoplastic membrane-localized RBOHs were required for systemic spread of the signal but not for local signal induction in directly stressed tissues. Endogenous ROS treatments revealed a very strong systemic response induced by a localized 1 h induction of (1)O2 using the conditional flu mutant. A qPCR time course of (1)O2 induced systemic marker genes in directly and indirectly connected leaves revealed a direct vascular connection component of both immediate and longer term SAA signaling responses. These results reveal the importance of an EXECUTER-dependent (1)O2 retrograde signal for both local and long distance RBOH-dependent acclimation signaling that is distinct from other HL signaling pathways, and that direct vascular connections have a role in spatial-temporal SAA induction. PMID:27288360

  16. Age-related changes of serum mitochondrial uncoupling 1, rumen and rectal temperature in goats.

    PubMed

    Arfuso, Francesca; Rizzo, Maria; Giannetto, Claudia; Giudice, Elisabetta; Fazio, Francesco; Piccione, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Thermoregulatory processes are induced not only by exposure to cold or heat but also by a variety of physiological situations including age, fasting and food intake that result in changes in body temperature. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the differences in serum mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), rumen temperature (TRUMEN) and rectal temperature (TRECTAL) values between adult and kids goats. Ten adult male Maltese goats aged 3-5 years old (Group A) and 30 male kids, raised for meat, were enrolled in this study. The kids were equally divided into 3 groups according to their age: Group B included kids aged 3 months, Group C included kids aged 4 months and Group D included kids aged 5 months. Blood samples and measurements of TRUMEN and TRECTAL were obtained from each animal. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to evaluate the effect of age on the studied parameters. Statistically significant higher serum UCP1 levels (P<0.001) were found in Group A as compared to Groups B, C and D. Higher TRUMEN values (P<0.001) were found in Group A than in Groups B, C and D, and in Group B than in Groups C and D. Group A showed lower TRECTAL values (P<0.001) than Groups B, C and D. The Pearson's Correlation test was applied to assess significant relationship among studied parameters showing a statistically significant negative correlation between the values of TRECTAL and serum UCP1 in all studied Groups (P<0.001). These results indicate that goats have good control of body temperature suggesting that further details about the thermogenic capacity and the function of UCP1 in kids and adult goats are worth exploring. PMID:27264887

  17. The Role of Uncoupling Protein 2 During Myocardial Dysfunction in a Canine Model of Endotoxin Shock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Dawei; Chai, Wenzhao; Long, Yun; Su, Longxiang; Yang, Rongli

    2015-03-01

    To explore the role of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) during myocardial dysfunction in a canine model of endotoxin shock, 26 mongrel canines were randomly divided into the following four groups: A (control group; n = 6), B2 (shock after 2 h; n = 7), B4 (shock after 4 h; n = 7), and B6 (shock after 6 h; n = 6). Escherichia coli endotoxin was injected into the canines via the central vein, and hemodynamics were monitored. Energy metabolism, UCP2 mRNA and protein expression, and UCP2 localization were analyzed, and the correlation between energy metabolism changes, and UCP2 expression was determined. After the canine endotoxin shock model was successfully established, the expression of UCP2 mRNA and protein was found to increase, with later time points showing significant increases (P < 0.05). Immunofluorescence assays of UCP2 in heart tissue showed that UCP2 was localized in the cytoplasm, and its expression pattern was the same as that found in the mRNA and protein analyses. The energy metabolism results revealed that the ADP levels increased, but the ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr) levels and ATP/ADP and PCr/ATP ratios decreased in the model. In particular, the PCr/ATP ratio was significantly different from that of the control group 6 h after shock (P < 0.05). Furthermore, correlation analysis showed that the UCP2 protein and mRNA levels were negatively correlated with myocardial energy levels. In summary, decreased energy synthesis can occur in the myocardium during endotoxin shock, and UCP2 may play an important role in this process. The negative correlation between UCP2 expression and energy metabolism requires further study, as the results might contribute to the treatment of sepsis with heart failure.

  18. Uncoupling between Phenotypic Senescence and Cell Cycle Arrest in Aging p21-Deficient Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Dulić, Vjekoslav; Beney, Georges-Edouard; Frebourg, Guillaume; Drullinger, Linda F.; Stein, Gretchen H.

    2000-01-01

    Irreversible G1 arrest in senescent human fibroblasts is mediated by two inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), p21Cip1/SDI1/WAF1 and p16Ink4A. To determine the physiological and molecular events that specifically require p21, we studied senescence in human diploid fibroblasts expressing the human papillomavirus type 16 E6 oncogene, which confers low p21 levels via enhanced p53 degradation. We show that in late-passage E6 cells, high Cdk activity drives the cell cycle, but population expansion is slowed down by crisis-like events, probably owing to defective cell cycle checkpoints. At the end of lifespan, terminal-passage E6 cells exhibited several aspects of the senescent phenotype and accumulated unphosphorylated pRb and p16. However, both replication and cyclin-Cdk2 kinase activity were still not blocked, demonstrating that phenotypic and replicative senescence are uncoupled in the absence of normal p21 levels. At this stage, E6 cells also failed to upregulate p27 and inactivate cyclin-Cdk complexes in response to serum deprivation. Eventually, irreversible G1 arrest occurred coincident with inactivation of cyclin E-Cdk2 owing to association with p21. Similarly, when p21−/− mouse embryo fibroblasts reached the end of their lifespan, they had the appearance of senescent cells yet, in contrast to their wild-type counterparts, they were deficient in downregulating bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, cyclin E- and cyclin A-Cdk2 activity, and inhibiting pRb hyperphosphorylation. These data support the model that the critical event ensuring G1 arrest in senescence is p21-dependent Cdk inactivation, while other aspects of senescent phenotype appear to occur independently of p21. PMID:10958672

  19. A biophysical study on molecular physiology of the uncoupling proteins of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Tuan; Kuljanin, Miljan; Smith, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial inner membrane uncoupling proteins (UCPs) facilitate transmembrane (TM) proton flux and consequently reduce the membrane potential and ATP production. It has been proposed that the three neuronal human UCPs (UCP2, UCP4 and UCP5) in the central nervous system (CNS) play significant roles in reducing cellular oxidative stress. However, the structure and ion transport mechanism of these proteins remain relatively unexplored. Recently, we reported a novel expression system for obtaining functionally folded UCP1 in bacterial membranes and applied this system to obtain highly pure neuronal UCPs in high yields. In the present study, we report on the structure and function of the three neuronal UCP homologues. Reconstituted neuronal UCPs were dominantly helical in lipid membranes and transported protons in the presence of physiologically-relevant fatty acid (FA) activators. Under similar conditions, all neuronal UCPs also exhibited chloride transport activities that were partially inhibited by FAs. CD, fluorescence and MS measurements and semi-native gel electrophoresis collectively suggest that the reconstituted proteins self-associate in the lipid membranes. Based on SDS titration experiments and other evidence, a general molecular model for the monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric functional forms of UCPs in lipid membranes is proposed. In addition to their shared structural and ion transport features, neuronal UCPs differ in their conformations and proton transport activities (and possibly mechanism) in the presence of different FA activators. The differences in FA-activated UCP-mediated proton transport could serve as an essential factor in understanding and differentiating the physiological roles of UCP homologues in the CNS. PMID:26182433

  20. Uncoupling of Bacterial and Terrigenous Dissolved Organic Matter Dynamics in Decomposition Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Herlemann, Daniel P. R.; Manecki, Marcus; Meeske, Christian; Pollehne, Falk; Labrenz, Matthias; Schulz-Bull, Detlef; Dittmar, Thorsten; Jürgens, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The biodegradability of terrigenous dissolved organic matter (tDOM) exported to the sea has a major impact on the global carbon cycle, but our understanding of tDOM bioavailability is fragmentary. In this study, the effects of preparative tDOM isolation on microbial decomposition were investigated in incubation experiments consisting of mesocosms containing mesohaline water from the Baltic Sea. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) consumption, molecular DOM composition, bacterial activities, and shifts in bacterial community structure were compared between mesocosms supplemented with riverine tDOM, either as filtered, particle-free river water or as a concentrate obtained by lyophilization/tangential ultrafiltration, and those containing only Baltic Sea water or river water. As shown using ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry (15 Tesla Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, FT-ICR-MS) covering approximately 4600 different DOM compounds, the three DOM preparation protocols resulted in distinct patterns of molecular DOM composition. However, despite DOC losses of 4–16% and considerable bacterial production, there was no significant change in DOM composition during the 28-day experiment. Moreover, tDOM addition affected neither DOC degradation nor bacterial dynamics significantly, regardless of the tDOM preparation. This result suggested that the introduced tDOM was largely not bioavailable, at least on the temporal scale of our experiment, and that the observed bacterial activity and DOC decomposition mainly reflected the degradation of unknown, labile, colloidal and low-molecular weight DOM, both of which escape the analytical window of FT-ICR-MS. In contrast to the different tDOM preparations, the initial bacterial inoculum and batch culture conditions determined bacterial community succession and superseded the effects of tDOM addition. The uncoupling of tDOM and bacterial dynamics suggests that mesohaline bacterial communities cannot

  1. Age-related changes of serum mitochondrial uncoupling 1, rumen and rectal temperature in goats.

    PubMed

    Arfuso, Francesca; Rizzo, Maria; Giannetto, Claudia; Giudice, Elisabetta; Fazio, Francesco; Piccione, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Thermoregulatory processes are induced not only by exposure to cold or heat but also by a variety of physiological situations including age, fasting and food intake that result in changes in body temperature. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the differences in serum mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), rumen temperature (TRUMEN) and rectal temperature (TRECTAL) values between adult and kids goats. Ten adult male Maltese goats aged 3-5 years old (Group A) and 30 male kids, raised for meat, were enrolled in this study. The kids were equally divided into 3 groups according to their age: Group B included kids aged 3 months, Group C included kids aged 4 months and Group D included kids aged 5 months. Blood samples and measurements of TRUMEN and TRECTAL were obtained from each animal. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to evaluate the effect of age on the studied parameters. Statistically significant higher serum UCP1 levels (P<0.001) were found in Group A as compared to Groups B, C and D. Higher TRUMEN values (P<0.001) were found in Group A than in Groups B, C and D, and in Group B than in Groups C and D. Group A showed lower TRECTAL values (P<0.001) than Groups B, C and D. The Pearson's Correlation test was applied to assess significant relationship among studied parameters showing a statistically significant negative correlation between the values of TRECTAL and serum UCP1 in all studied Groups (P<0.001). These results indicate that goats have good control of body temperature suggesting that further details about the thermogenic capacity and the function of UCP1 in kids and adult goats are worth exploring.

  2. Resolving the contribution of the uncoupled phycobilisomes to cyanobacterial pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry signals.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Alonso M; Snellenburg, Joris J; Gwizdala, Michal; Kirilovsky, Diana; van Grondelle, Rienk; van Stokkum, Ivo H M

    2016-01-01

    Pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry is extensively used to characterize photosynthetic organisms on the slow time-scale (1-1000 s). The saturation pulse method allows determination of the quantum yields of maximal (F(M)) and minimal fluorescence (F(0)), parameters related to the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus. Also, when the sample undergoes a certain light treatment during the measurement, the fluorescence quantum yields of the unquenched and the quenched states can be determined. In the case of cyanobacteria, however, the recorded fluorescence does not exclusively stem from the chlorophyll a in photosystem II (PSII). The phycobilins, the pigments of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting complexes, the phycobilisomes (PB), also contribute to the PAM signal, and therefore, F(0) and F(M) are no longer related to PSII only. We present a functional model that takes into account the presence of several fluorescent species whose concentrations can be resolved provided their fluorescence quantum yields are known. Data analysis of PAM measurements on in vivo cells of our model organism Synechocystis PCC6803 is discussed. Three different components are found necessary to fit the data: uncoupled PB (PB(free)), PB-PSII complexes, and free PSI. The free PSII contribution was negligible. The PB(free) contribution substantially increased in the mutants that lack the core terminal emitter subunits allophycocyanin D or allophycocyanin F. A positive correlation was found between the amount of PB(free) and the rate constants describing the binding of the activated orange carotenoid protein to PB, responsible for non-photochemical quenching. PMID:25893897

  3. Fruit calcium accumulation coupled and uncoupled from its transpiration in kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Giuseppe; Dichio, Bartolomeo; Lang, Alexander; Mininni, Alba N; Xiloyannis, Cristos

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of Ca in several fleshy fruit is often supposed to depend, among others, by climatic variables driving fruit transpiration. This study tests the whole causal chain hypothesis: VPD → fruit transpiration → Ca accumulation. Also there are evidences that relationship between fruit transpiration and Ca content is not always clear, hence the hypothesis that low VPD reduces the fraction of xylemic water destined to transpiration was tested by examining the water budget of fruit. Attached fruits of Actinidia deliciosa were subjected to Low (L) and High (H) VPD. Their transpiration was measured from early after fruit-set to day 157 after full bloom (DAFB). Fruits were picked at 70, 130 and 157 DAFB for Ca and K determinations and for water budget analysis. Cumulative transpired water was ∼ 70 g and ∼ 16 g H2O f(-1) in HVPD and LVPD, respectively. Calcium accumulated linearly (R(2) = 0.71) with cumulative transpiration when VPD was high, while correlation was weaker (R(2) = 0.24) under LVPD. Under low VPD the fraction of xylem stream destined to transpiration declined to 40-50%. Results suggest that Ca accumulation is coupled to cumulative transpiration under high VPD because under that condition cumulative transpiration equals xylem stream (which carry the nutrient). At LVPD, Ca gain by fruit is uncoupled from transpiration because ∼ 60% of the xylemic water is needed to sustain fruit growth. Results will apply to most fruits (apples, tomatoes, capsicum, grapes etc.) since most suffer Ca deficiency disorders and grow in changing environments with variable VPD, also they could be supportive for the implementation of fruit quality models accounting also for mineral compositions and for a reinterpretation of certain field practices aimed at naturally improve fruit Ca content. PMID:25982084

  4. Mapping the Nucleotide Binding Site of Uncoupling Protein 1 Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A tight regulation of proton transport in the inner mitochondrial membrane is crucial for physiological processes such as ATP synthesis, heat production, or regulation of the reactive oxygen species as proposed for the uncoupling protein family members (UCP). Specific regulation of proton transport is thus becoming increasingly important in the therapy of obesity and inflammatory, neurodegenerative, and ischemic diseases. We and other research groups have shown previously that UCP1- and UCP2-mediated proton transport is inhibited by purine nucleotides. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the inhibitory effect of ATP, although structural details are still lacking. Moreover, the unresolved mystery is how UCP operates in vivo despite the permanent presence of high (millimolar) concentrations of ATP in mitochondria. Here we use the topographic and recognition (TREC) mode of an atomic force microscope to visualize UCP1 reconstituted into lipid bilayers and to analyze the ATP–protein interaction at a single molecule level. The comparison of recognition patterns obtained with anti-UCP1 antibody and ATP led to the conclusion that the ATP binding site can be accessed from both sides of the membrane. Using cantilever tips with different cross-linker lengths, we determined the location of the nucleotide binding site inside the membrane with 1 Å precision. Together with the recently published NMR structure of a UCP family member (Berardi et al. Nature, 2011, 476, 109–113), our data provide a valuable insight into the mechanism of the nucleotide binding and pave the way for new pharmacological approaches against the diseases mentioned above. PMID:23414455

  5. Uncoupling protein 3 expression levels influence insulin sensitivity, fatty acid oxidation, and related signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Senese, Rosalba; Valli, Vivien; Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; Busiello, Rosa Anna; Cioffi, Federica; Silvestri, Elena; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia; de Lange, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    Controversy exists on whether uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) positively or negatively influences insulin sensitivity in vivo, and the underlying signaling pathways have been scarcely studied. We studied how a progressive reduction in UCP3 expression (using UCP3 +/+, UCP3 +/-, and UCP3 -/- mice) modulates insulin sensitivity and related metabolic parameters. In order to further validate our observations, we also studied animals in which insulin resistance was induced by administration of a high-fat diet (HFD). In UCP3 +/- and UCP3 -/- mice, gastrocnemius muscle Akt/protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) (serine 473) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (threonine 171) phosphorylation, and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) membrane levels were reduced compared to UCP3 +/+ mice. The HOMA-IR index (insulin resistance parameter) was increased both in the UCP3 +/- and UCP3 -/- mice. In these mice, insulin administration normalized Akt/PKB phosphorylation between genotypes while AMPK phosphorylation was further reduced, and sarcolemmal GLUT4 levels were induced but did not reach control levels. Furthermore, non-insulin-stimulated muscle fatty acid oxidation and the expression of several involved genes both in muscle and in liver were reduced. HFD administration induced insulin resistance in UCP3 +/+ mice and the aforementioned parameters resulted similar to those of chow-fed UCP3 +/- and UCP3 -/- mice. In conclusion, high-fat-diet-induced insulin resistance in wild-type mice mimics that of chow-fed UCP3 +/- and UCP3 -/- mice showing that progressive reduction of UCP3 levels results in insulin resistance. This is accompanied by decreased fatty acid oxidation and a less intense Akt/PKB and AMPK signaling.

  6. Uncoupling protein 1 binds one nucleotide per monomer and is stabilized by tightly bound cardiolipin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang; Willers, Chrissie; Kunji, Edmund R. S.; Crichton, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) catalyzes fatty acid-activated, purine nucleotide-sensitive proton leak across the mitochondrial inner membrane of brown adipose tissue to produce heat, and could help combat obesity and metabolic disease in humans. Studies over the last 30 years conclude that the protein is a dimer, binding one nucleotide molecule per two proteins, and unlike the related mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier, does not bind cardiolipin. Here, we have developed novel methods to purify milligram amounts of UCP1 from native sources by using covalent chromatography that, unlike past methods, allows the protein to be prepared in defined conditions, free of excess detergent and lipid. Assessment of purified preparations by TLC reveal that UCP1 retains tightly bound cardiolipin, with a lipid phosphorus content equating to three molecules per protein, like the ADP/ATP carrier. Cardiolipin stabilizes UCP1, as demonstrated by reconstitution experiments and thermostability assays, indicating that the lipid has an integral role in the functioning of the protein, similar to other mitochondrial carriers. Furthermore, we find that UCP1 is not dimeric but monomeric, as indicated by size exclusion analysis, and has a ligand titration profile in isothermal calorimetric measurements that clearly shows that one nucleotide binds per monomer. These findings reveal the fundamental composition of UCP1, which is essential for understanding the mechanism of the protein. Our assessment of the properties of UCP1 indicate that it is not unique among mitochondrial carriers and so is likely to use a common exchange mechanism in its primary function in brown adipose tissue mitochondria. PMID:26038550

  7. Association of oxidative stress with the formation of reproductive toxicity from mercury exposure on hermaphrodite nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuli; He, Kewen; Liu, Peidang; Li, Yinxia; Wang, Dayong

    2011-09-01

    Here we selected HgCl(2) to investigate the mechanism of Hg toxicity on reproduction in hermaphrodite nematodes. Accompanied with decrease of brood size, Hg exposure caused severe deficits in egg number in uterus, egg laying and reproductive structures, including gonad arms and vulva, and formation of protruding phenotype for vulva. Meanwhile, Hg exposure induced severe stress response and oxidative damage in gonad and vulva. Pre-treatment with vitamin E, a potent antioxidant, at the L2-larval stage prevented the oxidative damage and formation of reproductive deficits in Hg exposed nematodes; however, pre-treatment with paraquat, a regent generating superoxide anions, induced more severe reproductive deficits in Hg exposed nematodes. Moreover, Hg exposure increased expression of clk-2 and isp-1 genes, whose mutations decrease ROS production, and decreased expression of mev-1 and gas-1 genes, whose mutations increase ROS production. Thus, oxidative stress may be essential for the induction of reproductive deficits in Hg exposed hermaphrodite nematodes.

  8. Reproductive ageing in women.

    PubMed

    Djahanbakhch, O; Ezzati, M; Zosmer, A

    2007-01-01

    The traditional view in respect to female reproduction is that the number of oocytes at birth is fixed and continuously declines towards the point when no more oocytes are available after menopause. In this review we briefly discuss the embryonic development of female germ cells and ovarian follicles. The ontogeny of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is then discussed, with a focus on pubertal transition and normal ovulatory menstrual cycles during female adult life. Biochemical markers of menopausal transition are briefly examined. We also examine the effects of age on female fertility, the contribution of chromosomal abnormalities of the oocyte to the observed decline in female fertility with age and the possible biological basis for the occurrence of such abnormalities. Finally, we consider the effects of maternal age on obstetric complications and perinatal outcome. New data that have the potential to revolutionize our understanding of mammalian oogenesis and follicular formation, and of the female reproductive ageing process, are also briefly considered.

  9. Ghrelin and reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Repaci, Andrea; Gambineri, Alessandra; Pagotto, Uberto; Pasquali, Renato

    2011-06-20

    Ghrelin is an important factor involved in most of the metabolic and hormonal signals which adapt the reproductive functions in conditions of altered energy balance. Moreover, the coordinated role of leptin and ghrelin appears in fact to have a specific role in the regulation of puberty. Systemic action of ghrelin on the reproductive axis involves the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gondal axis. In addition, it has been shown that ghrelin may directly act at a gonadal level in both females and males. Available data also demonstrate that sex steroid hormones and gonadotropins may in turn regulate the gonadal effect of ghrelin, as documented by studies performed in females with the polycystic ovary syndrome and in hypogonadal men. Notably, recent studies also confirm a potentially important role for ghrelin in fetal and neonatal energy balance, and specifically in allowing fetal adaptation to an adverse intrauterine environment.

  10. Whither Artificial Reproduction?

    PubMed Central

    Percival-Smith, Robin

    1985-01-01

    Artificial reproduction now offers sub fertile couples a number of options which raise scientific and ethical questions. This article discusses the Canadian and British experiences in formulating regulations and legislation in this important field. Current work on mammalian embryo research foretells the direction which human research will take. This article stresses the need for family physicians' participation in the ethical decisions that accompany these new developments. PMID:21274181

  11. Interventions in reproduction.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, D S; Sheriff, S Omer

    2006-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technology has helped many childless couples. It has also raised questions about how appropriate the technology might be in different situations. How we understand parenthood is crucial in taking a stand on such scientific intervention. It is suggested that physicians should decide on offering artificial insemination, surrogacy and in-vitro fertilisation only after considering if the child will have good parents and if there will be legal complications from the use of the technology. PMID:17223683

  12. Mitochondria and mammalian reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ramalho-Santos, João; Amaral, Sandra

    2013-10-15

    Mitochondria are cellular organelles with crucial roles in ATP synthesis, metabolic integration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesis and management, the regulation of apoptosis (namely via the intrinsic pathway), among many others. Additionally, mitochondria in different organs or cell types may have distinct properties that can decisively influence functional analysis. In terms of the importance of mitochondria in mammalian reproduction, and although there are species-specific differences, these aspects involve both energetic considerations for gametogenesis and fertilization, control of apoptosis to ensure the proper production of viable gametes, and ROS signaling, as well as other emerging aspects. Crucially, mitochondria are the starting point for steroid hormone biosynthesis, given that the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone (a common precursor for all steroid hormones) takes place via the activity of the cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) on the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, mitochondrial activity in reproduction has to be considered in accordance with the very distinct strategies for gamete production in the male and female. These include distinct gonad morpho-physiologies, different types of steroids that are more prevalent (testosterone, estrogens, progesterone), and, importantly, the very particular timings of gametogenesis. While spermatogenesis is complete and continuous since puberty, producing a seemingly inexhaustible pool of gametes in a fixed environment; oogenesis involves the episodic production of very few gametes in an environment that changes cyclically. These aspects have always to be taken into account when considering the roles of any common element in mammalian reproduction.

  13. Clonal reproduction in fungi.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John W; Hann-Soden, Christopher; Branco, Sara; Sylvain, Iman; Ellison, Christopher E

    2015-07-21

    Research over the past two decades shows that both recombination and clonality are likely to contribute to the reproduction of all fungi. This view of fungi is different from the historical and still commonly held view that a large fraction of fungi are exclusively clonal and that some fungi have been exclusively clonal for hundreds of millions of years. Here, we first will consider how these two historical views have changed. Then we will examine the impact on fungal research of the concept of restrained recombination [Tibayrenc M, Ayala FJ (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 (48):E3305-E3313]. Using animal and human pathogenic fungi, we examine extrinsic restraints on recombination associated with bottlenecks in genetic variation caused by geographic dispersal and extrinsic restraints caused by shifts in reproductive mode associated with either disease transmission or hybridization. Using species of the model yeast Saccharomyces and the model filamentous fungus Neurospora, we examine intrinsic restraints on recombination associated with mating systems that range from strictly clonal at one extreme to fully outbreeding at the other and those that lie between, including selfing and inbreeding. We also consider the effect of nomenclature on perception of reproductive mode and a means of comparing the relative impact of clonality and recombination on fungal populations. Last, we consider a recent hypothesis suggesting that fungi thought to have the most severe intrinsic constraints on recombination actually may have the fewest.

  14. Clonal reproduction in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John W.; Hann-Soden, Christopher; Branco, Sara; Sylvain, Iman; Ellison, Christopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Research over the past two decades shows that both recombination and clonality are likely to contribute to the reproduction of all fungi. This view of fungi is different from the historical and still commonly held view that a large fraction of fungi are exclusively clonal and that some fungi have been exclusively clonal for hundreds of millions of years. Here, we first will consider how these two historical views have changed. Then we will examine the impact on fungal research of the concept of restrained recombination [Tibayrenc M, Ayala FJ (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 (48):E3305–E3313]. Using animal and human pathogenic fungi, we examine extrinsic restraints on recombination associated with bottlenecks in genetic variation caused by geographic dispersal and extrinsic restraints caused by shifts in reproductive mode associated with either disease transmission or hybridization. Using species of the model yeast Saccharomyces and the model filamentous fungus Neurospora, we examine intrinsic restraints on recombination associated with mating systems that range from strictly clonal at one extreme to fully outbreeding at the other and those that lie between, including selfing and inbreeding. We also consider the effect of nomenclature on perception of reproductive mode and a means of comparing the relative impact of clonality and recombination on fungal populations. Last, we consider a recent hypothesis suggesting that fungi thought to have the most severe intrinsic constraints on recombination actually may have the fewest. PMID:26195774

  15. Long Term Ablation of Protein Kinase A (PKA)-mediated Cardiac Troponin I Phosphorylation Leads to Excitation-Contraction Uncoupling and Diastolic Dysfunction in a Knock-in Mouse Model of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy*

    PubMed Central

    Dweck, David; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos A.; Chang, Audrey N.; Dulce, Raul A.; Badger, Crystal-Dawn; Koutnik, Andrew P.; Ruiz, Edda L.; Griffin, Brittany; Liang, Jingsheng; Kabbaj, Mohamed; Fincham, Frank D.; Hare, Joshua M.; Overton, J. Michael; Pinto, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac troponin I (cTnI) R21C (cTnI-R21C) mutation has been linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and renders cTnI incapable of phosphorylation by PKA in vivo. Echocardiographic imaging of homozygous knock-in mice expressing the cTnI-R21C mutation shows that they develop hypertrophy after 12 months of age and have abnormal diastolic function that is characterized by longer filling times and impaired relaxation. Electrocardiographic analyses show that older R21C mice have elevated heart rates and reduced cardiovagal tone. Cardiac myocytes isolated from older R21C mice demonstrate that in the presence of isoproterenol, significant delays in Ca2+ decay and sarcomere relaxation occur that are not present at 6 months of age. Although isoproterenol and stepwise increases in stimulation frequency accelerate Ca2+-transient and sarcomere shortening kinetics in R21C myocytes from older mice, they are unable to attain the corresponding WT values. When R21C myocytes from older mice are treated with isoproterenol, evidence of excitation-contraction uncoupling is indicated by an elevation in diastolic calcium that is frequency-dissociated and not coupled to shorter diastolic sarcomere lengths. Myocytes from older mice have smaller Ca2+ transient amplitudes (2.3-fold) that are associated with reductions (2.9-fold) in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content. This abnormal Ca2+ handling within the cell may be attributed to a reduction (2.4-fold) in calsequestrin expression in conjunction with an up-regulation (1.5-fold) of Na+-Ca2+ exchanger. Incubation of permeabilized cardiac fibers from R21C mice with PKA confirmed that the mutation prevents facilitation of mechanical relaxation. Altogether, these results indicate that the inability to enhance myofilament relaxation through cTnI phosphorylation predisposes the heart to abnormal diastolic function, reduced accessibility of cardiac reserves, dysautonomia, and hypertrophy. PMID:24973218

  16. Mouse models of altered gonadotrophin action: insight into male reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kim C; Oduwole, Olayiwola O; Peltoketo, Hellevi; Rulli, Susana B; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2014-10-01

    The advent of technologies to genetically manipulate the mouse genome has revolutionised research approaches, providing a unique platform to study the causality of reproductive disorders in vivo. With the relative ease of generating genetically modified (GM) mouse models, the last two decades have yielded multiple loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutation mouse models to explore the role of gonadotrophins and their receptors in reproductive pathologies. This work has provided key insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying reproductive disorders with altered gonadotrophin action, revealing the fundamental roles of these pituitary hormones and their receptors in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. This review will describe GM mouse models of gonadotrophins and their receptors with enhanced or diminished actions, specifically focusing on the male. We will discuss the mechanistic insights gained from these models into male reproductive disorders, and the relationship and understanding provided into male human reproductive disorders originating from altered gonadotrophin action.

  17. Sensitivity of some marine bacteria, a moderate halophile, and Escherichia coli to uncouplers at alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, R A; Wisse, G A; Stejskal, F L

    1988-09-01

    The inhibitory effects of uncouplers on amino acid transport into three marine bacteria, Vibrio alginolyticus 118, Vibrio parahaemolyticus 113, and Alteromonas haloplanktis 214, into a moderate halophile, Vibrio costicola NRC 37001, and into Escherichia coli K-12 were found to vary depending upon the uncoupler tested, its concentration, and the pH. Higher concentrations of all of the uncouplers were required to inhibit transport at pH 8.5 than at pH 7.0. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone showed the greatest reduction in inhibitory capacity as the pH was increased, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone showed less reduction, and 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide was almost as effective as an inhibitor of amino acid transport at pH 8.5 as at pH 7.0 for all of the organisms except A. haloplanktis 214. Differences between the protonophores in their relative activities at pHs 7.0 and 8.5 were attributed to differences in their pK values. 3,3',4',5-Tetrachlorosalicylanilide, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, and NaCN all inhibited Na+ extrusion from Na+-loaded cells of V. alginolyticus 118 at pH 8.5. The results support the conclusion that Na+ extrusion from this organism at pH 8.5 occurs as a result of Na+/H+ antiport activity. Data are presented indicating the presence in V. alginolyticus 118 of an NADH oxidase which is stimulated by Na+ at pH 8.5.

  18. Hyperinsulinemia leads to uncoupled insulin regulation of the GLUT4 glucose transporter and the FoxO1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Eva; Flier, Emily; Molle, Dorothee; Accili, Domenico; McGraw, Timothy E

    2011-06-21

    Insulin resistance is a component of the metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes. It has been recently shown that in liver insulin resistance is not complete. This so-called selective insulin resistance is characterized by defective insulin inhibition of hepatic glucose output while insulin-induced lipogenesis is maintained. How this occurs and whether uncoupled insulin action develops in other tissues is unknown. Here we show in a model of chronic hyperinsulinemia that adipocytes develop selective insulin resistance in which translocation of the GLUT4 glucose transporter to the cell surface is blunted yet nuclear exclusion of the FoxO1 transcription factor is preserved, rendering uncoupled insulin-controlled carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms. We found that in adipocytes FoxO1 nuclear exclusion has a lower half-maximal insulin dose than GLUT4 translocation, and it is because of this inherent greater sensitivity that control of FoxO1 by physiological insulin concentrations is maintained in adipocytes with compromised insulin signaling. Pharmacological and genetic interventions revealed that insulin regulates GLUT4 and FoxO1 through the PI3-kinase isoform p110α, although FoxO1 showed higher sensitivity to p110α activity than GLUT4. Transient down-regulation and overexpression of Akt isoforms in adipocytes demonstrated that insulin-activated PI3-kinase signals to GLUT4 primarily through Akt2 kinase, whereas Akt1 and Akt2 signal to FoxO1. We propose that the lower threshold of insulin activity for FoxO1's nuclear exclusion is in part due to its regulation by both Akt isoforms. Identification of uncoupled insulin action in adipocytes suggests this condition might be a general phenomenon of insulin target tissues contributing to insulin resistance's pathophysiology.

  19. Reproductive governance in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lynn M; Roberts, Elizabeth F S

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops the concept of reproductive governance as an analytic tool for tracing the shifting political rationalities of population and reproduction. As advanced here, the concept of reproductive governance refers to the mechanisms through which different historical configurations of actors - such as state, religious, and international financial institutions, NGOs, and social movements - use legislative controls, economic inducements, moral injunctions, direct coercion, and ethical incitements to produce, monitor, and control reproductive behaviours and population practices. Examples are drawn from Latin America, where reproductive governance is undergoing a dramatic transformation as public policy conversations are coalescing around new moral regimes and rights-based actors through debates about abortion, emergency contraception, sterilisation, migration, and assisted reproductive technologies. Reproductive discourses are increasingly framed through morality and contestations over 'rights', where rights-bearing citizens are pitted against each other in claiming reproductive, sexual, indigenous, and natural rights, as well as the 'right to life' of the unborn. The concept of reproductive governance can be applied to other settings in order to understand shifting political rationalities within the domain of reproduction. PMID:22889430

  20. Upregulation of uncoupling protein-3 in skeletal muscle during exercise: a potential antioxidant function.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ning; Zhang, Guizhong; Bo, Hai; Qu, Jinting; Ma, Guodong; Cao, Dongning; Wen, Li; Liu, Shusen; Ji, Li Li; Zhang, Yong

    2009-01-15

    Uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3) expression has been shown to increase dramatically in response to muscular contraction, but the physiological significance of UCP3 upregulation is still elusive. In this study, UCP3 mRNA and protein expression were investigated along with mitochondrial respiratory function, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and antioxidant defense in rat skeletal muscle during and after an acute bout of prolonged exercise. UCP3 mRNA expression was elevated sharply at 45 min of exercise, reaching 7- to 8-fold above resting level at 150 min. The increase in UCP3 protein content showed a latent response but was elevated approximately 1.9-fold at 120 min of exercise. Both UCP3 mRNA and UCP3 protein gradually returned to resting levels 24 h postexercise. Mitochondrial ROS production was progressively increased during exercise. However, ROS showed a dramatic drop at 150 min although their levels remained severalfold higher during the recovery. Mitochondrial State 4 respiration rate was increased by 46 and 58% (p < 0.05) at 90 and 120 min, respectively, but returned to resting rate at 150 min, when State 3 respiration and respiratory control index (RCI) were suppressed. ADP-to-oxygen consumption (P/O) ratio and ATP synthase activity were lowered at 3 h postexercise, whereas proton motive force and mitochondrial malondialdehyde content were unchanged. Manganese superoxide dismutase gene expression was not affected by exercise except for an increase in mRNA abundance at 3 h postexercise. These data demonstrate that UCP3 expression in rat skeletal muscle can be rapidly upregulated during prolonged exercise, possibly owing to increased ROS generation. Increased UCP3 may partially alleviate the proton gradient across the inner membrane, thereby reducing further ROS production by the electron transport chain. However, prolonged exercise caused a decrease in energy coupling efficiency in muscle mitochondria revealed by an increased respiration rate due to

  1. Unkempt is negatively regulated by mTOR and uncouples neuronal differentiation from growth control.

    PubMed

    Avet-Rochex, Amélie; Carvajal, Nancy; Christoforou, Christina P; Yeung, Kelvin; Maierbrugger, Katja T; Hobbs, Carl; Lalli, Giovanna; Cagin, Umut; Plachot, Cedric; McNeill, Helen; Bateman, Joseph M

    2014-09-01

    Neuronal differentiation is exquisitely controlled both spatially and temporally during nervous system development. Defects in the spatiotemporal control of neurogenesis cause incorrect formation of neural networks and lead to neurological disorders such as epilepsy and autism. The mTOR kinase integrates signals from mitogens, nutrients and energy levels to regulate growth, autophagy and metabolism. We previously identified the insulin receptor (InR)/mTOR pathway as a critical regulator of the timing of neuronal differentiation in the Drosophila melanogaster eye. Subsequently, this pathway has been shown to play a conserved role in regulating neurogenesis in vertebrates. However, the factors that mediate the neurogenic role of this pathway are completely unknown. To identify downstream effectors of the InR/mTOR pathway we screened transcriptional targets of mTOR for neuronal differentiation phenotypes in photoreceptor neurons. We identified the conserved gene unkempt (unk), which encodes a zinc finger/RING domain containing protein, as a negative regulator of the timing of photoreceptor differentiation. Loss of unk phenocopies InR/mTOR pathway activation and unk acts downstream of this pathway to regulate neurogenesis. In contrast to InR/mTOR signalling, unk does not regulate growth. unk therefore uncouples the role of the InR/mTOR pathway in neurogenesis from its role in growth control. We also identified the gene headcase (hdc) as a second downstream regulator of the InR/mTOR pathway controlling the timing of neurogenesis. Unk forms a complex with Hdc, and Hdc expression is regulated by unk and InR/mTOR signalling. Co-overexpression of unk and hdc completely suppresses the precocious neuronal differentiation phenotype caused by loss of Tsc1. Thus, Unk and Hdc are the first neurogenic components of the InR/mTOR pathway to be identified. Finally, we show that Unkempt-like is expressed in the developing mouse retina and in neural stem/progenitor cells, suggesting

  2. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  3. Expression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein in brown adipocytes. Absence in brown preadipocytes and BFC-1 cells. Modulation by isoproterenol in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Forest, C; Doglio, A; Casteilla, L; Ricquier, D; Ailhaud, G

    1987-01-01

    The expression of the uncoupling protein has been compared in cells of BFC-1 clonal line established from mouse brown adipose tissue (BAT) and in preadipocytes, as well as in adipocytes from mouse BAT, both in primary culture. The results of immunoblots show that, after one week in culture, adipocytes have a reduced level of the 32 kD protein. This level can be raised 2-3.5-fold by a 24-h exposure to isoproterenol. Thus a direct modulation by a beta-agonist drug in the expression of the uncoupling protein is observed. Under the same conditions as well as under various other conditions, preadipocytes in primary culture and BFC-1 cells do not express the uncoupling protein. At the same time these cells are able both to differentiate into adipose cells, as demonstrated by the emergence of enzyme markers and triglyceride accumulation, and to respond to isoproterenol. Thus isoproterenol is not sufficient to trigger the expression of the uncoupling protein and behaves as a mere modulator once the cells have acquired the capacity to express it. Injection of undifferentiated BFC-1 cells into athymic mice bearing catecholamine-containing mini-osmotic pumps, or co-cultures of BFC-1 cells and pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells do not allow BFC-1 cells to express the uncoupling protein. Taken together, the results suggest that the formation of brown preadipocytes is critically linked during development to the release by sympathetic nerves of specific trophic factors acting locally.

  4. VARIATIONS IN REPRODUCTIVE TOXICANT IDENTIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, F

    2008-05-13

    Reproductive toxicants are a very important class of compounds. They present unique hazards to those of child bearing ages, perform their 'dirty work' using a wide variety of mechanisms on a number of different organs, and are regulatorily important. Because of all of this, properly identifying reproductive toxicants is important, but fraught with difficulty. In this paper we will describe types or reproductive toxicants, their importance, and both mistakes and good practices that people who are not experts in reproductive toxicology may use in their attempts to identify them. Additionally, this paper will focus on chemical reproductive toxicants and will not address biological agents that could affect reproductive toxicity although many principles outlined here could be applied to that endeavor.

  5. Deleterious mutation and the evolution of eusociality.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Joshua L

    2002-12-01

    Certain arguments concerning the evolution of eusociality form a classic example of the application of the principles of kin selection. These arguments center on the different degrees of relatedness of potential beneficiaries of an individual's efforts, for example a female's higher relatedness to her sisters than to her daughters in a haplodiploid system. This type of reasoning is insufficicnt to account for the evolution and maintainence of sexual reproduction, because parthenogenic females produce offspring that are more closely related to them than are offspring produced sexually. Among the forces invoked to explain sexual reproduction is deleterious mutation. This factor can be shown to favor eusociality as well, because siblings produced by helping carry fewer deleterious alleles on average than would offspring. The strength of this effect depends on the genomewide deleterious mutation rate, U, and on the selection coefficient, s, associated with deleterious alleles. For small s, the effect depends approximately on the product Us. This phenomenon illustrates that an assumption implicit in some analyses-that the relatedness of an individual to an actor is all that matters to its value to that actor-can fail for the evolution of eusociality as it does for the evolution of sex. PMID:12583576

  6. Reproductive function in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cramer, J A; Jones, E E

    1991-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is a complex system within which both positive and negative feedback occur among its elements and higher brain systems. The occurrence of seizures and changes in the secretion of pituitary hormones can affect the feedback loop. Both seizures and antiepileptic drugs can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of males and females and cause changes in hormones and sexuality. Reproductive dysfunction has a social impact because of reduced fertility. Once conception occurs, live birth rates are not diminished. Prospective studies of men and women with epilepsy are needed.

  7. Mutation rates as adaptations.

    PubMed

    Maley, C

    1997-06-01

    In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes. PMID:9219670

  8. Mutation and premating isolation.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  9. Multiplex detection of mutations.

    PubMed

    Perlin, David S; Balashov, Sergey; Park, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Rapid and reliable detection of mutations at the genetic level is an integral part of modern molecular diagnostics. These mutations can range from dominant single nucleotide polymorphisms within specific loci to codominant heterozygotic insertions and they present considerable challenges to investigators in developing rapid nucleic acid-based amplification assays that can distinguish wild-type from mutant alleles. The recent improvements of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using self-reporting fluorescence probes have given researchers a powerful tool in developing assays for mutation detection that can be multiplexed for high-throughput screening of multiple mutations and cost effectiveness. Here we describe an application of a multiplexed real-time PCR assay using Molecular Beacon probes for the detection of mutations in codon 54 of the CYP51A gene in Aspergillus fumigatus conferring triazole resistance.

  10. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  11. Reproductive outcomes for survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Melissa M

    2010-11-01

    Because of remarkable progress in therapy, long-term survival is expected for 80% of children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer. Infertility remains one of the most common and life-altering complications experienced by adults treated for cancer during childhood. Surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy that negatively affects any component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may compromise reproductive outcomes in childhood cancer survivors. The risk of infertility is generally related to the tissues or organs involved in cancer and the specific type, dose, and combination of cytotoxic therapy. In addition to anticancer therapy, age at treatment, sex, and likely genetic factors influence the risk of permanent infertility. When possible, contemporary protocols limit cumulative doses of cytotoxic therapy in an effort to optimize reproductive potential. If sterilizing therapy is required for cancer control, then fertility preservation measures should be explored before initiation of therapy. For childhood cancer survivors who maintain fertility, health risks to offspring resulting from their cancer treatment are major concerns. Radiation affecting ovarian and uterine function has been linked to pregnancy complications, including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, fetal malposition, and low birth weight. The risk of congenital malformations, genetic disorders, and cancer appears to be low, with the exception of cancer risk in offspring born to survivors with germline cancer-predisposing mutations. This review summarizes research about cancer treatment factors affecting fertility and pregnancy outcomes of childhood cancer survivors. The data presented should facilitate the delivery of preventive counseling and age- and sex-appropriate interventions to optimize reproductive outcomes in childhood cancer survivors.

  12. Epistasis, pleiotropy, and the mutation load in sexual and asexual populations.

    PubMed

    Roze, Denis; Blanckaert, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Mutation may impose a substantial load on populations, which varies according to the reproductive mode of organisms. Over the past years, various authors used adaptive landscape models to predict the long-term effect of mutation on mean fitness; however, many of these studies assumed very weak mutation rates, so that at most one mutation segregates in the population. In this article, we derive several simple approximations (confirmed by simulations) for the mutation load at high mutation rate (U), using a general model that allows us to play with the number of selected traits (n), the degree of pleiotropy of mutations, and the shape of the fitness function (which affects the average sign and magnitude of epistasis among mutations). When mutations have strong fitness effects, the equilibrium fitness W¯ of sexuals and asexuals is close to e(-U); under weaker mutational effects, sexuals reach a different regime where W¯ is a simple function of U and of a parameter describing the shape of the fitness function. Contrarily to weak mutation results showing that W¯ is an increasing function of population size and a decreasing function of n, these parameters may have opposite effects in sexual populations at high mutation rate.

  13. Human reproductive issues in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santy, Patricia A.; Jennings, Richard T.

    1992-01-01

    A review of reproductive functioning in animal species studied during space flight demonstrated that most species were affected significantly by the absence of gravity and/or the presence of radiation. These two factors induced alterations in normal reproductive functioning independently of, as well as in combination with, each other. Based on animal models, several potential problem areas regarding human reproductive physiology and functioning in the space environment were identified. While there are no current space flight investigations, the animal studies suggest priorities for future research in human reproduction. Such studies will be critical for the successful colonization of the space frontier.

  14. Cytochrome P450 CYP78A9 is involved in Arabidopsis reproductive development.

    PubMed

    Sotelo-Silveira, Mariana; Cucinotta, Mara; Chauvin, Anne-Laure; Chávez Montes, Ricardo A; Colombo, Lucia; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; de Folter, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Synchronized communication between gametophytic and sporophytic tissue is crucial for successful reproduction, and hormones seem to have a prominent role in it. Here, we studied the role of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cytochrome P450 CYP78A9 enzyme during reproductive development. First, controlled pollination experiments indicate that CYP78A9 responds to fertilization. Second, while CYP78A9 overexpression can uncouple fruit development from fertilization, the cyp78a8 cyp78a9 loss-of-function mutant has reduced seed set due to outer ovule integument development arrest, leading to female sterility. Moreover, CYP78A9 has a specific expression pattern in inner integuments in early steps of ovule development as well as in the funiculus, embryo, and integuments of developing seeds. CYP78A9 overexpression did not change the response to the known hormones involved in flower development and fruit set, and it did not seem to have much effect on the major known hormonal pathways. Furthermore, according to previous predictions, perturbations in the flavonol biosynthesis pathway were detected in cyp78a9, cyp78a8 cyp78a9, and empty siliques (es1-D) mutants. However, it appeared that they do not cause the observed phenotypes. In summary, these results add new insights into the role of CYP78A9 in plant reproduction and present, to our knowledge, the first characterization of metabolite differences between mutants in this gene family. PMID:23610218

  15. Polarisabilities of long conjugated chain molecules with density functional response methods: The role of coupled and uncoupled response

    SciTech Connect

    Heßelmann, Andreas

    2015-04-28

    The longitudinal component of the dipole-dipole polarisability of polyacetylene molecules containing 4 to 20 carbon atoms has been calculated with density-functional theory (DFT) response methods. In order to analyse the effect of the uncoupled and coupled contributions to the response matrix, a number of different sets of orbitals were combined with different approximations for the Hessian matrix. This revealed a surprising result: a qualitatively correct increase of the polarisability with the chain length can already be reproduced on the uncoupled level if the response matrix is constructed from Hartree-Fock (HF) or exact-exchange (EXX) DFT orbitals. The nonlocal HF and the local EXX exchange potentials both produce a displacement of charge from the chain ends to the centre of the polyacetylene molecule compared to DFT methods using standard exchange-correlation potentials. In this way, the reduced increase of the transition dipole moments along the molecular axis counteracts the decrease of the occupied-virtual orbital energy gaps and leads to a linear dependence of the polarisabilities (normalised by the number of carbon atoms) on the chain length. A new DFT response approach is tested which utilises unitary transformed Hartree-Fock orbitals as input and which resolves the failure of standard DFT response methods.

  16. The cytotoxic effects of brown Cuban propolis depend on the nemorosone content and may be mediated by mitochondrial uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Pardo Andreu, Gilberto L; Reis, Felippe H Z; Dalalio, Felipe M; Nuñez Figueredo, Yanier; Cuesta Rubio, Osmany; Uyemura, Sergio A; Curti, Carlos; Alberici, Luciane C

    2015-02-25

    Three main types of Cuban propolis directly related to their secondary metabolite composition have been identified: brown, red and yellow propolis; the former is majoritarian and is characterized by the presence of nemorosone. In this study, brown Cuban propolis extracts were found cytotoxic against HepG2 cells and primary rat hepatocytes, in close association with the nemorosone contents. In mitochondria isolated from rat liver the extracts displayed uncoupling activity, which was demonstrated by the increase in succinate-supported state 4 respiration rates, dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria, and a marked ATP depletion. As in cells, the degree of such mitotoxic events was closely correlated to the nemorosone content. The propolis extracts that do not contain nemorosone were neither cytotoxic nor mitotoxic, except R-29, whose detrimental effect upon cells and mitochondria could be mediated by its isoflavonoids and chalcones components, well known mitochondrial uncouplers. Our results at least partly unravel the cytotoxic mechanism of Cuban propolis, particularly regarding brown propolis, and raise concerns about the toxicological implication of Cuban propolis consumption.

  17. Beta 3-adrenergic receptor stimulation restores message and expression of brown-fat mitochondrial uncoupling protein in adult dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Champigny, O; Ricquier, D; Blondel, O; Mayers, R M; Briscoe, M G; Holloway, B R

    1991-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is present throughout life in rodents and plays an important role in energy balance. However, whereas BAT is clearly recognizable in the neonates of larger mammals (including dogs, cats, sheep, cattle, and humans), it is undetectable or present in only small quantities in adults of these species and is replaced by a tissue with the gross characteristics of white adipose tissue. Here we provide evidence that treatment of adult dogs with a beta 3-adrenergic receptor agonist (ICI D7114) that has thermogenic and antiobesity properties leads to the appearance of BAT at several anatomical sites. The presence of BAT was primarily demonstrated by monitoring the inner mitochondrial membrane uncoupling protein and its mRNA, which are unique to the tissue. Neither message nor protein was detected in adipose tissue samples from control dogs but both were detected in samples from dogs treated with ICI D7114. The data suggest that stimulation of beta 3-adrenergic receptors can reactivate nascent BAT (which has the appearance of white adipose tissue) by increasing expression of the gene coding for uncoupling protein or lead to the recruitment of fully differentiated BAT from preadipocyte precursor cells. Images PMID:1720550

  18. Beta 3-adrenergic receptor stimulation restores message and expression of brown-fat mitochondrial uncoupling protein in adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Champigny, O; Ricquier, D; Blondel, O; Mayers, R M; Briscoe, M G; Holloway, B R

    1991-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is present throughout life in rodents and plays an important role in energy balance. However, whereas BAT is clearly recognizable in the neonates of larger mammals (including dogs, cats, sheep, cattle, and humans), it is undetectable or present in only small quantities in adults of these species and is replaced by a tissue with the gross characteristics of white adipose tissue. Here we provide evidence that treatment of adult dogs with a beta 3-adrenergic receptor agonist (ICI D7114) that has thermogenic and antiobesity properties leads to the appearance of BAT at several anatomical sites. The presence of BAT was primarily demonstrated by monitoring the inner mitochondrial membrane uncoupling protein and its mRNA, which are unique to the tissue. Neither message nor protein was detected in adipose tissue samples from control dogs but both were detected in samples from dogs treated with ICI D7114. The data suggest that stimulation of beta 3-adrenergic receptors can reactivate nascent BAT (which has the appearance of white adipose tissue) by increasing expression of the gene coding for uncoupling protein or lead to the recruitment of fully differentiated BAT from preadipocyte precursor cells. PMID:1720550

  19. Why kisspeptin is such important for reproduction?

    PubMed

    Meczekalski, Blazej; Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Recently discovered neuropeptide called kisspeptin is thought to be an essential gatekeeper in control of reproduction. Kisspeptin, the product of KiSS-1 gene and its G protein-coupled receptor GPR54 play a master role in the puberty period and fertility. This 54 amino acid peptide known also as metastatin, because of its metastasis suppression ability is also implicated in tumour biology. Kisspeptin/GPR54 system activates the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian axis. Its mechanism is not clearly understood. Kisspeptin influence is found above more at the level of hypothalamus but also at the pituitary and ovaries level. Kisspeptin can directly stimulate GnRH secretion from arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus. It is thought that kisspeptin plays an essential role in the metabolic regulation of fertility. In negative energy balance conditions an expression of KiSS-1 gene is decreased. Inactivating GPR54 mutations cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in humans. Simultaneously, mutations which increase GPR54 signalling are connected with gonadotropin-dependent premature puberty. Lately, possible therapeutic role of kisspeptin administration has been discussed. It was stated that kisspeptin might be used to manipulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in humans. However, further studies are essential to reveal the exact mechanism and role of GPR54 agonists and antagonists applications. Moreover, the role of kisspeptin in the aspect of detection and treatment of specific cancers should be discovered.

  20. Obesity and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Bray, G A

    1997-10-01

    Obesity produces a variety of alterations in the reproductive system and, similarly, manipulations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis produce changes in food intake, body weight and fat distribution. In men, the primary effects of obesity are a weight related reduction in testosterone and, with massive overweight, a reduction in free testosterone. In females, the weight-related development of menarche leads to earlier menarche in obese girls than in normal weight girls. One explanation for the relationship of fatness to menarche may be the ob protein (leptin) which is defective in the obese (ob/ob) mouse. Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue in proportion to the quantity of fat and may serve as a signal to the hypothalamus that fat stores are adequate to nourish a conceptus to term. In women, parity affects obesity and obesity in turn affects the regularity of the menstrual cycle. In many experimental animals with obesity, particularly the genetic forms of obesity, there is complete infertility in the females and marked impairment of reproductive function in the males. In animals with hypothalamic lesions, there is a gender effect on the magnitude of weight gain associated with the sexually dimorphic regions in the medial preoptic area. Castration with removal of oestrogen is followed by obesity in female animals and this can be prevented, as can most forms of obesity, by adrenalectomy. The inhibitory effects of oestrogen on food intake may result from suppression of neuropeptide-Y or galanin peptidergic systems in the arcuate nucleus or medial preoptic area.

  1. Stem cells and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongling; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the latest developments in reproductive tract stem cell biology. Recent findings In 2004, two studies indicated that ovaries contain stem cells which form oocytes in adults and that can be cultured in vitro into mature oocytes. A live birth after orthotopic transplantation of cyropreserved ovarian tissue in a woman whose ovaries were damaged by chemotherapy demonstrates the clinical potential of these cells. In the same year, another study provided novel evidence of endometrial regeneration by stem cells in women who received bone marrow transplants. This finding has potential for the use in treatment of uterine disorders. It also supports a new theory for the cause of endometriosis, which may have its origin in ectopic transdifferentiation of stem cells. Several recent studies have demonstrated that fetal cells enter the maternal circulation and generate microchimerism in the mother. The uterus is a dynamic organ permeable to fetal stem cells, capable of transdifferentiation and an end organ in which bone marrow stem cells may differentiate. Finally stem cell transformation can be an underlying cause of ovarian cancer. Summary Whereas we are just beginning to understand stem cells, the potential implications of stem cells to reproductive biology and medicine are apparent. PMID:20305558

  2. Inequalities cause reproductive deaths.

    PubMed

    Dillner, L

    1995-07-15

    A US organization, Population Action International, is reported in this article to have released findings on the health risks for women in 118 countries. Countries are ranked on 10 indicators, including such indicators as the number of births to women aged under 19 years, the availability of legal abortion, maternal mortality, and level of prenatal care. Italy, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden are identified as countries with low reproductive risk for women. The worst ranked countries are identified as Zaire, Angola, and Somalia. 21 countries were placed in the high risk group, of which only two, Haiti and Afghanistan, are not located in Africa. Editorial comment in the report is described in this article as reflecting the position that countries fail in investing in women's health, with devastating consequences. Some poor countries, such as Cuba, Tunisia, and Costa Rica, are cited for their investments in health care and family planning. The report is described as asserting that low status also prevents women from maintaining good health. Both access to reproductive health services and changing social norms supporting traditional roles in early and frequent childbearing are important to women's improved health status. It is also important for women to have educational and economic opportunities. Population Action International is seeking greater foreign aid contributions for family planning services in developing countries, emergency care in childbirth, health education, AIDS education, and access to safe abortion services.

  3. Reproduction and advances in reproductive studies in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Jewgenow, Katarina; Songsasen, Nucharin

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive mechanisms are extraordinarily diverse among species, even within the same phylogenetic clade. Due to this, it has been difficult to directly apply reproductive technologies developed in human and livestock to genetically manage ex situ wildlife, including carnivores. To date, more common, closely related species, e.g., domestic cats, dogs and ferrets have served as valuable models for developing reproductive technologies for managing rare, endangered carnivores. Artificial insemination and sperm cryopreservation have already been successfully used to manage ex situ populations in some carnivore species, such as the black-footed ferret, cheetah and giant panda. However, technologies aiming at preserving genetics of valuable females have not been fully developed in carnivores, due to the lack of fundamental knowledge about reproductive anatomy and physiology, gamete development, embryogenesis and cryopreservation. The present chapter is divided into two parts. The first part focuses on current knowledge about carnivore reproduction, with emphasis on species diversity in reproductive mechanisms. The second part highlights the progress in reproductive science and related technologies made during the last decade. In addition, we provide examples of how reproductive technologies can contribute to carnivore management and conservation. Although carnivores are comprised of 19 families, we will only focus our attention on four taxonomic groups, including felids, canids, ursids and mustelids. PMID:25091912

  4. Reproduction and advances in reproductive studies in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Jewgenow, Katarina; Songsasen, Nucharin

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive mechanisms are extraordinarily diverse among species, even within the same phylogenetic clade. Due to this, it has been difficult to directly apply reproductive technologies developed in human and livestock to genetically manage ex situ wildlife, including carnivores. To date, more common, closely related species, e.g., domestic cats, dogs and ferrets have served as valuable models for developing reproductive technologies for managing rare, endangered carnivores. Artificial insemination and sperm cryopreservation have already been successfully used to manage ex situ populations in some carnivore species, such as the black-footed ferret, cheetah and giant panda. However, technologies aiming at preserving genetics of valuable females have not been fully developed in carnivores, due to the lack of fundamental knowledge about reproductive anatomy and physiology, gamete development, embryogenesis and cryopreservation. The present chapter is divided into two parts. The first part focuses on current knowledge about carnivore reproduction, with emphasis on species diversity in reproductive mechanisms. The second part highlights the progress in reproductive science and related technologies made during the last decade. In addition, we provide examples of how reproductive technologies can contribute to carnivore management and conservation. Although carnivores are comprised of 19 families, we will only focus our attention on four taxonomic groups, including felids, canids, ursids and mustelids.

  5. Myosin Vb uncoupling from RAB8A and RAB11A elicits microvillus inclusion disease.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Byron C; Roland, Joseph T; Krishnan, Moorthy; Tyska, Matthew J; Lapierre, Lynne A; Dickman, Paul S; Goldenring, James R; Shub, Mitchell D

    2014-07-01

    Microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) is a severe form of congenital diarrhea that arises from inactivating mutations in the gene encoding myosin Vb (MYO5B). We have examined the association of mutations in MYO5B and disruption of microvillar assembly and polarity in enterocytes. Stable MYO5B knockdown (MYO5B-KD) in CaCo2-BBE cells elicited loss of microvilli, alterations in junctional claudins, and disruption of apical and basolateral trafficking; however, no microvillus inclusions were observed in MYO5B-KD cells. Expression of WT MYO5B in MYO5B-KD cells restored microvilli; however, expression of MYO5B-P660L, a MVID-associated mutation found within Navajo populations, did not rescue the MYO5B-KD phenotype but induced formation of microvillus inclusions. Microvilli establishment required interaction between RAB8A and MYO5B, while loss of the interaction between RAB11A and MYO5B induced microvillus inclusions. Using surface biotinylation and dual immunofluorescence staining in MYO5B-KD cells expressing mutant forms of MYO5B, we observed that early microvillus inclusions were positive for the sorting marker SNX18 and derived from apical membrane internalization. In patients with MVID, MYO5B-P660L results in global changes in polarity at the villus tips that could account for deficits in apical absorption, loss of microvilli, aberrant junctions, and losses in transcellular ion transport pathways, likely leading to the MVID clinical phenotype of neonatal secretory diarrhea. PMID:24892806

  6. Myosin Vb uncoupling from RAB8A and RAB11A elicits microvillus inclusion disease

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Byron C.; Roland, Joseph T.; Krishnan, Moorthy; Tyska, Matthew J.; Lapierre, Lynne A.; Dickman, Paul S.; Goldenring, James R.; Shub, Mitchell D.

    2014-01-01

    Microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) is a severe form of congenital diarrhea that arises from inactivating mutations in the gene encoding myosin Vb (MYO5B). We have examined the association of mutations in MYO5B and disruption of microvillar assembly and polarity in enterocytes. Stable MYO5B knockdown (MYO5B-KD) in CaCo2-BBE cells elicited loss of microvilli, alterations in junctional claudins, and disruption of apical and basolateral trafficking; however, no microvillus inclusions were observed in MYO5B-KD cells. Expression of WT MYO5B in MYO5B-KD cells restored microvilli; however, expression of MYO5B-P660L, a MVID-associated mutation found within Navajo populations, did not rescue the MYO5B-KD phenotype but induced formation of microvillus inclusions. Microvilli establishment required interaction between RAB8A and MYO5B, while loss of the interaction between RAB11A and MYO5B induced microvillus inclusions. Using surface biotinylation and dual immunofluorescence staining in MYO5B-KD cells expressing mutant forms of MYO5B, we observed that early microvillus inclusions were positive for the sorting marker SNX18 and derived from apical membrane internalization. In patients with MVID, MYO5B-P660L results in global changes in polarity at the villus tips that could account for deficits in apical absorption, loss of microvilli, aberrant junctions, and losses in transcellular ion transport pathways, likely leading to the MVID clinical phenotype of neonatal secretory diarrhea. PMID:24892806

  7. Performance analysis of coupled and uncoupled hydrodynamic and wave models in the northern Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, Claudia; Coluccelli, Alessandro; Valentini, Andrea; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Carniel, Sandro; Falcieri, Francesco; Paccagnella, Tiziana; Ravaioli, Mariangela; Riminucci, Francesco; Sclavo, Mauro; Russo, Aniello

    2014-05-01

    implementations currently running, there is the need to: assess their forecast skill; quantitatively evaluate if the new, coupled systems provide better performances than the uncoupled ones; individuate weaknesses and eventual time trends in the forecasts quality, their causes, and actions to improve the systems. This work presents a first effort aimed to satisfy such need. We employ in situ and remote sensing data collected starting from November 2011, in particular: temperature and salinity data collected during several oceanographic cruises, sea surface temperature derived from satellite measurements, waves, sea level and currents measurements from oceanographic buoys and platforms; specific observational activities funded by the Italian Flagship project RITMARE allowed to collect new measurements in NA coastal areas. Data-model comparison is firstly performed with exploratory qualitative comparisons in order to highlight discrepancies between observed and forecasted data, then a quantitative comparison is performed through the computation of standard statistical scores (root mean square error, mean error, mean bias, standard deviation, cross-correlation). Results are plotted in Taylor diagrams for a rapid evaluation of the overall performances.

  8. Uncoupling of fatty acid and glucose metabolism in malignant lymphoma: a PET study

    PubMed Central

    Nuutinen, J; Minn, H; Bergman, J; Haaparanta, M; Ruotsalainen, U; Laine, H; Knuuti, J

    1999-01-01

    of circulating FFAs. In conclusion, blood fatty acids appear to have minor significance for [F18]FDG uptake in lymphoma. This suggests that glucose utilization is uncoupled of FFA metabolism and indicates that glucose-free fatty acid cycle does not operate in lymphomatous tissue. Glucose appears to be the preferred substrate for energy metabolism in tumours, in spite of the high supply of FFAs in the fasting state. Although acipimox and other anti-lipolytic drugs have potential for treatment of catabolic state induced by cancer, they are not likely to interfere with tumour energy metabolism which is fuelled by glucose. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408861

  9. Dominant negative mutants of the Cdc2 kinase uncouple cell division from iterative plant development.

    PubMed Central

    Hemerly, A; Engler, J de A; Bergounioux, C; Van Montagu, M; Engler, G; Inzé, D; Ferreira, P

    1995-01-01

    Because plant cells do not move and are surrounded by a rigid cell wall, cell division rates and patterns are believed to be directly responsible for generating new structures throughout development. To study the relationship between cell division and morphogenesis, transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants were constructed expressing dominant mutations in a key regulator of the Arabidopsis cell cycle, the Cdc2a kinase. Plants constitutively overproducing the wild-type Cdc2a or the mutant form predicted to accelerate the cell cycle did not exhibit a significantly altered development. In contrast, a mutation expected to arrest the cell cycle abolished cell division when expressed in Arabidopsis, whereas some tobacco plants constitutively producing this mutant protein were recovered. These plants had a reduced histone H1 kinase activity and contained considerably fewer cells. These cells were, however, much larger and underwent normal differentiation. Morphogenesis, histogenesis and developmental timing were unaffected. The results indicate that, in plants, the developmental controls defining shape can act independently from cell division rates. Images PMID:7664733

  10. Assisted reproductive practice: religious perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schenker, Joscph G

    2005-03-01

    It is important to those who practise reproductive techniques to learn about different religious perspectives related to reproductive health problems. Religious groups are active in influencing the public regarding bioethical positions, and this is particularly evident with issues concerning procreation, abortion and infertility therapy. The Jewish attitude towards procreation is derived from the first commandment of God to Adam to 'Be fruitful and multiply'. Judaism allows the practice of all techniques of assisted reproduction when the oocyte and spermatozoon originate from the wife and husband respectively. The attitude toward reproductive practice varies among Christian groups. While assisted reproduction is not accepted by the Vatican, it may be practised by Protestant, Anglican and other denominations. According to traditional Christian views, beginning at conception, the embryo has moral status as a human being, and thus most assisted reproductive technologies are forbidden. According to Islam, the procedures of IVF and embryo transfer are acceptable, although they can be performed only for husband and wife. Developments in science and technology and corresponding clinical applications raise new religious questions, often without clear answers. The role of theology in bioethics is integral to clarify perceived attitudes toward these developments for different religious communities. This paper presents the attitude of monotheistic religions to therapeutic procedures, such as IVF-embryo transfer, spermatozoa, oocytes, embryo donation, cryopreservation of genetic material, surrogacy, posthumous reproduction, gender preselection, reproductive and therapeutic cloning.

  11. Phthalates as developmental reproductive toxicants

    EPA Science Inventory

    PE are a large family ofcompounds used in a wide array ofconsumer, industrial and medical products. Studies have shown that in utero treatment with PE such as diethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP) during the critical period offetal reproductive development produced male reproductive mal...

  12. Mechanical Signaling in Reproductive Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Soledad; Chang, Sydney; Barzilai, Joshua J.; Leppert, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    The organs of the female reproductive system are among the most dynamic tissues in the human body, undergoing repeated cycles of growth and involution from puberty through menopause. To achieve such impressive plasticity, reproductive tissues must respond not only to soluble signals (hormones, growth factors, and cytokines) but also to physical cues (mechanical forces and osmotic stress) as well. Here, we review the mechanisms underlying the process of mechanotransduction—how signals are conveyed from the extracellular matrix that surrounds the cells of reproductive tissues to the downstream molecules and signaling pathways that coordinate the cellular adaptive response to external forces. Our objective was to examine how mechanical forces contribute significantly to physiological functions and pathogenesis in reproductive tissues. We highlight how widespread diseases of the reproductive tract, from preterm labor to tumors of the uterus and breast, result from an impairment in mechanical signaling. PMID:25001021

  13. Monotreme and marsupial reproduction.

    PubMed

    Renfree, M B

    1995-01-01

    Marsupials were regarded as curiosities by their early European discoverers, animals to be wondered at. Monotremes were even more surprising; the platypus was such an amalgam of characters that it was thought to be a hoax. They were recognized very early as mammals that could make a major contribution to our understanding of reproductive processes, and work on marsupials at the turn of the century was much in evidence. It is, however, only in the past two decades, and especially in the past few years that marsupial research has regained this position. There is no doubt that future research will strengthen this contribution, but we are faced with serious conservation questions that must be solved if we are to maintain these wonderful animals as a resource for future generations. PMID:8848565

  14. The Reproductive System.

    PubMed

    Pask, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Correct sexual development is arguably the most important trait in an organism's life history since it is directly related to its genetic fitness. The developing gonad houses the germ cells, the only legacy we pass on to subsequent generations. Given the pivotal importance of correct reproductive function, it is confounding that disorders of sex development (DSDs) are among the most common congenital abnormalities in humans (Lee et al. J Pediatr Urol 8(6):611-615, 2012). Urogenital development is a highly complex process involving coordinated interactions between molecular and hormonal pathways in a tightly regulated order. The controls that regulate some of the key events in this process are beginning to be unraveled. This chapter provides an overview of our understanding of urogenital development from the gonads to the urogenital ducts and external genitalia. PMID:26659484

  15. Mutations in man

    SciTech Connect

    Obe, G.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections that cover some of the following topics: DNA repair, gene or point mutations, aspects of nondisjunction, origin and significance of chromosomal alterations, structure and organization of the human genome, and mutagenic activity of cigarette smoke.

  16. Reproductive health in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Friedman, H L

    1994-01-01

    The health and well-being of adolescents is closely intertwined with their physical, psychological and social development, but this is put at risk by sexual and reproductive health hazards which are increasing in much of the world. Changes in population growth and distribution, the rise of telecommunications, the increase in travel and a decline in the family, as well as a generally earlier start of menarche and later age of marriage are contributing to an increase in unprotected sexual relations before marriage. This, combined with risks from early marriage, result in too early or unwanted pregnancy and childbirth, induced abortion in hazardous circumstances and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV infection leading to AIDS. With more than half the world's population below the age of 25, and 4 out of 5 young people living in developing countries with inadequate access to prevention and care, there is an urgent need for action. Young women are particularly vulnerable. Mortality and morbidity from early pregnancy whether ending in childbirth or abortion, is much higher for the younger adolescent. Young women, especially those who have less formal education, are more vulnerable to pressures for marriage, or sexual relations before marriage, often with older men. Young people generally lack adequate knowledge about their own development and information on how to get help. Those who could help are rarely trained for working with adolescents, and services which are generally designed for adults or children often deter young people from getting help when they most need it. Policy and legislation relating to sexual and reproductive health issues are often contradictory, and unclear or unenforced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Reproductive Rights or Reproductive Justice? Lessons from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lynn

    2015-06-11

    Argentine sexual and reproductive rights activists insist on using the language and framework of "human rights," even when many reproductive rights activists in the US and elsewhere now prefer the framework of "reproductive justice." Reflecting on conversations with Argentine feminist anthropologists, social scientists, and reproductive rights activists, this paper analyzes why the Argentine movement to legalize abortion relies on the contested concept of human rights. Its conclusion that "women's rights are human rights" is a powerful claim in post-dictatorship politics where abortion is not yet legal and the full scope of women's rights has yet to be included in the government's human rights agenda. Argentine feminist human rights activists have long been attentive to the ways that social class, gender, migration, and racism intersect with reproduction. Because their government respects and responds to a human rights framework, however, they have not felt it necessary--as U.S. feminists have--to invent a new notion of reproductive justice in order to be heard. Given the increasing popularity of reproductive justice in health and human rights, the Argentine case shows that rights-based claims can still be politically useful when a State values the concept of human rights.

  18. Reproductive Rights or Reproductive Justice? Lessons from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Argentine sexual and reproductive rights activists insist on using the language and framework of "human rights," even when many reproductive rights activists in the US and elsewhere now prefer the framework of "reproductive justice." Reflecting on conversations with Argentine feminist anthropologists, social scientists, and reproductive rights activists, this paper analyzes why the Argentine movement to legalize abortion relies on the contested concept of human rights. Its conclusion that "women's rights are human rights" is a powerful claim in post-dictatorship politics where abortion is not yet legal and the full scope of women's rights has yet to be included in the government's human rights agenda. Argentine feminist human rights activists have long been attentive to the ways that social class, gender, migration, and racism intersect with reproduction. Because their government respects and responds to a human rights framework, however, they have not felt it necessary--as U.S. feminists have--to invent a new notion of reproductive justice in order to be heard. Given the increasing popularity of reproductive justice in health and human rights, the Argentine case shows that rights-based claims can still be politically useful when a State values the concept of human rights. PMID:26204578

  19. Fungal Infection Increases the Rate of Somatic Mutation in Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sonali Sachin; Ganea, Laura-Stefana; Razzak, Abdur M; García Gil, M R

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations are transmitted during mitosis in developing somatic tissue. Somatic cells bearing the mutations can develop into reproductive (germ) cells and the somatic mutations are then passed on to the next generation of plants. Somatic mutations are a source of variation essential to evolve new defense strategies and adapt to the environment. Stem rust disease in Scots pine has a negative effect on wood quality, and thus adversely affects the economy. It is caused by the 2 most destructive fungal species in Scandinavia: Peridermium pini and Cronartium flaccidum. We studied nuclear genome stability in Scots pine under biotic stress (fungus-infected, 22 trees) compared to a control population (plantation, 20 trees). Stability was assessed as accumulation of new somatic mutations in 10 microsatellite loci selected for genotyping. Microsatellites are widely used as molecular markers in population genetics studies of plants, and are particularly used for detection of somatic mutations as their rate of mutation is of a much higher magnitude when compared with other DNA markers. We report double the rate of somatic mutation per locus in the fungus-infected trees (4.8×10(-3) mutations per locus), as compared to the controls (2.0×10(-3) mutations per locus) when individual samples were analyzed at 10 different microsatellite markers. Pearson's chi-squared test indicated a significant effect of the fungal infection which increased the number of mutations in the fungus-infected trees (χ(2) = 12.9883, df = 1, P = 0.0003134).

  20. Application of genomic and molecular methods to fundamental questions in canine and feline reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Meyers-Wallen, V N

    2012-12-01

    Molecular tools are becoming increasingly available to investigate the genetic basis of reproductive disorders in dogs and cats. These were first successful in identifying the molecular basis of diseases inherited as simple Mendelian traits, and these are now being applied to those that are inherited as complex traits. In order to promote similar studies of reproductive disorders, we need to understand how we can play a proactive role in accumulating sufficient case material. We also need to understand these mutation discovery tools and identify collaborators who have experience with their use. The candidate gene and genomic approaches to mutation discovery in dogs are presented, including new sequencing methods and those used to confirm that a mutation has a role in disease pathology. As the final goal is to use our study results to prevent inherited disorders, we need to consider how we can promote efficiency in obtaining DNA test results and providing genetic counselling.

  1. Comparing Mutational Variabilities

    PubMed Central

    Houle, D.; Morikawa, B.; Lynch, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have reviewed the available data on V(M), the amount of genetic variation in phenotypic traits produced each generation by mutation. We use these data to make several qualitative tests of the mutation-selection balance hypothesis for the maintenance of genetic variance (MSB). To compare V(M) values, we use three dimensionless quantities: mutational heritability, V(M)/V(E); the mutational coefficient of variation, CV(M); and the ratio of the standing genetic variance to V(M), V(G)/V(M). Since genetic coefficients of variation for life history traits are larger than those for morphological traits, we predict that under MSB, life history traits should also have larger CV(M). This is confirmed; life history traits have a median CV(M) value more than six times higher than that for morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) approximates the persistence time of mutations under MSB in an infinite population. In order for MSB to hold, V(G)/V(M) must be small, substantially less than 1000, and life history traits should have smaller values than morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) averages about 50 generations for life history traits and 100 generations for morphological traits. These observations are all consistent with the predictions of a mutation-selection balance model. PMID:8807316

  2. Coordination Changes And Auto-Hydroxylation of FIH-1: Uncoupled O(2)-Activa in a Human Hypoxia Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-H.; Comeaux, L.M.; Herbst, R.W.; Saban, E.; Kennedy, D.C.; Maroney, M.J.; Knapp, M.J.

    2009-05-12

    Hypoxia sensing is the generic term for pO2-sensing in humans and other higher organisms. These cellular responses to pO2 are largely controlled by enzymes that belong to the Fe(II) alpha-ketoglutarate (alphaKG) dependent dioxygenase superfamily, including the human enzyme called the factor inhibiting HIF (FIH-1), which couples O2-activation to the hydroxylation of the hypoxia inducible factor alpha (HIFalpha). Uncoupled O2-activation by human FIH-1 was studied by exposing the resting form of FIH-1 (alphaKG + Fe)FIH-1, to air in the absence of HIFalpha. Uncoupling lead to two distinct enzyme oxidations, one a purple chromophore (lambda(max) = 583 nm) arising from enzyme auto-hydroxylation of Trp296, forming an Fe(III)-O-Trp296 chromophore [Y.-H. Chen, L.M. Comeaux, S.J. Eyles, M.J. Knapp, Chem. Commun. (2008), doi:10.1039/B809099H]; the other a yellow chromophore due to Fe(III) in the active site, which under some conditions also contained variable levels of an oxygenated surface residue (oxo)Met275. The kinetics of purple FIH-1 formation were independent of Fe(II) and alphaKG concentrations, however, product yield was saturable with increasing [alphaKG] and required excess Fe(II). Yellow FIH-1 was formed from (succinate+Fe)FIH-1, or by glycerol addition to (alphaKG+Fe)FIH-1, suggesting that glycerol could intercept the active oxidant from the FIH-1 active site and prevent hydroxylation. Both purple and yellow FIH-1 contained high-spin, rhombic Fe(III) centers, as shown by low temperature EPR. XAS indicated distorted octahedral Fe(III) geometries, with subtle differences in inner-shell ligands for yellow and purple FIH-1. EPR of Co(II)-substituted FIH-1 (alphaKG + Co)FIH-1, indicated a mixture of 5-coordinate and 6-coordinate enzyme forms, suggesting that resting FIH-1 can readily undergo uncoupled O2-activation by loss of an H2O ligand from the metal center.

  3. The optimal dosage and window of opportunity to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis following traumatic brain injury using the uncoupler FCCP.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Jignesh D; Pauly, James R; Sullivan, Patrick G

    2009-08-01

    Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to a rapid and extensive necrosis at the primary site of injury that appears to be driven in part by significant mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study is based on the hypothesis that TBI-induced, aberrant glutamate release increases mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling/overload ultimately leading to mitochondrial damage. Previous work from our laboratory demonstrates that mitochondrial uncoupling during the acute phases of TBI-induced excitotoxicity can reduce mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake (cycling), ROS production and mitochondrial damage resulting in neuroprotection and improved behavioral outcome. The current study was designed to determine the optimal dosage and therapeutic window of opportunity for the potent mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP following moderate TBI. For this study, we used young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g); either sham-operated or moderately (1.5 mm) injured using the controlled cortical impactor (CCI) model of TBI. In the first set of studies animals were injected with either vehicle (100% DMSO) or different concentrations of FCCP (0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg in 100% DMSO) intraperitoneally at 5 min post-injury; tested behaviorally at 10 days and cortical sparing assessed at 18 days post-injury. The results demonstrate that of all the dosages tested, 2.5 mg/kg rendered the maximum improvement in behavioral outcomes and tissue spared. Using this optimal dose (2.5 mg/kg) and time point for intervention (5 min post-injury), we assessed mitochondrial bioenergetics and mitochondrial structural integrity 24 h post-injury. Furthermore, using this dosage we assessed mitochondrial bioenergetics and Ca(2+) loading at 3 and 6 h post-injury to further verify our target mechanism and establish these assessments as a valid endpoint to use as a means to determine the therapeutic window of FCCP. To begin to address the window of opportunity for maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis, the optimal dose of FCCP

  4. Caste load and the evolution of reproductive skew.

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive skew theory seeks to explain how reproduction is divided among group members in animal societies. Existing theory is framed almost entirely in terms of selection, though nonadaptive processes must also play some role in the evolution of reproductive skew. Here I propose that a genetic correlation between helper fecundity and breeder fecundity may frequently constrain the evolution of reproductive skew. This constraint is part of a wider phenomenon that I term "caste load," which is defined as the decline in mean fitness caused by caste-specific selection pressures, that is, differential selection on breeding and nonbreeding individuals. I elaborate the caste load hypothesis using quantitative and population genetic arguments and individual-based simulations. Although selection can sometimes erode genetic correlations and resolve caste load, this may be constrained when mutations have similar pleiotropic effects on breeder and helper traits. I document evidence for caste load, identify putative genomic adaptations to it, and suggest future research directions. The models highlight the value of considering adaptation within the boundaries imposed by genetic architecture and incidentally reaffirm that monogamy promotes the evolutionary transition to eusociality. PMID:24334738

  5. The effects of kisspeptin in human reproductive function - therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Ratnasabapathy, Risheka; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2013-03-01

    Kisspeptin is a 54-amino acid peptide which is encoded by the KiSS-1 gene and activates the G protein-coupled receptor GPR54. Evidence suggests that this system is a key regulator of mammalian and human reproduction. Animal studies have shown that GPR54-deficient mice have abnormal sexual development. Central and peripheral administration of kisspeptin stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis whilst pre-administration of a gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist abolishes this effect. In humans, inactivating GPR54 mutations cause normosmic hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism whilst activation of GPR54 signalling is associated with premature puberty. In healthy human volunteers, the acute intravenous administration of kisspeptin potently increases plasma luteinising hormone (LH) levels and significantly increases plasma follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone without side effects in both males and in females particularly in the preovulatatory phase of the menstrual cycle. In infertility due to hypothalamic amenorrhoea acute administration of kisspeptin results in stimulation of reproductive hormones. The kisspeptin/GPR54 system therefore appears to play an important role in the regulation of reproduction in humans. Hence kisspeptin has potential as a novel tool for the manipulation of the HPG axis and treatment of infertility in humans. This review discusses the evidence highlighting kisspeptin's key role in human reproduction.

  6. New Genes Controlling Human Reproduction and How You Find Them

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, William F.; Pitteloud, Nelly; Seminara, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    The neuroendocrine control of reproduction in all mammals is governed by a hypothalamic neural network of approximately 1,500 gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) secreting neurons that control activity of the reproductive axis across life. Recently, the syndrome of human GnRH deficiency, either with anosmia, termed Kallmann Syndrome (KS), or with a normal sense of smell, termed normosmic Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism (nIHH), have proven important disease models that have revealed much about the abnormalities that can befall the GnRH neurons as they differentiate, migrate, form networks, mature and senesce. Mutations in several genes responsible for these highly coordinated developmental processes have thus been unearthed by the study of this prismatic disease model. This paper discusses several of the more important discoveries in this rapidly evolving field and puts them into a developmental and physiologic context. PMID:18596868

  7. Comparative reproductive biology of elephants.

    PubMed

    Brown, Janine L

    2014-01-01

    The ability to serially collect blood samples and conduct ultrasound examinations in Asian and African elephants has provided unique opportunities to study the biology of these endangered species. As a result, many unique aspects of elephant reproduction have been identified. For females, there are interesting differences in luteal steroidogenic activity, follicular maturation, pituitary gonadotropin secretion, fetal development and reproductive tract anatomy, while males exhibit the unique phenomenon of musth and an unusual reproductive anatomy (internal testes, ampullary semen storage). However, problems associated with uterine and ovarian pathologies hamper captive propagation efforts. Older, nulliparous cows are particularly susceptible, leading to speculation that continuous ovarian cyclicity of non-bred females in zoos is having a negative and cumulative effect on reproductive health. There are notable species differences in reproductive mechanisms as well (e.g., ovarian acyclicity, prolactin secretion, sperm cryosensitivity), implying that species-specific approaches to management and application of assisted reproductive techniques are needed for maximal reproductive efficiency and enhancement of genetic management.

  8. The role of syncytins in human reproduction and reproductive organ cancers.

    PubMed

    Soygur, Bikem; Sati, Leyla

    2016-11-01

    Human life begins with sperm and oocyte fusion. After fertilization, various fusion events occur during human embryogenesis and morphogenesis. For example, the fusion of trophoblastic cells constitutes a key process for normal placental development. Fusion in the placenta is facilitated by syncytin 1 and syncytin 2. These syncytins arose from retroviral sequences that entered the primate genome 25 million and more than 40 million years ago respectively. About 8% of the human genome consists of similar human endogenous retroviral (HERVs) sequences. Many are inactive because of mutations or deletions. However, the role of the few that remain transcriptionally active has not been fully elucidated. Syncytin proteins maintain cell-cell fusogenic activity based on ENV: gene-mediated viral cell entry. In this review, we summarize how syncytins and their receptors are involved in fusion events during human reproduction. The significance of syncytins in tumorigenesis is also discussed.

  9. Limited dispersal, deleterious mutations and the evolution of sex

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    This study presents a mathematical model that allows for some offspring to be dispersed at random, while others stay close to their mothers. A single genetic locus is assumed to control fertility, and this locus is subject to the occurrence of deletions mutations. It is shown that, at equilibrium, the frequency of deleterious mutations in the population is inversely related to the rate of dispersal. The results also show that sexual reproduction can lead to a decrease in the equilibrium frequency of deleterious mutations. The reason for this relationship is that sex involves the dispersal of genetic material, and thus, like the dispersal of offspring, sex enhances competition among adults. The model is described using the example of a hermaphroditic plant population. However, the results should apply to animal populations as well. 36 refs., 1 fig.

  10. From de novo mutations to personalized therapeutic interventions in autism.

    PubMed

    Brandler, William M; Sebat, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The high heritability, early age at onset, and reproductive disadvantages of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are consistent with an etiology composed of dominant-acting de novo (spontaneous) mutations. Mutation detection by microarray analysis and DNA sequencing has confirmed that de novo copy-number variants or point mutations in protein-coding regions of genes contribute to risk, and some of the underlying causal variants and genes have been identified. As our understanding of autism genes develops, the spectrum of autism is breaking up into quanta of many different genetic disorders. Given the diversity of etiologies and underlying biochemical pathways, personalized therapy for ASDs is logical, and clinical genetic testing is a prerequisite.

  11. Legal forms and reproductive norms.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Ruth

    2003-06-01

    This article draws on Pashukanis's concept of legal form and on O'Brien's concept of synthetic value to argue that legal form plays a role in reproductive relations by constructing legal subjects as the bearers of reproductive responsibilities. Pashukanis conceived of legal form as playing a particular role in capitalist exchange relations by interpellating subjects as the bearers of property rights. O'Brien argued that reproduction's specific value is synthetic value, which represents the value of integrating nature and reason in species continuity. Synthetic value is distinct from exchange value or emotional value which may also attach to reproductive process. By working through Pashukanis's method of extracting legal form from specific social relations and by adapting it to reproductive relations, an example is provided of how legal form analysis can be extended beyond the particular context of capitalist exchange relations. Just as legal form constitutes owners and non-owners as legal subjects, so it constitutes reproducers and non-reproducers. By tracing the way in which law attributes reproductive responsibility, legal form analysis shows us how law draws a line between wanting to attribute responsibility and not to attribute it, and this contradiction is a hook which social forces such as sexuality, gender, race, class and disability can latch on to in pushing legal form to shape reproductive responsibilities in a particular way. Each legal form is also externally contradicted by other legal forms. When law negotiates a balance between the reproductive norms of responsibilities and rights, it demonstrates how particular legal forms manage the interaction of different sets of social relations, such as reproduction and exchange. PMID:15871155

  12. Lack of association between uncoupling protein-2 Ala55Val polymorphism and incident diabetes in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by impaired insulin secretion, peripheral insulin resistance, and increased hepatic glucose production. Genes that contribute to genetic susceptibility to T2DM function in numerous biochemical pathways. Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) functions as a negat...

  13. Activation of Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 4 and ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel Cumulatively Decreases Superoxide Production in Insect Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Slocińska, Malgorzata; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-01-01

    It has been evidenced that mitochondrial uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4) and ATP-regulated potassium channel (mKATP channel) of insect Gromphadorhina coqereliana mitochondria decrease superoxide anion production. We elucidated whether the two energy-dissipating systems work together on a modulation of superoxide level in cockroach mitochondria. Our data show that the simultaneous activation of UCP4 by palmitic acid and mKATP channel by pinacidil revealed a cumulative effect on weakening mitochondrial superoxide formation. The inhibition of UCP4 by GTP (and/or ATP) and mKATP channel by ATP elevated superoxide production. These results suggest a functional cooperation of both energy-dissipating systems in protection against oxidative stress in insects.

  14. Mechanism of mitochondrial uncouplers, inhibitors, and toxins: focus on electron transfer, free radicals, and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Pozos, Robert S; Somanathan, Ratnasamy; Shangari, Nandita; O'Brien, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    The biology of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is summarized. Our approach to the mechanism of uncouplers, inhibitors, and toxins is based on electron transfer (ET) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Extensive supporting evidence, which is broadly applicable, is cited. ROS can be generated either endogenously or exogenously. Generally, the reactive entities arise via redox cycling by ET functionalities, such as, quinones (or precursors), metal compounds, imines (or iminiums), and aromatic nitro compounds (or reduced metabolites). In most cases, the ET functions are formed metabolically. The toxic substances belong to many categories, e.g., medicinals, industrial chemicals, abused drugs, and pesticides. Structure-activity relationships are presented from the ET-ROS perspective, and also quantitatively. Evidence for the theoretical framework is provided by the protective effect of antioxidants. Among other topics addressed are proton flux, membrane pores, and apoptosis. There is support for the thesis that mitochondrial insult may contribute to illnesses and aging.

  15. Uncoupling complement C1s activation from C1q binding in apoptotic cell phagocytosis and immunosuppressive capacity.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Parry, Graham C; Panicker, Sandip; Elkon, Keith B

    2016-02-01

    Complement activation contributes to inflammation in many diseases, yet it also supports physiologic apoptotic cells (AC) clearance and its downstream immunosuppressive effects. The roles of individual complement components in AC phagocytosis have been difficult to dissect with artificially depleted sera. Using human in vitro systems and the novel antibody complement C1s inhibitor TNT003, we uncoupled the role of the enzymatic activation of the classical pathway from the opsonizing role of C1q in mediating a) the phagocytosis of early and late AC, and b) the immunosuppressive capacity of early AC. We found that C1s inhibition had a small impact on the physiologic clearance of early AC, leaving their immunosuppressive properties entirely unaffected, while mainly inhibiting the phagocytosis of late apoptotic/secondary necrotic cells. Our data suggest that C1s inhibition may represent a valuable therapeutic strategy to control classical pathway activation without causing significant AC accumulation in diseases without defects in AC phagocytosis.

  16. First evidence and characterization of an uncoupling protein in fungi kingdom: CpUCP of Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Jarmuszkiewicz, W; Milani, G; Fortes, F; Schreiber, A Z; Sluse, F E; Vercesi, A E

    2000-02-11

    An uncoupling protein (UCP) was identified in mitochondria from Candida parapsilosis (CpUCP), a non-fermentative parasitic yeast. CpUCP was immunodetected using polyclonal antibodies raised against plant UCP. Activity of CpUCP, investigated in mitochondria depleted of free fatty acids, was stimulated by linoleic acid (LA) and inhibited by GTP. Activity of CpUCP enhanced state 4 respiration by decreasing DeltaPsi and lowered the ADP/O ratio. Thus, it was able to divert energy from oxidative phosphorylation. The voltage dependence of electron flux indicated that LA had a pure protonophoretic effect. The discovery of CpUCP proves that UCP-like proteins occur in the four eukaryotic kingdoms: animals, plants, fungi and protists.

  17. The Mahabharata and reproductive endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Bharti; Baruah, Manash P; Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    This communication approaches the Mahabharata through the prism of reproductive endocrinology. Descriptions of episodes related to reproduction are listed here, to provide fodder for the endocrinologically minded brain. The cases described here are perhaps, the first documented observations of fetal orgasm, pseudocyesis and assisted reproductive technology, including assisted insemination by donor, induction of ovulation, and in vitro fertilization as well as precocious growth and intersex. We do not presume to offer a definite explanation for these interesting episodes from the Mahabharata. We do, however, hope to stimulate interest in ancient Indian literature, and encourage a literary "forensic endocrine" analysis of events relevant to our specialty. PMID:27186562

  18. The Mahabharata and reproductive endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Bharti; Baruah, Manash P.; Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    This communication approaches the Mahabharata through the prism of reproductive endocrinology. Descriptions of episodes related to reproduction are listed here, to provide fodder for the endocrinologically minded brain. The cases described here are perhaps, the first documented observations of fetal orgasm, pseudocyesis and assisted reproductive technology, including assisted insemination by donor, induction of ovulation, and in vitro fertilization as well as precocious growth and intersex. We do not presume to offer a definite explanation for these interesting episodes from the Mahabharata. We do, however, hope to stimulate interest in ancient Indian literature, and encourage a literary “forensic endocrine” analysis of events relevant to our specialty. PMID:27186562

  19. Proton motive force, energy recycling by end product excretion, and metabolic uncoupling during anaerobic growth of Pseudomonas mendocina.

    PubMed Central

    Verdoni, N; Aon, M A; Lebeault, J M; Thomas, D

    1990-01-01

    Batch cultures of Pseudomonas mendocina, grown in rich medium with glucose excess, showed metabolic differences dependent upon whether the growth conditions were aerobic or anaerobic, with or without added electron acceptor. Under anaerobic conditions in the absence of nitrate, P. mendocina reached the stationary phase of growth after 2 or 3 days, followed by a stationary phase of 4 to 5 days. Under these conditions, a mixed-type fermentative metabolism (formic, lactic, and acetic acids) appeared. A fivefold-higher specific rate of glucose consumption and eightfold-higher production of organic acids, compared with aerobic cultures, were shown by this microorganism growing anaerobically in the absence of exogenous electron acceptors. The gradients of organic acid produced by P. mendocina under these conditions reached a maximum (lactate, 180 mV; formate, 150 mV; acetate, 215 mV) between days 2 and 3 of culture. The proton motive force (delta p) decreased during growth from -254 to -71 mV. The intracellular pH remained alkaline during the culture, reaching a steady-state value of 7.9. The gradients of organic acids apparently contributed to the generation of a delta p, which, according to the Energy Recycling Model (P. A. M. Michels, J. P. J. Michels, J. Boonstra, and W. N. Konings, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 5:357-364, 1979), would produce an average energy gain of 1 or 1.5 mol of ATP equivalents per mol of glucose consumed with H+/ATP stoichiometry of 3 or 2, respectively. Low YATP and Yglucose values were observed, suggesting that an uncoupled metabolism exists; i.e., ATP produced by catabolic processes is not directly used for biomass synthesis. This metabolic uncoupling could be induced at least in part by organic acids and the ATP wastage could be induced by a membrane-bound ATPase involved in intracellular pH regulation. PMID:2254245

  20. Simple thermodynamic model of unassisted proton shuttle uncoupling and prediction of activity from calculated speciation, lipophilicity, and molecular geometry.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Louis C

    2012-06-21

    A mechanistic model of uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by lipophilic weak acids (i.e. proton shuttles) was developed for the purposes of predicting the relative activity of xenobiotics of widely varying structure and of guiding the design of optimized derivatives. The model is based on thermodynamic premises not formulated elsewhere that allow for the calculation of steady-state conditions and of rate of energy dissipation on the basis of acid-dissociation and permeability behavior, the later estimated from partitioning behavior and geometric considerations. Moreover, permeability of either the neutral or of the ionized species is proposed to be effectively enhanced under conditions of asymmetrical molecular distribution. Finally, special considerations were developed to accommodate multi-protic compounds. The comparison of predicted to measured activity for a diverse testset of 48 compounds of natural origin spanning a wide range of activity yielded a Spearman's rho of 0.90. The model was used to tentatively identify several novel proton shuttles, as well as to elucidate core structures particularly conducive to proton shuttle activity from which optimized derivatives can be designed. Principles of design were formulated and examples of derivatives projected to be active at concentrations on the order of 10(-7)M are proposed. Among these are di-protic compounds predicted to shuttle two protons per cycle iteration and proposed to maximally exploit the proton shuttle mechanism. This work promotes the design of highly active, yet easily-metabolized uncouplers for therapeutic applications, namely the indirect activation of AMP-kinase, as well as for various industrial applications where low persistence is desirable.

  1. Acute heat stress induces oxidative stress and decreases adaptation in young white leghorn cockerels by downregulation of avian uncoupling protein.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, A; Akiba, Y; Toyomizu, M

    2007-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species-induced damage of cells and molecules is one of the mechanisms responsible for the decline in an animal's performance due to heat stress. Mitochondria are the main producers of cellular superoxide, a process that is sensitive to proton motive force, and this superoxide production can be decreased by mild uncoupling. We studied the effects of heat stress on the production of mitochondrial superoxide as well as heat stress effects on the expression of avian uncoupling protein (avUCP) and avian A nucleotide translocator (avANT) in skeletal muscles of chicks and young cockerels. Male White Leghorn (Julia) chicks at 16 d and cockerels at 87 d of age were exposed to acute heat stress, 34 degrees C for 18 h, or kept at moderate ambient temperature (25 and 21 degrees C, respectively). There was no difference in mitochondrial superoxide production between heat-exposed and control chicks, whereas significant differences were observed in the case of young cockerels. Greater substrate-independent superoxide production was found in muscle mitochondria from heat-stressed young cockerels. In chicks, neither avUCP nor avANT transcript expression was changed by heat exposure, whereas in young cockerels avUCP transcript was decreased, but avANT transcript level was not changed. Thus, in heat-stressed young cockerels, increased mitochondrial superoxide production was accompanied by downregulation of avUCP. Taken together, these results suggest that exposure of young cockerels to heat stress stimulates mitochondrial superoxide production, possibly via downregulation of avUCP. Chicks with persistent avUCP expression, on the other hand, are relatively better adapted to high temperature. It can be assumed that appropriate expression of avUCP may alleviate overproduction of mitochondrial superoxide and could help birds adapt to oxidative stress resulting from acute heat stress.

  2. Glutathionylation Mediates Angiotensin II–Induced eNOS Uncoupling, Amplifying NADPH Oxidase‐Dependent Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Liu, Chia‐Chi; Gentile, Carmine; Kok, Cindy; Nunez, Andrea; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A. S.; Davies, Michael J.; Hawkins, Clare L.; Rasmussen, Helge H.; Figtree, Gemma A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glutathionylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) “uncouples” the enzyme, switching its function from nitric oxide (NO) to O2•− generation. We examined whether this reversible redox modification plays a role in angiotensin II (Ang II)‐induced endothelial dysfunction. Methods and Results Ang II increased eNOS glutathionylation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), rabbit aorta, and human arteries in vitro. This was associated with decreased NO bioavailability and eNOS activity as well as increased O2•− generation. Ang II‐induced decrease in eNOS activity was mediated by glutathionylation, as shown by restoration of function by glutaredoxin‐1. Moreover, Ang II‐induced increase in O2•− and decrease in NO were abolished in HUVECs transiently transfected, with mutant eNOS rendered resistant to glutathionylation. Ang II effects were nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase dependent because preincubation with gp 91ds‐tat, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, abolished the increase in eNOS glutathionylation and loss of eNOS activity. Functional significance of glutathionylation in intact vessels was supported by Ang II‐induced impairment of endothelium‐dependent vasorelaxation that was abolished by the disulfide reducing agent, dithiothreitol. Furthermore, attenuation of Ang II signaling in vivo by administration of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor reduced eNOS glutathionylation, increased NO, diminished O2•−, improved endothelium‐dependent vasorelaxation and reduced blood pressure. Conclusions Uncoupling of eNOS by glutathionylation is a key mediator of Ang II‐induced endothelial dysfunction, and its reversal is a mechanism for cardiovascular protection by ACE inhibition. We suggest that Ang II‐induced O2•− generation in endothelial cells, although dependent on NADPH oxidase, is amplified by glutathionylation‐dependent eNOS uncoupling. PMID:24755153

  3. BCNU-induced gR2 defect mediates S-glutathionylation of Complex I and respiratory uncoupling in myocardium.

    PubMed

    Kang, Patrick T; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Ren, Pei; Guarini, Giacinta; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2014-06-15

    A deficiency of mitochondrial glutathione reductase (or GR2) is capable of adversely affecting the reduction of GSSG and increasing mitochondrial oxidative stress. BCNU [1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea] is an anticancer agent and known inhibitor of cytosolic GR ex vivo and in vivo. Here we tested the hypothesis that a BCNU-induced GR2 defect contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent impairment of heart function. Intraperitoneal administration of BCNU (40 mg/kg) specifically inhibited GR2 activity by 79.8 ± 2.7% in the mitochondria of rat heart. However, BCNU treatment modestly enhanced the activities of mitochondrial Complex I and other ETC components. The cardiac function of BCNU-treated rats was analyzed by echocardiography, revealing a systolic dysfunction associated with decreased ejection fraction, decreased cardiac output, and an increase in left ventricular internal dimension and left ventricular volume in systole. The respiratory control index of isolated mitochondria from the myocardium was moderately decreased after BCNU treatment, whereas NADH-linked uncoupling of oxygen consumption was significantly enhanced. Extracellular flux analysis to measure the fatty acid oxidation of myocytes indicated a 20% enhancement after BCNU treatment. When the mitochondria were immunoblotted with antibodies against GSH and UCP3, both protein S-glutathionylation of Complex I and expression of UCP3 were significantly up-regulated. Overexpression of SOD2 in the myocardium significantly reversed BCNU-induced GR2 inhibition and mitochondrial impairment. In conclusion, BCNU-mediated cardiotoxicity is characterized by the GR2 deficiency that negatively regulates heart function by impairing mitochondrial integrity, increasing oxidative stress with Complex I S-glutathionylation, and enhancing uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration.

  4. Small structural changes on a hydroquinone scaffold determine the complex I inhibition or uncoupling of tumoral oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Urra, Félix A; Córdova-Delgado, Miguel; Lapier, Michel; Orellana-Manzano, Andrea; Acevedo-Arévalo, Luis; Pessoa-Mahana, Hernán; González-Vivanco, Jaime M; Martínez-Cifuentes, Maximiliano; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Oney; Millas-Vargas, Juan Pablo; Weiss-López, Boris; Pavani, Mario; Ferreira, Jorge; Araya-Maturana, Ramiro

    2016-01-15

    Mitochondria participate in several distinctiveness of cancer cell, being a promising target for the design of anti-cancer compounds. Previously, we described that ortho-carbonyl hydroquinone scaffold 14 inhibits the complex I-dependent respiration with selective anti-proliferative effect on mouse mammary adenocarcinoma TA3/Ha cancer cells; however, the structural requirements of this hydroquinone scaffold to affect the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) of cancer cells have not been studied in detail. Here, we characterize the mitochondrial metabolism of TA3/Ha cancer cells, which exhibit a high oxidative metabolism, and evaluate the effect of small structural changes of the hydroquinone scaffold 14 on the respiration of this cell line. Our results indicate that these structural changes modify the effect on OXPHOS, obtaining compounds with three alternative actions: inhibitors of complex I-dependent respiration, uncoupler of OXPHOS and compounds with both actions. To confirm this, the effect of a bicyclic hydroquinone (9) was evaluated in isolated mitochondria. Hydroquinone 9 increased mitochondrial respiration in state 4o without effects on the ADP-stimulated respiration (state 3ADP), decreasing the complexes I and II-dependent respiratory control ratio. The effect on mitochondrial respiration was reversed by 6-ketocholestanol addition, indicating that this hydroquinone is a protonophoric uncoupling agent. In intact TA3/Ha cells, hydroquinone 9 caused mitochondrial depolarization, decreasing intracellular ATP and NAD(P)H levels and GSH/GSSG ratio, and slightly increasing the ROS levels. Moreover, it exhibited selective NAD(P)H availability-dependent anti-proliferative effect on cancer cells. Therefore, our results indicate that the ortho-carbonyl hydroquinone scaffold offers the possibility to design compounds with specific actions on OXPHOS of cancer cells. PMID:26712467

  5. BCNU-INDUCED GR2 DEFECT MEDIATES S-GLUTATHIONYLATION OF COMPLEX I AND RESPIRATORY UNCOUPLING IN MYOCARDIUM†

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Patrick T.; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Zen, Pei; Guarini, Giacinta; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2014-01-01

    A deficiency of mitochondrial glutathione reductase (or GR2) is capable of adversely affecting the reduction of GSSG and increasing mitochondrial oxidative stress. BCNU [1, 3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea] is an anticancer agent and known inhibitor of cytosolic GR ex vivo and in vivo. Here we tested the hypothesis that a BCNU-induced GR2 defect contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent impairment of heart function. Intraperitoneal administration of BCNU (40 mg/kg) specifically inhibited GR2 activity by 79.8±2.7% in the mitochondria of rat heart. However, BCNU treatment modestly enhanced the activities of mitochondrial Complex I and other ETC components. The cardiac function of BCNU-treated rats was analyzed by echocardiography, revealing a systolic dysfunction associated with decreased ejection fraction, decreased cardiac output, and an increase in left ventricular internal dimension and left ventricular volume in systole. The respiratory control index of isolated mitochondria from the myocardium was moderately decreased after BCNU treatment, whereas NADH-linked uncoupling of oxygen consumption was significantly enhanced. Extracellular flux analysis to measure the fatty acid oxidation of myocytes indicated a 20% enhancement after BCNU treatment. When the mitochondria were immunoblotted with antibodies against GSH and UCP3, both protein S-glutathionylation of Complex I and expression of UCP3 were significantly up-regulated. Overexpression of SOD2 in the myocardium significantly reversed BCNU-induced GR2 inhibition and mitochondrial impairment. In conclusion, BCNU-mediated cardiotoxicity is characterized by the GR2 deficiency that negatively regulates heart function by impairing mitochondrial integrity, increasing oxidative stress with Complex I S-glutathionylation, and enhancing uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration. PMID:24704251

  6. Small structural changes on a hydroquinone scaffold determine the complex I inhibition or uncoupling of tumoral oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Urra, Félix A; Córdova-Delgado, Miguel; Lapier, Michel; Orellana-Manzano, Andrea; Acevedo-Arévalo, Luis; Pessoa-Mahana, Hernán; González-Vivanco, Jaime M; Martínez-Cifuentes, Maximiliano; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Oney; Millas-Vargas, Juan Pablo; Weiss-López, Boris; Pavani, Mario; Ferreira, Jorge; Araya-Maturana, Ramiro

    2016-01-15

    Mitochondria participate in several distinctiveness of cancer cell, being a promising target for the design of anti-cancer compounds. Previously, we described that ortho-carbonyl hydroquinone scaffold 14 inhibits the complex I-dependent respiration with selective anti-proliferative effect on mouse mammary adenocarcinoma TA3/Ha cancer cells; however, the structural requirements of this hydroquinone scaffold to affect the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) of cancer cells have not been studied in detail. Here, we characterize the mitochondrial metabolism of TA3/Ha cancer cells, which exhibit a high oxidative metabolism, and evaluate the effect of small structural changes of the hydroquinone scaffold 14 on the respiration of this cell line. Our results indicate that these structural changes modify the effect on OXPHOS, obtaining compounds with three alternative actions: inhibitors of complex I-dependent respiration, uncoupler of OXPHOS and compounds with both actions. To confirm this, the effect of a bicyclic hydroquinone (9) was evaluated in isolated mitochondria. Hydroquinone 9 increased mitochondrial respiration in state 4o without effects on the ADP-stimulated respiration (state 3ADP), decreasing the complexes I and II-dependent respiratory control ratio. The effect on mitochondrial respiration was reversed by 6-ketocholestanol addition, indicating that this hydroquinone is a protonophoric uncoupling agent. In intact TA3/Ha cells, hydroquinone 9 caused mitochondrial depolarization, decreasing intracellular ATP and NAD(P)H levels and GSH/GSSG ratio, and slightly increasing the ROS levels. Moreover, it exhibited selective NAD(P)H availability-dependent anti-proliferative effect on cancer cells. Therefore, our results indicate that the ortho-carbonyl hydroquinone scaffold offers the possibility to design compounds with specific actions on OXPHOS of cancer cells.

  7. Mitochondrial biogenesis and increased uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue of mice fed a ketone ester diet

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shireesh; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; King, M. Todd; Baxa, Ulrich; Tam, Joseph; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Clarke, Kieran; Veech, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    We measured the effects of a diet in which d-β-hydroxybutyrate-(R)-1,3 butanediol monoester [ketone ester (KE)] replaced equicaloric amounts of carbohydrate on 8-wk-old male C57BL/6J mice. Diets contained equal amounts of fat, protein, and micronutrients. The KE group was fed ad libitum, whereas the control (Ctrl) mice were pair-fed to the KE group. Blood d-β-hydroxybutyrate levels in the KE group were 3-5 times those reported with high-fat ketogenic diets. Voluntary food intake was reduced dose dependently with the KE diet. Feeding the KE diet for up to 1 mo increased the number of mitochondria and doubled the electron transport chain proteins, uncoupling protein 1, and mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins in the interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in IBAT of the KE group was twice that in IBAT of the Ctrl group. Plasma leptin levels of the KE group were more than 2-fold those of the Ctrl group and were associated with increased sympathetic nervous system activity to IBAT. The KE group exhibited 14% greater resting energy expenditure, but the total energy expenditure measured over a 24-h period or body weights was not different. The quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index was 73% higher in the KE group. These results identify KE as a potential antiobesity supplement.—Srivastava, S., Kashiwaya, Y., King, M. T. Baxa, U., Tam, J., Niu, G., Chen, X., Clarke, K., Veech, R. L. Mitochondrial biogenesis and increased uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue of mice fed a ketone ester diet. PMID:22362892

  8. Uncoupling protein-2 up-regulation and enhanced cyanide toxicity are mediated by PPAR{alpha} activation and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Li, L.; Prabhakaran, K.; Zhang, L.; Leavesley, H.B.; Borowitz, J.L.; Isom, G.E.

    2007-08-15

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2) is an inner mitochondrial membrane proton carrier that modulates mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}) and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation. We have shown that up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643, a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) agonist, enhances cyanide cytotoxicity. The pathway by which Wy14,643 up-regulates UCP-2 was determined in a dopaminergic cell line (N27 cells). Since dopaminergic mesencephalic cells are a primary brain target of cyanide, the N27 immortalized mesencephalic cell was used in this study. Wy14,643 produced a concentration- and time-dependent up-regulation of UCP-2 that was linked to enhanced cyanide-induced cell death. MK886 (PPAR{alpha} antagonist) or PPAR{alpha} knock-down by RNA interference (RNAi) inhibited PPAR{alpha} activity as shown by the peroxisome proliferator response element-luciferase reporter assay, but only partially decreased up-regulation of UCP-2. The role of oxidative stress as an alternative pathway to UCP-2 up-regulation was determined. Wy14,643 induced a rapid surge of ROS generation and loading cells with glutathione ethyl ester (GSH-EE) or pre-treatment with vitamin E attenuated up-regulation of UCP-2. On the other hand, RNAi knockdown of PPAR{alpha} did not alter ROS generation, suggesting a PPAR{alpha}-independent component to the response. Co-treatment with PPAR{alpha}-RNAi and GSH-EE blocked both the up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643 and the cyanide-induced cell death. It was concluded that a PPAR{alpha}-mediated pathway and an oxidative stress pathway independent of PPAR{alpha} mediate the up-regulation of UCP-2 and subsequent increased vulnerability to cyanide-induced cytotoxicity.

  9. The Mitochondrial Uncoupler DNP Triggers Brain Cell mTOR Signaling Network Reprogramming and CREB Pathway Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yongqing; Gharavi, Robert; Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Jaewon; Siddiqui, Sana; Telljohann, Richard; Nassar, Matthew R.; Cutler, Roy G.; Becker, Kevin G.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is highly responsive to nutrient availability and ongoing activity in neuronal circuits. The molecular mechanisms by which brain cells respond to an increase in cellular energy expenditure are largely unknown. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling enhances cellular energy expenditure in mitochondria and can be induced with 2, 4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a proton ionophore previously used for weight loss. We found that DNP treatment reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, increases intracellular Ca2+ levels and reduces oxidative stress in cerebral cortical neurons. Gene expression profiling of the cerebral cortex of DNP-treated mice revealed reprogramming of signaling cascades that included suppression of the mTOR and insulin – PI3K – MAPK pathways, and up-regulation of tuberous sclerosis complex 2, a negative regulator of mTOR. Genes encoding proteins involved in autophagy processes were up-regulated in response to DNP. CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) signaling, Arc and BDNF, which play important roles in synaptic plasticity and adaptive cellular stress responses, were up-regulated in response to DNP, and DNP-treated mice exhibited improved performance in a test of learning and memory. Immunoblot analysis verified that key DNP-induced changes in gene expression resulted in corresponding changes at the protein level. Our findings suggest that mild mitochondrial uncoupling triggers an integrated signaling response in brain cells characterized by reprogramming of mTOR and insulin signaling, and up-regulation of pathways involved in adaptive stress responses, molecular waste disposal and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26010875

  10. GABA-induced uncoupling of GABA/benzodiazepine site interactions is mediated by increased GABAA receptor internalization and associated with a change in subunit composition.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M L; Ferreri, M C; Gravielle, M C

    2014-01-17

    Persistent activation of GABAA receptors triggers compensatory changes in receptor function that are relevant to physiological, pathological and pharmacological conditions. Chronic treatment of cultured neurons with GABA for 48h has been shown to produce a down-regulation of receptor number and an uncoupling of GABA/benzodiazepine site interactions with a half-time of 24-25h. Down-regulation is the result of a transcriptional repression of GABAA receptor subunit genes and depends on activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels. The mechanism of this uncoupling is currently unknown. We have previously demonstrated that a single brief exposure of rat primary neocortical cultures to GABA for 5-10min (t½=3min) initiates a process that results in uncoupling hours later (t½=12h) without a change in receptor number. Uncoupling is contingent upon GABAA receptor activation and independent of voltage-gated calcium influx. This process is accompanied by a selective decrease in subunit mRNA levels. Here, we report that the brief GABA exposure induces a decrease in the percentage of α3-containing receptors, a receptor subtype that exhibits a high degree of coupling between GABA and benzodiazepine binding sites. Initiation of GABA-induced uncoupling is prevented by co-incubation of GABA with high concentrations of sucrose suggesting that it is dependent on a receptor internalization step. Moreover, results from immunocytochemical and biochemical experiments indicate that GABA exposure causes an increase in GABAA receptor endocytosis. Together, these data suggest that the uncoupling mechanism involves an initial increase in receptor internalization followed by activation of a signaling cascade that leads to selective changes in receptor subunit levels. These changes might result in the assembly of receptors with altered subunit compositions that display a lower degree of coupling between GABA and benzodiazepine sites. Uncoupling might represent a homeostatic mechanism

  11. Is fully coupled hydrogeophysical inversion really better than uncoupled? A comparison study using ensemble Kalman filter assimilation of ERT-monitored tracer test data. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, M.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Salandin, P.; Binley, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in geophysical methods have been increasingly exploited as inverse modeling tools in groundwater hydrology. In particular, several attempts to constrain the hydrogeophysical inverse problem to reduce inversion error have been made using time-lapse geophysical measurements through both coupled and uncoupled inversion approaches. On one hand, the main advantage of coupled approaches is that the numerical models for the geophysical and hydrological processes are linked together such that the geophysical data are inverted directly for the hydrological properties of interest, avoiding artifacts related to the classical geophysical inversions. On the other hand, uncoupled approaches, relying upon a geophysical inversion that is carried out before estimating the hydrological variable of interest, could reveal something about the process that is not accounted for in a model, i.e., they are not constrained by the conceptualization of the hydrological model. In spite of the appeal and popularity of fully coupled inversion approaches, their superiority over more traditional uncoupled methods still needs to be objectively proven; the aim of this work is to shed some light on this debate. An approach based on the Lagrangian formulation of transport and the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is here applied to assess the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K) by assimilating time-lapse cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data generated for a synthetic tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer. In the coupled version of the proposed inverse modeling approach, the K distribution is retrieved by assimilating raw ERT resistance data without the need for a preliminary geoelectrical inversion. In the uncoupled version, K is estimated by assimilating electrical conductivity data derived from a previously performed classical geophysical inversion of the same resistance dataset. We compare the performance of the two approaches in a number of simulation

  12. Clinically relevant concentrations of di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) uncouple cardiac syncytium

    SciTech Connect

    Gillum, Nikki; Karabekian, Zaruhi; Swift, Luther M.; Brown, Ronald P.; Kay, Matthew W.; Sarvazyan, Narine

    2009-04-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a widely used plasticizer found in a variety of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) medical products. The results of studies in experimental animals suggest that DEHP leached from flexible PVC tubing may cause health problems in some patient populations. While the cancerogenic and reproductive effects of DEHP are well recognized, little is known about the potential adverse impact of phthalates on the heart. This study examined the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of DEHP on neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. It was found that application of DEHP to a confluent, synchronously beating cardiac cell network, leads to a marked, concentration-dependent decrease in conduction velocity and asynchronous cell beating. The mechanism behind these changes was a loss of gap junctional connexin-43, documented using Western blot analysis, dye-transfer assay and immunofluorescence. In addition to its effect on electrical coupling, DEHP treatment also affected the mechanical movement of myocyte layers. The latter was linked to the decreased stiffness of the underlying fibroblasts, as the amount of triton-insoluble vimentin was significantly decreased in DEHP-treated samples. The data indicate that DEHP, in clinically relevant concentrations, can impair the electrical and mechanical behavior of a cardiac cell network. Applicability of these findings to human patients remains to be established.

  13. Myosin VI deafness mutation prevents the initiation of processive runs on actin.

    PubMed

    Pylypenko, Olena; Song, Lin; Shima, Ai; Yang, Zhaohui; Houdusse, Anne M; Sweeney, H Lee

    2015-03-17

    Mutations in the reverse-direction myosin, myosin VI, are associated with deafness in humans and mice. A myosin VI deafness mutation, D179Y, which is in the transducer of the motor, uncoupled the release of the ATP hydrolysis product, inorganic phosphate (Pi), from dependency on actin binding and destroyed the ability of single dimeric molecules to move processively on actin filaments. We observed that processive movement is rescued if ATP is added to the mutant dimer following binding of both heads to actin in the absence of ATP, demonstrating that the mutation selectively destroys the initiation of processive runs at physiological ATP levels. A drug (omecamtiv) that accelerates the actin-activated activity of cardiac myosin was able to rescue processivity of the D179Y mutant dimers at physiological ATP concentrations by slowing the actin-independent release of Pi. Thus, it may be possible to create myosin VI-specific drugs that rescue the function of deafness-causing mutations.

  14. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    PubMed

    Couce, Alejandro; Guelfo, Javier R; Blázquez, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  15. [Role of uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 in energy balance, type 2 diabetes and obesity. Synergism with the thyroid].

    PubMed

    Zaninovich, Angel A

    2005-01-01

    Accumulation of fat in the tissues results from the balance between energy intake and expenditure. The thyroid hormones have long been known to be the main regulators of basal metabolism through its stimulation of oxygen consumption in cells. The discovery of brown adipose tissue (BAT) and its unique activity of heat production and dissipation through the action of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) during cold stress, showed the relevance of this tissue for energy expenditure in lower mammals. UCP1 is only expressed in BAT through the synergistic action of norepinephrine (NE) and thyroid hormones in animals exposed to cold and to a lesser degree after meals. The uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) is found in many tissues and exerts dual effects: it protects cells function from damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). On the other hand, the uncoupling induced by UCP2 in mitochondria of pancreatic beta cells decreases ATP synthesis and impairs insulin secretion in response to glucose. Hyperlipidemia also prevents insulin secretion through a similar pathway, leading to hyperglycemia. The uncoupling protein-3 is found mostly in skeletal muscle and BAT and its absence did not alter heat production or body temperature. This protein would export fatty acids ouside the mitochondrial matrix for combustion in tissues where fat is the main fuel. In humans, the uncoupling proteins may not play a leading role in energy regulation. However, intensive studies on these and other factors influencing energy expenditure, appetite and glucose metabolism are taken place worldwide and may soon provide more clues on the mechanisms regulating energy balance and their use in the prevention or treatment of human obesity and diabetes type 2.

  16. SOD1 mutations disrupt redox-sensitive Rac regulation of NADPH oxidase in a familial ALS model

    PubMed Central

    Harraz, Maged M.; Marden, Jennifer J.; Zhou, Weihong; Zhang, Yulong; Williams, Aislinn; Sharov, Victor S.; Nelson, Kathryn; Luo, Meihui; Paulson, Henry; Schöneich, Christian; Engelhardt, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegeneration in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is associated with enhanced redox stress caused by dominant mutations in superoxide dismutase–1 (SOD1). SOD1 is a cytosolic enzyme that facilitates the conversion of superoxide (O2•–) to H2O2. Here we demonstrate that SOD1 is not just a catabolic enzyme, but can also directly regulate NADPH oxidase–dependent (Nox-dependent) O2•– production by binding Rac1 and inhibiting its GTPase activity. Oxidation of Rac1 by H2O2 uncoupled SOD1 binding in a reversible fashion, producing a self-regulating redox sensor for Nox-derived O2•– production. This process of redox-sensitive uncoupling of SOD1 from Rac1 was defective in SOD1 ALS mutants, leading to enhanced Rac1/Nox activation in transgenic mouse tissues and cell lines expressing ALS SOD1 mutants. Glial cell toxicity associated with expression of SOD1 mutants in culture was significantly attenuated by treatment with the Nox inhibitor apocynin. Treatment of ALS mice with apocynin also significantly increased their average life span. This redox sensor mechanism may explain the gain-of-function seen with certain SOD1 mutations associated with ALS and defines new therapeutic targets. PMID:18219391

  17. Reproductive ethics and the family.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J L

    2000-06-01

    The phrase 'reproductive ethics', as used by bioethicists, typically refers to concerns over morally appropriate employment of assisted reproductive technologies and, perhaps somewhat less commonly, to issues arising from technologies that block conception or end pregnancies. I here recommend to the attention of the field a more commodious use of 'reproductive ethics', one that takes seriously how humans are brought into the world as moral and social beings, and not simply as biological individuals. As a focus for this expanded agenda, I examine prevalent disagreements over the patterns and sources of the responsibilities and prerogatives that help define family structures, both as these are reflected in assisted reproductive practices involving the purchase of gametes, and in U.S. legal controversies about whether parents, or family courts, should determine who has the right to a relationship with children. PMID:15586970

  18. Reproductive ethics and the family.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J L

    2000-06-01

    The phrase 'reproductive ethics', as used by bioethicists, typically refers to concerns over morally appropriate employment of assisted reproductive technologies and, perhaps somewhat less commonly, to issues arising from technologies that block conception or end pregnancies. I here recommend to the attention of the field a more commodious use of 'reproductive ethics', one that takes seriously how humans are brought into the world as moral and social beings, and not simply as biological individuals. As a focus for this expanded agenda, I examine prevalent disagreements over the patterns and sources of the responsibilities and prerogatives that help define family structures, both as these are reflected in assisted reproductive practices involving the purchase of gametes, and in U.S. legal controversies about whether parents, or family courts, should determine who has the right to a relationship with children.

  19. Developing a reproductive life plan.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Frey, Keith A; David, Paru S; Hunt, Katherine S; Noble, Brie N; Mayer, Anita P

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is 2-fold: to emphasize the importance of a reproductive life plan and to define its key elements. We review the 2006 recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regarding ways to improve the delivery of preconception health care to women in the United States, with particular focus on encouraging individual reproductive responsibility throughout the life span and on encouraging every woman to develop a reproductive life plan. We propose recommendations for the content of a reproductive life plan and explore ways to incorporate the guidelines from the CDC into clinical practice. By encouraging women to consider their plans for childbearing before they become pregnant, clinicians have the opportunity to influence behavior before pregnancy, which may decrease the incidence of unintended pregnancies and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  20. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  1. Reproduction Symposium: developmental programming of reproductive and metabolic health.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, V; Veiga-Lopez, A

    2014-08-01

    Inappropriate programming of the reproductive system by developmental exposure to excess steroid hormones is of concern. Sheep are well suited for investigating developmental origin of reproductive and metabolic disorders. The developmental time line of female sheep (approximately 5 mo gestation and approximately 7 mo to puberty) is ideal for conducting sequential studies of the progression of metabolic and/or reproductive disruption from the developmental insult to manifestation of adult consequences. Major benefits of using sheep include knowledge of established critical periods to target adult defects, a rich understanding of reproductive neuroendocrine regulation, availability of noninvasive approaches to monitor follicular dynamics, established surgical approaches to obtain hypophyseal portal blood for measurement of hypothalamic hormones, and the ability to perform studies in natural setting thereby keeping behavioral interactions intact. Of importance is the ability to chronically instrument fetus and mother for determining early endocrine perturbations. Prenatal exposure of the female to excess testosterone (T) leads to an array of adult reproductive disorders that include LH excess, functional hyperandrogenism, neuroendocrine defects, multifollicular ovarian morphology, and corpus luteum dysfunction culminating in early reproductive failure. At the neuroendocrine level, all 3 feedback systems are compromised. At the pituitary level, gonadotrope (LH secretion) sensitivity to GnRH is increased. Multifollicular ovarian morphology stems from persistence of follicles as well as enhanced follicular recruitment. These defects culminate in progressive loss of cyclicity and reduced fecundity. Prenatal T excess also leads to fetal growth retardation, an early marker of adult reproductive and metabolic diseases, insulin resistance, hypertension, and behavioral deficits. Collectively, the reproductive and metabolic deficits of prenatal T-treated sheep provide proof of

  2. Uncoupling histone turnover from transcription-associated histone H3 modifications.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Paolo; Strubin, Michel

    2015-04-30

    Transcription in eukaryotes is associated with two major changes in chromatin organization. Firstly, nucleosomal histones are continuously replaced by new histones, an event that in yeast occurs predominantly at transcriptionally active promoters. Secondly, histones become modified post-translationally at specific lysine residues. Some modifications, including histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and acetylation at lysines 9 (H3K9ac) and 14 (H3K14ac), are specifically enriched at active promoters where histones exchange, suggesting a possible causal relationship. Other modifications accumulate within transcribed regions and one of them, H3K36me3, is thought to prevent histone exchange. Here we explored the relationship between these four H3 modifications and histone turnover at a few selected genes. Using lysine-to-arginine mutants and a histone exchange assay, we found that none of these modifications plays a major role in either promoting or preventing histone turnover. Unexpectedly, mutation of H3K56, whose acetylation occurs prior to chromatin incorporation, had an effect only when introduced into the nucleosomal histone. Furthermore, we used various genetic approaches to show that histone turnover can be experimentally altered with no major consequence on the H3 modifications tested. Together, these results suggest that transcription-associated histone turnover and H3 modification are two correlating but largely independent events.

  3. Hormonal regulation of female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A; Bentley, G E; Cabrera, R; Ortega, H H; Perfito, N; Wu, T J; Micevych, P

    2012-07-01

    Reproduction is an event that requires the coordination of peripheral organs with the nervous system to ensure that the internal and external environments are optimal for successful procreation of the species. This is accomplished by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that coordinates reproductive behavior with ovulation. The primary signal from the central nervous system is gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which modulates the activity of anterior pituitary gonadotropes regulating follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) release. As ovarian follicles develop they release estradiol, which negatively regulates further release of GnRH and FSH. As estradiol concentrations peak they trigger the surge release of GnRH, which leads to LH release inducing ovulation. Release of GnRH within the central nervous system helps modulate reproductive behaviors providing a node at which control of reproduction is regulated. To address these issues, this review focuses on several critical questions. How is the HPG axis regulated in species with different reproductive strategies? What internal and external conditions modulate the synthesis and release of GnRH? How does GnRH modulate reproductive behavior within the hypothalamus? How does disease shift the activity of the HPG axis?

  4. Reproductive toxicity of phthalate esters.

    PubMed

    Martino-Andrade, Anderson Joel; Chahoud, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Phthalate esters are ubiquitous environmental contaminants that in general display low-toxicity. Overall, the reproductive effects of these compounds are well characterized in adult's animals, with gonadal injury observed after high dose exposure. However, results of recent transgeneration studies indicate that the reproductive system of developing animals is particularly vulnerable to certain phthalates. The phenotypic alterations observed in male offspring rats exposed during the perinatal period have remarkable similarities with common human reproductive disorders, including cryptorchidism, hypospadias and low-sperm counts. Recent results also indicate that high phthalate doses can adversely affect adult and developing female rats. However, the main question involving phthalates is whether the current level of human exposure is sufficient to adversely affect male and/or female reproductive health. Here, we review the reproductive toxicity data of phthalates in adult and developing animals as well as possible modes of action. In addition, we briefly discuss the relevance of animal studies to humans in light of recent epidemiological data and experimental research with low (human relevant) doses. Finally, we point out some critical issues that should be addressed in order to clarify the implications of phthalates for human reproduction. PMID:19760678

  5. Plant reproduction in spaceflight environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, M. E.; Kuang, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    Because plant reproduction is a complex developmental process there are many possible sites of perturbation by the unusual environments of orbital spacecraft. Previous long-duration experiments on Soviet platforms shared features of slowed development through the vegetative stage of plant growth and aborted reproductive function. Our goal has been to understand how special features of the spaceflight environment impact physiological function and reproductive development. In a series of short-duration experiments in the Shuttle mid-deck we studied early reproductive development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Pollen and ovule development aborted at an early stage in the first experiment on STS-54 which utilized closed plant growth chambers. Post-flight analysis suggested that the plants may have been carbon dioxide limited. Subsequent experiments utilized carbon dioxide enrichment (on STS-51) and cabin air flow-through with an air exchange system (on STS-68). Both modifications allowed pollen and ovule development to occur normally on orbit, and full reproductive development up to the stage of an immature seed occurred on STS-68. However, analysis of plant roots from these experiments demonstrated a limitation in rootzone aeration in the spaceflight material that was not mitigated by these procedures. In the future, additional resources (crew time, upgraded flight hardware, and special platforms) will invite more elaborate, long-duration experimentation. On the ISS, a variable speed centrifuge and upgraded plant habitats will permit detailed experiments on the role of gravity in shaping the plant micro-environment, and what influence this plays during reproduction.

  6. Novel function of LHFPL2 in female and male distal reproductive tract development

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Zhou, Jun; Li, Rong; Dudley, Elizabeth A.; Ye, Xiaoqin

    2016-01-01

    Congenital reproductive tract anomalies could impair fertility. Female and male reproductive tracts are developed from Müllerian ducts and Wolffian ducts, respectively, involving initiation, elongation and differentiation. Genetic basis solely for distal reproductive tract development is largely unknown. Lhfpl2 (lipoma HMGIC fusion partner-like 2) encodes a tetra-transmembrane protein with unknown functions. It is expressed in follicle cells of ovary and epithelial cells of reproductive tracts. A spontaneous point mutation of Lhfpl2 (LHFPL2G102E) leads to infertility in 100% female mice, which have normal ovarian development, ovulation, uterine development, and uterine response to exogenous estrogen stimulation, but abnormal upper longitudinal vaginal septum and lower vaginal agenesis. Infertility is also observed in ~70% mutant males, which have normal mating behavior and sperm counts, but abnormal distal vas deferens convolution resulting in complete and incomplete blockage of reproductive tract in infertile and fertile males, respectively. On embryonic day 15.5, mutant Müllerian ducts and Wolffian ducts have elongated but their duct tips are enlarged and fail to merge with the urogenital sinus. These findings provide a novel function of LHFPL2 and a novel genetic basis for distal reproductive tract development; they also emphasize the importance of an additional merging phase for proper reproductive tract development. PMID:26964900

  7. Estimating the spontaneous mutation rate of loss of sex in the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianping

    2002-01-01

    Few events have evolutionary consequences as pervasive as changes in reproductive behavior. Among those changes, the loss of the ability to undergo sexual reproduction is probably the most profound. However, little is known about the rate of loss of sex. Here I describe an experimental system using the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans and provide the first empirical estimate of the spontaneous mutation rate of loss of sex in fungi. Two critical steps in sexual reproduction in C. neoformans were examined: mating and filamentation. Mating, the fusion of cells of opposite sexes, is a universal first step in eukaryotic sexual reproduction. In contrast, filamentation, a prerequisite process preceding meiosis and sexual spore development, is restricted to C. neoformans and a few other fungal species. After approximately 600 mitotic divisions under favorable asexual growth conditions, mean abilities for mating and filamentation decreased significantly by >67 and 24%, respectively. Similarly, though statistically not significant, the mean vegetative growth rates also decreased and among the mutation accumulation lines, the vegetative growth rates were negatively correlated to the mating ability. The estimated mutation rates to decreases in mating ability and filamentation were in excess of 0.0172 and 0.0036, respectively. The results show that C. neoformans can be a highly attractive model for analyses of reproductive system evolution in fungi. PMID:12454063

  8. [HIV and reproductive choices].

    PubMed

    Boer, K; de Vries, J W; de Beaufort, I E

    1995-05-13

    It is estimated that there are about 120-150 hemophilic men infected with HIV in the Netherlands as well as 1000 men infected via intravenous drug use. The majority of them are in reproductive age with relationships with seronegative women. In the event they want to have a child, artificial insemination with donor sperm (KID) is an option. In 1994 there were 147 instances of insemination of 66 women with the processed semen of HIV-positive men and no infection resulted. The annual risk of HIV infection was 7.2% of a woman engaging in unprotected intercourse, according to a prospective Italian study. The risk of HIV infection per contact was estimated at 0.1-5.6%. However, it is not yet proven that processed sperm of an HIV-seropositive man can produce a pregnancy without the risk of infecting the woman. The risk of transmission of HIV to the fetus is higher in artificial insemination of a seropositive woman with the sperm of her partner. In vitro fertilization is not a sure method either for the prevention of HIV infection of the mother because of the possibility of an egg cell being infected before fertilization. HIV-infected pregnant women face the problems of caring for HIV-infected offspring. For HIV discordant couples the advice is to use both condoms for the prevention of infection and oral contraceptives for the prevention of pregnancy. In the case of a lesbian relationship, if the partners want to have a child, HIV infection is still a factor because of previous heterosexual contacts.

  9. Prokineticins in central and peripheral control of human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, Wael; Brouillet, Sophie; Sergent, Frederic; Boufettal, Houssine; Samouh, Naima; Aboussaouira, Touria; Hoffmann, Pascale; Feige, Jean Jacques; Benharouga, Mohamed; Alfaidy, Nadia

    2015-11-01

    Prokineticin 1 (PROK1) and (PROK2), are two closely related proteins that were identified as the mammalian homologs of their two amphibian homologs, mamba intestinal toxin (MIT-1) and Bv8. PROKs activate two G-protein linked receptors (prokineticin receptor 1 and 2, PROKR1 and PROKR2). Both PROK1 and PROK2 have been found to regulate a stunning array of biological functions. In particular, PROKs stimulate gastrointestinal motility, thus accounting for their family name "prokineticins". PROK1 acts as a potent angiogenic mitogen, thus earning its other name, endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial factor. In contrast, PROK2 signaling pathway has been shown to be a critical regulator of olfactory bulb morphogenesis and sexual maturation. During the last decade, strong evidences established the key roles of prokineticins in the control of human central and peripheral reproductive processes. PROKs act as main regulators of the physiological functions of the ovary, uterus, placenta, and testis, with marked dysfunctions in various pathological conditions such as recurrent pregnancy loss, and preeclampsia. PROKs have also been associated to the tumor development of some of these organs. In the central system, prokineticins control the migration of GnRH neurons, a key process that controls reproductive functions. Importantly, mutations in PROK2 and PROKR2 are associated to the development of Kallmann syndrome, with direct consequences on the reproductive system. This review describes the finely tuned actions of prokineticins in the control of the central and peripheral reproductive processes. Also, it discusses future research directions for the use of these cytokines as diagnostic markers for several reproductive diseases.

  10. Effects of short photoperiod on energy intake, thermogenesis, and reproduction in desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueying; Zhao, Zhijun; Vasilieva, Nina; Khrushchova, Anastasia; Wang, Dehua

    2015-03-01

    Desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii) are the least known species in the genus Phodopus with respect to ecology and physiology, and deserve scientific attention, particularly because of their small body size. Here, the responses of energy metabolism and reproductive function to short photoperiods in desert hamsters were investigated. Male and female desert hamsters were acclimated to either long day (LD) (L:D 16:8 h) or short day (SD) photoperiods (L:D 8:16 h) for three months, and then the females were transferred back to an LD photoperiod for a further five months, while at the end of the SD acclimation the males were killed and measurements were taken for serum leptin as well as molecular markers for thermogenesis. We found that like the other two species from the genus Phodopus, the desert hamsters under SD decreased body mass, increased adaptive thermogenesis as indicated by elevated mitochondrial protein content and uncoupling protein-1 content in brown adipose tissue, and suppressed reproduction compared to those under LD. However, different from the other two species, desert hamsters did not show any differences in energy intake or serum leptin concentration between LD and SD. These data suggest that different species from the same genus respond in different ways to the environmental signals, and the desert adapted species are not as sensitive to change in photoperiod as the other two species.

  11. Toward understanding the role of CYP78A9 during Arabidopsis reproduction.

    PubMed

    Sotelo-Silveira, Mariana; Cucinotta, Mara; Colombo, Lucia; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; de Folter, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    After fertilization in Arabidopsis, auxin response in ovules triggers fruit development through the stimulation of gibberellin metabolism. In a recent work, we showed that this model could not explain why CYP78A9 overexpression can uncouple these processes. The specific expression pattern of CYP78A9 suggests its involvement during reproductive development. Moreover, controlled pollination showed that CYP78A9 responds to fertilization. The genetic evidence supports the idea that CYP78A9 and its closest paralogs participate in a pathway that control floral organ size and ovule integuments development as denoted by the phenotypes of es1-D overexpression and cyp78a8 cyp78a9 double mutants. Furthermore, according to previous predictions, perturbations in the flavonol biosynthesis pathway were detected in cyp78a9, cyp78a8 cyp78a9 and es1-D mutants. However, they do not cause the observed phenotypes. Our results add new insights into the role of CYP78A9 in plant reproduction and present the first characterization of metabolite differences between mutants in this gene family. PMID:23733073

  12. Toward understanding the role of CYP78A9 during Arabidopsis reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Sotelo-Silveira, Mariana; Cucinotta, Mara; Colombo, Lucia; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; de Folter, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    After fertilization in Arabidopsis, auxin response in ovules triggers fruit development through the stimulation of gibberellin metabolism. In a recent work, we showed that this model could not explain why CYP78A9 overexpression can uncouple these processes. The specific expression pattern of CYP78A9 suggests its involvement during reproductive development. Moreover, controlled pollination showed that CYP78A9 responds to fertilization. The genetic evidence supports the idea that CYP78A9 and its closest paralogs participate in a pathway that control floral organ size and ovule integuments development as denoted by the phenotypes of es1-D overexpression and cyp78a8 cyp78a9 double mutants. Furthermore, according to previous predictions, perturbations in the flavonol biosynthesis pathway were detected in cyp78a9, cyp78a8 cyp78a9 and es1-D mutants. However, they do not cause the observed phenotypes. Our results add new insights into the role of CYP78A9 in plant reproduction and present the first characterization of metabolite differences between mutants in this gene family. PMID:23733073

  13. Reproductive cycles of buffalo.

    PubMed

    Perera, B M A O

    2011-04-01

    The domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) has an important role in the agricultural economy of many developing countries in Asia, providing milk, meat and draught power. It is also used in some Mediterranean and Latin American countries as a source of milk and meat for specialized markets. Although the buffalo can adapt to harsh environments and live on poor quality forage, reproductive efficiency is often compromised by such conditions, resulting in late sexual maturity, long postpartum anoestrus, poor expression of oestrus, poor conception rates and long calving intervals. The age at puberty is influenced by genotype, nutrition, management and climate, and under favourable conditions occurs at 15-18 months in river buffalo and 21-24 months in swamp buffalo. The ovaries are smaller than in cattle and contain fewer primordial follicles. Buffalo are capable of breeding throughout the year, but in many countries a seasonal pattern of ovarian activity occurs. This is attributed in tropical regions to changes in rainfall resulting in feed availability or to temperature stress resulting in elevated prolactin secretion, and in temperate regions to changes in photoperiod and melatonin secretion. The mean length of the oestrous cycle is 21 days, with greater variation than observed in cattle. The signs of oestrus in buffalo are less overt than in cattle and homosexual behaviour between females is rare. The duration of oestrus is 5-27 h, with ovulation occurring 24-48 h (mean 34 h) after the onset of oestrus. The hormonal changes occurring in peripheral circulation are similar to those observed in cattle, but the peak concentrations of progesterone and oestradiol-17β are less. The number of follicular waves during an oestrous cycle varies from one to three and influences the length of the luteal phase as well as the inter-ovulatory interval. Under optimal conditions, dairy types managed with limited or no suckling resume oestrus cyclicity by 30-60 days after calving

  14. Reproductive cycles of buffalo.

    PubMed

    Perera, B M A O

    2011-04-01

    The domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) has an important role in the agricultural economy of many developing countries in Asia, providing milk, meat and draught power. It is also used in some Mediterranean and Latin American countries as a source of milk and meat for specialized markets. Although the buffalo can adapt to harsh environments and live on poor quality forage, reproductive efficiency is often compromised by such conditions, resulting in late sexual maturity, long postpartum anoestrus, poor expression of oestrus, poor conception rates and long calving intervals. The age at puberty is influenced by genotype, nutrition, management and climate, and under favourable conditions occurs at 15-18 months in river buffalo and 21-24 months in swamp buffalo. The ovaries are smaller than in cattle and contain fewer primordial follicles. Buffalo are capable of breeding throughout the year, but in many countries a seasonal pattern of ovarian activity occurs. This is attributed in tropical regions to changes in rainfall resulting in feed availability or to temperature stress resulting in elevated prolactin secretion, and in temperate regions to changes in photoperiod and melatonin secretion. The mean length of the oestrous cycle is 21 days, with greater variation than observed in cattle. The signs of oestrus in buffalo are less overt than in cattle and homosexual behaviour between females is rare. The duration of oestrus is 5-27 h, with ovulation occurring 24-48 h (mean 34 h) after the onset of oestrus. The hormonal changes occurring in peripheral circulation are similar to those observed in cattle, but the peak concentrations of progesterone and oestradiol-17β are less. The number of follicular waves during an oestrous cycle varies from one to three and influences the length of the luteal phase as well as the inter-ovulatory interval. Under optimal conditions, dairy types managed with limited or no suckling resume oestrus cyclicity by 30-60 days after calving

  15. Hypercholesterolemia-induced erectile dysfunction: endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the mouse penis by NAD(P)H oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Liu, Tongyun; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Strong, Travis D.; Sezen, Sena F.; Johnson, Justin M.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hypercholesterolemia induces erectile dysfunction (ED) mostly by increasing oxidative stress and impairing endothelial function in the penis, but the mechanisms regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the penis are not understood. AIMS We evaluated whether hypercholesterolemia activates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase in the penis, providing an initial source of ROS to induce endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling and endothelial dysfunction resulting in ED. METHODS Low-density-lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)–null mice were fed Western diet for 4 weeks to induce early-stage hyperlipidemia. Wild type (WT) mice fed regular chow served as controls. Mice received NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 mM in drinking water) or vehicle. Erectile function was assessed in response to cavernous nerve electrical stimulation. Markers of endothelial function (phospho [P]-vasodilator-stimulated-protein [VASP]-Ser-239), oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [HNE]), sources of ROS (eNOS uncoupling and NAD[P]H oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox, and gp91phox), P-eNOS-Ser-1177, and eNOS were measured by Western blot in penes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Molecular mechanisms of ROS generation and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemia-induced ED. RESULTS Erectile response was significantly (P<0.05) reduced in hypercholesterolemic LDLR-null mice compared to WT mice. Relative to WT mice, hypercholesterolemia increased (P<0.05) protein expressions of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox and gp91phox, eNOS uncoupling, and 4-HNE-modified proteins, and reduced (P<0.05) P-VASP-Ser-239 expression in the penis. Apocynin treatment of LDLR-null mice preserved (P<0.05) maximal intracavernosal pressure, and reversed (P < 0.05) the abnormalities in protein expressions of gp67phox and gp47phox, 4-HNE, P-VASP-Ser-239, and eNOS uncoupling in the penis. Apocynin treatment of WT mice did not affect any of these parameters

  16. Reproduction in the space environment: Part I. Animal reproductive studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santy, P. A.; Jennings, R. T.; Craigie, D.

    1990-01-01

    Mankind's exploration and colonization of the frontier of space will ultimately depend on men's and women's ability to live, work, and reproduce in the space environment. This paper reviews animal studies, from microorganisms to mammals, done in space or under space-simulated conditions, which identify some of the key areas which might interfere with human reproductive physiology and/or embryonic development. Those space environmental factors which impacted almost all species included: microgravity, artificial gravity, radiation, and closed life support systems. These factors may act independently and in combination to produce their effects. To date, there have been no studies which have looked at the entire process of reproduction in any animal species. This type of investigation will be critical in understanding and preventing the problems which will affect human reproduction. Part II will discuss these problems directly as they relate to human physiology.

  17. [Acceleration of Embryonic Development of Pinus sibirica Trees with a One-Year Reproductive Cycle].

    PubMed

    Tret'yakova, I N; Lukina, N V

    2016-01-01

    The study of the formation of embryonic structures in Pinus sibirica forms with a one-year reproductive cycle showed that the acceleration of the embryonic process manifested itself as a reduction of the coenocytic stage of the female gametophyte development (1.5 months instead of 1 year). The egg was not fertilized because of the asynchronous maturation of male and female gametophytes. Seeds without embryos were formed. We assumed that the acceleration of the reproductive process in Pinus sibirica was caused by a mutation in the female generative organs.

  18. [Acceleration of Embryonic Development of Pinus sibirica Trees with a One-Year Reproductive Cycle].

    PubMed

    Tret'yakova, I N; Lukina, N V

    2016-01-01

    The study of the formation of embryonic structures in Pinus sibirica forms with a one-year reproductive cycle showed that the acceleration of the embryonic process manifested itself as a reduction of the coenocytic stage of the female gametophyte development (1.5 months instead of 1 year). The egg was not fertilized because of the asynchronous maturation of male and female gametophytes. Seeds without embryos were formed. We assumed that the acceleration of the reproductive process in Pinus sibirica was caused by a mutation in the female generative organs. PMID:27149748

  19. Quantifying Clonal and Subclonal Passenger Mutations in Cancer Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Ivana; Gerold, Jeffrey M.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of mutations in the exome of cancer cells are passengers, which do not affect the reproductive rate of the cell. Passengers can provide important information about the evolutionary history of an individual cancer, and serve as a molecular clock. Passengers can also become targets for immunotherapy or confer resistance to treatment. We study the stochastic expansion of a population of cancer cells describing the growth of primary tumors or metastatic lesions. We first analyze the process by looking forward in time and calculate the fixation probabilities and frequencies of successive passenger mutations ordered by their time of appearance. We compute the likelihood of specific evolutionary trees, thereby informing the phylogenetic reconstruction of cancer evolution in individual patients. Next, we derive results looking backward in time: for a given subclonal mutation we estimate the number of cancer cells that were present at the time when that mutation arose. We derive exact formulas for the expected numbers of subclonal mutations of any frequency. Fitting this formula to cancer sequencing data leads to an estimate for the ratio of birth and death rates of cancer cells during the early stages of clonal expansion. PMID:26828429

  20. R31C GNRH1 Mutation and Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Maione, Luigi; Albarel, Frederique; Bouchard, Philippe; Gallant, Megan; Flanagan, Colleen A.; Bobe, Regis; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joelle; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria; Brue, Thierry; Millar, Robert P.; Lombes, Marc; Young, Jacques; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Bouligand, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH) is a rare reproductive disease leading to lack of puberty and infertility. Loss-of-function mutations of GNRH1 gene are a very rare cause of autosomal recessive nCHH. R31C GNRH1 is the only missense mutation that affects the conserved GnRH decapeptide sequence. This mutation was identified in a CpG islet in nine nCHH subjects from four unrelated families, giving evidence for a putative “hot spot”. Interestingly, all the nCHH patients carry this mutation in heterozygosis that strikingly contrasts with the recessive inheritance associated with frame shift and non-sense mutations. Therefore, after exclusion of a second genetic event, a comprehensive functional characterization of the mutant R31C GnRH was undertaken. Using different cellular models, we clearly demonstrate a dramatic reduction of the mutant decapeptide capacity to bind GnRH-receptor, to activate MAPK pathway and to trigger inositol phosphate accumulation and intracellular calcium mobilization. In addition it is less able than wild type to induce lh-beta transcription and LH secretion in gonadotrope cells. Finally, the absence of a negative dominance in vitro offers a unique opportunity to discuss the complex in vivo patho-physiology of this form of nCHH. PMID:23936060