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Sample records for mutsa dna lesion

  1. Covalently Linked Tandem Lesions in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Patrzyc, Helen B.; Dawidzik, Jean B.; Budzinski, Edwin E.; Freund, Harold G.; Wilton, John H.; Box, Harold C.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generate a type of DNA damage called tandem lesions, two adjacent nucleotides both modified. A subcategory of tandem lesions consists of adjacent nucleotides linked by a covalent bond. Covalently linked tandem lesions generate highly characteristic liquid chromotography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) elution profiles. We have used this property to comprehensively survey X-irradiated DNA for covalently linked tandem lesions. A total of 15 tandem lesions were detected in DNA irradiated in deoxygenated aqueous solution, five tandem lesions were detected in DNA that was irradiated in oxygenated solution. PMID:23106212

  2. Function of transcription factors at DNA lesions in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Malewicz, Michal; Perlmann, Thomas

    2014-11-15

    Cellular systems for DNA repair ensure prompt removal of DNA lesions that threaten the genomic stability of the cell. Transcription factors (TFs) have long been known to facilitate DNA repair via transcriptional regulation of specific target genes encoding key DNA repair proteins. However, recent findings identified TFs as DNA repair components acting directly at the DNA lesions in a transcription-independent fashion. Together this recent progress is consistent with the hypothesis that TFs have acquired the ability to localize DNA lesions and function by facilitating chromatin remodeling at sites of damaged DNA. Here we review these recent findings and discuss how TFs may function in DNA repair.

  3. Human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Lucia; Campisi, Giuseppina; Lama, Anna; Giambalvo, Ornella; Osborn, John; Margiotta, Valerio; Ammatuna, Pietro

    2002-03-15

    This study determined the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in oral mucosa cells from 121 patients with different types of oral mucosal lesions (13 squamous cell carcinomas, 59 potentially malignant lesions, 49 benign erosive ulcerative lesions) and from 90 control subjects. HPV DNA was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction, and genotype was determined by DNA sequencing. HPV prevalence was 61.5% in carcinomas, 27.1% in potentially malignant lesions, 26.5% in erosive ulcerative lesions, and 5.5% in control subjects. The risk of malignant or potentially malignant lesions was associated with HPV and was statistically significant. HPV-18 was found in 86.5% of HPV-positive lesions but was not associated with a particular type of lesion and was found in 80% of the HPV-positive control subjects. HPV infection was related to older age but not to sex, smoking, or alcohol use; the presence of lesions in the oral cavity increased the risk of HPV infection.

  4. Relocalization of DNA lesions to the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Freudenreich, Catherine H.; Su, Xiaofeng A.

    2016-01-01

    Early screens in yeast for mutations exhibiting sensitivity to DNA damage identified nuclear pore components, but their role in DNA repair was not well understood. Over the last decade, studies have revealed that several types of persistent DNA lesions relocate to either the nuclear pore complex (NPC) or nuclear envelope (NE). Of these two sites, the nuclear pore appears to be crucial for DNA repair of persistent double-strand breaks, eroded telomeres and sites of fork collapse at expanded CAG repeats. Using a combination of cell biological imaging techniques and yeast genetic assays for DNA repair, researchers have begun to understand both the how and why of lesion relocation to the NPC. Here we review the types of lesions that relocate to the NPC, mediators of relocation and the functional consequences of relocation understood to date. The emerging theme is that relocation to the NPC regulates recombination to influence repair pathway choice and provide a rescue mechanism for lesions or DNA structures that are resistant to repair. PMID:27799300

  5. DNA lesions, inducible DNA repair, and cell division: Three key factors in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, B.N.; Shigenaga, M.K.; Gold, L.S.

    1993-12-01

    DNA lesions that escape repair have a certain probability of giving rise to mutations when the cell divides. Endogenous DNA damage is high: 10{sup 6} oxidative lesions are present per rat cell. An exogenous mutagen produces an increment in lesions over the background rate of endogenous lesions. The effectiveness of a particular lesion depends on whether it is excised by a DNA repair system and the probability that it gives rise to a mutation when the cell divides. When the cell divides, an unrepaired DNA lesion has a certain probability of giving rise to a mutation. Thus, an important factor in the mutagenic effect of an exogenous agent whether it is genotoxic or non-genotoxic, is the increment it causes over the background cell division rate (mitogenesis) in cells that appear to matter most in cancer, the stem cells, which are not on their way to being discarded. Increasing their cell division rate increases by high doses of chemicals. If both the rate of DNA lesions and cell division are increased, then there will be a multiplicative effect on mutagenesis (and carcinogenesis), for example, by high doses of a mutagen that also increases mitogenesis through cell killing. The defense system against reactive electrophilic mutagens, such as the glutathione transferases, are also almost all inducible and buffer cells against increments in active forms of chemicals that can cause DNA lesions. A variety of DNA repair defense systems, almost all inducible, buffer the cell against any increment in DNA lesions. Therefore, the effect of a particular chemical insult depends on the level of each defense, which in turn depends on the past history of exposure. Exogenous agents can influence the induction and effectiveness of these defenses. Defenses can be partially disabled by lack of particular micronutrients in the diet (e.g., antioxidants).

  6. Differential DNA lesion formation and repair in heterochromatin and euchromatin

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chunhua; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Cui, Tiantian; Wang, Qi-En; Wani, Altaf A.

    2016-01-01

    Discretely orchestrated chromatin condensation is important for chromosome protection from DNA damage. However, it is still unclear how different chromatin states affect the formation and repair of nucleotide excision repair (NER) substrates, e.g. ultraviolet (UV)-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PP), as well as cisplatin-induced intrastrand crosslinks (Pt-GG). Here, by using immunofluorescence and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we have demonstrated that CPD, which cause minor distortion of DNA double helix, can be detected in both euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, while 6-4PP and Pt-GG, which cause major distortion of DNA helix, can exclusively be detected in euchromatin, indicating that the condensed chromatin environment specifically interferes with the formation of these DNA lesions. Mechanistic investigation revealed that the class III histone deacetylase SIRT1 is responsible for restricting the formation of 6-4PP and Pt-GG in cells, probably by facilitating the maintenance of highly condensed heterochromatin. In addition, we also showed that the repair of CPD in heterochromatin is slower than that in euchromatin, and DNA damage binding protein 2 (DDB2) can promote the removal of CPD from heterochromatic region. In summary, our data provide evidence for differential formation and repair of DNA lesions that are substrates of NER. Both the sensitivity of DNA to damage and the kinetics of repair can be affected by the underlying level of chromatin compaction. PMID:26717995

  7. Human DNA Polymerase Kappa Encircles DNA: Implicatins for Mismatch Extension and Lesion Bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Lone,S.; Townson, S.; Uljon, S.; Johnson, R.; Brahma, A.; Nair, D.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.; Aggarwal, A.

    2007-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase (Pol ) is a proficient extender of mispaired primer termini on undamaged DNAs and is implicated in the extension step of lesion bypass. We present here the structure of Pol catalytic core in ternary complex with DNA and an incoming nucleotide. The structure reveals encirclement of the DNA by a unique 'N-clasp' at the N terminus of Pol , which augments the conventional right-handed grip on the DNA by the palm, fingers, and thumb domains and the PAD and provides additional thermodynamic stability. The structure also reveals an active-site cleft that is constrained by the close apposition of the N-clasp and the fingers domain, and therefore can accommodate only a single Watson-Crick base pair. Together, DNA encirclement and other structural features help explain Pol 's ability to extend mismatches and to promote replication through various minor groove DNA lesions, by extending from the nucleotide incorporated opposite the lesion by another polymerase.

  8. Cytosolic DNA triggers inflammasome activation in keratinocytes in psoriatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Yvonne; Peric, Mark; Koglin, Sarah; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Göss, Christine; Anz, David; Simanski, Maren; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen; Hornung, Veit; Gallo, Richard L; Ruzicka, Thomas; Besch, Robert; Schauber, Jürgen

    2011-05-11

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays a central role in the pathogenesis and the course of inflammatory skin diseases, including psoriasis. Posttranscriptional activation of IL-1β is mediated by inflammasomes; however, the mechanisms triggering IL-1β processing remain unknown. Recently, cytosolic DNA has been identified as a danger signal that activates inflammasomes containing the DNA sensor AIM2. In this study, we detected abundant cytosolic DNA and increased AIM2 expression in keratinocytes in psoriatic lesions but not in healthy skin. In cultured keratinocytes, interferon-γ induced AIM2, and cytosolic DNA triggered the release of IL-1β via the AIM2 inflammasome. Moreover, the antimicrobial cathelicidin peptide LL-37, which can interact with DNA in psoriatic skin, neutralized cytosolic DNA in keratinocytes and blocked AIM2 inflammasome activation. Together, these data suggest that cytosolic DNA is an important disease-associated molecular pattern that can trigger AIM2 inflammasome and IL-1β activation in psoriasis. Furthermore, cathelicidin LL-37 interfered with DNA-sensing inflammasomes, which thereby suggests an anti-inflammatory function for this peptide. Thus, our data reveal a link between the AIM2 inflammasome, cathelicidin LL-37, and autoinflammation in psoriasis, providing new potential targets for the treatment of this chronic skin disease.

  9. Dynamic DNA binding licenses a repair factor to bypass roadblocks in search of DNA lesions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Maxwell W.; Kim, Yoori; Williams, Gregory M.; Huck, John D.; Surtees, Jennifer A.; Finkelstein, Ilya J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins search for specific targets via facilitated diffusion along a crowded genome. However, little is known about how crowded DNA modulates facilitated diffusion and target recognition. Here we use DNA curtains and single-molecule fluorescence imaging to investigate how Msh2–Msh3, a eukaryotic mismatch repair complex, navigates on crowded DNA. Msh2–Msh3 hops over nucleosomes and other protein roadblocks, but maintains sufficient contact with DNA to recognize a single lesion. In contrast, Msh2–Msh6 slides without hopping and is largely blocked by protein roadblocks. Remarkably, the Msh3-specific mispair-binding domain (MBD) licences a chimeric Msh2–Msh6(3MBD) to bypass nucleosomes. Our studies contrast how Msh2–Msh3 and Msh2–Msh6 navigate on a crowded genome and suggest how Msh2–Msh3 locates DNA lesions outside of replication-coupled repair. These results also provide insights into how DNA repair factors search for DNA lesions in the context of chromatin. PMID:26837705

  10. Correlation of bistranded clustered abasic DNA lesion processing with structural and dynamic DNA helix distortion

    PubMed Central

    Bignon, Emmanuelle; Gattuso, Hugo; Morell, Christophe; Dehez, François; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Monari, Antonio; Dumont, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Clustered apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP; abasic) DNA lesions produced by ionizing radiation are by far more cytotoxic than isolated AP lesion entities. The structure and dynamics of a series of seven 23-bp oligonucleotides featuring simple bistranded clustered damage sites, comprising of two AP sites, zero, one, three or five bases 3′ or 5′ apart from each other, were investigated through 400 ns explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. They provide representative structures of synthetically engineered multiply damage sites-containing oligonucleotides whose repair was investigated experimentally (Nucl. Acids Res. 2004, 32:5609-5620; Nucl. Acids Res. 2002, 30: 2800–2808). The inspection of extrahelical positioning of the AP sites, bulge and non Watson–Crick hydrogen bonding corroborates the experimental measurements of repair efficiencies by bacterial or human AP endonucleases Nfo and APE1, respectively. This study provides unprecedented knowledge into the structure and dynamics of clustered abasic DNA lesions, notably rationalizing the non-symmetry with respect to 3′ to 5′ position. In addition, it provides strong mechanistic insights and basis for future studies on the effects of clustered DNA damage on the recognition and processing of these lesions by bacterial or human DNA repair enzymes specialized in the processing of such lesions. PMID:27587587

  11. Characterization of human translesion DNA synthesis across a UV-induced DNA lesion

    PubMed Central

    Hedglin, Mark; Pandey, Binod; Benkovic, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) during S-phase uses specialized TLS DNA polymerases to replicate a DNA lesion, allowing stringent DNA synthesis to resume beyond the offending damage. Human TLS involves the conjugation of ubiquitin to PCNA clamps encircling damaged DNA and the role of this post-translational modification is under scrutiny. A widely-accepted model purports that ubiquitinated PCNA recruits TLS polymerases such as pol η to sites of DNA damage where they may also displace a blocked replicative polymerase. We provide extensive quantitative evidence that the binding of pol η to PCNA and the ensuing TLS are both independent of PCNA ubiquitination. Rather, the unique properties of pols η and δ are attuned to promote an efficient and passive exchange of polymerases during TLS on the lagging strand. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19788.001 PMID:27770570

  12. Repair of DNA Lesions by a Reductive Electron Tansfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carell, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    Electron transfer phenomena in DNA are of fundamental importance for DNA damage[1] and DNA repair.[2] The movement of a positive charge (hole) through DNA[3-6] has been shown to proceed over significant distances. Two mechanisms, namely coherent superexchange for small transfer distances and hole, or polaron hopping for long range transfer are used to describe this phenomenon. In contrast to hole transfer, little is known about the transport of excess electrons (negative charges) through a DNA duplex. Such an excess electron transfer, however, is important in biology because DNA photolyase enzymes repair UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesions (T=T) in the DNA duplex by an electron transfer from a reduced an deprotonated FADH-cofactor to the dimer lesion. The presentation covers recent results obtained in our group about the distance and sequence dependence of an excess electron transfer in a defined donor-DNA-acceptor system.[7-9] The prepared DNA double strands contain a reduced flavin electron donor and a thymine dimer acceptor, separated by adenine:thymine (A:T)n bridges of various lengths. The electron injection is initiated by irradiation of the DNA-double strand at 360 nm, which causes excitation of the reduced and deprotonated flavin donor. The injected electron, if captured by the dimer (T=T), triggers subsequently a cycloreversion, which is detectable by HPLC. A plot of the observed splitting yields against the distance between the flavin donor and the dimer gave a straight line with a small beta'-value of beta' = 0.1 Å-1. Such small beta'-values were determined for long range hole transfer as well. Our data show that excess electron transfer proceeds similarly efficient. Plotting of the yield data according to the hopping model ln(yield per minute) against ln(N) by assuming that every T between the flavin donor and the dimer acceptor can function as a discrete charge carrier (N), gives a straight line with a reasonable eta-value of close to 2

  13. Non-DSB clustered DNA lesions. Does theory colocalize with the experiment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Nikolov, Vladimir; Mavragani, Ifigeneia V.; Plante, Ianik; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Iliakis, George; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.

    2016-11-01

    Ionizing radiation results in various kinds of DNA lesions such as double strand breaks (DSBs) and other non-DSB base lesions. These lesions may be formed in close proximity (i.e., within a few nanometers) resulting in clustered types of DNA lesions. These damage clusters are considered the fingerprint of ionizing radiation, notably charged particles of high linear energy transfer (LET). Accumulating theoretical and experimental evidence suggests that the induction of these clustered lesions appears under various irradiation conditions but also as a result of high levels of oxidative stress. The biological significance of these clustered DNA lesions pertains to the inability of cells to process them efficiently compared to isolated DNA lesions. The results in the case of unsuccessful or erroneous repair can vary from mutations up to chromosomal instability. In this mini review, we discuss of several Monte Carlo simulations codes and experimental evidence regarding the induction and repair of radiation-induced non-DSB complex DNA lesions. We also critically present the most widely used methodologies (i.e., gel electrophoresis and fluorescence microscopy [in situ colocalization assays]). Based on the comparison of different approaches, we provide examples and suggestions for the improved detection of these lesions in situ. Based on the current status of knowledge, we conclude that there is a great need for improvement of the detection techniques at the cellular or tissue level, which will provide valuable information for understanding the mechanisms used by the cell to process clustered DNA lesions.

  14. Identification of DNA lesions using a third base pair for amplification and nanopore sequencing.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Jan; Ding, Yun; Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2015-11-06

    Damage to the genome is implicated in the progression of cancer and stress-induced diseases. DNA lesions exist in low levels, and cannot be amplified by standard PCR because they are frequently strong blocks to polymerases. Here, we describe a method for PCR amplification of lesion-containing DNA in which the site and identity could be marked, copied and sequenced. Critical for this method is installation of either the dNaM or d5SICS nucleotides at the lesion site after processing via the base excision repair process. These marker nucleotides constitute an unnatural base pair, allowing large quantities of marked DNA to be made by PCR amplification. Sanger sequencing confirms the potential for this method to locate lesions by marking, amplifying and sequencing a lesion in the KRAS gene. Detection using the α-hemolysin nanopore is also developed to analyse the markers in individual DNA strands with the potential to identify multiple lesions per strand.

  15. Clustered DNA lesion repair in eukaryotes: relevance to mutagenesis and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Evelyne; Harrison, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    A clustered DNA lesion, also known as a multiply damaged site, is defined as ≥ 2 damages in the DNA within 1–2 helical turns. Only ionizing radiation and certain chemicals introduce DNA damage in the genome in this non-random way. What is now clear is that the lethality of a damaging agent is not just related to the types of DNA lesions introduced, but also to how the damage is distributed in the DNA. Clustered DNA lesions were first hypothesized to exist in the 1990’s, and work has progressed where these complex lesions have been characterized and measured in irradiated as well as in non-irradiated cells. A clustered lesion can consist of single as well as double strand breaks, base damage and abasic sites, and the damages can be situated on the same strand or opposing strands. They include tandem lesions, double strand break (DSB) clusters and non-DSB clusters, and base excision repair as well as the DSB repair pathways can be required to remove these complex lesions. Due to the plethora of oxidative damage induced by ionizing radiation, and the repair proteins involved in their removal from the DNA, it has been necessary to study how repair systems handle these lesions using synthetic DNA damage. This review focuses on the repair process and mutagenic consequences of clustered lesions in yeast and mammalian cells. By examining the studies on synthetic clustered lesions, and the effects of low vs high LET radiation on mammalian cells or tissues, it is possible to extrapolate the potential biological relevance of these clustered lesions to the killing of tumor cells by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and to the risk of cancer in non-tumor cells, and this will be discussed. PMID:21185841

  16. DNA Damage by Ionizing Radiation: Tandem Double Lesions by Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Wang, Dunyou; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation are the source of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, damage to the central nervous system, lowering of the immune response, as well as other radiation-induced damages to human health. Monte Carlo track simulations and kinetic modeling of radiation damages to the DNA employ available molecular and cellular data to simulate the biological effect of high and low LET radiation io the DNA. While the simulations predict single and double strand breaks and base damages, so far all complex lesions are the result of stochastic coincidence from independent processes. Tandem double lesions have not yet been taken into account. Unlike the standard double lesions that are produced by two separate attacks by charged particles or radicals, tandem double lesions are produced by one single attack. The standard double lesions dominate at the high dosage regime. On the other hand, tandem double lesions do not depend on stochastic coincidences and become important at the low dosage regime of particular interest to NASA. Tandem double lesions by hydroxyl radical attack of guanine in isolated DNA have been reported at a dosage of radiation as low as 10 Gy. The formation of two tandem base lesions was found to be linear with the applied doses, a characteristic of tandem lesions. However, tandem double lesions from attack by a charged particle have not been reported.

  17. DNA lesion identity drives choice of damage tolerance pathway in murine cell chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Isadora S.; Bar, Carmit; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Ainbinder, Elena; Leopold, Karoline; de Wind, Niels; Geacintov, Nicholas; Livneh, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    DNA-damage tolerance (DDT) via translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) or homology-dependent repair (HDR) functions to bypass DNA lesions encountered during replication, and is critical for maintaining genome stability. Here, we present piggyBlock, a new chromosomal assay that, using piggyBac transposition of DNA containing a known lesion, measures the division of labor between the two DDT pathways. We show that in the absence of DNA damage response, tolerance of the most common sunlight-induced DNA lesion, TT-CPD, is achieved by TLS in mouse embryo fibroblasts. Meanwhile, BP-G, a major smoke-induced DNA lesion, is bypassed primarily by HDR, providing the first evidence for this mechanism being the main tolerance pathway for a biologically important lesion in a mammalian genome. We also show that, far from being a last-resort strategy as it is sometimes portrayed, TLS operates alongside nucleotide excision repair, handling 40% of TT-CPDs in repair-proficient cells. Finally, DDT acts in mouse embryonic stem cells, exhibiting the same pattern—mutagenic TLS included—despite the risk of propagating mutations along all cell lineages. The new method highlights the importance of HDR, and provides an effective tool for studying DDT in mammalian cells. PMID:25589543

  18. Effect of UVM induction on mutation fixation at non-pairing and mispairing DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M S; Dunman, P M; Wang, G; Murphy, H S; Humayun, M Z

    1996-11-01

    Mutation fixation at an ethenocytosine (epsilon C) residue borne on transfected M13 single-stranded DNA is significantly enhanced in response to pretreatment of Escherichia coli cells with UV, alkylating agents or hydrogen peroxide, a phenomenon that we have called UVM for UV modulation of mutagenesis. The UVM response does not require the E. coli SOS or adaptive responses, and is observed in cells defective for oxyR, an oxidative DNA damage-responsive regulatory gene. UVM may represent either a novel DNA-repair phenomenon, or an unrecognized feature of DNA replication in damaged cells that affects a specific class of non-coding DNA lesions. To explore the range of DNA lesions subject to the UVM effect, we have examined mutation fixation at 3,N4-ethenocytosine and 1,N6-ethenoadenine, as well as at O6-methylguanine (O6mG). M13 viral single-stranded DNA constructs bearing a single mutagenic lesion at a specific site were transfected into cells pretreated with UV or 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG). Survival of transfected viral DNA was measured as transfection efficiency, and mutagenesis at the lesion site was analysed by a quantitative multiplex sequence analysis technology. The results suggest that the UVM effect modulates mutagenesis at the two etheno lesions, but does not appear to significantly affect mutagenesis at O6mG. Because the modulation of mutagenesis is observed in cells incapable of the SOS response, these data are consistent with the notion that UVM may represent a previously unrecognized DNA damage-inducible response that affects the fidelity of DNA replication at certain mutagenic lesions in Escherichia coli.

  19. DNA lesions in hyperthermic cell killing: effects of thermotolerance, procaine, and erythritol.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, J B; Konings, A W

    1986-04-01

    When HeLa S3 cells were subjected to 45 degrees C hyperthermia, DNA lesions were detected by the use of the alkaline unwinding/hydroxylapatite method. The number of lesions formed was not affected when the cells were made thermotolerant by either an acute (15 min 44 degrees C + 5 h 37 degrees C) or a chronic (5 h 42 degrees C) pretreatment before 45 degrees C hyperthermia. The presence of 10 mM procaine (heat sensitizer) or 0.5 M erythritol (heat protector) during hyperthermia also had no effect on the rate of formation of heat-induced alkali labile DNA lesions. These observations do not support a concept where DNA lesions are considered to be the ultimate cause of hyperthermic cell killing. Both drugs, however, influenced the rate of repair of radiation-induced strand breaks when present during preirradiation heat treatment. We conclude that the initial number of heat-induced alkali labile DNA lesions is not directly related to cell survival. It cannot be excluded, however, that differences in posthyperthermic repair of these lesions may lead to a positive correlation between residual DNA damage and survival after the different experimental conditions.

  20. ZRF1 mediates remodeling of E3 ligases at DNA lesion sites during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Gracheva, Ekaterina; Chitale, Shalaka; Wilhelm, Thomas; Rapp, Alexander; Byrne, Jonathan; Stadler, Jens; Medina, Rebeca; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Faithful DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation elicits both the recruitment of DNA repair factors and the deposition of histone marks such as monoubiquitylation of histone H2A at lesion sites. Here, we report how a ubiquitin E3 ligase complex specific to DNA repair is remodeled at lesion sites in the global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) pathway. Monoubiquitylation of histone H2A (H2A-ubiquitin) is catalyzed predominantly by a novel E3 ligase complex consisting of DDB2, DDB1, CUL4B, and RING1B (UV–RING1B complex) that acts early during lesion recognition. The H2A-ubiquitin binding protein ZRF1 mediates remodeling of this E3 ligase complex directly at the DNA lesion site, causing the assembly of the UV–DDB–CUL4A E3 ligase complex (DDB1–DDB2–CUL4A-RBX1). ZRF1 is an essential factor in GG-NER, and its function at damaged chromatin sites is linked to damage recognition factor XPC. Overall, the results shed light on the interplay between epigenetic and DNA repair recognition factors at DNA lesion sites. PMID:27091446

  1. Generation and Repair of AID-initiated DNA Lesions in B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhangguo; Wang, Jing H.

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates the secondary antibody diversification process in B lymphocytes. In mammalian B cells, this process includes somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), both of which require AID. AID induces U:G mismatch lesions in DNA that are subsequently converted into point mutations or DNA double stranded breaks during SHM/CSR. In a physiological context, AID targets immunoglobulin (Ig) loci to mediate SHM/CSR. However, recent studies reveal genome-wide access of AID to numerous non-Ig loci. Thus, AID poses a threat to the genome of B cells if AID-initiated DNA lesions cannot be properly repaired. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate the specificity of AID targeting and the repair pathways responsible for processing AID-initiated DNA lesions. PMID:24748462

  2. Non-DSB clustered DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation are largely responsible for the loss of plasmid DNA functionality in the presence of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Kouass Sahbani, S; Rezaee, M; Cloutier, P; Sanche, L; Hunting, D J

    2014-06-25

    The combination of cisplatin and ionizing radiation (IR) increases cell toxicity by both enhancing DNA damage and inhibiting repair mechanisms. Although the formation of cluster DNA lesions, particularly double-strand breaks (DSB) at the site of cisplatin-DNA-adducts has been reported to induce cell death, the contribution of DSB and non-DSB cluster lesions to the cellular toxicity is still unknown. Although both lesions are toxic, it is not always possible to measure their frequency and cell survival in the same model system. To overcome this problem, here, we investigate the effect of cisplatin-adducts on the induction of DSB and non-DSB cluster DNA lesions by IR and determine the impact of such lesions on plasmid functionality. Cluster lesions are two or more lesions on opposite DNA strands with a short distance such that error free repair is difficult or impossible. At a ratio of two cisplatin per plasmid, irradiation of platinated DNA in solution with (137)Cs γ-rays shows enhancements in the formation of DNA DSB and non-DSB cluster lesions by factors of 2.6 and 2.1, respectively, compared to unmodified DNA. However, in absolute terms, the yield for non-DSB cluster lesions is far larger than that for DSB, by a factor of 26. Unmodified and cisplatin-modified DNA were irradiated and subsequently transformed into Escherichia coli to give survival curves representing the functionality of the plasmid DNA as a function of radiation dose. Our results demonstrate that non-DSB cluster lesions are the only toxic lesions present at a sufficient frequency to account for the loss of DNA functionality. Our data also show that Frank-DSB lesions are simply too infrequent to account for the loss of DNA functionality. In conclusion, non-DSB cluster DNA damage is known to be difficult to repair and is probably the lesion responsible for the loss of functionality of DNA modified by cisplatin.

  3. A quantitative assay for assessing the effects of DNA lesions on transcription.

    PubMed

    You, Changjun; Dai, Xiaoxia; Yuan, Bifeng; Wang, Jin; Wang, Jianshuang; Brooks, Philip J; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Wang, Yinsheng

    2012-10-01

    Most mammalian cells in nature are quiescent but actively transcribing mRNA for normal physiological processes; thus, it is important to investigate how endogenous and exogenous DNA damage compromises transcription in cells. Here we describe a new competitive transcription and adduct bypass (CTAB) assay to determine the effects of DNA lesions on the fidelity and efficiency of transcription. Using this strategy, we demonstrate that the oxidatively induced lesions 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (cdA) and 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine (cdG) and the methylglyoxal-induced lesion N(2)-(1-carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-CEdG) strongly inhibited transcription in vitro and in mammalian cells. In addition, cdA and cdG, but not N(2)-CEdG, induced transcriptional mutagenesis in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, when located on the template DNA strand, all examined lesions were primarily repaired by transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair in mammalian cells. This newly developed CTAB assay should be generally applicable for quantitatively assessing how other DNA lesions affect DNA transcription in vitro and in cells.

  4. Artifactual mutations resulting from DNA lesions limit detection levels in ultrasensitive sequencing applications

    PubMed Central

    Arbeithuber, Barbara; Makova, Kateryna D.; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The need in cancer research or evolutionary biology to detect rare mutations or variants present at very low frequencies (<10−5) poses an increasing demand on lowering the detection limits of available methods. Here we demonstrated that amplifiable DNA lesions introduce important error sources in ultrasensitive technologies such as single molecule PCR (smPCR) applications (e.g. droplet-digital PCR), or next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods. Using templates with known amplifiable lesions (8-oxoguanine, deaminated 5-methylcytosine, uracil, and DNA heteroduplexes), we assessed with smPCR and duplex sequencing that templates with these lesions were amplified very efficiently by proofreading polymerases (except uracil), leading to G->T, and to a lesser extent, to unreported G->C substitutions at 8-oxoguanine lesions, and C->T transitions in amplified uracil containing templates. Long heat incubations common in many DNA extraction protocols significantly increased the number of G->T substitutions. Moreover, in ∼50-80% smPCR reactions we observed the random amplification preference of only one of both DNA strands explaining the known ‘PCR jackpot effect’, with the result that a lesion became indistinguishable from a true mutation or variant. Finally, we showed that artifactual mutations derived from uracil and 8-oxoguanine could be significantly reduced by DNA repair enzymes. PMID:27477585

  5. Artifactual mutations resulting from DNA lesions limit detection levels in ultrasensitive sequencing applications.

    PubMed

    Arbeithuber, Barbara; Makova, Kateryna D; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The need in cancer research or evolutionary biology to detect rare mutations or variants present at very low frequencies (<10(-5)) poses an increasing demand on lowering the detection limits of available methods. Here we demonstrated that amplifiable DNA lesions introduce important error sources in ultrasensitive technologies such as single molecule PCR (smPCR) applications (e.g. droplet-digital PCR), or next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods. Using templates with known amplifiable lesions (8-oxoguanine, deaminated 5-methylcytosine, uracil, and DNA heteroduplexes), we assessed with smPCR and duplex sequencing that templates with these lesions were amplified very efficiently by proofreading polymerases (except uracil), leading to G->T, and to a lesser extent, to unreported G->C substitutions at 8-oxoguanine lesions, and C->T transitions in amplified uracil containing templates. Long heat incubations common in many DNA extraction protocols significantly increased the number of G->T substitutions. Moreover, in ∼50-80% smPCR reactions we observed the random amplification preference of only one of both DNA strands explaining the known 'PCR jackpot effect', with the result that a lesion became indistinguishable from a true mutation or variant. Finally, we showed that artifactual mutations derived from uracil and 8-oxoguanine could be significantly reduced by DNA repair enzymes.

  6. Crystal Structure of a Replicative DNA Polymerase Bound to the Oxidized Guanine Lesion Guanidinohydantoin

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Pierre; Ye, Yu; Wallace, Susan S.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Doubli, Sylvie

    2010-04-12

    The oxidation of guanine generates one of the most common DNA lesions, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG). The further oxidation of 8-oxoG can produce either guanidinohydantoin (Gh) in duplex DNA or spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) in nucleosides and ssDNA. Although Gh can be a strong block for replicative DNA polymerases such as RB69 DNA polymerase, this lesion is also mutagenic: DNA polymerases bypass Gh by preferentially incorporating a purine with a slight preference for adenine, which results in G {center_dot} C {yields} T {center_dot} A or G {center_dot} C {yields} C {center_dot} G transversions. The 2.15 {angstrom} crystal structure of the replicative RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with DNA containing Gh reveals that Gh is extrahelical and rotated toward the major groove. In this conformation Gh is no longer in position to serve as a templating base for the incorporation of an incoming nucleotide. This work also constitutes the first crystallographic structure of Gh, which is stabilized in the R configuration in the two polymerase/DNA complexes present in the crystal asymmetric unit. In contrast to 8-oxoG, Gh is found in a high syn conformation in the DNA duplex and therefore presents the same hydrogen bond donor and acceptor pattern as thymine, which explains the propensity of DNA polymerases to incorporate a purine opposite Gh when bypass occurs.

  7. Kinetics of Mismatch Formation opposite Lesions by the Replicative DNA Polymerase from Bacteriophage RB69

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, Matthew; Rudnicki, Jean; Midkiff, John; Reha-Krantz, Linda; Doubli, Sylvie; Wallace, Susan S.

    2010-04-12

    The fidelity of DNA replication is under constant threat from the formation of lesions within the genome. Oxidation of DNA bases leads to the formation of altered DNA bases such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, commonly called 8-oxoG, and 2-hydroxyadenenine, or 2-OHA. In this work we have examined the incorporation kinetics opposite these two oxidatively derived lesions as well as an abasic site analogue by the replicative DNA polymerase from bacteriophage RB69. We compared the kinetic parameters for both wild type and the low fidelity L561A variant. While nucleotide incorporation rates (k{sub pol}) were generally higher for the variant, the presence of a lesion in the templating position reduced the ability of both the wild-type and variant DNA polymerases to form ternary enzyme-DNA-dNTP complexes. Thus, the L561A substitution does not significantly affect the ability of the RB69 DNA polymerase to recognize damaged DNA; instead, the mutation increases the probability that nucleotide incorporation will occur. We have also solved the crystal structure of the L561A variant forming an 8-oxoG {center_dot} dATP mispair and show that the propensity for forming this mispair depends on an enlarged polymerase active site.

  8. Gentiana asclepiadea protects human cells against oxidation DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Hudecová, Alexandra; Hašplová, Katarína; Miadoková, Eva; Magdolenová, Zuzana; Rinna, Alessandra; Collins, Andrew R; Gálová, Eliška; Vaculčíková, Dagmar; Gregáň, Fridrich; Dušinská, Mária

    2012-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine whether the methanolic and aqueous extracts from the haulm and flower of Gentiana asclepiadea exhibited free radical scavenging and protective (antigenotoxic) effect against DNA oxidation induced by H(2)O(2) in human lymphocytes and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293). All four extracts exhibited high scavenging effect on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals at concentrations 2.5 and 25 mg ml(-1). The level of DNA damage was measured using the alkaline version of single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Challenge with H(2)O(2) shows that the pre-treatment of the cells with non-genotoxic doses of Gentiana extracts protected human DNA-either eliminated or significantly reduced H(2)O(2) induced DNA damage. The genotoxic activity of H(2)O(2) was most effectively decreased after 30 min of pre-incubation with 0.05 mg ml(-1) (range, 93.5%-96.3% of reduction in lymphocytes) and 0.25 mg ml(-1) (range, 59.5%-71.4% and 52.7%-66.4% of reduction in lymphocytes and HEK 293 cells, respectively) of G. asclepiadea extracts. These results suggest that the tested G. asclepiadea extracts could be considered as an effective natural antioxidant source.

  9. DNA repair and replication fork helicases are differentially affected by alkyl phosphotriester lesion.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, Avvaru N; Sommers, Joshua A; Yu, Stephen; Wu, Yuliang; Xu, Ting; Kelman, Zvi; Kaplan, Daniel L; Brosh, Robert M

    2012-06-01

    DNA helicases are directly responsible for catalytically unwinding duplex DNA in an ATP-dependent and directionally specific manner and play essential roles in cellular nucleic acid metabolism. It has been conventionally thought that DNA helicases are inhibited by bulky covalent DNA adducts in a strand-specific manner. However, the effects of highly stable alkyl phosphotriester (PTE) lesions that are induced by chemical mutagens and refractory to DNA repair have not been previously studied for their effects on helicases. In this study, DNA repair and replication helicases were examined for unwinding a forked duplex DNA substrate harboring a single isopropyl PTE specifically positioned in the helicase-translocating or -nontranslocating strand within the double-stranded region. A comparison of SF2 helicases (RecQ, RECQ1, WRN, BLM, FANCJ, and ChlR1) with a SF1 DNA repair helicase (UvrD) and two replicative helicases (MCM and DnaB) demonstrates unique differences in the effect of the PTE on the DNA unwinding reactions catalyzed by these enzymes. All of the SF2 helicases tested were inhibited by the PTE lesion, whereas UvrD and the replication fork helicases were fully tolerant of the isopropyl backbone modification, irrespective of strand. Sequestration studies demonstrated that RECQ1 helicase was trapped by the PTE lesion only when it resided in the helicase-translocating strand. Our results are discussed in light of the current models for DNA unwinding by helicases that are likely to encounter sugar phosphate backbone damage during biological DNA transactions.

  10. Mechanism of RNA polymerase II bypass of oxidative cyclopurine DNA lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Walmacq, Celine; Wang, Lanfeng; Chong, Jenny; Scibelli, Kathleen; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Gnatt, Averell; Brooks, Philip J.; Wang, Dong; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2015-01-20

    In human cells, the oxidative DNA lesion 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (CydA) induces prolonged stalling of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) followed by transcriptional bypass, generating both error-free and mutant transcripts with AMP misincorporated immediately downstream from the lesion. Here, we present biochemical and crystallographic evidence for the mechanism of CydA recognition. Pol II stalling results from impaired loading of the template base (5') next to CydA into the active site, leading to preferential AMP misincorporation. Such predominant AMP insertion, which also occurs at an abasic site, is unaffected by the identity of the 5´-templating base, indicating that it derives from nontemplated synthesis according to an A rule known for DNA polymerases and recently identified for Pol II bypass of pyrimidine dimers. Subsequent to AMP misincorporation, Pol II encounters a major translocation block that is slowly overcome. The translocation block combined with the poor extension of the dA.rA mispair reduce transcriptional mutagenesis. Moreover, increasing the active-site flexibility by mutation in the trigger loop, which increases the ability of Pol II to accommodate the bulky lesion, and addition of transacting factor TFIIF facilitate CydA bypass. Thus, blocking lesion entry to the active site, trans-lesion A rule synthesis, and translocation block are common features of transcription across different bulky DNA lesions.

  11. Mechanism of RNA polymerase II bypass of oxidative cyclopurine DNA lesions

    DOE PAGES

    Walmacq, Celine; Wang, Lanfeng; Chong, Jenny; ...

    2015-01-20

    In human cells, the oxidative DNA lesion 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (CydA) induces prolonged stalling of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) followed by transcriptional bypass, generating both error-free and mutant transcripts with AMP misincorporated immediately downstream from the lesion. Here, we present biochemical and crystallographic evidence for the mechanism of CydA recognition. Pol II stalling results from impaired loading of the template base (5') next to CydA into the active site, leading to preferential AMP misincorporation. Such predominant AMP insertion, which also occurs at an abasic site, is unaffected by the identity of the 5´-templating base, indicating that it derives from nontemplated synthesismore » according to an A rule known for DNA polymerases and recently identified for Pol II bypass of pyrimidine dimers. Subsequent to AMP misincorporation, Pol II encounters a major translocation block that is slowly overcome. The translocation block combined with the poor extension of the dA.rA mispair reduce transcriptional mutagenesis. Moreover, increasing the active-site flexibility by mutation in the trigger loop, which increases the ability of Pol II to accommodate the bulky lesion, and addition of transacting factor TFIIF facilitate CydA bypass. Thus, blocking lesion entry to the active site, trans-lesion A rule synthesis, and translocation block are common features of transcription across different bulky DNA lesions.« less

  12. Resection is a major repair pathway of heavy ion-induced DNA lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Averbeck, Nicole; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    Space radiation include densely ionizing heavy ions, which can produce clustered DNA damage with high frequency in human cells. Repair of these complex lesions is generally assumed to be more difficult than for simple double-strand breaks. We show here that human cells use break resection with increasing frequency after exposure to heavy ions. Resection can lead to misrepair of the DNA lesion, via microhomology mediated end-joining. Resection can therefore be responsible for the increased effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of mutations and genetic late effects.

  13. Identification of potentially cytotoxic lesions induced by UVA photoactivation of DNA 4-thiothymidine in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Reelfs, Olivier; Macpherson, Peter; Ren, Xiaolin; Xu, Yao-Zhong; Karran, Peter; Young, Antony R.

    2011-01-01

    Photochemotherapy—in which a photosensitizing drug is combined with ultraviolet or visible radiation—has proven therapeutic effectiveness. Existing approaches have drawbacks, however, and there is a clinical need to develop alternatives offering improved target cell selectivity. DNA substitution by 4-thiothymidine (S4TdR) sensitizes cells to killing by ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation. Here, we demonstrate that UVA photoactivation of DNA S4TdR does not generate reactive oxygen or cause direct DNA breakage and is only minimally mutagenic. In an organotypic human skin model, UVA penetration is sufficiently robust to kill S4TdR-photosensitized epidermal cells. We have investigated the DNA lesions responsible for toxicity. Although thymidine is the predominant UVA photoproduct of S4TdR in dilute solution, more complex lesions are formed when S4TdR-containing oligonucleotides are irradiated. One of these, a thietane/S5-(6-4)T:T, is structurally related to the (6-4) pyrimidine:pyrimidone [(6-4) Py:Py] photoproducts induced by UVB/C radiation. These lesions are detectable in DNA from S4TdR/UVA-treated cells and are excised from DNA more efficiently by keratinocytes than by leukaemia cells. UVA irradiation also induces DNA interstrand crosslinking of S4TdR-containing duplex oligonucleotides. Cells defective in repairing (6-4) Py:Py DNA adducts or processing DNA crosslinks are extremely sensitive to S4TdR/UVA indicating that these lesions contribute significantly to S4TdR/UVA cytotoxicity. PMID:21890905

  14. The NEIL glycosylases remove oxidized guanine lesions from telomeric and promoter quadruplex DNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jia; Fleming, Aaron M.; Averill, April M.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplex is a four-stranded G-rich DNA structure that is highly susceptible to oxidation. Despite the important roles that G-quadruplexes play in telomere biology and gene transcription, neither the impact of guanine lesions on the stability of quadruplexes nor their repair are well understood. Here, we show that the oxidized guanine lesions 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG), guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) reduce the thermostability and alter the folding of telomeric quadruplexes in a location-dependent manner. Also, the NEIL1 and NEIL3 DNA glycosylases can remove hydantoin lesions but none of the glycosylases, including OGG1, are able to remove 8-oxoG from telomeric quadruplexes. Interestingly, a hydantoin lesion at the site most prone to oxidation in quadruplex DNA is not efficiently removed by NEIL1 or NEIL3. However, NEIL1, NEIL2 and NEIL3 remove hydantoins from telomeric quadruplexes formed by five TTAGGG repeats much more rapidly than the commonly studied four-repeat quadruplex structures. We also show that APE1 cleaves furan in selected positions in Na+-coordinated telomeric quadruplexes. In promoter G-quadruplex DNA, the NEIL glycosylases primarily remove Gh from Na+-coordinated antiparallel quadruplexes but not K+-coordinated parallel quadruplexes containing VEGF or c-MYC promoter sequences. Thus, the NEIL DNA glycosylases may be involved in both telomere maintenance and in gene regulation. PMID:25813041

  15. Recharacterization of ancient DNA miscoding lesions: insights in the era of sequencing-by-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Binladen, Jonas; Miller, Webb; Wiuf, Carsten; Willerslev, Eske; Poinar, Hendrik; Carlson, John E; Leebens-Mack, James H; Schuster, Stephan C

    2007-01-01

    Although ancient DNA (aDNA) miscoding lesions have been studied since the earliest days of the field, their nature remains a source of debate. A variety of conflicting hypotheses exist about which miscoding lesions constitute true aDNA damage as opposed to PCR polymerase amplification error. Furthermore, considerable disagreement and speculation exists on which specific damage events underlie observed miscoding lesions. The root of the problem is that it has previously been difficult to assemble sufficient data to test the hypotheses, and near-impossible to accurately determine the specific strand of origin of observed damage events. With the advent of emulsion-based clonal amplification (emPCR) and the sequencing-by-synthesis technology this has changed. In this paper we demonstrate how data produced on the Roche GS20 genome sequencer can determine miscoding lesion strands of origin, and subsequently be interpreted to enable characterization of the aDNA damage behind the observed phenotypes. Through comparative analyses on 390,965 bp of modern chloroplast and 131,474 bp of ancient woolly mammoth GS20 sequence data we conclusively demonstrate that in this sample at least, a permafrost preserved specimen, Type 2 (cytosine-->thymine/guanine-->adenine) miscoding lesions represent the overwhelming majority of damage-derived miscoding lesions. Additionally, we show that an as yet unidentified guanine-->adenine analogue modification, not the conventionally argued cytosine-->uracil deamination, underpins a significant proportion of Type 2 damage. How widespread these implications are for aDNA will become apparent as future studies analyse data recovered from a wider range of substrates.

  16. DNA lesion bypass polymerases and 4’-thio-β-Darabinofuranosylcytosine (T-araC)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yih-wen; Chou, Kai-ming

    2011-01-01

    The 4’-thio-β-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (T-araC) is a newly developed nucleoside analog that has shown promising activity against a broad spectrum of human solid tumors in both cellular and xenograft mice models. TaraC shares similar structure with another anticancer deoxycytidine analog, β-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (araC, cytarabine), which has been used in clinics for the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia but has a very limited efficacy against solid tumors. T-araC exerts its anticancer activity mainly by inhibiting replicative DNA polymerases from further extension after its incorporation into DNA. DNA lesion bypass polymerases can manage the DNA lesions introduced by therapeutic agents, such as cisplatin and araC, therefore reduce the activity of these compounds. In this study, the potential relationships between the lesion bypass Y-family DNA polymerases η, ι and κ (pol η, pol ι, and pol κ) and T-araC were examined. Biochemical studies indicated that the triphosphate metabolite of T-araC is a less preferred substrate for the Y-family polymerases. In addition, cell viability study indicated that pol η deficient human fibroblast cells were more sensitive to T-araC when compared with the normal human fibroblast cells. Together, these results suggest that bypass polymerases reduced cell sensitivity to T-araC through helping cells to overcome the DNA damages introduced by T-araC. PMID:22187668

  17. Encounter and extrusion of an intrahelical lesion by a DNA repair enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yan; Spong, Marie C.; Nam, Kwangho; Banerjee, Anirban; Jiralerspong, Sao; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.; Harvard-Med; Harvard

    2010-01-12

    How living systems detect the presence of genotoxic damage embedded in a million-fold excess of undamaged DNA is an unresolved question in biology. Here we have captured and structurally elucidated a base-excision DNA repair enzyme, MutM, at the stage of initial encounter with a damaged nucleobase, 8-oxoguanine (oxoG), nested within a DNA duplex. Three structures of intrahelical oxoG-encounter complexes are compared with sequence-matched structures containing a normal G base in place of an oxoG lesion. Although the protein-DNA interfaces in the matched complexes differ by only two atoms - those that distinguish oxoG from G - their pronounced structural differences indicate that MutM can detect a lesion in DNA even at the earliest stages of encounter. All-atom computer simulations show the pathway by which encounter of the enzyme with the lesion causes extrusion from the DNA duplex, and they elucidate the critical free energy difference between oxoG and G along the extrusion pathway.

  18. Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair of Oxidatively Generated Guanine Lesions in DNA.

    PubMed

    Shafirovich, Vladimir; Kropachev, Konstantin; Anderson, Thomas; Liu, Zhi; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Martin, Brooke D; Sugden, Kent; Shim, Yoonjung; Chen, Xuejing; Min, Jung-Hyun; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2016-03-04

    The well known biomarker of oxidative stress, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, is more susceptible to further oxidation than the parent guanine base and can be oxidatively transformed to the genotoxic spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh) lesions. Incubation of 135-mer duplexes with single Sp or Gh lesions in human cell extracts yields a characteristic nucleotide excision repair (NER)-induced ladder of short dual incision oligonucleotide fragments in addition to base excision repair (BER) incision products. The ladders were not observed when NER was inhibited either by mouse monoclonal antibody (5F12) to human XPA or in XPC(-/-) fibroblast cell extracts. However, normal NER activity appeared when the XPC(-/-) cell extracts were complemented with XPC-RAD23B proteins. The Sp and Gh lesions are excellent substrates of both BER and NER. In contrast, 5-guanidino-4-nitroimidazole, a product of the oxidation of guanine in DNA by peroxynitrite, is an excellent substrate of BER only. In the case of mouse embryonic fibroblasts, BER of the Sp lesion is strongly reduced in NEIL1(-/-) relative to NEIL1(+/+) extracts. In summary, in human cell extracts, BER and NER activities co-exist and excise Gh and Sp DNA lesions, suggesting that the relative NER/BER product ratios may depend on competitive BER and NER protein binding to these lesions.

  19. Aberrant topoisomerase-1 DNA lesions are pathogenic in neurodegenerative genome instability syndromes.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Sachin; Lee, Youngsoo; Nitiss, Karin C; Downing, Susanna M; Li, Yang; Shimada, Mikio; Zhao, Jingfeng; Russell, Helen R; Petrini, John H J; Nitiss, John L; McKinnon, Peter J

    2014-06-01

    DNA damage is considered to be a prime factor in several spinocerebellar neurodegenerative diseases; however, the DNA lesions underpinning disease etiology are unknown. We observed the endogenous accumulation of pathogenic topoisomerase-1 (Top1)-DNA cleavage complexes (Top1ccs) in murine models of ataxia telangiectasia and spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy 1. We found that the defective DNA damage response factors in these two diseases cooperatively modulated Top1cc turnover in a non-epistatic and ATM kinase-independent manner. Furthermore, coincident neural inactivation of ATM and DNA single-strand break repair factors, including tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase-1 or XRCC1, resulted in increased Top1cc formation and excessive DNA damage and neurodevelopmental defects. Notably, direct Top1 poisoning to elevate Top1cc levels phenocopied the neuropathology of the mouse models described above. Our results identify a critical endogenous pathogenic lesion associated with neurodegenerative syndromes arising from DNA repair deficiency, indicating that genome integrity is important for preventing disease in the nervous system.

  20. Aberrant Topoisomerase-1-DNA Lesions are Pathogenic in Neurodegenerative Genome Instability Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Katyal, Sachin; Lee, Youngsoo; Nitiss, Karin C.; Downing, Susanna M.; Li, Yang; Shimada, Mikio; Zhao, Jingfeng; Russell, Helen R.; Petrini, John H. J.; Nitiss, John L.; McKinnon, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage is considered a prime factor in multiple spinocerebellar neurodegenerative diseases; however, the DNA lesions underpinning disease etiology are unknown. Here we identify the endogenous accumulation of pathogenic topoisomerase-1-DNA cleavage complexes (Top1cc) in murine models of ataxia telangiectasia and spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy 1. We also show that the defective DNA damage response factors in these two diseases cooperatively modulate Top1cc turnover in a non-epistatic and ATM kinase-independent manner. Furthermore, coincident neural inactivation of ATM and DNA single strand break repair factors including tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase-1 or XRCC1 result in increased Top1cc formation and excessive DNA damage and neurodevelopmental defects. Importantly, direct topoisomerase-1 poisoning to elevate Top1cc levels phenocopies the neuropathology of the mouse models above. Our study identifies a critical endogenous pathogenic lesion associated with neurodegenerative syndromes arising from DNA repair deficiency, indicating the essential role that genome integrity plays in preventing disease in the nervous system. PMID:24793032

  1. Distinct profile of the mitochondrial DNA common deletion in benign skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Christian; Kamenisch, York; Landthaler, Michael; Berneburg, Mark

    2011-02-01

    Mutations of mitochondrial (mt) DNA, particularly the 4977 bp long common deletion, are increased in aging tissues and preferentially found in chronologically and photoaged skin. Mutations of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have also been identified in malignant tumors of the skin and of other organs. However, benign skin lesions have not yet been investigated. We analyzed the frequency of the common deletion in 27 benign skin lesions [8 seborrheic keratoses (SK), 5 epidermal nevi (EN), 14 solar lentigos (SL)] by quantitative real-time PCR, because SK and especially SL have been related to (photo)aged skin. All SK and four of five EN displayed reduced common deletion levels compared with adjacent normal skin. In contrast, 50% of SL revealed a higher percentage of the common deletion than the adjacent normal skin, and some SL showed very high absolute common deletion levels up to 14% of total mtDNA. Our results show that the amount of the common deletion is significantly different in benign skin lesions and raise further questions regarding the pathogenesis of SL and its possible role as a precursor lesion of SK.

  2. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Protein Loads as a Separate Factor onto DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rademakers, Suzanne; Volker, Marcel; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Nigg, Alex L.; Moné, Martijn J.; van Zeeland, Albert A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2003-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the main DNA repair pathway in mammals for removal of UV-induced lesions. NER involves the concerted action of more than 25 polypeptides in a coordinated fashion. The xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA) has been suggested to function as a central organizer and damage verifier in NER. How XPA reaches DNA lesions and how the protein is distributed in time and space in living cells are unknown. Here we studied XPA in vivo by using a cell line stably expressing physiological levels of functional XPA fused to green fluorescent protein and by applying quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The majority of XPA moves rapidly through the nucleoplasm with a diffusion rate different from those of other NER factors tested, arguing against a preassembled XPA-containing NER complex. DNA damage induced a transient (∼5-min) immobilization of maximally 30% of XPA. Immobilization depends on XPC, indicating that XPA is not the initial lesion recognition protein in vivo. Moreover, loading of replication protein A on NER lesions was not dependent on XPA. Thus, XPA participates in NER by incorporation of free diffusing molecules in XPC-dependent NER-DNA complexes. This study supports a model for a rapid consecutive assembly of free NER factors, and a relatively slow simultaneous disassembly, after repair. PMID:12897146

  3. Unprecedented dinuclear silver(I)-mediated base pair involving the DNA lesion 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Soham; Hepp, Alexander; Müller, Jens

    2015-02-28

    The DNA lesion 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (εA) has been investigated with respect to its metal-binding properties. A synthetic DNA duplex comprising an εA : εA mispair readily forms doubly silver(I)-mediated base pairs εA-Ag(I)2-εA, representing the first example for a dinuclear metal-mediated homo base pair of a purine derivative. It also constitutes the first example for a Hoogsteen-type metal-mediated homo base pair within a B-DNA duplex.

  4. ASCIZ regulates lesion-specific Rad51 focus formation and apoptosis after methylating DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    McNees, Carolyn J; Conlan, Lindus A; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Rad51 focus formation is required for homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but its regulation in response to non-DSB lesions is poorly understood. Here we report a novel human SQ/TQ cluster domain-containing protein termed ASCIZ that forms Rad51-containing foci in response to base-modifying DNA methylating agents but not in response to DSB-inducing agents. ASCIZ foci seem to form prior to Rad51 recruitment, and an ASCIZ core domain can concentrate Rad51 in focus-like structures independently of DNA damage. ASCIZ depletion dramatically increases apoptosis after methylating DNA damage and impairs Rad51 focus formation in response to methylating agents but not after ionizing radiation. ASCIZ focus formation and increased apoptosis in ASCIZ-depleted cells depend on the mismatch repair protein MLH1. Interestingly, ASCIZ foci form efficiently during G1 phase, when sister chromatids are unavailable as recombination templates. We propose that ASCIZ acts as a lesion-specific focus scaffold in a Rad51-dependent pathway that resolves cytotoxic repair intermediates, most likely single-stranded DNA gaps, resulting from MLH1-dependent processing of base lesions. PMID:15933716

  5. Metabolites of the biocide o-phenylphenol generate oxidative DNA lesions in V 79 cells.

    PubMed

    Henschke, P; Almstadt, E; Lüttgert, S; Appel, K E

    2000-01-01

    Incubation of the o-phenylphenol (OPP) metabolites, o-phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) and o-phenylbenzoquinone (PBQ) with V 79 Chinese hamster cells led to a significant enhancement of the amount of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) in nuclear DNA. With OPP no distinct induction of this lesion could be observed. In addition, PHQ and PBQ were able to generate DNA single-strand breaks (DNA SSB), while OPP failed to induce this lesion. All incubations were performed for 1 h without exogenous metabolic activations and the lowest effective concentration tested was 20 microM. It is concluded that these metabolites may contribute to the carcinogenicity of OPP and sodium o-phenylphenolate (SOPP) observed in rats, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) through their redox cycling properties.

  6. Translesion Synthesis of 2′-Deoxyguanosine Lesions by Eukaryotic DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    With the discovery of translesion synthesis DNA polymerases, great strides have been made in the last two decades in understanding the mode of replication of various DNA lesions in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A database search indicated that approximately 2000 articles on this topic have been published in this period. This includes research involving genetic and structural studies as well as in vitro experiments using purified DNA polymerases and accessory proteins. It is a daunting task to comprehend this exciting and rapidly emerging area of research. Even so, as the majority of DNA damage occurs at 2′-deoxyguanosine residues, this perspective attempts to summarize a subset of this field, focusing on the most relevant eukaryotic DNA polymerases responsible for their bypass. PMID:27760288

  7. In situ hybridization analysis of human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Zeuss, M S; Miller, C S; White, D K

    1991-06-01

    Commercial biotinylated DNA probes specific for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11; 16 and 18; and 31, 33, and 35 were used for in situ hybridization analysis of 105 oral mucosal specimens from 5 cases of verruca vulgaris, 15 cases of condyloma acuminatum, 30 cases of squamous papilloma, 20 cases of hyperkeratosis/acanthosis, 15 cases of epithelial dysplasia, 5 cases of carcinoma in situ, and 15 cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Positive hybridization signals were found in 26 specimens (24.8%). Only HPV-6/11 was detected. HPV DNA occurred significantly more often (p less than 0.005, chi-square analysis) in condyloma acuminatum (100%) and verruca vulgaris (100%) than squamous papilloma (13.3%), hyperkeratotic/acanthotic lesions (10%), and malignant and premalignant lesions (0%). The tongue (19.1%) and labial epithelium (17.1%) were infected most frequently. Nuclear reaction products indicating HPV infection were associated primarily with koilocytes. These results demonstrate the usefulness of commercial biotinylated probes for HPV DNA analysis in routine paraffin-embedded lesion specimens. They confirm HPV involvement in benign lesions of the oral mucosa but fail to associate HPV infection with oral cancer and precancer.

  8. Thermodynamic Consequences of the Hyperoxidized Guanine Lesion Guanidinohydantoin in Duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yennie, Craig J.; Delaney, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Guanidinohydantoin (Gh) is a hyperoxidized DNA lesion produced by oxidation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG). Previous work has shown that Gh is potently mutagenic both in vitro and in vivo coding for G → T and G → C transversion mutations. In this work, analysis by circular dichroism shows that the Gh lesion does not significantly alter the global structure of a 15-mer duplex, and that the DNA remains in the B-form. However, we find that Gh causes a large decrease in the thermal stability, decreasing the duplex melting temperature by ~ 17 °C relative to an unmodified duplex control. Using optical melting analysis and differential scanning calorimetry the thermodynamic parameters describing duplex melting were also determined. We find that the Gh lesion causes a dramatic decrease in the enthalpic stability of the duplex. This enthalpic destabilization is somewhat tempered by entropic stabilization yet Gh results in an overall decrease in thermodynamic stability of the duplex relative to a control which lacks DNA damage, with a ΔΔG° of −7 kcal/mol. These results contribute to our understanding of the consequences of hyperoxidation of G and provide insight into how the thermal and thermodynamic destabilization caused by Gh may influence replication and/or repair of the lesion. PMID:22780843

  9. O-GlcNAcylation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase (Ogg1) Impairs Oxidative Mitochondrial DNA Lesion Repair in Diabetic Hearts.

    PubMed

    Cividini, Federico; Scott, Brian T; Dai, Anzhi; Han, Wenlong; Suarez, Jorge; Diaz-Juarez, Julieta; Diemer, Tanja; Casteel, Darren E; Dillmann, Wolfgang H

    2016-12-16

    mtDNA damage in cardiac myocytes resulting from increased oxidative stress is emerging as an important factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. A prevalent lesion that occurs in mtDNA damage is the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), which can cause mutations when not repaired properly by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (Ogg1). Although the mtDNA repair machinery has been described in cardiac myocytes, the regulation of this repair has been incompletely investigated. Here we report that the hearts of type 1 diabetic mice, despite having increased Ogg1 protein levels, had significantly lower Ogg1 activity than the hearts of control, non-type 1 diabetic mice. In diabetic hearts, we further observed increased levels of 8-OHdG and an increased amount of mtDNA damage. Interestingly, Ogg1 was found to be highly O-GlcNAcylated in diabetic mice compared with controls. In vitro experiments demonstrated that O-GlcNAcylation inhibits Ogg1 activity, which could explain the mtDNA lesion accumulation observed in vivo Reducing Ogg1 O-GlcNAcylation in vivo by introducing a dominant negative O-GlcNAc transferase mutant (F460A) restored Ogg1 enzymatic activity and, consequently, reduced 8-OHdG and mtDNA damage despite the adverse hyperglycemic milieu. Taken together, our results implicate hyperglycemia-induced O-GlcNAcylation of Ogg1 in increased mtDNA damage and, therefore, provide a new plausible biochemical mechanism for diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  10. Characterization of the interplay between DNA repair and CRISPR/Cas9-induced DNA lesions at an endogenous locus

    PubMed Central

    Bothmer, Anne; Phadke, Tanushree; Barrera, Luis A.; Margulies, Carrie M; Lee, Christina S.; Buquicchio, Frank; Moss, Sean; Abdulkerim, Hayat S.; Selleck, William; Jayaram, Hariharan; Myer, Vic E.; Cotta-Ramusino, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR–Cas9 system provides a versatile toolkit for genome engineering that can introduce various DNA lesions at specific genomic locations. However, a better understanding of the nature of these lesions and the repair pathways engaged is critical to realizing the full potential of this technology. Here we characterize the different lesions arising from each Cas9 variant and the resulting repair pathway engagement. We demonstrate that the presence and polarity of the overhang structure is a critical determinant of double-strand break repair pathway choice. Similarly, single nicks deriving from different Cas9 variants differentially activate repair: D10A but not N863A-induced nicks are repaired by homologous recombination. Finally, we demonstrate that homologous recombination is required for repairing lesions using double-stranded, but not single-stranded DNA as a template. This detailed characterization of repair pathway choice in response to CRISPR–Cas9 enables a more deterministic approach for designing research and therapeutic genome engineering strategies. PMID:28067217

  11. Radical-induced purine lesion formation is dependent on DNA helical topology.

    PubMed

    Terzidis, Michael A; Prisecaru, Andreea; Molphy, Zara; Barron, Niall; Randazzo, Antonio; Dumont, Elise; Krokidis, Marios G; Kellett, Andrew; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos

    2016-11-01

    Herein we report the quantification of purine lesions arising from gamma-radiation sourced hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) on tertiary dsDNA helical forms of supercoiled (SC), open circular (OC), and linear (L) conformation, along with single-stranded folded and non-folded sequences of guanine-rich DNA in selected G-quadruplex structures. We identify that DNA helical topology and folding plays major, and unexpected, roles in the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyadenosine (8-oxo-dA), along with tandem-type purine lesions 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine (5',8-cdG) and 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (5',8-cdA). SC, OC, and L dsDNA conformers together with folded and non-folded G-quadruplexes d[TGGGGT]4 (TG4T), d[AGGG(TTAGGG)3] (Tel22), and the mutated tel24 d[TTGGG(TTAGGG)3A] (mutTel24) were exposed to HO(•) radicals and purine lesions were then quantified via stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS analysis. Purine oxidation in dsDNA follows L > OC ≫ SC indicating greater damage towards the extended B-DNA topology. Conversely, G-quadruplex sequences were significantly more resistant toward purine oxidation in their unfolded states as compared with G-tetrad folded topologies; this effect is confirmed upon comparative analysis of Tel22 (∼50% solution folded) and mutTel24 (∼90% solution folded). In an effort to identify the accessibly of hydroxyl radicals to quadruplex purine nucleobases, G-quadruplex solvent cavities were then modeled at 1.33 Å with evidence suggesting that folded G-tetrads may act as potential oxidant traps to protect against chromosomal DNA damage.

  12. Induction and processing of oxidative clustered DNA lesions in 56Fe-ion-irradiated human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doug; Kalogerinis, Peter; Tabrizi, Isla; Dingfelder, Michael; Stewart, Robert D; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2007-07-01

    Space and cosmic radiation is characterized by energetic heavy ions of high linear energy transfer (LET). Although both low- and high-LET radiations can create oxidative clustered DNA lesions and double-strand breaks (DSBs), the local complexity of oxidative clustered DNA lesions tends to increase with increasing LET. We irradiated 28SC human monocytes with doses from 0-10 Gy of (56)Fe ions (1.046 GeV/ nucleon, LET = 148 keV/microm) and determined the induction and processing of prompt DSBs and oxidative clustered DNA lesions using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Number Average Length Analysis (NALA). The (56)Fe ions produced decreased yields of DSBs (10.9 DSB Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)) and clusters (1 DSB: approximately 0.8 Fpg clusters: approximately 0.7 Endo III clusters: approximately 0.5 Endo IV clusters) compared to previous results with (137)Cs gamma rays. The difference in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the measured and predicted DSB yields may be due to the formation of spatially correlated DSBs (regionally multiply damaged sites) which result in small DNA fragments that are difficult to detect with the PFGE assay. The processing data suggest enhanced difficulty compared with gamma rays in the processing of DSBs but not clusters. At the same time, apoptosis is increased compared to that seen with gamma rays. The enhanced levels of apoptosis observed after exposure to (56)Fe ions may be due to the elimination of cells carrying high levels of persistent DNA clusters that are removed only by cell death and/or "splitting" during DNA replication.

  13. Excision of translesion synthesis errors orchestrates responses to helix-distorting DNA lesions

    PubMed Central

    Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Ferrás, Cristina; Pauw, Bea; Hendriks, Giel; Temviriyanukul, Piya; Carlée, Leone; Calléja, Fabienne; van Hees, Sandrine; Akagi, Jun-Ichi; Iwai, Shigenori; Hanaoka, Fumio; Jansen, Jacob G.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to correcting mispaired nucleotides, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins have been implicated in mutagenic, cell cycle, and apoptotic responses to agents that induce structurally aberrant nucleotide lesions. Here, we investigated the mechanistic basis for these responses by exposing cell lines with single or combined genetic defects in nucleotide excision repair (NER), postreplicative translesion synthesis (TLS), and MMR to low-dose ultraviolet light during S phase. Our data reveal that the MMR heterodimer Msh2/Msh6 mediates the excision of incorrect nucleotides that are incorporated by TLS opposite helix-distorting, noninstructive DNA photolesions. The resulting single-stranded DNA patches induce canonical Rpa–Atr–Chk1-mediated checkpoints and, in the next cell cycle, collapse to double-stranded DNA breaks that trigger apoptosis. In conclusion, a novel MMR-related DNA excision repair pathway controls TLS a posteriori, while initiating cellular responses to environmentally relevant densities of genotoxic lesions. These results may provide a rationale for the colorectal cancer tropism in Lynch syndrome, which is caused by inherited MMR gene defects. PMID:25869665

  14. Crystal structure of DNA polymerase β with DNA containing the base lesion spiroiminodihydantoin in a templating position.

    PubMed

    Eckenroth, Brian E; Fleming, Aaron M; Sweasy, Joann B; Burrows, Cynthia J; Doublié, Sylvie

    2014-04-08

    The first high-resolution crystal structure of spiroiminodihydantoin (dSp1) was obtained in the context of the DNA polymerase β active site and reveals two areas of significance. First, the structure verifies the recently determined S configuration at the spirocyclic carbon. Second, the distortion of the DNA duplex is similar to that of the single-oxidation product 8-oxoguanine. For both oxidized lesions, adaptation of the syn conformation results in similar backbone distortions in the DNA duplex. The resulting conformation positions the dSp1 A-ring as the base-pairing face whereas the B-ring of dSp1 protrudes into the major groove.

  15. Impact of age-associated cyclopurine lesions on DNA repair helicases.

    PubMed

    Khan, Irfan; Suhasini, Avvaru N; Banerjee, Taraswi; Sommers, Joshua A; Kaplan, Daniel L; Kuper, Jochen; Kisker, Caroline; Brosh, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    8,5' cyclopurine deoxynucleosides (cPu) are locally distorting DNA base lesions corrected by nucleotide excision repair (NER) and proposed to play a role in neurodegeneration prevalent in genetically defined Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients. In the current study, purified recombinant helicases from different classifications based on sequence homology were examined for their ability to unwind partial duplex DNA substrates harboring a single site-specific cPu adduct. Superfamily (SF) 2 RecQ helicases (RECQ1, BLM, WRN, RecQ) were inhibited by cPu in the helicase translocating strand, whereas helicases from SF1 (UvrD) and SF4 (DnaB) tolerated cPu in either strand. SF2 Fe-S helicases (FANCJ, DDX11 (ChlR1), DinG, XPD) displayed marked differences in their ability to unwind the cPu DNA substrates. Archaeal Thermoplasma acidophilum XPD (taXPD), homologue to the human XPD helicase involved in NER DNA damage verification, was impeded by cPu in the non-translocating strand, while FANCJ was uniquely inhibited by the cPu in the translocating strand. Sequestration experiments demonstrated that FANCJ became trapped by the translocating strand cPu whereas RECQ1 was not, suggesting the two SF2 helicases interact with the cPu lesion by distinct mechanisms despite strand-specific inhibition for both. Using a protein trap to simulate single-turnover conditions, the rate of FANCJ or RECQ1 helicase activity was reduced 10-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, by cPu in the translocating strand. In contrast, single-turnover rates of DNA unwinding by DDX11 and UvrD helicases were only modestly affected by the cPu lesion in the translocating strand. The marked difference in effect of the translocating strand cPu on rate of DNA unwinding between DDX11 and FANCJ helicase suggests the two Fe-S cluster helicases unwind damaged DNA by distinct mechanisms. The apparent complexity of helicase encounters with an unusual form of oxidative damage is likely to have important consequences in the

  16. DNA Lesions Caused by ROS and RNOS: A Review of Interactions and Reactions Involving Guanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Mishra, P. C.

    DNA is constantly attacked by a large number of endogenous and exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen oxide species (RNOS), and alkylating agents which produce a wide variety of modifications of its constituents, particularly the bases. Some of these modifications (lesions) are hazardous to normal cell functioning, and are implicated in several lethal conditions including chronic inflammatory diseases, atherosclerosis, aging, mutation, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders, such as the Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  17. Base-pairing preferences, physicochemical properties and mutational behaviour of the DNA lesion 8-nitroguanine.

    PubMed

    Bhamra, Inder; Compagnone-Post, Patricia; O'Neil, Ian A; Iwanejko, Lesley A; Bates, Andrew D; Cosstick, Richard

    2012-11-01

    8-Nitro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-nitrodG) is a relatively unstable, mutagenic lesion of DNA that is increasingly believed to be associated with tissue inflammation. Due to the lability of the glycosidic bond, 8-nitrodG cannot be incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) by chemical DNA synthesis and thus very little is known about its physicochemical properties and base-pairing preferences. Here we describe the synthesis of 8-nitro-2'-O-methylguanosine, a ribonucleoside analogue of this lesion, which is sufficiently stable to be incorporated into ODNs. Physicochemical studies demonstrated that 8-nitro-2'-O-methylguanosine adopts a syn conformation about the glycosidic bond; thermal melting studies and molecular modelling suggest a relatively stable syn-8-nitroG·anti-G base pair. Interestingly, when this lesion analogue was placed in a primer-template system, extension of the primer by either avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase (AMV-RT) or human DNA polymerase β (pol β), was significantly impaired, but where incorporation opposite 8-nitroguanine did occur, pol β showed a 2:1 preference to insert dA over dC, while AMV-RT incorporated predominantly dC. The fact that no 8-nitroG·G base pairing is seen in the primer extension products suggests that the polymerases may discriminate against this pairing system on the basis of its poor geometric match to a Watson-Crick pair.

  18. Increased leukocyte mitochondrial DNA copy number is associated with oral premalignant lesions: an epidemiology study.

    PubMed

    He, Yonggang; Gong, Yilei; Gu, Jian; Lee, J Jack; Lippman, Scott M; Wu, Xifeng

    2014-08-01

    Although changes in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) have been linked to increased susceptibility to several cancers, the relationship between the mtDNA copy number in PBLs and the risk of cancer precursors has not been investigated. In this study, we measured the relative mtDNA copy number in PBLs of 143 patients with histologically confirmed oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) and of 357 healthy controls that were frequency-matched to patients according to age, sex and race. OPL patients had a significantly higher mtDNA copy number than the controls (1.36 ± 0.74 versus 1.11 ± 0.32; P < 0.001). In analyses stratified by sex, race, alcohol consumption and smoking status, the mtDNA copy number was higher in the OPL patients than in the controls in all the strata. Using the median mtDNA copy number in the control group as a cutoff, we found that individuals with a high mtDNA copy number had significantly higher risk of having OPLs than individuals with a low mtDNA copy number (adjusted odds ratio, 1.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-3.05, P = 0.004). Analysis of the joint effect of alcohol consumption and smoking revealed even greater risk for OPLs. Our results suggest that high mtDNA copy number in PBLs is significantly associated with having OPLs. To our knowledge, this is the first epidemiologic study to show that the mtDNA copy number may indicate the risk of cancer precursors.

  19. Determination of human DNA polymerase utilization for the repair of a model ionizing radiation-induced DNA strand break lesion in a defined vector substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, T. A.; Russell, P. S.; Kohli, M.; Dar, M. E.; Neumann, R. D.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase and DNA ligase utilization for the repair of a major class of ionizing radiation-induced DNA lesion [DNA single-strand breaks containing 3'-phosphoglycolate (3'-PG)] was examined using a novel, chemically defined vector substrate containing a single, site-specific 3'-PG single-strand break lesion. In addition, the major human AP endonuclease, HAP1 (also known as APE1, APEX, Ref-1), was tested to determine if it was involved in initiating repair of 3'-PG-containing single-strand break lesions. DNA polymerase beta was found to be the primary polymerase responsible for nucleotide incorporation at the lesion site following excision of the 3'-PG blocking group. However, DNA polymerase delta/straightepsilon was also capable of nucleotide incorporation at the lesion site following 3'-PG excision. In addition, repair reactions catalyzed by DNA polymerase beta were found to be most effective in the presence of DNA ligase III, while those catalyzed by DNA polymerase delta/straightepsilon appeared to be more effective in the presence of DNA ligase I. Also, it was demonstrated that the repair initiating 3'-PG excision reaction was not dependent upon HAP1 activity, as judged by inhibition of HAP1 with neutralizing HAP1-specific polyclonal antibody.

  20. DNA damage response in peripheral nervous system: coping with cancer therapy-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Englander, Ella W

    2013-08-01

    In the absence of blood brain barrier (BBB) the DNA of peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons is exposed to a broader spectrum of endogenous and exogenous threats compared to that of the central nervous system (CNS). Hence, while CNS and PNS neurons cope with many similar challenges inherent to their high oxygen consumption and vigorous metabolism, PNS neurons are also exposed to circulating toxins and inflammatory mediators due to relative permeability of PNS blood nerve barrier (BNB). Consequently, genomes of PNS neurons incur greater damage and the question awaiting investigation is whether specialized repair mechanisms for maintenance of DNA integrity have evolved to meet the additional needs of PNS neurons. Here, I review data showing how PNS neurons manage collateral DNA damage incurred in the course of different anti-cancer treatments designed to block DNA replication in proliferating tumor cells. Importantly, while PNS neurotoxicity and concomitant chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) are among major dose limiting barriers in achieving therapy goals, CIPN is partially reversible during post-treatment nerve recovery. Clearly, cell recovery necessitates mobilization of the DNA damage response and underscores the need for systematic investigation of the scope of DNA repair capacities in the PNS to help predict post-treatment risks to recovering neurons.

  1. Structure of Human DNL Polymerase k Inserting dATP Opposite an 8-OxoG DNA Lesion

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez-Del Carpio, R.; Silverstein, T; Lone, S; Swan, M; Choudhury, J; Johnson, R; Pratkash, S; Aggarwal, A

    2009-01-01

    The structure we present here is the first for a eukaryotic translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase with an 8-oxoG:A base pair in the active site. The structure shows why Pol? is more efficient at inserting an A opposite the 8-oxoG lesion than a C. The structure also provides a basis for why Pol? is more efficient at inserting an A opposite the lesion than other Y-family DNA polymerases.

  2. Purine 5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxynucleoside lesions in irradiated DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Krokidis, Marios G.; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos; Terzidis, Michael A.

    2016-11-01

    Having their position gained among the smallest bulky DNA lesions recognized by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) enzyme, purine 5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxynucleosides (5‧,8-cPu) are increasingly attracting the interest in the field of genome integrity in health and diseases. Exclusively generated by one of the most harmful of the reactive oxygen species, the hydroxyl radical, 5‧,8-cPu can be utilized also for highly valuable information regarding the oxidative status nearby the area where the genetic information is stored. Herein, we have collected the most recently reported biological studies, focusing on the repair mechanism of these lesions and their biological significance particularly in transcription. The LC-MS/MS quantification protocols that appeared in the literature are discussed in details, along with the reported values for the four 5‧,8-cPu produced by in vitro γ-radiolysis experiments with calf thymus DNA. Mechanistic insights in the formation of the purine 5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxynucleosides and their chemical stability are also given in the light of their potential to be utilized as DNA biomarkers of oxidative stress.

  3. Hippocampal adult neurogenesis is maintained by Neil3-dependent repair of oxidative DNA lesions in neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Regnell, Christine Elisabeth; Hildrestrand, Gunn Annette; Sejersted, Yngve; Medin, Tirill; Moldestad, Olve; Rolseth, Veslemøy; Krokeide, Silje Zandstra; Suganthan, Rajikala; Luna, Luisa; Bjørås, Magnar; Bergersen, Linda H

    2012-09-27

    Accumulation of oxidative DNA damage has been proposed as a potential cause of age-related cognitive decline. The major pathway for removal of oxidative DNA base lesions is base excision repair, which is initiated by DNA glycosylases. In mice, Neil3 is the main DNA glycosylase for repair of hydantoin lesions in single-stranded DNA of neural stem/progenitor cells, promoting neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis is crucial for maintenance of hippocampus-dependent functions involved in behavior. Herein, behavioral studies reveal learning and memory deficits and reduced anxiety-like behavior in Neil3(-/-) mice. Neural stem/progenitor cells from aged Neil3(-/-) mice show impaired proliferative capacity and reduced DNA repair activity. Furthermore, hippocampal neurons in Neil3(-/-) mice display synaptic irregularities. It appears that Neil3-dependent repair of oxidative DNA damage in neural stem/progenitor cells is required for maintenance of adult neurogenesis to counteract the age-associated deterioration of cognitive performance.

  4. Oxidative stress at low levels can induce clustered DNA lesions leading to NHEJ mediated mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vyom; Collins, Leonard B.; Chen, Ting-huei; Herr, Natalie; Takeda, Shunichi; Sun, Wei; Swenberg, James A.; Nakamura, Jun

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage and mutations induced by oxidative stress are associated with various different human pathologies including cancer. The facts that most human tumors are characterized by large genome rearrangements and glutathione depletion in mice results in deletions in DNA suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause gene and chromosome mutations through DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the generation of DSBs at low levels of ROS is still controversial. In the present study, we show that H2O2 at biologically-relevant levels causes a marked increase in oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs) with a significant elevation of replication-independent DSBs. Although it is frequently reported that OCDLs are fingerprint of high-energy IR, our results indicate for the first time that H2O2, even at low levels, can also cause OCDLs leading to DSBs specifically in G1 cells. Furthermore, a reverse genetic approach revealed a significant contribution of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway in H2O2-induced DNA repair & mutagenesis. This genomic instability induced by low levels of ROS may be involved in spontaneous mutagenesis and the etiology of a wide variety of human diseases like chronic inflammation-related disorders, carcinogenesis, neuro-degeneration and aging. PMID:27015367

  5. An Iminohydantoin Lesion Induced in DNA by Peracids and Other Epoxidizing Oxidants

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenjie; Sangaiah, R.; Degen, Diana E.; Gold, Avram; Jayaraj, K.; Koshlap, Karl M.; Boysen, Gunnar; Williams, Jason; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Mocanu, Viorel; Dicheva, Nedyalka; Parker, Carol E.; Schaaper, Roel M.; Ball, Louise M.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation of guanine to 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2-Ih) is shown to be a major transformation in the oxidation of the single-stranded DNA 5-mer d(TTGTT) by m-CPBA and DMDO as a model for peracid oxidants and in the oxidation of the 5-base pair duplex d[(TTGTT)·(AACAA)] with DMDO. 2-Ih has not been reported as an oxidative lesion at the level of single/double-stranded DNA or at the nucleoside/nucleotide level. The lesion is stable to DNA digestion and chromatographic purification suggesting that 2-Ih may be a stable biomarker in vivo. The oxidation products have been structurally characterized and the reaction mechanism probed by oxidation of the monomeric species dGuo, dGMP and dGTP. DMDO selectively oxidizes the guanine moiety of dGuo, dGMP and dGTP to 2-Ih, and both peracetic and m-chloroperbenzoic acids exhibit the same selectivity. The presence of the glycosidic bond results in the stereoselective induction of an asymmetric center at the spiro carbon to give a mixture of diastereomers, with each diastereomer in equilibrium with a minor conformer through rotation about the formamido C-N bond. Labeling studies with 18O2-m-CPBA and H218O to determine the source of the added oxygen atoms have established initial epoxidation of the guanine 4-5 bond with pyrimidine ring contraction by an acyl 1,2-migration of guanine carbonyl C6 to form a transient dehydrodeoxyspiroiminodihydantoin followed by hydrolytic ring opening of the imidazolone ring. Consistent with the proposed mechanism, no 8-oxoguanine was detected as a product of the oxidations of the oligonucleotides or monomeric species mediated by DMDO or the peracids. The 2-Ih base thus appears to be a pathway-specific lesion generated by peracids and possibly other epoxidizing agents and holds promise as a potential biomarker. PMID:19354244

  6. Human DNA polymerase β, but not λ, can bypass a 2-deoxyribonolactone lesion together with proliferating cell nuclear antigen

    PubMed Central

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Pasi, Emanuela; Imoto, Shuhei; Hübscher, Ulrich; Greenberg, Marc M.; Maga, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The C1′-oxidized lesion 2-deoxyribonolactone (L) is induced by free radical attack of DNA. This lesion is mutagenic, inhibits base excision repair, and can lead to strand scission. In double stranded DNA L is repaired by long-patch base excision repair, but it induces replication fork arrest in a single-strand template. Translesion synthesis requires a specialized DNA polymerase (Pol). In E. coli, Pol V is responsible for bypassing L, while in yeast Pol ζ has been shown to be required for efficient bypass. Very little is known about the identity of human Pols capable of bypassing L. For instance, the activity of family X enzymes has never been investigated. We examined the ability of different family X Pols: Pols β, λ and TdT from human cells and Pol IV from S. cerevisiae to act on DNA containing an isolated 2-deoxyribonolactone, as well as when the lesion comprises the 5′-component of a tandem lesion. We show that Pol β, but not Pol λ, can bypass a single L lesion in the template, and its activity is increased by the auxiliary protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), while both enzymes were completely blocked by a tandem lesion. Yeast Pol IV was able to bypass the single L and the tandem lesion but with little nucleotide insertion specificity. Finally, L did not affect the polymerization activity of the template-independent enzyme TdT. PMID:23101935

  7. DNA damage and external lesions in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from contaminated habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, X.; Meier, J.; Chang, L.; Rowan, M.; Baumann, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Comet assay was used to compare levels of DNA damage in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) collected from three known contaminated locations, the Cuyahoga River (OH, USA), Ashtabula River (OH, USA; both tributaries to Lake Erie, USA), and Ashumet Pond (Cape Cod, MA, USA), with brown bullheads collected from three paired reference sites, Old Woman Creek (OH, USA), Conneaut River (OH, USA; both tributaries to Lake Erie), and Great Herring Pond (mainland MA, USA), respectively. Blood was sampled from each fish, and the Comet assay was conducted on erythrocytes. The assay results demonstrate that fish from the three contaminated sites each suffered higher DNA damage compared with fish from their respective reference sites. The results also show that the genetic damage was associated with the occurrence of external lesions and deformities in fish. The Comet assay is sufficiently sensitive to detect exposure of natural fish populations to environmental levels of genotoxic contaminants. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  8. Reduced contribution of thermally-labile sugar lesions to DNA double-strand break formation after exposure to neutrons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyendra K; Wu, Wenqi; Stuschke, Martin; Bockisch, Andreas; Iliakis, George

    2012-12-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response apparatus. However, DSBs also form by delayed chemical conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions (TLSL) to breaks. We recently reported that conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions to breaks occurs in cells maintained at physiological temperatures. Here, we investigate the influence of radiation quality on the formation of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs. We show that, although the yields of total DSBs are very similar after exposure to neutrons and X rays, the yields of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs from neutrons are decreased in comparison to that from X rays. Thus, the yields of prompt DSBs for neutrons are greater than for X rays. Notably, after neutron irradiation the decreased yield of thermally-labile sugar lesion dependent DSBs is strongly cell line dependent, likely reflecting subtle differences in DNA organization. We propose that the higher ionization density of neutrons generates with higher probability prompt DSBs within ionization clusters and renders the ensuing chemical evolution of thermally-labile sugar lesions inconsequential to DNA integrity. Modification of thermally-labile sugar lesion evolution may define novel radiation protection strategies aiming at decreasing DSB formation by chemically preserving thermally-labile sugar lesions until other DSB contributing lesions within the clustered damage site are removed by non-DSB repair pathways.

  9. Yields of strand breaks and base lesions induced by soft X-rays in plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, A; Fujii, K; Ushigome, T; Shikazono, N; Urushibara, A; Watanabe, R

    2006-01-01

    The yields of soft-X-ray-induced DNA damages have been measured by using closed-circular plasmid DNA. Several DNA solutions with three kinds of radical scavenger capacity and also fully hydrated DNA samples were irradiated to compare the contribution by indirect reaction of diffusible water radicals, such as OH*, with those by direct action of secondary electrons. The yields of prompt single- (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) decrease with increasing scavenging capacity. The SSB yields for soft X-rays are approximately midway those between gamma-ray and ultrasoft X-ray data previously reported. Heat labile sites are observed only in the low scavenger condition. The yields of the base lesions revealed by post irradiation treatment with base excision repair enzymes showed a similar value for Nth and Fpg protein except in the hydrated sample. These results indicate that the direct effect of soft X-rays induces the damages with different efficiency from those by indirect effect.

  10. DNA Lesions in MEDKA (O. Latipes): Development of a Micro-Method for Tissue Analysis Using GC-MS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-08-15

    Fenton reaction . Free Radic Res 1994; 20:345-63. 5. Imlay JA, Chin SM, Linn S. Toxic DNA damage by hydrogen ...peroxide through the Fenton reaction in vivo and in vitro . Science 1988; 240:640-2. 6. Malins DC. Identification of hydroxyl radical-induced lesions in DNA ...on DNA . However, other reactions cannot be ruled out. Difficulties presently exist in precisely defining the proportions of damage inflicted on

  11. DNA double-strand breaks and ATM activation by transcription-blocking DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Sordet, Olivier; Nakamura, Asako J; Redon, Christophe E; Pommier, Yves

    2010-01-15

    A taxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the deficiency of which causes a severe neurodegenerative disease, is a crucial mediator for the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response. We recently showed that transcription-blocking topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (TOP1cc) produce DSBs related to R-loop formation and activate ATM in post-mitotic neurons and lymphocytes. Here we discuss how TOP1cc can produce transcription arrest with R-loop formation and generate DSBs that activate ATM, as well as data suggesting that those transcription-dependent DSBs tend to form at the IgH locus and at specific genomic sites. We also address the potential roles of ATM in response to transcription-blocking TOP1cc.

  12. Rapid Histone-Catalyzed DNA Lesion Excision and Accompanying Protein Modification in Nucleosomes and Nucleosome Core Particles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liwei; Greenberg, Marc M

    2015-09-02

    C5'-Hydrogen atoms are frequently abstracted during DNA oxidation. The oxidized abasic lesion 5'-(2-phosphoryl-1,4-dioxobutane) (DOB) is an electrophilic product of the C5'-radical. DOB is a potent irreversible inhibitor of DNA polymerase β, and forms interstrand cross-links in free DNA. We examined the reactivity of DOB within nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles (NCPs), the monomeric component of chromatin. Depending upon the position at which DOB is generated within a NCP, it is excised from nucleosomal DNA at a rate 275-1500-fold faster than that in free DNA. The half-life of DOB (7.0-16.8 min) in NCPs is shorter than any other abasic lesion. DOB's lifetime in NCPs is also significantly shorter than the estimated lifetime of an abasic site within a cell, suggesting that the observed chemistry would occur intracellularly. Histones also catalyze DOB excision when the lesion is present in the DNA linker region of a nucleosome. Schiff-base formation between DOB and histone proteins is detected in nucleosomes and NCPs, resulting in pyrrolone formation at the lysine residues. The lysines modified by DOB are often post-translationally modified. Consequently, the histone modifications described herein could affect the regulation of gene expression and may provide a chemical basis for the cytotoxicity of the DNA damaging agents that produce this lesion.

  13. DNA lesions derived from the site selective oxidation of Guanine by carbonate radical anions.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Avrum; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2003-12-01

    Carbonate radical anions are potentially important oxidants of nucleic acids in physiological environments. However, the mechanisms of action are poorly understood, and the end products of oxidation of DNA by carbonate radicals have not been characterized. These oxidation pathways were explored in this work, starting from the laser pulse-induced generation of the primary radical species to the identification of the stable oxidative modifications (lesions). The cascade of events was initiated by utilizing 308 nm XeCl excimer laser pulses to generate carbonate radical anions on submicrosecond time scales. This laser flash photolysis method involved the photodissociation of persulfate to sulfate radical anions and the one electron oxidation of bicarbonate anions by the sulfate radicals to yield the carbonate radical anions. The latter were monitored by their characteristic transient absorption band at 600 nm. The rate constants of reactions of carbonate radicals with oligonucleotides increase in the ascending order: 5'-d(CCATCCTACC) [(5.7 +/- 0.6) x 10(6) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)] < 5'-d(TATAACGTTATA), self-complementary duplex [(1.4 +/- 0.2) x 10(7) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)] < 5'-d(CCATCGCTACC [(2.4 +/- 0.3) x 10(7) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)] < 5'-d(CCATC[8-oxo-G]CTACC) [(3.2 +/- 0.4) x 10(8) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)], where 8-oxo-G is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, the product of a two electron oxidation of guanine. This remarkable enhancement of the rate constants is correlated with the presence of either G or 8-oxo-G bases in the oligonucleotides. The rate constant for the oxidation of G in a single-stranded oligonuclotide is faster by a factor of approximately 2 than in the double-stranded form. The site selective oxidation of G and 8-oxo-G residues by carbonate radicals results in the formation of unique end products, the diastereomeric spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) lesions, the products of a four electron oxidation of guanine. These lesions, formed in high yields (40-60%), were isolated by reversed phase

  14. Iminohydantoin lesion induced in DNA by peracids and other epoxidizing oxidants.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenjie; Sangaiah, R; Degen, Diana E; Gold, Avram; Jayaraj, K; Koshlap, Karl M; Boysen, Gunnar; Williams, Jason; Tomer, Kenneth B; Mocanu, Viorel; Dicheva, Nedyalka; Parker, Carol E; Schaaper, Roel M; Ball, Louise M

    2009-05-06

    The oxidation of guanine to 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2-Ih) is shown to be a major transformation in the oxidation of the single-stranded DNA 5-mer d(TTGTT) by m-chloroperbenzoic acid (m-CPBA) and dimethyldioxirane (DMDO) as a model for peracid oxidants and in the oxidation of the 5-base pair duplex d[(TTGTT).(AACAA)] with DMDO. 2-Ih has not been reported as an oxidative lesion at the level of single/double-stranded DNA or at the nucleoside/nucleotide level. The lesion is stable to DNA digestion and chromatographic purification, suggesting that 2-Ih may be a stable biomarker in vivo. The oxidation products have been structurally characterized and the reaction mechanism has been probed by oxidation of the monomeric species dGuo, dGMP, and dGTP. DMDO selectively oxidizes the guanine moiety of dGuo, dGMP, and dGTP to 2-Ih, and both peracetic and m-chloroperbenzoic acids exhibit the same selectivity. The presence of the glycosidic bond results in the stereoselective induction of an asymmetric center at the spiro carbon to give a mixture of diastereomers, with each diastereomer in equilibrium with a minor conformer through rotation about the formamido C-N bond. Labeling studies with [(18)O(2)]-m-CPBA and H(2)(18)O to determine the source of the added oxygen atoms have established initial epoxidation of the guanine 4-5 bond with pyrimidine ring contraction by an acyl 1,2-migration of guanine carbonyl C6 to form a transient dehydrodeoxyspiroiminodihydantoin followed by hydrolytic ring-opening of the imidazolone ring. Consistent with the proposed mechanism, no 8-oxoguanine was detected as a product of the oxidations of the oligonucleotides or monomeric species mediated by DMDO or the peracids. The 2-Ih base thus appears to be a pathway-specific lesion generated by peracids and possibly other epoxidizing agents and holds promise as a potential biomarker.

  15. The nitrosated bile acid DNA lesion O6-carboxymethylguanine is a substrate for the human DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Senthong, Pattama; Millington, Christopher L.; Wilkinson, Oliver J.; Marriott, Andrew S.; Watson, Amanda J.; Reamtong, Onrapak; Eyers, Claire E.; Williams, David M.; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Povey, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of red meat is a risk factor in human colorectal cancer (CRC). One hypothesis is that red meat facilitates the nitrosation of bile acid conjugates and amino acids, which rapidly convert to DNA-damaging carcinogens. Indeed, the toxic and mutagenic DNA adduct O6-carboxymethylguanine (O6-CMG) is frequently present in human DNA, increases in abundance in people with high levels of dietary red meat and may therefore be a causative factor in CRC. Previous reports suggested that O6-CMG is not a substrate for the human version of the DNA damage reversal protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which protects against the genotoxic effects of other O6-alkylguanine lesions by removing alkyl groups from the O6-position. We now show that synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing the known MGMT substrate O6-methylguanine (O6-MeG) or O6-CMG effectively inactivate MGMT in vitro (IC50 0.93 and 1.8 nM, respectively). Inactivation involves the removal of the O6-alkyl group and its transfer to the active-site cysteine residue of MGMT. O6-CMG is therefore an MGMT substrate, and hence MGMT is likely to be a protective factor in CRC under conditions where O6-CMG is a potential causative agent. PMID:23335782

  16. Evolution of MS lesions to black holes under DNA vaccine treatment.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Athina; von Felten, Stefanie; Traud, Stefan; Rahman, Amena; Quan, Joanne; King, Robert; Garren, Hideki; Steinman, Lawrence; Cutter, Gary; Kappos, Ludwig; Radue, Ernst Wilhelm

    2012-07-01

    Persistent black holes (PBH) are associated with axonal loss and disability progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this work was to determine if BHT-3009, a DNA plasmid-encoding myelin basic protein (MBP), reduces the risk of new lesions becoming PBH, compared to placebo, and to test if pre-treatment serum anti-MBP antibody levels impact on the effect of BHT-3009 treatment. In this retrospective, blinded MRI study, we reviewed MRI scans of 155 MS patients from a double-blind, randomized, phase II trial with three treatment arms (placebo, 0.5 and 1.5 mg BHT-3009). New lesions at weeks 8 and 16 were tracked at week 48 and those appearing as T1-hypointense were classified as PBH. A subset of 46 patients with available pre-treatment serum anti-MBP IgM levels were analyzed separately. Overall, there was no impact of treatment on the risk for PBH. However, there was a significant interaction between anti-MBP antibodies and treatment effect: patients receiving 0.5 mg BHT-3009 showed a reduced risk of PBH with higher antibody levels compared to placebo (p < 0.01). Although we found no overall reduction of the risk for PBH in treated patients, there may be an effect of low-dose BHT-3009, depending on the patients' pre-treatment immune responses.

  17. The role of Fpg protein in UVC-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Silva-Júnior, A C T; Asad, L M B O; Felzenszwalb, I; Asad, N R

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) could be involved in ultraviolet-C (UVC)-induced DNA damage in Escherichia coli cells. In the present study, we evaluated the involvement of the GO system proteins in the repair of the 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxoG, GO) lesion, which is ROS-induced oxidative damage. We first found that the mutant strain Δfur, which produces an accumulation of iron, and the cells treated with 2,2'-dipyridyl, a iron chelator, were both as resistant to UVC-induced lethality as the wild strain. The 8-oxoG could be mediated by singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). The Fpg protein repaired this lesion when it was linked to C (cytosine), whereas the MutY protein repaired 8-oxoG when it was linked to A (adenine). The survival assay showed that the Fpg protein, but not the MutY protein, was important to UVC-induced lethality and interacted with the UvrA protein, a nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein involved in UVC repair. The GC-TA reversion assay in the mutant strains from the '8-oxoG-repair' GO system showed that UVC-induced mutagenesis in the fpg mutants, but not in the MutY strain. The transformation assay demonstrated that the Fpg protein is important in UVC repair. These results suggest that UVC could also cause indirect ROS-mediated DNA damage and the Fpg protein plays a predominant role in repairing this indirect damage.

  18. Glutathione Depletion and Carbon Ion Radiation Potentiate Clustered DNA Lesions, Cell Death and Prevent Chromosomal Changes in Cancer Cells Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Hanot, Maïté; Boivin, Anthony; Malésys, Céline; Beuve, Michaël; Colliaux, Anthony; Foray, Nicolas; Douki, Thierry; Ardail, Dominique; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Poor local control and tumor escape are of major concern in head-and-neck cancers treated by conventional radiotherapy or hadrontherapy. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is suspected of playing an important role in mechanisms leading to radioresistance, and its depletion should enable oxidative stress insult, thereby modifying the nature of DNA lesions and the subsequent chromosomal changes that potentially lead to tumor escape. This study aimed to highlight the impact of a GSH-depletion strategy (dimethylfumarate, and l-buthionine sulfoximine association) combined with carbon ion or X-ray irradiation on types of DNA lesions (sparse or clustered) and the subsequent transmission of chromosomal changes to the progeny in a radioresistant cell line (SQ20B) expressing a high endogenous GSH content. Results are compared with those of a radiosensitive cell line (SCC61) displaying a low endogenous GSH level. DNA damage measurements (γH2AX/comet assay) demonstrated that a transient GSH depletion in resistant SQ20B cells potentiated the effects of irradiation by initially increasing sparse DNA breaks and oxidative lesions after X-ray irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation enhanced the complexity of clustered oxidative damage. Moreover, residual DNA double-strand breaks were measured whatever the radiation qualities. The nature of the initial DNA lesions and amount of residual DNA damage were similar to those observed in sensitive SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation. Misrepaired or unrepaired lesions may lead to chromosomal changes, estimated in cell progeny by the cytome assay. Both types of irradiation induced aberrations in nondepleted resistant SQ20B and sensitive SCC61 cells. The GSH-depletion strategy prevented the transmission of aberrations (complex rearrangements and chromosome break or loss) in radioresistant SQ20B only when associated with carbon ion irradiation. A GSH-depleting strategy combined with hadrontherapy may thus have considerable advantage in the

  19. Glutathione depletion and carbon ion radiation potentiate clustered DNA lesions, cell death and prevent chromosomal changes in cancer cells progeny.

    PubMed

    Hanot, Maïté; Boivin, Anthony; Malésys, Céline; Beuve, Michaël; Colliaux, Anthony; Foray, Nicolas; Douki, Thierry; Ardail, Dominique; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Poor local control and tumor escape are of major concern in head-and-neck cancers treated by conventional radiotherapy or hadrontherapy. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is suspected of playing an important role in mechanisms leading to radioresistance, and its depletion should enable oxidative stress insult, thereby modifying the nature of DNA lesions and the subsequent chromosomal changes that potentially lead to tumor escape.This study aimed to highlight the impact of a GSH-depletion strategy (dimethylfumarate, and L-buthionine sulfoximine association) combined with carbon ion or X-ray irradiation on types of DNA lesions (sparse or clustered) and the subsequent transmission of chromosomal changes to the progeny in a radioresistant cell line (SQ20B) expressing a high endogenous GSH content. Results are compared with those of a radiosensitive cell line (SCC61) displaying a low endogenous GSH level. DNA damage measurements (γH2AX/comet assay) demonstrated that a transient GSH depletion in resistant SQ20B cells potentiated the effects of irradiation by initially increasing sparse DNA breaks and oxidative lesions after X-ray irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation enhanced the complexity of clustered oxidative damage. Moreover, residual DNA double-strand breaks were measured whatever the radiation qualities. The nature of the initial DNA lesions and amount of residual DNA damage were similar to those observed in sensitive SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation. Misrepaired or unrepaired lesions may lead to chromosomal changes, estimated in cell progeny by the cytome assay. Both types of irradiation induced aberrations in nondepleted resistant SQ20B and sensitive SCC61 cells. The GSH-depletion strategy prevented the transmission of aberrations (complex rearrangements and chromosome break or loss) in radioresistant SQ20B only when associated with carbon ion irradiation. A GSH-depleting strategy combined with hadrontherapy may thus have considerable advantage in the

  20. DNA alkylation lesions and their repair in human cells: modification of the comet assay with 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AlkD).

    PubMed

    Hašplová, Katarína; Hudecová, Alexandra; Magdolénová, Zuzana; Bjøras, Magnar; Gálová, Eliška; Miadoková, Eva; Dušinská, Mária

    2012-01-05

    3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AlkD) belongs to a new family of DNA glycosylases; it initiates repair of cytotoxic and promutagenic alkylated bases (its main substrates being 3-methyladenine and 7-methylguanine). The modification of the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) using AlkD enzyme thus allows assessment of specific DNA alkylation lesions. The resulting baseless sugars are alkali-labile, and under the conditions of the alkaline comet assay they appear as DNA strand breaks. The alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) was used to induce alkylation lesions and to optimize conditions for the modified comet assay method with AlkD on human lymphoblastoid (TK6) cells. We also studied cellular and in vitro DNA repair of alkylated bases in DNA in TK6 cells after treatment with MMS. Results from cellular repair indicate that 50% of DNA alkylation is repaired in the first 60 min. The in vitro repair assay shows that while AlkD recognises most alkylation lesions after 60 min, a cell extract from TK6 cells recognises most of the MMS-induced DNA adducts already in the first 15 min of incubation, with maximum detection of lesions after 60 min' incubation. Additionally, we tested the in vitro repair capacity of human lymphocyte extracts from 5 individuals and found them to be able to incise DNA alkylations in the same range as AlkD. The modification of the comet assay with AlkD can be useful for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity studies to detect alkylation damage and repair and also for human biomonitoring and molecular epidemiology studies.

  1. Measurement of oxidatively-induced clustered DNA lesions using a novel adaptation of single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay).

    PubMed

    Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Holt, Stewart M; Hair, Jessica M; Loftin, Charles W

    2010-12-01

    The two basic groups of complex DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSBs) and non-DSB oxidatively-induced clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs). The single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay has been widely used for the detection of low levels of various types of DNA lesions including single-strand breaks (SSBs), DSBs, and oxidized bases per individual cell. There are limited data on the use of the comet assay for the detection of non-DSB clustered DNA lesions using different repair enzymes as enzymatic probes. This unit discusses a novel adaptation of the comet assay used to measure these unique types of lesions. Until now OCDL yields have been measured using primarily pulsed-field agarose gel electrophoresis. The advantages offered by the current approach are: (1) measurement of OCDL levels per individual cell; (2) use of a small number of cells (∼10,000) and relatively low doses of ionizing radiation (1 to 2 Gy) or low levels of oxidative stress, which are not compatible with standard agarose gel electrophoresis; and finally, (3) the assay is fast and allows direct comparison with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis results.

  2. Oxidative stress induces DNA damage and inhibits the repair of DNA lesions induced by N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene in human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Pero, R W; Anderson, M W; Doyle, G A; Anna, C H; Romagna, F; Markowitz, M; Bryngelsson, C

    1990-08-01

    Human mononuclear leukocytes were exposed to prooxidants such as H2O2, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, and the effects on induction of DNA damage and repair were evaluated. ADP ribosylation was activated by prooxidant exposure and the response was bimodal with peaks of activation occurring at about 30 min and 4-5 h. Other evidence for prooxidant-induced DNA damage was provided by nucleoid sedimentation assays. Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was only slightly induced by prooxidant exposure which suggested that either the DNA lesions were repaired by a short patch mechanism involving little UDS, or the repair process was inhibited by prooxidant exposures, or some combination of both. This point was clarified by the fact that the repair of DNA lesions induced by N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene, an inducer of large patch DNA repair, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by exposure to H2O2 and the inhibition was dependent on ADP ribosylation. In contrast, the repair of DNA strand breaks induced by prooxidant exposures as identified above were complete within about 8 h and the repair was independent of ADP ribosylation. Both ADP ribosylation and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-induced UDS were shown to be up- and down-regulated by the redox state of human mononuclear leukocytes indicating a unique mechanism of cellular control over DNA repair.

  3. Oxidation of the sugar moiety of DNA by ionizing radiation or bleomycin could induce the formation of a cluster DNA lesion

    PubMed Central

    Regulus, Peggy; Duroux, Benoit; Bayle, Pierre-Alain; Favier, Alain; Cadet, Jean; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Bleomycin, a radiomimetic drug currently used in human cancer therapy, is a well known carcinogen. Its toxicity is mostly attributed to its potentiality to induce DNA double strand breaks likely arising from the formation of two vicinal DNA strand breaks, initiated by C4-hydrogen abstraction on the 2-deoxyribose moiety. In this work we demonstrate that such a hydrogen abstraction reaction is able to induce the formation of a clustered DNA lesion, involving a 3′ strand break together with a modified sugar residue exhibiting a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde that further reacts with a proximate cytosine base. The lesion thus produced was detected as a mixture of four isomers by HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry subsequent to DNA extraction and enzymatic digestion. The modified nucleosides that constitute new types of cytosine adducts were identified as the likely two pairs of diastereomers of 6-(2-deoxy-β-d-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-2-hydroxy-3(3-hydroxy-2-oxopropyl)-2,6-dihydroimidazo[1,2-c]-pyrimidin-5(3H)-one as inferred from mass spectrometry and NMR analyses of the chemically synthesized nucleosides. We demonstrate that bleomycin, and to a minor extent ionizing radiation, are able to induce significant amounts of the cytosine damage in cellular DNA. In addition, the repair kinetic of the lesion in a human lymphocyte cell line is rather slow, with a half-life of 10 h. The 2′-deoxycytidine adducts thus characterized that represent the first example of complex DNA lesions isolated and identified in cellular DNA upon one radical hit are likely to play an important role in the toxicity of bleomycin. PMID:17715301

  4. Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Expanded Under Ambient Oxygen Concentration Accumulate Oxidative DNA Lesions and Experience Procarcinogenic DNA Replication Stress.

    PubMed

    Bétous, Rémy; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Hoede, Claire; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Jones, Natalie; Longy, Michel; Sensebé, Luc; Cazaux, Christophe; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have led to growing interest in cell-based therapy because they can be easily harvested from an abundant tissue. ADSCs must be expanded in vitro before transplantation. This essential step causes concerns about the safety of adult stem cells in terms of potential transformation. Tumorigenesis is driven in its earliest step by DNA replication stress, which is characterized by the accumulation of stalled DNA replication forks and activation of the DNA damage response. Thus, to evaluate the safety of ADSCs during ex vivo expansion, we monitored DNA replication under atmospheric (21%) or physiologic (1%) oxygen concentration. Here, by combining immunofluorescence and DNA combing, we show that ADSCs cultured under 21% oxygen accumulate endogenous oxidative DNA lesions, which interfere with DNA replication by increasing fork stalling events, thereby leading to incomplete DNA replication and fork collapse. Moreover, we found by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) that culture of ADSCs under atmospheric oxygen concentration leads to misexpression of cell cycle and DNA replication genes, which could contribute to DNA replication stress. Finally, analysis of acquired small nucleotide polymorphism shows that expansion of ADSCs under 21% oxygen induces a mutational bias toward deleterious transversions. Overall, our results suggest that expanding ADSCs at a low oxygen concentration could reduce the risk for DNA replication stress-associated transformation, as occurs in neoplastic tissues. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:68-76.

  5. Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Expanded Under Ambient Oxygen Concentration Accumulate Oxidative DNA Lesions and Experience Procarcinogenic DNA Replication Stress.

    PubMed

    Bétous, Rémy; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Hoede, Claire; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Jones, Natalie; Longy, Michel; Sensebé, Luc; Cazaux, Christophe; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-08-24

    : Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have led to growing interest in cell-based therapy because they can be easily harvested from an abundant tissue. ADSCs must be expanded in vitro before transplantation. This essential step causes concerns about the safety of adult stem cells in terms of potential transformation. Tumorigenesis is driven in its earliest step by DNA replication stress, which is characterized by the accumulation of stalled DNA replication forks and activation of the DNA damage response. Thus, to evaluate the safety of ADSCs during ex vivo expansion, we monitored DNA replication under atmospheric (21%) or physiologic (1%) oxygen concentration. Here, by combining immunofluorescence and DNA combing, we show that ADSCs cultured under 21% oxygen accumulate endogenous oxidative DNA lesions, which interfere with DNA replication by increasing fork stalling events, thereby leading to incomplete DNA replication and fork collapse. Moreover, we found by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) that culture of ADSCs under atmospheric oxygen concentration leads to misexpression of cell cycle and DNA replication genes, which could contribute to DNA replication stress. Finally, analysis of acquired small nucleotide polymorphism shows that expansion of ADSCs under 21% oxygen induces a mutational bias toward deleterious transversions. Overall, our results suggest that expanding ADSCs at a low oxygen concentration could reduce the risk for DNA replication stress-associated transformation, as occurs in neoplastic tissues.

  6. Development of a 'clickable' non-natural nucleotide to visualize the replication of non-instructional DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Motea, Edward A; Lee, Irene; Berdis, Anthony J

    2012-03-01

    The misreplication of damaged DNA is an important biological process that produces numerous adverse effects on human health. This report describes the synthesis and characterization of a non-natural nucleotide, designated 3-ethynyl-5-nitroindolyl-2'-deoxyriboside triphosphate (3-Eth-5-NITP), as a novel chemical reagent that can probe and quantify the misreplication of damaged DNA. We demonstrate that this non-natural nucleotide is efficiently inserted opposite an abasic site, a commonly formed and potentially mutagenic non-instructional DNA lesion. The strategic placement of the ethynyl moiety allows the incorporated nucleoside triphosphate to be selectively tagged with an azide-containing fluorophore using 'click' chemistry. This reaction provides a facile way to quantify the extent of nucleotide incorporation opposite non-instructional DNA lesions. In addition, the incorporation of 3-Eth-5-NITP is highly selective for an abasic site, and occurs even in the presence of a 50-fold molar excess of natural nucleotides. The biological applications of using 3-Eth-5-NITP as a chemical probe to monitor and quantify the misreplication of non-instructional DNA lesions are discussed.

  7. Real-time surface plasmon resonance study of biomolecular interactions between polymerase and bulky mutagenic DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lifang; Vaidyanathan, V G; Cho, Bongsup P

    2014-10-20

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to measure polymerase-binding interactions of the bulky mutagenic DNA lesions N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4'-fluoro-4-aminobiphenyl (FABP) or N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-7-fluoro-2-acetylaminofluorene (FAAF) in the context of two unique 5'-flanking bases (CG*A and TG*A). The enzymes used were exo-nuclease-deficient Klenow fragment (Kf-exo(-)) or polymerase β (pol β). Specific binary and ternary DNA binding affinities of the enzymes were characterized at subnanomolar concentrations. The SPR results showed that Kf-exo(-) binds strongly to a double strand/single strand template/primer junction, whereas pol β binds preferentially to double-stranded DNA having a one-nucleotide gap. Both enzymes exhibited tight binding to native DNA, with high nucleotide selectivity, where the KD values for each base pair increased in the order dCTP ≪ dTTP ∼ dATP ≪ dGTP. In contrast to that for pol β, Kf-exo(-) binds tightly to lesion-modified templates; however, both polymerases exhibited minimal nucleotide selectivity toward adducted DNA. Primer steady-state kinetics and (19)F NMR results support the SPR data. The relative insertion efficiency fins of dCTP opposite FABP was significantly higher in the TG*A sequence compared to that in CG*A. Although Kf-exo(-) was not sensitive to the presence of a DNA lesion, FAAF-induced conformational heterogeneity perturbed the active site of pol β, weakening the enzyme's ability to bind to FAAF adducts compared to FABP adducts. The present study demonstrates the effectiveness of SPR for elucidating how lesion-induced conformational heterogeneity affects the binding capability of polymerases and ultimately the nucleotide insertion efficiency.

  8. Structural destabilization of DNA duplexes containing single-base lesions investigated by nanopore measurements.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qian; Fleming, Aaron M; Ding, Yun; Burrows, Cynthia J; White, Henry S

    2013-11-12

    The influence of DNA duplex structural destabilization introduced by a single base-pair modification was investigated by nanopore measurements. A series of 11 modified base pairs were introduced into the context of an otherwise complementary DNA duplex formed by a 17-mer and a 65-mer such that the overhanging ends comprised poly(dT)23 tails, generating a representative set of duplexes that display a range of unzipping mechanistic behaviors and kinetic stabilities. The guanine oxidation products 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG), guanidinohydantoin (Gh), and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) were paired with either cytosine (C), adenine (A), or 2,6-diaminopurine (D) to form modified base pairs. The mechanism and kinetic rate constants of duplex dissociation were determined by threading either the 3' or 5' overhangs into an α-hemolysin (α-HL) channel under an electrical field and measuring the distributions of unzipping times at constant force. In order of decreasing thermodynamic stability (as measured by duplex melting points), the rate of duplex dissociation increases, and the mechanism evolves from a first-order reaction to two sequential first-order reactions. These measurements allow us to rank the kinetic stability of lesion-containing duplexes relative to the canonical G:C base pair in which the OG:C, Gh:C, and Sp:C base pairs are, respectively, 3-200 times less stable. The rate constants also depend on whether unzipping was initiated from the 3' versus 5' side of the duplex. The kinetic stability of these duplexes was interpreted in terms of the structural destabilization introduced by the single base-pair modification. Specifically, a large distortion of the duplex backbone introduced by the presence of the highly oxidized guanine products Sp and Gh leads to a rapid two-step unzipping. The number of hydrogen bonds in the modified base pair plays a lesser role in determining the kinetics of duplex dissociation.

  9. Induction of DNA strand breaks, base lesions and clustered damage sites in hydrated plasmid DNA films by ultrasoft X rays around the phosphorus K edge.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, Akinari; Cunniffe, Siobhan M T; Watanabe, Ritsuko; Kobayashi, Katsumi; O'Neill, Peter

    2009-09-01

    To characterize the DNA damage induced by K-shell ionization of phosphorus atom in DNA backbone on the level of hydration, the yields of DNA strand breaks and base lesions arising from the interaction of ultrasoft X rays with energies around the phosphorus K edge were determined using dry and fully hydrated pUC18 plasmid DNA samples. Base lesions and bistranded clustered DNA damage sites were revealed by postirradiation treatment with the base excision repair proteins endonuclease III (Nth) and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg). The yield of prompt single-strand breaks (SSBs) with dry DNA irradiated at the phosphorus K resonance energy (2153 eV) is about one-third that below the phosphorus K edge (2147 eV). The yields of prompt double-strand breaks (DSBs) were found to be less dependent on the X-ray energy, with the yields being about two times lower when irradiated at 2153 eV. Heat-labile sites were not produced in detectable amounts. The yields of base lesions were dependent on the energy of the X rays, especially when the DNA was fully hydrated. Bistranded clustered DNA damage sites, revealed enzymatically as additional DSBs, were produced in dry as well as in hydrated DNA with all three energies of X rays. The yields of these enzyme-sensitive sites were also lower when irradiated at the phosphorus K resonance energy. On the other hand, the yields of prompt SSBs and enzyme-sensitive sites for the two off-resonance energies were, larger than those determined previously for gamma radiation. The results indicate that the photoelectric effect caused by X rays and dense ionization and excitation events along the tracks of low-energy secondary electrons are more effective at inducing SSBs and enzyme-sensitive sites. The complex types of damage, prompt and enzymatically induced DSBs, are preferentially induced by phosphorus K resonance at 2153 eV rather than simple SSBs and isolated base lesions, particularly in hydrated conditions. It is concluded that not

  10. Rev1 promotes replication through UV lesions in conjunction with DNA polymerases η, ι, and κ but not DNA polymerase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jeseong; Conde, Juan; Wakamiya, Maki; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases (Pols) promote replication through DNA lesions; however, little is known about the protein factors that affect their function in human cells. In yeast, Rev1 plays a noncatalytic role as an indispensable component of Polζ, and Polζ together with Rev1 mediates a highly mutagenic mode of TLS. However, how Rev1 functions in TLS and mutagenesis in human cells has remained unclear. Here we determined the role of Rev1 in TLS opposite UV lesions in human and mouse fibroblasts and showed that Rev1 is indispensable for TLS mediated by Polη, Polι, and Polκ but is not required for TLS by Polζ. In contrast to its role in mutagenic TLS in yeast, Rev1 promotes predominantly error-free TLS opposite UV lesions in humans. The identification of Rev1 as an indispensable scaffolding component for Polη, Polι, and Polκ, which function in TLS in highly specialized ways opposite a diverse array of DNA lesions and act in a predominantly error-free manner, implicates a crucial role for Rev1 in the maintenance of genome stability in humans. PMID:26680302

  11. Role of tissue exposure and DNA lesions for organ-specific effects of carcinogenic trans-4-acetylaminostilbene in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, H G

    1983-01-01

    trans-4-Acetylaminostilbene is acutely toxic to the glandular stomach and produces sebaceous gland tumors in rats quite specifically. Metabolism, tissue exposure to reactive metabolites, DNA binding and persistence of DNA lesions are implicated in tissue susceptibility, but nothing indicates that one of these parameters determines the biological effect. All tissues are exposed to reactive metabolites, liver as a nontarget tissue ranking highest. DNA binding in this tissue, however, is not irrelevant to tumor formation, but rather indicates the presence of initiating lesions. They can be amplified by partial hepatectomy and/or promoters, such as phenobarbital, DDT and diethylstilbestrol. Liver tumors are formed in high yields with these treatments, and mammary tumors also occur. trans-4-Acetylaminostilbene is therefore considered to be an incomplete carcinogen in these tissues and may initiate cells in other tissues as well. Apparently it lacks promoting properties which are supposed to be unrelated to reactive metabolites. It is concluded that DNA lesions do not reflect tissue risk, but rather secondary effects ultimately determine where the process of tumor formation starts and how fast it develops. PMID:6832097

  12. The DNA glycosylase AlkD uses a non-base-flipping mechanism to excise bulky lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Elwood A.; Shi, Rongxin; Parsons, Zachary D.; Yuen, Philip K.; David, Sheila S.; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2015-11-01

    Threats to genomic integrity arising from DNA damage are mitigated by DNA glycosylases, which initiate the base excision repair pathway by locating and excising aberrant nucleobases. How these enzymes find small modifications within the genome is a current area of intensive research. A hallmark of these and other DNA repair enzymes is their use of base flipping to sequester modified nucleotides from the DNA helix and into an active site pocket. Consequently, base flipping is generally regarded as an essential aspect of lesion recognition and a necessary precursor to base excision. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, DNA glycosylase mechanism that does not require base flipping for either binding or catalysis. Using the DNA glycosylase AlkD from Bacillus cereus, we crystallographically monitored excision of an alkylpurine substrate as a function of time, and reconstructed the steps along the reaction coordinate through structures representing substrate, intermediate and product complexes. Instead of directly interacting with the damaged nucleobase, AlkD recognizes aberrant base pairs through interactions with the phosphoribose backbone, while the lesion remains stacked in the DNA duplex. Quantum mechanical calculations revealed that these contacts include catalytic charge-dipole and CH-π interactions that preferentially stabilize the transition state. We show in vitro and in vivo how this unique means of recognition and catalysis enables AlkD to repair large adducts formed by yatakemycin, a member of the duocarmycin family of antimicrobial natural products exploited in bacterial warfare and chemotherapeutic trials. Bulky adducts of this or any type are not excised by DNA glycosylases that use a traditional base-flipping mechanism. Hence, these findings represent a new model for DNA repair and provide insights into catalysis of base excision.

  13. Comments on potential health effects of MRI-induced DNA lesions: quality is more important to consider than quantity

    PubMed Central

    Hill, M.A.; O'Neill, P.; McKenna, W.G.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being used in cardiology to detect heart disease and guide therapy. It is mooted to be a safer alternative to imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) or coronary angiographic imaging. However, there has recently been an increased interest in the potential long-term health risks of MRI, especially in the light of the controversy resulting from a small number of research studies reporting an increase in DNA damage following exposure, with calls to limit its use and avoid unnecessary examination, according to the precautionary principle. Overall the published data are somewhat limited and inconsistent; the ability of MRI to produce DNA lesions has yet to be robustly demonstrated and future experiments should be carefully designed to optimize sensitivity and benchmarked to validate and assess reproducibility. The majority of the current studies have focussed on the initial induction of DNA damage, and this has led to comparisons between the reported induction of γH2AX and implied double-strand break (DSB) yields produced following MRI with induction by imaging techniques using ionizing radiation. However, γH2AX is not only a marker of classical double-ended DSB, but also a marker of stalled replication forks and in certain circumstances stalled DNA transcription. Additionally, ionizing radiation is efficient at producing complex DNA damage, unique to ionizing radiation, with an associated reduction in repairability. Even if the fields associated with MRI are capable of producing DNA damage, the lesions produced will in general be simple, similar to those produced by endogenous processes. It is therefore inappropriate to try and infer cancer risk by simply comparing the yields of γH2AX foci or DNA lesions potentially produced by MRI to those produced by a given exposure of ionizing radiation, which will generally be more biologically effective and have a greater probability of leading to long-term health

  14. HO* radicals induce an unexpected high proportion of tandem base lesions refractory to repair by DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, François; Auvré, Frédéric; Radicella, J Pablo; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2010-03-23

    Reaction of HO(*) radicals with double-stranded calf thymus DNA produces high levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) and, to a minor extent, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyadenosine (8-oxodAdo). Formation of the hydroxylated purine lesions is explained by addition of HO(*) to the C8 position of the purine moiety. It has been reported that tandem lesions containing a formylamine residue neighboring 8-oxodGuo could be produced through addition of a transiently generated pyrimidine peroxyl radical onto the C8 of an adjacent purine base. Formation of such tandem lesions accounted for approximately 10% of the total 8-oxodGuo. In the present work we show that addition of HO(*) onto the C8 of purine accounts for only approximately 5% of the generated 8-oxodGuo. About 50% of the 8-hydroxylated purine lesions, including 8-oxodGuo and 8-oxodAdo, are involved in tandem damage and are produced by peroxyl addition onto the C8 of a vicinal purine base. In addition, the remaining 45% of the 8-oxodGuo are produced by an electron transfer reaction, providing an explanation for the higher yield of formation of 8-oxodGuo compared to 8-oxodAdo. Interestingly, we show that >40% of the 8-oxodGuo involved in tandem lesions is refractory to excision by DNA glycosylases. Altogether our results demonstrate that, subsequently to a single oxidation event, peroxidation reactions significantly increase the yield of formation of hydroxylated purine modifications, generating a high proportion of tandem lesions partly refractory to base excision repair.

  15. Single-molecule imaging of UvrA and UvrB recruitment to DNA lesions in living Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stracy, Mathew; Jaciuk, Marcin; Uphoff, Stephan; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.; Nowotny, Marcin; Sherratt, David J.; Zawadzki, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes chemically diverse DNA lesions in all domains of life. In Escherichia coli, UvrA and UvrB initiate NER, although the mechanistic details of how this occurs in vivo remain to be established. Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to provide a comprehensive characterization of the lesion search, recognition and verification process in living cells. We show that NER initiation involves a two-step mechanism in which UvrA scans the genome and locates DNA damage independently of UvrB. Then UvrA recruits UvrB from solution to the lesion. These steps are coordinated by ATP binding and hydrolysis in the ‘proximal' and ‘distal' UvrA ATP-binding sites. We show that initial UvrB-independent damage recognition by UvrA requires ATPase activity in the distal site only. Subsequent UvrB recruitment requires ATP hydrolysis in the proximal site. Finally, UvrA dissociates from the lesion complex, allowing UvrB to orchestrate the downstream NER reactions. PMID:27562541

  16. Lesion-induced DNA weak structural changes detected by pulsed EPR spectroscopy combined with site-directed spin labelling

    PubMed Central

    Sicoli, Giuseppe; Mathis, Gérald; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Boulard, Yves; Gasparutto, Didier; Gambarelli, Serge

    2009-01-01

    Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) was applied to determine nanometre spin–spin distances on DNA duplexes that contain selected structural alterations. The present approach to evaluate the structural features of DNA damages is thus related to the interspin distance changes, as well as to the flexibility of the overall structure deduced from the distance distribution. A set of site-directed nitroxide-labelled double-stranded DNA fragments containing defined lesions, namely an 8-oxoguanine, an abasic site or abasic site analogues, a nick, a gap and a bulge structure were prepared and then analysed by the DEER spectroscopic technique. New insights into the application of 4-pulse DEER sequence are also provided, in particular with respect to the spin probes’ positions and the rigidity of selected systems. The lesion-induced conformational changes observed, which were supported by molecular dynamics studies, confirm the results obtained by other, more conventional, spectroscopic techniques. Thus, the experimental approaches described herein provide an efficient method for probing lesion-induced structural changes of nucleic acids. PMID:19304747

  17. Role of iron and superoxide for generation of hydroxyl radical, oxidative DNA lesions, and mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nunoshiba, T; Obata, F; Boss, A C; Oikawa, S; Mori, T; Kawanishi, S; Yamamoto, K

    1999-12-03

    We measured the generation of hydroxyl radical (OH(.)) and oxidative DNA lesions in aerobically grown Escherichia coli cells lacking in both superoxide dismutases (SodA SodB) and repressor of iron uptake (Fur) using electroparamagnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with a selected-ion monitoring method. A specific signal corresponding to OH(.) generation and an increase in oxidative DNA lesions such as 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine and 1,2-dihydro-2-oxoadenine were detected in the strain deficient in sodA sodB fur. We showed that iron metabolism deregulation in fur mutant produced a 2.5-fold iron overload. The sodA sodB fur strain was about 100-fold higher mutability than the wild-type strain. The mutation spectrum in the strain was found to induce GC --> TA and AT --> CG transversions predominantly. The hypermutability of the strain was suppressed by the tonB mutation which reduces iron transport. Thus, excess iron and excess superoxide were responsible for OH(.) generation, oxidative DNA lesion formation, and hypermutability in E. coli.

  18. Structure determination of DNA methylation lesions N1-meA and N3-meC in duplex DNA using a cross-linked protein-DNA system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lianghua; Yi, Chengqi; Jian, Xing; Zheng, Guanqun; He, Chuan

    2010-07-01

    N(1)-meA and N(3)-meC are cytotoxic DNA base methylation lesions that can accumulate in the genomes of various organisms in the presence of S(N)2 type methylating agents. We report here the structural characterization of these base lesions in duplex DNA using a cross-linked protein-DNA crystallization system. The crystal structure of N(1)-meA:T pair shows an unambiguous Hoogsteen base pair with a syn conformation adopted by N(1)-meA, which exhibits significant changes in the opening, roll and twist angles as compared to the normal A:T base pair. Unlike N(1)-meA, N(3)-meC does not establish any interaction with the opposite G, but remains partially intrahelical. Also, structurally characterized is the N(6)-meA base modification that forms a normal base pair with the opposite T in duplex DNA. Structural characterization of these base methylation modifications provides molecular level information on how they affect the overall structure of duplex DNA. In addition, the base pairs containing N(1)-meA or N(3)-meC do not share any specific characteristic properties except that both lesions create thermodynamically unstable regions in a duplex DNA, a property that may be explored by the repair proteins to locate these lesions.

  19. Small RNA-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA lesions by the DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 2 and ARGONAUTE 1.

    PubMed

    Schalk, Catherine; Cognat, Valérie; Graindorge, Stéfanie; Vincent, Timothée; Voinnet, Olivier; Molinier, Jean

    2017-04-04

    As photosynthetic organisms, plants need to prevent irreversible UV-induced DNA lesions. Through an unbiased, genome-wide approach, we have uncovered a previously unrecognized interplay between Global Genome Repair and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in the recognition of DNA photoproducts, prevalently in intergenic regions. Genetic and biochemical approaches indicate that, upon UV irradiation, the DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 2 (DDB2) and ARGONAUTE 1 (AGO1) of Arabidopsis thaliana form a chromatin-bound complex together with 21-nt siRNAs, which likely facilitates recognition of DNA damages in an RNA/DNA complementary strand-specific manner. The biogenesis of photoproduct-associated siRNAs involves the noncanonical, concerted action of RNA POLYMERASE IV, RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE-2, and DICER-LIKE-4. Furthermore, the chromatin association/dissociation of the DDB2-AGO1 complex is under the control of siRNA abundance and DNA damage signaling. These findings reveal unexpected nuclear functions for DCL4 and AGO1, and shed light on the interplay between small RNAs and DNA repair recognition factors at damaged sites.

  20. The Case for 8, 5’-Cyclopurine-2’-Deoxynucleosides as Endogenous DNA Lesions That Cause Neurodegeneration in Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, PJ

    2007-01-01

    Patients with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) lack the capacity to carry out a specific type of DNA repair process called nucleotide excision repair (NER). The NER pathway plays a critical role in the repair of DNA damage resulting from UV radiation. A subset of XP patients develop a profound neurodegenerative condition known as XP neurological disease. Robbins and colleagues (PNAS 75:1984–88, 1978) hypothesized that since UV light cannot reach into the human brain, XP neurological disease results from some form of endogenous DNA damage that is normally repaired by the NER pathway. In the absence of NER, the damage accumulates, causing neuronal death by blocking transcription. In this manuscript, I consider the evidence that a particular class of oxidative DNA lesions, the 8, 5’-cyclopurine-2’-deoxynucleosides, fulfills many of the criteria expected of neurodegenerative DNA lesions in XP. Specifically, these lesions are chemically stable, endogenous DNA lesions that are repaired by the NER pathway but not by any other known process, and strongly block transcription by RNA polymerase II in cells from XP patients. A similar set of criteria might be used to evaluate other candidate DNA lesions responsible for neurological diseases resulting from defects in other DNA repair mechanisms as well. PMID:17184928

  1. In Vitro Ligation of Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing C8-Oxidized Purine Lesions using Bacteriophage T4 DNA Ligase†

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaobei; Muller, James G.; Halasyam, Mohan; David, Sheila S.; Burrows, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Ligases conduct the final stage of repair of DNA damage by sealing a single-stranded nick after excision of damaged nucleotides and reinsertion of correct nucleotides. Depending upon the circumstances and the success of the repair process, lesions may remain at the ligation site, either in the template or at the oligomer termini to be joined. Ligation experiments using bacteriophage T4 DNA ligase were carried out with purine lesions in four positions surrounding the nick site in a total of 96 different duplexes. The oxidized lesion 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (OG) showed, as expected, that the enzyme is most sensitive to lesions on the 3′ end of the nick compared to the 5′ end and to lesions located in the intact template strand. In general, substrates containing the OG·A mismatch were more readily ligated than OG·C. Ligations of duplexes containing the OA·T base pair (OA=8-oxo-7,8- dihydroadenosine) that could adopt an anti-anti conformation proceeded in high efficiencies. An OI·Acontaining duplex (OI = 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroinosine) behaved similarly to OG·A. Due to its low reduction potential, OG is readily oxidized to secondary oxidation products, such as the guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) nucleosides; these lesions also contain an oxo group at the original C8 position of the purine. Ligation of oligomers containing Gh and Sp occurred when opposite A and G although the overall ligation efficiencies were much lower than most OG base pairs. Steady-state kinetic studies were carried out for representative examples of lesions in the template. Km increased by 90–100-fold for OG·C, OI·C, OI·A and OA·T containing duplexes compared to G·C. Substrates containing Gh·A, Gh·G, Sp·A and Sp·G base pairs showed Km values 20–70-fold higher than G·C while the Km value for OG·A was 5 times lower than G·C. PMID:17323928

  2. DNA-PK triggers histone ubiquitination and signaling in response to DNA double-strand breaks produced during the repair of transcription-blocking topoisomerase I lesions.

    PubMed

    Cristini, Agnese; Park, Joon-Hyung; Capranico, Giovanni; Legube, Gaëlle; Favre, Gilles; Sordet, Olivier

    2016-02-18

    Although defective repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leads to neurodegenerative diseases, the processes underlying their production and signaling in non-replicating cells are largely unknown. Stabilized topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (Top1cc) by natural compounds or common DNA alterations are transcription-blocking lesions whose repair depends primarily on Top1 proteolysis and excision by tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase-1 (TDP1). We previously reported that stabilized Top1cc produce transcription-dependent DSBs that activate ATM in neurons. Here, we use camptothecin (CPT)-treated serum-starved quiescent cells to induce transcription-blocking Top1cc and show that those DSBs are generated during Top1cc repair from Top1 peptide-linked DNA single-strand breaks generated after Top1 proteolysis and before excision by TDP1. Following DSB induction, ATM activates DNA-PK whose inhibition suppresses H2AX and H2A ubiquitination and the later assembly of activated ATM into nuclear foci. Inhibition of DNA-PK also reduces Top1 ubiquitination and proteolysis as well as resumption of RNA synthesis suggesting that DSB signaling further enhances Top1cc repair. Finally, we show that co-transcriptional DSBs kill quiescent cells. Together, these new findings reveal that DSB production and signaling by transcription-blocking Top1 lesions impact on non-replicating cell fate and provide insights on the molecular pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as SCAN1 and AT syndromes, which are caused by TDP1 and ATM deficiency, respectively.

  3. Lesion bypass in yeast cells: Pol η participates in a multi-DNA polymerase process

    PubMed Central

    Bresson, Anne; Fuchs, Robert P.P.

    2002-01-01

    Replication through (6–4)TT and G-AAF lesions was compared in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains proficient and deficient for the RAD30-encoded DNA polymerase η (Pol η). In the RAD30 strain, the (6–4)TT lesion is replicated both inaccurately and accurately 60 and 40% of the time, respectively. Surprisingly, in a rad30Δ strain, the level of mutagenic bypass is essentially suppressed, while error-free bypass remains unchanged. Therefore, Pol η is responsible for mutagenic replication through the (6–4)TT photoproduct, while another polymerase mediates its error-free bypass. Deletion of the RAD30 gene also reduces the levels of both accurate and inaccurate bypass of AAF lesions within two different sequence contexts up to 8-fold. These data show that, in contrast to the accurate bypass by Pol η of TT cyclobutane dimers, it is responsible for the mutagenic bypass of other lesions. In conclusion, this paper shows that, in yeast, translesion synthesis involves the combined action of several polymerases. PMID:12110599

  4. Repriming by PrimPol is critical for DNA replication restart downstream of lesions and chain-terminating nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Guilliam, Thomas A.; Tsuda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Junpei; Bailey, Laura J.; Iwai, Shigenori; Takeda, Shunichi; Doherty, Aidan J.; Hirota, Kouji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT PrimPol is a DNA damage tolerance enzyme possessing both translesion synthesis (TLS) and primase activities. To uncover its potential role in TLS-mediated IgVλ hypermutation and define its interplay with other TLS polymerases, PrimPol−/− and PrimPol−/−/Polη−/−/Polζ −/− gene knockouts were generated in avian cells. Loss of PrimPol had no significant impact on the rate of hypermutation or the mutation spectrum of IgVλ. However, PrimPol−/− cells were sensitive to methylmethane sulfonate, suggesting that it may bypass abasic sites at the IgVλ segment by repriming DNA synthesis downstream of these sites. PrimPol−/− cells were also sensitive to cisplatin and hydroxyurea, indicating that it assists in maintaining / restarting replication at a variety of lesions. To accurately measure the relative contribution of the TLS and primase activities, we examined DNA damage sensitivity in PrimPol−/− cells complemented with polymerase or primase-deficient PrimPol. Polymerase-defective, but not primase-deficient, PrimPol suppresses the hypersensitivity of PrimPol−/− cells. This indicates that its primase, rather than TLS activity, is pivotal for DNA damage tolerance. Loss of TLS polymerases, Polη and Polζ has an additive effect on the sensitivity of PrimPol−/− cells. Moreover, we found that PrimPol and Polη-Polζ redundantly prevented cell death and facilitated unperturbed cell cycle progression. PrimPol−/− cells also exhibited increased sensitivity to a wide variety of chain-terminating nucleoside analogs (CTNAs). PrimPol could perform close-coupled repriming downstream of CTNAs and oxidative damage in vitro. Together, these results indicate that PrimPol's repriming activity plays a central role in reinitiating replication downstream from CTNAs and other specific DNA lesions. PMID:27230014

  5. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation changes with development of arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladesh: a case-control follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Seow, Wei Jie; Kile, Molly L; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Pan, Wen-Chi; Byun, Hyang-Min; Mostofa, Golam; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Lin, Xihong; Christiani, David C

    2014-07-01

    Studies have found an association between aberrant DNA methylation and arsenic-induced skin lesions. However, little is known about DNA methylation changes over time in people who develop arsenic-induced skin lesions. We sought to investigate epigenome-wide changes of DNA methylation in people who developed arsenic-induced skin lesions in a 10-year period. In 2009-2011, we conducted a follow-up study of 900 skin lesion cases and 900 controls and identified 10 people who developed skin lesions since a baseline survey in 2001-2003. The 10 cases ("New Cases") were matched with 10 controls who did not have skin lesions at baseline or follow-up ("Persistent Controls"). Drinking water and blood samples were collected, and skin lesion was diagnosed by the same physician at both time points. We measured DNA methylation in blood using Infinium HumanMethylation450K BeadChip, followed by quantitative validation using pyrosequencing. Two-sample t-tests were used to compare changes in percent methylation between New Cases and Persistent Controls. Six CpG (cytosine-phosphate-guanine) sites with greatest changes of DNA methylation over time among New Cases were further validated with a correlation of 93% using pyrosequencing. One of the validated CpG site (cg03333116; change of %methylation was 13.2 in New Cases versus -0.09 in Persistent Controls; P < 0.001) belonged to the RHBDF1 gene, which was previously reported to be hypermethylated in arsenic-exposed cases. We examined DNA methylation changes with the development of arsenic-induced skin lesions over time but nothing was statistically significant given the small sample size of this exploratory study and the high dimensionality of data.

  6. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation changes with development of arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladesh: a case-control follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Wei Jie; Kile, Molly L.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Pan, Wen-Chi; Byun, Hyang-Min; Mostofa, Golam; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Lin, Xihong; Christiani, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Studies have found an association between aberrant DNA methylation and arsenic-induced skin lesions. Yet, little is known about DNA methylation changes over time in people who develop arsenic-induced skin lesions. We sought to investigate epigenome-wide changes of DNA methylation in people who developed arsenic-induced skin lesions in a ten year period. In 2009–2011, we conducted a follow-up study of 900 skin lesion cases and 900 controls and identified 10 people who developed skin lesions since a baseline survey in 2001–2003. The 10 cases (“New Cases”) were matched with 10 controls who did not have skin lesions at baseline or follow-up (“Persistent Controls”). Drinking water and blood samples were collected and skin lesion was diagnosed by the same physician at both time points. We measured DNA methylation in blood using Infinium HumanMethylation450K BeadChip, followed by quantitative validation using pyrosequencing. Two-sample t-tests were used to compare changes in percent methylation between New Cases and Persistent Controls. Six CpG sites with greatest changes of DNA methylation over time among New Cases were further validated with a correlation of 93% using pyrosequencing. One of the validated CpG site (cg03333116; change of %methylation was 13.2 in New Cases versus −0.09 in Persistent Controls; P <0.001) belonged to the RHBDF1 gene, which was previously reported to be hypermethylated in arsenic-exposed cases. We examined DNA methylation changes with the development of arsenic-induced skin lesions over time but nothing was statistically significant given the small sample size of this exploratory study and the high dimensionality of data. PMID:24677489

  7. Long-term persistence of hepatitis B surface antigen and antibody induced by DNA-mediated immunization results in liver and kidney lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Zi, Xiao-Yuan; Yao, Yu-Cheng; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Xiong, Jun; Wu, Xiu-Ju; Zhang, Nan; Ba, Yue; Li, Wen-Lin; Wang, Xin-Ming; Li, Jian-Xiu; Yu, Hong-Yu; Ye, Xu-Ting; Lau, Joseph T Y; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2006-04-01

    DNA-mediated immunization has been recognized as a new approach for prevention and treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, the side effects of this approach have not been well described. Here we report that DNA-mediated immunization by intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA encoding HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) induced long-term persistence of HBsAg and HBsAg-specific antibody (anti-HBs) in the sera of the immunized BALB/c mice and resulted in liver and kidney lesions. The lesions persisted for 6 months after injection. Lesions were also found in normal mice injected with the sera from immunized mice, and in HBV-transgenic mice injected with anti-HBs antibody, or sera from immunized mice. Furthermore, lesions were accompanied by deposition of circulating immune complex (CIC) of HBsAg and anti-HBs antibody in the damaged organs. These results indicate that long-term persistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs in the immunized mice can result in deposited CIC in liver and kidney, and in development of lesions. The use of DNA containing mammalian replication origins, such as the plasmids used in this study, is not appropriate for human vaccines due to safety concerns relating to persistence of DNA; nevertheless, the safety of DNA-mediated immunization protocols still needs to be carefully evaluated before practical application.

  8. Replication and recombination factors contributing to recombination-dependent bypass of DNA lesions by template switch.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, Fabio; Fumasoni, Marco; Szakal, Barnabas; Maloisel, Laurent; Branzei, Dana

    2010-11-11

    Damage tolerance mechanisms mediating damage-bypass and gap-filling are crucial for genome integrity. A major damage tolerance pathway involves recombination and is referred to as template switch. Template switch intermediates were visualized by 2D gel electrophoresis in the proximity of replication forks as X-shaped structures involving sister chromatid junctions. The homologous recombination factor Rad51 is required for the formation/stabilization of these intermediates, but its mode of action remains to be investigated. By using a combination of genetic and physical approaches, we show that the homologous recombination factors Rad55 and Rad57, but not Rad59, are required for the formation of template switch intermediates. The replication-proficient but recombination-defective rfa1-t11 mutant is normal in triggering a checkpoint response following DNA damage but is impaired in X-structure formation. The Exo1 nuclease also has stimulatory roles in this process. The checkpoint kinase, Rad53, is required for X-molecule formation and phosphorylates Rad55 robustly in response to DNA damage. Although Rad55 phosphorylation is thought to activate recombinational repair under conditions of genotoxic stress, we find that Rad55 phosphomutants do not affect the efficiency of X-molecule formation. We also examined the DNA polymerase implicated in the DNA synthesis step of template switch. Deficiencies in translesion synthesis polymerases do not affect X-molecule formation, whereas DNA polymerase δ, required also for bulk DNA synthesis, plays an important role. Our data indicate that a subset of homologous recombination factors, together with DNA polymerase δ, promote the formation of template switch intermediates that are then preferentially dissolved by the action of the Sgs1 helicase in association with the Top3 topoisomerase rather than resolved by Holliday Junction nucleases. Our results allow us to propose the choreography through which different players contribute to

  9. Coilin is rapidly recruited to UVA-induced DNA lesions and γ-radiation affects localized movement of Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Bártová, Eva; Foltánková, Veronika; Legartová, Soňa; Sehnalová, Petra; Sorokin, Dmitry V; Suchánková, Jana; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Cajal bodies are important nuclear structures containing proteins that preferentially regulate RNA-related metabolism. We investigated the cell-type specific nuclear distribution of Cajal bodies and the level of coilin, a protein of Cajal bodies, in non-irradiated and irradiated human tumor cell lines and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Cajal bodies were localized in different nuclear compartments, including DAPI-poor regions, in the proximity of chromocenters, and adjacent to nucleoli. The number of Cajal bodies per nucleus was cell cycle-dependent, with higher numbers occurring during G2 phase. Human ES cells contained a high coilin level in the nucleoplasm, but coilin-positive Cajal bodies were also identified in nuclei of mouse and human ES cells. Coilin, but not SMN, recognized UVA-induced DNA lesions, which was cell cycle-independent. Treatment with γ-radiation reduced the localized movement of Cajal bodies in many cell types and GFP-coilin fluorescence recovery after photobleaching was very fast in nucleoplasm in comparison with GFP-coilin recovery in DNA lesions. By contrast, nucleolus-localized coilin displayed very slow fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, which indicates very slow rates of protein diffusion, especially in nucleoli of mouse ES cells.

  10. A prior administration of heavy metals reduces thymus lymphocyte DNA lesions and lipid peroxidation in gamma-irradiated mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, A. N.; Ryabchenko, N. I.; Ivannik, B. P.; Dzikovskaya, L. A.; Ryabchenko, V. I.; Kolomijtseva, G. Ya.

    2003-05-01

    In the present work we report that a prior injection of Pb, Cd or Zn salt solutions in SHK male mice decreases the effect followed γ-irradiation on thymus lymphocyte DNA structure and level of lipid peroxidation. It is assumed that the observed phenomenon is caused by activation of protective mechanisms of cells, expression of the genes of antioxidant proteins such as the metallothioneins, etc. Indeed the measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) in blood plasma showed that the injection of metal salt solutions at median lethal doses a half hour before γ-irradiation (1 Gy) causes the decrease of the MDA contents at 48 h after irradiation on 100% (Zn), 70% (Cd) and 20% (Pb). However we found that combined exposure of the mice also results to significant decrease of the thymus lymphocytes total number of as compared to the irradiation without metals. The elimination of the cells with high level of DNA lesions and existence at least a subset of cells which would survive the current oxidative stress (γ-irradiation) possibly represents one path-way of the survival of individual organism facing stress. ln turn the observed decrease of the lesion levels may be reflection of the cell number change.

  11. Structure determination of DNA methylation lesions N1-meA and N3-meC in duplex DNA using a cross-linked protein-DNA system

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Lianghua; Yi, Chengqi; Jian, Xing; Zheng, Guanqun; He, Chuan

    2010-08-13

    N1-meA and N3-meC are cytotoxic DNA base methylation lesions that can accumulate in the genomes of various organisms in the presence of SN2 type methylating agents. We report here the structural characterization of these base lesions in duplex DNA using a cross-linked protein-DNA crystallization system. The crystal structure of N1-meA:T pair shows an unambiguous Hoogsteen base pair with a syn conformation adopted by N1-meA, which exhibits significant changes in the opening, roll and twist angles as compared to the normal A:T base pair. Unlike N1-meA, N3-meC does not establish any interaction with the opposite G, but remains partially intrahelical. Also, structurally characterized is the N6-meA base modification that forms a normal base pair with the opposite T in duplex DNA. Structural characterization of these base methylation modifications provides molecular level information on how they affect the overall structure of duplex DNA. In addition, the base pairs containing N1-meA or N3-meC do not share any specific characteristic properties except that both lesions create thermodynamically unstable regions in a duplex DNA, a property that may be explored by the repair proteins to locate these lesions.

  12. DNA DAMAGE AND EXTERNAL LESIONS IN BROWN BULLHEAD FROM CONTAMINATED HABITATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The single cell gel electrophoresis ("Comet") assay was used to compare levels of DNA damage in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) collected from three known contaminated locations, the Cuyahoga River, Ashtabula River, and Ashumet Pond (Cape Cod), with brown bullheads collected...

  13. Synthesis of DNA Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing Site-Specific 1,3-Butadiene- Deoxyadenosine Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wickramaratne, Susith; Seiler, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Post-oligomerization synthesis is a useful technique for preparing site-specifically modified DNA oligomers. This approach involves site-specific incorporation of inherently reactive halogenated nucleobases into DNA strands using standard solid phase synthesis, followed by post-oligomerization nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) reactions with carcinogen-derived synthons. In these reactions, the inherent reactivities of DNA and carcinogen-derived species are reversed: the modified DNA nucleobase acts as an electrophile, while the carcinogen-derived species acts as a nucleophile. In the present protocol, we describe the use of the post-oligomerization approach to prepare DNA strands containing site- and stereospecific N6-adenine and N1, N6-adenine adducts induced by epoxide metabolites of the known human and animal carcinogen, 1,3-butadiene (BD). The resulting oligomers containing site specific, structurally defined DNA adducts can be used in structural and biological studies to reveal the roles of specific BD adducts in carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. PMID:26344227

  14. Distant neighbor base sequence context effects in human nucleotide excision repair of a benzo[a]pyrene-derived DNA lesion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuqin; Kropachev, Konstantin; Xu, Rong; Tang, Yijin; Kolbanovskii, Marina; Kolbanovskii, Alexander; Amin, Shantu; Patel, Dinshaw J; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2010-06-11

    The effects of non-nearest base sequences, beyond the nucleotides flanking a DNA lesion on either side, on nucleotide excision repair (NER) in extracts from human cells were investigated. We constructed two duplexes containing the same minor groove-aligned 10S (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(2)-dG (G*) DNA adduct, derived from the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P): 5'-C-C-A-T-C-G*-C-T-A-C-C-3' (CG*C-I), and 5'-C-A-C3-A4-C5-G*-C-A-C-A-C-3' (CG*C-II). We used polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to compare the extent of DNA bending, and molecular dynamics simulations to analyze the structural characteristics of these two DNA duplexes. The NER efficiencies are 1.6(+/-0.2)-fold greater in the case of the CG*C-II than the CG*C-I sequence context in 135-mer duplexes. Gel electrophoresis and self-ligation circularization experiments revealed that the CG*C-II duplex is more bent than the CG*C-I duplex, while molecular dynamics simulations showed that the unique -C3-A4-C5- segment in the CG*C-II duplex plays a key role. The presence of a minor groove-positioned guanine amino group, the Watson-Crick partner to C3, acts as a wedge; facilitated by a highly deformable local -C3-A4- base step, this amino group allows the B[a]P ring system to produce a more enlarged minor groove in CG*C-II than in CG*C-I, as well as a local untwisting and enlarged and flexible Roll only in the CG*C-II sequence. These structural properties fit well with our earlier findings that in the case of the family of minor groove 10S (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(2)-dG lesions, flexible bends and enlarged minor groove widths constitute NER recognition signals, and extend our understanding of sequence context effects on NER to the neighbors that are distant to the lesion.

  15. 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, a major mutagenic oxidative DNA lesion, and DNA strand breaks in nasal respiratory epithelium of children exposed to urban pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, L; Wen-Wang, L; Zhang, Y J; Rodriguez-Alcaraz, A; Osnaya, N; Villarreal-Calderón, A; Santella, R M

    1999-01-01

    Southwest metropolitan Mexico City children are repeatedly exposed to high levels of a complex mixture of air pollutants, including ozone, particulate matter, aldehydes, metals, and nitrogen oxides. We explored nasal cell 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a major mutagenic lesion producing G-->T transversion mutations, using an immunohistochemical method, and DNA single strand breaks (ssb) using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay as biomarkers of oxidant exposure. Nasal biopsies from the posterior inferior turbinate were examined in children in grades one through five, including 12 controls from a low-polluted coastal town and 87 Mexico City children. Each biopsy was divided for the 8-OHdG and DNA ssb assays. There was an age-dependent increase in the percentage of nasal cells with DNA tails > 10 microm in Mexico City children: 19 +/- 9% for control cells, and 43 +/- 4, 50 +/- 16, 56 +/- 17, 60 +/- 17 and 73 +/- 14%, respectively, for first through fifth graders (p < 0.05). Nasal ssb were significantly higher in fifth graders than in first graders (p < 0.05). Higher levels (2.3- to 3-fold) of specific nuclear staining for 8-OHdG were observed in exposed children as compared to controls (p < 0.05). These results suggest that DNA damage is present in nasal epithelial cells in Mexico City children. Persistent oxidative DNA damage may ultimately result in a selective growth of pr eneoplastic nasal initiated cells in this population and the potential for nasal neoplasms may increase with age. The combination of 8-OHdG and DNA ssb should be useful for monitoring oxidative damage in people exposed to polluted atmospheres. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10339447

  16. The 8, 5’-Cyclopurine-2’-Deoxynucleosides: Candidate Neurodegenerative DNA Lesions in Xeroderma Pigmentosum, and Unique Probes of Transcription and Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, P. J.

    2008-01-01

    It is a commonly held view that oxidatively-induced DNA lesions are repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway, whereas DNA lesions induced by UV light and other “bulky” chemical adducts are repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. While this distinction is generally accurate, the 8,5’ cyclopurine deoxynucleosides represent an important exception, in that they are formed in DNA by the hydroxyl radical, but are specifically repaired by NER, not by BER. They are also strong blocks to nucleases and polymerases, including RNA polymerase II in human cells. In this review, I will discuss the evidence that these lesions are in part responsible for the neurodegeneration that occurs in some XP patients, and what additional evidence would be necessary to prove such a role. I will also consider other DNA lesions that might be involved in XP neurologic disease. Finally, I will also discuss how our recent studies of these lesions have generated novel insights into the process of transcriptional mutagenesis in human cells, as well as the value of studying these lesions not only for a better understanding of NER, but also for other aspects of human health and disease. PMID:18495558

  17. Chemical repair of base lesions, AP-sites, and strand breaks on plasmid DNA in dilute aqueous solution by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We report a novel mechanism of radiation protection of DNA by chemical activity of ascorbic acid. •The “chemical repair” of DNA damage was revealed using biochemical assay and chemical kinetics analysis. •We found that ascorbic acid significantly repairs precursors of nucleobase lesions and abasic sites. •However, ascorbic acid seldom repairs precursors of DNA-strand breaks. -- Abstract: We quantified the damage yields produced in plasmid DNA by γ-irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–100 μM) of ascorbic acid, which is a major antioxidant in living systems, to clarify whether it chemically repairs radiation damage in DNA. The yield of DNA single strand breaks induced by irradiation was analyzed with agarose gel electrophoresis as conformational changes in closed circular plasmids. Base lesions and abasic sites were also observed as additional conformational changes by treating irradiated samples with glycosylase proteins. By comparing the suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, in addition to scavenging of the OH radicals derived from water radiolysis, it was found that ascorbic acid promotes the chemical repair of precursors of AP-sites and base lesions more effectively than those of single strand breaks. We estimated the efficiency of the chemical repair of each lesion using a kinetic model. Approximately 50–60% of base lesions and AP-sites were repaired by 10 μM ascorbic acid, although strand breaks were largely unrepaired by ascorbic acid at low concentrations. The methods in this study will provide a route to understanding the mechanistic aspects of antioxidant activity in living systems.

  18. Heavy ion-induced lesions in DNA: A theoretical model for the initial induction of DNA strand breaks and chromatin breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed and used to calculate yields and spatial distributions of DNA strand breaks resulting from the interactions of heavy ions with chromatin in aqueous systems. The three dimensional spatial distribution of ionizing events has been modeled for charged particles as a function of charge and velocity. Chromatin has been modeled as a 30 nm diameter solenoid of nucleosomal DNA. The Monte Carlo methods used by Chatterjee et al. have been applied to DNA in a chromatin conformation. Refinements to their methods include: a combined treatment of primary and low energy (<2 keV) secondary electron interactions, an improved low energy delta ray model, and the combined simulation of direct energy deposition on the DNA and attack by diffusing hydroxyl radicals. Individual particle tracks are treated independently, which is assumed to be applicable to low fluence irradiations in which multiple particle effects are negligible. Single strand break cross section [open quotes]hooks[close quotes] seen in experiments at very high LET appear to be due to the collapsing radial extent of the track, as predicted in the [open quotes]deep sieve[close quotes] hypothesis proposed by Tobias et al. Spatial distributions of lesions produced by particles have been found to depend on chromatin structure. In the future, heavy ions may be used as a tool to probe the organization of DNA in chromatin. A Neyman A-binomial variation of the [open quotes]cluster model[close quotes] for the distribution of chromatin breaks per irradiated cell has been theoretically tested. The model includes a treatment of the chromatin fragment detection technique's resolution, which places a limitation on the minimum size of fragments which can be detected. The model appears to fit some of the experimental data reasonably well. However, further experimental and theoretical refinements are desirable.

  19. DNA DAMAGE AND EXTERNAL LESIONS IN BROWN BULLHEADS FROM CONTAMINATED HABITATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Comet assay was used to compare levels of DNA damage in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) collected from three known contaminated locations, the Cuyahoga River, Ashtabula River, and Ashumet Pond (Cape Cod), with brown bullheads collected from three paired reference sites, ...

  20. From bacteria to humans: lessons learned from a reductionist's view of ultraviolet light-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Trosko, J E

    2001-01-01

    What follows is a personal remembrance of how Dr. Richard Setlow influenced me as a young postdoctoral fellow at Oak Ridge National laboratory between 1963 and 1966. The narrative tries to place my "maturation" as a young, inexperienced scientist in the context of the cultural upheaval caused by the Vietnam war, of a Northerner facing a "culture-shock" living in the South and in a revolution in molecular and radiation biology taking place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory at that time. The unique historic juxtaposition of Dr. Setlow's contribution of the discovery of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in bacterial DNA, being potentially the molecular lesion responsible for cell killing and mutagenesis, occurring as I was at Oak Ridge, and the wonderful working relationship I had with William Carrier, his technician, led to our discovery with James Regan that normal human cells repaired these lesion from their DNA. Amazingly, because of Dr. Setlow's challenge to me about my thoughts of the implications of his findings in bacteria, the chance visit to Oak Ridge National Laboratory by Dr. James Cleaver and my background as a human geneticist provided me the extraordinary opportunity to carry out a collaboration to test if human cancer prone syndromes might be deficient in the repair of these UV-induced DNA lesions. With our finding that the direct demonstration of a lack of repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in cells from the skin cancer prone syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, opened up a new paradigm for the understanding of the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis of both radiation and chemical carcinogenesis. From this investigator's vantage point in the history of the understanding of carcinogenesis, which has led us to the present point of "oncogenes" and "tumor suppressor genes", the old adage by Newton, "I only saw further because I stood on the shoulder of giants", is so applicable here. Dr. Setlow's shoulders were indeed among those of all of us that have made

  1. Immunohistochemical study of DNA topoisomerase I, DNA topoisomerase II alpha, p53, and Ki-67 in oral preneoplastic lesions and oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hafian, Hilal; Venteo, Lydie; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor; Lefevre, Benoît; Pluot, Michel

    2004-06-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (topo I) is the molecular target of the camptothecin group of anticancer drugs. Laboratory studies have shown that the cellular response to topo I-targeted drugs depends on the topo I expression and DNA replication rate and the apoptotic pathway activity. In this study, we tested potential indicators of the sensitivity of topo I-targeted drugs in 36 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were immunostained with monoclonal antibodies against Ki-67, p53, and topo I, and with polyclonal antibodies against DNA topoisomerase II-alpha (topo II-alpha). These markers were also tested in 18 epithelial hyperplastic lesions and 18 mild dysplasias. Immunostaining was quantified by the percentage of stained nuclei in each sample (the labeling index); 200 immunoreactive epithelial nuclei were counted per case for each antibody. The results support the possibility of using topo II-alpha staining for assessing the proliferative activity. High expression of topo II-alpha and topo I in OSCCs suggests that they may serve as potential indicators of sensitivity to topo I inhibitors. However, the apoptotic pathway assessed by p53 immunostaining was found to be uninformative. Analysis of the relationship between immunohistochemical results and clinical and pathologic parameters (the T and N stages and differentiation) showed that only the differentiation parameter correlated with the topo I expression rate. Thus, significant increase in the topo I expression in the poorly differentiated OSCCs suggests their higher sensitivity to drug treatment.

  2. Urea lesion formation in DNA as a consequence of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine oxidation and hydrolysis provides a potent source of point mutations.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Paul T; Neeley, William L; Delaney, James C; Gu, Feng; Niles, Jacquine C; Hah, Sang Soo; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Essigmann, John M

    2005-01-01

    The DNA oxidation product 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) forms several mutagenic oxidation products, including a metastable oxaluric acid (Oa) derivative. We report here that a synthetic oligonucleotide containing Oa hydrolyzes under simulated "in vivo" conditions to form a mutagenic urea (Ua) lesion. Using the Oa 2'-deoxyribonucleoside as a model, the hydrolysis rate depended strongly upon the concentrations of bicarbonate and divalent magnesium. In buffered solutions containing physiologically relevant levels of these species, the half-life of Oa nucleoside was approximately 40 h at 37 degrees C. The mutagenic properties of Ua in DNA were investigated using a M13mp7L2 bacteriophage genome containing Ua at a specific site. Transfection of the lesion-containing genome into wild-type AB1157 Escherichia coli allowed determination of the mutation frequency and DNA polymerase bypass efficiency from the resulting progeny phage. Ua was bypassed with an efficiency of 11% as compared to a guanine control and caused a 99% G-->T mutation frequency, assuming the lesion originated from G, which is at least an order of magnitude higher than the mutation frequency of 8-oxoG under the same conditions. SOS induction of bypass DNA polymerase(s) in the bacteria prior to transfection caused the mutation frequency and type to shift to 43% G-->T, 46% G-->C, and 10% G-->A mutations. We suggest that Ua is instructional, meaning that the shape of the lesion and its interactions with DNA polymerases influence which nucleotide is inserted opposite the lesion during replication and that the instructional nature of the lesion is modulated by the size of the binding pocket of the DNA polymerase. Replication past Ua, when formed by hydrolysis of the 8-oxoG oxidation product Oa, denotes a pathway that nearly quantitatively generates point mutations in vivo.

  3. Handling the 3-methylcytosine lesion by six human DNA polymerases members of the B-, X- and Y-families

    PubMed Central

    Furrer, Antonia; van Loon, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents often generate 3-methylcytosine (3meC) lesions that are efficiently repaired by AlkB homologues. If AlkB homologue proteins are not functional, or the number of 3meC lesions exceeds the cellular repair capacity, the damage will persist in the genome and become substrate of DNA polymerases (Pols). Though alkylating agents are present in our environment and used in the clinics, currently nothing is known about the impact of 3meC on the accuracy and efficiency of human Pols. Here we compared the 3meC bypass properties of six human Pols belonging to the three families: B (Pol δ), X (Pols β and λ) and Y (Pols κ, ι and η). We show that under replicative conditions 3meC impairs B-family, blocks X-family, but not Y-family Pols, in particular Pols η and ι. These Pols successfully synthesize opposite 3meC; Pol ι preferentially misincorporates dTTP and Pol η dATP. The most efficient extenders from 3meC base-paired primers are Pols κ and η. Finally, using xeroderma pigmentosum variant patient cell extracts, we provide evidence that the presence of functional Pol η is mandatory to efficiently overcome 3meC by mediating complete bypass or extension. Our data suggest that Pol η is crucial for efficient 3meC bypass. PMID:24097443

  4. Cybrid studies establish the causal link between the mtDNA m.3890G>A/MT-ND1 mutation and optic atrophy with bilateral brainstem lesions

    PubMed Central

    Caporali, Leonardo; Ghelli, Anna Maria; Iommarini, Luisa; Maresca, Alessandra; Valentino, Maria Lucia; La Morgia, Chiara; Liguori, Rocco; Zanna, Claudia; Barboni, Piero; De Nardo, Vera; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Rizzo, Giovanni; Tonon, Caterina; Lodi, Raffaele; Calvaruso, Maria Antonietta; Cappelletti, Martina; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Achilli, Alessandro; Pala, Maria; Torroni, Antonio; Carelli, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Complex I (CI) deficiency is a frequent cause of mitochondrial disorders and, in most cases, is due to mutations in CI subunit genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In this study, we establish the pathogenic role of the heteroplasmic mtDNA m.3890G>A/MT-ND1 (p.R195Q) mutation, which affects an extremely conserved amino acid position in ND1 subunit of CI. This mutation was found in a young-adult male with optic atrophy resembling Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and bilateral brainstem lesions. The only previously reported case with this mutation was a girl with fatal infantile Leigh syndrome with bilateral brainstem lesions. Transfer of the mutant mtDNA in the cybrid cell system resulted in a marked reduction of CI activity and CI-dependent ATP synthesis in the presence of a normally assembled enzyme. These findings establish the pathogenicity of the m.3890G>A/MT-ND1 mutation and remark the link between CI mutations affecting the mtDNA-encoded ND subunits and LHON-like optic atrophy, which may be complicated by bilateral and symmetric lesions affecting the central nervous system. Peculiar to this mutation is the distribution of the brainstem lesions, with sparing of the striatum in both patients. PMID:23246842

  5. Radiation-induced damage to cellular DNA: Chemical nature and mechanisms of lesion formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J. Richard

    2016-11-01

    This mini-review focuses on the recent identification of several novel radiation-induced single and tandem modifications in cellular DNA. For this purpose accurate high-performance electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) was applied allowing their quantitative measurement and unambiguous characterization. Exposure of human cells to gamma rays led to the formation of several modified bases arising from the rearrangement of the pyrimidine ring of thymine, cytosine and 5-methylcytosine subsequent to initial addition of an hydroxyl radical (•OH) to the 5,6-ethylenic bond. In addition, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, an novel epigenetic mark, and 5-formylcytosine, were found to be generated consecutively to •OH-mediated hydrogen abstraction from the methyl group of 5-methylcytosine. Relevant mechanistic information on one-oxidation reactions of cellular DNA was also gained from the detection of 5-hydroxycytosine and guanine-thymine intra-strand adducts whose formation is rationalized by the generation of related base radical cation. Attempts to search for the radiation-induced formation of purine 5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxyribonucleosides were unsuccessful with the exception of trace amounts of (5‧S)-5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxyadenosine.

  6. Relative biological effectiveness for photons: implication of complex DNA double-strand breaks as critical lesions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Xudong; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen; Luo, Chunxiong; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Yugang

    2017-03-21

    Current knowledge in radiobiology ascribes the adverse biological effects of ionizing radiation primarily to the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which is supposed to be potentially lethal and may be converted to lethal damage due to misrepair. Soft and ultrasoft x-rays have been found to bear elevated biological effectiveness for cell killing compared with conventional x-rays or (60)Co γ-rays. This phenomenon is qualitatively interpreted as the increased level of DSB induction for low energy photons, however, a thorough quantitative reasoning is lacking. Here, we systematically compared the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with relative DSB induction for photons from several hundreds of eV up to MeV. Although there is an approximate two-fold increase in the yields of DSB for low energy photons found in our calculation and a large number of experimental measurements, it is far from enough to account for the three- to four-fold increase in RBE. Further theoretical investigations show that DSB complexity (additional single-strand breaks and base damage within 10 base pairs) increases notably for low energy photons, which largely reconciles the discrepancy between RBE and DSB induction. Our theoretical results are in line with accumulating experimental evidence that complex DSBs are refractory to repair machinery and may contribute predominantly to the formation of lethal damage.

  7. Relative biological effectiveness for photons: implication of complex DNA double-strand breaks as critical lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Xudong; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen; Luo, Chunxiong; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Yugang

    2017-03-01

    Current knowledge in radiobiology ascribes the adverse biological effects of ionizing radiation primarily to the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which is supposed to be potentially lethal and may be converted to lethal damage due to misrepair. Soft and ultrasoft x-rays have been found to bear elevated biological effectiveness for cell killing compared with conventional x-rays or 60Co γ-rays. This phenomenon is qualitatively interpreted as the increased level of DSB induction for low energy photons, however, a thorough quantitative reasoning is lacking. Here, we systematically compared the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with relative DSB induction for photons from several hundreds of eV up to MeV. Although there is an approximate two-fold increase in the yields of DSB for low energy photons found in our calculation and a large number of experimental measurements, it is far from enough to account for the three- to four-fold increase in RBE. Further theoretical investigations show that DSB complexity (additional single-strand breaks and base damage within 10 base pairs) increases notably for low energy photons, which largely reconciles the discrepancy between RBE and DSB induction. Our theoretical results are in line with accumulating experimental evidence that complex DSBs are refractory to repair machinery and may contribute predominantly to the formation of lethal damage.

  8. Direct measurement of the 3-dimensional DNA lesion distribution induced by energetic charged particles in a mouse model tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mirsch, Johanna; Tommasino, Francesco; Frohns, Antonia; Conrad, Sandro; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Charged particles are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy and contribute significantly to the natural radiation risk. The difference in the biological effects of high-energy charged particles compared with X-rays or γ-rays is determined largely by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition events. Part of the energy is deposited in a densely ionizing manner in the inner part of the track, with the remainder spread out more sparsely over the outer track region. Our knowledge about the dose distribution is derived solely from modeling approaches and physical measurements in inorganic material. Here we exploited the exceptional sensitivity of γH2AX foci technology and quantified the spatial distribution of DNA lesions induced by charged particles in a mouse model tissue. We observed that charged particles damage tissue nonhomogenously, with single cells receiving high doses and many other cells exposed to isolated damage resulting from high-energy secondary electrons. Using calibration experiments, we transformed the 3D lesion distribution into a dose distribution and compared it with predictions from modeling approaches. We obtained a radial dose distribution with sub-micrometer resolution that decreased with increasing distance to the particle path following a 1/r2 dependency. The analysis further revealed the existence of a background dose at larger distances from the particle path arising from overlapping dose deposition events from independent particles. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantification of the spatial dose distribution of charged particles in biologically relevant material, and will serve as a benchmark for biophysical models that predict the biological effects of these particles. PMID:26392532

  9. Assay of excised oxidative DNA lesions: isolation of 8-oxoguanine and its nucleoside derivatives from biological fluids with a monoclonal antibody column.

    PubMed Central

    Park, E M; Shigenaga, M K; Degan, P; Korn, T S; Kitzler, J W; Wehr, C M; Kolachana, P; Ames, B N

    1992-01-01

    An immunoaffinity column is described that facilitates the analysis of oxidative damage products of DNA and RNA in urine, blood plasma, and medium isolated from cultures of Escherichia coli. In intact animals, lesions (adducts) excised from DNA are transported from the cell through the circulation and excreted in urine. In bacteria, DNA adducts are excreted directly into the medium. In either case, the adducts can be assayed as a measure of oxidative damage to DNA. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (oxo8dG;8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), a bio-marker of oxidative damage to DNA, has been isolated, and its substrate binding properties have been characterized. The relative binding affinities of this monoclonal antibody for oxo8dG, unmodified nucleosides, or derivatives of Gua made it suitable for the preparation of immunoaffinity columns that greatly facilitate the isolation of oxo8dG, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine from various biological fluids. Quantitative analysis of these adducts in urine of rats fed a nucleic acid-free diet and in the medium from cultures of E. coli suggests that oxo8-7,8-dihydroguanine is the principal repair product from oxo8-dG in DNA of both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The results support our previous estimate of about 10(5) oxidative lesions to DNA being formed and excised in an average rat cell per day. PMID:1565629

  10. The simultaneous detection of mitochondrial DNA damage from sun-exposed skin of three whale species and its association with UV-induced microscopic lesions and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Amy; Martinez-Levasseur, Laura M; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Gendron, Diane; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2013-07-01

    Due to life history and physiological constraints, cetaceans (whales) are unable to avoid prolonged exposure to external environmental insults, such as solar ultraviolet radiation (UV). The majority of studies on the effects of UV on skin are restricted to humans and laboratory animals, but it is important to develop tools to understand the effects of UV damage on large mammals such as whales, as these animals are long-lived and widely distributed, and can reflect the effects of UV across a large geographical range. We and others have used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a reliable marker of UV-induced damage particularly in human skin. UV-induced mtDNA strand breaks or lesions accumulate throughout the lifespan of an individual, thus constituting an excellent biomarker for cumulative exposure. Based on our previous studies in human skin, we have developed for the first time in the literature a quantitative real-time PCR methodology to detect and quantify mtDNA lesions in skin from sun-blistered whales. Furthermore the methodology allows for simultaneous detection of mtDNA damage in different species. Therefore using 44 epidermal mtDNA samples collected from 15 blue whales, 10 fin whales, and 19 sperm whales from the Gulf of California, Mexico, we quantified damage across 4.3 kilobases, a large region of the ~16,400 base pair whale mitochondrial genome. The results show a range of mtDNA damage in the skin of the three different whale species. This previously unreported observation was correlated with apoptotic damage and microscopic lesions, both of which are markers of UV-induced damage. As is the case in human studies, this suggests the potential use of mtDNA as a biomarker for measuring the effect of cumulative UV exposure in whales and may provide a platform to help understand the effects of changing global environmental conditions.

  11. Use of a postlabelling assay to examine the removal of radiation-induced DNA lesions by purified enzymes and human cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Weinfeld, M; Lee, J; Ruiqi, G; Karimi-Busheri, F; Chen, D; Allalunis-Turner, J

    1997-08-01

    We have used a 32P-postlabelling assay to examine the activity of purified Esherichia coli endonuclease IV, human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease I and human cell-free extracts towards irradiated DNA. The assay can detect thymine glycols, 3'-phosphoglycolate groups and at least one other major lesion that has yet to be fully characterized. It was observed that endonuclease IV removed the phosphoglycolates and the uncharacterized lesion(s) suggesting that the latter are abasic sites with modified deoxyribose residues. The purified human enzyme acted only on the phosphoglycolate residues. Cell-free extract, prepared from A549 lung carcinoma cells by sonication or treatment with toluene, efficiently removed the phosphoglycolate and unknown lesions, but was less reactive towards thymine glycols. The extract was completely inactivated by heating at 60 degrees C for 10 min. Removal of the unknown product and phosphoglycolate did not require magnesium, but 1 mM EDTA did inhibit release of the latter. The cell-free extract exhibited substantially more activity towards native than heat-denatured DNA. A comparison of extracts prepared from 4 cell lines displaying a range of radiosensitivities, including an ataxia telangiectasia cell line, showed that all contained similar levels of repair activity towards the detectable lesions.

  12. Specificity of mutagenesis by 4-aminobiphenyl: mutations at G residues in bacteriophage M13 DNA and G-->C transversions at a unique dG(8-ABP) lesion in single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Verghis, S B; Essigmann, J M; Kadlubar, F F; Morningstar, M L; Lasko, D D

    1997-12-01

    Mutagenesis by the human bladder carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP) was studied in single-stranded DNA from a bacteriophage M13 cloning vector. In comparison to ABP lesions in double-stranded DNA, lesions in single-stranded DNA were approximately 70-fold more mutagenic and 50-fold more genotoxic. Sequencing analysis of ABP-induced mutations in the lacZ gene revealed exclusively base-pair substitutions, with over 80% of the mutations occurring at G sites; the G at position 6310 accounted for 25% of the observed mutations. Among the sequence changes at G sites, G-->T transversions predominated, followed by G-->C transversions and G-->A transitions. In order to further elucidate the mutagenic mechanism of ABP, an oligonucleotide containing the major DNA adduct, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG(8-ABP)), was situated within the PstI site of a single-stranded M13 genome. After in vivo replication of the adduct containing ABP-modified and control (unadducted) genomes, the mutational frequency and mutational specificity of the dG(8-ABP) lesion were determined. The targeted mutational efficiency was approximately 0.01%, and the primary mutation observed was the G-->C transversion. Thus dG(8-ABP), albeit weakly mutagenic at the PstI site, can contribute to the mutational spectrum of ABP lesions.

  13. The formation of catalytically competent enzyme-substrate complex is not a bottleneck in lesion excision by human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, N A; Kiryutin, A S; Kuznetsova, A A; Panov, M S; Barsukova, M O; Yurkovskaya, A V; Fedorova, O S

    2017-04-01

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) protects DNA from alkylated and deaminated purine lesions. AAG flips out the damaged nucleotide from the double helix of DNA and catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond to release the damaged base. To understand better, how the step of nucleotide eversion influences the overall catalytic process, we performed a pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of AAG interaction with specific DNA-substrates, 13-base pair duplexes containing in the 7th position 1-N6-ethenoadenine (εA), hypoxanthine (Hx), and the stable product analogue tetrahydrofuran (F). The combination of the fluorescence of tryptophan, 2-aminopurine, and 1-N6-ethenoadenine was used to record conformational changes of the enzyme and DNA during the processes of DNA lesion recognition, damaged base eversion, excision of the N-glycosidic bond, and product release. The thermal stability of the duplexes characterized by the temperature of melting, Tm, and the rates of spontaneous opening of individual nucleotide base pairs were determined by NMR spectroscopy. The data show that the relative thermal stability of duplexes containing a particular base pair in position 7, (Tm(F/T) < Tm(εA/T) < Tm(Hx/T) < Tm(A/T)) correlates with the rate of reversible spontaneous opening of the base pair. However, in contrast to that, the catalytic lesion excision rate is two orders of magnitude higher for Hx-containing substrates than for substrates containing εA, proving that catalytic activity is not correlated with the stability of the damaged base pair. Our study reveals that the formation of the catalytically competent enzyme-substrate complex is not the bottleneck controlling the catalytic activity of AAG.

  14. Reconciliation of chemical, enzymatic, spectroscopic and computational data to assign the absolute configuration of the DNA base lesion spiroiminodihydantoin.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Aaron M; Orendt, Anita M; He, Yanan; Zhu, Judy; Dukor, Rina K; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2013-12-04

    The diastereomeric spiroiminodihydantoin-2'-deoxyribonucleoside (dSp) lesions resulting from 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) or 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (dOG) oxidation have generated much attention due to their highly mutagenic nature. Their propeller-like shape leads these molecules to display mutational profiles in vivo that are stereochemically dependent. However, there exist conflicting absolute configuration assignments arising from electronic circular dichroism (ECD) and NOESY-NMR experiments; thus, providing definitive assignments of the 3D structure of these molecules is of great interest. In the present body of work, we present data inconsistent with the reported ECD assignments for the dSp diastereomers in the nucleoside context, in which the first eluting isomer from a Hypercarb HPLC column was assigned to be the S configuration, and the second was assigned the R configuration. The following experiments were conducted: (1) determination of the diastereomer ratio of dSp products upon one-electron oxidation of dG in chiral hybrid or propeller G-quadruplexes that expose the re or si face to solvent, respectively; (2) absolute configuration analysis using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy; (3) reinterpretation of the ECD experimental spectra using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with the inclusion of 12 explicit H-bonding waters around the Sp free bases; and (4) reevaluation of calculated specific rotations for the Sp enantiomers using the hydration model in the TDDFT calculations. These new insights provide a fresh look at the absolute configuration assignments of the dSp diastereomers in which the first eluting from a Hypercarb-HPLC column is (-)-(R)-dSp and the second is (+)-(S)-dSp. These assignments now provide the basis for understanding the biological significance of the stereochemical dependence of enzymes that process this form of DNA damage.

  15. [Direct assay of radiation-induced DNA base lesions to mammalian cells]. Final progress report, September 1, 1991--November 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    We have successfully developed the GC/MS technique so that an assessment of base damage in mammalian cells can be accomplished. The technique now has a sensitivity that will allow one to perform research in the low dose region suitable for hazards evaluation. The research on the hydrated DNA molecule has been seminal in generating a better understanding of the mechanisms by which low LET radiation induces DNA damage in mammalian cells. Also reported here are (1) the methodology for hydrating and irradiating DNA has been developed, (2) the procedures for identifying and quantitating radiation-induced DNA damage by HPLC and GC/MS have been mastered, (3) an hypotheses that radiation-induced damage in closely associated water molecules can result in DNA damage which is indistinguishable from that caused by direct ionization of the DNA has been generated and supported by experimental data, and (4) mathematical expressions that relate DNA lesion formation to the important parameters in the above hypotheses have been constructed so that the predictions of the hypotheses can now be tested.

  16. Lignin-stimulated reduction of oxidative DNA lesions in testicular cells and lymphocytes of sprague-dawley rats in vitro and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Lábaj, Juraj; Slameoová, Darina; Lazarová, Monika; Kosiková, Bozena

    2004-01-01

    Lignin biopolymers constitute 30% of plant biomass and belong to the most abundant organic polymers on earth. We showed previously that this important component of dietary fiber exhibited a protective effect against the overall DNA damage induced by H2O2 or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in hamster lung cells and human foreskin cells cultured in vitro. The objective of the present work was to examine DNA-protective effects of lignin in rat testicular cells and rat peripheral blood lymphocytes using in vitro and ex vivo experiments. H2O2 and visible light-excited methylene blue (MB) were used as DNA-damaging agents. Testicular cells were chosen because the germinal epithelium of testes is one of the most proliferately active tissues potentially susceptible to DNA-damaging effects. As a second target peripheral blood lymphocytes were chosen because dietary lignin or its metabolites circulate in the animal organism probably through the blood system. For the in vitro experiments, isolated cells were preincubated with lignin for 2 h before treatment with one of the oxidative agents. In ex vivo experiments, the cells were exposed to H2O2 or visible light-excited MB after isolation from rats fed either a common diet or a lignin-supplemented diet. The water-soluble, sulfur-free lignin used in experiments was obtained by fractionation of hardwood hydrolysate. The level of direct single-strand DNA breaks in H2O2-treated cells was measured by the classical comet assay, and the level of oxidative DNA lesions in visible light-treated cells was measured by a modified comet assay. We found that lignin reduced DNA lesions induced by H2O2 or visible light-excited MB both in vitro and ex vivo. The major conclusion of our study is that lignin polymer obtained by fractionation of hardwood hydrolysate manifested a specific type of antimutagenic effect.

  17. Creation of RNA molecules that recognize the oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rink, Stacia M.; Shen, Jiang-Cheng; Loeb, Lawrence A.

    1998-01-01

    We used in vitro evolution to obtain RNA molecules that specifically recognize and bind with high affinity to the oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in DNA. A pool of ≈1015 RNA molecules containing a random insert of 45 nucleotides in length was subject to 10 successive rounds of chromatographic enrichment using an 8-oxodG affinity matrix, reverse transcription, PCR amplification, and RNA synthesis. Selected RNA molecules bind to 8-oxodG located at the 3′ terminus (Kd ≤ 270 nM) or in the center (Kd ≤ 2.8 μM) of a 19-nt strand of DNA, with no detectable affinity for the corresponding dG-containing DNA sequences. These 8-oxodG-binding RNAs will be used to monitor levels of 8-oxodG in DNA from biological sources and should provide a unique method for evaluating oxygen-mediated DNA damage. This approach should be applicable for the creation of RNA molecules that can bind to and identify the different modifications of DNA produced by a variety of environmental agents. PMID:9751715

  18. Histopathological lesions and DNA adducts in the liver of European flounder (Platichthys flesus) collected in the Seine estuary versus two reference estuarine systems on the French Atlantic coast.

    PubMed

    Cachot, Jérôme; Cherel, Yan; Larcher, Thibaut; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Laroche, Jean; Quiniou, Louis; Morin, Jocelyne; Schmitz, Julien; Burgeot, Thierry; Pottier, Didier

    2013-02-01

    An epidemiological survey was conducted in the Seine estuary and in two smaller and relatively preserved estuaries on the French Atlantic coast in order to estimate the occurrence of liver lesions in European flounder, Platichthys flesus, and also to seek putative risk factors for the recorded pathologies. Four hundred and seventy-eight fish of both sexes and of different size ranges were sampled in the three studied areas, 338 of which in the Seine estuary. All fish were examined for histopathological liver lesions, while DNA adducts and otoliths were analyzed on a subsample. Five categories of hepatic lesions were recorded with the following prevalence for the Seine estuary: 36.7 % inflammations, 8 % parasites (mainly encysted nematodes), 6.5 % foci of cellular alteration (FCA), 5.3 % foci of necrosis or regeneration (FNR), and 1.5 % tumors. Inflammation occurrence increased according to age, contrary to parasitic infestations and FCA which were more prevalent in young fish, notably those of <1 year old (group 0). Tumors were only observed in females of more than two winters. Females exhibited a higher prevalence of tumors (3.0 %) and FCA (6.5 %) than males (0 and 2.6 %, respectively). Parasitic and infectious lesions and FNR were equally distributed in males and females. The prevalence of FNR was also shown to vary according to sampling season, with significantly more occurrences of liver necrosis in the fish collected in summer than in spring. Spatial differences were observed with a higher occurrence of encysted parasites in flounders from the upper Seine estuary, while inflammations predominated in flounders living downstream. Temporal trends were also noted, with an increased prevalence of parasitic infestations, inflammations, and FCA in the 2002-2003 period in comparison to the 1996-1997 one. The three flounder populations from the Seine estuary (Normandy), Ster estuary (Brittany), and Bay of Veys (Normandy) showed different spectra of hepatic lesions

  19. Detection of the Epstein-Barr virus and DNA-topoisomerase II- α in recurrent and nonrecurrent giant cell lesion of the jawbones.

    PubMed

    Zyada, Manal M; Salama, Nagla M

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether the expression of Topo II-α correlates with presence of EBV in giant cell lesion of the jawbones and whether it is predictive of clinical biologic behavior of these lesions. Paraffin-embedded tissues from 8 recurrent and 7 nonrecurrent cases of bony GCLs and 9 peripheral giant cell lesions (PGCLs) as a control group were assessed for the expression of EBV and Topo II-α using immunohistochemistry. The results showed positive staining for Topo II-α in mononuclear stromal cells (MSCs) and multinucleated giant cells (MGCs). Student t-test showed that mean Topo II-α labelling index (LI) in recurrent cases was significantly higher than that in non-recurrent cases (P = 0.0001). Moreover, Spearman's correlation coefficients method showed a significant correlation between DNA Topo II-α LI and both of gender and site in these lesions. Moderate EBV expression in relation to the highest Topo II-α LI was observed in two cases of GCT. It was concluded that high Topo II-α LIs could be identified as reliable predicators for the clinical behavior of GCLs. Moreover, EBV has no etiological role in the benign CGCLs in contrast to its role in the pathogenesis of GCTs.

  20. Identification of the C4'-oxidized abasic site as the most abundant 2-deoxyribose lesion in radiation-damaged DNA using a novel HPLC-based approach.

    PubMed

    Roginskaya, Marina; Mohseni, Reza; Moore, Terence J; Bernhard, William A; Razskazovskiy, Yuriy

    2014-02-01

    A novel analytical high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based method of quantification of the yields of C4'-oxidized abasic sites, 1, in oxidatively damaged DNA has been elaborated. This new approach is based on efficient conversion of 1 into N-substituted 5-methylene-Δ(3)-pyrrolin-2-ones, 2, upon treatment of damaged DNA with primary amines in neutral or slightly acidic solutions with subsequent quantification of 2 by HPLC. The absolute and relative radiation-chemical yields of 1 in irradiated DNA solutions were re-evaluated using this method. The yields were compared with those of other 2-deoxyribose degradation products including 5-methylene-2(5H)-furanone, malondialdehyde, and furfural resulting from the C1', C4' and C5'-oxidations, respectively. The yield of free base release (FBR) determined in the same systems was employed as an internal measure of the total oxidative damage to the 2-deoxyribose moiety. Application of this technique identifies 1 as the most abundant sugar lesion in double-stranded (ds) DNA irradiated under air in solution (36% FBR). In single-stranded (ss) DNA this product is second by abundance (33% FBR) after 2-deoxyribonolactones (C1'-oxidation; 43% FBR). The production of nucleoside-5'-aldehydes (C5'-oxidation; 14% and 5% FBR in dsDNA and ssDNA, respectively) is in the third place. Taken together with the parallel reaction channel that converts C4'-radicals into malondialdehyde and 3'-phosphoglycolates, our results identify the C4'-oxidation as a prevalent pathway of oxidative damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone (50% or more of all 2-deoxyribose damages) in indirectly damaged DNA.

  1. Microhomology-mediated end joining is the principal mediator of double-strand break repair during mitochondrial DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Tadi, Satish Kumar; Sebastian, Robin; Dahal, Sumedha; Babu, Ravi K; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2016-01-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are associated with various mitochondrial disorders. The deletions identified in humans are flanked by short, directly repeated mitochondrial DNA sequences; however, the mechanism of such DNA rearrangements has yet to be elucidated. In contrast to nuclear DNA (nDNA), mtDNA is more exposed to oxidative damage, which may result in double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although DSB repair in nDNA is well studied, repair mechanisms in mitochondria are not characterized. In the present study, we investigate the mechanisms of DSB repair in mitochondria using in vitro and ex vivo assays. Whereas classical NHEJ (C-NHEJ) is undetectable, microhomology-mediated alternative NHEJ efficiently repairs DSBs in mitochondria. Of interest, robust microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) was observed with DNA substrates bearing 5-, 8-, 10-, 13-, 16-, 19-, and 22-nt microhomology. Furthermore, MMEJ efficiency was enhanced with an increase in the length of homology. Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and protein inhibition assays suggest the involvement of CtIP, FEN1, MRE11, and PARP1 in mitochondrial MMEJ. Knockdown studies, in conjunction with other experiments, demonstrated that DNA ligase III, but not ligase IV or ligase I, is primarily responsible for the final sealing of DSBs during mitochondrial MMEJ. These observations highlight the central role of MMEJ in maintenance of mammalian mitochondrial genome integrity and is likely relevant for deletions observed in many human mitochondrial disorders.

  2. On the chemical yield of base lesions, strand breaks, and clustered damage generated in plasmid DNA by the direct effect of X rays.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Shubhadeep; Milligan, Jamie R; Bernhard, William A

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the yield of DNA base damages, deoxyribose damage, and clustered lesions due to the direct effects of ionizing radiation and to compare these with the yield of DNA trapped radicals measured previously in the same pUC18 plasmid. The plasmids were prepared as films hydrated in the range 2.5 < Gamma < 22.5 mol water/mol nucleotide. Single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) were detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Specific types of base lesions were converted into SSBs and DSBs using the base-excision repair enzymes endonuclease III (Nth) and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg). The yield of base damage detected by this method displayed a strikingly different dependence on the level of hydration (Gamma) compared with that for the yield of DNA trapped radicals; the former decreased by 3.2 times as Gamma was varied from 2.5 to 22.5 and the later increased by 2.4 times over the same range. To explain this divergence, we propose that SSB yields produced in plasmid DNA by the direct effect cannot be analyzed properly with a Poisson process that assumes an average of one strand break per plasmid and neglects the possibility of a single track producing multiple SSBs within a plasmid. The yields of DSBs, on the other hand, are consistent with changes in free radical trapping as a function of hydration. Consequently, the composition of these clusters could be quantified. Deoxyribose damage on each of the two opposing strands occurs with a yield of 3.5 +/- 0.5 nmol/J for fully hydrated pUC18, comparable to the yield of 4.1 +/- 0.9 nmol/J for DSBs derived from opposed damages in which at least one of the sites is a damaged base.

  3. Lesion-Induced Mutation in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Its Avoidance by the Y-Family DNA Polymerase Dbh.

    PubMed

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2015-10-01

    Hyperthermophilic archaea offer certain advantages as models of genome replication, and Sulfolobus Y-family polymerases Dpo4 (S. solfataricus) and Dbh (S. acidocaldarius) have been studied intensively in vitro as biochemical and structural models of trans-lesion DNA synthesis (TLS). However, the genetic functions of these enzymes have not been determined in the native context of living cells. We developed the first quantitative genetic assays of replication past defined DNA lesions and error-prone motifs in Sulfolobus chromosomes and used them to measure the efficiency and accuracy of bypass in normal and dbh(-) strains of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Oligonucleotide-mediated transformation allowed low levels of abasic-site bypass to be observed in S. acidocaldarius and demonstrated that the local sequence context affected bypass specificity; in addition, most erroneous TLS did not require Dbh function. Applying the technique to another common lesion, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG), revealed an antimutagenic role of Dbh. The efficiency and accuracy of replication past 8-oxo-dG was higher in the presence of Dbh, and up to 90% of the Dbh-dependent events inserted dC. A third set of assays, based on phenotypic reversion, showed no effect of Dbh function on spontaneous -1 frameshifts in mononucleotide tracts in vivo, despite the extremely frequent slippage at these motifs documented in vitro. Taken together, the results indicate that a primary genetic role of Dbh is to avoid mutations at 8-oxo-dG that occur when other Sulfolobus enzymes replicate past this lesion. The genetic evidence that Dbh is recruited to 8-oxo-dG raises questions regarding the mechanism of recruitment, since Sulfolobus spp. have eukaryotic-like replisomes but no ubiquitin.

  4. Reduced ATM kinase activity and an attenuated p53 response to DNA damage in carcinogen-induced preneoplastic hepatic lesions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Silins, I; Finnberg, N; Ståhl, A; Högberg, J; Stenius, U

    2001-12-01

    In previous studies we have demonstrated that the p53 response to DNA damage in preneoplastic liver lesions, referred to as enzyme-altered foci (EAF), is attenuated. In the present investigation comparative quantitative RT-PCR revealed no major difference in the p53 mRNA levels in EAF and non-EAF tissue. When CoCl(2) was employed to induce hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1alpha), both non-EAF and EAF hepatocytes readily accumulated p53, whereas EAF hepatocytes did not accumulate p53 upon treatment with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). The p53 response was also induced in EAF hepatocytes by the inhibitor of nuclear export, leptomycin B. An inhibitor of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), wortmannin, blocked the DEN-induced p53 response in non-EAF hepatocytes. Assay of kinase activity in immunoprecipitated material from EAF and non-EAF tissue revealed attenuated ATM activity in EAF. Immunohistological and western blot analysis of the level of ATM protein was in agreement with the activity measurements and no phosphorylation of Ser15 in p53 was detected in EAF tissue 24 h after a challenging dose of DEN. Taken together with previously published data, these data indicate selective attenuation of the DNA damage pathway in EAF hepatocytes. Down-regulation of DNA damage-induced and ATM-mediated phosphorylation of p53 may confer a growth advantage on EAF hepatocytes.

  5. HPV Genotypes in High Grade Cervical Lesions and Invasive Cervical Carcinoma as Detected by Two Commercial DNA Assays, North Carolina, 2001–2006

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Susan; Steinau, Martin; Rinas, Allen; Gargano, Julia W.; Ludema, Christina; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Carter, Alicia L.; Grant, Kathy L.; Bamberg, Melanie; McDermott, James E.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Brewer, Noel T.; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background HPV typing using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) cervical tissue is used to evaluate HPV vaccine impact, but DNA yield and quality in FFPE specimens can negatively affect test results. This study aimed to evaluate 2 commercial assays for HPV detection and typing using FFPE cervical specimens. Methods Four large North Carolina pathology laboratories provided FFPE specimens from 299 women ages18 and older diagnosed with cervical disease from 2001 to 2006. For each woman, one diagnostic block was selected and unstained serial sections were prepared for DNA typing. Extracts from samples with residual lesion were used to detect and type HPV using parallel and serial testing algorithms with the Linear Array and LiPA HPV genotyping assays. Findings LA and LiPA concordance was 0.61 for detecting any high-risk (HR) and 0.20 for detecting any low-risk (LR) types, with significant differences in marginal proportions for HPV16, 51, 52, and any HR types. Discordant results were most often LiPA-positive, LA-negative. The parallel algorithm yielded the highest prevalence of any HPV type (95.7%). HR type prevalence was similar using parallel (93.1%) and serial (92.1%) approaches. HPV16, 33, and 52 prevalence was slightly lower using the serial algorithm, but the median number of HR types per woman (1) did not differ by algorithm. Using the serial algorithm, HPV DNA was detected in >85% of invasive and >95% of pre-invasive lesions. The most common type was HPV16, followed by 52, 18, 31, 33, and 35; HPV16/18 was detected in 56.5% of specimens. Multiple HPV types were more common in lower grade lesions. Conclusions We developed an efficient algorithm for testing and reporting results of two commercial assays for HPV detection and typing in FFPE specimens, and describe HPV type distribution in pre-invasive and invasive cervical lesions in a state-based sample prior to HPV vaccine introduction. PMID:22479516

  6. Molecular cloning of the feline thymus and activation-regulated chemokine cDNA and its expression in lesional skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sadatoshi; Okayama, Taro; Ohmori, Keitaro; Masuda, Kenichi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2003-02-01

    Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is a member of CC chemokine and plays an essential role in recruitment of CC chemokine receptor 4 positive Th2 cells to allergic lesion. To investigate the association of TARC in allergic inflammation of cats, a TARC cDNA was cloned from feline thymus by RT-PCR with 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The feline TARC clone contained a full length open reading frame encoding 99 amino acids which shared 80.8%, 72.5%, 65.6% and 67.8% homology with dog, human, mouse and rat homologues, respectively. Expression of TARC mRNA was detected not only in thymus but also in spleen, lung, lymph node, kidney, small intestine, colon and skin of the normal cat tissues examined. Furthermore, it was found that TARC mRNA was strongly expressed in lesional skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque. The present results demonstrated that TARC might be involved in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic plaque in cats.

  7. UVA and visible light photons produce frank strand breaks in human P3 cell DNA as well as a new class of alkali-labile lesion

    SciTech Connect

    Peak, M.J.; Peak, J.G.

    1994-05-01

    Human P3 epithelioid cells were exposed to UVA (290--400 nm), as well as to blue and green photons in the 400--520 mm region of the spectrum, and the production of strand breaks in their DNA was measured by using elution. After exposure to blue photons the profiles were convex (downturning), shown to be due to the induction of a mixture of frank single-strand DNA breaks (SSB) plus rapidly developing alkali-labile sites (ALS). as well as latent breaks that develop during the first 6 h of the elution, termed slowly developing alkali-labile sites (SDALS). A significant proportion of the lesions produced by P3 cells by blue light photons are SDALS, whereas green light photons at 520 nm and UVA photons at 365 nm produce no SDALS and the elution profiles are exponential. This is also the case for Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to 405 nm, evidence that a unique chromophore in P3 cells that absorbs strongly in the blue region leads to the formation of SDALS. The similarity in induction of SDALS at 460 and 405 nm is evidence that the chromophore is not a porphyrin, because these compounds have sharp absorption maxima in the lower 400 nm region. The chemical nature of these lesions as well as the cellular responses to them remain enigmatic.

  8. Manganese-Induced Oxidative DNA Damage in Neuronal SH-SY5Y Cells: Attenuation of thymine base lesions by glutathione and N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Adrienne P.; Schneider, Jeffrey A.; Nelson, Bryant C.; Atha, Donald H.; Jain, Ashok; Soliman, Karam F. A.; Aschner, Michael; Mazzio, Elizabeth; Reams, R. Renee

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element required for normal function and development. However, exposure to this metal at elevated levels may cause manganism, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with neurological symptoms similar to idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD). Elevated body burdens of Mn from exposure to parental nutrition, vapors in mines and smelters and welding fumes have been associated with neurological health concerns. The underlying mechanism of Mn neurotoxicity remains unclear. Accordingly, the present study was designed to investigate the toxic effects of Mn2+ in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Mn2+ caused a concentration dependent decrease in SH-SY5Y cellular viability compared to controls. The LD50 value was 12.98 μM Mn2+ (p <0.001 for control vs. 24h Mn treatment). Both TUNEL and annexin V/propidium iodide apoptosis assays confirmed the induction of apoptosis in the cells following exposure to Mn2+ (2 μM, 62 μM or 125 μM). In addition, Mn2+ induced both the formation and accumulation of DNA single strand breaks (via alkaline comet assay analysis) and oxidatively modified thymine bases (via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis). Pre-incubation of the cells with characteristic antioxidants, either 1 mM N-acetylcysteine or 1 mM glutathione reduced the level of DNA strand breaks and the formation of thymine base lesions, suggesting protection against oxidative cellular damage. Our findings indicate that 1) exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to Mn promotes both the formation and accumulation of oxidative DNA nucleotide base damage, 2) SH-SY5Y cells with accumulated DNA damage are more likely to die via an apoptotic pathway and 3) the accumulated levels of DNA damage can be abrogated by the addition of exogenous chemical antioxidants. This is the first known report of Mn2+-induction and antioxidant protection of thymine lesions in this SH-SY5Y cell line and contributes new information to the potential use of antioxidants as a

  9. Role of shielding in modulating the effects of solar particle events: Monte Carlo calculation of absorbed dose and DNA complex lesions in different organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, F.; Biaggi, M.; De Biaggi, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Panzarasa, A.; Paretzke, H. G.; Pelliccioni, M.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.; Zankl, M.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2004-01-01

    Distributions of absorbed dose and DNA clustered damage yields in various organs and tissues following the October 1989 solar particle event (SPE) were calculated by coupling the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code with two anthropomorphic phantoms (a mathematical model and a voxel model), with the main aim of quantifying the role of the shielding features in modulating organ doses. The phantoms, which were assumed to be in deep space, were inserted into a shielding box of variable thickness and material and were irradiated with the proton spectra of the October 1989 event. Average numbers of DNA lesions per cell in different organs were calculated by adopting a technique already tested in previous works, consisting of integrating into "condensed-history" Monte Carlo transport codes--such as FLUKA--yields of radiobiological damage, either calculated with "event-by-event" track structure simulations, or taken from experimental works available in the literature. More specifically, the yields of "Complex Lesions" (or "CL", defined and calculated as a clustered DNA damage in a previous work) per unit dose and DNA mass (CL Gy-1 Da-1) due to the various beam components, including those derived from nuclear interactions with the shielding and the human body, were integrated in FLUKA. This provided spatial distributions of CL/cell yields in different organs, as well as distributions of absorbed doses. The contributions of primary protons and secondary hadrons were calculated separately, and the simulations were repeated for values of Al shielding thickness ranging between 1 and 20 g/cm2. Slight differences were found between the two phantom types. Skin and eye lenses were found to receive larger doses with respect to internal organs; however, shielding was more effective for skin and lenses. Secondary particles arising from nuclear interactions were found to have a minor role, although their relative contribution was found to be larger for the Complex Lesions than for the

  10. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Qiuling; Ma, Ning; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wenchao; Li, Yong; Ma, Zhifeng; Li, Yunyun; Tian, Fengjie; Zhang, Wenping; Mu, Jinjun; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Dongxing; Liu, Haifang; Yang, Mimi; Ma, Caifeng; Yun, Fen

    2013-01-01

    8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was paralleled by increased debris of cells. ► Oxidative DNA damage of PMNs is associated with arsenic-related skin lesions.

  11. Endonuclease IV and exonuclease III are involved in the repair and mutagenesis of DNA lesions induced by UVB in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Souza, L L; Eduardo, I R; Pádula, M; Leitão, A C

    2006-03-01

    Exonuclease III (Exo III) and endonuclease IV (Endo IV) play a critical role in the base excision repair (BER) of Escherichia coli. Both are endowed with AP endonucleolytic activity, cleaving the 5' phosphodiester bond adjacent to spontaneous or induced abasic sites in DNA. Although mutants defective in Exo III (xthA) are usually hypersensitive to oxidative agents such as hydrogen peroxide, near-UV-light and X-rays, mutants defective in Endo IV (nfo) are not as sensitive as the xthA strain. To further investigate the roles of these AP endonucleases in DNA repair, we evaluated the sensitivity and mutagenesis of xthA and nfo strains after UVB and compared with UVC light. Our results revealed that xthA but not nfo strain was hypersensitive to UVB. The use of Fe(+2) ion chelator (dipyridyl), prior to irradiation, completely protected the xthA mutant against UVB lethal lesions, suggesting the generation of toxic oxidative lesions mediated by transition metal reactions. The nfo strain displayed increased UVB-induced mutagenesis, which was significantly suppressed by pre-treatment with dipyridyl. Although xthA strain did not display increased mutagenesis after UVC and UVB treatments, this phenotype was not related to xthA mutation, but rather to an unknown secondary mutation specifying an antimutator phenotype. After UVB irradiation, the base substitution spectra of nfo strain revealed a bias towards AT-->GC transitions and GC-->CG transversions, which were also suppressed by previous treatment with the iron chelator. Overall, on the basis of the differential sensitivities and mutational spectra displayed after UVC and UVB treatments, we propose a role for Endo IV and Exo III to counteract DNA damage induced by the oxidative counterpart of UVB in E.coli.

  12. Acute ethanol exposure suppresses the repair of O6-methylguanine DNA lesions in castrated adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D M; Tentler, J J; Carney, J P; Wilson, T M; Kelley, M R

    1994-10-01

    Alcohol has clearly been associated with an increase of cancers in numerous tissue, including the respiratory tract, colon, rectum, liver, but especially the esophagus, larynx, pharynx, and mouth. Alcohol alone has not been shown to be a mutagen until it is converted to acetaldehyde and, therefore, alcohol presumably acts as a cocarcinogen. Previous data has shown that alcohol concentrations of 2% or greater inhibits DNA repair, and in light of the widespread consumption of alcoholic beverages with alcohol contents ranging from 4 to 5% (beer and wine coolers) to 50% (whiskey), interest in determining the mechanism(s) responsible for alcohol-induced carcinogenesis has heightened. Although previous studies, in intact rats, have investigated the effects of chronic alcohol exposure on some aspects of DNA repair, we have begun to address the effects of acute or "binge" alcohol exposure on mammalian DNA repair. Toward this end, we report the inhibition of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) by a single intraperitoneal injection of 30% ethanol in adult male castrated rats. This inhibition lasted for at least 24 hr. We also observed a dose-response effect of ethanol on MGMT activity, again only in the castrated rats. The finding of ethanol's effect on MGMT activity in castrated and not intact rats implies a hormonal component of MGMT DNA repair response, which has only been alluded to in past research.

  13. DNA repair kinetic of hydrogen peroxide and UVA/B induced lesions in peripheral blood leucocytes from xeroderma pigmentosum patients and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Elio A Prieto; Mudry, Marta D; Palermo, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the fine kinetics of DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) syndrome, a complex disorder linked to a deficiency in repair that increases cancer susceptibility. The repair process was evaluated by the comet assay (CA) in cells from 2 XP patients and 9 controls exposed to UVA/B (UVA 366/UVB 280 nm) and H2O2 (150 μM) at temperatures of 4, 15, and 37°C. Samples were taken at 2-min intervals during the first 10 min to analyze the "fine kinetics" repair during the initial phase of the curve, and then at 15, 20, 25, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min. CA evaluation of DNA repair activity points to BER/NER initiation in the first 30 min with both inductors at 37°C and 15°C, but final comet length showed differences according to treatment. Repair kinetics during 120 min showed a good correlation with clinical features in both XP patients. Differences in final comet length were less pronounced in XP cells treated with H2O2 than with UVA/B, probably because the peroxide produces mainly base oxidation but less bulky lesions; UVA/B generates a mixture of both. These findings reinforce the value of CA in testing in DNA repair ability or exposure monitoring.

  14. Identification of the novel lesion 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA isolated from. gamma. -irradiated human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dizdaroglu, M.; Dirksen, M.L.; Simic, M.G.; Robbins, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    The authors used capillary gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) to detect damage in DNA from ..gamma..-irradiated viable cells. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed peripheral blood B-lymphocytes (lines GM 130 and RB 4580) were ..gamma..-irradiated at 0/sup 0/C at 1 to 10 krad (8.2 krad/min). The cells were immediately lysed with sodium dodecyl sulfate and incubated with proteinase K. The DNA was isolated by phenol-chloroform extractions, ethanol precipitations, and RNase A digestion. The DNA was hydrolyzed to 2'-deoxyribonucleosides with a mixture of DNase I, venom and spleen exonucleases, and alkaline phosphatase. The hydrolysate was dried, trimethylsilylated, and analyzed by GC-MS with selected-ion monitoring. Chromatographic retention time and mass spectrum were determined for a trimethylsilylated sample of authentic 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8,5'-cyclo-dGuo). DNA from ..gamma..-irradiated cells gave the characteristic ions of this compound with proper relative intensities. Formation of 8,5'-cyclo-dGuo was dose-dependent. It was detectable in ca. 0.05 mg of DNA from cells irradiated at doses as low as 1 krad. The (5'R)- and the (5'S)-epimer of 8,5'-cyclo-dGuo were observed in a ratio of 1 to 3. The formation of 8,5'-cyclo-dGuo is believed to involve hydrogen atom abstraction from the carbon-5' of 2'-deoxyribose by radiation-generated OH radicals followed by intramolecular cyclization between carbon-5' and carbon-8 and subsequent oxidation of the resulting nitrogen-7 radical.

  15. Exploration of cellular DNA lesion, DNA-binding and biocidal ordeal of novel curcumin based Knoevenagel Schiff base complexes incorporating tryptophan: Synthesis and structural validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, Thiravidamani; Raman, Natarajan

    2016-07-01

    A few novel Schiff base transition metal complexes of general formula [MLCl] (where, L = Schiff base, obtained by the condensation reaction of Knoevenagel condensate of curcumin, L-tryptophan and M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Zn(II)), were prepared by stencil synthesis. They were typified using UV-vis, IR, EPR spectral techniques, micro analytical techniques, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity. Geometry of the metal complexes was examined and recognized as square planar. DNA binding and viscosity studies revealed that the metal(II) complexes powerfully bound via an intercalation mechanism with the calf thymus DNA. Gel-electrophoresis technique was used to investigate the DNA cleavage competence of the complexes and they establish to approve the cleavage of pBR322 DNA in presence of oxidant H2O2. This outcome inferred that the synthesized complexes showed better nuclease activity. Moreover, the complexes were monitored for antimicrobial activities. The results exposed that the synthesized compounds were forceful against all the microbes under exploration.

  16. From non-covalent binding to irreversible DNA lesions: nile blue and nile red as photosensitizing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattuso, Hugo; Besancenot, Vanessa; Grandemange, Stéphanie; Marazzi, Marco; Monari, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    We report a molecular modeling study, coupled with spectroscopy experiments, on the behavior of two well known organic dyes, nile blue and nile red, when interacting with B-DNA. In particular, we evidence the presence of two competitive binding modes, for both drugs. However their subsequent photophysical behavior is different and only nile blue is able to induce DNA photosensitization via an electron transfer mechanism. Most notably, even in the case of nile blue, its sensitization capabilities strongly depend on the environment resulting in a single active binding mode: the minor groove. Fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the presence of competitive interaction modes for both sensitizers, while the sensitization via electron transfer, is possible only in the case of nile blue.

  17. From non-covalent binding to irreversible DNA lesions: nile blue and nile red as photosensitizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Gattuso, Hugo; Besancenot, Vanessa; Grandemange, Stéphanie; Marazzi, Marco; Monari, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We report a molecular modeling study, coupled with spectroscopy experiments, on the behavior of two well known organic dyes, nile blue and nile red, when interacting with B-DNA. In particular, we evidence the presence of two competitive binding modes, for both drugs. However their subsequent photophysical behavior is different and only nile blue is able to induce DNA photosensitization via an electron transfer mechanism. Most notably, even in the case of nile blue, its sensitization capabilities strongly depend on the environment resulting in a single active binding mode: the minor groove. Fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the presence of competitive interaction modes for both sensitizers, while the sensitization via electron transfer, is possible only in the case of nile blue. PMID:27329409

  18. Comparative analysis of four oxidized guanine lesions from reactions of DNA with peroxynitrite, singlet oxygen, and γ-radiation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liang; Ye, Wenjie; Prestwich, Erin G; Wishnok, John S; Taghizadeh, Koli; Dedon, Peter C; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2013-02-18

    Oxidative damage to DNA has many origins, including irradiation, inflammation, and oxidative stress, but the chemistries are not the same. The most oxidizable base in DNA is 2-deoxyguanosine (dG), and the primary oxidation products are 8-oxodG and 2-amino-imidazolone. The latter rapidly converts to 2,2-diamino-oxazolone (Ox), and 8-oxodG is further oxidized to spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and guanidinohydantoin (Gh). In this study, we have examined the dose-response relationship for the formation of the above four products arising in calf thymus DNA exposed to gamma irradiation, photoactivated rose bengal, and two sources of peroxynitrite. In order to carry out these experiments, we developed a chromatographic system and synthesized isotopomeric internal standards to enable accurate and precise analysis based upon selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. 8-OxodG was the most abundant products in all cases, but its accumulation was highly dependent on the nature of the oxidizing agent and the subsequent conversion to Sp and Gh. Among the other oxidation products, Ox was the most abundant, and Sp was formed in significantly greater yield than Gh.

  19. Epigenetic Modifications and Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Oral Lichen Planus Lesions Presenting Poor Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dillenburg, Caroline S.; Martins, Marco A.T.; Almeida, Luciana O.; Meurer, Luise; Squarize, Cristiane H.; Martins, Manoela D.; Castilho, Rogerio M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epigenetics refers to changes in cell characteristics that occur independently of modifications to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence. Alterations mediated by epigenetic mechanisms are important factors in cancer progression. Although an exciting prospect, the identification of early epigenetic markers associated with clinical outcome in premalignant and malignant disorders remains elusive. We examined alterations in chromatin acetylation in oral lichen planus (OLP) with distinct clinical behavior and compared the alterations to the levels of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We analyzed 42 OLP patients, who had different responses to therapy, for acetyl-histone H3 at lys9 (H3K9ac), which is associated with enhanced transcription and nuclear decondensation, and the presence of DSBs, as determined by accumulation of phosphorylated γH2AX foci. Patients with high levels of H3K9ac acetylation failed to respond to therapy or experienced disease recurrence shortly after therapy. Similar to H3K9ac, patients who responded poorly to therapy had increased accumulation of DNA DSB, indicating genomic instability. These findings suggest that histone modifications occur in OLP, and H3K9ac and γH2AX histones may serve as epigenetic markers for OLP recurrence. PMID:26222871

  20. Bixin protects hepatocytes against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced genotoxicity but does not suppress DNA damage and pre-neoplastic lesions in the colon of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; de Andrade, Kelly Jacqueline Barbosa; Paula, Marcela Cristina Ferreira; Oliveira Acésio, Nathália; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Borges, Priscilla Scalon Freitas; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2014-01-01

    Bixin is a carotenoid found in the seeds of Bixa orellana L., a plant native to tropical America that is used in the food industry. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bixin on DNA damage and pre-neoplastic lesions induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in the liver and colon of Wistar rats. The animals received bixin at daily doses of 0.1, 1.0 and 10mg/kg body weight (bw) by gavage. For the assessment of DNA damage in hepatocytes and colon cells with the comet assay, the administration of bixin was for 7 days. The animals received a single subcutaneous injection of 25mg/kg bw of DMH, and were euthanized 4h later. For the evaluation of the frequency of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), the animals were treated with the different doses of bixin for 4 weeks. Four doses of 40mg/kg bw DMH, two doses in the first week and two doses in the second week, were administered and euthanasia occurred at 4 weeks after the beginning of treatment. Bixin reduced the frequency of DNA damage in hepatocytes at the highest two doses tested (1.0 and 10mg/kg bw). On the other hand, no differences in the frequency of DNA damage in colon cells were observed between animals treated with bixin plus DMH and those treated with DMH alone. In addition, the frequency of ACF did not differ significantly between the group treated with bixin plus DMH and the DMH group. The results suggest that bixin does not suppress the formation of ACF, indicating the absence of a protective effect against colon carcinogenesis.

  1. Hypersensitivity to mutation and sister-chromatid-exchange induction in CHO cell mutants defective in incising DNA containing UV lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Brookman, K.W.; Dillehay, L.E.; Mooney, C.L.; Carrano, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Five UV-sensitive mutant strains of CHO cells representing different genetic complementation groups were analyzed for their ability to perform the incision step of nucleotide excision repair after UV exposure. The assay utilized inhibitors of DNA synthesis to accumulate the short-lived strand breaks resulting from repair incisions. After 6 J/m/sup 2/, each of the mutants showed < 10% of the incision rate of the parental AA8 cells. After 50 J/m/sup 2/, the rate in AA8 was similar to that at 6 J/m/sup 2/, but the rates in the mutants were significantly higher (approx. 20% of the rate of AA8). Thus by this incision assay the mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable. Each of the mutants were hypersensitive to mutation induction at both the hprt and aprt loci by a factor of 10, and in the one strain tested ouabain resistance was induced sevenfold more efficiently than in AA8 cells. Sister chromatid exchange was also induced with sevenfold increased efficiency in the two mutant strains examined. Thus, here CHO mutants resemble xeroderma pigmentosum cells in terms of their incision defects and their hypersensitivity to DNA damage by UV.

  2. DNA lesion can facilitate base ionization: vertical ionization energies of aqueous 8-oxoguanine and its nucleoside and nucleotide.

    PubMed

    Palivec, Vladimír; Pluhařová, Eva; Unger, Isaak; Winter, Bernd; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-12-04

    8-Oxoguanine is one of the key products of indirect radiation damage to DNA by reactive oxygen species. Here, we describe ionization of this damaged nucleobase and the corresponding nucleoside and nucleotide in aqueous phase, modeled by the nonequilibrium polarizable continuum model, establishing their lowest vertical ionization energies of 6.8-7.0 eV. We thus confirm that 8-oxoguanine has even lower ionization energy than the parental guanine, which is the canonical nucleobase with the lowest ionization energy. Therefore, it can act as a trap for the cationic hole formed by ionizing radiation and thus protect DNA from further radiation damage. We also model using time-dependent density functional theory and measure by liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy the valence photoelectron spectrum of 8-oxoguanine in water. We show that the calculated higher lying ionization states match well the experiment which, however, is not sensitive enough to capture the electron signal corresponding to the lowest ionization process due to the low solubility of 8-oxoguanine in water.

  3. Evaluation of oxidative DNA lesions in plasma and nuclear abnormalities in erythrocytes of wild fish (Liza aurata) as an integrated approach to genotoxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M; Ahmad, I; Maria, V L; Ferreira, C S S; Serafim, A; Bebianno, M J; Pacheco, M; Santos, M A

    2010-12-21

    Genetic lesions (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA) were seasonally quantified in the blood of Liza aurata caught at Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), a multi-contaminated aquatic system. Thus, five critical sites were assessed and compared with a reference site (Torreira). Oxidative DNA damage was found in Gafanha (harbour-water area), Laranjo (metal-contaminated) and Vagos (contaminated with PAHs) in the spring; Rio Novo do Principe (near a former paper-mill effluent) in the autumn; Rio Novo do Principe and Vagos in the winter. ENA were higher than Torreira at VAG (spring and winter). Torreira did not display seasonal variation neither in terms of 8-OHdG or total ENA. A positive correlation between 8-OHdG and ENA was found, suggesting oxidative stress as a mechanism involved in the formation of ENA. This study clearly demonstrates the presence of DNA-damaging substances in Ria de Aveiro and recommends the use of 8-OHdG and ENA as biomarkers of environmental contamination.

  4. Identification of Malassezia species in the facial lesions of Chinese seborrhoeic dermatitis patients based on DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lian, C-h; Shen, L-l; Gao, Q-y; Jiang, M; Zhao, Z-j; Zhao, J-j

    2014-12-01

    The genus Malassezia is important in the aetiology of facial seborrhoeic dermatitis (FSD), which is the most common clinical type. The purpose of this study was to analyse the distribution of Malassezia species in the facial lesions of Chinese seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD) patients and healthy individuals. Sixty-four isolates of Malassezia were isolated from FSD patients and 60 isolates from healthy individuals. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was used to identify the isolates. The most frequently identified Malassezia species associated with FSD was M. furfur (76.56%), followed by M. sympodialis (12.50%) and M. japonica (9.38%). The most frequently isolated species in healthy individuals were M. furfur (61.67%), followed by M. sympodialis (25.00%), M. japonica (6.67%), M. globosa (3.33%), and M. obtusa (3.33%). Overall, our study revealed that while M. furfur is the predominant Malassezia species in Chinese SD patients, there is no significant difference in the distribution of Malassezia species between Chinese SD patients and healthy individuals.

  5. Reduced repair capacity of a DNA clustered damage site comprised of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and 2-deoxyribonolactone results in an increased mutagenic potential of these lesions

    DOE PAGES

    Cunniffe, Siobhan; O’Neill, Peter; Greenberg, Marc M.; ...

    2014-04-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites. Non-double strand break (DSB) clustered damage has been shown to compromise the base excision repair pathway, extending the lifetimes of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions. This increases the likelihood the lesions persist to replication and thus increasing the mutagenic potential of the lesions within the cluster. Lesions formed by ionizing radiation include 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) and 2-deoxyribonolactone (dL). dL poses an additional challenge to the cell as it is not repaired by the short-patch base excision repair pathway. Here we show recalcitrant dL repairmore » is reflected in mutations observed when DNA containing it and a proximal 8-oxodGuo is replicated in Escherichia coli. 8-oxodGuo in close proximity to dL on the opposing DNA strand results in an enhanced frequency of mutation of the lesions within the cluster and a 20 base sequence flanking the clustered damage site in an E. coli based plasmid assay. In vitro repair of a dL lesion is reduced when compared to the repair of an abasic (AP) site and a tetrahydrofuran (THF), and this is due mainly to a reduction in the activity of polymerase β, leading to retarded FEN1 and ligase 1 activities. This study has given insights in to the biological effects of clusters containing dL.« less

  6. The Werner syndrome protein limits the error-prone 8-oxo-dG lesion bypass activity of human DNA polymerase kappa

    PubMed Central

    Maddukuri, Leena; Ketkar, Amit; Eddy, Sarah; Zafar, Maroof K.; Eoff, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase kappa (hpol κ) is the only Y-family member to preferentially insert dAMP opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) during translesion DNA synthesis. We have studied the mechanism of action by which hpol κ activity is modulated by the Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a RecQ helicase known to influence repair of 8-oxo-dG. Here we show that WRN stimulates the 8-oxo-dG bypass activity of hpol κ in vitro by enhancing the correct base insertion opposite the lesion, as well as extension from dC:8-oxo-dG base pairs. Steady-state kinetic analysis reveals that WRN improves hpol κ-catalyzed dCMP insertion opposite 8-oxo-dG ∼10-fold and extension from dC:8-oxo-dG by 2.4-fold. Stimulation is primarily due to an increase in the rate constant for polymerization (kpol), as assessed by pre-steady-state kinetics, and it requires the RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain. In support of the functional data, recombinant WRN and hpol κ were found to physically interact through the exo and RQC domains of WRN, and co-localization of WRN and hpol κ was observed in human cells treated with hydrogen peroxide. Thus, WRN limits the error-prone bypass of 8-oxo-dG by hpol κ, which could influence the sensitivity to oxidative damage that has previously been observed for Werner's syndrome cells. PMID:25294835

  7. The Werner syndrome protein limits the error-prone 8-oxo-dG lesion bypass activity of human DNA polymerase kappa.

    PubMed

    Maddukuri, Leena; Ketkar, Amit; Eddy, Sarah; Zafar, Maroof K; Eoff, Robert L

    2014-10-29

    Human DNA polymerase kappa (hpol κ) is the only Y-family member to preferentially insert dAMP opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) during translesion DNA synthesis. We have studied the mechanism of action by which hpol κ activity is modulated by the Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a RecQ helicase known to influence repair of 8-oxo-dG. Here we show that WRN stimulates the 8-oxo-dG bypass activity of hpol κ in vitro by enhancing the correct base insertion opposite the lesion, as well as extension from dC:8-oxo-dG base pairs. Steady-state kinetic analysis reveals that WRN improves hpol κ-catalyzed dCMP insertion opposite 8-oxo-dG ∼10-fold and extension from dC:8-oxo-dG by 2.4-fold. Stimulation is primarily due to an increase in the rate constant for polymerization (kpol), as assessed by pre-steady-state kinetics, and it requires the RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain. In support of the functional data, recombinant WRN and hpol κ were found to physically interact through the exo and RQC domains of WRN, and co-localization of WRN and hpol κ was observed in human cells treated with hydrogen peroxide. Thus, WRN limits the error-prone bypass of 8-oxo-dG by hpol κ, which could influence the sensitivity to oxidative damage that has previously been observed for Werner's syndrome cells.

  8. Requirements for bypass of UV-induced lesions in single-stranded DNA of bacteriophage phi X174 in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Slater, S C; Maurer, R

    1991-01-01

    According to the current model for mutagenic bypass of UV-induced lesions, efficient bypass requires three proteins: activated RecA (RecA*) and either activated UmuD (UmuD') and UmuC or their plasmid-encoded analogues, MucA' and MucB. RecA* aids synthesis of UmuD' and UmuC (and MucA'/MucB) at two levels: by inactivation of the LexA transcriptional repressor of these genes and by cleavage of UmuD (and MucA) to produce the active fragments, UmuD' (MucA'). A third role for RecA is revealed when these two roles are otherwise satisfied in a suitably engineered strain. An often-suggested possible role for RecA in bypass is inhibition of editing by the epsilon subunit of DNA polymerase III. Here, by demonstrating that elimination of epsilon by deletion of its gene, dnaQ, does not relieve the requirement for the third function of RecA, we show that RecA must perform some function other than, or in addition to, inhibition of epsilon. We also show that elimination of epsilon does not relieve the requirement for either Muc protein. Moreover, we observed reactivation of irradiated phi X174 in unirradiated cells expressing MucA' and MucB. This finding makes it unlikely that the additional role of recA involves derepression of an unidentified gene or cleavage of an unidentified protein and makes it more likely that RecA participates directly in bypass. PMID:1847514

  9. Requirements for bypass of UV-induced lesions in single-stranded DNA of bacteriophage phi X174 in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, S.C.; Maurer, R. )

    1991-02-15

    According to the current model for mutagenic bypass of UV-induced lesions, efficient bypass requires three proteins: activated RecA (RecA*) and either activated UmuD (UmuD') and UmuC or their plasmid-encoded analogues, MucA' and MucB. RecA* aids synthesis of UmuD' and UmuC (and MucA'/MucB) at two levels: by inactivation of the LexA transcriptional repressor of these genes and by cleavage of UmuD (and MucA) to produce the active fragments, UmuD' (MucA'). A third role for RecA is revealed when these two roles are otherwise satisfied in a suitably engineered strain. An often-suggested possible role for RecA in bypass is inhibition of editing by the epsilon subunit of DNA polymerase III. Here, by demonstrating that elimination of epsilon by deletion of its gene, dnaQ, does not relieve the requirement for the third function of RecA, we show that RecA must perform some function other than, or in addition to, inhibition of epsilon. We also show that elimination of epsilon does not relieve the requirement for either Muc protein. Moreover, we observed reactivation of irradiated phi X174 in unirradiated cells expressing MucA' and MucB. This finding makes it unlikely that the additional role of recA involves derepression of an unidentified gene or cleavage of an unidentified protein and makes it more likely that RecA participates directly in bypass.

  10. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone: reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu, Haiying; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 10(8) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10-1000 μmol dm(-3)) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid.

  11. Influence of local sequence context on damaged base conformation in human DNA polymerase iota: molecular dynamics studies of nucleotide incorporation opposite a benzo[a]pyrene-derived adenine lesion.

    PubMed

    Donny-Clark, Kerry; Broyde, Suse

    2009-11-01

    Human DNA polymerase iota is a lesion bypass polymerase of the Y family, capable of incorporating nucleotides opposite a variety of lesions in both near error-free and error-prone bypass. With undamaged templating purines polymerase iota normally favors Hoogsteen base pairing. Polymerase iota can incorporate nucleotides opposite a benzo[a]pyrene-derived adenine lesion (dA*); while mainly error-free, the identity of misincorporated bases is influenced by local sequence context. We performed molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the structural basis for lesion bypass. Our results suggest that hydrogen bonds between the benzo[a]pyrenyl moiety and nearby bases limit the movement of the templating base to maintain the anti glycosidic bond conformation in the binary complex in a 5'-CAGA*TT-3' sequence. This facilitates correct incorporation of dT via a Watson-Crick pair. In a 5'-TTTA*GA-3' sequence the lesion does not form these hydrogen bonds, permitting dA* to rotate around the glycosidic bond to syn and incorporate dT via a Hoogsteen pair. With syn dA*, there is also an opportunity for increased misincorporation of dGTP. These results expand our understanding of the versatility and flexibility of polymerase iota and its lesion bypass functions in humans.

  12. Brain Lesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don't look like normal brain tissue. Usually, a brain lesion is an incidental finding unrelated to the condition or symptom that led to the imaging test in the first place. ...

  13. Direct analysis of tobacco-specific nitrosamine NNK and its metabolite NNAL in human urine by LC-MS/MS: evidence of linkage to methylated DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chiung-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Chen, Jian-Lian; Tam, Lai-Man; Chao, Mu-Rong

    2014-02-01

    4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and its urinary metabolite, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), are the most investigated carcinogenic biomarkers of tobacco-specific nitrosamines. Here, we report the development of a sensitive and selective assay based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to simultaneously measure urinary NNK and NNAL. With the use of isotope internal standards and online solid-phase extraction, urine samples were directly analyzed without prior sample purification. The detection limits of this method were 0.13 and 0.19 pg on column for NNK and NNAL, respectively. Inter- and intra-day imprecision was <10 %. Mean recovery of NNK and NNAL in urine was 99-100 %. This method was applied to measure urinary NNK and NNAL in 101 smokers and 40 nonsmokers to assess tobacco exposure. Urinary nicotine, cotinine, N3-methyladenine (N3-MeA), and N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG) were also measured by isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS methods. The results showed that urinary NNK was not observed in all smokers. Urinary free NNAL (0.10 ± 0.09 ng/mg creatinine) and total NNAL (0.17 ± 0.14 ng/mg creatinine) were detected in all smokers. Urinary concentrations of NNAL were significantly correlated with nicotine, cotinine, N3-MeA, and N7-MeG in smokers (P < 0.001). This method enables the direct and simultaneous measurement of NNK and NNAL in urine using only 50 μL of urine. This study first demonstrated in human that urinary tobacco-specific nitrosamines metabolite (NNAL) are highly correlated with their resulting methylated DNA lesions in urine, which may help to substantiate an increased cancer risk associated with tobacco smoke exposure.

  14. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  15. Repair of UV-induced DNA lesions in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomeres is moderated by Sir2 and Sir3, and inhibited by yKu-Sir4 interaction.

    PubMed

    Guintini, Laetitia; Tremblay, Maxime; Toussaint, Martin; D'Amours, Annie; Wellinger, Ralf E; Wellinger, Raymund J; Conconi, Antonio

    2017-02-21

    Ultraviolet light (UV) causes DNA damage that is removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER). UV-induced DNA lesions must be recognized and repaired in nucleosomal DNA, higher order structures of chromatin and within different nuclear sub-compartments. Telomeric DNA is made of short tandem repeats located at the ends of chromosomes and their maintenance is critical to prevent genome instability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the chromatin structure of natural telomeres is distinctive and contingent to telomeric DNA sequences. Namely, nucleosomes and Sir proteins form the heterochromatin like structure of X-type telomeres, whereas a more open conformation is present at Y'-type telomeres. It is proposed that there are no nucleosomes on the most distal telomeric repeat DNA, which is bound by a complex of proteins and folded into higher order structure. How these structures affect NER is poorly understood. Our data indicate that the X-type, but not the Y'-type, sub-telomeric chromatin modulates NER, a consequence of Sir protein-dependent nucleosome stability. The telomere terminal complex also prevents NER, however, this effect is largely dependent on the yKu-Sir4 interaction, but Sir2 and Sir3 independent.

  16. Human papillomavirus in oral lesions.

    PubMed

    González, Joaquín V; Gutiérrez, Rafael A; Keszler, Alicia; Colacino, Maria del Carmen; Alonio, Lidia V; Teyssie, Angelica R; Picconi, Maria Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral cancer; however its involvement is still controversial. This study evaluates the frequency of HPV DNA in a variety of oral lesions in patients from Argentina. A total of 77 oral tissue samples from 66 patients were selected (cases); the clinical-histopathological diagnoses corresponded to: 11 HPV- associated benign lesions, 8 non-HPV associated benign lesions, 33 premalignant lesions and 25 cancers. Sixty exfoliated cell samples from normal oral mucosa were used as controls. HPV detection and typing were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers MY09, 11, combined with RFLP or alternatively PCR using primers GP5+, 6+ combined with dot blot hybridization. HPV was detected in 91.0% of HPV- associated benign lesions, 14.3% of non-HPV associated benign lesions, 51.5% of preneoplasias and 60.0% of cancers. No control sample tested HPV positive. In benign HPV- associated lesions, 30.0% of HPV positive samples harbored high-risk types, while in preneoplastic lesions the value rose to 59.9%. In cancer lesions, HPV detection in verrucous carcinoma was 88.9% and in squamous cell carcinoma 43.8%, with high-risk type rates of 75.5% and 85.6%, respectively. The high HPV frequency detected in preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions supports an HPV etiological role in at least a subset of oral cancers.

  17. Pink lesions.

    PubMed

    Giacomel, Jason; Zalaudek, Iris

    2013-10-01

    Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy or surface microscopy) is an ancillary dermatologic tool that in experienced hands can improve the accuracy of diagnosis of a variety of benign and malignant pigmented skin tumors. The early and more accurate diagnosis of nonpigmented, or pink, tumors can also be assisted by dermoscopy. This review focuses on the dermoscopic diagnosis of pink lesions, with emphasis on blood vessel morphology and pattern. A 3-step algorithm is presented, which facilitates the timely and more accurate diagnosis of pink tumors and subsequently guides the management for such lesions.

  18. Imperfect DNA lesion repair in the semiconservative quasispecies model: Derivation of the Hamming class equations and solution of the single-fitness peak landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Sherley, James L.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2004-12-01

    This paper develops a Hamming class formalism for the semiconservative quasispecies equations with imperfect lesion repair, first presented and analytically solved in Y. Brumer and E.I. Shakhnovich (q-bio.GN/0403018, 2004). Starting from the quasispecies dynamics over the space of genomes, we derive an equivalent dynamics over the space of ordered sequence pairs. From this set of equations, we are able to derive the infinite sequence length form of the dynamics for a class of fitness landscapes defined by a master genome. We use these equations to solve for a generalized single-fitness-peak landscape, where the master genome can sustain a maximum number of lesions and remain viable. We determine the mean equilibrium fitness and error threshold for this class of landscapes, and show that when lesion repair is imperfect, semiconservative replication displays characteristics from both conservative replication and semiconservative replication with perfect lesion repair. The work presented here provides a formulation of the model which greatly facilitates the analysis of a relatively broad class of fitness landscapes, and thus serves as a convenient springboard into biological applications of imperfect lesion repair.

  19. Relationship between DNA mismatch repair genes expression, Ku-genes expression and ploidy-related parameters in the progression of pigmented lesions of the skin.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Tscherny, Michael; Stachura, Jerzy; Ruschenburg, Ilka; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Defects of DNA repair systems in cutaneous tumours are related to DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, PMS1, PMS2) and Ku70/80 genes involved in double- strand repair. In this study we investigated the statistical relationship between these systems and DNA-ploidy-related parameters in 19 naevus cell naevi, 23 lentigos maligna, 76 primary melanomas and 31 melanoma metastases, applying the correlation coefficient according to Spearman. In naevi significant correlations were found between Ku70/80 gene expression and some ploidy-related parameters. In lentigos, additionally, some significant correlations between the expression of DNA mismatch repair genes were found. Similar results were demonstrated for primary melanomas. In metastases no one significant correlation between DNA mismatch repair genes and Ku-genes was present. We postulate that DNA mismatch repair genes and Ku70/80 genes are functionally independent and that some of them are able to influence ploidy-related parameters.

  20. DNA Lesions in Medaka (o. latipes): Development of a Micro-Method for Tissue Analysis Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-29

    Imlay, J.A., Chin S.M., and Linn, S. Toxic DNA damage by hydrogen peroxide through the Fenton reaction in vivo and in vitro . 1988. Science 240 (4852...carcinogenesis was obtained when it was shown that 8-OH-Gua was misread in a DNA synthesis system in vitro with E. coli (20). In fact, the presence...represent a growing body of evidence implicating the OOH in DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Formation of the hydroxyl radical The reduction of molecular

  1. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  2. Rad18 is required for functional interactions between FANCD2, BRCA2, and Rad51 to repair DNA topoisomerase 1-poisons induced lesions and promote fork recovery

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Mani, Chinnadurai; Clark, David W; Palle, Komaraiah

    2016-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) and its analogues are chemotherapeutic agents that covalently and reversibly link DNA Topoisomerase I to its nicked DNA intermediate eliciting the formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) during replication. The repair of these DSB involves multiple DNA damage response and repair proteins. Here we demonstrate that CPT-induced DNA damage promotes functional interactions between BRCA2, FANCD2, Rad18, and Rad51 to repair the replication-associated DSB through homologous recombination (HR). Loss of any of these proteins leads to equal disruption of HR repair, causes chromosomal aberrations and sensitizes cells to CPT. Rad18 appears to function upstream in this repair pathway as its downregulation prevents activation of FANCD2, diminishes BRCA2 and Rad51 protein levels, formation of nuclear foci of all three proteins and recovery of stalled or collapsed replication forks in response to CPT. Taken together this work further elucidates the complex interplay of DNA repair proteins in the repair of replication-associated DSB. PMID:26871286

  3. Identification of the major lesion from the reaction of an acridine-targeted aniline mustard with DNA as an adenine N1 adduct.

    PubMed

    Boritzki, T J; Palmer, B D; Coddington, J M; Denny, W A

    1994-01-01

    DNA adducts of two acridine-linked aniline half-mustards have been isolated and identified. The compound where the half-mustard is attached to the DNA-targeting acridine moiety by a short linker chain alkylates both double- and single-stranded DNA exclusively at guanine N7, as do the majority of known aromatic and aliphatic nitrogen mustards. The longer-chain analogue, also containing a more reactive half-mustard, shows a strikingly different pattern, alkylating double-stranded DNA to yield primarily (> 90%) the adenine N1 adduct, together with < 10% of the adenine N3 adduct and only trace amounts of the guanine N7 adduct. In the presence of MgCl2 (which is known not to inhibit the interaction of drugs at minor groove sites), the adenine N3 adduct is the major product. The latter compound is the first known aniline mustard (and apparently the first known alkylating agent of any type) to preferentially alkylate adenine at the N1 position in duplex DNA. These results are consistent with previous work [Prakash et al. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9799-9807], which showed that the preferred site of DNA alkylation by the corresponding long-chain acridine-linked aniline bis-mustards in general was at major groove sites of adenines and identifies the major site of alkylation as adenine N1 and not N7. This selectivity for adenine N1 alkylation is suggested to result from a preference for the acridine mustard side chain of these compounds to project into the major groove following intercalation of the acridine, coupled with structural distortion of the DNA helix to make the N1 positions of adenines adjacent to the intercalation sites more accessible.

  4. Cytologic findings, and feline herpesvirus DNA and Chlamydophila felis antigen detection rates in normal cats and cats with conjunctival and corneal lesions.

    PubMed

    Volopich, Sabine; Benetka, Viviane; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Möstl, Karin; Sommerfeld-Stur, Irene; Nell, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Samples were collected from 36 cats with feline herpesvirus (FHV-1)-related ocular disease (conjunctivitis, epithelial or stromal keratitis, or corneal sequestration), and 17 cats without ocular changes. Corneoconjunctival swabs, scrapings and biopsies were tested in various combinations for presence of FHV-1 DNA using single round (sr) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nested PCR (nPCR). Additional swabs from the inferior conjunctival fornix were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Chlamydophila felis antigen. Cytologic evaluation was carried out on conjunctival (cats with conjunctivitis) and corneal (cats with keratitis) cytobrush preparations. FHV-1 DNA was detected by PCR in 14 (39%) cats with ocular disease and 1 (6%) of the control group. Agreement between srPCR and nPCR results was significant (P < 0.01). FHV-1 DNA was detected in 3/7 cats with conjunctivitis, 5/6 cats with epithelial keratitis, 3/11 cats with stromal keratitis, and 3/12 cats with corneal sequestration. There was a significant association (P = 0.0027) between viral presence and epithelial keratitis. However, no significant association was found between viral presence and conjunctivitis (P = 0.059), stromal keratitis (P = 0.15), or corneal sequestration (P = 0.18). With respect to FHV-1 DNA detection, intersample agreement was significant (P < 0.03). No sampling technique seemed more likely than another to harvest detectable viral DNA, except for cats with corneal sequestrum in which viral DNA was not detected using corneoconjunctival swabs. FHV-1 DNA was detected in 6/9 samples with intranuclear inclusion bodies and in 6/7 cats with eosinophils on cytologic examination. All samples tested negative for C. felis antigen.

  5. Chemopreventive effect of Copaifera langsdorffii leaves hydroalcoholic extract on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced DNA damage and preneoplastic lesions in rat colon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Natural antioxidants present in common foods and beverages have drawn great attention to cancer prevention due to its health benefits, remarkable lack of toxicity and side effects. Copaifera langsdorffii, known as “copaiba”, “capaiva”, or “pau-de-óleo“, belongs to the Leguminosae family and occurs in fields and grasslands in the northern and northeastern parts of Brazil. Biological studies of Copaifera corroborate its widespread use by the population. This paper describes the effects of C. langsdorffii leaves hydroalcoholic extract on the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced DNA damage and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colon of male Wistar rats. Methods The hydroalcoholic extract of C. langsdorffii was administered to rats by gavage at daily doses of 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg body weight. To evaluate DNA damage by the comet assay, animals received the C. langsdorffii extract for seven days and a single subcutaneous injection (sc) of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) at a dose of 40 mg/kg on day 7. Animals were sacrificed 4 h after injection of DMH, to assess DNA damage. For the ACF assay, animals were acclimatized for one week (week 1) and then treated with the C. langsdorffii extract five times a week for four weeks (weeks 2 to 5). The rats received sc injections of DMH (40 mg/kg) on days 2 and 5 of weeks 2 and 3, to induce ACF. Animals were euthanized at week 5; i.e., four weeks after the first DMH treatment. Results Animals treated with different doses of the C. langsdorffii extract combined with DMH had significantly lower frequency of DNA damage as compared with the positive control (animals treated with DMH only). The percentage of reduction in the frequency of DNA damage ranged from 14.30% to 38.8%. The groups treated with 40 and 80 mg/kg C. langsdorffii extract during and after DMH treatment presented significantly lower numbers of ACF and aberrant crypts compared with the control. Conclusion The C. langsdorffii extract significantly reduced

  6. No detection of HTLV-I proviral DNA in lesional skin biopsies from Swiss and German patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Böni, R; Davis-Daneshfar, A; Burg, G; Fuchs, D; Wood, G S

    1996-02-01

    The search for an infective agent linked to cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) has also included the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). Using sensitive techniques such as Southern blotting under low stringency conditions of hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primer sets designed to match pol, env and pX sequences of HTLV-I, we have screened lesional skin biopsies of 50 Swiss and German patients suffering from CTCL. No evidence of proviral integration of HTLV-I could be demonstrated in any of our patients. Our results, as well as a review of the literature, indicate that at least for European patients, HTLV-I does not seem to play a role in the aetiology of CTCL.

  7. Oxidative DNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik E

    2005-07-01

    Oxidative DNA modifications are frequent in mammalian DNA and have been suggested an important mechanism in carcinogenesis, diabetes and ageing. The foundations for this suggestion are: Evidence for the importance of oxidative DNA modifications in cancer development is: high levels of oxidative lesions in cancer tissue; highly conserved and specific DNA repair systems targeting oxidative lesions; high levels of oxidative DNA lesions in oxidative DNA repair knock-out animals; defective repair of oxidative lesions in cancer-prone progeria syndromes; reduced cancer incidence in populations with high dietary antioxidant intake; and increased oxidative stress to DNA in tobacco smokers. Conflicting evidence for a relation between oxidative stress to DNA and cancer is: disagreement about the true levels and occurrence of the oxidative lesions in vivo; failure to identify the localization of oxidative lesions in important genes, e.g. tumor suppressor and oncogenes; lack of evidence that the oxidative lesions induce mutations in vivo; no cancer development in animals knocked-out for specific DNA repair enzymes in spite of high tissue levels of oxidative lesions; and unchanged cancer rates after antioxidant interventions in large clinical controlled and randomized trials. The rate of DNA oxidation has been estimated from urinary excretion of repair products and it is evident that if these lesions were not repaired, a large part of DNA would be oxidized to a degree not compatible with living. The methodologies by which oxidative DNA modifications are measured cover a wide and different range, advantages and disadvantages will be presented. One particular problem is artificial oxidation, and methods to prevent such artifacts will be presented together with results from a large interlaboratory standardization program. The methodology by which the lesions can be measured is complicated and prone to artifacts during DNA isolation, digestion, derivatization and maybe even during

  8. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  9. Geranylgeraniol and beta-ionone inhibit hepatic preneoplastic lesions, cell proliferation, total plasma cholesterol and DNA damage during the initial phases of hepatocarcinogenesis, but only the former inhibits NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    de Moura Espíndola, Roseli; Mazzantini, Rogério Pietro; Ong, Thomas Prates; de Conti, Aline; Heidor, Renato; Moreno, Fernando Salvador

    2005-06-01

    Chemopreventive activities of the isoprenoids geranylgeraniol (GGO) and beta-ionone (BI) were evaluated during initial phases of hepatocarcinogenesis. Rats received 8 or 16 mg/100 g body wt GGO (GGO8 and GGO16 groups) or BI (BI8 and BI16 groups), or only corn oil (CO group, controls) daily for 7 weeks. Incidence (%) and the mean number of visible hepatocyte nodules/animal were inhibited in the GGO8 (64% and 21 +/- 40), GGO16 (33% and 3 +/- 5), BI8 (50% and 13 +/- 34) and BI16 (42% and 9 +/- 19) groups compared with the CO group (100% and 34 +/- 51) (P < 0.05, except for the GGO8 group). Number/cm(2) liver section, mean area (mm(2)) and % liver section area occupied by persistent hepatic placental glutathione S-transferase positive preneoplastic lesions (PNL) were reduced in the GGO8 (11 +/- 9; 0.26 +/- 0.35; 2.7 +/- 3.0), GGO16 (6 +/- 6; 0.18 +/- 0.16; 0.9 +/- 0.9), BI8 (9 +/- 5; 0.13 +/- 0.20; 1.1 +/- 1.2) and BI16 (8 +/- 6; 0.08 +/- 0.09; 0.6 +/- 0.4) groups compared with the CO group (26 +/- 18; 0.29 +/- 0.34; 7.0 +/- 5.5) (P < 0.05). GGO16 and BI16 groups showed smaller visible hepatocyte nodules, reduced PNL cell proliferation and total plasma cholesterol levels compared with the CO group (P < 0.05), but did not show any differences (P > 0.05) in PNL apoptosis. DNA damage expressed as comet length (microm) was reduced in the GGO8 (96.7 +/- 1.5), GGO16 (94.2 +/- 1.5), BI8 (97.1 +/- 1.1) and BI16 (95.1 +/- 1.5) groups compared with the CO group (102.1 +/- 1.7) (P < 0.05). In comparison with normal animals, the CO group animals showed increased (P < 0.05) nuclear levels of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) p65 subunit in hepatic cells, which were decreased (P < 0.05) in the GGO16 group animals. Anticarcinogenic actions of these isoprenoids seem to follow a dose-response relationship. Results indicate that GGO and BI could be represented as promising chemopreventive agents against hepatocarcinogenesis. Inhibition of cell proliferation and DNA damage seems to be

  10. Simultaneous Detection of 3-Nitrotyrosine and 3-Nitro-4-hydroxyphenylacetic Acid in Human Urine by Online SPE LC-MS/MS and Their Association with Oxidative and Methylated DNA Lesions.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mu-Rong; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Hung-Hsin; Lin, Jia-Hong; Hu, Chiung-Wen

    2015-05-18

    Reactive nitrogen species (RNS) can modify proteins at tyrosine and tryptophan residues, and they are involved in the pathogenesis of various human diseases. In this study, we present the first liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based method that enables the simultaneous measurement of urinary 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NTYR) and its metabolite 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (NHPA). After the addition of stable isotope-labeled internal standards, urine samples were purified and enriched using manual solid-phase extraction (SPE) and HPLC fractionation followed by online SPE LC-MS/MS analysis. The limits of quantification in urine were 3.1 and 2.5 pg/mL for 3-NTYR and NHPA, respectively. Inter- and intraday imprecision was <15%. The mean relative recoveries of 3-NTYR and NHPA in urine were 89-98% and 90-98%, respectively. We further applied this method to 65 urinary samples from healthy subjects. Urinary samples were also analyzed for N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) as well as oxidative and methylated DNA lesions, namely, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo), N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG), and N3-methyladenine (N3-MeA), using reported LC-MS/MS methods. Urinary 3-NTYR and NHPA levels were measured at concentrations of 63.2 ± 51.5 and 77.4 ± 60.8 pg/mL, respectively. Urinary 3-NTYR and NHPA levels were highly correlated with each other and with 8-oxoGua and 8-oxodGuo. Our findings demonstrated that a relationship exists between oxidative and nitrative stress. However, 3-NTYR and NHPA were correlated with N7-MeG and N3-MeA but not with NDMA, suggesting that NDMA may not be a representative biomarker of N-nitroso compounds that are induced by RNS.

  11. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  12. Condylomatous genital lesions in cynomolgus macaques from Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Harari, Ariana; Wood, Charles E; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Chen, Zigui; Domaingue, Marie Claire; Elmore, David; Koenig, Patricia; Wagner, Janice D; Jennings, Ryan N; Burk, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    Genital condyloma-like lesions were observed on male and female cynomolgus macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) originating from the island of Mauritius. Cytobrush and/or biopsy samples were obtained from lesions of 57 affected macaques. Primary histologic features included eosinophilic, neutrophilic, and lymphoplasmacytic penile and vulvar inflammation, epidermal hyperplasia with acanthosis, and increased collagenous stroma. Polymerase chain reaction-based assays to amplify viral DNA revealed the presence of macaque lymphocryptovirus (LCV) DNA but not papillomavirus or poxvirus DNA. Subsequent DNA analyses of 3 genomic regions of LCV identified isolates associated with lesions in 19/25 (76%) biopsies and 19/57 (33%) cytology samples. Variable immunolabeling for proteins related to the human LCV Epstein Barr Virus was observed within intralesional plasma cells, stromal cells, and epithelial cells. Further work is needed to characterize the epidemiologic features of these lesions and their association with LCV infection in Mauritian-origin macaques.

  13. Association of Malassezia species with psoriatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M; Honnavar, Prasanna; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Dogra, Sunil; Singh, Pankaj; Handa, Sanjeev

    2014-08-01

    The aetiology of psoriasis remains elusive. Among multiple factors hypothesised, association of Malassezia spp. is supported by response to topical antifungals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of Malassezia spp. with psoriatic lesion. The subjects included 50 consecutive patients with psoriasis, and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Samples were collected using scotch tape over one square inch area from the lesional and non-lesional sites. The isolated Malassezia spp. were identified by phenotypic methods and confirmed by ITS2 PCR-RFLP and sequencing of D1/D2 region of 26S rDNA. Psoriatic lesions were seen commonly on scalp (28%, 14), chest (22%, 11) and arms (16%, 8). Majority of cases presented with chronic plaque form (76%, 38; P < 0.05). From psoriatic lesions, most frequently isolated Malassezia species was M. furfur (70.6%, 24), followed by M. japonica (11.8%, 4) and M. globosa (8.8%, 3). From healthy individuals M. furfur, M. sympodialis, mixture of M. furfur and M. globosa was isolated in 73.3%, 10% and 16.7% (22, 3 and 5) of cases respectively. The average number of colonies isolated from scalp lesions of the patients was significantly higher (P = 0.03) than healthy areas. Although no strong association of Malassezia species was formed with psoriatic lesion in general, the fungi may play a role in exacerbation of scalp psoriasis.

  14. Aetiology of abfraction lesions.

    PubMed

    Lyons, K

    2001-09-01

    The aetiology of abfraction lesions is complex. Most evidence indicates that physical loading forces are a major contributing factor, although they are unlikely to be entirely responsible. Intraoral chemical influences and toothbrush abrasion, combined with the dynamics of inter-occlusal activity such as chewing, swallowing, and parafunction, lead to stress corrosion and may contribute to abfraction lesions. The multifactorial aetiology that operates in the initiation and progression of these lesions has made investigation difficult. Various theories have been proposed and numerous surveys and studies conducted, but the primary causal factor has yet to be definitively determined. This review concludes that occlusal loading is the initiating factor in the development of abfraction lesions.

  15. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  16. Oxidative damage in multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Haider, Lukas; Fischer, Marie T; Frischer, Josa M; Bauer, Jan; Höftberger, Romana; Botond, Gergö; Esterbauer, Harald; Binder, Christoph J; Witztum, Joseph L; Lassmann, Hans

    2011-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, associated with demyelination and neurodegeneration. The mechanisms of tissue injury are currently poorly understood, but recent data suggest that mitochondrial injury may play an important role in this process. Since mitochondrial injury can be triggered by reactive oxygen and nitric oxide species, we analysed by immunocytochemistry the presence and cellular location of oxidized lipids and oxidized DNA in lesions and in normal-appearing white matter of 30 patients with multiple sclerosis and 24 control patients without neurological disease or brain lesions. As reported before in biochemical studies, oxidized lipids and DNA were highly enriched in active multiple sclerosis plaques, predominantly in areas that are defined as initial or 'prephagocytic' lesions. Oxidized DNA was mainly seen in oligodendrocyte nuclei, which in part showed signs of apoptosis. In addition, a small number of reactive astrocytes revealed nuclear expression of 8-hydroxy-d-guanosine. Similarly, lipid peroxidation-derived structures (malondialdehyde and oxidized phospholipid epitopes) were seen in the cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes and some astrocytes. In addition, oxidized phospholipids were massively accumulated in a fraction of axonal spheroids with disturbed fast axonal transport as well as in neurons within grey matter lesions. Neurons stained for oxidized phospholipids frequently revealed signs of degeneration with fragmentation of their dendritic processes. The extent of lipid and DNA oxidation correlated significantly with inflammation, determined by the number of CD3 positive T cells and human leucocyte antigen-D expressing macrophages and microglia in the lesions. Our data suggest profound oxidative injury of oligodendrocytes and neurons to be associated with active demyelination and axonal or neuronal injury in multiple sclerosis.

  17. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-09-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations.

  18. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  19. Incidental vertebral lesions.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Walcott, Brian P

    2011-12-01

    Incidental vertebral lesions on imaging of the spine are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Contributing factors include the aging population, the increasing prevalence of back pain, and increased usage of MR imaging. Additionally, refinements in CT and MR imaging have increased the number of demonstrable lesions. The management of incidental findings varies among practitioners and commonly depends more on practice style than on data or guidelines. In this article we review incidental findings within the vertebral column and review management of these lesions, based on available Class III data.

  20. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  1. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  2. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal; Basal cell cancer - removal; Actinic keratosis - removal; Wart - removal; Squamous cell - removal; Mole - removal; Nevus - removal; ... can remove: Benign or pre-malignant skin lesions Warts Moles Sunspots Hair Small blood vessels in the ...

  3. Bilateral lacrimal caruncle lesions

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Yuta; Takai, Yoshiko; Yasuda, Shunsuke; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the treatment of a lesion on the medial lacrimal canthus of both eyes. He had a history of perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, i.e., pANCA-positive interstitial pneumonia. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging excluded space occupying lesions, and laboratory testing excluded thyroid-related diseases. The masses were excised, and histopathological examinations showed sebaceous gland hyperplasia and inflammatory changes around the gland. In addition, the specimen from the left eye showed a retention cyst possibly caused by an infection. It was also possible that the use of steroid was involved in the development of the lesions. A relationship between the ANCA and the lesions was not completely eliminated. PMID:28303065

  4. Effect of Base-Pairing Partner on the Thermodynamic Stability of the Diastereomeric Spiroiminodihydantoin Lesion.

    PubMed

    Gruessner, Brian; Dwarakanath, Megana; Stewart, Elizabeth; Bae, Yoon; Jamieson, Elizabeth R

    2016-03-21

    Oxidation of guanine by reactive oxygen species and high valent metals produces damaging DNA base lesions like 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG). 8-oxoG can be further oxidized to form the spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) lesion, which is even more mutagenic. DNA polymerases preferentially incorporate purines opposite the Sp lesion, and DNA glycosylases excise the Sp lesion from the duplex, although the rate of repair is different for the two Sp diastereomers. To further understand the biological processing of the Sp lesion, differential scanning calorimetry studies were performed on a series of 15-mer DNA duplexes. The thermal and thermodynamic stabilities of each of the Sp diastereomers paired to the four standard DNA bases were investigated. It was found that, regardless of the base-pairing partner, the Sp lesion was always highly destabilizing in terms of DNA melting temperature, enthalpic stability, and overall duplex free energy. We found no significant differences between the two Sp diastereomers, but changing the base-pairing partner of the Sp lesion produced slight differences in stability. Specifically, duplexes with Sp:C pairings were always the most destabilized, whereas pairing the Sp lesion with a purine base modestly increased stability. Overall, these results suggest that, although the stability of the Sp diastereomers cannot explain the differences in the rates of repair by DNA glycosylases, the most stable base-pairing partners do correspond with the nucleotide preference of DNA polymerases.

  5. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  6. Intraventricular mass lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.; Sobel, D.F.; Kelley, W.M.; Norman, D.

    1984-11-01

    Determining the precise etiology of an intraventricular mass can be a difficult diagnostic problem. CT and angiographic findings were reviewed in a series of 73 patients who had intraventricular masses. The histologic diagnosis can be suggested preoperatively by an analysis of the frequency of lesions occurring at a given ventricular location, lesion density before and after administration of contrast material, age, and sex of the patient, morphologic appearance of the mass, and presence or absence of hydrocephalus. Angiography is useful when meningioma, choroid plexus papilloma and carcinoma, or arteriovenous malformation are considered.

  7. T7 replisome directly overcomes DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Pandey, Manjula; Inman, James T.; Yang, Yi; Kashlev, Mikhail; Patel, Smita S.; Wang, Michelle D.

    2015-12-01

    Cells and viruses possess several known `restart' pathways to overcome lesions during DNA replication. However, these `bypass' pathways leave a gap in replicated DNA or require recruitment of accessory proteins, resulting in significant delays to fork movement or even cell division arrest. Using single-molecule and ensemble methods, we demonstrate that the bacteriophage T7 replisome is able to directly replicate through a leading-strand cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesion. We show that when a replisome encounters the lesion, a substantial fraction of DNA polymerase (DNAP) and helicase stay together at the lesion, the replisome does not dissociate and the helicase does not move forward on its own. The DNAP is able to directly replicate through the lesion by working in conjunction with helicase through specific helicase-DNAP interactions. These observations suggest that the T7 replisome is fundamentally permissive of DNA lesions via pathways that do not require fork adjustment or replisome reassembly.

  8. In-vitro replication of UV-irradiated DNA by human cell extracts: Evidence that xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XP-V) cells bypass lesions in an abnormal, error-prone manner

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, W.G.; Nadas, K.; Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    Despite a normal rate of excision repair, XP-V cells are extremely sensitive to UV mutagenicity and abnormally slow in replicating DNA that contains photoproducts. Furthermore, the kinds of mutations induced by UV{sub 254} in the endogenous HPRT gene differ significantly from those of normal cells. Using a replication fidelity assay developed by Kunkel and coworkers, we are testing the hypothesis that the DNA replication complex in XP-V cells is defective when replicating DNA containing UV damage. We compared the frequency of mutants generated during T-antigen-dependent replication of unirradiated and UV{sub 254}-irradiated DNA by extracts from HeLa and XP-V cells. The mutational target was the E. coli lacZ{alpha} gene inserted in SV40 ori-containing M13mp2 (M13mp2SV). With undamaged DNA, neither extract showed an increase in mutant frequency above what is seen with unreplicated M13mp2SV. The presence of an average of five pyrimidine dimers per phage reduced replication by HeLa extract 35% and increased the mutant frequency 5-fold. With XP-V extract these values were 80% and 24-fold, respectively. The mutants are being sequenced to determine whether the kinds of mutations produced by the two extracts differ.

  9. Chronic cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Marchell, Richard M; Judson, Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Sarcoidosis involvement of the skin is common. The skin lesions of sarcoidosis may be nonspecific, showing a nondiagnostic inflammatory reaction pattern on histologic evaluation. Nonspecific skin lesions are often associated with an acute presentation of sarcoidosis and, in general, portend a good prognosis. Specific sarcoidosis skin lesions reveal typical sarcoid granulomas on histologic examination. These lesions tend to be chronic and require therapy for resolution. This article will review the epidemiology, diagnostic evaluation, and description of the various chronic skin lesions of sarcoidosis. Various images of these skin lesions will be demonstrated.

  10. [Managing focal incidental renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, C; Paño, B; Sebastià, C

    2016-01-01

    Incidental renal lesions are relatively common in daily radiological practice. It is important to know the different diagnostic possibilities for incidentally detected lesions, depending on whether they are cystic or solid. The management of cystic lesions is guided by the Bosniak classification. In solid lesions, the goal is to differentiate between renal cancer and benign tumors such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. Radiologists need to know the recommendations for the management of these lesions and the usefulness of the different imaging techniques and interventional procedures in function of the characteristics of the incidental lesion and the patient's life expectancy.

  11. DNA damage, severe organ lesions and high muscle levels of As and Hg in two benthic fish species from a chemical warfare agent dumping site in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Camilla; Petochi, Tommaso; Corsi, Ilaria; Dinardo, Maria Maddalena; Baroni, Davide; Alcaro, Luigi; Focardi, Silvano; Tursi, Angelo; Marino, Giovanna; Frigeri, Antonio; Amato, Ezio

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the environmental threat to benthic species from chemical weapons dumped in the southern Adriatic Sea. An ecotoxicological approach using chemical analysis and biological responses was applied, in two sentinel species: the Blackbelly rosefish Helicolenus dactylopterus and European conger Conger conger. Specimen were collected in a stretch of sea, where had been dumped war materials and from a reference site free of ordnance. Residues of yperite, Hg and As were measured in fish fillets. Skin, liver, kidney and spleen were examined for histopathological and macroscopical lesions. Liver detoxifying capacities (EROD and UDPGT) and genotoxicity (comet assay) were also investigated. As and Hg levels were three-four times higher than those from the reference site in both species (p<0.001). Both species captured in dumping site showed clear signs of chronic illness according to the health assessment index (HAI). Deep ulcers and nodules were observed on skin and external organs. Histological lesions such as periportal and bile duct fibrosis, pericholangitis, steatosis, granuloma and elevated splenic MMCs were detected in liver and spleen. Significantly higher EROD activities were also found in both species from dumping site (p<0.01). Comet assay revealed genotoxicty in gills of C. conger from dumping site, indicating uptake of chemical warfare agents through fish gills. European conger was found to be a more sensitive bioindicator of this type of contamination than the Blackbelly rosefish.

  12. Gram stain of skin lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Skin lesion gram stain Images Viral lesion culture References Hall GS, Woods GL. Medical bacteriology. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  13. Electrocatalysis in DNA Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Ariel; Hill, Michael G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysis is often thought of solely in the inorganic realm, most often applied to energy conversion in fuel cells. However, the ever-growing field of bioelectrocatalysis has made great strides in advancing technology for both biofuel cells as well as biological detection platforms. Within the context of bioelectrocatalytic detection systems, DNA-based platforms are especially prevalent. One subset of these platforms, the one we have developed, takes advantage of the inherent charge transport properties of DNA. Electrocatalysis coupled with DNA-mediated charge transport has enabled specific and sensitive detection of lesions, mismatches and DNA-binding proteins. Even greater signal amplification from these platforms is now being achieved through the incorporation of a secondary electrode to the platform both for patterning DNA arrays and for detection. Here, we describe the evolution of this new DNA sensor technology. PMID:25435647

  14. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-05-14

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA.

  15. Klatskin-Like Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Senthil Kumar, M. P.; Marudanayagam, R.

    2012-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinoma, also known as Klatskin tumour, is the commonest type of cholangiocarcinoma. It poses unique problems in the diagnosis and management because of its anatomical location. Curative surgery in the form of major hepatic resection entails significant morbidity. About 5–15% of specimens resected for presumed Klatskin tumour prove not to be cholangiocarcinomas. There are a number of inflammatory, infective, vascular, and other pathologies, which have overlapping clinical and radiological features with a Klatskin tumour, leading to misinterpretation. This paper aims to summarise the features of such Klatskin-like lesions that have been reported in surgical literature. PMID:22811587

  16. Cystic Lesions of the Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Daniel; Suby-Long, Thomas; Restrepo, Carlos S

    2016-06-01

    Cystic lesions are commonly seen in the mediastinum, and they may arise from virtually any organ. The vast majority of these lesions are benign and result in no symptoms. When large, cysts may produce symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures. The most common mediastinal cysts are pericardial and foregut duplication cysts. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance are routinely used to evaluate these lesions. Although computed tomography offers superior spatial resolution, magnetic resonance is useful in differentiating cysts that contain proteinaceous material from solid lesions. Occasionally, cysts arise from solid lesions, such as thymoma or teratoma. Although cysts are alike in appearance, location helps narrowing the differential diagnoses.

  17. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  18. Databases and Bioinformatics Tools for the Study of DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Milanowska, Kaja; Rother, Kristian; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2011-01-01

    DNA is continuously exposed to many different damaging agents such as environmental chemicals, UV light, ionizing radiation, and reactive cellular metabolites. DNA lesions can result in different phenotypical consequences ranging from a number of diseases, including cancer, to cellular malfunction, cell death, or aging. To counteract the deleterious effects of DNA damage, cells have developed various repair systems, including biochemical pathways responsible for the removal of single-strand lesions such as base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) or specialized polymerases temporarily taking over lesion-arrested DNA polymerases during the S phase in translesion synthesis (TLS). There are also other mechanisms of DNA repair such as homologous recombination repair (HRR), nonhomologous end-joining repair (NHEJ), or DNA damage response system (DDR). This paper reviews bioinformatics resources specialized in disseminating information about DNA repair pathways, proteins involved in repair mechanisms, damaging agents, and DNA lesions. PMID:22091405

  19. Widespread telomere instability in prostatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Tu, LiRen; Huda, Nazmul; Grimes, Brenda R; Slee, Roger B; Bates, Alison M; Cheng, Liang; Gilley, David

    2016-05-01

    A critical function of the telomere is to disguise chromosome ends from cellular recognition as double strand breaks, thereby preventing aberrant chromosome fusion events. Such chromosome end-to-end fusions are known to initiate genomic instability via breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. Telomere dysfunction and other forms of genomic assault likely result in misregulation of genes involved in growth control, cell death, and senescence pathways, lowering the threshold to malignancy and likely drive disease progression. Shortened telomeres and anaphase bridges have been reported in a wide variety of early precursor and malignant cancer lesions including those of the prostate. These findings are being extended using methods for the analysis of telomere fusions (decisive genetic markers for telomere dysfunction) specifically within human tissue DNA. Here we report that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and prostate cancer (PCa) prostate lesions all contain similarly high frequencies of telomere fusions and anaphase bridges. Tumor-adjacent, histologically normal prostate tissue generally did not contain telomere fusions or anaphase bridges as compared to matched PCa tissues. However, we found relatively high levels of telomerase activity in this histologically normal tumor-adjacent tissue that was reduced but closely correlated with telomerase levels in corresponding PCa samples. Thus, we present evidence of high levels of telomere dysfunction in BPH, an established early precursor (PIN) and prostate cancer lesions but not generally in tumor adjacent normal tissue. Our results suggest that telomere dysfunction may be a common gateway event leading to genomic instability in prostate tumorigenesis. .

  20. Automated Estimation Of Lesion Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttimann, Urs E.; Webber, Richard L.; Groenhuis, Roelf A. J.; Troullos, Emanuel; Rethman, Michael T.

    1985-06-01

    Two methods were studied of estimating automatically the relative volume of local lesions in digital subtractions radiographs. The first method approximates the projected, lesion area by an equivalent circular area, and the second by an equivalent polygonal area. Lesion volume is estimated in both methods as equivalent area times the average gray-level difference between the detected area and the surrounding background. Regression results of the estimated relative volume versus the calibrated size of lesions induced in dry human mandibles showed the polygonal approximation to be superior. This method also permitted successful monitoring of bone remodelling during the healing process of surgically induced lesions in dogs. The quantitative results, as well as the examples from in vivo lesions demonstrate feasibility and clinically relavance of the methodology.

  1. Fuzzy description of skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskaris, Nikolaos; Ballerini, Lucia; Fisher, Robert B.; Aldridge, Ben; Rees, Jonathan

    2010-02-01

    We propose a system for describing skin lesions images based on a human perception model. Pigmented skin lesions including melanoma and other types of skin cancer as well as non-malignant lesions are used. Works on classification of skin lesions already exist but they mainly concentrate on melanoma. The novelty of our work is that our system gives to skin lesion images a semantic label in a manner similar to humans. This work consists of two parts: first we capture they way users perceive each lesion, second we train a machine learning system that simulates how people describe images. For the first part, we choose 5 attributes: colour (light to dark), colour uniformity (uniform to non-uniform), symmetry (symmetric to non-symmetric), border (regular to irregular), texture (smooth to rough). Using a web based form we asked people to pick a value of each attribute for each lesion. In the second part, we extract 93 features from each lesions and we trained a machine learning algorithm using such features as input and the values of the human attributes as output. Results are quite promising, especially for the colour related attributes, where our system classifies over 80% of the lesions into the same semantic classes as humans.

  2. Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H

    2015-11-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and such lesions can promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5'-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER.

  3. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA Triage of Women with Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance with cobas 4800 HPV and Hybrid Capture 2 Tests for Detection of High-Grade Lesions of the Uterine Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Lapierre, Simon Grandjean; Sauthier, Philippe; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Dufresne, Simon; Petignat, Patrick; Provencher, Diane; Drouin, Pierre; Gauthier, Philippe; Dupuis, Marie-Josée; Michon, Bertrand; Ouellet, Stéphan; Hadjeres, Rachid; Ferenczy, Alex; Franco, Eduardo L.

    2012-01-01

    The triage of women with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive smears for atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) to colposcopy is now an integrated option in clinical guidelines. The performance of cobas 4800 HPV and that of Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) for HR HPV DNA detection in cervical samples in PreservCyt were compared in 396 women referred to colposcopy for ASC-US. Of these, 316 did not have cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), 47 had CIN1, 29 had CIN2 or CIN3 (CIN2+), and 4 had CIN of unknown grade. HR HPV was detected in 129 (32.6%) and 149 (37.6%) samples with HC2 and cobas 4800 HPV, respectively (P = 0.15). The clinical sensitivities and specificities for detecting CIN2+ were 89.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 72.8 to 97.2%) and 66.7% (95% CI, 61.7 to 71.3%) with cobas 4800 HPV and 93.1% (95% CI, 77.0 to 99.2%) and 72.2% (95% CI 67.4 to 76.5%) with HC2. The performance of cobas 4800 HPV was similar to that of HC2 for identifying women with ASC-US who would benefit the most from colposcopy. PMID:22301023

  4. Translesion Synthesis: Insights into the Selection and Switching of DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Linlin; Washington, M. Todd

    2017-01-01

    DNA replication is constantly challenged by DNA lesions, noncanonical DNA structures and difficult-to-replicate DNA sequences. Two major strategies to rescue a stalled replication fork and to ensure continuous DNA synthesis are: (1) template switching and recombination-dependent DNA synthesis; and (2) translesion synthesis (TLS) using specialized DNA polymerases to perform nucleotide incorporation opposite DNA lesions. The former pathway is mainly error-free, and the latter is error-prone and a major source of mutagenesis. An accepted model of translesion synthesis involves DNA polymerase switching steps between a replicative DNA polymerase and one or more TLS DNA polymerases. The mechanisms that govern the selection and exchange of specialized DNA polymerases for a given DNA lesion are not well understood. In this review, recent studies concerning the mechanisms of selection and switching of DNA polymerases in eukaryotic systems are summarized. PMID:28075396

  5. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  6. Fortuitously discovered liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Sharma, Malay; Gibson, Robert N; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jenssen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The fortuitously discovered liver lesion is a common problem. Consensus might be expected in terms of its work-up, and yet there is none. This stems in part from the fact that there is no preventive campaign involving the early detection of liver tumors other than for patients with known liver cirrhosis and oncological patients. The work-up (detection and differential diagnosis) of liver tumors comprises theoretical considerations, history, physical examination, laboratory tests, standard ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound techniques, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as image-guided biopsy. CEUS techniques have proved to be the most pertinent method; these techniques became part of the clinical routine about 10 years ago in Europe and Asia and are used for a variety of indications in daily clinical practice. CEUS is in many cases the first and also decisive technical intervention for detecting and characterizing liver tumors. This development is reflected in many CEUS guidelines, e.g., in the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) guidelines 2004, 2008 and 2012 as well as the recently published World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology-EFSUMB guidelines 2012. This article sets out considerations for making a structured work-up of incidental liver tumors feasible. PMID:23745019

  7. Oxidative Glial Cell Damage Associated with White Matter Lesions in the Aging Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Al-Mashhadi, Sufana; Simpson, Julie E; Heath, Paul R; Dickman, Mark; Forster, Gillian; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol; Ince, Paul G; Wharton, Stephen B

    2015-09-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are common in brain aging and are associated with dementia. We aimed to investigate whether oxidative DNA damage and occur in WML and in apparently normal white matter in cases with lesions. Tissue from WML and control white matter from brains with lesions (controls lesional) and without lesions (controls non-lesional) were obtained, using post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging-guided sampling, from the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study. Oxidative damage was assessed by immunohistochemistry to 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxoguanosine (8-OHdG) and Western blotting for malondialdehyde. DNA response was assessed by phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), p53, senescence markers and by quantitative Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) panel for candidate DNA damage-associated genes. 8-OHdG was expressed in glia and endothelium, with increased expression in both WML and controls lesional compared with controls non-lesional (P < 0.001). γH2Ax showed a similar, although attenuated difference among groups (P = 0.03). Expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase and p16 suggested induction of senescence mechanisms in glia. Oxidative DNA damage and a DNA damage response are features of WML pathogenesis and suggest candidate mechanisms for glial dysfunction. Their expression in apparently normal white matter in cases with WML suggests that white matter dysfunction is not restricted to lesions. The role of this field-effect lesion pathogenesis and cognitive impairment are areas to be defined.

  8. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease.

  9. DNA damage may drive nucleosomal reorganization to facilitate damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGresley, Sarah E.; Wilt, Jamie; Antonik, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    One issue in genome maintenance is how DNA repair proteins find lesions at rates that seem to exceed diffusion-limited search rates. We propose a phenomenon where DNA damage induces nucleosomal rearrangements which move lesions to potential rendezvous points in the chromatin structure. These rendezvous points are the dyad and the linker DNA between histones, positions in the chromatin which are more likely to be accessible by repair proteins engaged in a random search. The feasibility of this mechanism is tested by considering the statistical mechanics of DNA containing a single lesion wrapped onto the nucleosome. We consider lesions which make the DNA either more flexible or more rigid by modeling the lesion as either a decrease or an increase in the bending energy. We include this energy in a partition function model of nucleosome breathing. Our results indicate that the steady state for a breathing nucleosome will most likely position the lesion at the dyad or in the linker, depending on the energy of the lesion. A role for DNA binding proteins and chromatin remodelers is suggested based on their ability to alter the mechanical properties of the DNA and DNA-histone binding, respectively. We speculate that these positions around the nucleosome potentially serve as rendezvous points where DNA lesions may be encountered by repair proteins which may be sterically hindered from searching the rest of the nucleosomal DNA. The strength of the repositioning is strongly dependent on the structural details of the DNA lesion and the wrapping and breathing of the nucleosome. A more sophisticated evaluation of this proposed mechanism will require detailed information about breathing dynamics, the structure of partially wrapped nucleosomes, and the structural properties of damaged DNA.

  10. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  11. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-01-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5. PMID:24324319

  12. No carious cervical lesions: abfraction.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-10-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5.

  13. Dermoscopy of pigmented skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Soyer, H P; Argenziano, G; Chimenti, S; Ruocco, V

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the basic concepts of dermoscopy, the various dermoscopic equipments and the standard criteria for diagnosing pigmented skin lesions. In assessing dermoscopic images, both global and local features can be recognized. These features will be systematically described and illustrated in Part I of this article. First, we will focus on 8 morphologically rather distinctive global features that allow a quick, preliminary categorization of a given pigmented skin lesion. Second, we will describe various local features representing the letters of the dermoscopic alphabet. The local features permit a more detailed assessment of pigmented skin lesions.

  14. Sensitive diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis by lesion swab sampling coupled to qPCR

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, EMILY R.; GOMEZ, MARIA ADELAIDA; SCHESKE, LAURA; RIOS, RUBY; MARQUEZ, RICARDO; COSSIO, ALEXANDRA; ALBERTINI, AUDREY; SCHALLIG, HENK; SARAVIA, NANCY GORE

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Variation in clinical accuracy of molecular diagnostic methods for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is commonly observed depending on the sample source, the method of DNA recovery and the molecular test. Few attempts have been made to compare these variables. Two swab and aspirate samples from lesions of patients with suspected CL (n = 105) were evaluated alongside standard diagnosis by microscopic detection of amastigotes or culture of parasites from lesion material. Three DNA extraction methods were compared: Qiagen on swab and aspirate specimens, Isohelix on swabs and Boil/Spin of lesion aspirates. Recovery of Leishmania DNA was evaluated for each sample type by real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of parasitic 18S rDNA, and the diagnostic accuracy of the molecular method determined. Swab sampling combined with Qiagen DNA extraction was the most efficient recovery method for Leishmania DNA, and was the most sensitive (98%; 95% CI: 91–100%) and specific (84%; 95% CI: 64–95%) approach. Aspirated material was less sensitive at 80% (95% CI: 70–88%) and 61% (95% CI: 50–72%) when coupled to Qiagen or Boil-Spin DNA extraction, respectively. Swab sampling of lesions was painless, simple to perform and coupled with standardized DNA extraction enhances the feasibility of molecular diagnosis of CL. PMID:25111885

  15. Lesions of the avian pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert E; Reavill, Drury R

    2014-01-01

    Although not well described, occasional reports of avian exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease are available. This article describes the lesions associated with common diseases of the avian pancreas reported in the literature and/or seen by the authors.

  16. Herpes viral culture of lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus; Herpes simplex virus culture Images Viral lesion culture References Costello M, Sabatini LM, Yungbluth M. Viral infections. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  17. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  18. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity.

  19. Border preserving skin lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, Mostafa; Samei, Golnoosh

    2008-03-01

    Melanoma is a fatal cancer with a growing incident rate. However it could be cured if diagnosed in early stages. The first step in detecting melanoma is the separation of skin lesion from healthy skin. There are particular features associated with a malignant lesion whose successful detection relies upon accurately extracted borders. We propose a two step approach. First, we apply K-means clustering method (to 3D RGB space) that extracts relatively accurate borders. In the second step we perform an extra refining step for detecting the fading area around some lesions as accurately as possible. Our method has a number of novelties. Firstly as the clustering method is directly applied to the 3D color space, we do not overlook the dependencies between different color channels. In addition, it is capable of extracting fine lesion borders up to pixel level in spite of the difficulties associated with fading areas around the lesion. Performing clustering in different color spaces reveals that 3D RGB color space is preferred. The application of the proposed algorithm to an extensive data-base of skin lesions shows that its performance is superior to that of existing methods both in terms of accuracy and computational complexity.

  20. Simulation of spiculated breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Alrehily, Faisal; Pinto, R. Ferrari; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wells, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials are a promising new approach increasingly used for the evaluation and comparison of breast imaging modalities. A key component in such an assessment paradigm is the use of simulated pathology, in particular, simulation of lesions. Breast mass lesions can be generally classified into two categories based on their appearance; nonspiculated masses and spiculated masses. In our previous work, we have successfully simulated non-spiculated masses using a fractal growth process known as diffusion limited aggregation. In this new work, we have extended the DLA model to simulate spiculated lesions by using features extracted from patient DBT images containing spiculated lesions. The features extracted included spicule length, width, curvature and distribution. This information was used to simulate realistic looking spicules which were attached to the surface of a DLA mass to produce a spiculated mass. A batch of simulated spiculated masses was inserted into normal patient images and presented to an experienced radiologist for review. The study yielded promising results with the radiologist rating 60% of simulated lesions in 2D and 50% of simulated lesions in DBT as realistic.

  1. Pineal lesions: a multidisciplinary challenge.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Manfred; Emami, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    The pineal region is a complex anatomical compartment, harbouring the pineal gland surrounded by the quadrigeminal plate and the confluents of the internal cerebral veins to form the vein of Galen. The complexity of lesions in that region, however, goes far beyond the pineal parenchyma proper. Originating in the pineal gland, there are not only benign cysts but also numerous different tumour types. In addition, lesions such as tectal gliomas, tentorial meningiomas and choroid plexus papillomas arise from the surrounding structures, occupying that regions. Furthermore, the area has an affinity for metastatic lesions. Vascular lesions complete the spectrum mainly as small tectal arteriovenous malformations or cavernous haemangiomas.Taken together, there is a wide spectrum of lesions, many unique to that region, which call for a multidisciplinary approach. The limited access and anatomical complexity have generated a spectrum of anatomical approaches and raised the interest for neuroendoscopic approaches. Equally complex is the spectrum of treatment modalities such as microsurgery as the main option but stereotactic radiosurgery as an alternative or adjuvant to surgery for selected cases, radiation as for germinoma (see below) and or combinatorial chemotherapy, which may need to precede any other ablative technique as constituents.In this context, we review the current literature and our own series to obtain a snapshot sentiment of how to approach pineal lesions, how to interrelate alternative/competing concepts and review the recent technological advances.

  2. Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and they promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5'-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER. PMID:26596511

  3. Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and they promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5′-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER. PMID:26466358

  4. Draining skin lesion from a desert poodle.

    PubMed

    Beaudin, Sylvie; Rich, Lon J; Meinkoth, James H; Cowell, Rick L

    2005-01-01

    A 16-month-old intact female Poodle in Arizona had a history of intermittent coughing of a few weeks duration. Coccidiomycosis antibody screening test results were negative for immunoglobulin (Ig) M, but were positive (1:64) for IgG. Fine needle aspiration specimens of a draining lesion on the right palmar front foot contained large numbers of neutrophils, many of which contained bacteria, and lower numbers of macrophages. A few small structures also were observed, 2-5 microm in diameter with thin, nonstaining capsules and small, round to oval densely aggregated, eccentric nuclei. Cytologic findings were consistent with septic pyogranulomatous inflammation with Coccidiodes immitis endospores. Fungal culture of a sample from the draining lesion yielded white growth with barrel-shaped arthroconidia. Identification of the organism as C immitis was confirmed by a commercial DNA probe test. Although coccidioidomycosis often is diagnosed by microscopic identification of C immitis spherules in cytologic specimens, in this case only endospores, which are released from mature spherules, were observed. In cases of suspected coccidiodomycosis, the unique morphology of endospores may be useful in making a cytologic diagnosis.

  5. Mismatch repair system proteins in oral benign and malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Silva, Gleyson Kleber do; Martins, Manoela Domingues; Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Vargas, Pablo Agustin

    2017-04-01

    Different environmental agents may cause DNA mutations by disrupting its double-strand structure; however, even normal DNA polymerase function may synthesize mismatch nucleotide bases, occasionally demonstrating failure in its proofreading activity. To overcome this issue, mismatch repair (MMR) system, a group of proteins specialized in finding mispairing bases and small loops of insertion or deletion, works to avoid the occurrence of mutations that could ultimately lead to innumerous human diseases. In the last decades, the role of MMR proteins in oral carcinogenesis and in the development of other oral cavity neoplasms has grown, but their importance in the pathogenesis and their prognostic potential for patients affected by oral malignancies, especially oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), remain unclear. Therefore, in this manuscript we aimed to review and critically discuss the currently available data on MMR proteins expression in oral potentially malignant lesions, in OSCC, and in other oral neoplasms to better understand their relevance in these lesions.

  6. Nodular lesions and mesangiolysis in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi; Shimizu, Miho; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Yoshio; Kaneko, Shuichi; Furuichi, Kengo

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure all over the world. Advanced human diabetic nephropathy is characterized by the presence of specific lesions including nodular lesions, doughnut lesions, and exudative lesions. Thus far, animal models precisely mimicking advanced human diabetic nephropathy, especially nodular lesions, remain to be fully established. Animal models with spontaneous diabetic kidney diseases or with inducible kidney lesions may be useful for investigating the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Based on pathological features, we previously reported that diabetic glomerular nodular-like lesions were formed during the reconstruction process of mesangiolysis. Recently, we established nodular-like lesions resembling those seen in advanced human diabetic nephropathy through vascular endothelial injury and mesangiolysis by administration of monocrotaline. Here, in this review, we discuss diabetic nodular lesions and its animal models resembling human diabetic kidney lesions, with our hypothesis that endothelial cell injury and mesangiolysis might be required for nodular lesions.

  7. Structural insights into the recognition of cisplatin and AAF-dG lesion by Rad14 (XPA)

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sandra C.; Kuper, Jochen; Gasteiger, Karola L.; Simon, Nina; Strasser, Ralf; Eisen, David; Geiger, Simon; Schneider, Sabine; Kisker, Caroline; Carell, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is responsible for the removal of a large variety of structurally diverse DNA lesions. Mutations of the involved proteins cause the xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cancer predisposition syndrome. Although the general mechanism of the NER process is well studied, the function of the XPA protein, which is of central importance for successful NER, has remained enigmatic. It is known, that XPA binds kinked DNA structures and that it interacts also with DNA duplexes containing certain lesions, but the mechanism of interactions is unknown. Here we present two crystal structures of the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the yeast XPA homolog Rad14 bound to DNA with either a cisplatin lesion (1,2-GG) or an acetylaminofluorene adduct (AAF-dG). In the structures, we see that two Rad14 molecules bind to the duplex, which induces DNA melting of the duplex remote from the lesion. Each monomer interrogates the duplex with a β-hairpin, which creates a 13mer duplex recognition motif additionally characterized by a sharp 70° DNA kink at the position of the lesion. Although the 1,2-GG lesion stabilizes the kink due to the covalent fixation of the crosslinked dG bases at a 90° angle, the AAF-dG fully intercalates into the duplex to stabilize the kinked structure. PMID:26100901

  8. Microorganisms in closed periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Abou-Rass, M; Bogen, G

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the microorganisms of strictly selected closed periapical lesions associated with both refractory endodontic therapy and pulpal calcification. Definitive criteria were established that assured complete clinical isolation of the periapical lesion from the oral and periodontal environment. A total of 13 criteria-referenced lesions were selected from 70 patients with endodontic surgical indications. A well controlled culturing method was used in all cases and samples were taken by one clinician at three separate sites during each surgery. Samples taken at the surgical window and within the body of the lesion served as controls, whilst a third sample was taken at the apex. In all 13 cases, samples taken from the apex yielded microorganisms comprising 63.6% obligate anaerobes and 36.4% facultative anaerobes. Prevalence of the isolated species was 31.8% for Actinomyces sp., 22.7% Propionibacterium sp., 18.2% Streptococcus sp., 13.6% Staphlyococcus sp., 4.6% Porphyromonas gingivalis, 4.6% Peptostreptococcus micros and 4.6% Gram-negative enterics. The results of this investigation indicate that closed periapical lesions associated with calcified teeth or those resistant to root canal treatment harbour bacteria. The inability to eradicate all root canal microorganisms during root canal treatment, along with anatomical factors, may allow further bacterial colonization of the root apex and surrounding periapical tissues, and consequently prevent healing.

  9. [Bone lesion in multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ise, Mikiko; Takagi, Toshiyuki

    2007-12-01

    Bone destruction is a hallmark of multiple myeloma(MM). Almost all MM patients develop osteolytic bone lesions that can cause pathologic fractures and severe bone pain. Osteolytic lesions result from increased bone resorption due to osteoclast stimulation and decreased bone formation due to osteoblast inhibition. Plain radiography, CT, and MRI are established imaging techniques in MM. FDG-PET imaging is promising newer scanning technique under current evaluation. The aggressive features of MM bone lesions have significantly contributed to poor prognosis. Therefore, a systemic approach to analgesia, which includes radiotherapy and orthopedic intervention, must be applied as a part of the comprehensive care plan of MM patient. Bisphosphonates have been shown to reduce vertebral fractures and bone pain.

  10. Oral Lesions and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Castellarin, P.; Pozzato, G.; Tirelli, G.; Di Lenarda, R.; Biasotto, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders are heterogeneous malignancy characterized by the expansion of a lymphoid clone more or less differentiated. At the level of the oral cavity, the lymphoproliferative disorder can occur in various ways, most commonly as lymphoid lesions with extranodal externalization, but sometimes, oral lesions may represent a localization of a disease spread. With regard to the primary localizations of lymphoproliferative disorders, a careful examination of the head and neck, oral, and oropharyngeal area is necessary in order to identify suspicious lesions, and their early detection results in a better prognosis for the patient. Numerous complications have been described and frequently found at oral level, due to pathology or different therapeutic strategies. These complications require precise diagnosis and measures to oral health care. In all this, oral pathologists, as well as dental practitioners, have a central role in the treatment and long-term monitoring of these patients. PMID:20871659

  11. Detection of helicobacter pylori in benign laryngeal lesions by polymerase chain reaction: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although Helicobacter Pylori (HP) was detected in some cases of chronic laryngitis, the results were not confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By this time, it has not been found in laryngeal lesions by in house PCR, the most sensitive method for detecting the genome tracks. Regarding the previous results and also few numbers of studies about the presence of HP in benign laryngeal lesions, specifically by PCR, we aimed to investigate the presence of HP in benign laryngeal lesions by in-house PCR. Methods The samples were taken from 55 patients with benign laryngeal lesions and frozen in −20°C. One milliliter (ml) of lysis buffer was added to 100 mg (mg) of each sample and the tube was placed in 56°C overnight. Then DNA extraction was carried out. Results To find HP DNA, in-house PCR was performed that revealed 5 positive results among 55 patients with benign laryngeal lesions. Of them, 3 were polyp, 1 was nodule and 1 was papilloma. Conclusion Although the number of positive results was not a lot in this study, it was in contrast with previous studies which could not find any HP tracks in benign laryngeal lesions by other methods. More studies about the prevalence of HP in benign laryngeal lesions improve judging about the effect of this infection on benign laryngeal lesions. PMID:22515206

  12. Renal lesions of nondomestic felids.

    PubMed

    Newkirk, K M; Newman, S J; White, L A; Rohrbach, B W; Ramsay, E C

    2011-05-01

    To comprehensively evaluate the occurrence of renal lesions in a variety of nondomestic felids, necropsy cases from 1978 to 2008 were reviewed from a municipal zoo and a large cat sanctuary for those in which the kidneys were examined histologically. Seventy exotic felids were identified (25 tigers, 18 lions, 6 cougars, 5 leopards, 3 snow leopards, 3 clouded leopards, 3 Canadian lynx, 2 ocelots, 2 bobcats, 2 cheetahs, 1 jaguar), and their histologic renal lesions were evaluated and compared. The most common lesion was tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN); 36 of 70 (51%) cats were affected to some degree. Lymphocytic interstitial nephritis was the most common lesion in the tigers (9 of 25, 36%) and was rarely seen in other species. Although the renal pelvis was not available for all cats, 28 of 47 (60%) had some degree of lymphocytic pyelitis. There was no significant association between the presence of pyelitis and that of TIN. Only 1 cat had pyelonephritis. Renal papillary necrosis was present in 13 of 70 (19%) cats and was significantly associated with historical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment (odds ratio, 7.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.9 to 26.8). Only 1 cat (lion) had amyloid accumulation, and it was restricted to the corticomedullary junction. Primary glomerular lesions were absent in all cats. Intraepithelial pigment was identified in many of the cats but was not correlated with severity of TIN. Despite several previous reports describing primary glomerular disease or renal amyloidosis in exotic felids, these lesions were rare to absent in this population.

  13. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J; O’Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways. PMID:27308403

  14. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Kevin J; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways.

  15. Can Small Lesions Induce Language Reorganization as Large Lesions Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestu, Fernando; Saldana, Cristobal; Amo, Carlos; Gonzalez-Hidalgo, Mercedes; Fernandez, Alberto; Fernandez, Santiago; Mata, Pedro; Papanicolaou, Andrew; Ortiz, Tomas

    2004-01-01

    Shift of the cortical mechanisms of language from the usually dominant left to the non-dominant right hemisphere has been demonstrated in the presence of large brain lesions. Here, we report a similar phenomenon in a patient with a cavernoma over the anterolateral superior temporal gyrus associated with epilepsy. Language mapping was performed by…

  16. Cutaneous lesions of the nose

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated. PMID:20525327

  17. Lesion detectability in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Robert M.; Boswell, Jonathan S.; Myers, Kyle J.; Peter, Guillaume

    2001-06-01

    The usefulness of Fourier-based measures of imaging performance has come into question for the evaluation of digital imaging systems. Figures of merit such as detective quantum efficiency are relevant for linear, shift-invariant systems with stationary noise. However, no digital imaging system is shift invariant, and realistic images do not satisfy the stationarity condition. Our methods for task- based evaluation of imaging systems, based on lesion detectability, do not require such assumptions. We have computed the performance of Hotelling and nonprewhitening matched-filter observers for the task of lesion detection in digital radiography.

  18. Repair of oxidatively induced DNA damage by DNA glycosylases: Mechanisms of action, substrate specificities and excision kinetics.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral; Coskun, Erdem; Jaruga, Pawel

    Endogenous and exogenous reactive species cause oxidatively induced DNA damage in living organisms by a variety of mechanisms. As a result, a plethora of mutagenic and/or cytotoxic products are formed in cellular DNA. This type of DNA damage is repaired by base excision repair, although nucleotide excision repair also plays a limited role. DNA glycosylases remove modified DNA bases from DNA by hydrolyzing the glycosidic bond leaving behind an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site. Some of them also possess an accompanying AP-lyase activity that cleaves the sugar-phosphate chain of DNA. Since the first discovery of a DNA glycosylase, many studies have elucidated the mechanisms of action, substrate specificities and excision kinetics of these enzymes present in all living organisms. For this purpose, most studies used single- or double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides with a single DNA lesion embedded at a defined position. High-molecular weight DNA with multiple base lesions has been used in other studies with the advantage of the simultaneous investigation of many DNA base lesions as substrates. Differences between the substrate specificities and excision kinetics of DNA glycosylases have been found when these two different substrates were used. Some DNA glycosylases possess varying substrate specificities for either purine-derived lesions or pyrimidine-derived lesions, whereas others exhibit cross-activity for both types of lesions. Laboratory animals with knockouts of the genes of DNA glycosylases have also been used to provide unequivocal evidence for the substrates, which had previously been found in in vitro studies, to be the actual substrates in vivo as well. On the basis of the knowledge gained from the past studies, efforts are being made to discover small molecule inhibitors of DNA glycosylases that may be used as potential drugs in cancer therapy.

  19. Homologous recombination maintenance of genome integrity during DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The DNA strand exchange protein Rad51 provides a safe mechanism for the repair of DNA breaks using the information of a homologous DNA template. Homologous recombination (HR) also plays a key role in the response to DNA damage that impairs the advance of the replication forks by providing mechanisms to circumvent the lesion and fill in the tracks of single-stranded DNA that are generated during the process of lesion bypass. These activities postpone repair of the blocking lesion to ensure that DNA replication is completed in a timely manner. Experimental evidence generated over the last few years indicates that HR participates in this DNA damage tolerance response together with additional error-free (template switch) and error-prone (translesion synthesis) mechanisms through intricate connections, which are presented here. The choice between repair and tolerance, and the mechanism of tolerance, is critical to avoid increased mutagenesis and/or genome rearrangements, which are both hallmarks of cancer. PMID:27308329

  20. Molecular Characterization of Poxviruses Associated with Tattoo Skin Lesions in UK Cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Blacklaws, Barbara A.; Gajda, Anna M.; Tippelt, Sabine; Jepson, Paul D.; Deaville, Rob; Van Bressem, Marie-Francoise; Pearce, Gareth P.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing concern for the well-being of cetacean populations around the UK. Tattoo skin disease (characterised by irregular, grey, black or yellowish, stippled cutaneous lesions) caused by poxvirus infection is a potential health indicatora potential health indicator for cetaceans. Limited sequence data indicates that cetacean poxviruses (CPVs) belong to an unassigned genus of the Chordopoxvirinae. To obtain further insight into the phylogenetic relationships between CPV and other Chordopoxvirinae members we partially characterized viral DNA originating from tattoo lesions collected in Delphinidae and Phocoenidae stranded along the UK coastline in 1998–2008. We also evaluated the presence of CPV in skin lesions other than tattoos to examine specificity and sensitivity of visual diagnosis. After DNA extraction, regions of the DNA polymerase and DNA topoisomerase I genes were amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared with other isolates. The presence of CPV DNA was demonstrated in tattoos from one striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), eight harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) and one short-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and in one ‘dubious tattoo’ lesion detected in one other porpoise. Seventeen of the 18 PCR positive skin lesions had been visually identified as tattoos and one as a dubious tattoo. None of the other skin lesions were PCR positive. Thus, visual identification had a 94.4% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The DNA polymerase PCR was most effective in detecting CPV DNA. Limited sequence phylogeny grouped the UK samples within the odontocete poxviruses (CPV group 1) and indicated that two different poxvirus lineages infect the Phocoenidae and the Delphinidae. The phylogenetic tree had three major branches: one with the UK Phocoenidae viruses, one with the Delphinidae isolates and one for the mysticete poxvirus (CPV group 2). This implies a radiation of poxviruses according to the host suborder and the families within these

  1. DNA strand breaks: the DNA template alterations that trigger p53-dependent DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, W G; Kastan, M B

    1994-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 serves as a critical regulator of a G1 cell cycle checkpoint and of apoptosis following exposure of cells to DNA-damaging agents. The mechanism by which DNA-damaging agents elevate p53 protein levels to trigger G1/S arrest or cell death remains to be elucidated. In fact, whether damage to the DNA template itself participates in transducing the signal leading to p53 induction has not yet been demonstrated. We exposed human cell lines containing wild-type p53 alleles to several different DNA-damaging agents and found that agents which rapidly induce DNA strand breaks, such as ionizing radiation, bleomycin, and DNA topoisomerase-targeted drugs, rapidly triggered p53 protein elevations. In addition, we determined that camptothecin-stimulated trapping of topoisomerase I-DNA complexes was not sufficient to elevate p53 protein levels; rather, replication-associated DNA strand breaks were required. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the antimetabolite N(phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) did not cause rapid p53 protein increases but resulted in delayed increases in p53 protein levels temporally correlated with the appearance of DNA strand breaks. Finally, we concluded that DNA strand breaks were sufficient for initiating p53-dependent signal transduction after finding that introduction of nucleases into cells by electroporation stimulated rapid p53 protein elevations. While DNA strand breaks appeared to be capable of triggering p53 induction, DNA lesions other than strand breaks did not. Exposure of normal cells and excision repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells to low doses of UV light, under conditions in which thymine dimers appear but DNA replication-associated strand breaks were prevented, resulted in p53 induction attributable to DNA strand breaks associated with excision repair. Our data indicate that DNA strand breaks are sufficient and probably necessary for p53 induction in cells with wild-type p53 alleles exposed to DNA

  2. Metatranscriptomics reveals overall active bacterial composition in caries lesions

    PubMed Central

    Simón-Soro, Aurea; Guillen-Navarro, Miriam; Mira, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying the microbial species in caries lesions is instrumental to determine the etiology of dental caries. However, a significant proportion of bacteria in carious lesions have not been cultured, and the use of molecular methods has been limited to DNA-based approaches, which detect both active and inactive or dead microorganisms. Objective To identify the RNA-based, metabolically active bacterial composition of caries lesions at different stages of disease progression in order to provide a list of potential etiological agents of tooth decay. Design Non-cavitated enamel caries lesions (n=15) and dentin caries lesions samples (n=12) were collected from 13 individuals. RNA was extracted and cDNA was constructed, which was used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene. The resulting 780 bp polymerase chain reaction products were pyrosequenced using Titanium-plus chemistry, and the sequences obtained were used to determine the bacterial composition. Results A mean of 4,900 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene with an average read length of 661 bp was obtained per sample, giving a comprehensive view of the active bacterial communities in caries lesions. Estimates of bacterial diversity indicate that the microbiota of cavities is highly complex, each sample containing between 70 and 400 metabolically active species. The composition of these bacterial consortia varied among individuals and between caries lesions of the same individuals. In addition, enamel and dentin lesions had a different bacterial makeup. Lactobacilli were found almost exclusively in dentin cavities. Streptococci accounted for 40% of the total active community in enamel caries, and 20% in dentin caries. However, Streptococcus mutans represented only 0.02–0.73% of the total bacterial community. Conclusions The data indicate that the etiology of dental caries is tissue dependent and that the disease has a clear polymicrobial origin. The low proportion of mutans streptococci detected confirms that they

  3. Oxidatively induced DNA damage and its repair in cancer.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2015-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by endogenous and exogenous reactive species. DNA lesions resulting from this type of damage are mutagenic and cytotoxic and, if not repaired, can cause genetic instability that may lead to disease processes including carcinogenesis. Living organisms possess DNA repair mechanisms that include a variety of pathways to repair multiple DNA lesions. Mutations and polymorphisms also occur in DNA repair genes adversely affecting DNA repair systems. Cancer tissues overexpress DNA repair proteins and thus develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions before they become toxic is a major mechanism for development of resistance to therapy, affecting patient survival. Accumulated evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker for patient response to therapy. Thus, knowledge of DNA protein expressions in normal and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. DNA repair proteins constitute targets for inhibitors to overcome the resistance of tumors to therapy. Inhibitors of DNA repair for combination therapy or as single agents for monotherapy may help selectively kill tumors, potentially leading to personalized therapy. Numerous inhibitors have been developed and are being tested in clinical trials. The efficacy of some inhibitors in therapy has been demonstrated in patients. Further development of inhibitors of DNA repair proteins is globally underway to help eradicate cancer.

  4. Human Papillomavirus in the Lesions of the Oral Mucosa According to Topography

    PubMed Central

    Mravak-Stipetić, Marinka; Sabol, Ivan; Kranjčić, Josip; Knežević, Marjana; Grce, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Background The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) types and oral lesions has been shown in many studies. Considering the significance that HPV has in the development of malignant and potentially malignant disorders of the oral mucosa, the purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV DNA in different oral lesions. In addition, we wanted to elucidate whether the HPV infection is associated predominantly with either the lesion or a particular anatomic site of the oral cavity. Methodology/Principal Findings The study included 246 subjects with different oral lesions, and 73 subjects with apparently healthy oral mucosa (controls). The oral lesions were classified according to their surface morphology and clinical diagnosis. The epithelial cells were collected with a cytobrush from different topographic sites in the oral cavity of the oral lesions and controls. The presence of HPV DNA was evaluated by consensus and type-specific primer-directed polymerase chain reaction. The HPV positivity was detected in 17.7% of oral lesions, significantly more than in apparently healthy mucosa (6.8%), with a higher presence in benign proliferative mucosal lesions (18.6%). High-risk HPV types were predominantly found in potentially malignant oral disorders (HPV16 in 4.3% and HPV31 in 3.4%), while benign proliferative lesions as well as healthy oral mucosa contained mainly undetermined HPV type (13.6 and 6.8%, respectively). Conclusions/Significance The distribution of positive HPV findings on the oral mucosa seems to be more associated with a particular anatomical site than the diagnosis itself. Samples taken from the vermilion border, labial commissures, and hard palate were most often HPV positive. Thus, topography plays a role in HPV prevalence findings in oral lesions. Because of the higher prevalence of the high-risk HPV types in potentially malignant oral disorders, these lesions need to be continuously controlled and treated. PMID:23922786

  5. Imaging inflammatory acne: lesion detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cula, Gabriela O.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    It is known that effectiveness of acne treatment increases when the lesions are detected earlier, before they could progress into mature wound-like lesions, which lead to scarring and discoloration. However, little is known about the evolution of acne from early signs until after the lesion heals. In this work we computationally characterize the evolution of inflammatory acne lesions, based on analyzing cross-polarized images that document acne-prone facial skin over time. Taking skin images over time, and being able to follow skin features in these images present serious challenges, due to change in the appearance of skin, difficulty in repositioning the subject, involuntary movement such as breathing. A computational technique for automatic detection of lesions by separating the background normal skin from the acne lesions, based on fitting Gaussian distributions to the intensity histograms, is presented. In order to track and quantify the evolution of lesions, in terms of the degree of progress or regress, we designed a study to capture facial skin images from an acne-prone young individual, followed over the course of 3 different time points. Based on the behavior of the lesions between two consecutive time points, the automatically detected lesions are classified in four categories: new lesions, resolved lesions (i.e. lesions that disappear completely), lesions that are progressing, and lesions that are regressing (i.e. lesions in the process of healing). The classification our methods achieve correlates well with visual inspection of a trained human grader.

  6. DNA-mediated charge transport for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Elizabeth M.; Livingston, Alison L.; Chmiel, Nikolas H.; David, Sheila S.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2003-01-01

    MutY, like many DNA base excision repair enzymes, contains a [4Fe4S]2+ cluster of undetermined function. Electrochemical studies of MutY bound to a DNA-modified gold electrode demonstrate that the [4Fe4S] cluster of MutY can be accessed in a DNA-mediated redox reaction. Although not detectable without DNA, the redox potential of DNA-bound MutY is ≈275 mV versus NHE, which is characteristic of HiPiP iron proteins. Binding to DNA is thus associated with a change in [4Fe4S]3+/2+ potential, activating the cluster toward oxidation. Given that DNA charge transport chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to perturbations in base pair structure, such as mismatches, we propose that this redox process of MutY bound to DNA exploits DNA charge transport and provides a DNA signaling mechanism to scan for mismatches and lesions in vivo. PMID:14559969

  7. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  8. Trapping and Structural Elucidation of a Very Advanced Intermediate in the Lesion-Extrusion Pathway of hOGG1

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seongmin; Radom, Christopher T.; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2008-07-28

    Here we present the first structure of a very advanced intermediate in the lesion-extrusion pathway of a DNA glycosylase, human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1), and a substrate DNA containing a mutagenic lesion, 8-oxoguanine (oxoG). The structure was obtained by irradiation and flash-freezing of a disulfide-cross-linked (DXLed) complex of hOgg1 bound to DNA containing a novel photocaged derivative of oxoG. The X-ray structure reveals that, upon irradiation, the oxoG lesion has transited from the exosite to the active site pocket, but has not undergone cleavage by the enzyme. Furthermore, all but one of the specificity-determining interactions between the lesion and the enzyme are unformed in the flashed complex (FC), because active site functionality and elements of the DNA backbone are mispositioned. This structure thus provides a first glimpse into the structure of a very late-stage intermediate in the lesion-extrusion pathway -- the latest observed to date for any glycosylase -- in which the oxoG has undergone insertion into the enzyme active site following photodeprotection, but the enzyme and DNA have not yet completed the slower process of adjusting to the presence of the lesion in the active site.

  9. One virus, one lesion--individual components of CIN lesions contain a specific HPV type.

    PubMed

    Quint, Wim; Jenkins, David; Molijn, Anco; Struijk, Linda; van de Sandt, Miekel; Doorbar, John; Mols, Johann; Van Hoof, Christine; Hardt, Karin; Struyf, Frank; Colau, Brigitte

    2012-05-01

    In 20-40% of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) and in 4-8% of cervical carcinoma tissue specimens, multiple HPV genotypes have been detected. Whole tissue section (WTS) PCR does not determine how the individual types relate causally to complex and multiple CIN. Our objective was to determine whether laser capture micro-dissection (LCM) with HPV PCR genotyping (LCM-PCR) could accurately recover type-specific HPV DNA from epithelial cells in individual areas of CIN and normal epithelium, and whether one or more viruses are present in one lesion. For that, histologically selected samples of CIN and normal epithelium were isolated by LCM and analysed by the SPF(10) PCR/LiPA(25) (version 1) HPV genotyping system for 25 HPV genotypes. HPV genotypes detected in 756 areas of CIN (grade 1, 2 or 3) by LCM-PCR were compared with results obtained by WTS-PCR in 60 cases (74 biopsies). We showed that when a single HPV type is detected by WTS-PCR, that type was almost always (94%; 29/31) recovered by LCM-PCR from CIN. When multiple HPV types were present by WTS-PCR, their distribution within histological sections could be mapped by LCM-PCR. Association of a single HPV type with a discrete area of CIN was found for 93% (372/399) of LCM fragments analysed by PCR. We found colliding CIN lesions associated with separate HPV types and only 62% (61/99) of HPV types detected by WTS-PCR were found in CIN by LCM-PCR. Therefore, the LCM-PCR technique was found very accurate for high-resolution HPV genotyping and for assigning an individual HPV type to an area of CIN. At LCM level, in cervical biopsy sections with multiple HPV infections, the relation between HPV types and CIN lesions is often complex. Almost every HPV type found in CIN by LCM-PCR is associated with a biological separate independent CIN lesion-one virus, one lesion.

  10. DNA Strand Breaks, Neurodegeneration and Aging in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Defective responses to DNA single- or double-strand breaks can result in neurological disease, underscoring the critical importance of DNA repair for neural homeostasis. Human DNA repair-deficient syndromes are generally congenital, in which brain pathology reflects the consequences of developmentally incurred DNA damage. Although, it is unclear to what degree DNA strand-break repair defects in mature neural cells contributes to disease pathology. However, DNA single-strand breaks are a relatively common lesion which if not repaired can impact cells via interference with transcription. Thus, this lesion, and probably to a lesser extent DNA double strand breaks, may be particularly relevant to aging in the neural cell population. In this review we will examine the consequences of defective DNA strand break repair towards homeostasis in the brain. Further, we also consider the utility of mouse models as reagents to understand the connection between DNA strand breaks and aging in the brain. PMID:18455751

  11. Differential impact of ionic and coordinate covalent chromium (Cr)-DNA binding on DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Fornsaglio, Jamie L; O'Brien, Travis J; Patierno, Steven R

    2005-11-01

    The reactive species produced by the reduction of Cr(VI), particularly Cr(III), can form both ionic and coordinate covalent complexes with DNA. These Cr(III)-DNA interactions consist of Cr-DNA monoadducts, Cr-DNA ternary adducts, and Cr-DNA interstrand cross-links (Cr-ICLs), the latter of which are DNA polymerase arresting lesions (PALs). We sought to determine the impact of Cr-DNA interactions on the formation of replication blocking lesions in S. cerevisiae using a PCR-based method. We found that target sequence (TS) amplification using DNA isolated from Cr(VI)-treated yeast actually increased as a function of Cr(VI) concentration. Moreover, the enhanced TS amplification was reproduced in vitro using Cr(III)-treated DNA. In contrast, PCR amplification of TS from DNA isolated from yeast exposed to equitoxic doses of the inorganic DNA cross-linking agent cisplatin (CDDP), was decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. This paradox suggested that a specific Cr-DNA interaction, such as an ionic Cr-DNA complex, was responsible for the enhanced TS amplification, thereby masking the replication-blocking effect of certain ternary Cr-DNA adducts (i.e. interstrand cross-links). To test this possibility, we removed ionically associated Cr from the DNA using salt extraction prior to PCR analysis. This procedure obviated the increased amplification and revealed a dose-dependent decrease in TS amplification and an increase in Cr-PALs. These data from DNA analyzed ex vivo after treatment of intact cells indicate that ionic interactions of Cr with DNA result in increased DNA amplification whereas coordinate-covalent Cr-DNA complexes lead to formation of Cr-PALs. Thus, these results suggest that treatment of living cells with Cr(VI) leads to two modes of Cr-binding, which may have conflicting effects on DNA replication.

  12. Malignancy Risk Models for Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zarate, Ana M.; Brezzo, María M.; Secchi, Dante G.; Barra, José L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this work was to assess risk habits, clinical and cellular phenotypes and TP53 DNA changes in oral mucosa samples from patients with Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders (OPMD), in order to create models that enable genotypic and phenotypic patterns to be obtained that determine the risk of lesions becoming malignant. Study Design: Clinical phenotypes, family history of cancer and risk habits were collected in clinical histories. TP53 gene mutation and morphometric-morphological features were studied, and multivariate models were applied. Three groups were estabished: a) oral cancer (OC) group (n=10), b) OPMD group (n=10), and c) control group (n=8). Results: An average of 50% of patients with malignancy were found to have smoking and drinking habits. A high percentage of TP53 mutations were observed in OC (30%) and OPMD (average 20%) lesions (p=0.000). The majority of these mutations were GC ? TA transversion mutations (60%). However, patients with OC presented mutations in all the exons and introns studied. Highest diagnostic accuracy (p=0.0001) was observed when incorporating alcohol and tobacco habits variables with TP53 mutations. Conclusions: Our results prove to be statistically reliable, with parameter estimates that are nearly unbiased even for small sample sizes. Models 2 and 3 were the most accurate for assessing the risk of an OPMD becoming cancerous. However, in a public health context, model 3 is the most recommended because the characteristics considered are easier and less costly to evaluate. Key words:TP53, oral potentially malignant disorders, risk factors, genotype, phenotype. PMID:23722122

  13. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM) formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. Conclusions/Significance A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks. PMID:24722772

  14. DNA Charge Transport within the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Grodick, Michael A.; Muren, Natalie B.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    The unique characteristics of DNA charge transport (CT) have prompted an examination of roles for this chemistry within a biological context. Not only can DNA CT facilitate long range oxidative damage of DNA, but redox-active proteins can couple to the DNA base stack and participate in long range redox reactions using DNA CT. DNA transcription factors with redox-active moieties such as SoxR and p53 can use DNA CT as a form of redox sensing. DNA CT chemistry also provides a means to monitor the integrity of the DNA, given the sensitivity of DNA CT to perturbations in base stacking as arise with mismatches and lesions. Enzymes that utilize this chemistry include an interesting and ever-growing class of DNA-processing enzymes involved in DNA repair, replication, and transcription that have been found to contain 4Fe-4S clusters. DNA repair enzymes containing 4Fe-4S clusters, that include Endonuclease III (EndoIII), MutY, and DinG from bacteria, as well as XPD from archaea, have been shown to be redox-active when bound to DNA, share a DNA-bound redox potential, and can be reduced and oxidized at long range via DNA CT. Interactions between DNA and these proteins in solution, in addition to genetics experiments within E. coli, suggest that DNA-mediated CT can be used as a means of cooperative signaling among DNA repair proteins that contain 4Fe-4S clusters as a first step in finding DNA damage, even within cells. Based on these data, we can consider also how DNA-mediated CT may be used as a means of signaling to coordinate DNA processing across the genome. PMID:25606780

  15. Hock lesions and free-stall design.

    PubMed

    Weary, D M; Taszkun, I

    2000-04-01

    We compared the prevalence and severity of skin lesions on the hocks of lactating dairy cows in southern British Columbia, comparing 20 farms using three common bedding surfaces: sawdust, sand, and geotextile mattresses. Skin lesions were scored at five positions on the hock. For each position we noted if the lesion showed inflammatory attributes, and then assigned a severity score. Of the 1752 lactating cows scored, 1267 cows (73%) had at least one hock lesion. Of those cows with lesions, 87% had lesions on both legs, 76% had lesions on more than one location on the hock, and 78% had a lesion of at least moderate severity (i.e., evidence of skin breakage or an area of hair loss >10 cm2). Lesions were most prevalent on farms that used geotextile mattresses (91% of cows) and least common on farms that used sand (24% of cows). Moreover, lesions on cows from farms using mattresses were more numerous and more severe than those on cows from sand-bedded farms. The prevalence and severity of lesions on farms using sawdust was intermediate. Lesions also varied in relation to location on the hock. For farms using geotextile mattresses, lesions were more common and more severe on the lateral surfaces of both the tuber calcis and the tarsal joint. On farms using sawdust, lesions were common on the dorsal surface of the tuber calcis and the lateral surfaces of both the tuber calcis and the tarsal joint. Lesions were rare on all five positions for cows from sand-bedded farms. Among the 10 farms sampled using sawdust, we found a significant negative relationship between the length of the stall and severity of lesions. For cows with lesions, the number and severity of lesions increased with age.

  16. [Immunological features of renal lesion in chronic alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Tarasova, N S; Beloborodova, E I

    2001-01-01

    One hundred and sixty males whose mean age was 42 years were examined. Of them there were 122 patients with stage II chronic alcoholism (CA), 92 with renal lesion following the type of chronic glomerulonephritis (CG) (Group 1); 30 patients with CA without renal lesion (Group 2), and 42 patients had CG alone (Group 3). Methods that characterize humoral immunity were used. These included detection of circulating immune complexes (CIC) by polyethylene glycol precipitation, measurement of the concentrations of IgA, IgM, and IgG by the Mancini radial immunodiffusion assay, detection DNA antibodies by the Farre test modified by V. V. Koshelev, that of serum anticomplement activity, measurement of the levels of complement by its hemolytic activity, determination of the activity of the lysosomal enzymes acid RNAase, acid DNAase, and cathepsin by the procedure of A. A. Pokrovsky et al. Complex estimation of the content of CIC, immunoglobulins, DNA antibodies and the activity of the lysosomal enzymes in patients with renal lesion makes it possible to evaluate the severity of a pathological process and to make its prognosis.

  17. Assessment of epigenetic alterations in early colorectal lesions containing BRAF mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Masanori; Harada, Taku; Maruyama, Reo; Ashida, Masami; Aoki, Hironori; Matsushita, Hiro-o; Yoshikawa, Kenjiro; Harada, Eiji; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Wakita, Shigenori; Niinuma, Takeshi; Kai, Masahiro; Eizuka, Makoto; Sugai, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the molecular and clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal serrated lesions, we assessed the DNA methylation of cancer-associated genes in a cohort of BRAF-mutant precancerous lesions from 94 individuals. We then compared those results with the lesions' clinicopathological features, especially colorectal subsites. The lesions included hyperplastic polyps (n = 16), traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs) (n = 15), TSAs with sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs) (n = 6), SSAs (n = 49) and SSAs with dysplasia (n = 16). The prevalence of lesions exhibiting the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was lower in the sigmoid colon and rectum than in other bowel subsites, including the cecum, ascending, transverse and descending colon. In addition, several cancer-associated genes showed higher methylation levels within lesions in the proximal to sigmoid colon than in the sigmoid colon and rectum. These results indicate that the methylation status of lesions with BRAF mutation is strongly associated with their location, histological findings and neoplastic pathways. By contrast, no difference in aberrant DNA methylation was observed in normal-appearing background colonic mucosa along the bowel subsites, which may indicate the absence of an epigenetic field defect. PMID:27145369

  18. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  19. Dieulafoy's lesion of the rectum.

    PubMed

    Gul, Y A; Jabbar, M F; Karim, F A; Moissinac, K

    2002-06-01

    Dieulafoy's lesion is an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. It may present with massive and life threatening bleed and although more common in the upper gastrointestinal tract, it is being increasingly reported as affecting the lower gastrointestinal tract. Diagnosis is usually achieved during proctoscopic and endoscopic visualization. In cases where there is profuse and torrential hemorrhage, angiography may help to confirm the diagnosis. There are a few treatment options available, all of which have a varying degree of success. More commonly than not, a combination of treatment is warranted as illustrated by our case. Recurrent bleeding may occur just as in cases of Dieulafoy's lesion affecting the upper gastrointestinal tract. Even though endoscopic visualization of the lower gastrointestinal tract in the presence of profuse lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage may not be possible, this important procedure should not be omitted as the bleeding source may be lying in a low and accessible location for prompt interventional haemorrhage control.

  20. Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    the articulation between C1 and the os odontoideum on flexion imaging. The remainder of his cervical vertebral bodies had normal alignment with no...appears normal. Figure 3. Flexion view of plain cervical spine. This image shows abnormal translation of the articulation between C1 and the C2 os...worldwide. Peer Reviewed Title: Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion Journal Issue: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 12(4) Author: Robson

  1. Vascular lesions in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Grishman, E; Venkataseshan, V S

    1988-05-01

    Three groups of kidney specimens from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were examined for histologic evidence of vascular lesions in small arteries and arterioles. Group 1 consisted of 24 autopsy kidneys from patients who died before the advent of steroid therapy, and Group 2, of 26 more recent autopsy specimens from patients treated with steroids and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Group 3 comprised 276 renal biopsies. Group 1 showed characteristic subendothelial eosinophilic deposits in small arteries and arterioles of 8 cases; Group 2 showed similar lesions in 5 specimens, while 3 others revealed evidence of resorption of deposits. Deposits were characterized by clumping and were delimited toward the media by a thick basement membrane. Only one case showed necrotizing arteritis resembling polyarteritis nodosa. Group 3 presented vascular deposits in 19 cases and thrombotic microangiopathy in 2. Electron microscopic appearance of some of the deposits is described. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a mixture of IgG, IgA, and IgM in 7 cases, a finding that was not seen in a group of non-lupus patients with various vascular lesions. Vascular deposits are generally rare in systemic lupus erythematosus, although in autopsies widely scattered involvement of arteries and arterioles was seen in nearly 1/3 of the cases. The deposits were more common in male patients. The evolution of the lesions could be followed through various stages to eventual sclerosis, particularly in patients treated with steroids or immunosuppressants. Some deposits appeared to resolve after treatment. Patients with vascular deposits had more severe glomerular disease and a more serious clinical course. Thrombotic microangiopathy appears to be a secondary phenomenon whose pathogenesis is unknown.

  2. Aging: not all DNA damage is equal.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Wilbert P; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Pothof, Joris

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances have identified accumulation of DNA damage as a major driver of aging. However, there are numerous kinds of DNA lesions each with their own characteristics and cellular outcome, which highly depends on cellular context: proliferation (cell cycle), differentiation, propensity for survival/death, cell condition and systemic hormonal and immunological parameters. In addition, DNA damage is strongly influenced by cellular metabolism, anti-oxidant status and exogenous factors, consistent with the multi-factorial nature of aging. Notably, DNA lesions interfering with replication have very different outcomes compared to transcription. These considerations provide a conceptual framework in which different types of DNA damage and their setting contribute to the aging process in differential manners.

  3. Fibronectin in multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, R. A.; Mitchell, M. E.

    1989-01-01

    Cryostat sections of central nervous system (CNS) tissues of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other CNS diseases were stained with antibodies to fibronectin, a macrophage fibronectin receptor component, fibrin/fibrinogen, and albumin using immunoperoxidase. In active, but not inactive, MS plaques vessel fibronectin was increased (to approximately 57% of Factor VIII+ vessels) over uninvolved MS and normal control white matter (P less than 0.001 for both). Fibronectin was primarily localized to vessel walls and amount of staining correlated with degree of inflammation. Active plaques and necrotic lesions also had extracellular fibronectin and fibrin/ogen. These molecules and the fibronectin receptor were found on macrophages. Albumin was more widely and diffusely distributed in lesions than fibronectin. Thus, in addition to extravasation from damaged vessels, fibronectin may be deposited on or synthesized by endothelial cells and macrophages in the CNS. Fibronectin could facilitate monocyte adhesion to endothelial cell luminal surfaces, promote migration of mononuclear cells, and enhance myelin phagocytosis in MS lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2528301

  4. Automatic segmentation of psoriasis lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Yang; Shi, Chenbo; Wang, Li; Shu, Chang

    2014-10-01

    The automatic segmentation of psoriatic lesions is widely researched these years. It is an important step in Computer-aid methods of calculating PASI for estimation of lesions. Currently those algorithms can only handle single erythema or only deal with scaling segmentation. In practice, scaling and erythema are often mixed together. In order to get the segmentation of lesions area - this paper proposes an algorithm based on Random forests with color and texture features. The algorithm has three steps. The first step, the polarized light is applied based on the skin's Tyndall-effect in the imaging to eliminate the reflection and Lab color space are used for fitting the human perception. The second step, sliding window and its sub windows are used to get textural feature and color feature. In this step, a feature of image roughness has been defined, so that scaling can be easily separated from normal skin. In the end, Random forests will be used to ensure the generalization ability of the algorithm. This algorithm can give reliable segmentation results even the image has different lighting conditions, skin types. In the data set offered by Union Hospital, more than 90% images can be segmented accurately.

  5. Imaging of skull base lesions.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Hillary R; Curtin, Hugh D

    2016-01-01

    Skull base imaging requires a thorough knowledge of the complex anatomy of this region, including the numerous fissures and foramina and the major neurovascular structures that traverse them. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play complementary roles in imaging of the skull base. MR is the preferred modality for evaluation of the soft tissues, the cranial nerves, and the medullary spaces of bone, while CT is preferred for demonstrating thin cortical bone structure. The anatomic location and origin of a lesion as well as the specific CT and MR findings can often narrow the differential diagnosis to a short list of possibilities. However, the primary role of the imaging specialist in evaluating the skull base is usually to define the extent of the lesion and determine its relationship to vital neurovascular structures. Technologic advances in imaging and radiation therapy, as well as surgical technique, have allowed for more aggressive approaches and improved outcomes, further emphasizing the importance of precise preoperative mapping of skull base lesions via imaging. Tumors arising from and affecting the cranial nerves at the skull base are considered here.

  6. DNA damage response induced by HZE particles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David; Aroumougame, Asaithamby

    Convincing evidences indicate that high-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) induced complex DNA lesions are more difficult to repair than isolated DNA lesions induced by low-LET IR; this has been associated with the increased RBE for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in high energy charged-particle irradiated human cells. We have employed an in situ method to directly monitor induction and repair of clustered DNA lesions at the single-cell level. We showed, consistent with biophysical modeling, that the kinetics of loss of clustered DNA lesions was substantially compromised in human fibroblasts. The unique spatial distribution of different types of DNA lesions within the clustered damages determined the cellular ability to repair these damages. Importantly, examination of metaphase cells derived from HZE particle irradiated cells revealed that the extent of chromosome aberrations directly correlated with the levels of unrepaired clustered DNA lesions. In addition, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We found that complex DNA lesions induced by HZE particles were even more difficult to be repaired in organotypic 3D culture, resulting enhanced cell killing and chromosome aberrations. Our data suggest that DNA repair capability in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. As the organotypic 3D model mimics human lung, it opens up new experimental approaches to explore the effect of radiation in vivo and will have important implications for evaluating radiation risk in human tissues.

  7. Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Martin; Lukasova, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    The genetic information of cells continuously undergoes damage induced by intracellular processes including energy metabolism, DNA replication and transcription, and by environmental factors such as mutagenic chemicals and UV and ionizing radiation. This causes numerous DNA lesions, including double strand breaks (DSBs). Since cells cannot escape this damage or normally function with a damaged genome, several DNA repair mechanisms have evolved. Although most "single-stranded" DNA lesions are rapidly removed from DNA without permanent damage, DSBs completely break the DNA molecule, presenting a real challenge for repair mechanisms, with the highest risk among DNA lesions of incorrect repair. Hence, DSBs can have serious consequences for human health. Therefore, in this chapter, we will refer only to this type of DNA damage. In addition to the biochemical aspects of DSB repair, which have been extensively studied over a long period of time, the spatio-temporal organization of DSB induction and repair, the importance of which was recognized only recently, will be considered in terms of current knowledge and remaining questions.

  8. The interplay among chromatin dynamics, cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms modulates the cellular response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Federico; Giannattasio, Michele; Muzi-Falconi, Marco; Plevani, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    Cells are continuously under the assault of endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress that challenges the integrity of DNA. To cope with such a formidable task cells have evolved surveillance mechanisms, known as checkpoints, and a variety of DNA repair systems responding to different types of DNA lesions. These lesions occur in the context of the chromatin structure and, as expected for all DNA transactions, the cellular response to DNA damage is going to be influenced by the chromatin enviroment. In this review, we will discuss recent studies implicating chromatin remodelling factors and histone modifications in the response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and in checkpoint activation in response to UV lesions.

  9. Menstrual bleeding from an endometriotic lesion.

    PubMed

    Burney, Richard O; Lathi, Ruth B

    2009-05-01

    We present a case in which endometriotic lesions were observed to be focally hemorrhagic at laparoscopy performed during menstruation. Red vesicular lesions likely represent early disease with intact capacity for hormonally induced menstrual bleeding.

  10. Bypass of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside by DNA polymerase β during DNA replication and base excision repair leads to nucleotide misinsertions and DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhongliang; Xu, Meng; Lai, Yanhao; Laverde, Eduardo E; Terzidis, Michael A; Masi, Annalisa; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Liu, Yuan

    2015-09-01

    5',8-Cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides including 5',8-cyclo-dA (cdA) and 5',8-cyclo-dG (cdG) are induced by hydroxyl radicals resulting from oxidative stress such as ionizing radiation. 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside lesions are repaired by nucleotide excision repair with low efficiency, thereby leading to their accumulation in the human genome and lesion bypass by DNA polymerases during DNA replication and base excision repair (BER). In this study, for the first time, we discovered that DNA polymerase β (pol β) efficiently bypassed a 5'R-cdA, but inefficiently bypassed a 5'S-cdA during DNA replication and BER. We found that cell extracts from pol β wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited significant DNA synthesis activity in bypassing a cdA lesion located in replication and BER intermediates. However, pol β knock-out cell extracts exhibited little DNA synthesis to bypass the lesion. This indicates that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a cdA lesion during DNA replication and BER. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pol β inserted both a correct and incorrect nucleotide to bypass a cdA at a low concentration. Nucleotide misinsertion was significantly stimulated by a high concentration of pol β, indicating a mutagenic effect induced by pol β lesion bypass synthesis of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside. Moreover, we found that bypass of a 5'S-cdA by pol β generated an intermediate that failed to be extended by pol β, resulting in accumulation of single-strand DNA breaks. Our study provides the first evidence that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a 5',8-cyclo-dA during DNA replication and repair, as well as new insight into mutagenic effects and genome instability resulting from pol β bypassing of a cdA lesion.

  11. Thermodynamic profiles and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of oligonucleotide duplexes containing single diastereomeric spiroiminodihydantoin lesions.

    PubMed

    Khutsishvili, Irine; Zhang, Na; Marky, Luis A; Crean, Conor; Patel, Dinshaw J; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2013-02-26

    The spiroiminodihydantoins (Sp) are highly mutagenic oxidation products of guanine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine in DNA. The Sp lesions have recently been detected in the liver and colon of mice infected with Helicobacter hepaticus that induces inflammation and the development of liver and colon cancers in murine model systems [Mangerich, A., et al. (2012) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, E1820-E1829]. The impact of Sp lesions on the thermodynamic characteristics and the effects of the diastereomeric Sp-R and Sp-S lesions on the conformational features of double-stranded 11-mer oligonucleotide duplexes have been studied by a combination of microcalorimetric methods, analysis of DNA melting curves, and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The nonplanar, propeller-like shapes of the Sp residues strongly diminish the extent of local base stacking interactions that destabilize the DNA duplexes characterized by unfavorable enthalpy contributions. Relative to that of an unmodified duplex, the thermally induced unfolding of the duplexes with centrally positioned Sp-R and Sp-S lesions into single strands is accompanied by a smaller release of cationic counterions (Δn(Na⁺) = 0.6 mol of Na⁺/mol of duplex) and water molecules (Δn(w) = 17 mol of H₂O/mol of duplex). The unfolding parameters are similar for the Sp-R and Sp-S lesions, although their orientations in the duplexes are different. The structural disturbances radiate one base pair beyond the flanking C:G pair, although Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding is maintained at all flanking base pairs. The observed relatively strong destabilization of B-form DNA by the physically small Sp lesions is expected to have a significant impact on the processing of these lesions in biological environments.

  12. A novel gammaherpesvirus associated with genital lesions in a Blainville's beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris).

    PubMed

    Saliki, Jeremiah T; Cooper, Emily J; Rotstein, David S; Caseltine, Shannon L; Pabst, D Ann; McLellan, William A; Govett, Pamela; Harms, Craig; Smolarek, Kara A; Romero, Carlos H

    2006-01-01

    An adult male Blainville's beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris) was found stranded on the Atlantic coast of the USA on 28 January 2004. Necropsy revealed a focal papilloma-like penile lesion, the cells from which revealed single 4-6 microm basophilic intranuclear inclusions. Total DNA extracted from lesion material was tested using a pan-herpes-virus PCR assay that targets the DNA polymerase gene and found to be positive. When the amplified DNA fragment was cloned, sequenced, and compared to GenBank-deposited herpesvirus DNA polymerase sequences, the detected virus was determined to be a distinct member of the Gammaherpesvirinae subfamily of herpesviruses. This new virus, tentatively named Ziphiid herpesvirus type 1, was associated with but not determined to be the cause of genital disease in the Blainville's beaked whale.

  13. [Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells]. Progress report, [April 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The excision of radiation-induced lesions in DNA by a DNA repair enzyme complex, namely the UvrABC nuclease complex, has been investigated. Irradiated DNA was treated with the enzyme complex. DNA fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. The results showed that a number pyrimidine- and purine-derived lesions in DNA were excised by the UvrABC nuclease complex and that the enzyme complex does not act on radiation-induced DNA lesions as a glycosylase. This means that it does not excise individual base products, but it excises oligomers containing these lesions. A number of pyrimidine-derived lesions that were no substrates for other DNA repair enzymes investigated in our laboratory were substrates for the UvrABC nuclease complex.

  14. Mechanisms of Post-Replication DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanzhe; Mutter-Rottmayer, Elizabeth; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Vaziri, Cyrus; Yang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Accurate DNA replication is crucial for cell survival and the maintenance of genome stability. Cells have developed mechanisms to cope with the frequent genotoxic injuries that arise from both endogenous and environmental sources. Lesions encountered during DNA replication are often tolerated by post-replication repair mechanisms that prevent replication fork collapse and avert the formation of DNA double strand breaks. There are two predominant post-replication repair pathways, trans-lesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS). TLS is a DNA damage-tolerant and low-fidelity mode of DNA synthesis that utilizes specialized ‘Y-family’ DNA polymerases to replicate damaged templates. TS, however, is an error-free ‘DNA damage avoidance’ mode of DNA synthesis that uses a newly synthesized sister chromatid as a template in lieu of the damaged parent strand. Both TLS and TS pathways are tightly controlled signaling cascades that integrate DNA synthesis with the overall DNA damage response and are thus crucial for genome stability. This review will cover the current knowledge of the primary mediators of post-replication repair and how they are regulated in the cell. PMID:28208741

  15. Stress-induced DNA Damage biomarkers: Applications and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism’s endogenous processes like replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damages play a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g. X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e. single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition to such DNA damage products, we suggest possible gene inductions that can be used to characterize responses to different types of stresses i.e. radiation, oxidative and replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and stringent meta-analysis of literature data.

  16. Looking for Waldo: A Potential Thermodynamic Signature to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus DNA in its simplest form is an ensemble of nucleic acids, water, and ions, and the conformation of DNA is dependent on the relative proportions of all three components. When DNA is covalently damaged by endogenous or exogenous reactive species, including those produced by some anticancer drugs, the ensemble undergoes localized changes that affect nucleic acid structure, thermodynamic stability, and the qualitative and quantative arrangement of associated cations and water molecules. Fortunately, the biological effects of low levels of DNA damage are successfully mitigated by a large number of proteins that efficiently recognize and repair DNA damage in the midst of a vast excess of canonical DNA. In this Account, we explore the impact of DNA modifications on the high resolution and dynamic structure of DNA, DNA stability, and the uptake of ions and water and explore how these changes may be sensed by proteins whose function is to initially locate DNA lesions. We discuss modifications on the nucleobases that are located in the major and minor grooves of DNA and include lesions that are observed in vivo, including oxidized bases, as well as some synthetic nucleobases that allow us to probe how the location and nature of different substituents affect the thermodynamics and structure of the DNA ensemble. It is demonstrated that disruption of a cation binding site in the major groove by modification of the N7-position on the purines, which is the major site for DNA alkylation, is enthalpically destabilizing. Accordingly, tethering a cationic charge in the major groove is enthalpically stabilizing. The combined structural and thermodynamic studies provide a detailed picture of how different DNA lesions affect the dynamics of DNA and how modified bases interact with their environment. Our work supports the hypothesis that there is a “thermodynamic signature” to DNA lesions that can be exploited in the initial search that requires differentiation between

  17. Looking for Waldo: a potential thermodynamic signature to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gold, Barry; Stone, Michael P; Marky, Luis A

    2014-04-15

    DNA in its simplest form is an ensemble of nucleic acids, water, and ions, and the conformation of DNA is dependent on the relative proportions of all three components. When DNA is covalently damaged by endogenous or exogenous reactive species, including those produced by some anticancer drugs, the ensemble undergoes localized changes that affect nucleic acid structure, thermodynamic stability, and the qualitative and quantative arrangement of associated cations and water molecules. Fortunately, the biological effects of low levels of DNA damage are successfully mitigated by a large number of proteins that efficiently recognize and repair DNA damage in the midst of a vast excess of canonical DNA. In this Account, we explore the impact of DNA modifications on the high resolution and dynamic structure of DNA, DNA stability, and the uptake of ions and water and explore how these changes may be sensed by proteins whose function is to initially locate DNA lesions. We discuss modifications on the nucleobases that are located in the major and minor grooves of DNA and include lesions that are observed in vivo, including oxidized bases, as well as some synthetic nucleobases that allow us to probe how the location and nature of different substituents affect the thermodynamics and structure of the DNA ensemble. It is demonstrated that disruption of a cation binding site in the major groove by modification of the N7-position on the purines, which is the major site for DNA alkylation, is enthalpically destabilizing. Accordingly, tethering a cationic charge in the major groove is enthalpically stabilizing. The combined structural and thermodynamic studies provide a detailed picture of how different DNA lesions affect the dynamics of DNA and how modified bases interact with their environment. Our work supports the hypothesis that there is a "thermodynamic signature" to DNA lesions that can be exploited in the initial search that requires differentiation between canonical DNA and

  18. A bizarre abdominal cystic lesion.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Ricci, Claudio; Casadei, Riccardo; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-09-06

    In spite of careful intraoperative precautions and gauze counts, mistakes can still occur during surgery. In the case reported, a retained gauze leaved during a surgical approach for removing a solid-cystic papillary tumor localized in the pancreatic tail, caused both persistent abdominal discomfort and the presence of an abdominal cystic lesion at imaging techniques. When a previous operative history is present, a foreign body should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of a patient with an intra-abdominal cystic mass. Finally, radio-opaque marker should be routinely used by surgeons in order to reach a correct diagnosis in operated patients having retained gauze.

  19. DNA Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-11-01

    DNA is one candidate of promising molecules for molecular electronic devices, since it has the double helix structure with pi-electron bases for electron transport, the address at 0.4 nm intervals, and the self-assembly. Electrical conductivity and nanostructure of DNA and modified DNA molecules are investigated in order to research the application of DNA in nanoelectronic devices. It has been revealed that DNA is a wide-gap semiconductor in the absence of doping. The conductivity of DNA has been controlled by chemical doping, electric field doping, and photo-doping. It has found that Poly(dG)[middle dot]Poly(dC) has the best conductivity and can function as a conducting nanowire. The pattern of DNA network is controlled by changing the concentration of the DNA solution.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  1. Computer-aided tracking of MS lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Deborah; Gurwitz Kletenik, Devorah; Koshy, Philip

    2011-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions are known to change over time. The location, size and shape characteristics of lesions are often used to diagnose and to track disease progression. We have improved our lesion-browsing tool that allows users to automatically locate successive significant lesions in a MRI stack. In addition, an automatic alignment feature was implemented to facilitate comparisons across stacks. A lesion stack is formed that can be browsed independently or in tandem with the image windows. Lesions of interest can then be measured, rendered and rotated. Multiple windows allow the viewer to compare the size and shape of lesions from the MRI images of the same patient taken at different time intervals.

  2. Identification, molecular and phylogenetic analysis of poxvirus in skin lesions of southern right whale.

    PubMed

    Fiorito, Carla; Palacios, Carlos; Golemba, Marcelo; Bratanich, Ana; Argüelles, Maria Belen; Fazio, Ana; Bertellotti, Marcelo; Lombardo, Daniel

    2015-10-16

    Poxvirus skin disease has been reported in several species of cetaceans, principally in odontocetes, and a single report in mysticetes. Southern right whales Eubalaena australis in Peninsula Valdes, Argentina, show a variety of skin lesions of unknown etiology, and the number of these lesions has increased in recent years. Samples from dead whales were taken in order to establish the etiology of these lesions. One calf and one adult presented ring-type lesions, characterized by a circumscribed and slightly raised area of skin. Lesions were histologically characterized by the presence of microvesicles and vacuolated cells in the stratum spinosum, along with hyperplasia of the stratum corneum and eosinophilic inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells. Transmission electron microscopy showed aggregations of virions with typical poxvirus morphology. PCR of cetacean poxvirus (CPV) DNA polymerase, DNA topoisomerase I and parapoxvirus DNA polymerase gene fragments was done, and confirmed the presence of poxvirus in one sample. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the detected poxvirus belongs to the CPV-2 group. This is the first confirmed report of poxvirus in southern right whales in Argentina.

  3. Ossicular chain lesions in cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Albera, R; Canale, A; Piumetto, E; Lacilla, M; Dagna, F

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to describe ossicle resorption in chronic otitis with cholesteatoma and correlate it with clinical parameters such as age, contralateral ear condition, tympanic membrane aspect, cholesteatoma pathogenesis and extension, associated lesions and hearing threshold. Preoperative clinical data were collected for 140 patients with chronic otitis with cholesteatoma, whose ossicles were evaluated during surgery. 82% of patients showed ossicle resorption, with incus damage in 78% of cases. Multiple involvement was found in 45% of cases and the incus-stapes association was the most frequent. In 13 patients (11%) with ossicle damage, the ossicular chain was in continuity with a hearing threshold similar to patients without ossicular resorption. Ossicles were always damaged in congenital cholesteatoma and in case of associated lesions. Cholesteatoma extension was related to the incidence of ossicle resorption (p < 0.0001). Air and bone conduction worsened as the number of involved ossicles increased, while the air-bone gap remained stable. In conclusion, the origin and location of cholesteatoma are related to the site of ossicular damage, which is subsequent to the contact between bone and cholesteatoma. Pure-tone audiometry and air-bone gap do not reflect actual ossicular chain status. None of the other preoperative clinical parameters considered were reliable predictors of the condition of the ossicular chain.

  4. DNA Damage in Plant Herbarium Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Staats, Martijn; Cuenca, Argelia; Richardson, James E.; Vrielink-van Ginkel, Ria; Petersen, Gitte; Seberg, Ole; Bakker, Freek T.

    2011-01-01

    Dried plant herbarium specimens are potentially a valuable source of DNA. Efforts to obtain genetic information from this source are often hindered by an inability to obtain amplifiable DNA as herbarium DNA is typically highly degraded. DNA post-mortem damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative assessment of DNA post-mortem damage is essential to determine the accuracy of molecular data from herbarium specimens. In this study we present an assessment of DNA damage as miscoding lesions in herbarium specimens using 454-sequencing of amplicons derived from plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear DNA. In addition, we assess DNA degradation as a result of strand breaks and other types of polymerase non-bypassable damage by quantitative real-time PCR. Comparing four pairs of fresh and herbarium specimens of the same individuals we quantitatively assess post-mortem DNA damage, directly after specimen preparation, as well as after long-term herbarium storage. After specimen preparation we estimate the proportion of gene copy numbers of plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear DNA to be 2.4–3.8% of fresh control DNA and 1.0–1.3% after long-term herbarium storage, indicating that nearly all DNA damage occurs on specimen preparation. In addition, there is no evidence of preferential degradation of organelle versus nuclear genomes. Increased levels of C→T/G→A transitions were observed in old herbarium plastid DNA, representing 21.8% of observed miscoding lesions. We interpret this type of post-mortem DNA damage-derived modification to have arisen from the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine during long-term herbarium storage. Our results suggest that reliable sequence data can be obtained from herbarium specimens. PMID:22163018

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system for studying clustered DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Moscariello, M.M.; Sutherland, B.

    2010-08-01

    DNA-damaging agents can induce clustered lesions or multiply damaged sites (MDSs) on the same or opposing DNA strands. In the latter, attempts to repair MDS can generate closely opposed single-strand break intermediates that may convert non-lethal or mutagenic base damage into double-strand breaks (DSBs). We constructed a diploid S. cerevisiae yeast strain with a chromosomal context targeted by integrative DNA fragments carrying different damages to determine whether closely opposed base damages are converted to DSBs following the outcomes of the homologous recombination repair pathway. As a model of MDS, we studied clustered uracil DNA damages with a known location and a defined distance separating the lesions. The system we describe might well be extended to assessing the repair of MDSs with different compositions, and to most of the complex DNA lesions induced by physical and chemical agents.

  6. Formation of the carboxamidine precursor of cyanuric acid from guanine oxidative lesion dehydro-guanidinohydantoin.

    PubMed

    Irvoas, Joris; Trzcionka, Jérôme; Pratviel, Geneviève

    2014-09-01

    DNA damage under oxidative stress leads to oxidation of guanine base. The identification of the resulting guanine lesions in cellular DNA is difficult due to the sensitivity of the primary oxidation products to hydrolysis and/or further oxidation. We isolated dehydroguanidino-hydantoin (DGh) (or oxidized guanidinohydantoin), a secondary oxidation product of guanine, and showed that this lesion reacts readily with nucleophiles such as asymmetric peroxides and transforms to 2,4,6-trioxo-1,3,5-triazinane-1-carboxamidine residue. Further hydrolysis of this intermediate leads to cyanuric acid and finally to urea residue. This work demonstrates a new possible pathway for the formation of the well-known carboxamidine precursor of cyanuric acid lesion.

  7. Detection and characterisation of papillomavirus in skin lesions of giraffe and sable antelope in South Africa.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, E; Bosman, A M; van Wilpe, E; Williams, J H; Bengis, R G; van Heerden, J; Venter, E H

    2011-06-01

    Papillomavirus was detected electron microscopically in cutaneous fibropapillomas of a giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and a sable antelope (Hippotragus niger). The virus particles measured 45 nm in diameter. Histopathologically, the lesions showed histopathological features similar to those of equine sarcoid as well as positive immunoperoxidase-staining of tissue sections for papillomavirus antigen. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detected bovine papillomavirus (BPV) DNA. Bovine papillomavirus-1 was characterised by real-time PCR in the sable and giraffe, and cloning and sequencing of the PCR product revealed a similarity to BPV-1. As in the 1st giraffe, the lesions from a 2nd giraffe revealed locally malignant pleomorphism, possibly indicating the lesional end-point of papilloma infection. Neither virus particles nor positively staining papillomavirus antigen could be demonstrated in the 2nd giraffe but papillomavirus DNA was detected by real-time PCR which corresponded with BPV-1 and BPV-2.

  8. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  9. Effect of fluoride, lesion baseline severity and mineral distribution on lesion progression.

    PubMed

    Lippert, F; Butler, A; Lynch, R J M; Hara, A T

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of fluoride (F) concentration, lesion baseline severity (ΔZ(base)) and mineral distribution on lesion progression. Artificial caries lesions were created using three protocols [methylcellulose acid gel (MeC), hydroxyethylcellulose acid gel (HEC), carboxymethylcellulose acid solution (CMC)] and with low and high ΔZ(base) groups by varying demineralization times within protocols. Subsequently, lesions were immersed in a demineralizing solution for 24 h in the presence of 0, 1, 2 or 5 ppm F. Changes in mineral distribution characteristics of caries lesions were studied using transverse microradiography. At baseline, the protocols yielded lesions with three distinctly different mineral distributions. Secondary demineralization revealed differences in F response between and within lesion types. In general, lowΔZ lesions were more responsive to F than highΔZ lesions. LowΔZ MeC lesions showed the greatest range of response among all lesions, whereas highΔZ HEC lesions were almost unaffected by F. Laminations were observed in the presence of F in all but highΔZ HEC and CMC lesions. Changes in mineral distribution effected by F were most pronounced in MeC lesions, with remineralization/mineral redeposition in the original lesion body at the expense of sound enamel beyond the original lesion in a dose-response manner. Both ΔZ(base) and lesion mineral distribution directly impact the F response and the extent of secondary demineralization of caries lesions. Further studies - in situ and on natural white spot lesions - are required to better mimic in vivo caries under laboratory conditions.

  10. DNA Charge Transport for Sensing and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sontz, Pamela A.; Muren, Natalie B.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus The DNA duplex is an exquisite macromolecular array that stores genetic information to encode proteins and regulate pathways, but its unique structure imparts chemical function that allows it also to mediate charge transport (CT). We have utilized diverse platforms to probe DNA CT, using spectroscopic, electrochemical, and even genetic methods. These studies have established powerful features of DNA CT chemistry. DNA CT can occur over long molecular distances as long as the bases are well stacked; perturbations in base stacking as arise with single base mismatches, DNA lesions, and the binding of some proteins that kink the DNA, all serve to inhibit DNA CT. Significantly, single molecule studies of DNA CT show that ground state CT can occur over 34 nm as long as the duplex is well stacked; one single base mismatch inhibits CT. The DNA duplex is an effective sensor for the integrity of the base pair stack. Moreover the efficiency of DNA CT is what one would expect for a stack of graphite sheets, equivalent to the stack of DNA base pairs, and independent of the sugar-phosphate backbone. Since DNA CT offers a means to carry out redox chemistry from a distance, we have considered how this chemistry might be used for long range signaling in a biological context. We have taken advantage of our chemical probes and platforms to characterize DNA CT also in the context of the cell. CT can occur over long distances, perhaps funneling damage to particular sites and insulating others from oxidative stress. Significantly, transcription factors that activate the genome to respond to oxidative stress can also be activated from a distance through DNA CT. Numerous proteins work to maintain the integrity of the genome and increasingly they have been found to contain [4Fe-4S] clusters that do not appear to carry out either structural or enzymatic roles. Using electrochemical methods, we find that DNA binding shifts the redox potentials of the clusters, activating them

  11. Transcriptional bypass of regioisomeric ethylated thymidine lesions by T7 RNA polymerase and human RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    You, Changjun; Wang, Pengcheng; Dai, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-01-01

    Alkylative damage to DNA can be induced by environmental chemicals, endogenous metabolites and some commonly prescribed chemotherapeutic agents. The regioisomeric N3-, O2- and O4-ethylthymidine (N3-, O2- and O4-EtdT, respectively) represent an important class of ethylated DNA lesions. Using nonreplicative double-stranded vectors containing an N3-EtdT, O2-EtdT or O4-EtdT at a defined site in the template strand, herein we examined the effects of these lesions on DNA transcription mediated by single-subunit T7 RNA polymerase or multisubunit human RNA polymerase II in vitro and in human cells. We found that O4-EtdT is highly mutagenic and exclusively induces the misincorporation of guanine opposite the lesion, whereas N3-EtdT and O2-EtdT display promiscuous miscoding properties during transcription. In addition, N3-EtdT and O2-EtdT were found to inhibit strongly DNA transcription in vitro and in certain human cells. Moreover, N3-EtdT, but not O2-EtdT or O4-EtdT, is an efficient substrate for transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. These findings provide new important insights into how these alkylated DNA lesions compromise the flow of genetic information, which may help to understand the risk of these lesions in living cells. PMID:25404131

  12. P16(INK 4a) and Ki-67 expression in human papilloma virus-related head and neck mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Gültekin, Sibel Elif; Sengüven, Burcu; Klussmann, Jens Peter; Dienes, Hans Peter

    2015-03-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is postulated as a risk factor in the etiology of some specific mucosal pathologies in the head and neck regions. Despite the frequent use of p16(INK4a) as a surrogate marker for HPV-infection, there is still controversy with respect to its reliability. This study has been undertaken to assess the potential role of p16(INK 4a) and Ki-67 expression in HPV-related lesions. The study was conducted on 71 specimens of oral, tonsillar and laryngeal lesions which comprised 25 dysplasia and 46 papilloma specimens. Specimens were immunohistochemically stained for p16(INK4A) and Ki-67 proteins. HPV DNA was determined by one step multiplex polymerase chain reaction. HPV DNA was detected in 33.8% of all lesions. Tonsil and larynx lesions showed significant differences with oral lesions for HPV positivity (p < 0.001). p16(INK 4a) over-expression was seen in 56.5% of papilloma and 60% of dysplasia specimens. HPV status showed a positive correlation with p16(INK 4a) expression in tonsillar dysplasias (p < 0.001). p16(INK 4a) expression may have a value as a marker in high risk HPV induced dysplasias, but not in low risk infected lesions. The proliferation index is not related to HPV-induced lesions and may be evaluated as an independent marker in head and neck premalignant lesions.

  13. Chlamydia pecorum: fetal and placental lesions in sporadic caprine abortion.

    PubMed

    Giannitti, Federico; Anderson, Mark; Miller, Myrna; Rowe, Joan; Sverlow, Karen; Vasquez, Marce; Cantón, Germán

    2016-03-01

    Chlamydial abortion in small ruminants is usually associated with Chlamydia abortus infection. Although Chlamydia pecorum has been detected in aborted ruminants and epidemiological data suggests that C. pecorum is abortigenic in these species, published descriptions of lesions in fetuses are lacking. This work describes fetoplacental lesions in a caprine abortion with C. pecorum infection, and further supports the abortigenic role of C. pecorum in ruminants. A 16-month-old Boer goat aborted twin fetuses at ~130 days of gestation. Both fetuses (A and B) and the placenta of fetus A were submitted for postmortem examination and diagnostic workup. At autopsy, the fetuses had moderate anasarca, intermuscular edema in the hindquarters (A), and brachygnathia and palatoschisis (B). In the placenta, the cotyledons were covered by yellow fibrinosuppurative exudate that extended into the adjacent intercotyledonary areas. Histologically, there was severe suppurative and necrotizing placentitis with vasculitis (arteriolitis) and thrombosis, multifocal lymphohistiocytic and neutrophilic hepatitis (A), and fibrinosuppurative enteritis in both fetuses. Chlamydia antigen was detected in the placenta by the direct fluorescent antibody test and in fetal intestines by immunohistochemistry. Nested polymerase chain reaction of DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of placenta and intestine amplified 400 bp of the Chlamydia 16S rRNA gene that was sequenced and found to be 99% identical to C. pecorum by BLAST analysis. Other known abortigenic infectious agents were ruled out by specific testing. It is concluded that C. pecorum infection is associated with fetoplacental lesions and sporadic abortion in goats.

  14. Congenital lung lesions: Postnatal management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Dakshesh H; Rasiah, Shree Vishna

    2015-08-01

    Antenatal diagnosis of lung lesion has become more accurate resulting in dilemma and controversies of its antenatal and postnatal management. Majority of antenatally diagnosed congenital lung lesions are asymptomatic in the neonatal age group. Large lung lesions cause respiratory compromise and inevitably require urgent investigations and surgery. The congenital lung lesion presenting with hydrops requires careful postnatal management of lung hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension. Preoperative stabilization with gentle ventilation with permissive hypercapnia and delayed surgery similar to congenital diaphragmatic hernia management has been shown to result in good outcome. The diagnostic investigations and surgical management of the asymptomatic lung lesions remain controversial. Postnatal management and outcome of congenital cystic lung lesions are discussed.

  15. In vivo detection and replication studies of α-anomeric lesions of 2′-deoxyribonucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Nicholas J.; Zhai, Qianqian; Navarro, Diana C.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Wang, Yinsheng

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage, arising from endogenous metabolism or exposure to environmental agents, may perturb the transmission of genetic information by blocking DNA replication and/or inducing mutations, which contribute to the development of cancer and likely other human diseases. Hydroxyl radical attack on the C1′, C3′ and C4′ of 2-deoxyribose can give rise to epimeric 2-deoxyribose lesions, for which the in vivo occurrence and biological consequences remain largely unexplored. Through independent chemical syntheses of all three epimeric lesions of 2′-deoxyguanosine (dG) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, we demonstrated unambiguously the presence of substantial levels of the α-anomer of dG (α-dG) in calf thymus DNA and in DNA isolated from mouse pancreatic tissues. We further assessed quantitatively the impact of all four α-dN lesions on DNA replication in Escherichia coli by employing a shuttle-vector method. We found that, without SOS induction, all α-dN lesions except α-dA strongly blocked DNA replication and, while replication across α-dA was error-free, replicative bypass of α-dC and α-dG yielded mainly C→A and G→A mutations. In addition, SOS induction could lead to markedly elevated bypass efficiencies for the four α-dN lesions, abolished the G→A mutation for α-dG, pronouncedly reduced the C→A mutation for α-dC and triggered T→A mutation for α-dT. The preferential misincorporation of dTMP opposite the α-dNs could be attributed to the unique base-pairing properties of the nucleobases elicited by the inversion of the configuration of the N-glycosidic linkage. Our results also revealed that Pol V played a major role in bypassing α-dC, α-dG and α-dT in vivo. The abundance of α-dG in mammalian tissue and the impact of the α-dNs on DNA replication demonstrate for the first time the biological significance of this family of DNA lesions. PMID:26202973

  16. Effective and lesion-free cutaneous influenza vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji; Li, Bo; Wu, Mei X.

    2015-01-01

    The current study details efficient lesion-free cutaneous vaccination via vaccine delivery into an array of micropores in the skin, instead of bolus injection at a single site. Such delivery effectively segregated vaccine-induced inflammation, resulting in rapid resolution of the inflammation, provided that distances between any two micropores were sufficient. When the inoculation site was treated by FDA-approved nonablative fractional laser (NAFL) before insertion of a PR8 model influenza vaccine-packaged, biodegradable microneedle array (MNs), mice displayed vigorous antigen-uptake, eliciting strong Th1-biased immunity. These animals were completely protected from homologous viral challenges, and fully or partially protected from heterologous H1N1 and H3N2 viral challenges, whereas mice receiving MNs alone suffered from severe illnesses or died of similar viral challenges. NAFL-mediated adjuvanicity was ascribed primarily to dsDNA and other “danger” signals released from laser-damaged skin cells. Thus, mice deficient in dsDNA-sensing pathway, but not Toll like receptor (TLR) or inflammasome pathways, showed poor responses to NAFL. Importantly, with this novel approach both mice and swine exhibited strong protective immunity without incurring any appreciable skin irritation, in sharp contrast to the overt skin irritation caused by intradermal injections. The effective lesion-free cutaneous vaccination merits further clinical studies. PMID:25848020

  17. Comet Lesions in Patients with Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum

    PubMed Central

    Tatlıpınar, Sinan; Şahan, Berna; Altunsoy, Muhsin

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a genetic multisystemic disorder affecting the skin, eyes and cardiovascular system. Basic fundoscopic findings in PXE result from Bruch’s membrane involvement. The most important fundoscopic findings are angioid streaks. Other significant ocular findings are peau d’orange appearance, optic disc drusen, pattern dystrophy-like macular appearance, comet lesions, and choroidal neovascularization. Comet lesions are a pathognomonic ocular finding for PXE. The presence of both angioid streaks in the fundus and typical skin lesions should alert clinicians to PXE. Herein, we present two PXE cases with comet lesions. PMID:27800246

  18. Occurrence in vivo of sister chromatid exchanges at the same locus in successive cell divisions caused by nonrepairable lesions induced by gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Morales-Ramírez, P; Vallarino-Kelly, T; Rodríguez-Reyes, R

    1988-01-01

    The capacity of lesions induced by gamma radiation to produce sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in successive divisions in mouse bone marrow cells in vivo was evaluated using a protocol for the three-way differentiation of sister chromatids. Evidence was obtained that exposure to gamma radiation induces DNA lesions that result in the formation of SCE at the same locus in two successive cell divisions. The relevance of this observation with respect to DNA repair and mutagenesis is discussed.

  19. Prevalent bacterial species and novel phylotypes in advanced noma lesions.

    PubMed

    Paster, B J; Falkler Jr, W A; Enwonwu, C O; Idigbe, E O; Savage, K O; Levanos, V A; Tamer, M A; Ericson, R L; Lau, C N; Dewhirst, F E

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the bacterial diversity in advanced noma lesions using culture-independent molecular methods. 16S ribosomal DNA bacterial genes from DNA isolated from advanced noma lesions of four Nigerian children were PCR amplified with universally conserved primers and spirochetal selective primers and cloned into Escherichia coli. Partial 16S rRNA sequences of approximately 500 bases from 212 cloned inserts were used initially to determine species identity or closest relatives by comparison with sequences of known species or phylotypes. Nearly complete sequences of approximately 1,500 bases were obtained for most of the potentially novel species. A total of 67 bacterial species or phylotypes were detected, 25 of which have not yet been grown in vitro. Nineteen of the species or phylotypes, including Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus spp., and the opportunistic pathogens Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Ochrobactrum anthropi were detected in more than one subject. Other known species that were detected included Achromobacter spp., Afipia spp., Brevundimonas diminuta, Capnocytophaga spp., Cardiobacterium sp., Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium spp., Gemella haemoylsans, and Neisseria spp. Phylotypes that were unique to noma infections included those in the genera Eubacterium, Flavobacterium, Kocuria, Microbacterium, and Porphyromonas and the related Streptococcus salivarius and genera Sphingomonas and TREPONEMA: Since advanced noma lesions are infections open to the environment, it was not surprising to detect species not commonly associated with the oral cavity, e.g., from soil. Several species previously implicated as putative pathogens of noma, such as spirochetes and Fusobacterium spp., were detected in at least one subject. However, due to the limited number of available noma subjects, it was not possible at this time to associate specific species with the disease.

  20. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  1. Involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA and repair in cancer development and aging

    PubMed Central

    Tudek, Barbara; Winczura, Alicja; Janik, Justyna; Siomek, Agnieszka; Foksinski, Marek; Oliński, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA repair may mediate several cellular processes, like replication and transcription, mutagenesis and apoptosis and thus may be important factors in the development and pathology of an organism, including cancer. DNA is constantly damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) directly and also by products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), which form exocyclic adducts to DNA bases. A wide variety of oxidatively-generated DNA lesions are present in living cells. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoGua) is one of the best known DNA lesions due to its mutagenic properties. Among LPO-derived DNA base modifications the most intensively studied are ethenoadenine and ethenocytosine, highly miscoding DNA lesions considered as markers of oxidative stress and promutagenic DNA damage. Although at present it is impossible to directly answer the question concerning involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA in cancer etiology, it is likely that oxidatively modified DNA bases may serve as a source of mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and are involved in aging (i.e. they may be causal factors responsible for these processes). To counteract the deleterious effect of oxidatively damaged DNA, all organisms have developed several DNA repair mechanisms. The efficiency of oxidatively damaged DNA repair was frequently found to be decreased in cancer patients. The present work reviews the basis for the biological significance of DNA damage, particularly effects of 8-oxoGua and ethenoadduct occurrence in DNA in the aspect of cancer development, drawing attention to the multiplicity of proteins with repair activities. PMID:20589166

  2. Ibotenic acid lesions of the lateral hypothalamus: comparison with the electrolytic lesion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Winn, P; Tarbuck, A; Dunnett, S B

    1984-05-01

    Rats received either ibotenic acid, electrolytic or sham lesions of the lateral hypothalamic area. Compared to sham operated rats, both lesion groups showed aphagia and adipsia following the lesion; this was less severe in the ibotenic acid lesioned rats. Once recovered, the ibotenic acid lesioned rats showed residual regulatory impairments in their compensatory responses to glucoprivation and to extracellular and intracellular dehydration. However, unlike the electrolytic lesioned rats, those with ibotenic acid lesions did not show akinesia and exhibited normal responses to both d-amphetamine and apomorphine. Ibotenic acid lesions resulted in extensive loss of cell bodies within the lateral hypothalamic area while sparing ascending dopamine neurones. The results are interpreted as suggesting that the lateral hypothalamic area and ascending dopamine neurones are components of a single system involved in the regulation of food and water intake.

  3. [Furcation lesions in deciduous teeth].

    PubMed

    Demars-Fremault, C; Pilipili Muhima, C

    1991-03-01

    The area of furcation of temporary molars constitutes a zone of exchanges and rearrangements relating to the evolution of the sub-adjacent permanent tooth. It is subjected to the eruption of the latter and to the physiological modifications of the temporary tooth. Moreover, this area is the site of above-mentioned inflammatory or infections conditions, maintained or aggravated by anatomical factors (accessory canals, thin pulpar floor, with little calcified dentine and broad tubuli), physiological factors (multiplication of accessory canals, decrease in the floor and migration of the epithelial attachment), endodontic factors (pulpal involvement and its complications) and periodontal factors (septum syndrome). The pathology of furcation is an evolving lesion. When discovered early it can be treated by endodontic therapy, while, in a later phase, it will require the extraction of the tooth. The assessment is made on the basis of a X-Ray examination which permits the temporary tooth to be situated in its stable or labile phase, the condition of the pulpal floor to be evaluated and the stage of sub-adjacent germ mineralisation to be estimated. A periodontal arrangement, by coronal reconstitution, conditions the reliability of the endodontic therapies.

  4. Focal liver lesions found incidentally

    PubMed Central

    Algarni, Abdullah A; Alshuhri, Abdullah H; Alonazi, Majed M; Mourad, Moustafa Mabrouk; Bramhall, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    Incidentally found focal liver lesions are a common finding and a reason for referral to hepatobiliary service. They are often discovered in patients with history of liver cirrhosis, colorectal cancer, incidentally during work up for abdominal pain or in a trauma setting. Specific points should considered during history taking such as risk factors of liver cirrhosis; hepatitis, alcohol consumption, substance exposure or use of oral contraceptive pills and metabolic syndromes. Full blood count, liver function test and tumor markers can act as a guide to minimize the differential diagnosis and to categorize the degree of liver disease. Imaging should start with B-mode ultrasound. If available, contrast enhanced ultrasound is a feasible, safe, cost effective option and increases the ability to reach a diagnosis. Contrast enhanced computed tomography should be considered next. It is more accurate in diagnosis and better to study anatomy for possible operation. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance is the gold standard with the highest sensitivity. If doubt still remains, the options are biopsy or surgical excision. PMID:27028805

  5. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-01-01

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  6. [Mandibular lesions in multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Scutellari, P N; Orzincolo, C

    1992-03-01

    A review was made of 237 cases of multiple myeloma seen at the Institute of Radiology and Hematology of the Ferrara University from 1984 through 1990. The results showed skeletal involvement of the mandible to be present in 25 patients (10.54%). The diagnosis of multiple myeloma was based on the following criteria: 1) increased number of abnormal, atypical or immature plasma cells in the bone marrow; 2) the presence of a monoclonal protein in the serum or urine; 3) bone lesions consistent with those of myeloma. Symptoms include pain and swelling of the oral cavity, tooth mobility and loss, numbness along the inferior dental nerve, and paresthesia of the lower lip. The typical radiographic appearance is a well-defined "punched-out" lytic defect, solitary or multiple; sometimes, the defect enlarges and appears "bubbly" or septated. Permeative lytic areas, with blurred outlines, are a rare pattern, which is radiologically indistinguishable from skeletal metastases. The involvement of the oral cavity and jaw in multiple myeloma has been often reported in literature: nevertheless, if radiographs of the jaws had been systematically taken in all the cases, its incidence would probably have been much higher than previously suspected.

  7. Deceptive Lesions of Periodontium: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Pandiar, Deepak; Pattamparambath, Manjusha; Kalathingal, Pranav Vijayan; Maliyekkal, Shameena Pallikandi; Vijay, Amol Nagrale

    2015-09-01

    Basic pathology of the common appearing diseases of the periodontium are not always common inflammatory reactions. The root cause may be malignant and metastatic lesions. Here, we present unusual causes of these common periodontal lesions. This article also stress upon the importance of histopathological examination of the surgically excised localized gingival swellings which fail to regress after conservative therapy.

  8. Osteochondral Lesions of the Talar Dome.

    PubMed

    Stone

    1996-03-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talar dome are relatively common causes of ankle pain and disability. Trauma is the most common cause, but ischemic necrosis, en-docrine disorders, and genetic factors may have etiologic significance. Medial lesions are usually located posteriorly on the dome of the talus, whereas lateral lesions are most frequently located anteriorly. Although the staging system described by Berndt and Harty remains popular, it may not accurately reflect the integrity of the articular cartilage. Small lesions of the talar dome may be present despite a normal appearance on plain radiography. Bone scintigraphy may show increased radionuclide uptake in the talar dome. Magnetic resonance imaging is also sensitive for identifying intraosseous abnormalities in the talus and has the added benefit of revealing other types of soft-tissue lesions not visible on routine radiographic studies. Computed tomography remains the imaging technique of choice when delineation of a bone fragment is desired. Nonoperative management of osteochondral lesions, including restricted weight-bearing and/or immobilization, is recommended unless a loose fragment is clearly present. Surgical options include drilling (usually reserved for intact lesions), debridement of the lesion with curettage or abrasion of the bone bed, internal fixation of the fragment, and bone grafting. Recent technical advances allow these procedures to be performed arthroscopically, with potential reduction of surgical trauma, length of hospital stay, and complication rates.

  9. Pure Gerstmann's syndrome from a focal lesion.

    PubMed

    Roeltgen, D P; Sevush, S; Heilman, K M

    1983-01-01

    It is controversial whether a focal lesion can specifically induce Gerstmann's syndrome (dyscalculia, left-right disorientation, finger agnosia, and agraphia). Also, Gerstmann's tetrad has been attributed to other cerebral symptoms, particularly aphasia. We examined a patient who had all four symptoms of Gerstmann's syndrome, without other symptoms or signs, and who had a discrete left parietal lesion.

  10. Benign lesions of the external auditory canal.

    PubMed

    Tran, L P; Grundfast, K M; Selesnick, S H

    1996-10-01

    Benign mass lesions of the external auditory canal, such as exostoses and osteomas, are common findings on physical examination but most often do not require treatment. The differential diagnosis of lesions in the external auditory canal, however, should not be limited to those benign processes discussed here, but should also include infectious, dermatologic, congenital, and malignant processes.

  11. The substrate specificity of MutY for hyperoxidized guanine lesions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Sarah; Neeley, William L; Delaney, James C; Essigmann, John M

    2007-02-06

    The DNA damage product 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanine (8-oxoG) is a commonly used biomarker of oxidative stress. The mutagenic potential of this DNA lesion is mitigated in Escherichia coli by multiple enzymes. One of these enzymes, MutY, excises an A mispaired with 8-oxoG as part of the process to restore the original G:C base pair. However, numerous studies have shown that 8-oxoG is chemically labile toward further oxidation. Here, we examine the activity of MutY on the 8-oxoG oxidation products guanidinohydantoin (Gh), two diastereomers of spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp1 and Sp2), oxaluric acid (Oa), and urea (Ur). Single-stranded viral genomes containing a site-specific lesion were constructed and replicated in E. coli that are either proficient in DNA repair or that lack MutY. These lesions were found previously to be potently mutagenic in repair competent bacteria, and we report here that these 8-oxoG-derived lesions are equally miscoding when replicated in E. coli lacking MutY; no significant change in mutation identity or frequency is observed. Interestingly, however, in the presence of MutY, Sp1 and Sp2 are more toxic than in cells lacking this repair enzyme.

  12. Pediatric Awake Craniotomy for Brain Lesions.

    PubMed

    Akay, Ali; Rükşen, Mete; Çetin, H Yurday; Seval, H Özer; İşlekel, Sertaç

    2016-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is a special method to prevent motor deficits during the resection of lesions that are located in, or close to, functional areas. Although it is more commonly performed in adult patients, reports of pediatric cases undergoing awake craniotomy are limited in the literature. In our clinic, where we frequently use awake craniotomy in adult patients, we performed this method in 2 selected pediatric cases for lesion surgery. At an early age, these 2 cases diagnosed with epilepsy presented cerebral lesions, but since the lesions enclosed functional areas, surgical resection was not regarded as a treatment option at this time. In these 2 pediatric cases, we successfully completed lesion surgery with awake craniotomy. The method and the techniques employed during surgery are presented concomitant with other reports in the literature.

  13. Guanine- 5-carboxylcytosine base pairs mimic mismatches during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Toshihiro; Ito, Shinsuke; Toda, Mariko; Kanao, Rie; Collins, Leonard B; Shibata, Marika; Urabe, Miho; Koseki, Haruhiko; Masuda, Yuji; Swenberg, James A; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2014-06-09

    The genetic information encoded in genomes must be faithfully replicated and transmitted to daughter cells. The recent discovery of consecutive DNA conversions by TET family proteins of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) suggests these modified cytosines act as DNA lesions, which could threaten genome integrity. Here, we have shown that although 5caC pairs with guanine during DNA replication in vitro, G·5caC pairs stimulated DNA polymerase exonuclease activity and were recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Knockdown of thymine DNA glycosylase increased 5caC in genome, affected cell proliferation via MMR, indicating MMR is a novel reader for 5caC. These results suggest the epigenetic modification products of 5caC behave as DNA lesions.

  14. Nucleosomes Suppress the Formation of Double-strand DNA Breaks during Attempted Base Excision Repair of Clustered Oxidative Damages*

    PubMed Central

    Cannan, Wendy J.; Tsang, Betty P.; Wallace, Susan S.; Pederson, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can produce multiple, clustered oxidative lesions in DNA. The near simultaneous excision of nearby lesions in opposing DNA strands by the base excision repair (BER) enzymes can produce double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). This attempted BER accounts for many of the potentially lethal or mutagenic DSBs that occur in vivo. To assess the impact of nucleosomes on the frequency and pattern of BER-dependent DSB formation, we incubated nucleosomes containing oxidative damages in opposing DNA strands with selected DNA glycosylases and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1. Overall, nucleosomes substantially suppressed DSB formation. However, the degree of suppression varied as a function of (i) the lesion type and DNA glycosylase tested, (ii) local sequence context and the stagger between opposing strand lesions, (iii) the helical orientation of oxidative lesions relative to the underlying histone octamer, and (iv) the distance between the lesion cluster and the nucleosome edge. In some instances the binding of a BER factor to one nucleosomal lesion appeared to facilitate binding to the opposing strand lesion. DSB formation did not invariably lead to nucleosome dissolution, and in some cases, free DNA ends resulting from DSB formation remained associated with the histone octamer. These observations explain how specific structural and dynamic properties of nucleosomes contribute to the suppression of BER-generated DSBs. These studies also suggest that most BER-generated DSBs will occur in linker DNA and in genomic regions associated with elevated rates of nucleosome turnover or remodeling. PMID:24891506

  15. DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S

    2001-05-01

    DNA ligases catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds between juxtaposed 5' phosphate and a 3'-hydroxyl terminus in duplex DNA. This activity can repair single-stranded nicks in duplex DNA and join duplex DNA restriction fragments having either blunt ends or homologous cohesive ends. Two ligases are used for nucleic acid research and their reaction conditions and applications are described in this unit: E. coli ligase and T4 ligase. These enzymes differ in two important properties. One is the source of energy: T4 ligase uses ATP, while E. coli ligase uses NAD. Another important difference is their ability to ligate blunt ends; under normal reaction conditions, only T4 DNA ligase will ligate blunt ends.

  16. Detection of lesions in mammographic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.; Jacobson, Francine L.; Judy, Philip F.

    1999-05-01

    This paper is a report on very surprising results from recent work on detection of real lesions in digitized mammograms. The experiments were done using a novel experimental procedure with hybrid images. The lesions (signals) were real tumor masses extracted from breast tissue specimen radiographs. In the detection experiments, the tumors were added to digitized normal mammographic backgrounds. The results of this new work have been both novel and very surprising. Contrast thresholds increased with increasing lesion size for lesions larger than approximately 1 mm in diameter. Earlier work with white noise, radiographic image noise, computed tomography (CT) noise and some types of patient structure have accustomed us to a particular relationship between lesion size and contrast for constant detectability. All previous contrast/detail (CD) diagrams have been similar, the contrast threshold decreases as lesion size increases and flattens at large lesion sizes. The CD diagram for lesion detection in mammographic structure is completely different. It will be shown that this is a consequence of the power-law dependence of the projected breast tissue structure spectral density on spatial frequency. Mammographic tissue structure power spectra have the form P(f) equals B/f(beta ), with an average exponent of approximately 3 (range from 2 to 4), and are approximately isotropic (small angular dependence). Results for two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) signal detection experiments using 4 tumor lesions and one mathematically generated signal will be presented. These results are for an unbiased selection of mammographic backgrounds. It is possible that an additional understanding of the effects of breast structure on lesion detectability can be obtained by investigating detectability in various classes of mammographic backgrounds. This will be the subject of future research.

  17. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  18. DNA excision repair at telomeres.

    PubMed

    Jia, Pingping; Her, Chengtao; Chai, Weihang

    2015-12-01

    DNA damage is caused by either endogenous cellular metabolic processes such as hydrolysis, oxidation, alkylation, and DNA base mismatches, or exogenous sources including ultraviolet (UV) light, ionizing radiation, and chemical agents. Damaged DNA that is not properly repaired can lead to genomic instability, driving tumorigenesis. To protect genomic stability, mammalian cells have evolved highly conserved DNA repair mechanisms to remove and repair DNA lesions. Telomeres are composed of long tandem TTAGGG repeats located at the ends of chromosomes. Maintenance of functional telomeres is critical for preventing genome instability. The telomeric sequence possesses unique features that predispose telomeres to a variety of DNA damage induced by environmental genotoxins. This review briefly describes the relevance of excision repair pathways in telomere maintenance, with the focus on base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR). By summarizing current knowledge on excision repair of telomere damage and outlining many unanswered questions, it is our hope to stimulate further interest in a better understanding of excision repair processes at telomeres and in how these processes contribute to telomere maintenance.

  19. Overview of DNA Repair in Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Rajão, Matheus Andrade; Nascimento de Aguiar, Pedro Henrique; Vieira-da-Rocha, João Pedro; Machado, Carlos Renato; Furtado, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of DNA lesions arise due to environmental agents, normal cellular metabolism, or intrinsic weaknesses in the chemical bonds of DNA. Diverse cellular mechanisms have evolved to maintain genome stability, including mechanisms to repair damaged DNA, to avoid the incorporation of modified nucleotides, and to tolerate lesions (translesion synthesis). Studies of the mechanisms related to DNA metabolism in trypanosomatids have been very limited. Together with recent experimental studies, the genome sequencing of Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania major, three related pathogens with different life cycles and disease pathology, has revealed interesting features of the DNA repair mechanism in these protozoan parasites, which will be reviewed here. PMID:20976268

  20. Bacteriology of diabetic foot lesions.

    PubMed

    Yoga, R; Khairul, A; Sunita, K; Suresh, C

    2006-02-01

    Infection plays a pivotal role in enhancing a diabetic foot at risk toward amputation. Effective antibiotic therapy against the offending pathogens is an important component of treatment of diabetic foot infections. Recognition of the pathogen is always difficult as the representative deep tissue sample for culture is surrounded by ulcer surface harbouring colonies of organisms frequently labelled as skin commensals. The emergent of resistant strains represents a compounding problem standing against efforts to prevent amputation. This study was undertaken to identify the pathogens associated with diabetic foot infection in terms of their frequency and sensitivity against certain commonly used antibiotics. Forty-four consecutive patients with open diabetic foot infections had wound swab taken for culture and sensitivity testing. Cultures positive were observed in 89% of the cases with Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeroginosa encountered in 20%, 14% and 14% of cases respectively. Mixed growths were isolated in 6% of cultures. All Staphylcoccus aureus isolates were resistant to Penicillin but 80% were sensitive to Erythromycin and Co-trimoxazole. Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were sensitive to Methicillin and Gentamycin in 80% and 60% of cases respectively, and resistant to Ampicillin and Ceftazidime in 83% and 50% respectively. All Pseudomonas aeroginosa isolates were sensitive to Amikacin and Ciprofloxacin but 50% were resistant to Gentamycin. There was no single antibiotic possessing good coverage for all common organisms isolated from diabetic foot lesions. Staphylococcus aureus remains the predominant cause of diabetic foot infections followed by Klebsiela pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Most infections are monomicrobial. The emergence of multiresistant organisms is a worrying feature in diabetic foot infections.

  1. Regression of Human Papillomavirus Intraepithelial Lesions Is Induced by MVA E2 Therapeutic Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    López-Contreras, Mario; Rosales, Carlos; Magallanes-Molina, Jose-Roberto; Gonzalez-Vergara, Roberto; Arroyo-Cazarez, Jose Martin; Ricardez-Arenas, Antonio; del Follo-Valencia, Armando; Padilla-Arriaga, Santiago; Guerrero, Miriam Veronica; Pirez, Miguel Angel; Arellano-Fiore, Claudia; Villarreal, Freddy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human papilloma viruses can induce warts, condylomas, and other intraepithelial cervical lesions that can progress to cancer. Cervical cancer is a serious problem in developing countries because early detection is difficult, and thus proper early treatment is many times missing. In this phase III clinical trial, we evaluated the potential use of MVA E2 recombinant vaccinia virus to treat intraepithelial lesions associated with papillomavirus infection. A total of 1176 female and 180 male patients with intraepithelial lesions were studied. They were injected with 107 MVA E2 virus particles directly into their uterus, urethra, vulva, or anus. Patients were monitored by colposcopy and cytology. Immune response was determined by measuring the antibody titer against MVA E2 virus and by analyzing the cytotoxic activity against cancer cells bearing papillomavirus DNA. Papillomavirus was determined by the Hybrid Capture method or by polymerase chain reaction analysis. By histology, 1051 (89.3%) female patients showed complete elimination of lesions after treatment with MVA E2. In 28 (2.4%) female patients, the lesion was reduced to CIN 1. Another 97 (8.3%) female patients presented isolated koilocytes after treatment. In men, all lesions were completely eliminated. All MVA E2–treated patients developed antibodies against the MVA E2 vaccine and generated a specific cytotoxic response against papilloma-transformed cells. Papillomavirus DNA was not detected after treatment in 83% of total patients treated. MVA E2 did not generate any apparent side effects. These data suggest that therapeutic vaccination with MVA E2 vaccine is an excellent candidate to stimulate the immune system and generate regression in intraepithelial lesions when applied locally. PMID:25275724

  2. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  3. Rates of chemical cleavage of DNA and RNA oligomers containing guanine oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Aaron M; Alshykhly, Omar; Zhu, Judy; Muller, James G; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2015-06-15

    The nucleobase guanine in DNA (dG) and RNA (rG) has the lowest standard reduction potential of the bases, rendering it a major site of oxidative damage in these polymers. Mapping the sites at which oxidation occurs in an oligomer via chemical reagents utilizes hot piperidine for cleaving oxidized DNA and aniline (pH 4.5) for cleaving oxidized RNA. In the present studies, a series of time-dependent cleavages of DNA and RNA strands containing various guanine lesions were examined to determine the strand scission rate constants. The guanine base lesions 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG), spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh), 2,2,4-triamino-2H-oxazol-5-one (Z), and 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2Ih) were evaluated in piperidine-treated DNA and aniline-treated RNA. These data identified wide variability in the chemical lability of the lesions studied in both DNA and RNA. Further, the rate constants for cleaving lesions in RNA were generally found to be significantly smaller than for lesions in DNA. The OG nucleotides were poorly cleaved in DNA and RNA; Sp nucleotides were slowly cleaved in DNA and did not cleave significantly in RNA; Gh and Z nucleotides cleaved in both DNA and RNA at intermediate rates; and 2Ih oligonucleotides cleaved relatively quickly in both DNA and RNA. The data are compared and contrasted with respect to future experimental design.

  4. Patenting DNA.

    PubMed

    Bobrow, Martin; Thomas, Sandy

    2002-12-01

    The protection of inventions based on human DNA sequences has been achieved mainly through application of the patent system. Over the past decade, there has been continuing debate about whether this use of intellectual property rights is acceptable. Companies and universities have been active during this period in filing thousands of patent applications. Although many have argued that to claim a DNA sequence in a patent is to claim a discovery, patent law allows discoveries that are useful to be claimed as part of an invention. As the technology to isolate DNA sequences has advanced, the criterion for inventiveness, necessary for any invention to be eligible for filing, has become more difficult to justify in the case of claims to DNA sequences. Moreover, the discovery that a gene is associated with a particular disease is, it is argued, to discover a fact about the world and undeserving of the status of an invention. Careful examination of the grounds for allowing the patenting of DNA sequences as research tools suggests such rewards will rarely be justified. The patenting of DNA sequences as chemical intermediates necessary for the manufacture of therapeutic proteins is, however, reasonable given that the information within the sequence is applied to produce a tangible substance which has application as a medicine. Despite the legal, technical and political complexities of applying the flexibilities with the current law, it is argued that much could be achieved in the area of patenting DNA by raising the thresholds for patentability.

  5. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  6. Colon Preneoplastic Lesions in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Suzui, Masumi; Morioka, Takamitsu; Yoshimi, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    The animal model is a powerful and fundamental tool in the field of biochemical research including toxicology, carcinogenesis, cancer therapeutics and prevention. In the carcinogenesis animal model system, numerous examples of preneoplastic lesions have been isolated and investigated from various perspectives. This may indicate that several options of endpoints to evaluate carcinogenesis effect or therapeutic outcome are presently available; however, classification of preneoplastic lesions has become complicated. For instance, these lesions include aberrant crypt foci (ACF), dysplastic ACF, flat ACF, β-catenin accumulated crypts, and mucin-depleted foci. These lesions have been induced by commonly used chemical carcinogens such as azoxymethane (AOM), 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), methylnitrosourea (MUN), or 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). Investigators can choose any procedures or methods to examine colonic preneoplastic lesions according to their interests and the objectives of their experiments. Based on topographical, histopathological, and biological features of colon cancer preneoplastic lesions in the animal model, we summarize and discuss the character and implications of these lesions. PMID:24526805

  7. Polypoidal Lesions in the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Kumari M.K., Kalpana; K.C., Mahadeva

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nasal polyps are polypoidal masses arising from mucous membranes of nose and paranasal sinuses. They are overgrowths of the mucosa that frequently accompany allergic rhinitis. They are freely movable and nontender. Aims and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to study the histopathologic spectrum of polypoidal lesions of the nasal cavity. Materials and Methods: The study comprised of 100 consecutive cases of polypoidal lesions in the nasal cavity, received in the department of pathology. The age and sex of the patients were recorded. The tissues were routinely processed for histopathologic sections and stained with haematoxylin and eosin stains. Special stains like Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) was done wherever applicable. The cases were classified into neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions. The neoplastic lesions were further classified according to WHO classification on histopathologic examination. Results: Analysis of 100 polypoidal lesions in the nose and paranasal sinuses with clinical diagnosis of nasal polyps, revealed 66 cases were nonneoplastic and 34 were neoplastic;17 (50%)were benign and 17(50%) were malignant. True nasal polyps both inflammatory and allergic together comprised 44 cases of the 100 polypoidal lesions in the nasal cavity. Angiofibroma and inverted papilloma were the most frequent benign tumour accounting for 12/17(0.7%). The most common malignant tumour was anaplastic carcinoma 7/17(0.4%). Nonneoplastic and benign tumours were common in younger age groups whereas malignant tumours were most common in older males. Conclusion: The majority of polypoidal lesions in the nasal cavity are nonneoplastic. PMID:23905098

  8. Hepatic lesions segmentation in ultrasound nonlinear imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissi, Adelaide A.; Cormier, Stephane; Pourcelot, Leandre; Tranquart, Francois

    2005-04-01

    Doppler has been used for many years for cardiovascular exploration in order to visualize the vessels walls and anatomical or functional diseases. The use of ultrasound contrast agents makes it possible to improve ultrasonic information. Nonlinear ultrasound imaging highlights the detection of these agents within an organ and hence is a powerful technique to image perfusion of an organ in real-time. The visualization of flow and perfusion provides important information for the diagnosis of various diseases as well as for the detection of tumors. However, the images are buried in noise, the speckle, inherent in the image formation. Furthermore at portal phase, there is often an absence of clear contrast between lesions and surrounding tissues because the organ is filled with agents. In this context, we propose a new method of automatic liver lesions segmentation in nonlinear imaging sequences for the quantification of perfusion. Our method of segmentation is divided into two stages. Initially, we developed an anisotropic diffusion step which raised the structural characteristics to eliminate the speckle. Then, a fuzzy competitive clustering process allowed us to delineate liver lesions. This method has been used to detect focal hepatic lesions (metastasis, nodular hyperplasia, adenoma). Compared to medical expert"s report obtained on 15 varied lesions, the automatic segmentation allows us to identify and delineate focal liver lesions during the portal phase which high accuracy. Our results show that this method improves markedly the recognition of focal hepatic lesions and opens the way for future precise quantification of contrast enhancement.

  9. Characterizing lesions in corals from American Samoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Rameyer, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    The study of coral disease has suffered from an absence of systematic approaches that are commonly used to determine causes of diseases in animals. There is a critical need to develop a standardized and portable nomenclature for coral lesions in the field and to incorporate more commonly available biomedical tools in coral disease surveys to determine the potential causes of lesions in corals. We characterized lesions in corals from American Samoa based on gross and microscopic morphology and classified them as discoloration, growth anomalies, or tissue loss. The most common microscopic finding in corals manifesting discoloration was the depletion of zooxanthellae, followed by necrosis, sometimes associated with invasive algae or fungi. The most common microscopic lesion in corals manifesting tissue loss was cell necrosis often associated with algae, fungi, or protozoa. Corals with growth anomaly had microscopic evidence of hyperplasia of gastrovascular canals, followed by necrosis associated with algae or metazoa (polychaete worms). Several species of apparently normal corals also had microscopic changes, including the presence of bacterial aggregates or crustacea in tissues. A single type of gross lesion (e.g., discoloration) could have different microscopic manifestations. This phenomenon underlines the importance of using microscopy to provide a more systematic description of coral lesions and to detect potential pathogens associated with these lesions.

  10. A molecular epidemiology of treponemes in beef cattle digital dermatitis lesions and comparative analyses with sheep contagious ovine digital dermatitis and dairy cattle digital dermatitis lesions.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, L E; Evans, N J; Blowey, R W; Grove-White, D H; Clegg, S R; Duncan, J S; Carter, S D

    2015-07-09

    Bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) is an infective foot disease commonly reported in dairy cattle where Treponema are considered as the primary causative infectious agents. There still remains little definitive information on the etiology of BDD in beef cattle suggesting further investigations are warranted. Beef BDD lesions (n=34) and healthy beef foot tissues (n=38) were analysed by PCR for three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups and also for Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum. Spirochete culture was attempted on all BDD lesion samples. One or more BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups were detected in 100% of beef BDD lesions. "Treponema medium/Treponema vincentii-like", "Treponema phagedenis-like" and Treponema pedis spirochetes were identified in 27/34 (79%), 31/34 (91%) and 24/34 (71%) of BDD lesions, respectively. No BDD-associated treponeme DNA was amplified from beef healthy foot tissues. D. nodosus and F. necrophorum were present in 24/34 (71%) and 15/34 (44%) of lesions and 10/38 (26%) and 12/38 (32%) of healthy foot tissues, respectively. Twenty spirochetes were isolated from beef BDD lesions; 19 were representatives of the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups. One spirochete isolate shared less than 97% 16S rRNA gene similarity to the three cultivable BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups and therefore may represent a novel taxa of Treponema. Upon comparison, sheep contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD), dairy cattle and beef cattle BDD lesions appear to have extremely similar bacteriological data and therefore provides evidence of a shared etiopathogenesis posing concerns for cross-species transmission.

  11. Neurovestibular Compensation following Ototoxic Lesion and Labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanshenas, Hamed; Ashouri, Anousheh; Kaufman, Galen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Unilateral labyrinthectomy and intra-tympanic gentamycin have been employed in the treatment of Ménière's disease, but the efficacy of these techniques has not been well established. Objective The objective of this study is to measure the time course of recovery from a unilateral labyrinthectomy either after ipsilateral topical treatment with gentamicin to the inner ear or without the previous insult. Methods Twenty-nine adult Mongolian gerbils were randomized into two experimental groups. Group 1 (n = 17) received a right ear gentamicin drug-induced lesion by unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Group 2 (n = 12) only received a right unilateral labyrinthectomy lesion. We measured the horizontal vestibulo-ocular responses in gerbils before and after the lesion. The gerbils received an angular acceleration stimulus and their eye movements were recorded. Results The gentamicin lesion resulted in a quicker recovery. Experimental groups underwent a similar time course of recovery. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between the two groups. Both groups displayed adaptation to the lesion by day 21, but long-term compensation did not completely revert to the original pre-lesion state. Conclusions In a lesion requiring both static and dynamic compensation as in UL, the need for a static compensation may alter pre-existing compensation from a previous dynamic insult and require a new compensation. A previous lesion and adaptation is not preserved for a second lesion and the subject has to re-compensate. Therefore, surgical treatment in Meniere's disease such as UL can be considered without prior gentamicin treatment. Static and dynamic compensations do not appear to be as independent as previous studies have suggested. PMID:27096015

  12. Oral White Lesions Associated with Chewing Khat

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Meir; Epstein, Joel B; Levi, Harel; Yarom, Noam

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Khat is a cultivated plant whose leaves when chewed elevate mood. Unlike the chewing of betel nut, no association between the white oral mucosal lesions in khat users and oral malignancies has been reported. Chewing of khat has been documented in many countries and has increased with worldwide migration. The impact of chewing khat upon the oral mucosa is essentially unknown. Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the occurrence of oral white changes in chronic khat chewers. Oral mucosal changes in a group of 47 Yemenite Israeli men over 30 years of age, who had chewed khat more than 3 years, were compared to those of 55 Yemenite men who did not chew. Results White lesions were significantly more prevalent in the khat chewers (83%) compared to the non chewing individuals (16%) (P < 0.001). White oral lesions were identified primarily on the lower buccal attached gingival mucosa, the alveolar mucosa and the lower mucobuccal fold on the chewing side (p < 0.001). There was no significant association between the occurrence of the white lesions and smoking. Even though the majority of the white lesions (85.4%) were homogenous, 71.4% of the non homogenous lesions were identified in khat chewers. Vital staining with toluidine blue and exfoliative cytology was conducted on a subset of patients with homogenous and non-homogenous oral lesions, and there were no findings suspicious for pre-malignant or malignant changes. Discussion This study demonstrated a relationship between khat chewing and oral white lesions, which we attribute to chronic local mechanical and chemical irritation of the mucosa. Our findings also suggest that mucosal changes associated with khat are benign, however, this initial study requires further studies including follow-up of khat users to confirm the current findings, including the likely benign changes associated with chronic use and histologic findings of clinical lesions.

  13. Oral White Lesions Associated with Chewing Khat

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Meir; Epstein, Joel B; Levi, Harel; Yarom, Noam

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Khat is a cultivated plant whose leaves when chewed elevate mood. Unlike the chewing of betel nut, no association between the white oral mucosal lesions in khat users and oral malignancies has been reported. Chewing of khat has been documented in many countries and has increased with worldwide migration. The impact of chewing khat upon the oral mucosa is essentially unknown. Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the occurrence of oral white changes in chronic khat chewers. Oral mucosal changes in a group of 47 Yemenite Israeli men over 30 years of age, who had chewed khat more than 3 years, were compared to those of 55 Yemenite men who did not chew. Results White lesions were significantly more prevalent in the khat chewers (83%) compared to the non chewing individuals (16%) (P < 0.001). White oral lesions were identified primarily on the lower buccal attached gingival mucosa, the alveolar mucosa and the lower mucobuccal fold on the chewing side (p < 0.001). There was no significant association between the occurrence of the white lesions and smoking. Even though the majority of the white lesions (85.4%) were homogenous, 71.4% of the non homogenous lesions were identified in khat chewers. Vital staining with toluidine blue and exfoliative cytology was conducted on a subset of patients with homogenous and non-homogenous oral lesions, and there were no findings suspicious for pre-malignant or malignant changes. Discussion This study demonstrated a relationship between khat chewing and oral white lesions, which we attribute to chronic local mechanical and chemical irritation of the mucosa. Our findings also suggest that mucosal changes associated with khat are benign, however, this initial study requires further studies including follow-up of khat users to confirm the current findings, including the likely benign changes associated with chronic use and histologic findings of clinical lesions. PMID:19570281

  14. Sampling probability distributions of lesions in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looney, P.; Warren, L. M.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2015-03-01

    One approach to image perception studies in mammography using virtual clinical trials involves the insertion of simulated lesions into normal mammograms. To facilitate this, a method has been developed that allows for sampling of lesion positions across the cranio-caudal and medio-lateral radiographic projections in accordance with measured distributions of real lesion locations. 6825 mammograms from our mammography image database were segmented to find the breast outline. The outlines were averaged and smoothed to produce an average outline for each laterality and radiographic projection. Lesions in 3304 mammograms with malignant findings were mapped on to a standardised breast image corresponding to the average breast outline using piecewise affine transforms. A four dimensional probability distribution function was found from the lesion locations in the cranio-caudal and medio-lateral radiographic projections for calcification and noncalcification lesions. Lesion locations sampled from this probability distribution function were mapped on to individual mammograms using a piecewise affine transform which transforms the average outline to the outline of the breast in the mammogram. The four dimensional probability distribution function was validated by comparing it to the two dimensional distributions found by considering each radiographic projection and laterality independently. The correlation of the location of the lesions sampled from the four dimensional probability distribution function across radiographic projections was shown to match the correlation of the locations of the original mapped lesion locations. The current system has been implemented as a web-service on a server using the Python Django framework. The server performs the sampling, performs the mapping and returns the results in a javascript object notation format.

  15. [Liver ultrasound: focal lesions and diffuse diseases].

    PubMed

    Segura Grau, A; Valero López, I; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura Cabral, J M

    2016-01-01

    Liver ultrasound is frequently used as a first-line technique for the detection and characterization of the most common liver lesions, especially those incidentally found focal liver lesions, and for monitoring of chronic liver diseases. Ultrasound is not only used in the Bmode, but also with Doppler and, more recently, contrast-enhanced ultrasound. It is mainly used in the diagnosis of diffuse liver diseases, such as steatosis or cirrhosis. This article presents a practical approach for diagnosis workup, in which the different characteristics of the main focal liver lesions and diffuse liver diseases are reviewed.

  16. The Horizon for Treating Cutaneous Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Amit M.; Chou, Elizabeth L.; Findeiss, Laura; Kelly, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Dermatologists encounter a wide range of cutaneous vascular lesions, including infantile hemangiomas, port-wine stain birthmarks, arteriovenous malformations, venous malformations, Kaposi sarcomas, angiosarcomas, and angiofibromas. Current treatment modalities to reduce these lesions include topical and/or intralesional steroids, laser therapy, surgical resection, and endovascular therapy. However, each method has limitations owing to recurrence, comorbidities, toxicity, or lesion location. Photodynamic therapy, antiangiogenic therapy, and evolving methods of sclerotherapy are promising areas of development that may mitigate limitations of current treatments and offer exciting options for patients and their physicians. PMID:22640429

  17. [Precancerous conditions and lesions of the stomach].

    PubMed

    Falt, P; Hanousek, M; Kundrátová, E; Urban, O

    2013-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is a common malignant disease associated with an unfavorable prognosis in the case of late dia-gnosis. The most significant precancerous condition is chronic atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia caused by Helicobacter pylori infection. These longlasting changes may lead to formation of dysplastic precancerous lesions. Upper endoscopy and histologic examination of forceps bio-psy specimens play a key role in the dia-gnosis of gastric precancerous conditions and lesions. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy and endoscopic surveillance are main therapeutic modalities of gastric precancerous conditions. Localized precancerous lesions and early gastric neoplasia without the risk of lymphatic spread could be cured by means of endoscopic resection techniques.

  18. The horizon for treating cutaneous vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amit M; Chou, Elizabeth L; Findeiss, Laura; Kelly, Kristen M

    2012-06-01

    Dermatologists encounter a wide range of cutaneous vascular lesions, including infantile hemangiomas, port-wine stain birthmarks, arteriovenous malformations, venous malformations, Kaposi sarcomas, angiosarcomas, and angiofibromas. Current treatment modalities to reduce these lesions include topical and/or intralesional steroids, laser therapy, surgical resection, and endovascular therapy. However, each method has limitations owing to recurrence, comorbidities, toxicity, or lesion location. Photodynamic therapy, antiangiogenic therapy, and evolving methods of sclerotherapy are promising areas of development that may mitigate limitations of current treatments and offer exciting options for patients and their physicians.

  19. DNA Dosimetry Assessment for Sunscreen Genotoxic Photoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Lago, Juliana Carvalhães; Yagura, Teiti; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the increase of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) incidence over the last few decades, the use of sunscreen has been widely adopted for skin protection. However, considering the high efficiency of sunlight-induced DNA lesions, it is critical to improve upon the current approaches that are used to evaluate protection factors. An alternative approach to evaluate the photoprotection provided by sunscreens against daily UV radiation-induced DNA damage is provided by the systematic use of a DNA dosimeter. Methodology/Principal Findings The Sun Protection Factor for DNA (DNA-SPF) is calculated by using specific DNA repair enzymes, and it is defined as the capacity for inhibiting the generation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and oxidised DNA bases compared with unprotected control samples. Five different commercial brands of sunscreen were initially evaluated, and further studies extended the analysis to include 17 other products representing various formulations and Sun Protection Factors (SPF). Overall, all of the commercial brands of SPF 30 sunscreens provided sufficient protection against simulated sunlight genotoxicity. In addition, this DNA biosensor was useful for rapidly screening the biological protection properties of the various sunscreen formulations. Conclusions/Significance The application of the DNA dosimeter is demonstrated as an alternative, complementary, and reliable method for the quantification of sunscreen photoprotection at the level of DNA damage. PMID:22768281

  20. Structural Basis for Error-free Replication of Oxidatively Damaged DNA by Yeast DNA Polymerase eta

    SciTech Connect

    T Silverstein; R Jain; R Johnson; L Prakash; S Prakash; A Aggarwal

    2011-12-31

    7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adducts are formed frequently by the attack of oxygen-free radicals on DNA. They are among the most mutagenic lesions in cells because of their dual coding potential, where, in addition to normal base-pairing of 8-oxoG(anti) with dCTP, 8-oxoG in the syn conformation can base pair with dATP, causing G to T transversions. We provide here for the first time a structural basis for the error-free replication of 8-oxoG lesions by yeast DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol{eta}). We show that the open active site cleft of Pol{eta} can accommodate an 8-oxoG lesion in the anti conformation with only minimal changes to the polymerase and the bound DNA: at both the insertion and post-insertion steps of lesion bypass. Importantly, the active site geometry remains the same as in the undamaged complex and provides a basis for the ability of Pol to prevent the mutagenic replication of 8-oxoG lesions in cells.

  1. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  2. Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Strategies for Assessing the Biological Consequences and Repair of DNA Adducts.

    PubMed

    You, Changjun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-02-16

    The genetic integrity of living organisms is constantly threatened by environmental and endogenous sources of DNA damaging agents that can induce a plethora of chemically modified DNA lesions. Unrepaired DNA lesions may elicit cytotoxic and mutagenic effects and contribute to the development of human diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration. Understanding the deleterious outcomes of DNA damage necessitates the investigation about the effects of DNA adducts on the efficiency and fidelity of DNA replication and transcription. Conventional methods for measuring lesion-induced replicative or transcriptional alterations often require time-consuming colony screening and DNA sequencing procedures. Recently, a series of mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategies have been developed in our laboratory as an efficient platform for qualitative and quantitative analyses of the changes in genetic information induced by DNA adducts during DNA replication and transcription. During the past few years, we have successfully used these MS-based methods for assessing the replicative or transcriptional blocking and miscoding properties of more than 30 distinct DNA adducts. When combined with genetic manipulation, these methods have also been successfully employed for revealing the roles of various DNA repair proteins or translesion synthesis DNA polymerases (Pols) in modulating the adverse effects of DNA lesions on transcription or replication in mammalian and bacterial cells. For instance, we found that Escherichia coli Pol IV and its mammalian ortholog (i.e., Pol κ) are required for error-free bypass of N(2)-(1-carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-CEdG) in cells. We also found that the N(2)-CEdG lesions strongly inhibit DNA transcription and they are repaired by transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair in mammalian cells. In this Account, we focus on the development of MS-based approaches for determining the effects of DNA adducts on DNA replication and transcription

  3. Insight into the cooperative DNA binding of the O⁶-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tessmer, Ingrid; Fried, Michael G

    2014-08-01

    The O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is a highly conserved protein responsible for direct repair of alkylated guanine and to a lesser degree thymine bases. While specific DNA lesion-bound complexes in crystal structures consist of monomeric AGT, several solution studies have suggested that cooperative DNA binding plays a role in the physiological activities of AGT. Cooperative AGT-DNA complexes have been described by theoretical models, which can be tested by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Direct access to structural features of AGT-DNA complexes at the single molecule level by AFM imaging revealed non-specifically bound, cooperative complexes with limited cluster length. Implications of cooperative binding in AGT-DNA interactions are discussed.

  4. Human DNA polymerase θ grasps the primer terminus to mediate DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, Karl E.; Averill, April M.; Aller, Pierre; Wood, Richard D.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase θ protects against genomic instability via an alternative end-joining repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks. Breast, lung and oral cancers over-express polymerase θ, and reduction of its activity in mammalian cells increases sensitivity to double-strand break inducing agents, including ionizing radiation. Reported here are crystal structures of the C-terminal polymerase domain from human polymerase θ, illustrating two potential modes of dimerization. One structure depicts insertion of ddATP opposite an abasic site analog during translesion DNA synthesis. The second structure describes a cognate ddGTP complex. Polymerase θ employs a specialized thumb subdomain to establish unique upstream contacts to the primer DNA strand, including an interaction to the 3’-terminal phosphate from one of five distinctive insertion loops. These observations demonstrate how polymerase θ grasps the primer to bypass DNA lesions, or extend poorly annealed DNA termini to mediate end-joining. PMID:25775267

  5. DNA Damage Tolerance and a Web of Connections with DNA Repair at Yale

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    This short article summarizes some of the research carried out recently by my laboratory colleagues on the function of DNA polymerase zeta (polζ) in mammalian cells. Some personal background is also described, relevant to research associations with Yale University and its continuing influence. Polζ is involved in the bypass of many DNA lesions by translesion DNA synthesis and is responsible for the majority of DNA damage-induced point mutagenesis in mammalian cells (including human cells), as well as in yeast. We also found that the absence of this enzyme leads to gross chromosomal instability in mammalian cells and increased spontaneous tumorigenesis in mice. Recently, we discovered a further unexpectedly critical role for polζ: it plays an essential role in allowing continued rapid proliferation of cells and tissues. These observations and others indicate that polζ engages frequently during DNA replication to bypass and tolerate DNA lesions or unusual DNA structures that are barriers for the normal DNA replication machinery. PMID:24348215

  6. DNA adductomics.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  7. Meta-transcriptome Profiling of the Human-Leishmania braziliensis Cutaneous Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Stephen M.; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Carvalho, Lucas P.; Passos, Sara; Novais, Fernanda O.; Hughitt, V. Keith; Beiting, Daniel P.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Scott, Phillip; El-Sayed, Najib M.

    2016-01-01

    Host and parasite gene expression in skin biopsies from Leishmania braziliensis-infected patients were simultaneously analyzed using high throughput RNA-sequencing. Biopsies were taken from 8 patients with early cutaneous leishmaniasis and 17 patients with late cutaneous leishmaniasis. Although parasite DNA was found in all patient lesions at the time of biopsy, the patients could be stratified into two groups: one lacking detectable parasite transcripts (PTNeg) in lesions, and another in which parasite transcripts were readily detected (PTPos). These groups exhibited substantial differences in host responses to infection. PTPos biopsies contained an unexpected increase in B lymphocyte-specific and immunoglobulin transcripts in the lesions, and an upregulation of immune inhibitory molecules. Biopsies without detectable parasite transcripts showed decreased evidence for B cell activation, but increased expression of antimicrobial genes and genes encoding skin barrier functions. The composition and abundance of L. braziliensis transcripts in PTPos lesions were surprisingly conserved among all six patients, with minimal meaningful differences between lesions from patients with early and late cutaneous leishmaniasis. The most abundant parasite transcripts expressed in lesions were distinct from transcripts expressed in vitro in human macrophage cultures infected with L. amazonensis or L. major. Therefore in vitro gene expression in macrophage monolayers may not be a strong predictor of gene expression in lesions. Some of the most highly expressed in vivo transcripts encoded amastin-like proteins, hypothetical genes, putative parasite virulence factors, as well as histones and tubulin. In summary, RNA sequencing allowed us to simultaneously analyze human and L. braziliensis transcriptomes in lesions of infected patients, and identify unexpected differences in host immune responses which correlated with active transcription of parasite genes. PMID:27631090

  8. Fractal analysis of tumoral lesions in brain.

    PubMed

    Martín-Landrove, Miguel; Pereira, Demian; Caldeira, María E; Itriago, Salvador; Juliac, María

    2007-01-01

    In this work, it is proposed a method for supervised characterization and classification of tumoral lesions in brain, based on the analysis of irregularities at the lesion contour on T2-weighted MR images. After the choice of a specific image, a segmentation procedure with a threshold selected from the histogram of intensity levels is applied to isolate the lesion, the contour is detected through the application of a gradient operator followed by a conversion to a "time series" using a chain code procedure. The correlation dimension is calculated and analyzed to discriminate between normal or malignant structures. The results found showed that it is possible to detect a differentiation between benign (cysts) and malignant (gliomas) lesions suggesting the potential of this method as a diagnostic tool.

  9. Endoscopic management of adenomatous ampullary lesions

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Jesús; Pinedo, Eugenia; Ojeda, Vanesa; del Rio, Maria Guerra

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the ampulla of Vater represent an uncommon group of gastrointestinal malignancies. The majority of lesions of the ampulla of Vater are either adenomas or adenocarcinomas. Ampullary lesions are often incidental findings. Accurate preoperative diagnosis and staging of ampullary tumors is imperative for predicting prognosis and determining the most appropriate therapeutic approach. Endoscopic ampullectomy is a safe and efficacious therapeutic procedure that can obviate the need for potentially major surgical intervention. This review will provide the framework for the diagnosis and management of ampullary lesions from the perspective of the practicing gastroenterologist. Strategies for safe and successful endoscopic ampullectomy with a focus on accurate preoperative diagnosis and staging, resection technique, and management of complications are presented. PMID:26413485

  10. Bone marrow lesions: A systematic diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Filippo Del; Farahani, Sahar J; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow lesions on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are common and may be seen with various pathologies. The authors outline a systematic diagnostic approach with proposed categorization of various etiologies of bone marrow lesions. Utilization of typical imaging features on conventional MR imaging techniques and other problem-solving techniques, such as chemical shift imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), to achieve accurate final diagnosis has been highlighted. PMID:25114392

  11. [Osteoporosis associated with spinal cord lesion].

    PubMed

    Miladinović, Ksenija; Vavra-Hadziahmetović, Narcisa; Muftić, Mirsad; Sakota, Slavica

    2007-01-01

    One of the complications caused by spinal lesion is osteoporosis which development is induced by lesion itself, and its mechanism is not explained enough. Risk factor of this kind of osteoporosis is fracture which management is difficult and is cause of further complications which aggravate already damaged quality of life of patients with spinal cord injury, and demand additional health insurance expenses. Importance of prevention and treatment of spinal cord injury induced osteoporosis is enlightened by case report.

  12. Ocular lesions and experimental choline deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ossani, Georgina P; Pelayes, David; Diaz, María L; Lago, Nestor R; Fariña, Silvia L; Monserrat, Alberto J; Zarate, Jorge O

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown ocular haemorrhages in choline-deficient rats. The aim of this paper is to study further the relationship between ocular and renal lesions and biochemical alterations in rats fed a choline-deficient diet. Fifty one weanling male Wistar rats, were divided into two groups. Thirty one of them were fed a choline-deficient diet and the rest was fed a choline-supplemented diet ad libitum. Animals from both groups were killed between the fifth and the eighth day. Urea, creatinine and homocysteine concentrations in blood were determined. Eyes were used for light microscopy study; high resolution light microscopy and the study of the retina as "rétine a plat". Kidneys were studied by light microscopy. Choline-supplemented rats did not show ocular or renal lesion. Choline-deficient rats that showed renal lesions, tubular or cortical necrosis, did not always have ocular changes. There were no ocular changes in the only choline-deficient rat without renal lesion. The ocular changes consisted mainly in haemorrhage in both cameras and ciliary and vitreous bodies. Correlations between ocular and renal lesion (r = 0.72, p < 0.0001, CI 95%: 0.48-0.86); ocular lesion and creatinine (r = 0.86, p < 0.0001, Cl 95%: 0.72-0.93) and ocular lesion and urea (r = 0.70, p < 0.0001, Cl 95%: 0.44-0.85) were positive. Choline-deficiency induces ocular haemorrhagic lesions after the development of renal necrosis. The ocular pathology could be due to the immaturity of the ocular vasculature at this age. The hyaloid, choroid and retinal system are involved.

  13. Elementary lesions in dermatological semiology: literature review*

    PubMed Central

    Cardili, Renata Nahas; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Discrepancies in the terminology of elementary lesions persist when texts from Dermatology and Semiology books are compared, which can cause some confusion in both the teaching of undergraduate medical students and the learning acquired by professionals in the field. This review aims to compare and clarify the differences in the description of elementary lesions by many authors, used as references for specialists in dermatology. PMID:27828637

  14. Medial septal lesion enhances general anesthesia response.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Stan; Ma, Jingyi; Shen, Bixia; Nachim, Ilan; Luo, Tao

    2013-09-01

    Electrolytic lesion of the medial septum, a basal forebrain nucleus that projects to the hippocampus, prolonged the emergence from general anesthesia in rats. Septal lesioned rats required a longer time to recover from a loss of righting reflex (LORR) and a loss of tail-pinch response after injectable (20 mg/kg i.p. pentobarbital, 5mg/kg i.v. propofol) or volatile (1.5% halothane, 2% isoflurane) anesthetic. When incremental doses of propofol were given i.p., septal lesioned rats as compared to control rats showed LORR at a lower dose of propofol. Similarly, when the rats were exposed to increasing concentrations of isoflurane, the percent of rats showing LORR was leftward shifted for lesioned rats as compared to control rats. Septal lesioned rats as compared to control rats showed decreased locomotor activity when exposed to 1.5% halothane. Lesion of the medial septum was confirmed by thionin-stained histological sections as well as loss of acetylcholinesterase (AchE) staining in the hippocampus, indicating a depletion of septohippocampal cholinergic afferents. Medial septal lesion resulted in a near complete loss of hippocampal theta rhythm during walking and a general decrease in power of the hippocampal EEG at all frequencies (0-100 Hz), during walking or immobility. It is concluded that lesion of medial septum, in part through a loss of septohippocampal cholinergic afferents, increased the anesthesia response to volatile and injectable general anesthetics, during both induction and emergence. It is suggested that the septohippocampal system participates in many components of general anesthesia including hypnosis, immobility, and analgesia.

  15. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  16. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  17. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  18. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  19. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  20. DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR PROLIFERATIVE THYROID LESIONS IN BONY FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid proliferative lesions are rather common in bony fishes but disagreement exists in the fish pathology community concerning diagnostic criteria for hyperplastic versus neoplastic lesions. To simplify the diagnosis of proliferative thyroid lesions and to reduce confusion reg...

  1. Human papillomavirus-32-associated focal epithelial hyperplasia accompanying HPV-16-positive papilloma-like lesions in oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Wang, Jiayi; Lei, Lei; Li, Yanzhong; Zhou, Min; Dan, Hongxia; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2013-05-01

    Human papillomavirus infection can cause a variety of benign or malignant oral lesions, and the various genotypes can cause distinct types of lesions. To our best knowledge, there has been no report of 2 different human papillomavirus-related oral lesions in different oral sites in the same patient before. This paper reported a patient with 2 different oral lesions which were clinically and histologically in accord with focal epithelial hyperplasia and oral papilloma, respectively. Using DNA extracted from these 2 different lesions, tissue blocks were tested for presence of human papillomavirus followed by specific polymerase chain reaction testing for 6, 11, 13, 16, 18, and 32 subtypes in order to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Finally, human papillomavirus-32-positive focal epithelial hyperplasia accompanying human papillomavirus-16-positive oral papilloma-like lesions were detected in different sites of the oral mucosa. Nucleotide sequence sequencing further confirmed the results. So in our clinical work, if the simultaneous occurrences of different human papillomavirus associated lesions are suspected, the multiple biopsies from different lesions and detection of human papillomavirus genotype are needed to confirm the diagnosis.

  2. Is thymidine glycol containing DNA a substrate of E. coli DNA mismatch repair system?

    PubMed

    Perevozchikova, Svetlana A; Trikin, Roman M; Heinze, Roger J; Romanova, Elena A; Oretskaya, Tatiana S; Friedhoff, Peter; Kubareva, Elena A

    2014-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system plays a crucial role in the prevention of replication errors and in the correction of some oxidative damages of DNA bases. In the present work the most abundant oxidized pyrimidine lesion, 5,6-dihydro-5,6-dihydroxythymidine (thymidine glycol, Tg) was tested for being recognized and processed by the E. coli MMR system, namely complex of MutS, MutL and MutH proteins. In a partially reconstituted MMR system with MutS-MutL-MutH proteins, G/Tg and A/Tg containing plasmids failed to provoke the incision of DNA. Tg residue in the 30-mer DNA duplex destabilized double helix due to stacking disruption with neighboring bases. However, such local structural changes are not important for E. coli MMR system to recognize this lesion. A lack of repair of Tg containing DNA could be due to a failure of MutS (a first acting protein of MMR system) to interact with modified DNA in a proper way. It was shown that Tg in DNA does not affect on ATPase activity of MutS. On the other hand, MutS binding affinities to DNA containing Tg in G/Tg and A/Tg pairs are lower than to DNA with a G/T mismatch and similar to canonical DNA. Peculiarities of MutS interaction with DNA was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence anisotropy. Binding of MutS to Tg containing DNAs did not result in the formation of characteristic DNA kink. Nevertheless, MutS homodimer orientation on Tg-DNA is similar to that in the case of G/T-DNA. In contrast to G/T-DNA, neither G/Tg- nor A/Tg-DNA was able to stimulate ADP release from MutS better than canonical DNA. Thus, Tg residue in DNA is unlikely to be recognized or processed by the E. coli MMR system. Probably, the MutS transformation to active "sliding clamp" conformation on Tg-DNA is problematic.

  3. ERK kinases modulate the activation of PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs) in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Yan, Judy; Tang, Damu

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) is the critical surveillance mechanism in maintaining genome integrity. The mechanism activates checkpoints to prevent cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA lesions, and mediates lesion repair. DDR is coordinated by three apical PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs), including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-PKcs (the catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase). These kinases are activated in response to specific DNA damage or lesions, resulting in checkpoint activation and DNA lesion repair. While it is clear that the pathways of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK are the core components of DDR, there is accumulating evidence revealing the involvement of other cellular pathways in regulating DDR; this is in line with the concept that in addition to being a nuclear event DDR is also a cellular process. One of these pathways is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. ERK is a converging point of multiple signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adding to this list of pathways is the recent development of ERK in DDR. The ERK kinases (ERK1 and ERK2) contribute to the proper execution of DDR in terms of checkpoint activation and the repair of DNA lesions. This review summarizes the contributions of ERK to DDR with emphasis on the relationship of ERK kinases with the activation of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs.

  4. Renal lesions in cetaceans from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Viera, O; Ruoppolo, V; Marigo, J; Carvalho, V L; Groch, K R; Bertozzi, C P; Takakura, C; Namiyama, G; Vanstreels, R E T; Catão-Dias, J L

    2015-05-01

    This study reports the occurrence of renal lesions in cetaceans from the coast of Brazil subjected to necropsy examination between 1996 and 2011. The animals (n = 192) were by-caught in fishing nets, were found dead on beaches or died despite attempted rehabilitation. Kidney samples were evaluated grossly and microscopically and, depending on the histopathological findings, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analyses were conducted. Due to autolysis, a diagnosis was reached in only 128 animals, of which 82 (64.1%) had kidney lesions. Cystic renal disease was the most common lesion observed in 34 cases (26.6%) and these were classified as simple cysts in eight cases (6.3%), polycystic kidney disease in one rough-toothed dolphin (Steno bredanensis), secondary glomerulocystic disease in 16 cases (12.5%) and primary glomerulocystic disease in nine cases (7%). Other lesions included membranous glomerulonephritis (28 cases; 21.9%), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (20 cases; 15.6%), lymphoplasmacytic interstitial nephritis (21 cases; 16.4%), lipidosis (19 cases; 14.8%), glomerulosclerosis (8 cases; 6.3%) and pyogranulomatous nephritis(five cases; 3.9%); two of the later were associated with the migration of nematode larvae. Additionally, tubular adenoma was identified in a Franciscana (Pontoporia blainvillei). The pathological implications of these lesions are discussed according the cause of death, age or sex of the animals. Furthermore, the lesions were compared with those of other marine and terrestrial mammals, including man.

  5. Potentially malignant oral lesions: clinicopathological correlations

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Haline Cunha de Medeiros; Pinto, Najara Alcântara Sampaio; Pereira, Joabe dos Santos; de Medeiros, Ana Miryam Costa; da Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the incidence of potentially malignant oral lesions, and evaluate and correlate their clinical and pathological aspects. Methods The sample consisted of cases clinically diagnosed as oral leukoplakia, oral erythroplakia, erythroleukoplakia, actinic cheilitis, and oral lichen planus treated at a diagnostic center, between May 2012 and July 2013. Statistical tests were conducted adopting a significance level of 5% (p≤0.05). Results Out of 340 patients, 106 (31.2%) had potentially malignant oral lesions; and 61 of these (17.9%) were submitted to biopsy. Actinic cheilitis was the most frequent lesion (37.5%) and the lower lip was the most affected site (49.6%). Among 106 patients in the sample, 48 (45.3%) reported nicotine consumption, 35 (33%) reported alcohol intake and 34 (32.1%) sun exposure while working. When clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compared, oral erythroplakia and atypical ulcer were the lesions that exhibited greater compatibility (100% each). Conclusion In most cases, clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compatible. An association between the occurrence of erythroplakia, leukoplakia and erythroleukoplakia with smoking was observed. Similarly, an association between actinic cheilitis and sun exposure was noted. Erythroleukoplakia presented the highest malignancy grade in this study. Finally, dental surgeons should draw special attention to diagnosis of potentially malignant oral lesions, choose the best management, and control the lesions to avoid their malignant transformation. PMID:27074232

  6. Texture feature based liver lesion classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doron, Yeela; Mayer-Wolf, Nitzan; Diamant, Idit; Greenspan, Hayit

    2014-03-01

    Liver lesion classification is a difficult clinical task. Computerized analysis can support clinical workflow by enabling more objective and reproducible evaluation. In this paper, we evaluate the contribution of several types of texture features for a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system which automatically classifies liver lesions from CT images. Based on the assumption that liver lesions of various classes differ in their texture characteristics, a variety of texture features were examined as lesion descriptors. Although texture features are often used for this task, there is currently a lack of detailed research focusing on the comparison across different texture features, or their combinations, on a given dataset. In this work we investigated the performance of Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM), Local Binary Patterns (LBP), Gabor, gray level intensity values and Gabor-based LBP (GLBP), where the features are obtained from a given lesion`s region of interest (ROI). For the classification module, SVM and KNN classifiers were examined. Using a single type of texture feature, best result of 91% accuracy, was obtained with Gabor filtering and SVM classification. Combination of Gabor, LBP and Intensity features improved the results to a final accuracy of 97%.

  7. Extreme dryness and DNA-protein cross-links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieger-Dose, A.; Dose, K.; Meffert, R.; Mehler, M.; Risi, S.

    Exposure of fungal conidia (Aspergillus ochraceus) or spores of Bacillus subtilis to extreme dryness or vacuum induces DNA lesions, including strand breaks and the formation of DNA-protein cross-links. In wet cells only a small amount of protein is bound to DNA, but exposure to conditions of lowered water activity results in an increasing number of cross-links between DNA and proteins. In fungal conidia these cross-links are detected after selective iodination (125J) of the DNA-bound proteins followed by gel electrophoresis and subsequent autoradiography. Another approach is the labelling of DNA with 32p by means of nick translation and the detection of differences in the electrophoretic mobility of DNA before and after digestion with proteinase K of proteins bound to DNA.

  8. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies.

  9. Structure of Escherichia coli AlkA in Complex with Undamaged DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Brian R.; Lee, Seongmin; Wang, Shuyu; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    Because DNA damage is so rare, DNA glycosylases interact for the most part with undamaged DNA. Whereas the structural basis for recognition of DNA lesions by glycosylases has been studied extensively, less is known about the nature of the interaction between these proteins and undamaged DNA. Here we report the crystal structures of the DNA glycosylase AlkA in complex with undamaged DNA. The structures revealed a recognition mode in which the DNA is nearly straight, with no amino acid side chains inserted into the duplex, and the target base pair is fully intrahelical. A comparison of the present structures with that of AlkA recognizing an extrahelical lesion revealed conformational changes in both the DNA and protein as the glycosylase transitions from the interrogation of undamaged DNA to catalysis of nucleobase excision. Modeling studies with the cytotoxic lesion 3-methyladenine and accompanying biochemical experiments suggested that AlkA actively interrogates the minor groove of the DNA while probing for the presence of lesions. PMID:20843803

  10. Structure of Escherichia coli AlkA in Complex with Undamaged DNA

    DOE PAGES

    Bowman, Brian R.; Lee, Seongmin; Wang, Shuyu; ...

    2010-11-22

    Because DNA damage is so rare, DNA glycosylases interact for the most part with undamaged DNA. Whereas the structural basis for recognition of DNA lesions by glycosylases has been studied extensively, less is known about the nature of the interaction between these proteins and undamaged DNA. Here we report the crystal structures of the DNA glycosylase AlkA in complex with undamaged DNA. The structures revealed a recognition mode in which the DNA is nearly straight, with no amino acid side chains inserted into the duplex, and the target base pair is fully intrahelical. A comparison of the present structures withmore » that of AlkA recognizing an extrahelical lesion revealed conformational changes in both the DNA and protein as the glycosylase transitions from the interrogation of undamaged DNA to catalysis of nucleobase excision. Modeling studies with the cytotoxic lesion 3-methyladenine and accompanying biochemical experiments suggested that AlkA actively interrogates the minor groove of the DNA while probing for the presence of lesions.« less

  11. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  12. Brain involvement by leprosy presenting as a frontal cystic lesion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Yun, Sook Jung; Won, Young Ho; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Min-Cheol; Jung, Shin

    2014-07-01

    Leprosy has a predilection for peripheral nerves and is not considered to involve the CNS. The idea that the CNS is exempt from Mycobacterium leprae bacilli has been suspected from a clinical perspective or CSF study in leprosy patients. However, there has been no direct evidence for CNS involvement by leprosy in a living patient. To the best of the authors' knowledge, the present case is the first report providing histopathological and molecular evidence for CNS involvement by leprosy in a living patient. Brain MRI revealed a 2-cm cystic lesion in the right frontal lobe of the patient. The medical history revealed that the patient had been receiving multidrug therapy for borderline lepromatous leprosy. Neuronavigation-guided craniotomy and lesion removal were performed due to a presumptive diagnosis of low-grade glioma. The brain specimen demonstrated variably thickened blood vessels and densely scattered foamy macrophages in the perivascular spaces and parenchymal stroma. Fite acid-fast stain displayed red granular inclusions that were suggestive for fragmented M. leprae. M. leprae-specific nested polymerase chain reaction amplification showed positive bands, and DNA sequencing also demonstrated homology with the M. leprae genome. This case supports the notion that M. leprae can involve the cerebral cortex regardless of cranial nerve engagement.

  13. RNA Primer Extension Hinders DNA Synthesis by Escherichia coli Mutagenic DNA Polymerase IV

    PubMed Central

    Tashjian, Tommy F.; Lin, Ida; Belt, Verena; Cafarelli, Tiziana M.; Godoy, Veronica G.

    2017-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the highly conserved DNA damage regulated dinB gene encodes DNA Polymerase IV (DinB), an error prone specialized DNA polymerase with a central role in stress-induced mutagenesis. Since DinB is the DNA polymerase with the highest intracellular concentrations upon induction of the SOS response, further regulation must exist to maintain genomic stability. Remarkably, we find that DinB DNA synthesis is inherently poor when using an RNA primer compared to a DNA primer, while high fidelity DNA polymerases are known to have no primer preference. Moreover, we show that the poor DNA synthesis from an RNA primer is conserved in DNA polymerase Kappa, the human DinB homolog. The activity of DinB is modulated by interactions with several other proteins, one of which is the equally evolutionarily conserved recombinase RecA. This interaction is known to positively affect DinB’s fidelity on damaged templates. We find that upon interaction with RecA, DinB shows a significant reduction in DNA synthesis when using an RNA primer. Furthermore, with DinB or DinB:RecA a robust pause, sequence and lesion independent, occurs only when RNA is used as a primer. The robust pause is likely to result in abortive DNA synthesis when RNA is the primer. These data suggest a novel mechanism to prevent DinB synthesis when it is not needed despite its high concentrations, thus protecting genome stability. PMID:28298904

  14. RNA Primer Extension Hinders DNA Synthesis by Escherichia coli Mutagenic DNA Polymerase IV.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, Tommy F; Lin, Ida; Belt, Verena; Cafarelli, Tiziana M; Godoy, Veronica G

    2017-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the highly conserved DNA damage regulated dinB gene encodes DNA Polymerase IV (DinB), an error prone specialized DNA polymerase with a central role in stress-induced mutagenesis. Since DinB is the DNA polymerase with the highest intracellular concentrations upon induction of the SOS response, further regulation must exist to maintain genomic stability. Remarkably, we find that DinB DNA synthesis is inherently poor when using an RNA primer compared to a DNA primer, while high fidelity DNA polymerases are known to have no primer preference. Moreover, we show that the poor DNA synthesis from an RNA primer is conserved in DNA polymerase Kappa, the human DinB homolog. The activity of DinB is modulated by interactions with several other proteins, one of which is the equally evolutionarily conserved recombinase RecA. This interaction is known to positively affect DinB's fidelity on damaged templates. We find that upon interaction with RecA, DinB shows a significant reduction in DNA synthesis when using an RNA primer. Furthermore, with DinB or DinB:RecA a robust pause, sequence and lesion independent, occurs only when RNA is used as a primer. The robust pause is likely to result in abortive DNA synthesis when RNA is the primer. These data suggest a novel mechanism to prevent DinB synthesis when it is not needed despite its high concentrations, thus protecting genome stability.

  15. Chemistry and Structural Biology of DNA Damage and Biological Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Michael P.; Huang, Hai; Brown, Kyle L.; Shanmugam, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    The formation of adducts by the reaction of chemicals with DNA is a critical step for the initiation of carcinogenesis. The structural analysis of various DNA adducts reveals that conformational and chemical rearrangements and interconversions are a common theme. Conformational changes are modulated both by the nature of adduct and the base sequences neighboring the lesion sites. Equilibria between conformational states may modulate both DNA repair and error-prone replication past these adducts. Likewise, chemical rearrangements of initially formed DNA adducts are also modulated both by the nature of adducts and the base sequences neighboring the lesion sites. In this review, we focus on DNA damage caused by a number of environmental and endogenous agents, and biological consequences. PMID:21922653

  16. DNA Damage in Chronic Kidney Disease: Evaluation of Clinical Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Nicole; Stopper, Helga; Heidland, August

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an increased cancer risk compared to a healthy control population. To be able to estimate the cancer risk of the patients and to assess the impact of interventional therapies thereon, it is of particular interest to measure the patients' burden of genomic damage. Chromosomal abnormalities, reduced DNA repair, and DNA lesions were found indeed in cells of patients with CKD. Biomarkers for DNA damage measurable in easily accessible cells like peripheral blood lymphocytes are chromosomal aberrations, structural DNA lesions, and oxidatively modified DNA bases. In this review the most common methods quantifying the three parameters mentioned above, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, the comet assay, and the quantification of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, are evaluated concerning the feasibility of the analysis and regarding the marker's potential to predict clinical outcomes. PMID:27313827

  17. DNA Damage Repair in the Context of Plant Chromatin1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of DNA molecules is constantly challenged. All organisms have developed mechanisms to detect and repair multiple types of DNA lesions. The basic principles of DNA damage repair (DDR) in prokaryotes and unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes are similar, but the association of DNA with nucleosomes in eukaryotic chromatin requires mechanisms that allow access of repair enzymes to the lesions. This is achieved by chromatin-remodeling factors, and their necessity for efficient DDR has recently been demonstrated for several organisms and repair pathways. Plants share many features of chromatin organization and DNA repair with fungi and animals, but they differ in other, important details, which are both interesting and relevant for our understanding of genome stability and genetic diversity. In this Update, we compare the knowledge of the role of chromatin and chromatin-modifying factors during DDR in plants with equivalent systems in yeast and humans. We emphasize plant-specific elements and discuss possible implications. PMID:26089404

  18. BUBR1 expression in benign oral lesions and squamous cell carcinomas: correlation with human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Lira, Régia C P; Miranda, Fabiana A; Guimarães, Márcia C M; Simões, Renata T; Donadi, Eduardo A; Soares, Christiane P; Soares, Edson G

    2010-04-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common head and neck cancer. Only in Brazil, the estimate is for 14,160 new cases in 2009. HPV is associated with increasing risk of oral cancer, but its role in carcinogenesis is still controversial. BUBR1, an important protein in the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), has been associated with some virus-encoded proteins and cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of BUBR1 in non-malignant oral lesions and OSCC with and without metastasis associated with HPV infection. We performed immunohistochemistry for BUBR1 in 70 OSCC biopsies divided into three groups (in situ tumors, invasive tumors without metastasis and invasive tumors with metastasis) with their respective lymph nodes from samples with metastasis and in 16 non-malignant oral lesions. PCR was performed in order to detect HPV DNA. Significantly higher BUBR1 expression associated with shorter survival (p=0.0479) was observed in malignant lesions. There was also a significant correlation (r=1.000) with BUBR1 expression in lesions with metastasis and their lymph nodes. Ninety percent of OSCC and 100% of benign lesions were HPV positive. HPV16 and HVP18 were present in 13 and 24% of HPV-positive OSCC samples, respectively. HPV was more prevalent (76%) in samples with a high BUBR1 expression and the absence of viral DNA had no influence on BUBR1 expression. These findings suggest that HPV could be associated with overexpression of BUBR1 in OSCC, but not in benign oral lesions.

  19. Human brain lesion-deficit inference remapped.

    PubMed

    Mah, Yee-Haur; Husain, Masud; Rees, Geraint; Nachev, Parashkev

    2014-09-01

    Our knowledge of the anatomical organization of the human brain in health and disease draws heavily on the study of patients with focal brain lesions. Historically the first method of mapping brain function, it is still potentially the most powerful, establishing the necessity of any putative neural substrate for a given function or deficit. Great inferential power, however, carries a crucial vulnerability: without stronger alternatives any consistent error cannot be easily detected. A hitherto unexamined source of such error is the structure of the high-dimensional distribution of patterns of focal damage, especially in ischaemic injury-the commonest aetiology in lesion-deficit studies-where the anatomy is naturally shaped by the architecture of the vascular tree. This distribution is so complex that analysis of lesion data sets of conventional size cannot illuminate its structure, leaving us in the dark about the presence or absence of such error. To examine this crucial question we assembled the largest known set of focal brain lesions (n = 581), derived from unselected patients with acute ischaemic injury (mean age = 62.3 years, standard deviation = 17.8, male:female ratio = 0.547), visualized with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and processed with validated automated lesion segmentation routines. High-dimensional analysis of this data revealed a hidden bias within the multivariate patterns of damage that will consistently distort lesion-deficit maps, displacing inferred critical regions from their true locations, in a manner opaque to replication. Quantifying the size of this mislocalization demonstrates that past lesion-deficit relationships estimated with conventional inferential methodology are likely to be significantly displaced, by a magnitude dependent on the unknown underlying lesion-deficit relationship itself. Past studies therefore cannot be retrospectively corrected, except by new knowledge that would render them redundant

  20. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  1. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  2. Oxidative Stress and Carbonyl Lesions in Ulcerative Colitis and Associated Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiqi; Li, Sai; Cao, Yu; Tian, Xuefei; Zeng, Rong; Liao, Duan-Fang; Cao, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has long been known as a pathogenic factor of ulcerative colitis (UC) and colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC), but the effects of secondary carbonyl lesions receive less emphasis. In inflammatory conditions, reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion free radical (O2∙−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radical (HO∙), are produced at high levels and accumulated to cause oxidative stress (OS). In oxidative status, accumulated ROS can cause protein dysfunction and DNA damage, leading to gene mutations and cell death. Accumulated ROS could also act as chemical messengers to activate signaling pathways, such as NF-κB and p38 MAPK, to affect cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. More importantly, electrophilic carbonyl compounds produced by lipid peroxidation may function as secondary pathogenic factors, causing further protein and membrane lesions. This may in turn exaggerate oxidative stress, forming a vicious cycle. Electrophilic carbonyls could also cause DNA mutations and breaks, driving malignant progression of UC. The secondary lesions caused by carbonyl compounds may be exceptionally important in the case of host carbonyl defensive system deficit, such as aldo-keto reductase 1B10 deficiency. This review article updates the current understanding of oxidative stress and carbonyl lesions in the development and progression of UC and CAC. PMID:26823956

  3. Abfraction lesions: etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Dilbone, Deborah A; Pereira, Patricia Nr; Duarte, Wagner R; Geraldeli, Saulo; Delgado, Alex J

    2016-01-01

    Abfraction is a type of noncarious cervical lesion (NCCL) characterized by loss of tooth tissues with different clinical appearances. Evidence supports that abfraction lesions, as any NCCLs, have a multifactorial etiology. Particularly, the cervical wear of abfraction can occur as a result of normal and abnormal tooth function and may also be accompanied by pathological wear, such as abrasion and erosion. The interaction between chemical, biological, and behavioral factors is critical and helps to explain why some individuals exhibit more than one type of cervical wear mechanism than others. In an era of personalized dentistry, patient risk factors for NCCLs must be identified and addressed before any treatment is performed. Marked variations exist in dental practice concerning the diagnosis and management of these lesions. The lack of understanding about the prognosis of these lesions with or without intervention may be a major contributor to variations in dentists' management decisions. This review focuses on the current knowledge and available treatment strategies for abfraction lesions. By recognizing that progressive changes in the cervical area of the tooth are part of a physiologically dynamic process that occurs with aging, premature and unnecessary intervention can be avoided. In cases of asymptomatic teeth, where tooth vitality and function are not compromised, abfraction lesions should be monitored for at least 6 months before any invasive procedure is planned. In cases of abfraction associated with gingival recession, a combined restorative-surgical approach may be performed. Restorative intervention and occlusal adjustment are not indicated as treatment options to prevent further tooth loss or progression of abfraction. The clinical decision to restore abfraction lesions may be based on the need to replace form and function or to relieve hypersensitivity of severely compromised teeth or for esthetic reasons.

  4. Abfraction lesions: etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Dilbone, Deborah A; Pereira, Patricia NR; Duarte, Wagner R; Geraldeli, Saulo; Delgado, Alex J

    2016-01-01

    Abfraction is a type of noncarious cervical lesion (NCCL) characterized by loss of tooth tissues with different clinical appearances. Evidence supports that abfraction lesions, as any NCCLs, have a multifactorial etiology. Particularly, the cervical wear of abfraction can occur as a result of normal and abnormal tooth function and may also be accompanied by pathological wear, such as abrasion and erosion. The interaction between chemical, biological, and behavioral factors is critical and helps to explain why some individuals exhibit more than one type of cervical wear mechanism than others. In an era of personalized dentistry, patient risk factors for NCCLs must be identified and addressed before any treatment is performed. Marked variations exist in dental practice concerning the diagnosis and management of these lesions. The lack of understanding about the prognosis of these lesions with or without intervention may be a major contributor to variations in dentists’ management decisions. This review focuses on the current knowledge and available treatment strategies for abfraction lesions. By recognizing that progressive changes in the cervical area of the tooth are part of a physiologically dynamic process that occurs with aging, premature and unnecessary intervention can be avoided. In cases of asymptomatic teeth, where tooth vitality and function are not compromised, abfraction lesions should be monitored for at least 6 months before any invasive procedure is planned. In cases of abfraction associated with gingival recession, a combined restorative-surgical approach may be performed. Restorative intervention and occlusal adjustment are not indicated as treatment options to prevent further tooth loss or progression of abfraction. The clinical decision to restore abfraction lesions may be based on the need to replace form and function or to relieve hypersensitivity of severely compromised teeth or for esthetic reasons. PMID:27217799

  5. How to Cope with DNA Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation and Anti-Cancer Drugs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, A.; Miyagawa, K.

    Ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents induce many types of DNA lesions, of which DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are assumed to be the most deleterious. DNA damage response mechanisms encompass pathways of DNA damage signaling, DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint arrest, and apoptosis. Increasing evidence suggests that these pathways function co-operatively to maintain genomic stability in the face of exogenous and endogenous DNA damage. The relative impact of one mechanism over another probably depends on the kinds of lesions, the cell cycle phase, and the cell or tissue type. The inability to respond properly to or to repair DSBs may lead to hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents and genomic instability including chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal instability, a state of continuous accumulation of chromosomal change, is a common feature of many human cancers and of chromosome instability syndromes with increased cancer susceptibility. Here, we review the DNA da mage response and the links between deficiencies in response to DSBs and chromosomal instability.

  6. Eukaryotic Translesion Polymerases and Their Roles and Regulation in DNA Damage Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Lauren S.; Minesinger, Brenda K.; Wiltrout, Mary Ellen; D'Souza, Sanjay; Woodruff, Rachel V.; Walker, Graham C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance machineries are crucial to overcome the vast array of DNA damage that a cell encounters during its lifetime. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge about the eukaryotic DNA damage tolerance pathway translesion synthesis (TLS), a process in which specialized DNA polymerases replicate across from DNA lesions. TLS aids in resistance to DNA damage, presumably by restarting stalled replication forks or filling in gaps that remain in the genome due to the presence of DNA lesions. One consequence of this process is the potential risk of introducing mutations. Given the role of these translesion polymerases in mutagenesis, we discuss the significant regulatory mechanisms that control the five known eukaryotic translesion polymerases: Rev1, Pol ζ, Pol κ, Pol η, and Pol ι. PMID:19258535

  7. Implications for Damage Recognition during Dpo4-Mediated Mutagenic Bypass of m1G and m3C Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Rechkoblit, Olga; Delaney, James C.; Essigmann, John M.; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2012-05-08

    DNA is susceptible to alkylation damage by a number of environmental agents that modify the Watson-Crick edge of the bases. Such lesions, if not repaired, may be bypassed by Y-family DNA polymerases. The bypass polymerase Dpo4 is strongly inhibited by 1-methylguanine (m1G) and 3-methylcytosine (m3C), with nucleotide incorporation opposite these lesions being predominantly mutagenic. Further, extension after insertion of both correct and incorrect bases, introduces additional base substitution and deletion errors. Crystal structures of the Dpo4 ternary extension complexes with correct and mismatched 3'-terminal primer bases opposite the lesions reveal that both m1G and m3C remain positioned within the DNA template/primer helix. However, both correct and incorrect pairing partners exhibit pronounced primer terminal nucleotide distortion, being primarily evicted from the DNA helix when opposite m1G or misaligned when pairing with m3C. Our studies provide insights into mechanisms related to hindered and mutagenic bypass of methylated lesions and models associated with damage recognition by repair demethylases.

  8. The Ageing Brain: Effects on DNA Repair and DNA Methylation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Langie, Sabine A. S.; Cameron, Kerry M.; Ficz, Gabriella; Oxley, David; Tomaszewski, Bartłomiej; Gorniak, Joanna P.; Maas, Lou M.; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Reik, Wolf; von Zglinicki, Thomas; Mathers, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) may become less effective with ageing resulting in accumulation of DNA lesions, genome instability and altered gene expression that contribute to age-related degenerative diseases. The brain is particularly vulnerable to the accumulation of DNA lesions; hence, proper functioning of DNA repair mechanisms is important for neuronal survival. Although the mechanism of age-related decline in DNA repair capacity is unknown, growing evidence suggests that epigenetic events (e.g., DNA methylation) contribute to the ageing process and may be functionally important through the regulation of the expression of DNA repair genes. We hypothesize that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in mediating the age-related decline in BER in the brain. Brains from male mice were isolated at 3–32 months of age. Pyrosequencing analyses revealed significantly increased Ogg1 methylation with ageing, which correlated inversely with Ogg1 expression. The reduced Ogg1 expression correlated with enhanced expression of methyl-CpG binding protein 2 and ten-eleven translocation enzyme 2. A significant inverse correlation between Neil1 methylation at CpG-site2 and expression was also observed. BER activity was significantly reduced and associated with increased 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine levels. These data indicate that Ogg1 and Neil1 expression can be epigenetically regulated, which may mediate the effects of ageing on DNA repair in the brain. PMID:28218666

  9. Renal vascular lesions in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Descombes, E; Droz, D; Drouet, L; Grünfeld, J P; Lesavre, P

    1997-09-01

    We retrospectively studied the prevalence, histologic features, clinical correlations, and long-term outcome of the intrarenal vascular lesions of lupus nephritis (LN) in a series of 169 renal biopsies performed between 1980 and 1994 in 132 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The most common vascular lesions were nonspecific sclerotic changes, found in 37% of the biopsies (24% if only the cases with moderate to severe changes are considered). The other common vascular lesions were "immunoglobulin microvascular casts," found in 24% of the biopsies. Vasculitis and thrombotic microangiopathy were rare lesions and were seen in only 4 (2.4%) and 1 (0.6%) cases, respectively. Isolated sclerotic vascular changes were present in biopsies from older patients with a longer duration of LN, compared with the group with no vascular lesions, and were associated with a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension. Overall, however, the long-term renal and patient survival of this group did not differ significantly from that of the patients without vascular changes. Immunoglobulin microvascular casts (IMCs) ("lupus vasculopathy") were characterized by the presence of immunoglobulin deposition within the glomerular capillaries and small arterioles. In the present study we extensively investigated the morphologic and immunologic features of this lesion. The lesions were notable for the absence of endothelial or parietal vascular lesions and of fibrin, platelets, and leukocytes, which indicates that thrombosis is not involved in the vascular obstruction. According to our data immunoglobulin precipitation in the microvasculature seems to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this lesion, which is why we propose the term "immunoglobulin microvascular casts." In general, IMCs were associated with the most severe and active forms of diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (World Health Organization [WHO] class IV). However our data show that, in contrast to previous studies

  10. Detection of aerosolized varicella-zoster virus DNA in patients with localized herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kayoko; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tomitaka, Akiko; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Asano, Yoshizo

    2004-03-15

    We examined the excretion of varicella zoster virus (VZV) in hospitalized patients with herpes zoster localized to the thoracic region whose skin lesions were covered with either hydrocolloid dressing agents (hydrocolloid group) or conventional gauze bandages (gauze group). The presence of VZV DNA in swab samples from lesion coverings, the throat, and filters of air purifiers was examined by use of a sensitive polymerase chain reaction assay. For the hydrocolloid group, VZV was detected in none of the samples from lesion coverings or air purifier filters; for the gauze group, VZV DNA was detected in samples from gauze coverings and air purifier filters for all 6 patients. VZV DNA was detected less frequently in throat samples from patients in the hydrocolloid group than in those from patients in the gauze group. The results of the present study suggest that hydrocolloid dressing agents prevent excretion of aerosolized VZV DNA from skin lesions of patients with localized herpes zoster.

  11. DNA repair capacity of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Raquel

    2007-08-14

    Damage to the genome is unavoidable in living creatures, because of sunlight exposure as well as environmental chemicals present in food and drinking water. There is a need to monitor and purify the drinking water; therefore, several methods of detection have been developed. A very promising model system for this purpose is the zebrafish (Danio rerio), which is endowed with special qualities for detecting external as well as internal abnormalities. Grossman and Wei's assay [Grossman L, Wei Q (1995) Clin Chem 12:1854-1863], which measures the expression level of a nonreplicating recombinant plasmid DNA containing a UV-damaged luciferase reporter gene, shows that zebrafish can repair chromosomal lesions to a much greater extent than the human population. This vertebrate model is still very promising after possible down-regulation of the DNA repair enzymes.

  12. Search field size and lesion detection performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipnis, Sameer; Huda, Walter; Hardie, Andrew; Ogden, Kent

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the ability of an observer to identify abnormal foci on CT and how that ability is affected by changing the search field size from a whole abdomen to the liver region alone. A 2-Alternate Forced Choice (2 AFC) experimental paradigm was used to quantify observer detection performance. Each AFC experiment yielded the intensity needed to achieve 92% accuracy in lesion detection (I92%). Abdominal images were obtained at an x-ray tube voltage of 120 kV with a CTDIvol of 20 mGy. Circular lesions were generated by projecting spheres onto the image plane, followed by blurring function. Five lesion sizes (5 mm, 7 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, and 15 mm), and four readers who were extensively trained in AFC methodology, were used in the 2AFC experiments. Each experiment was repeated 4 times to improve the experimental precision, as well as to provide an estimate of experimental uncertainty. For each observer, the experimental order of the 40 experiments was randomized to eliminate learning curve and/or observer fatigue. We measured contrast detail slopes for both Abdomen and Liver search field size, and determined ratio of I92% value for Abdomen search field to the corresponding I92% for the Liver search field (i.e., Rabd:liv). Values of Rabd:liv provides quantitative indicator of the relative difficulty of detection lesions in the whole Abdomen relative to lesion detection restricted to the Liver. The slope of the contrast detail curve for the Abdomen search field was -0.03, whereas the corresponding slope for the Liver search field was -0.18. Rabd:liv ranged between 1.3 and 1.6, with an average of 1.4 +/- 0.1. The value of Rabd:liv monotonically increased from 1.35 for 5 mm lesions to nearly 1.6 for the largest 15 mm lesion. The results of our study indicate that limiting the area of search to the liver on a CT of the abdomen improves the detection of mass lesions. This finding is almost certainly related to the fact that the liver provides a relatively

  13. QUANTITATION OF INTRACELLULAR NAD(P)H IN LIVING CELLS CAN MONITOR AN IMBALANCE OF DNA SINGLE STRAND BREAK REPAIR IN REAL TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitation of intracellular NAD(P)H in living cells can monitor an imbalance of DNA single strand break repair in real time.

    ABSTRACT

    DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) are one of the most frequent DNA lesions in genomic DNA generated either by oxidative stress or du...

  14. CDKN2A (p14(ARF)/p16(INK4a)) and ATM promoter methylation in patients with impalpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Delmonico, Lucas; Moreira, Aline dos Santos; Franco, Marco Felipe; Esteves, Eliane Barbosa; Scherrer, Luciano; Gallo, Claúdia Vitória de Moura; do Nascimento, Cristina Moreira; Ornellas, Maria Helena Faria; de Azevedo, Carolina Maria; Alves, Gilda

    2015-10-01

    Early detection of breast cancer increases the chances of cure, but the reliable identification of impalpable lesions is still a challenge. In spite of the advances in breast cancer detection, the molecular basis of impalpable lesions and the corresponding circulating biomarkers are not well understood. Impalpable lesions, classified by radiologists according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System in the categories 3 and 4, can be either benign or malignant (slow growing or aggressive). In this article, we report the DNA methylation pattern in CDKN2A (p14(ARF)/p16(INK4a)) and in ATM gene promoters from 62 impalpable lesions, 39 peripheral blood samples, and 39 saliva samples, assessed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction method. ATM showed the greatest percentage of methylation in DNA from lesions (benign and malignant), blood (even with p16(INK4a)), and saliva, followed by p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). Among the malignant cases, ATM promoter was the most hypermethylated in lesion DNA and in blood and saliva DNAs, and p14(ARF), the least. The highest percentage of p16(INK4a) methylation was found in the blood. Finally, our data are relevant because they were obtained using impalpable breast lesions from patients who were carefully recruited in 2 public hospitals of Rio de Janeiro.

  15. Systematically describing gross lesions in corals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.; Aeby, G.

    2006-01-01

    Many coral diseases are characterized based on gross descriptions and, given the lack or difficulty of applying existing laboratory tools to understanding causes of coral diseases, most new diseases will continued to be described based on appearance in the field. Unfortunately, many existing descriptions of coral disease are ambiguous or open to subjective interpretation, making comparisons between oceans problematic. One reason for this is that the process of describing lesions is often confused with that of assigning causality for the lesion. However, causality is usually something not obtained in the field and requires additional laboratory tests. Because a concise and objective morphologic description provides the foundation for a case definition of any disease, there is a need for a consistent and standardized process to describe lesions of corals that focuses on morphology. We provide a framework to systematically describe and name diseases in corals involving 4 steps: (1) naming the disease, (2) describing the lesion, (3) formulating a morphologic diagnosis and (4) formulating an etiologic diagnosis. This process focuses field investigators on describing what they see and separates the process of describing a lesion from that of inferring causality, the latter being more appropriately done using laboratory techniques.

  16. Occipital lesions: a possible cost of cradleboards.

    PubMed

    Holliday, D Y

    1993-03-01

    This examination of a Mimbres-Mogollon pueblo skeletal sample reveals a surprising percentage of individuals with occipital lesions. Each lesion is located in the approximate center of the squama immediately superior to the external occipital protuberance. Notably, no child over the age of 1 year exhibits a lesion that would have been active at the time of death, but a number of older children and adults exhibit evidence of healed lesions in this same area on the occipital. The restricted nature of these lesions, in terms of both their locations and ages of those actively affected, suggests that the use of cradleboards may have been at least a contributing, if not initiatory, factor in their creation. Specifically, this study suggests that the pressure and friction of an infant's head against a cradleboard may have 1) produced ischemic ulcers, 2) produced the conditions favorable for bacterial infections such as impetigo or carbuncles, or 3) complicated the treatment of other infections appearing on the back of the scalp.

  17. Alcoholism and the Armanni-Ebstein lesion.

    PubMed

    Parai, Jacqueline L; Kodikara, Sarathchandra; Milroy, Christopher M; Pollanen, Michael S

    2012-03-01

    The Armanni-Ebstein lesion is a histological change in the kidney consisting of sub-nuclear vacuolation of the proximal tubules. It has been most associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. The vacuoles have been reported to contain glycogen. More recent studies show them to contain fat. Recent papers have associated the Armanni-Ebstein lesion with non-diabetic ketoacidosis. We present 11 cases of alcoholic ketoacidosis where the Armanni-Ebstein lesion was identified. None had a history of diabetes mellitus and none showed any changes of diabetic nephropathy. All 11 cases had raised acetone levels (3-67 mg/100 mL (mean 17.9 mg/100 mL and median value of 16 mg/100 mL). In addition a case of isopropanol poisoning was found to have the Armanni-Ebstein lesion. Isopropanol is converted to acetone but is not associated with acidosis. These results indicate that the Armanni-Ebstein lesion is not specific to diabetes mellitus.

  18. Computer detection of stellate lesions in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegelmeyer, W. Philip, Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The three primary signs for which radiologists search when screening mammograms for breast cancer are stellate lesions, microcalcifications, and circumscribed lesions. Stellate lesions are of particular importance, as they are almost always associated with a malignancy. Further, they are often indicated only by subtle architectural distortions and so are in general easier to miss than the other signs. We have developed a method for the automatic detection of stellate lesions in digitized mammograms, and have tested them on image data where the presence or absence of malignancies is known. We extract image features from the known images, use them to grow binary decision trees, and use those trees to label each pixel of new mammograms with its probability of being located on an abnormality. The primary feature for the detection of stellate lesions is ALOE, analysis of local oriented edges, which is derived from an analysis of the histogram of edge orientations in local windows. Other features, based on the Laws texture energy measures, have been developed to respond to normal tissue, and so improve the false alarm performance of the entire system.

  19. MECHANISTIC AND BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HELICASE ACTION ON DAMAGED DNA

    PubMed Central

    Suhasini, Avvaru N.; Brosh, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Helicases catalytically unwind structured nucleic acids in a nucleoside-triphosphate-dependent and directionally specific manner, and are essential for virtually all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism. ATPase-driven helicases which translocate along nucleic acids play a role in damage recognition or unwinding of a DNA tract containing the lesion. Although classical biochemical experiments provided evidence that bulky covalent adducts inhibit DNA unwinding catalyzed by certain DNA helicases in a strand-specific manner (i.e. , block to DNA unwinding restricted to adduct residence in the strand the helicase translocates), recent studies suggest more complex arrangements that may depend on the helicase under study, its assembly in a protein complex, and the type of structural DNA perturbation. Moreover, base and sugar phosphate backbone modifications exert effects on DNA helicases that suggest specialized tracking mechanisms. As a component of the replication stress response, the single-stranded DNA binding protein Replication Protein A (RPA) may serve to enable eukaryotic DNA helicases to overcome certain base lesions. Helicases play important roles in DNA damage signaling which also involve their partnership with RPA. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of mechanistic and biological aspects of helicase action on damaged DNA. PMID:20574162

  20. DNA Double Strand Breaks: A Common Theme in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Daniela; Mollinari, Cristiana; Racaniello, Mauro; Garaci, Enrico; Cardinale, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of DNA damage and impairment of DNA repair systems are involved in the pathogenesis of different neurodegenerative diseases. Whenever DNA damage is too extensive, the DNA damage response pathway provides for triggering cellular senescence and/or apoptosis. However, whether the increased level of DNA damage in neurodegenerative disorders is a cause rather than the consequence of neurodegenerative events remains to be established. Among possible DNA lesions, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are rare events, nevertheless they are the most lethal form of DNA damage. In neurons, DSBs are particularly deleterious because of their reduced DNA repair capability as compared to proliferating cells. Here, we provide a description of DSB repair systems and describe human studies showing the presence of several types of DNA lesions in three major neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). Then, we analyze the role of DSB accumulation and deficiency of DSB repair systems in neurodegeneration by examining studies on animal models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. The role of cytology in oral lesions: a review of recent improvements.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Historically, sensitivity and specificity of oral cytology is poor. Using conventional oral cytology for the diagnosis of cancer and its precursors has not had the success that cytologists had hoped for; however, with improved methodology, oral cytology has enjoyed a resurgence of interest. This renewed interest is partly due to the introduction of a specialized brush that collects a full-thickness epithelial sample and not just superficially sloughed cells, as well as analysis of that sample with computer assistance; in addition, a variety of adjunctive techniques have been introduced to potentially enhance the diagnosis of the cytologic specimens including DNA analysis, immunocytochemistry, molecular analysis, and liquid-based preparations. An increase in sensitivity (>96%) and specificity (>90%) of the oral brush biopsy with computer-assisted diagnosis has been reported for identification of malignant and premalignant lesions. Brush cytology is valuable to prevent misdiagnosing doubtful oral lesions, i.e., those lesions without a definitive etiology, diagnosing large lesions where excision of the entire tissue is not possible or practicable, evaluating patients with recurrent malignancies, and monitoring premalignant lesions.

  2. Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0238 TITLE: Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL...of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Oxygen-rich environments can create pro-mutagenic DNA lesions such as 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) that can be misreplicated during translesion DNA synthesis

  3. Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents Against Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    effectively and accurately replicate crosslinked DNA lesions such as thymine dimers and cisplatinated DNA (19-21). A third group of DNA polymerases...lines correlates with resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin which damage DNA (38). Furthermore, pol  overexpression is a poor... cisplatinated GG adduct (33). In this model, dCTP is properly paired with the first templating nucleobase via conventional hydrogen bonds. In general, our

  4. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  5. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  6. Synthetic DNA

    PubMed Central

    O’ Driscoll, Aisling; Sleator, Roy D.

    2013-01-01

    With world wide data predicted to exceed 40 trillion gigabytes by 2020, big data storage is a very real and escalating problem. Herein, we discuss the utility of synthetic DNA as a robust and eco-friendly archival data storage solution of the future. PMID:23514938

  7. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms and promoter methylation in cervical oncogenic lesions and cancer.

    PubMed

    Botezatu, Anca; Socolov, Demetra; Iancu, Iulia V; Huica, Irina; Plesa, Adriana; Ungureanu, Carmen; Anton, Gabriela

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms and MTHFR methylation pattern in cervical lesions development among women from Romania, a country with high prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) cervical infections. To achieve this goal, blood samples and cervical cytology specimens (n = 77)/tumour tissue specimens (n = 23) were investigated. As control, blood and negative cytological smears (n = 50) were used. A statistically significant association was found between T allele of C677T polymorphism and cervical lesions, heterozygote women presenting a threefold increased risk (normal/cervical lesions and tumours: wild homozygote 34/41 (0.68/0.41), heterozygote 14/51 (0.28/0.51), mutant homozygote 2/8 (0.04/0.08); OR = 3.081, P = 0.0035). Using χ square test for the control group, the HPV-negative and HPV-positive patients with cervix lesions, a significant correlation between viral infection and T allele of C677T polymorphism (P = 0.0287) was found. The MTHFR promoter was methylated in all HGSIL and tumour samples, significant differences being noted between HPV-positive samples, control group and cases of cervical dysplastic lesions without HPV DNA (P < 0. 0001) and between samples from patients with high-risk (hr)HPV versus low-risk (lr)HPV (P = 0.0026). No correlations between polymorphisms and methylation were observed. In Romania, individuals carrying T allele are susceptible for cervical lesions. MTHFR promoter methylation is associated with cervical severity lesions and with hrHPV.

  8. E2F-7 couples DNA damage-dependent transcription with the DNA repair process.

    PubMed

    Zalmas, Lykourgos-Panagiotis; Coutts, Amanda S; Helleday, Thomas; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2013-09-15

    The cellular response to DNA damage, mediated by the DNA repair process, is essential in maintaining the integrity and stability of the genome. E2F-7 is an atypical member of the E2F family with a role in negatively regulating transcription and cell cycle progression under DNA damage. Surprisingly, we found that E2F-7 makes a transcription-independent contribution to the DNA repair process, which involves E2F-7 locating to and binding damaged DNA. Further, E2F-7 recruits CtBP and HDAC to the damaged DNA, altering the local chromatin environment of the DNA lesion. Importantly, the E2F-7 gene is a target for somatic mutation in human cancer and tumor-derived mutant alleles encode proteins with compromised transcription and DNA repair properties. Our results establish that E2F-7 participates in 2 closely linked processes, allowing it to directly couple the expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response with the DNA repair machinery, which has relevance in human malignancy.

  9. DNA Polymerases λ and β: The Double-Edged Swords of DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mentegari, Elisa; Kissova, Miroslava; Bavagnoli, Laura; Maga, Giovanni; Crespan, Emmanuele

    2016-01-01

    DNA is constantly exposed to both endogenous and exogenous damages. More than 10,000 DNA modifications are induced every day in each cell’s genome. Maintenance of the integrity of the genome is accomplished by several DNA repair systems. The core enzymes for these pathways are the DNA polymerases. Out of 17 DNA polymerases present in a mammalian cell, at least 13 are specifically devoted to DNA repair and are often acting in different pathways. DNA polymerases β and λ are involved in base excision repair of modified DNA bases and translesion synthesis past DNA lesions. Polymerase λ also participates in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, recent data have revealed that, depending on their relative levels, the cell cycle phase, the ratio between deoxy- and ribo-nucleotide pools and the interaction with particular auxiliary proteins, the repair reactions carried out by these enzymes can be an important source of genetic instability, owing to repair mistakes. This review summarizes the most recent results on the ambivalent properties of these enzymes in limiting or promoting genetic instability in mammalian cells, as well as their potential use as targets for anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:27589807

  10. DNA Damage Response and Autophagy: A Meaningful Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Eliopoulos, Aristides G.; Havaki, Sophia; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and the DNA damage response (DDR) are biological processes essential for cellular and organismal homeostasis. Herein, we summarize and discuss emerging evidence linking DDR to autophagy. We highlight published data suggesting that autophagy is activated by DNA damage and is required for several functional outcomes of DDR signaling, including repair of DNA lesions, senescence, cell death, and cytokine secretion. Uncovering the mechanisms by which autophagy and DDR are intertwined provides novel insight into the pathobiology of conditions associated with accumulation of DNA damage, including cancer and aging, and novel concepts for the development of improved therapeutic strategies against these pathologies. PMID:27917193

  11. Replication of N[superscript 2],3-Ethenoguanine by DNA Polymerases

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Linlin; Christov, Plamen P.; Kozekov, Ivan D.; Pence, Matthew G.; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2014-10-02

    The unstable DNA adduct N2,3-ethenoguanine, a product of both exposure to the carcinogen vinyl chloride and of oxidative stress, was built into an oligonucleotide, using an isostere strategy to stabilize the glycosidic bond. This modification was then used to examine the cause of mutations by DNA polymerases, in terms of both the biochemistry of the lesion and a structure of the lesion within a polymerase.

  12. [Cystic lesions--diagnosis and conservative treatment].

    PubMed

    Olas, Jacek; Bucka, Jolanta; Dworak, Agata; Golański, Bartłomiej

    2003-01-01

    Effective treatment of cystic lesions that we can apply in the outpatient clinic is the target for seeking a new solution in finding treatment that will produce a better percentage of recovered patients. At this moment non-surgical treatment of cystic lesions is compare with traditional methods of treatment i.e. cyst content aspiration and injection of steroids, with methods which lead to obliteration of cyst lumen and in this way closing the space being the reservoir for the cyst content. Local application of hialuronidase, aspiration, and then steroid injection is gaining more and more attention of clinicians. We also pay much more attention to local fibrinogen injection as a safe and effective method of treatment, which can be useful in the treatment of cystic lesions and topical treatment of bursitis.

  13. Pigmented Skin Lesions Classification Using Dermatoscopic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdehourat, Germán; Corez, Andrés; Bazzano, Anabella; Musé, Pablo

    In this paper we propose a machine learning approach to classify melanocytic lesions in malignant and benign from dermatoscopic images. The image database is composed of 433 benign lesions and 80 malignant melanoma. After an image pre-processing stage that includes hair removal filtering, each image is automatically segmented using well known image segmentation algorithms. Then, each lesion is characterized by a feature vector that contains shape, color and texture information, as well as local and global parameters that try to reflect structures used in medical diagnosis. The learning and classification stage is performed using AdaBoost.M1 with C4.5 decision trees. For the automatically segmented database, classification delivered a false positive rate of 8.75% for a sensitivity of 95%. The same classification procedure applied to manually segmented images by an experienced dermatologist yielded a false positive rate of 4.62% for a sensitivity of 95%.

  14. Rare lesions of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cem; Altinors, Nur; Sonmez, Erkin; Gulsen, Salih; Caner, Hakan

    2010-07-01

    Vestibular schwannomas, meningiomas and epidermoids account for a vast majority of the lesions occurring in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA). Neoplastic and non-neoplastic pathologies other than these tumors constitute 1% of all lesions located in the CPA. The aim of this study was to reveal our experience in the treatment of the rare lesions of the CPA. We have retrospectively reviewed the medical files and radiological data of all patients who underwent surgery involving any kind of pathology in the CPA. We have excluded those patients with a histopathological diagnosis of meningioma, schwannoma and epidermoids. Our research revealed a case of craniopharyngioma, a case of chloroma, a case of solitary fibrous tumor, a case of pinealoblastoma, a case of atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor, a case of an aneurysm, a case of hemorrhage and a case of abscess.

  15. Morgellons Disease Presenting As an Eyelid Lesion.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Rasanamar K; Steele, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Morgellons disease is characterized by complaints of uncomfortable skin sensations and fibers emanating from nonhealing skin lesions. Morgellons disease is well-known in the dermatology and psychiatry literature, where it is typically considered a subtype of delusional parasitosis, but it has not yet been described in the ophthalmology literature. A patient with self-reported Morgellons disease is presented, who was referred for evaluation of left lower eyelid ectropion. She reported that her skin was infested with fibers that were "trying to get down into the eyelid." On examination, she had ectropion of the left lower eyelid, broken cilia, and an ulcerated left upper eyelid lesion concerning for carcinoma. Biopsy of the lesion was consistent with excoriation. Treatment of her ectropion was deferred out of concern for wound dehiscence, given the patient's aggressive excoriation behavior. This case is presented to make the ophthalmologist aware of this disorder and to highlight the appropriate clinical management.

  16. [Operative management of trigono-atrial lesions].

    PubMed

    Hussein, S

    1998-01-01

    Trigono-atrial-Lesions are microsurgically serios accessible, the results of transcortical aproaches are difficult and frequently unsatisfactory. The microsurgical anatomy of the trigono-atrial region will be studied on 100 brain hemispheres (the posterior cerebral arteries were injected selective on 70 hemispheres). According to the anatomical findings, an interhemispheric microsurgical approach has been developed. The operative results of 25 patients with different atrial lesions are presented. There was no operative mortality, the postoperative morbidity was 12%, in 24% (n = 6) the preoperative state was still unchanged, in 12 cases (48%) we note a normal neurological and neuropsychological postoperative status. In 4 patients (16%) the neurological symptoms are postoperatively improved. According to these first results, the described transatrial approach seems to be a real alternative for careful selected meanly leftsided lesions of the trigone.

  17. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Soussan; Monsef Esfahani, Alireza; Bidari Zerehpoush, Farahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic gram-negative spiral organism. It is recognized as the etiologic factor for peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Recently, it has been isolated from dental plaque and the dorsum of the tongue. This study was designed to assess the association between H. pylori and oral lesions such as ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and primary lymphoma. Materials and methods. A total of 228 biopsies diagnosed as oral ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral primary lymphoma were selected from the archives of the Pathology Department. Thirty-two samples that were diagnosed as being without any pathological changes were selected as the control group. All the paraffin blocks were cut for hematoxylin and eosin staining to confirm the diagnoses and then the samples were prepared for immunohistochemistry staining. Data were collected and analyzed. Results. Chi-squared test showed significant differences between the frequency of H. pylori positivity in normal tissue and the lesions were examined (P=0.000). In addition, there was a statistically significant difference between the lesions examined (P=0.042). Chi-squared test showed significant differences between H. pylori positivity and different tissue types except inside the muscle layer as follows: in epithelium and in lamina propria (P=0.000), inside the blood vessels (P=0.003), inside the salivary gland duct (P=0.036), and muscle layer (P=0.122). Conclusion. There might be a relation between the presence of H. pylori and oral lesions. Therefore, early detection and eradication of H. pylori in high-risk patients are suggested. PMID:24578822

  18. Distinguishing torpedo maculopathy from similar lesions of the posterior segment.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Victor M; Schwartz, Stephen G; Flynn, Harry W; Capó, Hilda; Berrocal, Audina M; Murray, Timothy G; Harbour, J William

    2014-01-01

    Torpedo maculopathy is a congenital solitary, oval-shaped lesion typically located temporal to the center of the macula. Congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), RPE lesions of Gardner syndrome, and other lesions can present with similar characteristics. Because of its unique clinical and imaging features, torpedo maculopathy generally can be differentiated from other posterior segment lesions.

  19. Classification and prevalence of foot lesions in captive flamingos (Phoenicopteridae).

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Adriana M W; Nielsen, Søren S; King, Catherine E; Bertelsen, Mads F

    2010-03-01

    Foot lesions can compromise the health and welfare of captive birds. In this study, we estimated the prevalence of foot lesions in captive flamingos (Phoenicopteridae). The study was based on photos of 1,495 pairs of foot soles from 854 flamingos in 18 European and two Texan (USA) zoological collections. Methodology for evaluating flamingo feet lesions was developed for this project because no suitable method had been reported in the literature. Four types of foot lesions were identified: hyperkeratoses, fissures, nodular lesions, and papillomatous growths. Seven areas on each foot received a severity score from 0 to 2 for each type of lesion (0 = no lesion, 1 = mild to moderate lesion, 2 = severe lesion). The prevalence of birds with lesions (scores 1 or 2) were 100%, 87%, 17%, and 46% for hyperkeratosis, fissures, nodular lesions, and papillomatous growths, respectively. Birds with severe lesions (score 2) constituted 67%, 46%, 4%, and 12% for hyperkeratosis, fissures, nodular lesions, and papillomatous growths, respectively. Hyperkeratosis and nodular lesions were most prevalent on the base of the foot and the proximal portion of the digits, likely reflecting those areas bearing the most weight. The second and fourth digits were most affected with fissures and papillomatous lesions; these areas of the foot appear to be where the most flexion occurs during ambulation. The study demonstrates that foot lesions are highly prevalent and widely distributed in the study population, indicating that they are an extensive problem in captive flamingos.

  20. Cryo-EM Imaging of DNA-PK DNA Damage Repair Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Phoebe L. Stewart

    2005-06-27

    Exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that must be repaired for cell survival. Higher eukaryotes respond to DSBs by arresting the cell cycle, presumably to repair the DNA lesions before cell division. In mammalian cells, the nonhomologous end-joining DSB repair pathway is mediated by the 470 kDa DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) together with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. Mouse knock-out models of these three proteins are all exquisitely sensitive to low doses of ionizing radiation. In the presence of DNA ends, Ku binds to the DNA and then recruits DNA-PKcs. After formation of the complex, the kinase activity associated with DNA-PKcs becomes activated. This kinase activity has been shown to be essential for repairing DNA DSBs in vivo since expression of a kinase-dead form of DNA-PKcs in a mammalian cell line that lacks DNA-PKcs fails to complement the radiosensitive phenotype. The immense size of DNA-PKcs suggests that it may also serve as a docking site for other DNA repair proteins. Since the assembly of the DNA-PK complex onto DNA is a prerequisite for DSB repair, it is critical to obtain structural information on the complex. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle reconstruction methods provide a powerful way to image large macromolecular assemblies at near atomic (10-15 ?) resolution. We have already used cryo-EM methods to examine the structure of the isolated DNA-PKcs protein. This structure reveals numerous cavities throughout the protein that may allow passage of single or double-stranded DNA. Pseudo two-fold symmetry was found for the monomeric protein, suggesting that DNA-PKcs may interact with two DNA ends or two Ku heterodimers simultaneously. Here we propose to study the structure of the cross-linked DNA-PKcs/Ku/DNA complex. Difference imaging with our published DNA-PKcs structure will enable us to elucidate the architecture of the complex. A second

  1. Formamidopyrimidines in DNA: mechanisms of formation, repair, and biological effects.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral; Kirkali, Güldal; Jaruga, Pawel

    2008-12-15

    Oxidatively induced damage to DNA results in a plethora of lesions comprising modified bases and sugars, DNA-protein cross-links, tandem lesions, strand breaks, and clustered lesions. Formamidopyrimidines, 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyAde) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua), are among the major lesions generated in DNA by hydroxyl radical attack, UV radiation, or photosensitization under numerous in vitro and in vivo conditions. They are formed by one-electron reduction of C8-OH-adduct radicals of purines and thus have a common precursor with 8-hydroxypurines generated upon one-electron oxidation. Methodologies using mass spectrometry exist to accurately measure FapyAde and FapyGua in vitro and in vivo. Formamidopyrimidines are repaired by base excision repair. Numerous prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA glycosylases are highly specific for removal of these lesions from DNA in the first step of this repair pathway, indicating their biological importance. FapyAde and FapyGua are bypassed by DNA polymerases with the insertion of the wrong intact base opposite them, leading to mutagenesis. In mammalian cells, the mutagenicity of FapyGua exceeds that of 8-hydroxyguanine, which is thought to be the most mutagenic of the oxidatively induced lesions in DNA. The background and formation levels of the former in vitro and in vivo equal or exceed those of the latter under various conditions. FapyAde and FapyGua exist in living cells at significant background levels and are abundantly generated upon exposure to oxidative stress. Mice lacking the genes that encode specific DNA glycosylases accumulate these lesions in different organs and, in some cases, exhibit a series of pathological conditions including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Animals exposed to environmental toxins accumulate formamidopyrimidines in their organs. Here, we extensively review the mechanisms of formation, measurement, repair, and biological effects of formamidopyrimidines

  2. Decoding Diffusivity in Multiple Sclerosis: Analysis of Optic Radiation Lesional and Non-Lesional White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Klistorner, Alexander; Vootakuru, Nikitha; Wang, Chenyu; Yiannikas, Con; Graham, Stuart L.; Parratt, John; Garrick, Raymond; Levin, Netta; Masters, Lynette; Lagopoulos, Jim; Barnett, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been suggested as a new promising tool in MS that may provide greater pathological specificity than conventional MRI, helping, therefore, to elucidate disease pathogenesis and monitor therapeutic efficacy. However, the pathological substrates that underpin alterations in brain tissue diffusivity are not yet fully delineated. Tract-specific DTI analysis has previously been proposed in an attempt to alleviate this problem. Here, we extended this approach by segmenting a single tract into areas bound by seemingly similar pathological processes, which may better delineate the potential association between DTI metrics and underlying tissue damage. Method Several compartments were segmented in optic radiation (OR) of 50 relapsing-remitting MS patients including T2 lesions, proximal and distal parts of fibers transected by lesion and fibers with no discernable pathology throughout the entire length of the OR. Results Asymmetry analysis between lesional and non-lesional fibers demonstrated a marked increase in Radial Diffusivity (RD), which was topographically limited to focal T2 lesions and potentially relates to the lesional myelin loss. A relative elevation of Axial Diffusivity (AD) in the distal part of the lesional fibers was observed in a distribution consistent with Wallerian degeneration, while diffusivity in the proximal portion of transected axons remained normal. A moderate, but significant elevation of RD in OR non-lesional fibers was strongly associated with the global (but not local) T2 lesion burden and is probably related to microscopic demyelination undetected by conventional MRI. Conclusion This study highlights the utility of the compartmentalization approach in elucidating the pathological substrates of diffusivity and demonstrates the presence of tissue-specific patterns of altered diffusivity in MS, providing further evidence that DTI is a sensitive marker of tissue damage in both lesions and NAWM. Our

  3. Non-infectious inflammatory genital lesions.

    PubMed

    Andreassi, Lucio; Bilenchi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    The genitalia may be the site of non-infectious inflammatory lesions that are generally manifested as balanoposthitis and vulvovaginitis. In men, these forms constitute 50% of all balanoposthitis forms, and in women, vulvovaginitis frequency is even higher. They consist of genital locations of general skin diseases, such as psoriasis, lichen planus, lichen sclerosus, and other clinical entities with their own physiognomy, such as Zoon's balanitis-vulvitis. Diagnosis of genital non-infectious inflammatory lesions is usually made on clinical criteria. A biopsy is only necessary for the identification of clinical conditions that may simulate inflammatory form but are actually premalignant processes.

  4. New developments in endocervical glandular lesions.

    PubMed

    McCluggage, W Glenn

    2013-01-01

    McCluggage W G (2012) Histopathology New developments in endocervical glandular lesions There is evidence that the prevalence of premalignant and malignant endocervical glandular lesions is increasing in real as well as in apparent terms. In this review, new developments and selected controversial aspects of endocervical glandular lesions are covered, concentrating mainly on premalignant and malignant lesions. The terminology of premalignant endocervical glandular lesions is discussed with a comparison of the World Health Organization classification and the cervical glandular intraepithelial neoplasia (CGIN) system, which is in widespread use in the United Kingdom. Primary cervical adenocarcinomas comprise a heterogeneous group of different morphological types, and while it is known that the majority of these are associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV), it has become clear in recent years that most of the more uncommon morphological types are unassociated with HPV, although they may sometimes be p16-positive. A spectrum of benign, premalignant and malignant cervical glandular lesions exhibiting gastric differentiation is now recognized; these include type A tunnel clusters, typical and atypical lobular endocervical glandular hyperplasia, adenoma malignum and gastric-type adenocarcinoma. The latter is a recently described variant of primary cervical adenocarcinoma which has a different morphological appearance to the usual endocervical type and which is probably associated with different patterns of spread and a worse prognosis. There is accumulating evidence that 'early invasive' cervical adenocarcinomas have an excellent prognosis and are suitable for conservative management. Immunohistochemical markers of value in the distinction between a primary cervical and endometrial adenocarcinoma are discussed. While it is well known that a panel of markers comprising oestrogen receptor (ER), vimentin, p16 and monoclonal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is

  5. Bone lesions in early congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, E U; Solomon, A

    1976-01-31

    A radiological study of bone changes in 112 children with congenital syphilis was undertaken. A similar number of normal children acted as a control group. Radiological examination of 5 syphilitic children showed that their bones were normal. Combined metaphyseal and periosteal lesions were the commonest bone disorders seen and are thus the most convincing radiological evidence of congenital syphilis. Transverse metaphyseal lucencies occur early in the disease, and with Wimburger's sign they are the prime evidence of pathology in syphilitic bone. Other radiographic changes are probably owing to minimal trauma in fragile disorganized bone. The occurrence of periosteal lesions alone has also been evaluated.

  6. Isolated sphenoid sinus lesion: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Alazzawi, Sarmad; Shahrizal, Tengku; Prepageran, Narayanan; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Isolated sphenoid sinus lesions are an uncommon entity and present with non-specific symptoms. In this case report, the patient presented with a history of headaches for a duration of one month without sinonasal symptoms. A computed tomography scan showed a soft tissue mass occupying the sphenoid sinus. An endoscopic biopsy revealed fungal infection. Endoscopic wide sphenoidotomy with excision of the sphenoid sinus lesion was then performed however, the microbiological examination post-surgery did not show any fungal elements. Instead, Citrobacter species was implicated to be the cause of infection. PMID:25320694

  7. Ameloblastoma: an aggressive lesion of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Suma, M S; Sundaresh, K J; Shruthy, R; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-10-09

    Ameloblastoma is a benign locally invasive epithelial odontogenic tumour comprising 1% of all tumours and cysts arising in the jaws. It is commonly found in the third and fourth decade in the molar ramus region of the mandible. Among all types of ameloblastoma, multicystic ameloblastoma is believed to be locally aggressive lesion that has the tendency for recurrence. In this report we present a large multicystic ameloblastoma in the left body-ramus region of the mandible in a 55-year-old woman. This large lesion was diagnosed with the help of CT and was successfully managed by hemimandibulectomy with simultaneous reconstruction using iliac crest bone.

  8. A liver lesion in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sujata; Rajoriya, Neil; Wang, Lai Mun; Collier, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is associated with an increased risk of cholangiocarcinoma; appropriate surveillance should be undertaken for this. Our case illustrates an unexpected liver lesion in such a patient, which would not have been detected with imaging alone. In suspected cancer, if a patient is not a candidate for liver resection, liver biopsy should be considered in case there is a treatment option for an alternative cause of the liver lesion. This is a careful decision to be made due to the risk of tumour seeding compromising cure and needs to be discussed via the hepatobiliary multidisciplinary team. PMID:25827915

  9. COORDINATING DNA POLYMERASE TRAFFIC DURING HIGH AND LOW FIDELITY SYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    With the discovery that organisms possess multiple DNA polymerases (Pols) displaying different fidelities, processivities, and activities came the realization that mechanisms must exist to manage the actions of these diverse enzymes to prevent gratuitous mutations. Although many of the Pols encoded by most organisms are largely accurate, and participate in DNA replication and DNA repair, a sizeable fraction display a reduced fidelity, and act to catalyze potentially error-prone translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) past lesions that persist in the DNA. Striking the proper balance between use of these different enzymes during DNA replication, DNA repair, and TLS is essential for ensuring accurate duplication of the cell’s genome. This review highlights mechanisms that organisms utilize to manage the actions of their different Pols. A particular emphasis is placed on discussion of current models for how different Pols switch places with each other at the replication fork during high fidelity replication and potentially error-pone TLS. PMID:19540941

  10. Sequence specificity of DNA cleavage by Micrococcus luteus. gamma. endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Hentosh, P.; Henner, W.D.; Reynolds, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    DNA fragments of defined sequence have been used to determine the sites of cleavage by ..gamma..-endonuclease activity in extracts prepared from Micrococcus luteus. End-labeled DNA restriction fragments of pBR322 DNA that had been irradiated under nitrogen in the presence of potassium iodide or t-butanol were treated with M. luteus ..gamma.. endonuclease and analyzed on irradiated DNA preferentially at the positions of cytosines and thymines. DNA cleavage occurred immediately to the 3' side of pyrimidines in irradiated DNA and resulted in fragments that terminate in a 5'-phosphoryl group. These studies indicate that both altered cytosines and thymines may be important DNA lesions requiring repair after exposure to ..gamma.. radiation.

  11. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  12. Historical perspective on the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Hanawalt, Philip C

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality.

  13. Historical Perspective on the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality. PMID:26507443

  14. The DinB•RecA complex of Escherichia coli mediates an efficient and high-fidelity response to ubiquitous alkylation lesions.

    PubMed

    Cafarelli, Tiziana M; Rands, Thomas J; Godoy, Veronica G

    2014-03-01

    Alkylation DNA lesions are ubiquitous, and result from normal cellular metabolism as well as from treatment with methylating agents and chemotherapeutics. DNA damage tolerance by translesion synthesis DNA polymerases has an important role in cellular resistance to alkylating agents. However, it is not yet known whether Escherichia coli (E. coli) DNA Pol IV (DinB) alkylation lesion bypass efficiency and fidelity in vitro are similar to those inferred by genetic analyses. We hypothesized that DinB-mediated bypass of 3-deaza-3-methyladenine, a stable analog of 3-methyladenine, the primary replication fork-stalling alkylation lesion, would be of high fidelity. We performed here the first kinetic analyses of E. coli DinB•RecA binary complexes. Whether alone or in a binary complex, DinB inserted the correct deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) opposite either lesion-containing or undamaged template; the incorporation of other dNTPs was largely inefficient. DinB prefers undamaged DNA, but the DinB•RecA binary complex increases its catalytic efficiency on lesion-containing template, perhaps as part of a regulatory mechanism to better respond to alkylation damage. Notably, we find that a DinB derivative with enhanced affinity for RecA, either alone or in a binary complex, is less efficient and has a lower fidelity than DinB or DinB•RecA. This finding contrasts our previous genetic analyses. Therefore, mutagenesis resulting from alkylation lesions is likely limited in cells by the activity of DinB•RecA. These two highly conserved proteins play an important role in maintaining genomic stability when cells are faced with ubiquitous DNA damage. Kinetic analyses are important to gain insights into the mechanism(s) regulating TLS DNA polymerases.

  15. DNA nanostructure immobilization to lithographic DNA arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrete, Omar D.

    Although DNA is well known for its genetic role in biology, DNA has also been sought-after as a material for the self-assembly of biological and electronic devices. Examples of DNA nanostructure construction include DNA tiled self-assembly and DNA Origami, where by controlling the sequence and concentration of DNA molecules, the rational design of geometric DNA nanostructures is possible. The assembly of DNA nanostructures takes place in solution and thus they are in disorder and require further organization to construct circuitry or devices. Hence, it is essential for future applications of this technology to develop methods to direct the placement of DNA nanostructures on a surface. To address this challenge my research examines the use of DNA microarrays to capture DNA nanostructures via DNA hybridization. Modern DNA arrays offer a high-density of sequence-specific molecular recognition sites where the addressable placement of DNA nanostructures can be achieved. Using Maskless Array Synthesizer (MAS) technology, I have characterized photolithographic DNA arrays for the hybridization of DNA complexes like large DNA molecules (> 1 kb), DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates, and DNA Origami. Although modern photolithographic DNA arrays can possess a high-density of sequence (106/cm2), the printed DNA areas are on the order of tens of microns. Thus, I have also developed a method to reduce the DNA array spot size to nanoscale dimensions through the combined use of electron beam lithography with photolithographic DNA synthesis. This work addresses the key elements towards developing a surface patterning technology that takes advantage of DNA base-pairing for both molecular sub-assembly and surface patterning.

  16. DICER, DROSHA and DNA damage response RNAs are necessary for the secondary recruitment of DNA damage response factors.

    PubMed

    Francia, Sofia; Cabrini, Matteo; Matti, Valentina; Oldani, Amanda; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) plays a central role in preserving genome integrity. Recently, we reported that the endoribonucleases DICER and DROSHA contribute to DDR activation by generating small non-coding RNAs, termed DNA damage response RNA (DDRNA), carrying the sequence of the damaged locus. It is presently unclear whether DDRNAs act by promoting the primary recognition of DNA lesions or the secondary recruitment of DDR factors into cytologically detectable foci and consequent signal amplification. Here, we demonstrate that DICER and DROSHA are dispensable for primary recruitment of the DDR sensor NBS1 to DNA damage sites. Instead, the accumulation of the DDR mediators MDC1 and 53BP1 (also known as TP53BP1), markers of secondary recruitment, is reduced in DICER- or DROSHA-inactivated cells. In addition, NBS1 (also known as NBN) primary recruitment is resistant to RNA degradation, consistent with the notion that RNA is dispensable for primary recognition of DNA lesions. We propose that DICER, DROSHA and DDRNAs act in the response to DNA damage after primary recognition of DNA lesions and, together with γH2AX, are essential for enabling the secondary recruitment of DDR factors and fuel the amplification of DDR signaling.

  17. Mutation of the little finger domain in human DNA polymerase η alters fidelity when copying undamaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Beardslee, Renee A; Suarez, Samuel C; Toffton, Shannon M; McCulloch, Scott D

    2013-10-01

    DNA polymerase η (pol η) synthesizes past cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer and possibly 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesions during DNA replication. Loss of pol η is associated with an increase in mutation rate, demonstrating its indispensable role in mutation suppression. It has been recently reported that β-strand 12 (amino acids 316-324) of the little finger region correctly positions the template strand with the catalytic core of the enzyme. The authors hypothesized that modification of β-strand 12 residues would disrupt correct enzyme-DNA alignment and alter pol η's activity and fidelity. To investigate this, the authors purified proteins containing the catalytic core of the polymerase, incorporated single amino acid changes to select β-strand 12 residues, and evaluated DNA synthesis activity for each pol η. Lesion bypass efficiencies and replication fidelities when copying DNA-containing cis-syn cyclobutane thymine-thymine dimer and 8-oxoG lesions were determined and compared with the corresponding values for the wild-type polymerase. The results confirm the importance of the β-strand in polymerase function and show that fidelity is most often altered when undamaged DNA is copied. Additionally, it is shown that DNA-protein contacts distal to the active site can significantly affect the fidelity of synthesis.

  18. Chromatin perturbations during the DNA damage response in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Kastan, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response is a widely used term that encompasses all signaling initiated at DNA lesions and damaged replication forks as it extends to orchestrate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, cell death and senescence. ATM, an apical DNA damage signaling kinase, is virtually instantaneously activated following the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex, which has a catalytic role in DNA repair, and the KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase are required for maximal ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. The sensing of DNA lesions occurs within a highly complex and heterogeneous chromatin environment. Chromatin decondensation and histone eviction at DSBs may be permissive for KAT5 binding to H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, ATM kinase acetylation and activation. Furthermore, chromatin perturbation may be a prerequisite for most DNA repair. Nucleosome disassembly during DNA repair was first reported in the 1970s by Smerdon and colleagues when nucleosome rearrangement was noted during the process of nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells. Recently, the multi-functional protein nucleolin was identified as the relevant histone chaperone required for partial nucleosome disruption at DBSs, the recruitment of repair enzymes and for DNA repair. Notably, ATM kinase is activated by chromatin perturbations induced by a variety of treatments that do not directly cause DSBs, including treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Central to the mechanisms that activate ATR, the second apical DNA damage signaling kinase, outside of a stalled and collapsed replication fork in S-phase, is chromatin decondensation and histone eviction associated with DNA end resection at DSBs. Thus, a stress that is common to both ATM and ATR kinase activation is chromatin perturbations, and we argue that chromatin perturbations are both sufficient and required for induction of the DNA damage response.

  19. Significance of image analysis in the diagnosis of bone tumors and tumor-like lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Thomas; Gahm, Thomas; Delling, Guenter

    1990-11-01

    The distinction between different types of giant-cell containing lesions often represents a challenge for pathologists since wide ranges and overlappings of their morphological features are common. But despite of their similarities the treatment is very different and depends on an accurate morpological diagnostic. Our present study was undertaken to investigate the nuclear DNA content (NDC) of giant-cell containing lesions and its value for the diagnostic. Furthermore we studied the significance of NDC to predict the biological behavior of giant-cell tumors. 12 aneurysmal bone cysts 25 central osteosarcomas (biopsies) and 16 giant-cell tumors of the Hamburger Knochentumorregister were included in this study. In all cases fresh material was available. 20 imprintcytologies from each specimen of each case were prepared . 10 were used for Feulgen-staining to perform quantitative DNA-measurements. 10 were used for Pappenheim-staining for morphological examination. Conventionally prepared sections of each specimen of each patient radiological findings and clinical data served as control-system. The recently developed DNA measuring program CESAR based on image analysis (IBAS I Kontron Germany) was used for this study. The obtained DNA distributions were classified according to a new developed DNAgrading system for imprintcytologies (s. table 1). All investigated aneurysmal bone cysts were 0 I (euploid). 23 central osteosarcomas were G III (aneuploid). 2 central osteosarcomas (predominantly cartilage producing) were G II (only a small number of hypertetraploid cells). 9 giant-cell tumors were G II. 7 Giant

  20. TRAIP promotes DNA damage response during genome replication and is mutated in primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Harley, Margaret E; Murina, Olga; Leitch, Andrea; Higgs, Martin R; Bicknell, Louise S; Yigit, Gökhan; Blackford, Andrew N; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Mackenzie, Karen J; Reddy, Kaalak; Halachev, Mihail; McGlasson, Sarah; Reijns, Martin A M; Fluteau, Adeline; Martin, Carol-Anne; Sabbioneda, Simone; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Chessa, Luciana; Maghnie, Mohamad; Salim, Mahmoud; Bober, Michael B; Nürnberg, Peter; Jackson, Stephen P; Hurles, Matthew E; Wollnik, Bernd; Stewart, Grant S; Jackson, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    DNA lesions encountered by replicative polymerases threaten genome stability and cell cycle progression. Here we report the identification of mutations in TRAIP, encoding an E3 RING ubiquitin ligase, in patients with microcephalic primordial dwarfism. We establish that TRAIP relocalizes to sites of DNA damage, where it is required for optimal phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA2 during S-phase in response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, as well as fork progression through UV-induced DNA lesions. TRAIP is necessary for efficient cell cycle progression and mutations in TRAIP therefore limit cellular proliferation, providing a potential mechanism for microcephaly and dwarfism phenotypes. Human genetics thus identifies TRAIP as a component of the DNA damage response to replication-blocking DNA lesions.

  1. Genetics of mutagenesis in E. coli: various combinations of translesion polymerases (Pol II, IV and V) deal with lesion/sequence context diversity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jérôme; Etienne, Hélène; Janel-Bintz, Régine; Fuchs, Robert P P

    2002-02-28

    The biochemistry and genetics of translesion synthesis (TLS) and, as a consequence, of mutagenesis has recently received much attention in view of the discovery of novel DNA polymerases, most of which belong to the Y family. These distributive and low fidelity enzymes assist the progression of the high fidelity replication complex in the bypass of DNA lesions that normally hinder its progression. The present paper extends our previous observation that in Escherichia coli all three SOS-inducible DNA polymerases (Pol II, IV and V) are involved in TLS and mutagenesis. The genetic control of frameshift mutation pathways induced by N-2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) adducts or by oxidative lesions induced by methylene blue and visible light is investigated. The data show various examples of mutation pathways with an absolute requirement for a specific combination of DNA polymerases and, in contrast, other examples where two DNA polymerases exhibit functional redundancy within the same pathway. We suggest that cells respond to the challenge of replicating DNA templates potentially containing a large diversity of DNA lesions by using a pool of accessory DNA polymerases with relaxed specificities that assist the high fidelity replicase.

  2. Cholesterol granuloma and other petrous apex lesions.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, Brandon

    2015-04-01

    This article presents the latest information on the presentation, diagnosis, imaging characteristics, management, and outcomes for petrous apex cholesterol granulomas. An in-depth review of the pathophysiology and surgical approaches is presented along with a summary of other petrous apex lesions and their imaging characteristics.

  3. Endoscopic laser stereotaxis: management of brain lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorano, Lucia J.; Chavantes, Maria C.; Moure, Federico; Diaz, Fernando

    1994-05-01

    Image-guided stereotaxis is an accurate and safe method of directing therapy to target volumes defined in 2D multi-planes or 3D perspectives using computer reconstruction of image data. The major limitations of stereotactic techniques are the lack of intraoperative visualization and the ability to directly monitor the procedures, and changes of intracranial coordinates after decompression of cystic lesions or aspiration of cerebrospinal fluid in the management of intraventricular lesions. Stereotactic neuroendoscopy involves integration of rigid-flexible endoscopy and the Nd-YAG laser in 2D/3D multiplanar image-guided stereotactic procedures. The major advantages of endoscopic laser surgery include being minimally invasive (burrhole or small craniotomy surgery), direct intraoperative visualization, hemostasis, evacuation or resection assessment, and wide exploration of intracranial cavities or ventricles. We used endoscopic laser surgery in the management of 202 patients undergoing biopsy, aspiration, resection, and internal decompression of deep and subcortical intracranial lesions, and for different types of fenestration procedures. Image-guidance combined with endoscopic techniques may offer a safe, accurate alternative to conventional neurosurgical procedures in treating small solid, cystic, intraventricular lesions, and in fenestration procedures.

  4. Magnetic resonance sees lesions of multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ziporyn, T.

    1985-02-15

    The value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and quantitation of the progression of multiple sclerosis is discussed. Magnetic resonance imaging generates images that reflect differential density and velocity of hydrogen nuclei between cerebral gray and white matter, as well as between white matter and pathological lesions of the disease.

  5. Pseudoepitheliomatous Hyperplasia in Oral Lesions: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Vaidhehi Narayan; Uma, K; Girish, H C; Murgod, Sanjay; Shyamala, K; Naik, Ranajit B

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia (PEH) is a histopathological reaction pattern to various stimuli, which includes trauma, infection, inflammation, neoplasia. It is seen as tongue like epithelial proliferation invading the connective tissue and should not be mistaken for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This review enlists oral lesions which exhibit PEH with a note on how to differentiate SCC from PEH. PMID:26435636

  6. Calcified lesion modeling for excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Holly A.; Archuleta, Andrew; Splinter, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Objective: Develop a representative calcium target model to evaluate penetration of calcified plaque lesions during atherectomy procedures using 308 nm Excimer laser ablation. Materials and Methods: An in-vitro model representing human calcified plaque was analyzed using Plaster-of-Paris and cement based composite materials as well as a fibrinogen model. The materials were tested for mechanical consistency. The most likely candidate(s) resulting from initial mechanical and chemical screening was submitted for ablation testing. The penetration rate of specific multi-fiber catheter designs and a single fiber probe was obtained and compared to that in human cadaver calcified plaque. The effects of lasing parameters and catheter tip design on penetration speed in a representative calcified model were verified against the results in human cadaver specimens. Results: In Plaster of Paris, the best penetration was obtained using the single fiber tip configuration operating at 100 Fluence, 120 Hz. Calcified human lesions are twice as hard, twice as elastic as and much more complex than Plaster of Paris. Penetration of human calcified specimens was highly inconsistent and varied significantly from specimen to specimen and within individual specimens. Conclusions: Although Plaster of Paris demonstrated predictable increases in penetration with higher energy density and repetition rate, it can not be considered a totally representative laser ablation model for calcified lesions. This is in part due to the more heterogeneous nature and higher density composition of cadaver intravascular human calcified occlusions. Further testing will require a more representative model of human calcified lesions.

  7. Endoscopic laser therapy for obstructing tracheobronchial lesions.

    PubMed

    Beamis, J F; Vergos, K; Rebeiz, E E; Shapshay, S M

    1991-05-01

    The Lahey Clinic experience using laser bronchoscopy for relief of obstructive tracheobronchial lesions during a 7-year period from 1982 to 1989 involves 269 patients treated with 400 procedures. The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser was used for tracheal stenosis and granulation tissue. The neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used for all obstructing endobronchial neoplasms. Indications for therapy included severe dyspnea, hemoptysis, and postobstructive pneumonitis. All patients had relatively central lesions. A rigid bronchoscope was used to treat 88% of patients, and 12% of patients were treated with a flexible bronchoscope. One death occurred during the intraoperative period. Eleven deaths occurred within 1 week of therapy and were related to the presence of extensive malignant lesions or to coronary artery disease. Our experience indicates that bronchoscopic application of the CO2 or Nd:YAG laser affords effective palliation for patients with obstructive tracheobronchial lesions. The Nd:YAG laser is recommended for patients with bulky vascular endobronchial neoplasms, and the CO2 laser is best reserved for patients with benign tracheal stenosis and granulation tissue.

  8. Partial excision of residual burn lesions.

    PubMed

    Engrav, L H; Gottlieb, J R; Millard, S P; Walkinshaw, M D; Heimbach, D M; Marvin, J A

    1987-01-01

    Most burn victims have unattractive residual lesions, which may include hypertrophic donor sites, unsightly skin grafts, hypertrophic scars, and mature scars with altered pigmentation or texture. Some of these lesions can be treated by total excision in one or more stages or they can be reconstructed utilizing grafts, flaps, Z-plasties, or tissue expansion. But frequently these procedures are either not indicated or not elected by the patient. In such a situation, the only surgical option is partial excision, with the goal of making the lesion less conspicuous and more easily concealed by clothing. Whether or not such partial excisions are worthwhile is the obvious question. We could not find an answer in the literature and therefore decided to review our own experience. Between 6/30/81 and 3/12/86, 92 such procedures were performed and followed in 25 patients. Partial excision of hypertrophic donor sites, unsightly skin grafts, and hypertrophic scars did yield improved appearance in most patients. However, partial excision of mature scars, ie, areas of altered pigmentation or texture, did not have the same success. We continue to treat the first three types of lesions in this fashion but no longer include the latter.

  9. Pontine lesions mimicking acute peripheral vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Thomke, F.; Hopf, H. C.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Clinical signs of acute peripheral vestibulopathy (APV) were repeatedly reported with pontine lesions. The clinical relevance of such a mechanism is not known, as most studies were biased by patients with additional clinical signs of brainstem dysfunction.
METHODS—Masseter reflex (MassR), blink reflex (BlinkR), brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), and DC electro-oculography (EOG) were tested in 232 consecutive patients with clinical signs of unilateral APV.
RESULTS—Forty five of the 232 patients (19.4%) had at least one electrophysiological abnormality suggesting pontine dysfunction mainly due to possible vertebrobasilar ischaemia (22 patients) and multiple sclerosis (eight patients). MassR abnormalities were seen in 24patients, and EOG abnormalities of saccades and following eye movements occurred in 22 patients. Three patients had BlinkR-R1 abnormalities, and one had delayed BAEP waves IV and V. Clinical improvement was almost always (32 of 34 re-examined patients) associated with improvement or normalisation of at least one electrophysiological abnormality. Brain MRI was done in 25 of the 44 patients and confirmed pontine lesions in six (two infarcts, three inflammations, one tumour).
CONCLUSIONS—Pontine dysfunction was suggested in 45 of 232 consecutive patients with clinical signs of APV on the basis of abnormal electrophysiological findings, and was mainly attributed to brainstem ischaemia and multiple sclerosis. The frequency of pontine lesions mimicking APV is underestimated if based on MRI established lesions only.

 PMID:10084533

  10. Non carious cervical lesions. A review.

    PubMed

    Ceruti, P; Menicucci, G; Mariani, G D; Pittoni, D; Gassino, G

    2006-01-01

    Non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL) are characterized by a loss of hard dental tissue near the cement-enamel-junction. Commonly, their shape is like a wedge with the apex pointing inwards. Other times, they appear as regular depressions, like a dome or a cup. Their main characteristic is the presence of hard-mineralized tissue. According to the literature, the prevalence of cervical lesions is 85%, while their incidence is about 18% among permanent teeth. NCCL are currently classified as erosion, abrasion, or abfraction. Their etiology seems to be related to different factors: hexogen and endogen acids, mechanical abrasive action, tooth flexion under axial and non-axial loads. Moreover, it seems that a fundamental role is ascribable to tooth bending phenomena due to the strength components parallel or oblique to the occlusal level, which occur during the normal function as well as during parafunctions. The frequent therapeutic failures are probably due to the same factors causing the onset of the original lesion. Several materials have been proposed to restore NCCL: amalgam (abandoned), glass-ionomer cements, compomers, and composite resins. Early failures of these restorations have often been reported in the literature, probably due to the same factors which originally caused the lesions. Further investigations are required to determine more reliable restorative therapies.

  11. Remineralization of caries lesions extending into dentin.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, J M

    2001-05-01

    Remineralization is one aspect of the overall process of tooth decay. However, it is primarily studied in shallow lesions. The aim of this study was to explore whether caries lesions in enamel and extending into the dentin can be remineralized. A single-section model was developed for the longitudinal and non-destructive monitoring of changes in enamel and dentin. Lesions at least 200 microm into dentin were formed in undersaturated acetate buffers. Next, the lesions were divided into groups (three treatment and one control) and remineralized. The treatments were: weekly immersion in 1,000 ppm fluoride, single treatment with methanehydroxybisphosphonate, and a constant level of 1 ppm fluoride. De- and remineralization was assessed by transverse microradiography. Remineralization was observed in enamel, but also in dentin, indicating that, deep into dentin, the pores become supersaturated to apatite formation. Treatments affected remineralization only in the outer part of enamel. Both findings are explained by a relatively fast diffusion of mineral ions, with precipitation being rate-limiting. The results suggest that dentin remineralization, underneath enamel, can be achieved and could possibly be used in clinical treatment strategies.

  12. Conservative restoration of proximal-cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Setien, Victor; Armstrong, Steven R; Vargas, Marcos A

    2003-01-01

    One of the authors has used this technique successfully for the past three years in various clinical situations that involve both difficult access anterior and posterior teeth. This is a tooth-structure conserving clinical procedure that can provide a simplified approach for restoring otherwise difficult clinical lesions.

  13. Cutaneous lesions of the external ear

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Michael; Sand, Daniel; Brors, Dominik; Altmeyer, Peter; Mann, Benno; Bechara, Falk G

    2008-01-01

    Skin diseases on the external aspect of the ear are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, othorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners, general and plastic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the ear. This article will focus on those diseases wherefore surgery or laser therapy is considered as a possible treatment option or which are potentially subject to surgical evaluation. PMID:18261212