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Sample records for mutual mobile membranes

  1. Mutual diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    The generalized Stokes-Einstein equation is used, together with the two-dimensional pressure equation, to analyze mutual diffusion in concentrated membrane systems. These equations can be used to investigate the role that both direct and hydrodynamic interactions play in determining diffusive behavior. Here only direct interactions are explicitly incorporated into the theory at high densities; however, both direct and hydrodynamic interactions are analyzed for some dilute solutions. We look at diffusion in the presence of weak attractions, soft repulsions, and hard-core repulsions. It is found that, at low densities, attractions retard mutual diffusion while repulsions enhance it. Mechanistically, attractions tend to tether particles together and oppose the dissipation of gradients or fluctuations in concentration, while repulsions provide a driving force that pushes particles apart. At higher concentrations, changes in the structure of the fluid enhance mutual diffusion even in the presence of attractions. It is shown that the theoretical description of postelectrophoresis relaxation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments must be modified if interacting systems are studied. The effects of interactions on mutual diffusion coefficients have probably already been seen in postelectrophoresis relaxation experiments. PMID:2775829

  2. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein–protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances. PMID:27625676

  3. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein-protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances.

  4. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E S; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-08-02

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the "membrane size" for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111-3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman-Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion.

  5. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes

    PubMed Central

    Domanov, Yegor A.; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E. S.; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S.; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the “membrane size” for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111—3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman–Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  6. Mutual control of membrane fission and fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christopher; Baars, Tonie L; Bühler, Susanne; Mayer, Andreas

    2004-11-24

    Membrane fusion and fission are antagonistic reactions controlled by different proteins. Dynamins promote membrane fission by GTP-driven changes of conformation and polymerization state, while SNAREs fuse membranes by forming complexes between t- and v-SNAREs from apposed vesicles. Here, we describe a role of the dynamin-like GTPase Vps1p in fusion of yeast vacuoles. Vps1p forms polymers that couple several t-SNAREs together. At the onset of fusion, the SNARE-activating ATPase Sec18p/NSF and the t-SNARE depolymerize Vps1p and release it from the membrane. This activity is independent of the SNARE coactivator Sec17p/alpha-SNAP and of the v-SNARE. Vps1p release liberates the t-SNAREs for initiating fusion and at the same time disrupts fission activity. We propose that reciprocal control between fusion and fission components exists, which may prevent futile cycles of fission and fusion.

  7. A virtual structure approach to formation control of unicycle mobile robots using mutual coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowska, Anna; van den Broek, Thijs; Huijberts, Henri; van de Wouw, Nathan; Kostić, Dragan; Nijmeijer, Henk

    2011-11-01

    In this article, the formation control problem for unicycle mobile robots is studied. A distributed virtual structure control strategy with mutual coupling between the robots is proposed. The rationale behind the introduction of the coupling terms is the fact that these introduce additional robustness of the formation with respect to perturbations as compared to typical leader-follower approaches. The applicability of the proposed approach is shown in simulations and experiments with a group of wirelessly controlled mobile robots.

  8. Theoretical comparison of the self diffusion and mutual diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Scalettar, B A; Abney, J R; Owicki, J C

    1988-01-01

    Self diffusion and mutual diffusion in two-dimensional membrane systems are analyzed. It is shown that interprotein interactions can produce markedly different density-dependent changes in the diffusion coefficients describing these two processes; the qualitative differences are illustrated by using a theoretical formalism valid for dilute solutions. Results are obtained for three analytical potentials: hard-core repulsions, soft repulsions, and soft repulsions with weak attractions. Self diffusion is inhibited by all three interactions. In contrast, mutual diffusion is inhibited by attractions but is enhanced by repulsions. It is shown that such interaction-dependent differences in self diffusion and mutual diffusion could underlie, among other things, the disparity in protein diffusion coefficients extracted from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and postelectrophoresis relaxation data. PMID:3413121

  9. Microbial fuel cells and osmotic membrane bioreactors have mutual benefits for wastewater treatment and energy production.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dianxun; Lu, Lu; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-07-01

    This study demonstrates that microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and osmotic membrane bioreactors (OMBRs) can be mutually beneficial when integrated together for wastewater treatment. When connecting MFCs with OMBRs, the solute buildup increased conductivity and buffer capacity, which greatly increased MFC power density from 3 W/m(3) up to 11.5 W/m(3). In turn, the MFCs conditioned and reduced sludge production and therefore reduced forward osmosis (FO) membrane fouling. The MFC-OMBR equipped with new thin-film composite (TFC) membrane showed excellent organic (>95%) and phosphorus removal (>99%) and therefore maintained effluent sCOD below 20 mg/L. However, the nitrogen removal was limited due to the negative surface charge of the thin-film composite membrane and solution chemistry, which led to higher flux of ammonium toward the OMBR draw solution. Further studies are needed to improve nitrogen removal, reduce fouling, and optimize system integration.

  10. Mobility of membrane-trapped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Hassan; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    The translation or diffusion of particles along membranes or interfaces is of interest because it is a model system for describing basic features of interfacial hydrodynamics. It is also important in cellular signalling in biology and biophysics, and it can be used to deduce the rheological properties of surface films. Here, we consider the translational mobility of spherical and oblate spheroidal particles protruding into the surrounding subphase liquid. Both the subphase and surface film contribute to the resistance experienced by the particle, which is calculated as a function of the degree of protrusion as well as the viscosity contrast between the surface film and the surrounding fluid. The calculations are based on a combination of a perturbation expansion involving the particle shape and the Lorentz reciprocal theorem. It appears that just considering one term of the expansions is in very good agreement with available analytical and numerical results.

  11. Modulation of membrane protein lateral mobility by polyphosphates and polyamines.

    PubMed

    Schindler, M; Koppel, D E; Sheetz, M P

    1980-03-01

    The lateral mobility of fluorescein-labeled membrane glycoproteins was measured in whole unlysed erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts by the technique of "fluorescence redistribution after fusion." Measurements were made on polyethylene glycol-fused cell pairs in which only one member of the couplet was initially fluorescently labeled. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from the rate of fluorescence redistribution determined from successive scans with a focused laser beam across individual fused pairs. This technique allows for the analysis of diffusion within cell membranes without the possible damaging photochemical events caused by photobleaching. It was found that lateral mobility of erythrocyte proteins can be increased by the addition of polyphosphates (i.e., ATP and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and decreased by the addition of organic polyamines (i.e., neomycin and spermine). This control is exerted by these molecules only when they contact the cytoplasmic side of the membrane and is not dependent upon high-energy phosphates. Microviscosity experiments employing diphenylhexatriene demonstrated no changes in membrane lipid state as a function of these reagents. Our results, in conjunction with data on the physical interactions of cytoskeletal proteins, suggest that the diffusion effector molecules alter the lateral mobility of erythrocyte membrane proteins through modifications of interactions in the shell, which is composed of spectrin, actin, and component 4.1.

  12. CHARMM-GUI HMMM Builder for Membrane Simulations with the Highly Mobile Membrane-Mimetic Model.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yifei; Cheng, Xi; Lee, Jumin; Vermaas, Josh V; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Park, Soohyung; Klauda, Jeffery B; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-17

    Slow diffusion of the lipids in conventional all-atom simulations of membrane systems makes it difficult to sample large rearrangements of lipids and protein-lipid interactions. Recently, Tajkhorshid and co-workers developed the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model with accelerated lipid motion by replacing the lipid tails with small organic molecules. The HMMM model provides accelerated lipid diffusion by one to two orders of magnitude, and is particularly useful in studying membrane-protein associations. However, building an HMMM simulation system is not easy, as it requires sophisticated treatment of the lipid tails. In this study, we have developed CHARMM-GUI HMMM Builder (http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/hmmm) to provide users with ready-to-go input files for simulating HMMM membrane systems with/without proteins. Various lipid-only and protein-lipid systems are simulated to validate the qualities of the systems generated by HMMM Builder with focus on the basic properties and advantages of the HMMM model. HMMM Builder supports all lipid types available in CHARMM-GUI and also provides a module to convert back and forth between an HMMM membrane and a full-length membrane. We expect HMMM Builder to be a useful tool in studying membrane systems with enhanced lipid diffusion.

  13. Determination of electrolyte friction from measurements of the tracer diffusion coefficients, mutual diffusion coefficients, and electrophoretic mobilities of charged spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Plank, Lindsay; Ware, B. R.

    1984-07-01

    The technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching has been used to measure the tracer diffusion coefficient of fluorescein-labeled charged polystyrene spheres in dilute solutions as a function of solution ionic strength. As the ratio of the particle radius (a) to the Debye-Hückel screening length (κ-1) was varied from 13 to 0.6, a 20% reduction in tracer diffusion coefficient was observed. The mutual diffusion coefficient, measured by quasielastic light scattering, increased as κa was reduced, demonstrating the dominant effect of thermodynamic factors on this parameter. The tracer data have been compared with theoretical predictions of other workers describing the influence of small-ion interactions with a charge sphere on its translational friction. The theoretical results of Schurr, and Booth, involve an explicit dependence on the electrokinetic charge of the sphere and yield estimates of this parameter (by least squares) which are significantly smaller than those obtained from laser Doppler electrophoretic light scattering results for the electrophoretic mobility of the labeled spheres. Approximations in the theoretical analyses are expected to account for these discrepancies.

  14. Reduced Lateral Mobility of Lipids and Proteins in Crowded Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Goose, Joseph E.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2013-01-01

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the E. coli outer membrane proteins FhuA, LamB, NanC, OmpA and OmpF in a POPE/POPG (3∶1) bilayer were performed to characterise the diffusive nature of each component of the membrane. At small observation times (<10 ns) particle vibrations dominate phospholipid diffusion elevating the calculated values from the longer time-scale bulk value (>50 ns) of 8.5×10−7 cm2 s−1. The phospholipid diffusion around each protein was found to vary based on distance from protein. An asymmetry in the diffusion of annular lipids in the inner and outer leaflets was observed and correlated with an asymmetry in charged residues in the vicinity of the inner and outer leaflet head-groups. Protein rotational and translational diffusion were also found to vary with observation time and were inversely correlated with the radius of gyration of the protein in the plane of the bilayer. As the concentration of protein within the bilayer was increased, the overall mobility of the membrane decreased reflected in reduced lipid diffusion coefficients for both lipid and protein components. The increase in protein concentration also resulted in a decrease in the anomalous diffusion exponent α of the lipid. Formation of extended clusters and networks of proteins led to compartmentalisation of lipids in extreme cases. PMID:23592975

  15. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Integration with the ISS Extravehicular Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margiott, Victoria; Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    NASA has developed a Solid Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) to provide cooling for the next generation spacesuit. One approach to increasing the TRL of the system is to incorporate this hardware with the existing EMU. Several integration issues were addressed to support a potential demonstration of the SWME with the existing EMU. Systems analysis was performed to assess the capability of the SWME to maintain crewmember cooling and comfort as a replacement for sublimation. The materials of the SWME were reviewed to address compatibility with the EMU. Conceptual system placement and integration with the EMU via an EVA umbilical system to ensure crew mobility and Airlock egress were performed. A concept of operation for EVA use was identified that is compatible with the existing system. This concept is extensible as a means to provide cooling for the existing EMU. The cooling system of one of the EMUs on orbit has degraded, with the root cause undetermined. Should there be a common cause resident on ISS, this integration could provide a means to recover cooling capability for EMUs on orbit.

  16. Investigation of humidity control via membrane separation for advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbold, D. D.; Ray, R. J.; Pledger, W. A.; Mccray, S. B.; Brown, M. F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a membrane-based process for dehumidifying the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). The membrane process promises to be smaller, lighter, and more energy efficient than the other technologies for dehumidification. The dehydration membranes were tested for 90 days at conditions expected to be present in the EMU. The results of these tests indicate that membrane-based technology can effectively control humidity in the EMU.

  17. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  18. Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching Analysis of the Diffusional Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins: HER3 Mobility in Breast Cancer Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Mitul; Koland, John G

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) method is a straightforward means of assessing the diffusional mobility of membrane-associated proteins that is readily performed with current confocal microscopy instrumentation. We describe here the specific application of the FRAP method in characterizing the lateral diffusion of genetically encoded green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged plasma membrane receptor proteins. The method is exemplified in an examination of whether the previously observed segregation of the mammalian HER3 receptor protein in discrete plasma membrane microdomains results from its physical interaction with cellular entities that restrict its mobility. Our FRAP measurements of the diffusional mobility of GFP-tagged HER3 reporters expressed in MCF7 cultured breast cancer cells showed that despite the observed segregation of HER3 receptors within plasma membrane microdomains their diffusion on the macroscopic scale is not spatially restricted. Thus, in FRAP analyses of various HER3 reporters a near-complete recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching was observed, indicating that HER3 receptors are not immobilized by long-lived physical interactions with intracellular species. An examination of HER3 proteins with varying intracellular domain sequence truncations also indicated that a proposed formation of oligomeric HER3 networks, mediated by physical interactions involving specific HER3 intracellular domain sequences, either does not occur or does not significantly reduce HER3 mobility on the macroscopic scale.

  19. Hydrodynamic mobility of a solid particle near a spherical elastic membrane: Axisymmetric motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah; Gekle, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    We use the image solution technique to compute the leading order frequency-dependent self-mobility function of a small solid particle moving perpendicular to the surface of a spherical capsule whose membrane possesses shearing and bending rigidities. Comparing our results with those obtained earlier for an infinitely extended planar elastic membrane, we find that membrane curvature leads to the appearance of a prominent additional peak in the mobility. This peak is attributed to the fact that the shear resistance of the curved membrane involves a contribution from surface-normal displacements, which is not the case for planar membranes. In the vanishing frequency limit, the particle self-mobility near a no-slip hard sphere is recovered only when the membrane possesses a nonvanishing resistance toward shearing. We further investigate capsule motion, finding that the pair-mobility function is solely determined by membrane shearing properties. Our analytical predictions are validated by fully resolved boundary integral simulations where a very good agreement is obtained.

  20. Hydrodynamic mobility of a solid particle near a spherical elastic membrane: Axisymmetric motion.

    PubMed

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah; Gekle, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    We use the image solution technique to compute the leading order frequency-dependent self-mobility function of a small solid particle moving perpendicular to the surface of a spherical capsule whose membrane possesses shearing and bending rigidities. Comparing our results with those obtained earlier for an infinitely extended planar elastic membrane, we find that membrane curvature leads to the appearance of a prominent additional peak in the mobility. This peak is attributed to the fact that the shear resistance of the curved membrane involves a contribution from surface-normal displacements, which is not the case for planar membranes. In the vanishing frequency limit, the particle self-mobility near a no-slip hard sphere is recovered only when the membrane possesses a nonvanishing resistance toward shearing. We further investigate capsule motion, finding that the pair-mobility function is solely determined by membrane shearing properties. Our analytical predictions are validated by fully resolved boundary integral simulations where a very good agreement is obtained.

  1. Mobility functions of a spheroidal particle near a planar elastic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah; Lisicki, Maciej; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    Using an analytical theory, we compute the leading order corrections to the translational, rotational and translation-rotation coupling mobilities of a prolate spheroid immersed in a Newtonian fluid and moving nearby an elastic cell membrane. The corrections are expressed in terms of the spheroid-to-membrane distance, spheroid orientation and the characteristic frequencies associated with membrane shearing and bending. We find that the corrections to the translation-rotation coupling mobility are primarily determined by bending resistance whereas shearing elasticity manifests itself in a more pronounced way in the rotational mobility. We further demonstrate the validity of the analytical approximation by close comparison with boundary integral simulations of a truly extended spheroidal particle. The analytical calculations are found to be in a good agreement with the numerical simulations over the whole range of the applied frequencies.

  2. Drug binding and mobility relating to the thermal fluctuation in fluid lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Emiko; Yoshii, Noriyuki

    2008-12-01

    Drug binding and mobility in fluid lipid bilayer membranes are quantified in situ by using the multinuclear solution NMR combined with the pulsed-field-gradient technique. One-dimensional and pulsed-field-gradient F19 and H1 NMR signals of an anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) are analyzed at 283-313 K in the presence of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) as model cell membranes. The simultaneous observation of the membrane-bound and free 5FU signals enables to quantify in what amount of 5FU is bound to the membrane and how fast 5FU is moving within the membrane in relation to the thermal fluctuation of the soft, fluid environment. It is shown that the mobility of membrane-bound 5FU is slowed down by almost two orders of magnitude and similar to the lipid movement in the membrane, the movement closely related to the intramembrane fluidity. The mobility of 5FU and EPC is, however, not similar at 313 K; the 5FU movement is enhanced in the membrane as a result of the loose binding of 5FU in the lipid matrices. The membrane-bound fraction of 5FU is ˜0.1 and almost unaltered over the temperature range examined. It is also independent of the 5FU concentration from 2 to 30 mM with respect to the 40-50 mM LUV. The free energy of the 5FU binding is estimated at -4 to -2 kJ/mol, the magnitude always close to the thermal fluctuation, 2.4-2.6 kJ/mol.

  3. [Effect of the mobility of gate charges on volt-ampere characteristics of excitable membranes].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, A N

    1996-01-01

    An assumption on nature of the gate charges and known data on gate changes mobility allow to deduce the volt-ampere characteristics of ionic channels and the same for membrane. Model research shows that the volt-ampere curve shape depends on gate charges mobility. Its reduction and the followed gate charges immobilization during membrane excitation process are expressed as the changes of volt-ampere curves. These changes might be to specify as the fast components of the inactivation process. A number critical values of the gate charges mobility are calculated which are important for the functions of memory (hysteresis) and excitation (negative resistance). The coincidence of values of biased charge in model and experiment is noted. The formulae that are drown are compared with Hodgkin-Huxley approximations.

  4. Confined Mobility of TonB and FepA in Escherichia coli Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lill, Yoriko; Jordan, Lorne D.; Smallwood, Chuck R.; Newton, Salete M.; Lill, Markus A.; Klebba, Phillip E.; Ritchie, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The important process of nutrient uptake in Escherichia coli, in many cases, involves transit of the nutrient through a class of beta-barrel proteins in the outer membrane known as TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) and requires interaction with the inner membrane protein TonB. Here we have imaged the mobility of the ferric enterobactin transporter FepA and TonB by tracking them in the membranes of live E. coli with single-molecule resolution at time-scales ranging from milliseconds to seconds. We employed simple simulations to model/analyze the lateral diffusion in the membranes of E.coli, to take into account both the highly curved geometry of the cell and artifactual effects expected due to finite exposure time imaging. We find that both molecules perform confined lateral diffusion in their respective membranes in the absence of ligand with FepA confined to a region 0.180−0.007+0.006 μm in radius in the outer membrane and TonB confined to a region 0.266−0.009+0.007 μm in radius in the inner membrane. The diffusion coefficient of these molecules on millisecond time-scales was estimated to be 21−5+9 μm2/s and 5.4−0.8+1.5 μm2/s for FepA and TonB, respectively, implying that each molecule is free to diffuse within its domain. Disruption of the inner membrane potential, deletion of ExbB/D from the inner membrane, presence of ligand or antibody to FepA and disruption of the MreB cytoskeleton was all found to further restrict the mobility of both molecules. Results are analyzed in terms of changes in confinement size and interactions between the two proteins. PMID:27935943

  5. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E.; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Nature’s fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5’s active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  6. Characterization of Membrane Protein-Lipid Interactions by Mass Spectrometry Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cong, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-12-01

    Lipids in the biological membrane can modulate the structure and function of integral and peripheral membrane proteins. Distinguishing individual lipids that bind selectively to membrane protein complexes from an ensemble of lipid-bound species remains a daunting task. Recently, ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has proven to be invaluable for interrogating the interactions between protein and individual lipids, where the complex undergoes collision induced unfolding followed by quantification of the unfolding pathway to assess the effect of these interactions. However, gas-phase unfolding experiments for membrane proteins are typically performed on the entire ensemble (apo and lipid bound species), raising uncertainty to the contribution of individual lipids and the species that are ejected in the unfolding process. Here, we describe the application of mass spectrometry ion mobility mass spectrometry (MS-IM-MS) for isolating ions corresponding to lipid-bound states of a model integral membrane protein, ammonia channel (AmtB) from Escherichia coli. Free of ensemble effects, MS-IM-MS reveals that bound lipids are ejected as neutral species; however, no correlation was found between the lipid-induced stabilization of complex and their equilibrium binding constants. In comparison to data obtained by IM-MS, there are surprisingly limited differences in stability measurements from IM-MS and MS-IM-MS. The approach described here to isolate ions of membrane protein complexes will be useful for other MS methods, such as surface induced dissociation or collision induced dissociation to determine the stoichiometry of hetero-oligomeric membrane protein complexes.

  7. Rapid Mobilization of Membrane Lipids in Wheat Leaf-Sheaths during Incompatible Interactions with Hessian Fly*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lieceng; Liu, Xuming; Wang, Haiyan; Khajuria, Chitvan; Reese, John C.; Whitworth, R. Jeff; Welti, Ruth; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2013-01-01

    Hessian fly (HF) is a biotrophic insect that interacts with wheat on a gene-for-gene basis. We profiled changes in membrane lipids in two isogenic wheat lines: a susceptible line and its backcrossed offspring containing the resistance gene H13. Our results revealed a 32 to 45% reduction in total concentrations of 129 lipid species in resistant plants during incompatible interactions within 24 h after HF attack. A smaller and delayed response was observed in susceptible plants during compatible interactions. Microarray and real-time PCR analyses of 168 lipid-metabolism related transcripts revealed that the abundance of many of these transcripts increased rapidly in resistant plants after HF attack, but did not change in susceptible plants. In association with the rapid mobilization of membrane lipids, the concentrations of some fatty acids and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) increased specifically in resistant plants. Exogenous application of OPDA increased mortality of HF larvae significantly. Collectively, our data, along with previously published results, indicate that the lipids were mobilized through lipolysis, producing free fatty acids, which were likely further converted into oxylipins and other defense molecules. Our results suggest that rapid mobilization of membrane lipids constitutes an important step for wheat to defend against HF attack. PMID:22668001

  8. Membrane-Extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry for In-Situ Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai; Zhang, Wei; Whitten, William B; Li, Haiyang; Watson, David B; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry (ME-IMS) has been developed for in-situ sampling and analysis of trace chlorinated hydrocarbons in water in a single procedure. The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a spiral hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a vapor flow through the membrane tube. The extracted analyte flows into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) chamber and is analyzed in a home-made IMS analyzer. PDMS membrane is found to effectively extract chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents from liquid phase to vapor. The specialized IMS analyzer has been found to have resolutions of R=33 and 41, respectively, for negative- and positive-modes and is capable of detecting aqueous tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as low as 80 g/L and 74 g/L in negative ion mode, respectively. The time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of TCE are both experimentally and theoretically studied for various concentrations, membrane lengths, and flow rates. These characteristics demonstrate that membrane-extraction IMS is feasible for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  9. Transport Modeling of Membrane Extraction of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon from Water for Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Du, Yongzhai; Feng, Zhili; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry (ME-IMS) is a feasible technique for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water. This work studies theoretically the time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of trichloroethylene (TCE). The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a transport gas flowing through the membrane tube into IMS analyzer. The theoretical study is based on a two-dimensional transient fluid flow and mass transport model. The model describes the TCE mixing in the water, permeation through the membrane layer, and convective diffusion in the air flow inside membrane tube. The effect of various transport gas flow rates on temporal profiles of IMS signal intensity is investigated. The results show that fast time response and high transport yield can be achieved for ME-IMS by controlling the flow rate in the extraction membrane tube. These modeled time-response profiles are important for determining duty cycles of field-deployable sensors for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  10. Mobility of water and selected atoms in DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, F. Y.; Roennest, A.; Peters, G. H.; Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A.

    2013-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study the structure and mobility of water and selected atoms in dimyristoyl-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipids forming a fully hydrated free standing bilayer membrane at 310 K. The effect of the anionic headgroup in DMPG on structure and dynamics has been studied by comparison with simulation[2] and experimental[3] results for bilayer membranes of dimyristoyl-phosphorylcholine (DMPC) lipids, which have a neutral head group and the same aliphatic tails. The membrane is found to be in the fluid phase with monovalent sodium counter ions and in the gel phase with divalent calcium counter ions as evidenced by an area/lipid change and the NMR order parameter. The simulation results are compared with preliminary neutron scattering results. Supported by NSF Grant No. DGE-1069091

  11. Determination of fuel ethers in water by membrane extraction ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Sanna; Nousiainen, Marjaana; Sillanpää, Mika

    2013-03-15

    Fuel oxygenates are environmentally detrimental compounds due to their rapid migration to groundwater. Fuel oxygenates have been reported to cause taste and odour problems in drinking water, and they also have long-term health effects. Feasible analytical methods are required to observe the presence of fuel oxygenates in drinking and natural water. The authors studied ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) to determinate isomeric fuel ether oxygenates; ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), diisopropyl ether (DIPE), and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME), separated from aqueous matrices with a pervaporation membrane module. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was also membrane extracted and detected with IMS. The authors demonstrated that fuel ethers (MTBE, ETBE, DIPE, and TAME) can be quantified at μg/L level with membrane extraction IMS. A membrane extraction module coupled to IMS is a time and cost effective analysis method because sampling can be performed in a single procedure and from different natural water matrices within a few minutes. Consequently, IMS combined with membrane extraction is suitable not only for waterworks and other online applications but also in the field monitoring the quality of drinking and natural water.

  12. Imaging of mobile long-lived nanoplatforms in the live cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Brameshuber, Mario; Weghuber, Julian; Ruprecht, Verena; Gombos, Imre; Horváth, Ibolya; Vigh, László; Eckerstorfer, Paul; Kiss, Endre; Stockinger, Hannes; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2010-12-31

    The plasma membrane has been hypothesized to contain nanoscopic lipid platforms, which are discussed in the context of "lipid rafts" or "membrane rafts." Based on biochemical and cell biological studies, rafts are believed to play a crucial role in many signaling processes. However, there is currently not much information on their size, shape, stability, surface density, composition, and heterogeneity. We present here a method that allows for the first time the direct imaging of nanoscopic long-lived platforms with raft-like properties diffusing in the live cell plasma membrane. Our method senses these platforms by their property to assemble a characteristic set of fluorescent marker proteins or lipids on a time scale of seconds. A special photobleaching protocol was used to reduce the surface density of labeled mobile platforms down to the level of well isolated diffraction-limited spots without altering the single spot brightness. The statistical distribution of probe molecules per platform was determined by single molecule brightness analysis. For demonstration, we used the consensus raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric GFP and the fluorescent lipid analog BODIPY-G(M1), which preferentially partitions into liquid-ordered phases. For both markers, we found cholesterol-dependent homo-association in the plasma membrane of living CHO and Jurkat T cells in the resting state, thereby demonstrating the existence of small, mobile, long-lived platforms containing these probes. We further applied the technology to address structural changes in the plasma membrane during fever-type heat shock: at elevated temperatures, the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric GFP homo-association disappeared, accompanied by an increase in the expression of the small heat shock protein Hsp27.

  13. Effect of integral membrane proteins on the lateral mobility of plastoquinone in phosphatidylcholine proteoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Mary F.; Whitmarsh, John

    1990-01-01

    Pyrene fluorescence quenching by plastoquinone was used to estimate the rate of plastoquinone lateral diffusion in soybean phosphatidylcholine proteoliposomes containing the following integral membrane proteins: gramicidin D, spinach cytochrome bf complex, spinach cytochrome f, reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome bc1, and beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase. The measured plastoquinone lateral diffusion coefficient varied between 1 and 3 · 10-7 cm2 s-1 in control liposomes that lacked protein. When proteins were added, these values decreased: a 10-fold decrease was observed when 16-26% of the membrane surface area was occupied by protein for all the proteins but gramicidin. The larger protein complexes (cytochrome bf, Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers, cytochrome bc1, and cytochrome oxidase), whose hydrophobic volumes were 15-20 times as large as that of cytochrome f and the gramicidin transmembrane dimer, were 15-20 times as effective in decreasing the lateral-diffusion coefficient over the range of concentrations studied. These proteins had a much stronger effect than that observed for bacteriorhodopsin in fluorescence photobleaching recovery measurements. The effect of high-protein concentrations in gramicidin proteoliposomes was in close agreement with fluorescence photobleaching measurements. The results are compared with the predictions of several theoretical models of lateral mobility as a function of integral membrane concentration. PMID:19431774

  14. Visualizing the mobility and distribution of chlorophyll proteins in higher plant thylakoid membranes: effects of photoinhibition and protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Goral, Tomasz K; Johnson, Matthew P; Brain, Anthony P R; Kirchhoff, Helmut; Ruban, Alexander V; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2010-06-01

    The diffusion of proteins in chloroplast thylakoid membranes is believed to be important for processes including the photosystem-II repair cycle and the regulation of light harvesting. However, to date there is very little direct information on the mobility of thylakoid proteins. We have used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in a laser-scanning confocal microscope to visualize in real time the exchange of chlorophyll proteins between grana in intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Most chlorophyll proteins in the grana appear immobile on the 10-min timescale of our measurements. However, a limited population of chlorophyll proteins (accounting for around 15% of chlorophyll fluorescence) can exchange between grana on this timescale. In intact, wild-type chloroplasts this mobile population increases significantly after photoinhibition, consistent with a role for protein diffusion in the photosystem-II repair cycle. No such increase in mobility is seen in isolated grana membranes, or in the Arabidopsis stn8 and stn7 stn8 mutants, which lack the protein kinases required for phosphorylation of photosystem II core proteins and light-harvesting complexes. Furthermore, mobility under low-light conditions is significantly lower in stn8 and stn7 stn8 plants than in wild-type Arabidopsis. The changes in protein mobility correlate with changes in the packing density and size of thylakoid protein complexes, as observed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. We conclude that protein phosphorylation switches the membrane system to a more fluid state, thus facilitating the photosystem-II repair cycle.

  15. Interaction of caldesmon with endoplasmic reticulum membrane: effects on the mobility of phospholipids in the membrane and on the phosphatidylserine base-exchange reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, P; Makuch, R; Sikorski, A F; Jezierski, A; Pikula, S; Dabrowska, R

    1997-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated by tryptophan fluorescence the interaction of caldesmon with anionic phospholipid vesicles [Czurylo, Zborowski and Dabrowska (1993) Biochem. J. 291, 403-408]. In the present work we investigated the interaction of caldesmon with natural-membrane (rat liver endoplasmic reticulum) phospholipids by co-sedimentation assay. The results indicate that 1 mol of caldesmon binds approx. 170 mol of membrane phospholipids with a binding affinity constant of 7.3 x 10(6) M-1. The caldesmon-membrane phospholipid complex dissociates with increasing salt concentration and in the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin. As indicated by EPR measurements of membrane lipids labelled with 5-doxyl stearate and TEMPO-phosphatidylethanolamine, binding of caldesmon results in an increase in mobility of the acyl chains (in the region of carbon 5) and a decrease in polar headgroup mobility of phospholipids. Interaction of caldesmon with phospholipids is accompanied by inhibition of phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis via a phospholipid base-exchange reaction, with phosphatidylserine as substrate. This shows that, of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane phospholipids, the main target of caldesmon is phosphatidylserine. PMID:9371708

  16. Imitation of artificial membrane system via mobile phases with Tween-80 and cholic acid in biopartitioning micellar chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rukhadze, Marina D; Sebiskveradze, Maya V; Akhalkatsi, Tsaro G; Makharadze, Teona G

    2006-08-01

    The chromatographic behaviour of compounds of biomedical significance was studied using micellar mobile phases modified with polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate (Tween-80). The influence of the surfactant within the 0.75-4% concentration range on the retention factor of model compounds was investigated. The biological surfactant cholic acid was introduced into the mobile phases in order to approach to the structure of natural membranes, viz. erythrocyte and cytoplasmatic membranes. It was found that curves of dependence of retention factor vs concentration of Tween-80 in the absence and presence of cholic acid in the mobile phase considerably diverge with one another, especially in the 2-3% concentration range of Tween-80 using C18-type support. Increasing the concentration of Tween-80 resulted in the increase of retention factors using phenyl-coated stationary phase.

  17. Mutual diffusion of inclusions in freely suspended smectic liquid crystal films.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhiyuan; Nguyen, Zoom Hoang; Park, Cheol Soo; Glaser, Matthew A; Maclennan, Joseph E; Clark, Noel A; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Powers, Thomas R

    2014-09-19

    We study experimentally and theoretically the hydrodynamic interaction of pairs of circular inclusions in two-dimensional, fluid smectic membranes suspended in air. By analyzing their Brownian motion, we find that the radial mutual mobilities of identical inclusions are independent of their size but that the angular coupling becomes strongly size dependent when their radius exceeds a characteristic hydrodynamic length. These observations are described well for arbitrary inclusion separations by a model that generalizes the Levine-MacKintosh theory of point-force response functions and uses a boundary-element approach to calculate the mobility matrix for inclusions of finite extent.

  18. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules... exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed in... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for mutually exclusive...

  19. 47 CFR 22.131 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Licensing Requirements and Procedures Applications and Notifications § 22... procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Public Mobile Services... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for mutually exclusive...

  20. Mobile ER-to-Golgi but not post-Golgi membrane transport carriers disappear during the terminal myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, Mika; Kaisto, Tuula; Metsikkö, Kalervo

    2010-10-01

    The organelles of the exocytic pathway undergo a profound reorganization during the myogenic differentiation. Here, we have investigated the dynamics of the membrane trafficking at various stages of the differentiation process by using the green fluorescent protein-tagged, temperature-sensitive vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (tsG-GFP) as a marker. At the restrictive temperature of 39°C, the tsG-GFP located to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) at each stage of differentiation. Mobile membrane containers moving from the ER to the Golgi elements were seen in myoblasts and myotubes upon shifting the temperature to 20°C. In adult myofibers, in contrast, such containers were not seen although the tsG-GFP rapidly shifted from the ER to the Golgi elements. The mobility of tsG-GFP in the myofiber ER was restricted, suggesting localization in an ER sub-compartment. Contrasting with the ER-to-Golgi trafficking, transport from the Golgi elements to the plasma membrane involved mobile transport containers in all differentiation stages. These findings indicate that ER-to-Golgi trafficking in adult skeletal myofibers does not involve long-distance moving membrane carriers as occurs in other mammalian cell types.

  1. Capabilities of a mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation service for severe respiratory failure delivered by intensive care specialists.

    PubMed

    Sherren, P B; Shepherd, S J; Glover, G W; Meadows, C I S; Langrish, C; Ioannou, N; Wyncoll, D; Daly, K; Gooby, N; Agnew, N; Barrett, N A

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a single-centre observational study of retrievals for severe respiratory failure over 12 months. Our intensivist-delivered retrieval service has mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation capabilities. Sixty patients were analysed: 34 (57%) were female and the mean (SD) age was 44.1 (13.6) years. The mean (SD) PaO2 /FI O2 ratio at referral was 10.2 (4.1) kPa and median (IQR [range]) Murray score was 3.25 (3.0-3.5 [1.5-4.0]). Forty-eight patients (80%) required veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation at the referring centre. There were no cannulation or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-related complications. The median (IQR [range]) retrieval distance was 47.2 (14.9-77.0 [2.3-342.0]) miles. There were no major adverse events during retrieval. Thirty-seven patients (77%) who received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survived to discharge from the intensive care unit and 36 patients (75%) were alive after six months. Senior intensivist-initiated and delivered mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is safe and associated with a high incidence of survival.

  2. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Integration with the ISS Extravehicular Mobility Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margiott, Victoria; Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    NASA has developed a Solid Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) to provide cooling for the next generation spacesuit. The current spacesuit team has looked at this technology from the standpoint of using the ISS EMU to demonstrate the SWME technology while EVA, and from the standpoint of augmenting EMU cooling in the case of a fouled EMU cooling system. One approach to increasing the TRL of the system is to incorporate this hardware with the existing EMU. Several integration issues were addressed to support a potential demonstration of the SWME with the existing EMU. Systems analysis was performed to assess the capability of the SWME to maintain crewmember cooling and comfort as a replacement for sublimation. The materials of the SWME were reviewed to address compatibility with the EMU. Conceptual system placement and integration with the EMU via an EVA umbilical system to ensure crew mobility and Airlock egress were performed. A concept of operation for EVA use was identified that is compatible with the existing system. This concept is extensible as a means to provide cooling for the existing EMU. The cooling system of one of the EMUs on orbit has degraded, with the root cause undetermined. Should there be a common cause resident on ISS, this integration could provide a means to recover cooling capability for EMUs on orbit.

  3. On the mobility, membrane location and functionality of mechanosensitive channels in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Jonas; Galbiati, Heloisa; Rasmussen, Akiko; Miller, Samantha; Poolman, Bert

    2016-09-06

    Bacterial mechanosensitive channels protect cells from structural damage during hypoosmotic shock. MscS, MscL and MscK are the most abundant channels in E. coli and arguably the most important ones in osmoprotection. By combining physiological assays with quantitative photo-activated localization microscopy (qPALM), we find an almost linear relationship between channel abundance and cell survival. A minimum of 100 MscL (or MscS) channels is needed for protection when a single type of channel is expressed. Under native-like conditions MscL, MscS as well as MscK distribute homogeneously over the cytoplasmic membrane and the lateral diffusion of the channels is in accordance with their relative protein mass. However, we observe cluster formation and a reduced mobility of MscL when the majority of the subunits of the pentameric channel contain the fluorescent mEos3.2 protein. These data provide new insights into the quantitative biology of mechanosensitive channels and emphasizes the need for care in analysing protein complexes even when the fluorescent tag has been optimized for monomeric behaviour.

  4. Voltage- and Tension-Dependent Lipid Mobility in the Outer Hair Cell Plasma Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oghalai, John S.; Zhao, Hong-Bo; Kutz, J. Walter; Brownell, William E.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for electromotility of outer hair cells in the ear is unknown but is thought to reside within the plasma membrane. Lipid lateral diffusion in the outer hair cell plasma membrane is a sigmoidal function of transmembrane potential and bathing media osmolality. Cell depolarization or hyposmotic challenge shorten the cell and reduce membrane fluidity by half. Changing the membrane tension with amphipathic drugs results in similar reductions. These dynamic changes in membrane fluidity represent the modulation of membrane tension by lipid-protein interactions. The voltage dependence may be associated with the force-generating motors that contribute to the exquisite sensitivity of mammalian hearing.

  5. Analytical Investigation and Improvement of Performance of a Proton Exchange Membrane (Pem) Fuel Cell in Mobile Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaee, I.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell in mobile applications is investigated analytically. At present the main use and advantages of fuel cells impact particularly strongly on mobile applications such as vehicles, mobile computers and mobile telephones. Some external parameters such as the cell temperature (Tcell ) , operating pressure of gases (P) and air stoichiometry (λair ) affect the performance and voltage losses in the PEM fuel cell. Because of the existence of many theoretical, empirical and semi-empirical models of the PEM fuel cell, it is necessary to compare the accuracy of these models. But theoretical models that are obtained from thermodynamic and electrochemical approach, are very exact but complex, so it would be easier to use the empirical and smi-empirical models in order to forecast the fuel cell system performance in many applications such as mobile applications. The main purpose of this study is to obtain the semi-empirical relation of a PEM fuel cell with the least voltage losses. Also, the results are compared with the existing experimental results in the literature and a good agreement is seen.

  6. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Ward, Meaghan E; Ritz, Emily; Ahmed, Mumdooh A M; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins.

  7. Acid effect on 99mTc and 99Mo mutual separation and their transport across supported liquid membrane extraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf Chaudry, M.

    2000-02-01

    Work on 99mTc extraction using supported liquid membrane (SLM) has been performed with tri-n-octylamine as a carrier. MoO 4 2- ions transport with TOA-xylene has alos been studied with respect to HCl concentration (0.001 to 0.05M) in the feed solution. 99mTc transport in the same HCl concentration range has shown that while MoO 4 2- ions flux is higher at -5mol/m2.s, the TcO 4 - ions flux is in the range of (5-7)×10-11 mol/m2.s. In case of sulphuric acid in the feed the transport of 99mTc has been found to be higher ((28-55)×10-11 mol/m2), while 99Mo transport is observed to be suppressed as the H2SO4 concentration in the feed solution increases, providing a useful method for extraction of 99mTc, produced from the disintegration of 99Mo with time. Membranes supports used are of polypropylene and PTFE material. Effect of acid on Mo species present in the feed solution and the mechanism of transport through the SLM are also discussed.

  8. Development of a Low-Cost, Durable Membrane and Membrane Electrode Assemby for Stationary and Mobile Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Michel Foure; Gaboury, Scott; Goldbach, Jim; Mountz, David; Yi, Jung

    2008-01-31

    The development of low cost, durable membranes and membranes electrode assemblies (MEAs) remain a critical challenge for the successful introduction of fuel cells into mass markets. It was the goal of the team lead by Arkema, Inc. (formerly Atofina, Inc.) to address these shortages. Thus, this project addresses the following technical barriers from the Fuel Cells section of the Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: (A) Durability (B) Cost Arkema’s approach consisted in using blends of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) and proprietary sulfonated polyelectrolytes. The strength and originality of Arkema’s approach lies in the decoupling of ion conductivity from the other requirements. Kynar® (Arkema trade name for PVDF) provides an exceptional combination of properties that make it ideally suited for a membrane matrix. In a first phase, Arkema demonstrated the feasibility of the concept with the M31 membrane generation. After MEA optimization, it was shown that the beginning-of-life (BOL) performance of M31 MEAs was essentially on a par with that of PFSA MEAs at 60ºC under fully humidified conditions. On the other hand, long-term durability studies showed a high decay rate of 45µV/h over a 2100 hr. test. Arkema then designed several families of polyelectrolyte candidates, which, in principle, could not undergo the same failure mechanisms. A new membrane candidate was developed: M41. It offered the same generally good mechanical, ex-situ conductivity and gas barrier properties as M31. In addition, ex-situ accelerated testing suggested a several orders of magnitude improvement in chemical stability. M41 based MEAs showed comparable BOL performance with that of PFSA (80ºC, 100% RH). M41 MEAs were further shown to be able to withstand several hours temperature excursions at 120ºC without apparent damage. Accelerated studies were carried out using the DOE and/or US Fuel Cell Council

  9. Membrane-based continuous remover of trifluoroacetic acid in mobile phase for LC-ESI-MS analysis of small molecules and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhigui; Zhang, Jialing; Xing, Jiawei; Bai, Yu; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2012-07-01

    We developed a "continuous" trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) remover based on electrodialysis with bipolar membrane for online coupling of liquid chromatography (LC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) using TFA containing mobile phase. With the TFA remover as an interface, the TFA anion in the mobile phase was removed based on electrodialysis mechanism, and meanwhile, the anion exchange membrane was self-regenerated by the hydroxide ions produced by the bipolar membrane. So the remover could continuously work without any additional regeneration process. The established LC-TFA remover-MS system has been successfully applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of small molecules as well as proteins.

  10. sigma opiates and certain antipsychotic drugs mutually inhibit (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 and (/sup 3/H)haloperidol binding in guinea pig brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, S.W.; Cook, L.

    1984-09-01

    The relationship between binding of antipsychotic drugs and sigma psychotomimetic opiates to binding sites for the sigma agonist (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine) and to dopamine D/sub 2/ sites was investigated. In guinea pig brain membranes, (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 bound to single class of sites with a K/sub d/ of 4 x 10/sup -8/ M and a B/sub max/ of 333 fmol/mg of protein. This binding was different from ..mu.., kappa, or delta opiate receptor binding. It was inhibited by opiates that produce psychotomimetic activities but not by opiates that lack such activities. Some antipsychotic drugs inhibited (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding with high to moderate affinities in the following order of potency: haloperidol > perphenazine > fluphenazine > acetophenazine > trifluoperazine > molindone greater than or equal to pimozide greater than or equal to thioridazine greater than or equal to chlorpromazine greater than or equal to triflupromazine. However, there were other antipsychotic drugs such as spiperone and clozapine that showed low affinity for the (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites. Affinities of antipsychotic drugs for (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites did not correlate with those for (/sup 3/H)spiperone (dopamine D/sub 2/) sites. (/sup 3/H)-Haloperidol binding in whole brain membranes was also inhibited by the sigma opiates pentazocine, cyclazocine, and (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047. In the striatum, about half of the saturable (/sup 3/H)haloperidol binding was to (/sup 3/H)spiperone (D/sub 2/) sites and the other half was to sites similar to (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites. 15 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  11. Single Molecule Lateral Mobility and Membrane Organization in DMPC/Cholesterol Mixtures at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Saame; Stillwell, William; Naumann, Christoph

    2002-03-01

    To better understand the lipid heterogeneity of biological membranes, we have studied the lateral mobility and membrane organization of DMPC and cholesterol (Chol) mixtures at the air-water interface using single molecule fluorescence imaging and epifluorescence microscopy. The single molecule imaging technique was used to track the lateral diffusion of single molecules of TRITC-DPPE or cholesteryl Bodipy. In the absence of Chol, mean square displacement histograms obtained from single molecule tracking of TRITC-DPPE show unobstructed diffusion. Including Chol at low levels of Chol (<10 moldiffusion at intermediate levels ( 30 molof Chol (>40 molmacroscopic phase separations. Data obtained from tracking experiments of cholesteryl-Bodipy also show complementary changes in diffusion. Our results indicate that our techniques provide insight into the micro and macro organization of lipid domains at the air-water interface.

  12. Epidermal growth factor-induced mobilization of a ganglioside-specific sialidase (NEU3) to membrane ruffles

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Hata, Keiko; Wada, Tadashi; Moriya, Setsuko; Miyagi, Taeko . E-mail: miyagi-ta173@pref.miyagi.jp

    2006-07-28

    Human ganglioside-specific sialidase, NEU3, localized at cell membranes is thought to regulate various biological processes at cell surfaces. We here explored functional subcellular localization of the sialidase by immunofluorescence and found accumulation at leading edges of cell membranes in the presence of serum in culture. In response to EGF, the sialidase redistributed rapidly to ruffling cell membranes of squamous carcinoma A431 cells and co-localized with Rac-1. NEU3 overexpression enhanced Rac-1 activation and cell migration as compared with controls in HeLa cells as well as in A431 cells. Consistent with co-localization with Rac-1 by immunofluorescence, NEU3 was found to co-precipitate with activated Rac bound to GST-PAK-1 fusion protein. NEU3 silencing by siRNA, in contrast, resulted in inhibition of Rac-1 activation. These results indicate that NEU3 is able to mobilize to membrane ruffles in response to growth stimuli and activate the Rac-1 signaling by co-localization with Rac-1, leading to increased cell motility.

  13. Mobilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    istic and romantic emotionalism that typifies this genre. Longino, James C., et al. “A Study of World War Procurement and Industrial Mobilization...States. Harrisburg, PA: Military Service Publishing Co., 1941. CARL 355.22 J72b. Written in rough prose , this World War II era document explains the

  14. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-11-01

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds.

  15. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-11-08

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds.

  16. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-01-01

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds. PMID:27824161

  17. Evolution of mutualism between species

    SciTech Connect

    Post, W.M.; Travis, C.C.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent theoretical work on mutualism, the interaction between species populations that is mutually beneficial, is reviewed. Several ecological facts that should be addressed in the construction of dynamic models for mutualism are examined. Basic terminology is clarified. (PSB)

  18. Mobility Measurements Probe Conformational Changes in Membrane Proteins due to Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Richard G.; Turner, Matthew S.

    2015-11-01

    The function of membrane-embedded proteins such as ion channels depends crucially on their conformation. We demonstrate how conformational changes in asymmetric membrane proteins may be inferred from measurements of their diffusion. Such proteins cause local deformations in the membrane, which induce an extra hydrodynamic drag on the protein. Using membrane tension to control the magnitude of the deformations, and hence the drag, measurements of diffusivity can be used to infer—via an elastic model of the protein—how conformation is changed by tension. Motivated by recent experimental results [Quemeneur et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 5083 (2014)], we focus on KvAP, a voltage-gated potassium channel from Aeropyrum pernix. The conformation of KvAP is found to change considerably due to tension, with its "walls," where the protein meets the membrane, undergoing significant angular strains. The torsional stiffness is determined to be 26.8 kBT per radian at room temperature. This has implications for both the structure and the function of such proteins in the environment of a tension-bearing membrane.

  19. Mobility Measurements Probe Conformational Changes in Membrane Proteins due to Tension.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard G; Turner, Matthew S

    2015-11-06

    The function of membrane-embedded proteins such as ion channels depends crucially on their conformation. We demonstrate how conformational changes in asymmetric membrane proteins may be inferred from measurements of their diffusion. Such proteins cause local deformations in the membrane, which induce an extra hydrodynamic drag on the protein. Using membrane tension to control the magnitude of the deformations, and hence the drag, measurements of diffusivity can be used to infer-via an elastic model of the protein-how conformation is changed by tension. Motivated by recent experimental results [Quemeneur et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 5083 (2014)], we focus on KvAP, a voltage-gated potassium channel from Aeropyrum pernix. The conformation of KvAP is found to change considerably due to tension, with its "walls," where the protein meets the membrane, undergoing significant angular strains. The torsional stiffness is determined to be 26.8k(B)T per radian at room temperature. This has implications for both the structure and the function of such proteins in the environment of a tension-bearing membrane.

  20. The absence of chlorophyll b affects lateral mobility of photosynthetic complexes and lipids in grana membranes of Arabidopsis and barley chlorina mutants.

    PubMed

    Tyutereva, Elena V; Evkaikina, Anastasiia I; Ivanova, Alexandra N; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V

    2017-04-05

    The lateral mobility of integral components of thylakoid membranes, such as plastoquinone, xanthophylls, and pigment-protein complexes, is critical for the maintenance of efficient light harvesting, high rates of linear electron transport, and successful repair of damaged photosystem II (PSII). The packaging of the photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in the membrane depends on their size and stereometric parameters which in turn depend on the composition of the complexes. Chlorophyll b (Chlb) is an important regulator of antenna size and composition. In this study, the lateral mobility (the mobile fraction size) of pigment-protein complexes and lipids in grana membranes was analyzed in chlorina mutants of Arabidopsis and barley lacking Chlb. In the Arabidopsis ch1-3 mutant, diffusion of membrane lipids decreased as compared to wild-type plants, but the diffusion of photosynthetic complexes was not affected. In the barley chlorina f2 3613 mutant, the diffusion of pigment-protein complexes significantly decreased, while the diffusion of lipids increased, as compared to wild-type plants. We propose that the size of the mobile fractions of pigment-protein complexes in grana membranes in vivo is higher than reported previously. The data are discussed in the context of the protein composition of antennae, characteristics of the plastoquinone pool, and production of reactive oxygen species in leaves of chlorina mutants.

  1. Rapid mobilization of membrane lipids in wheat leaf-sheathes during incompatible interactions with hessian fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) is a biotrophic parasitic insect that interacts with wheat on a typical gene-for-gene basis. In this study, we systematically profiled changes in membrane lipids in two isogenic wheat lines: a susceptible line and its backcrossed offspring containing resistance ge...

  2. Enhanced ionic liquid mobility induced by confinement in 1D CNT membranes.

    PubMed

    Berrod, Q; Ferdeghini, F; Judeinstein, P; Genevaz, N; Ramos, R; Fournier, A; Dijon, J; Ollivier, J; Rols, S; Yu, D; Mole, R A; Zanotti, J-M

    2016-04-21

    Water confined within carbon nanotubes (CNT) exhibits tremendous enhanced transport properties. Here, we extend this result to ionic liquids (IL) confined in vertically aligned CNT membranes. Under confinement, the IL self-diffusion coefficient is increased by a factor 3 compared to its bulk reference. This could lead to high power battery separators.

  3. 47 CFR 22.717 - Procedure for mutually exclusive applications in the Rural Radiotelephone Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedure for mutually exclusive applications... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Rural Radiotelephone Service § 22.717 Procedure for mutually exclusive applications in the Rural Radiotelephone Service. Mutually...

  4. 47 CFR 22.717 - Procedure for mutually exclusive applications in the Rural Radiotelephone Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedure for mutually exclusive applications... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Rural Radiotelephone Service § 22.717 Procedure for mutually exclusive applications in the Rural Radiotelephone Service. Mutually...

  5. [Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an awake patient : Use of the mobile ECMO team for fulminant pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Keller, D; Lotz, C; Kippnich, M; Adami, P; Kranke, P; Roewer, N; Kredel, M; Schimmer, C; Leyh, R; Muellenbach, R M

    2015-05-01

    The current report highlights the use of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (va-ECMO) in a case of pulmonary embolism complicated by right ventricular failure. A 38-year-old woman was admitted to a secondary care hospital with dyspnea and systemic hypotension. Diagnostic testing revealed a massive pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy was unsuccessful necessitating thromboendarterectomy in the presence of cardiogenic shock. To allow the necessary transport of the highly unstable patient to a tertiary care center a mobile ECMO team was called in. The team immediately initiated awake va-ECMO as a bridge to therapy. Extracorporeal support subsequently allowed a safe transportation and successful completion of the surgical procedure with complete recovery.

  6. Ambulatory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with subclavian venoarterial cannulation to increase mobility and recovery in a patient awaiting cardiac transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Samuel; MacHannaford, Juan C.; Chamogeorgakis, Themistokles; Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V.; Felius, Joost; Rafael, Aldo E.; Malyala, Rajasekhar S.

    2017-01-01

    Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can provide temporary cardiopulmonary support for patients in hemodynamic extremis or refractory heart failure until more durable therapies—such as cardiac transplantation or a left ventricular assist device—can be safely implemented. Conventional ECMO cannulation strategies commonly employ the femoral artery and vein, constraining the patients to the supine position for the duration of ECMO support. We have recently adopted a modified cannulation approach to promote patient mobility, rehabilitation, and faster recovery and to mitigate complications associated with femoral arterial cannulation, such as limb ischemia and compartment syndrome. This technique involves cannulation of the subclavian artery and vein. The current case report details our recent experience with this approach in a critically ill patient awaiting cardiac transplantation.

  7. Enhanced ionic liquid mobility induced by confinement in 1D CNT membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrod, Q.; Ferdeghini, F.; Judeinstein, P.; Genevaz, N.; Ramos, R.; Fournier, A.; Dijon, J.; Ollivier, J.; Rols, S.; Yu, D.; Mole, R. A.; Zanotti, J.-M.

    2016-04-01

    Water confined within carbon nanotubes (CNT) exhibits tremendous enhanced transport properties. Here, we extend this result to ionic liquids (IL) confined in vertically aligned CNT membranes. Under confinement, the IL self-diffusion coefficient is increased by a factor 3 compared to its bulk reference. This could lead to high power battery separators.Water confined within carbon nanotubes (CNT) exhibits tremendous enhanced transport properties. Here, we extend this result to ionic liquids (IL) confined in vertically aligned CNT membranes. Under confinement, the IL self-diffusion coefficient is increased by a factor 3 compared to its bulk reference. This could lead to high power battery separators. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01445c

  8. Self-assembly in Nafion membranes upon hydration: water mobility and adsorption isotherms.

    PubMed

    Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V

    2014-09-25

    By means of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, we explored geometrical, transport, and sorption properties of hydrated Nafion-type polyelectrolyte membranes. Composed of a perfluorinated backbone with sulfonate side chains, Nafion self-assembles upon hydration and segregates into interpenetrating hydrophilic and hydrophobic subphases. This segregated morphology determines the transport properties of Nafion membranes that are widely used as compartment separators in fuel cells and other electrochemical devices, as well as permselective diffusion barriers in protective fabrics. We introduced a coarse-grained model of Nafion, which accounts explicitly for polymer rigidity and electrostatic interactions between anionic side chains and hydrated metal cations. In a series of DPD simulations with increasing content of water, a classical percolation transition from a system of isolated water clusters to a 3D network of hydrophilic channels was observed. The hydrophilic subphase connectivity and water diffusion were studied by constructing digitized replicas of self-assembled morphologies and performing random walk simulations. A non-monotonic dependence of the tracer diffusivity on the water content was found. This unexpected behavior was explained by the formation of large and mostly isolated water domains detected at high water content and high equivalent polymer weight. Using MC simulations, we calculated the chemical potential of water in the hydrated polymer and constructed the water sorption isotherms, which extended to the oversaturated conditions. We determined that the maximum diffusivity and the onset of formation of large water domains corresponded to the saturation conditions at 100% humidity. The oversaturated membrane morphologies generated in the canonical ensemble DPD simulations correspond to the metastable and unstable states of Nafion membrane that are not realized in the experiments.

  9. Survival, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities of freshwater planarian, Dugesia japonica, exposed to synthetic and natural surfactants.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Surfactants are a major class of emerging pollutants widely used in large quantities in everyday life and commonly found in surface waters worldwide. Freshwater planarian was selected to examine the effects of different surfactants by measuring mortality, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities. Among the 10 surfactants tested, the acute toxicities of betaine and polyethylene glycol (PEG-200) to planarians were relatively low, with a median lethal concentration (LC50) greater than 10,000 mg/L. The toxicity to planarians of the other eight surfactants based on 48-h LC50 could be arranged in the descending order of cetylpyridinum chloride (CPC) > 4-tert-octylphenol (4-tert-OP) > ammonium lauryl sulfate > benzalkonium chloride > saponin > sodium lauroylsarcosinate > dioctyl sulfosuccinate > dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB). Both CPC and 4-tert-OP were very toxic to planarians, with 48-h LC50 values <1 mg/L. The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of planarian mobility were in the 0.1 to 50 mg/L range and were in the same range as the 24-h LC50 of planarians exposed to different surfactants, except for DTAB. In addition, significant inhibition of cholinesterase activity activities was found in planarians exposed to 4-tert-OP at 2.5 and 5 mg/L and to saponin at 10 mg/L after 2-h treatments. This result suggests that planarian mobility responses can be used as an alternative indicator for acute toxicity of surfactants after a very short exposure period.

  10. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  11. Mutual Adaptaion in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siskin, Leslie Santee

    2016-01-01

    Building on an expanded concept of mutual adaptation, this chapter explores a distinctive and successful aspect of International Baccalaureate's effort to scale up, as they moved to expand their programs and support services in Title I schools. Based on a three-year, mixed-methods study, it offers a case where we see not only local adaptations…

  12. Formation of a Mast Cell Synapse: FcεRI Membrane Dynamics upon Binding Mobile or Immobilized Ligands on Surfaces1

    PubMed Central

    Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Spendier, Kathrin; Pfeiffer, Janet; Griffiths, Gary; Li, Haitao; Lidke, Keith A.; Oliver, Janet M.; Lidke, Diane S.; Thomas, James L.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    High affinity IgE receptors (FcεRI) on mast cells form a “synapse” when presented with mobile, bilayer incorporated antigen. Here, we show that receptor reorganization within the contacting mast cell membrane is markedly different upon binding of mobile and immobilized ligands. Rat basophilic leukemia mast cells (RBL-2H3) primed with fluorescent anti-DNP IgE were engaged by surfaces presenting either bilayer-incorporated, monovalent DNP-lipid (mobile ligand) or chemically crosslinked, multivalent DNP (immobilized ligand). Total internal reflection fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy methods were used to visualize receptor reorganization at the contact site. The spatial relationships of FcεRI to other cellular components at the synapse, such as actin, cholesterol and LAT, were also analyzed. Stimulation of mast cells with immobilized polyvalent ligand resulted in typical levels of degranulation. Remarkably, degranulation also followed interaction of mast cells with bilayers presenting mobile, monovalent ligand. Receptors engaged with mobile ligand coalesce into large, cholesterol-rich clusters that occupy the central portion of the contacting membrane. These data indicate that FcεRI crosslinking is not an obligatory step in triggering mast cell signaling and suggest that dense populations of mobile receptors are capable of initiating low level degranulation upon ligand recognition. PMID:20042583

  13. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance... insurance business within the United States, and all mutual marine insurance companies and mutual fire...

  14. Interhospital Transport System for Critically Ill Patients: Mobile Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation without a Ventilator

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Hye Ju; Cho, Woo Hyun; Park, Jong Myung; Kim, Dohyung

    2017-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been successfully used as a method for the interhospital transportation of critically ill patients. In South Korea, a well-established ECMO interhospital transport system is lacking due to limited resources. We developed a simplified ECMO transport system without mechanical ventilation for use by public emergency medical services. Methods Eighteen patients utilized our ECMO transport system from December 2011 to September 2015. We retrospectively analyzed the indications for ECMO, the patient status during transport, and the patient outcomes. Results All transport was conducted on the ground by ambulance. The distances covered ranged from 26 to 408 km (mean, 65.9±88.1 km) and the average transport time was 56.1±57.3 minutes (range, 30 to 280 minutes). All patients were transported without adverse events. After transport, 4 patients (22.2%) underwent lung transplantation because of interstitial lung disease. Eight patients who had severe acute respiratory distress syndrome showed recovery of heart and lung function after ECMO therapy. A total of 13 patients (70.6%) were successfully taken off ECMO, and 11 patients (61.1%) survived. Conclusion Our ECMO transport system without mechanical ventilation can be considered a safe and useful method for interhospital transport and could be a good alternative option for ECMO transport in Korean hospitals with limited resources. PMID:28180097

  15. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Wilkes, Robert; Kuehnel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the Generation 4 Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (Gen4 SWME). The SWME offers several advantages when compared with prior crewmember cooling technologies, including the ability to reject heat at increased atmospheric pressures, reduced loop infrastructure, and higher tolerance to fouling. Like its predecessors, Gen4 SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Test results from the backup cooling system which is based on a similar design and the subject of a companion paper, suggested that further volume reductions could be achieved through fiber density optimization. Testing was performed with four fiber bundle configurations ranging from 35,850 fibers to 41,180 fibers. The optimal configuration reduced the Gen4 SWME envelope volume by 15% from that of Gen3 while dramatically increasing the performance margin of the system. A rectangular block design was chosen over the Gen3 cylindrical design, for packaging configurations within the AEMU PLSS envelope. Several important innovations were made in the redesign of the backpressure valve which is used to control evaporation. A twin-port pivot concept was selected from among three low profile valve designs for superior robustness, control and packaging. The backpressure valve motor, the thermal control valve, delta pressure sensors and temperature sensors were incorporated into the manifold endcaps, also for packaging considerations. Flight-like materials including a titanium housing were used for all components. Performance testing

  16. Covariant mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    The connection between maximal sets of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) in a prime-power dimensional Hilbert space and finite phase-space geometries is well known. In this article, we classify MUBs according to their degree of covariance with respect to the natural symmetries of a finite phase-space, which are the group of its affine symplectic transformations. We prove that there exist maximal sets of MUBs that are covariant with respect to the full group only in odd prime-power dimensional spaces, and in this case, their equivalence class is actually unique. Despite this limitation, we show that in dimension 2r covariance can still be achieved by restricting to proper subgroups of the symplectic group, that constitute the finite analogues of the oscillator group. For these subgroups, we explicitly construct the unitary operators yielding the covariance.

  17. Mobility of ribosomes bound to microsomal membranes. A freeze-etch and thin-section electron microscope study of the structure and fluidity of the rough endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The lateral mobility of ribosomes bound to rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) membranes was demonstrated under experimental conditions. High- salt-washed rough microsomes were treated with pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase) to cleave the mRNA of bound polyribosomes and allow the movement of individual bound ribosomesmfreeze-etch and thin-section electron microscopy demonstrated that, when rough microsomes were treated with RNase at 4 degrees C and then maintained at this temperature until fixation, the bound ribosomes retained their homogeneous distribution on the microsomal surface. However, when RNase- treated rough microsomes were brought to 24 degrees C, a temperature above the thermotropic phase transition of the microsomal phospholipids, bound ribosomes were no longer distributed homogeneously but, instead, formed large, tightly packed aggregates on the microsomal surface. Bound polyribosomes could also be aggregated by treating rough microsomes with antibodies raised against large ribosomal subunit proteins. In these experiments, extensive cross-linking of ribosomes from adjacent microsomes also occurred, and large ribosome-free membrane areas were produced. Sedimentation analysis in sucrose density gradients demonstrated that the RNase treatment did not release bound ribosomes from the membranes; however, the aggregated ribosomes remain capable of peptide bond synthesis and were released by puromycin. It is proposed that the formation of ribosomal aggregates on the microsomal surface results from the lateral displacement of ribosomes along with their attached binding sites, nascent polypeptide chains, and other associated membrane proteins; The inhibition of ribosome mobility after maintaining rough microsomes at 4 degrees C after RNase, or antibody, treatment suggests that the ribosome binding sites are integral membrane proteins and that their mobility is controlled by the fluidity of the RER membrane. Examination of the hydrophobic interior of microsomal

  18. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire... marine insurance companies and mutual fire insurance companies exclusively issuing either...

  19. International Mutual Recognition: Progress and Prospects. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul

    Increasing the mobility of service providers, including professionals, via mutual recognition (of regulatory systems) agreements (MRAs) has become a significant issue worldwide. Despite increasing interest in MRAs, it may be argued that MRAs are but one of a larger range of major developments that have fueled current interest in occupational…

  20. Estimating mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraskov, Alexander; Stögbauer, Harald; Grassberger, Peter

    2004-06-01

    We present two classes of improved estimators for mutual information M(X,Y) , from samples of random points distributed according to some joint probability density μ(x,y) . In contrast to conventional estimators based on binnings, they are based on entropy estimates from k -nearest neighbor distances. This means that they are data efficient (with k=1 we resolve structures down to the smallest possible scales), adaptive (the resolution is higher where data are more numerous), and have minimal bias. Indeed, the bias of the underlying entropy estimates is mainly due to nonuniformity of the density at the smallest resolved scale, giving typically systematic errors which scale as functions of k/N for N points. Numerically, we find that both families become exact for independent distributions, i.e. the estimator M̂ (X,Y) vanishes (up to statistical fluctuations) if μ(x,y)=μ(x)μ(y) . This holds for all tested marginal distributions and for all dimensions of x and y . In addition, we give estimators for redundancies between more than two random variables. We compare our algorithms in detail with existing algorithms. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our estimators for assessing the actual independence of components obtained from independent component analysis (ICA), for improving ICA, and for estimating the reliability of blind source separation.

  1. [Biological mutualism, concepts and models].

    PubMed

    Perru, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Mutualism is a biological association for a mutual benefit between two different species. In this paper, firstly, we examine the history and signification of mutualism in relation to symbiosis. Then, we consider the link between concepts and models of mutualism. Models of mutualism depend on different concepts we use: If mutualism is situated at populations' level, it will be expressed by Lotka-Volterra models, concerning exclusively populations' size. If mutualism is considered as a resources' exchange or a biological market increasing the fitness of these organisms, it will be described at an individual level by a cost-benefit model. Our analysis will be limited to the history and epistemology of Lotka-Volterra models and we hypothesize that these models are adapted at first to translate dynamic evolutions of mutualism. They render stability or variations of size and assume that there are clear distinctions and a state of equilibrium between populations of different species. Italian mathematician Vito Volterra demonstrated that biological associations consist in a constant relation between some species. In 1931 and 1935, Volterra described the general form of antagonistic or mutualistic biological associations by the same differential equations. We recognize that these equations have been more used to model competition or prey-predator interactions, but a simple sign change allows describing mutualism. The epistemological problem is the following: Volterra's equations help us to conceptualize a global phenomenon. However, mutualistic interactions may have stronger effects away from equilibrium and these effects may be better understood at individual level. We conclude that, between 1985 and 2000, some researchers carried on working and converting Lotka-Volterra models but this description appeared as insufficient. So, other researchers adopted an economical viewpoint, considering mutualism as a biological market.

  2. 47 CFR 22.509 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications in the Paging and Radiotelephone Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for mutually exclusive applications... COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.509 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications in the Paging and Radiotelephone...

  3. 47 CFR 22.509 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications in the Paging and Radiotelephone Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for mutually exclusive applications... COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.509 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications in the Paging and Radiotelephone...

  4. 47 CFR 90.720 - Channels available for public safety/mutual aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Channels available for public safety/mutual aid... Frequencies in the 220-222 MHz Band § 90.720 Channels available for public safety/mutual aid. (a) Part 90... rule to use mobile and/or portable units on Channels 161-170 throughout the United States,...

  5. Laterally Mobile, Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers at the Fluorous−Aqueous Interface in a Plug-Based Microfluidic System: Characterization and Testing with Membrane Protein Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Kreutz, Jason E.; Li, Liang; Roach, L. Spencer; Hatakeyama, Takuji; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2009-11-04

    This paper describes a method to generate functionalizable, mobile self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in plug-based microfluidics. Control of interfaces is advancing studies of biological interfaces, heterogeneous reactions, and nanotechnology. SAMs have been useful for such studies, but they are not laterally mobile. Lipid-based methods, though mobile, are not easily amenable to setting up the hundreds of experiments necessary for crystallization screening. Here we demonstrate a method, complementary to current SAM and lipid methods, for rapidly generating mobile, functionalized SAMs. This method relies on plugs, droplets surrounded by a fluorous carrier fluid, to rapidly explore chemical space. Specifically, we implemented his-tag binding chemistry to design a new fluorinated amphiphile, RfNTA, using an improved one-step synthesis of RfOEG under Mitsunobu conditions. RfNTA introduces specific binding of protein at the fluorous-aqueous interface, which concentrates and orients proteins at the interface, even in the presence of other surfactants. We then applied this approach to the crystallization of a his-tagged membrane protein, Reaction Center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, performed 2400 crystallization trials, and showed that this approach can increase the range of crystal-producing conditions, the success rate at a given condition, the rate of nucleation, and the quality of the crystal formed.

  6. Granulophysin is located in the membrane of azurophilic granules in human neutrophils and mobilizes to the plasma membrane following cell stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Cham, B. P.; Gerrard, J. M.; Bainton, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    Granulophysin, a protein described in platelet dense granule membranes, has been shown to be similar or identical to CD63, a lysosomal membrane protein. We have previously shown granulophysin to be present in neutrophils using immunofluorescence. We now localize granulophysin to the neutrophil azurophilic granules by fine structural immunocytochemistry. Granulophysin expression on the surface membrane of the neutrophil is increased following stimulation of the cells, demonstrated by flow cytometry and fine structural immunocytochemistry. A similar pattern is shown for an anti-CD63 antibody. Incubation of activated neutrophils with D545, a monoclonal antibody to granulophysin, blocks subsequent binding of anti-CD63 antibodies to the cell surface, and anti-CD63 antibodies prevent subsequent binding of D545 as assessed by flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Our results support the homology of CD63 and granulophysin previously demonstrated in platelets and confirm CD63 as an activation marker in neutrophils and the first azurophilic granule membrane marker of neutrophils. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:8203473

  7. Uncertainty relation for mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeloch, James; Broadbent, Curtis J.; Howell, John C.

    2014-12-01

    We postulate the existence of a universal uncertainty relation between the quantum and classical mutual informations between pairs of quantum systems. Specifically, we propose that the sum of the classical mutual information, determined by two mutually unbiased pairs of observables, never exceeds the quantum mutual information. We call this the complementary-quantum correlation (CQC) relation and prove its validity for pure states, for states with one maximally mixed subsystem, and for all states when one measurement is minimally disturbing. We provide results of a Monte Carlo simulation suggesting that the CQC relation is generally valid. Importantly, we also show that the CQC relation represents an improvement to an entropic uncertainty principle in the presence of a quantum memory, and that it can be used to verify an achievable secret key rate in the quantum one-time pad cryptographic protocol.

  8. Planar Supported Membranes with Mobile SNARE Proteins and Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy Assays to Study Synaptic Vesicle Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Volker; Liang, Binyong; Kreutzberger, Alex J. B.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle membrane fusion, the process by which neurotransmitter gets released at the presynaptic membrane is mediated by a complex interplay between proteins and lipids. The realization that the lipid bilayer is not just a passive environment where other molecular players like SNARE proteins act, but is itself actively involved in the process, makes the development of biochemical and biophysical assays particularly challenging. We summarize in vitro assays that use planar supported membranes and fluorescence microscopy to address some of the open questions regarding the molecular mechanisms of SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. Most of the assays discussed in this mini-review were developed in our lab over the last 15 years. We emphasize the sample requirements that we found are important for the successful application of these methods. PMID:28360838

  9. Occurrence of serum M-protein species in Japanese patients older than 50 years based on relative mobility in cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Y; Shiba, K; Fukumura, Y; Kobayashi, I; Kamei, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the occurrence of serum M-protein species in 2,007 Japanese patients older than 50 years of age. All sera samples were analyzed by cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis. The relative mobility of an M-protein band was calculated by dividing the migration distance of M protein by that of albumin. M proteins were found to be present in 71 of 2,007 cases (3.5%). Men 80-89 years old showed the highest occurrence of M proteins, 11.0%. The relative mobility of M-protein bands, especially the band of the IgA-type M protein, increased as the patient's age advanced. The patients had higher levels of the IgG-type M protein than healthy Japanese subjects. We found that the occurrence of M-protein species in Japanese patients increases with their age. The IgG-type M protein was most frequently expressed among other types. The mobility of the M protein was greater in older patients probably because of aging-related changes in the carbohydrate chain of immunoglobulins composing an M-protein molecule.

  10. A Cytosolic Chaperone Complexes with Dynamic Membrane J-Proteins and Mobilizes a Nonenveloped Virus out of the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Christopher Paul; Ravindran, Madhu Sudhan; Inoue, Takamasa; Tsai, Billy

    2014-01-01

    Nonenveloped viruses undergo conformational changes that enable them to bind to, disrupt, and penetrate a biological membrane leading to successful infection. We assessed whether cytosolic factors play any role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane penetration of the nonenveloped SV40. We find the cytosolic SGTA-Hsc70 complex interacts with the ER transmembrane J-proteins DnaJB14 (B14) and DnaJB12 (B12), two cellular factors previously implicated in SV40 infection. SGTA binds directly to SV40 and completes ER membrane penetration. During ER-to-cytosol transport of SV40, SGTA disengages from B14 and B12. Concomitant with this, SV40 triggers B14 and B12 to reorganize into discrete foci within the ER membrane. B14 must retain its ability to form foci and interact with SGTA-Hsc70 to promote SV40 infection. Our results identify a novel role for a cytosolic chaperone in the membrane penetration of a nonenveloped virus and raise the possibility that the SV40-induced foci represent cytosol entry sites. PMID:24675744

  11. How Do Professional Mutual Recognition Agreements Affect Higher Education? Examining Regional Policy in North America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sa, Creso; Gaviria, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Professional mutual recognition agreements (MRAs) are one of the policy instruments employed in global and regional trade agreements to facilitate the mobility of skilled labour. While such agreements have been noted in the literature examining cross-border academic mobility, little is known about how they impact higher education. This paper…

  12. Cellular Effects of Endotoxin in Vitro: Mobility of Endotoxin in the Plasma Membrane of Hepatocytes and Neuroblastoma Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    1111 E115Ew coCelUlar effecu of eratlotxin in vivat mobility o( ’-Hxn ate iý o memtbrane 4f heptoc-tes wid onewobuztomn ceflh 0) Laurie Kilpatrick...National 2 • D. iber. W. and 3runeya, FLU. (194) in Muuetods o Enrzyu•m Analyi (Uagmeyer. KU. ad.) pp. Institutes of Health. 23V-27 3L Academi PrI. New York

  13. Reduced Volume Prototype Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; A Next-Generation Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makinen, Janice V.; Anchondo, Ian; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Colunga, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the reduced volume prototype (RVP) spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME). The RVP SWME is the third generation of hollow fiber SWME hardware. Like its predecessors, RVP SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Major design improvements, including a 36% reduction in volume, reduced weight, and a more flight-like backpressure valve, facilitate the packaging of RVP SWME in the AEMU PLSS envelope. The development of these evaporative cooling systems will contribute to a more robust and comprehensive AEMU PLSS.

  14. An agent based model of integrin clustering: Exploring the role of ligand clustering, integrin homo-oligomerization, integrin-ligand affinity, membrane crowdedness and ligand mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Yousef; Jamali, Tahereh; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2013-07-01

    Integrins are cell-surface protein heterodimers that coordinate cellular responses to mechanochemical cues from the extracellular matrix (ECM) and stimulate the assembly of small adhesion complexes, which are the initial sites of cell-ECM adhesion. Clustering of integrins is known to mediate signaling through a variety of signal transduction pathways. Yet, the molecular mechanisms of integrin clustering are poorly understood. In this paper, we develop computational models, using agent based modeling (ABM) techniques, to explore two key underlying mechanisms of integrin clustering, namely ligand organization and integrin homo-oligomerization. Our models help to shed light on the potential roles ligand clustering and integrin homo-oligomerization may play in controlling integrin clustering. A potential mechanism for the clustering of integrin is discussed and the effects of other parameters such as integrin-ligand affinity, membrane crowdedness and ligand mobility on integrin clustering are examined.

  15. Experimental test of new theoretical models for the electrokinetic properties of biological membranes. The effect of UO/sup 2 + +/ and tetracaine on the electrophoretic mobility of bilayer membranes and human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquale, L.; Winiski, A.; Oliva, C.; Vaio, G.; McLaughlin, S.

    1986-12-01

    For a large smooth particle with charges at the surface, the electrophoretic mobility is proportional to the zeta potential, which is related to the charge density by the Gouy-Chapman theory of the diffuse double layer. This classical model adequately describes the dependence of the electrophoretic mobility of phospholipid vesicles on charge density and salt concentration, but it is not applicable to most biological cells, for which new theoretical models have been developed. We tested these new models experimentally by measuring the effect of UO/sup 2 + +/ on the electrophoretic mobility of model membranes and human erythrocytes in 0.15 M NaCl at pH 5. We used UO/sup 2 + +/ for these studies because it should adsorb specifically to the bilayer surface of the erythrocyte and should not change the density of fixed charges in the glycocalyx. Our experiments demonstrate that it forms high-affinity complexes with the phosphate groups of several phospholipids in a bilayer but does not bind significantly to sialic acid residues. As observed previously, UO/sup 2 + +/ adsorbs strongly to egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles: 0.1 mM UO/sup 2 + +/ changes the zeta potential of PC vesicles from 0 to +40 mV. It also has a large effect on the electrophoretic mobility of vesicles formed from mixtures of PC and the negative phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS): 0.1 mM UO/sup 2 + +/ changes the zeta potential of PC/PS vesicles (10 mol % PS) from -13 to +37 mV. In contrast, UO/sup 2 + +/ has only a small effect on the electrophoretic mobility of either vesicles formed from mixtures of PC and the negative ganglioside GM1 or erythrocytes: 0.1 mM UO/sup 2 + +/ changes the apparent zeta potential of PC/GM1 vesicles (17 mol % GM1) from -11 to +5 mV and the apparent zeta potential of erythrocytes from -12 to -4 mV.

  16. Mutual Respect and Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary theories of civic education frequently appeal to an ideal of mutual respect in the context of ethical, ethical and religious disagreement. This paper critically examines two recently popular criticisms of this ideal. The first, coming from a postmodern direction, charges that the ideal is hypocritical in its effort to be maximally…

  17. Hospital mutual aid evacuation plan.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R

    1997-02-01

    Health care facilities need to be prepared for disasters such as floods, tornadoes and earthquakes. Rochester, NY, and its surrounding communities devised a hospital mutual aid evacuation plan in the event a disaster occurs and also to comply with the Joint Commission. This document discusses the plan's development process and also provides the end result.

  18. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling Systems for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean.; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Petty, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator - Baseline heat rejection technology for the Portable Life Support System of the Advanced EMU center dot Replaces sublimator in the current EMU center dot Contamination insensitive center dot Can work with Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator in Spacesuit Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) to reject heat and reuse evaporated water The Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is being developed to replace the sublimator for future generation spacesuits. Water in LCVG absorbs body heat while circulating center dot Warm water pumped through SWME center dot SWME evaporates water vapor, while maintaining liquid water - Cools water center dot Cooled water is then recirculated through LCVG. center dot LCVG water lost due to evaporation (cooling) is replaced from feedwater The Independent TCV Manifold reduces design complexity and manufacturing difficulty of the SWME End Cap. center dot The offset motor for the new BPV reduces the volume profile of the SWME by laying the motor flat on the End Cap alongside the TCV.

  19. Nematode-Bacteria Mutualism: Selection Within the Mutualism Supersedes Selection Outside of the Mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Morran, Levi T.; Penley, McKenna J.; Byrd, Victoria S.; Meyer, Andrew J.; O’Sullivan, Timothy S.; Bashey, Farrah; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Lively, Curtis M.

    2016-01-01

    The coevolution of interacting species can lead to co-dependent mutualists. Little is known about the effect of selection on partners within verses apart from the association. Here, we determined the effect of selection on bacteria (Xenorhabdus nematophila) both within and apart from its mutualistic partner (a nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae). In nature, the two species cooperatively infect and kill arthropods. We passaged the bacteria either together with (M+), or isolated from (M−), nematodes under two different selection regimes: random selection (S−) and selection for increased virulence against arthropod hosts (S+). We found that the isolated bacteria evolved greater virulence under selection for greater virulence (M−S+) than under random selection (M−S−). In addition, the response to selection in the isolated bacteria (M−S+) caused a breakdown of the mutualism following reintroduction to the nematode. Finally, selection for greater virulence did not alter the evolutionary trajectories of bacteria passaged within the mutualism (M+S+ = M+S−), indicating that selection for the maintenance of the mutualism was stronger than selection for increased virulence. The results show that selection on isolated mutualists can rapidly breakdown beneficial interactions between species, but that selection within a mutualism can supersede external selection, potentially generating co-dependence over time. PMID:26867502

  20. Proteomic analysis reveals a FANCA-modulated neddylation pathway involved in CXCR5 membrane targeting and cell mobility.

    PubMed

    Renaudin, Xavier; Guervilly, Jean-Hugues; Aoufouchi, Said; Rosselli, Filippo

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to identify novel substrates of the FANCcore complex, the inactivation of which leads to the genetic disorder Fanconi anemia, which is associated with bone marrow failure, developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to cancer. Eight FANC proteins participate in the nuclear FANCcore complex, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin-ligase that monoubiquitylates FANCD2 and FANCI in response to replicative stress. Here, we use mass spectrometry to compare proteins from FANCcore-complex-deficient cells to those of rescued control cells after treatment with hydroxyurea, an inducer of FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. FANCD2 and FANCI appear to be the only targets of the FANCcore complex. We identify other proteins that are post-translationally modified in a FANCA- or FANCC-dependent manner. The majority of these potential targets localize to the cell membrane. Finally, we demonstrate that (a) the chemokine receptor CXCR5 is neddylated; (b) FANCA but not FANCC appears to modulate CXCR5 neddylation through an unknown mechanism; (c) CXCR5 neddylation is involved in targeting the receptor to the cell membrane; and (d) CXCR5 neddylation stimulates cell migration and motility. Our work has uncovered a pathway involving FANCA in neddylation and cell motility.

  1. N-formyl peptide receptors in human neutrophils display distinct membrane distribution and lateral mobility when labeled with agonist and antagonist

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Receptors for bacterial N-formyl peptides are instrumental for neutrophil chemotactic locomotion and activation at sites of infection. As regulatory mechanisms for signal transduction, both rapid coupling of the occupied receptor to cytoskeletal components, and receptor lateral redistribution, have been suggested (Jesaitis et al., 1986, 1989). To compare the distribution and lateral diffusion of the nonactivated and activated neutrophil N-formyl-peptide receptor, before internalization, we used a new fluorescent N-formyl-peptide receptor antagonist, tertbutyloxycarbonyl-Phe(D)-Leu-Phe(D)-Leu-Phe-OH (Boc- FLFLF, 0.1-1 microM), and the fluorescent receptor agonist formyl-Nle- Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys (fnLLFnLYK, 0.1-1 microM). Fluorescent Boc-FLFLF did not elicit an oxidative burst in the neutrophil at 37 degrees C, as assessed by chemiluminescence and reduction of p-nitroblue tetrazolium chloride, but competed efficiently both with formyl-methionyl-leucyl- phenylalanine (fMLF) and fnLLFnLYK. It was not internalized, as evidenced by confocal microscopy and acid elution of surface bound ligand. The lateral mobility characteristics of the neutrophil fMLF receptor were investigated with the technique of FRAP. The diffusion coefficient (D) was similar for antagonist- and agonist-labeled receptors (D approximately 5 x 10(-10) cm2/s), but the fraction of mobile receptors was significantly lower in agonist- compared to antagonist-labeled cells, approximately 40% in contrast to approximately 60%. This reduction in receptor mobile fraction was slightly counteracted, albeit not significantly, by dihydrocytochalasin B (dhcB, 5 microM). To block internalization of agonist-labeled receptors, receptor mobility measurements were done at 14 degrees C. At this temperature, confocal microscopy revealed clustering of receptors in response to agonist binding, compared to a more uniform receptor distribution in antagonist-labeled cells. The pattern of agonist- induced receptor clustering was

  2. Pluto-charon mutual events

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, R.P. )

    1989-11-01

    Since 1985, planetary astronomers have been working to take advantage of a once-per-century apparent alignment between Pluto and its satellite, Charon, which has allowed mutual occultation and transit events to be observed. There events, which will cease in 1990, have permitted the first precise determinations of their individual radii, densities, and surface compositions. In addition, information on their surface albedo distributions can be obtained.

  3. Mutuality in the provision of Scottish healthcare.

    PubMed

    Howieson, Brian

    2015-11-01

    The backdrop to this article is provided by the Better Health, Better Care Action Plan (Scottish Government, 2007), Section 1 of which is entitled 'Towards a Mutual NHS'. According to Better Health, Better Care (Scottish Government, 2007: 5): 'Mutual organisations are designed to serve their members. They are designed to gather people around a common sense of purpose. They are designed to bring the organisation together in what people often call "co-production."' The aim of this article is to précis the current knowledge of mutuality in the provision of Scottish healthcare. In detail, it will: introduce the 'mutual' organisation; offer a historical perspective of mutuality; suggest why healthcare mutuality is important; and briefly, detail the differences in mutual health-care policy in England and Scotland. It is hoped that this analysis will help researchers and practitioners alike appreciate further the philosophy of mutuality in the provision of Scottish healthcare.

  4. 76 FR 36625 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  5. 76 FR 20458 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  6. Waveguide mutually pumped phase conjugators.

    PubMed

    James, S W; Youden, K E; Jeffrey, P M; Eason, R W; Chandler, P J; Zhang, L; Townsend, P D

    1993-09-20

    The operation of the bridge mutually pumped phase conjugator is reported in a planar waveguide structure in photorefractive BaTiO(3). The waveguide was fabricated by the technique of ion implantation, using 1.5-MeVH(+) ions at a dose of 10(16) ions/cm(2). An order of magnitude decrease in response time is observed in the waveguide as compared with typical values obtained in bulk crystals, probably as a result of a combination of the optical confinement within the waveguide and possible modification of the charge-transport properties induced by the implantation process.

  7. Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Marjorie G.; Agrawal, Anurag A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in which species have evolved extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), sugar-secreting organs that recruit arthropod mutualists, have twofold higher diversification rates than families that lack species with EFNs. Zooming in on six distantly related plant clades, trait-dependent diversification models confirmed the tendency for lineages with EFNs to display increased rates of diversification. These results were consistent across methodological approaches. Inference using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to model the placement and number of rate shifts revealed that high net diversification rates in EFN clades were driven by an increased number of positive rate shifts following EFN evolution compared with sister clades, suggesting that EFNs may be indirect facilitators of diversification. Our replicated analysis indicates that defense mutualisms put lineages on a path toward increased diversification rates within and between clades, and is concordant with the hypothesis that mutualistic interactions with animals can have an impact on deep macroevolutionary patterns and enhance plant diversity. PMID:25349406

  8. Effect of fish oil on lateral mobility of prostaglandin F2α (FP) receptors and spatial distribution of lipid microdomains in bovine luteal cell plasma membrane in vitro.

    PubMed

    Plewes, M R; Burns, P D; Graham, P E; Hyslop, R M; Barisas, B G

    2017-01-01

    Lipid microdomains are ordered regions on the plasma membrane of cells, rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, ranging in size from 10 to 200 nm in diameter. These lipid-ordered domains may serve as platforms to facilitate colocalization of intracellular signaling proteins during agonist-induced signal transduction. It is hypothesized that fish oil will disrupt the lipid microdomains, increasing spatial distribution of these lipid-ordered domains and lateral mobility of the prostaglandin (PG) F2α (FP) receptors in bovine luteal cells. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of fish oil on (1) the spatial distribution of lipid microdomains, (2) lateral mobility of FP receptors, and (3) lateral mobility of FP receptors in the presence of PGF2α on the plasma membrane of bovine luteal cells in vitro. Bovine ovaries were obtained from a local abattoir and corpora lutea were digested using collagenase. In experiment 1, lipid microdomains were labeled using cholera toxin subunit B Alexa Fluor 555. Domains were detected as distinct patches on the plasma membrane of mixed luteal cells. Fish oil treatment decreased fluorescent intensity in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01). In experiment 2, single particle tracking was used to examine the effects of fish oil treatment on lateral mobility of FP receptors. Fish oil treatment increased microdiffusion and macrodiffusion coefficients of FP receptors as compared to control cells (P < 0.05). In addition, compartment diameters of domains were larger, and residence times were reduced for receptors in fish oil-treated cells (P < 0.05). In experiment 3, single particle tracking was used to determine the effects of PGF2α on lateral mobility of FP receptors and influence of fish oil treatment. Lateral mobility of receptors was decreased within 5 min following the addition of ligand for control cells (P < 0.05). However, lateral mobility of receptors was unaffected by addition of ligand for fish oil-treated cells

  9. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. 1.831-1 Section 1.831-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual...

  10. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. 1.831-1 Section 1.831-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual...

  11. Construction of bacteria-eukaryote synthetic mutualism.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Isao; Hosoda, Kazufumi; Suzuki, Shingo; Yamamoto, Kayo; Kihara, Kumiko; Mori, Kotaro; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2013-08-01

    Mutualism is ubiquitous in nature but is known to be intrinsically vulnerable with regard to both population dynamics and evolution. Synthetic ecology has indicated that it is feasible for organisms to establish novel mutualism merely through encountering each other by showing that it is feasible to construct synthetic mutualism between organisms. However, bacteria-eukaryote mutualism, which is ecologically important, has not yet been constructed. In this study, we synthetically constructed mutualism between a bacterium and a eukaryote by using two model organisms. We mixed a bacterium, Escherichia coli (a genetically engineered glutamine auxotroph), and an amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum, in 14 sets of conditions in which each species could not grow in monoculture but potentially could grow in coculture. Under a single condition in which the bacterium and amoeba mutually compensated for the lack of required nutrients (lipoic acid and glutamine, respectively), both species grew continuously through several subcultures, essentially establishing mutualism. Our results shed light on the establishment of bacteria-eukaryote mutualism and indicate that a bacterium and eukaryote pair in nature also has a non-negligible possibility of establishing novel mutualism if the organisms are potentially mutualistic.

  12. Mobile membrane introduction tandem mass spectrometry for on-the-fly measurements and adaptive sampling of VOCs around oil and gas projects in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogh, E.; Gill, C.; Bell, R.; Davey, N.; Martinsen, M.; Thompson, A.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    The release of hydrocarbons into the environment can have significant environmental and economic consequences. The evolution of smaller, more portable mass spectrometers to the field can provide spatially and temporally resolved information for rapid detection, adaptive sampling and decision support. We have deployed a mobile platform membrane introduction mass spectrometer (MIMS) for the in-field simultaneous measurement of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. In this work, we report instrument and data handling advances that produce geographically referenced data in real-time and preliminary data where these improvements have been combined with high precision ultra-trace VOCs analysis to adaptively sample air plumes near oil and gas operations in Alberta, Canada. We have modified a commercially available ion-trap mass spectrometer (Griffin ICX 400) with an in-house temperature controlled capillary hollow fibre polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer membrane interface and in-line permeation tube flow cell for a continuously infused internal standard. The system is powered by 24 VDC for remote operations in a moving vehicle. Software modifications include the ability to run continuous, interlaced tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments for multiple contaminants/internal standards. All data are time and location stamped with on-board GPS and meteorological data to facilitate spatial and temporal data mapping. Tandem MS/MS scans were employed to simultaneously monitor ten volatile and semi-volatile analytes, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX), reduced sulfur compounds, halogenated organics and naphthalene. Quantification was achieved by calibrating against a continuously infused deuterated internal standard (toluene-d8). Time referenced MS/MS data were correlated with positional data and processed using Labview and Matlab to produce calibrated, geographical Google Earth data-visualizations that enable adaptive sampling protocols

  13. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... business within the United States, and all mutual marine insurance companies and mutual fire or flood insurance companies exclusively issuing perpetual policies or whose principal business is the issuance of...) Foreign insurance companies not carrying on an insurance business within the United States are not...

  14. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... insurance business within the United States, and all mutual marine insurance companies and mutual fire or flood insurance companies exclusively issuing perpetual policies or whose principal business is the...) Foreign insurance companies not carrying on an insurance business within the United States are not...

  15. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine...

  16. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine...

  17. [Maintaining solidarity: is mutuality the solution?].

    PubMed

    Gevers, J K M; Ploem, M C

    2013-01-01

    Solidarity is essentially the willingness to contribute to the community and its demands, which may even involve contributing more than one is expecting to receive. Another principle is mutuality: this refers to a balance between rights and obligations or between mutual obligations. In its advisory document 'The importance of mutuality......solidarity takes work!', The Dutch Council for Public Health and Health Care underlines the importance of ensuring solidarity within the Dutch health care system, e.g. by encouraging patients to take responsibility for their own health, possibly by introducing elements of mutuality. In our contribution, we comment on the Council's advice. Although we fully agree with the overall conclusion that solidarity should be maintained within the system, we do not see how the introduction of increased mutuality will contribute to this goal.

  18. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  19. 12 CFR 239.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 239.3... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. (a) A mutual savings association may not reorganize to become...

  20. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  1. 12 CFR 239.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 239.3... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. (a) A mutual savings association may not reorganize to become...

  2. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  3. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  4. 12 CFR 239.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 239.3... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. (a) A mutual savings association may not reorganize to become...

  5. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  6. Mycorrhiza: A Common Form of Mutualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medve, Richard J.

    1978-01-01

    Mycorrhizae are among the most common examples of mutualism. This article discusses their structure, symbolic relationship, factors affecting formation and applying research. Questions are posed and answers suggested. (MA)

  7. Phenological shifts and the fate of mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Nicole E.; CaraDonna, Paul J.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is altering the timing of life history events in a wide array of species, many of which are involved in mutualistic interactions. Because many mutualisms can form only if partner species are able to locate each other in time, differential phenological shifts are likely to influence their strength, duration and outcome. At the extreme, climate change-driven shifts in phenology may result in phenological mismatch: the partial or complete loss of temporal overlap of mutualistic species. We have a growing understanding of how, when, and why phenological change can alter one type of mutualism–pollination. However, as we show here, there has been a surprising lack of attention to other types of mutualism. We generate a set of predictions about the characteristics that may predispose mutualisms in general to phenological mismatches. We focus not on the consequences of such mismatches but rather on the likelihood that mismatches will develop. We explore the influence of three key characteristics of mutualism: 1) intimacy, 2) seasonality and duration, and 3) obligacy and specificity. We predict that the following characteristics of mutualism may increase the likelihood of phenological mismatch: 1) a non-symbiotic life history in which co-dispersal is absent; 2) brief, seasonal interactions; and 3) facultative, generalized interactions. We then review the limited available data in light of our a priori predictions and point to mutualisms that are more and less likely to be at risk of becoming phenologically mismatched, emphasizing the need for research on mutualisms other than plant–pollinator interactions. Future studies should explicitly focus on mutualism characteristics to determine whether and how changing phenologies will affect mutualistic interactions. PMID:25883391

  8. Cadmium (II) and lead (II) transport in a polymer inclusion membrane using tributyl phosphate as mobile carrier and CuFeO(2) as a polarized photo electrode.

    PubMed

    Arous, Omar; Amara, Mourad; Trari, Mohamed; Bouguelia, Aissa; Kerdjoudj, Hacène

    2010-08-15

    In this work, a development of polymeric inclusion membranes for the cations separation is reported. The membrane was made up of cellulose triacetate (CTA) with a tributyl phosphate (TBP) incorporated into the polymer as metal ions carrier. The transport of lead (II) and cadmium (II) ions in two membrane systems polymer inclusion membrane (PIM), PIM coupled with photo-chemical electrode using TBP as carrier and 2-nitro phenyl octyl ether (NPOE) or tris ethylhexyl phosphate (TEHP) as plasticizer have been investigated. The membranes: polymer+plasticizer+carrier were synthesized and characterized by FTIR, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Transports of lead and cadmium have been studied using these systems and the results were compared to commercial cation exchange membrane (CRA). The obtained results showed that for Pb(2+) ion, the concentrations of the strip phase increases using synthesized membranes. The conduction band of the delafossite CuFeO(2) (-1.25 V(SCE)) yields a thermodynamically M(2+) (=Pb(2+), Cd(2+)) photo electrodeposition and speeds up the diffusion process. In all the cases, the potential of the electrode M/M(2+) in the feed compartment increases until a maximum value, reached at approximately 100 min above which it undergoes a diminution.

  9. Mutual learning and reverse innovation--where next?

    PubMed

    Crisp, Nigel

    2014-03-28

    There is a clear and evident need for mutual learning in global health systems. It is increasingly recognized that innovation needs to be sourced globally and that we need to think in terms of co-development as ideas are developed and spread from richer to poorer countries and vice versa. The Globalization and Health journal's ongoing thematic series, "Reverse innovation in global health systems: learning from low-income countries" illustrates how mutual learning and ideas about so-called "reverse innovation" or "frugal innovation" are being developed and utilized by researchers and practitioners around the world. The knowledge emerging from the series is already catalyzing change and challenging the status quo in global health. The path to truly "global innovation flow", although not fully established, is now well under way. Mobilization of knowledge and resources through continuous communication and awareness raising can help sustain this movement. Global health learning laboratories, where partners can support each other in generating and sharing lessons, have the potential to construct solutions for the world. At the heart of this dialogue is a focus on creating practical local solutions and, simultaneously, drawing out the lessons for the whole world.

  10. Mutual learning and reverse innovation–where next?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There is a clear and evident need for mutual learning in global health systems. It is increasingly recognized that innovation needs to be sourced globally and that we need to think in terms of co-development as ideas are developed and spread from richer to poorer countries and vice versa. The Globalization and Health journal’s ongoing thematic series, “Reverse innovation in global health systems: learning from low-income countries” illustrates how mutual learning and ideas about so-called "reverse innovation" or "frugal innovation" are being developed and utilized by researchers and practitioners around the world. The knowledge emerging from the series is already catalyzing change and challenging the status quo in global health. The path to truly “global innovation flow”, although not fully established, is now well under way. Mobilization of knowledge and resources through continuous communication and awareness raising can help sustain this movement. Global health learning laboratories, where partners can support each other in generating and sharing lessons, have the potential to construct solutions for the world. At the heart of this dialogue is a focus on creating practical local solutions and, simultaneously, drawing out the lessons for the whole world. PMID:24673828

  11. Mutual Information Rate and Bounds for It

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Murilo S.; Rubinger, Rero M.; Viana, Emilson R.; Sartorelli, José C.; Parlitz, Ulrich; Grebogi, Celso

    2012-01-01

    The amount of information exchanged per unit of time between two nodes in a dynamical network or between two data sets is a powerful concept for analysing complex systems. This quantity, known as the mutual information rate (MIR), is calculated from the mutual information, which is rigorously defined only for random systems. Moreover, the definition of mutual information is based on probabilities of significant events. This work offers a simple alternative way to calculate the MIR in dynamical (deterministic) networks or between two time series (not fully deterministic), and to calculate its upper and lower bounds without having to calculate probabilities, but rather in terms of well known and well defined quantities in dynamical systems. As possible applications of our bounds, we study the relationship between synchronisation and the exchange of information in a system of two coupled maps and in experimental networks of coupled oscillators. PMID:23112809

  12. Integrating plant carbon dynamics with mutualism ecology.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Elizabeth G

    2016-04-01

    Plants reward microbial and animal mutualists with carbohydrates to obtain nutrients, defense, pollination, and dispersal. Under a fixed carbon budget, plants must allocate carbon to their mutualists at the expense of allocation to growth, reproduction, or storage. Such carbon trade-offs are indirectly expressed when a plant exhibits reduced growth or fecundity in the presence of its mutualist. Because carbon regulates the costs of all plant mutualisms, carbon dynamics are a common platform for integrating these costs in the face of ecological complexity and context dependence. The ecophysiology of whole-plant carbon allocation could thus elucidate the ecology and evolution of plant mutualisms. If mutualisms are costly to plants, then they must be important but frequently underestimated sinks in the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  13. Mutual information and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamma, A.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the metastable, symmetry-breaking ground states of quantum many-body Hamiltonians have vanishing quantum mutual information between macroscopically separated regions and are thus the most classical ones among all possible quantum ground states. This statement is obvious only when the symmetry-breaking ground states are simple product states, e.g., at the factorization point. On the other hand, symmetry-breaking states are in general entangled along the entire ordered phase, and to show that they actually feature the least macroscopic correlations compared to their symmetric superpositions is highly nontrivial. We prove this result in general, by considering the quantum mutual information based on the two-Rényi entanglement entropy and using a locality result stemming from quasiadiabatic continuation. Moreover, in the paradigmatic case of the exactly solvable one-dimensional quantum X Y model, we further verify the general result by considering also the quantum mutual information based on the von Neumann entanglement entropy.

  14. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  15. Conceptual Alignment: How Brains Achieve Mutual Understanding.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Arjen; Verhagen, Lennart; Toni, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    We share our thoughts with other minds, but we do not understand how. Having a common language certainly helps, but infants' and tourists' communicative success clearly illustrates that sharing thoughts does not require signals with a pre-assigned meaning. In fact, human communicators jointly build a fleeting conceptual space in which signals are a means to seek and provide evidence for mutual understanding. Recent work has started to capture the neural mechanisms supporting those fleeting conceptual alignments. The evidence suggests that communicators and addressees achieve mutual understanding by using the same computational procedures, implemented in the same neuronal substrate, and operating over temporal scales independent from the signals' occurrences.

  16. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  17. Mutually unbiased bases and generalized Bell states

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, Andrei B.; Sych, Denis; Sanchez-Soto, Luis L.; Leuchs, Gerd

    2009-05-15

    We employ a straightforward relation between mutually unbiased and Bell bases to extend the latter in terms of a direct construction for the former. We analyze in detail the properties of these generalized Bell states, showing that they constitute an appropriate tool for testing entanglement in bipartite multiqudit systems.

  18. Do Mutual Children Cement Bonds in Stepfamilies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1988-01-01

    Interviewed 105 midwestern stepfamilies, 39 of whom had reproduced together. Found no significant differences between families with mutual children and those without in terms of marital adjustment, stepparent- and parent-child relationships, and stepfamily affect. It was not possible to predict which families were most likely to reproduce together…

  19. Mutual Coupling Compensation on Spectral-based DOA Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanudin, R.

    2016-11-01

    Direction of arrival (DOA) estimation using isotropic antenna arrays are commonly being implemented without considering the mutual coupling effect in between the array elements. This paper presents an analysis of DOA estimation with mutual coupling compensation using a linear antenna array. Mutual coupling effect is represented by mutual coupling coefficients and taken into account when calculating the array output. The mutual coupling compensation technique exploits a banded mutual coupling matrix to reduce the computational complexity. The banded matrix reflects the relationship between mutual coupling effect and the element spacing in an antenna array. The analysis is being carried out using the Capon algorithm, one of spectral-based DOA algorithms, for estimating the DOA of incoming signals. Computer simulations are performed to show the performance of the mutual coupling compensation technique on DOA estimation. Simulation results show that, in term of estimation resolution, the mutual coupling compensation technique manages to obtain a comparable results compared to the case without mutual coupling consideration. However, the mutual coupling compensation technique produces significant estimation error compared to the case without mutual coupling. The study concludes that the banded matrix of mutual coupling coefficients should be properly designed to improve the performance of mutual coupling compensation technique in DOA estimation.

  20. Plant invasions--the role of mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D M; Allsopp, N; D'Antonio, C M; Milton, S J; Rejmánek, M

    2000-02-01

    Many introduced plant species rely on mutualisms in their new habitats to overcome barriers to establishment and to become naturalized and, in some cases, invasive. Mutualisms involving animal-mediated pollination and seed dispersal, and symbioses between plant roots and microbiota often facilitate invasions. The spread of many alien plants, particularly woody ones, depends on pollinator mutualisms. Most alien plants are well served by generalist pollinators (insects and birds), and pollinator limitation does not appear to be a major barrier for the spread of introduced plants (special conditions relating to Ficus and orchids are described). Seeds of many of the most notorious plant invaders are dispersed by animals, mainly birds and mammals. Our review supports the view that tightly coevolved, plant-vertebrate seed dispersal systems are extremely rare. Vertebrate-dispersed plants are generally not limited reproductively by the lack of dispersers. Most mycorrhizal plants form associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi which, because of their low specificity, do not seem to play a major role in facilitating or hindering plant invasions (except possibly on remote islands such as the Galapagos which are poor in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi). The lack of symbionts has, however, been a major barrier for many ectomycorrhizal plants, notably for Pinus spp. in parts of the southern hemisphere. The roles of nitrogen-fixing associations between legumes and rhizobia and between actinorhizal plants and Frankia spp. in promoting or hindering invasions have been virtually ignored in the invasions literature. Symbionts required to induce nitrogen fixation in many plants are extremely widespread, but intentional introductions of symbionts have altered the invasibility of many, if not most, systems. Some of the world's worst invasive alien species only invaded after the introduction of symbionts. Mutualisms in the new environment sometimes re-unite the same species that form

  1. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, Mark S.; Shlomo, Golan; Anderson, Marc A.

    1994-01-01

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

  2. Hardware device binding and mutual authentication

    DOEpatents

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-03-04

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

  3. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  4. Mutual synchronization of weakly coupled gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rozental, R. M.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The processes of synchronization of two weakly coupled gyrotrons are studied within the framework of non-stationary equations with non-fixed longitudinal field structure. With the allowance for a small difference of the free oscillation frequencies of the gyrotrons, we found a certain range of parameters where mutual synchronization is possible while a high electronic efficiency is remained. It is also shown that synchronization regimes can be realized even under random fluctuations of the parameters of the electron beams.

  5. Three-Ship Mutual Interference Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1965-11-16

    increase beyond this event; the data before Event 500 do not show these effects. Short duration transmit-receive misalignment as observed aboard GARCIA , is...on BELKNAP and GARCIA have not been noted on McCLOY. ii 10 CONFIDENTIAL CONFIDENTIAL TRACOR, jNC - , S, Aig? Te~oS 3. CORRECTED SEA TEST LOG Complete...frequency band causing mutual influence. In this example, chart #1 shows BELKNAP and GARCIA influencing McCLOY at a higher frequency band. Sanborn

  6. Combating isolation: Building mutual mentoring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Anne J.

    2015-12-01

    Women physicists can often feel isolated at work. Support from a grant through the ADVANCE program of the National Science Foundation (U.S. government funding) created mutual mentoring networks aimed at combating isolation specifically for women faculty at undergraduate-only institutions. This paper will discuss the organization of one such network, what contributed to its success, some of the outcomes, and how it might be implemented in other contexts.

  7. Sequence comparisons via algorithmic mutual information

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavijevic, A.

    1994-12-31

    One of the main problems in DNA and protein sequence comparisons is to decide whether observed similarity of two sequences should be explained by their relatedness or by mere presence of some shared internal structure, e.g., shared internal tandem repeats. The standard methods that are based on statistics or classical information theory can be used to discover either internal structure or mutual sequence similarity, but cannot take into account both. Consequently, currently used methods for sequence comparison employ {open_quotes}masking{close_quotes} techniques that simply eliminate sequences that exhibit internal repetitive structure prior to sequence comparisons. The {open_quotes}masking{close_quotes} approach precludes discovery of homologous sequences of moderate or low complexity, which abound at both DNA and protein levels. As a solution to this problem, we propose a general method that is based on algorithmic information theory and minimal length encoding. We show that algorithmic mutual information factors out the sequence similarity that is due to shared internal structure and thus enables discovery of truly related sequences. We extend the recently developed algorithmic significance method to show that significance depends exponentially on algorithmic mutual information.

  8. Observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, C.; Di Martino, M.; Ferreri, W.; Osservatorio Astronomico, Turin )

    1989-07-01

    As part of the planned 'Pluto-Charon Mutual Eclipse Season Campaign', one mutual event was observed at the ESO Observatory on July 10, 1986 and seven mutual events were observed at the Serra La Nave stellar station of Catania Astrophysical Observatory from April 29 to July 21, 1987. At ESO the measurements were performed at the 61-cm Bochum telescope equipped with a photon-counting system and U, B, V, filters; at Serra La Nave the Cassegrain focus of the 91-cm reflector was equipped with a photon-counting system and B and V filters. The observed light losses and contact times do not show relevant systematic deviations from the predicted ones. An examination of the behavior of the B and V light curves gives slight indications of a different slope of the B and V light loss of the same event for a superior or an inferior event, and shows that the superior events are shallower at wavelengths longer than B. 6 refs.

  9. Identity theory and personality theory: mutual relevance.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Sheldon

    2007-12-01

    Some personality psychologists have found a structural symbolic interactionist frame and identity theory relevant to their work. This frame and theory, developed in sociology, are first reviewed. Emphasized in the review are a multiple identity conception of self, identities as internalized expectations derived from roles embedded in organized networks of social interaction, and a view of social structures as facilitators in bringing people into networks or constraints in keeping them out, subsequently, attention turns to a discussion of the mutual relevance of structural symbolic interactionism/identity theory and personality theory, looking to extensions of the current literature on these topics.

  10. Creating a culture of mutual respect.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Kathryn; Mestel, Pamela; Feldman, David L

    2010-04-01

    The Joint Commission mandates that hospitals seeking accreditation have a process to define and address disruptive behavior. Leaders at Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, took the initiative to create a code of mutual respect that not only requires respectful behavior, but also encourages sensitivity and awareness to the causes of frustration that often lead to inappropriate behavior. Steps to implementing the code included selecting code advocates, setting up a system for mediating disputes, tracking and addressing operational system issues, providing training for personnel, developing a formal accountability process, and measuring the results.

  11. Generalized mutual information of quantum critical chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, F. C.; Rajabpour, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    We study the generalized mutual information I˜n of the ground state of different critical quantum chains. The generalized mutual information definition that we use is based on the well established concept of the Rényi divergence. We calculate this quantity numerically for several distinct quantum chains having either discrete Z (Q ) symmetries (Q -state Potts model with Q =2 ,3 ,4 and Z (Q ) parafermionic models with Q =5 ,6 ,7 ,8 and also Ashkin-Teller model with different anisotropies) or the U (1 ) continuous symmetries (Klein-Gordon field theory, X X Z and spin-1 Fateev-Zamolodchikov quantum chains with different anisotropies). For the spin chains these calculations were done by expressing the ground-state wave functions in two special bases. Our results indicate some general behavior for particular ranges of values of the parameter n that defines I˜n. For a system, with total size L and subsystem sizes ℓ and L -ℓ , the I˜n has a logarithmic leading behavior given by c/˜n4 log[L/π sin(π/ℓ L ) ] where the coefficient c˜n is linearly dependent on the central charge c of the underlying conformal field theory describing the system's critical properties.

  12. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measured by confocal microscopy as a tool for the analysis of vesicular lipid transport and plasma membrane mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Gerd; Goetz, Alexandra; Orso, Evelyn; Rothe, Gregor

    1998-04-01

    The vesicular transport of lipids from the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi apparatus affects the composition of the plasma membrane. The purpose of our study was to develop an in vitro test system for characterization of vesicular lipid transport kinetics by using confocal microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Fibroblasts from two patients homozygous for the hypercatabolic HDL deficiency syndrome Tangier disease and 4 control subjects were pulsed with the C6-NBD-ceramide for 30 minutes. Chase incubation at room temperature resulted in the metabolic accumulation of fluorescent C6-NBD-sphingolyelin and C6-NBD-glycosylceramides in the medial- and trans-Golgi region. Cells were analyzed with an inverted Leica TCS microscope. Calibration was performed through the analysis of diffusion of 50 nm microparticles embedded in media of different viscosity. An acousto optical tunable filter (AOTF) was used for the selective bleaching of the medial- and trans- Golgi region followed by analysis of the fluorescence recovery for 4 minutes. Post-bleach fluorescence recovery through the trans-Golgi-oriented transport of NBD-sphingomyelin was calculated from 2-dimensional scans. Tangier fibroblasts displayed a retarded recovery of fluorescence in the trans- Golgi region. This suggests that the vesicular transport of sphingomyelin and cholesterol is disturbed in Tangier disease confirming data from our laboratory generated with radiometabolites on whole cells. Our data suggest that FRAP analysis allows a sensitive kinetic and spatially resolved analysis of disturbances of vesicular lipid transport.

  13. Motion vision for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrb, Matthieu

    The problem of using computer vision in mobile robots is dealt with. The datacube specialized cards and a parallel machine using a transputer network are studied. The tracking and localization of a three dimensional object in a sequence of images is examined, using first order prediction of the motion in the image plane and verification by a maximal clique search in the graph of mutually compatible matchings. A dynamic environment modeling module, using numerical fusion between trinocular stereovision and tracking of stereo matched primitives is presented. The integration of this perception system in the control architecture of a mobile robot is examined to achieve various functions, such as vision servo motion and environment modeling. The functional units implementing vision tasks and the data exchanged with other units are outlined. Experiments realized with the mobile robot Hilare 1.5 allowed the proposed algorithms and concepts to be validated.

  14. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  15. Mutual information-based facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazar, Mliki; Hammami, Mohamed; Hanêne, Ben-Abdallah

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel low-computation discriminative regions representation for expression analysis task. The proposed approach relies on interesting studies in psychology which show that most of the descriptive and responsible regions for facial expression are located around some face parts. The contributions of this work lie in the proposition of new approach which supports automatic facial expression recognition based on automatic regions selection. The regions selection step aims to select the descriptive regions responsible or facial expression and was performed using Mutual Information (MI) technique. For facial feature extraction, we have applied Local Binary Patterns Pattern (LBP) on Gradient image to encode salient micro-patterns of facial expressions. Experimental studies have shown that using discriminative regions provide better results than using the whole face regions whilst reducing features vector dimension.

  16. Concurrent behavior: Are the interpretations mutually exclusive?

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, David O.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental literature is replete with examples of behavior which occur concurrently with a schedule of reinforcement. These concurrent behaviors, often with similar topographies and occurring under like circumstances, may be interpreted as functionally autonomous, collateral, adjunctive, superstitious or mediating behavior. The degree to which the interaction of concurrent and schedule controlled behavior is used in the interpretation of behavior illustrated the importance of distinguishing among these interpretations by experimental procedure. The present paper reviews the characteristics of these interpretations, and discusses the experimental procedures necessary to distinguish among them. The paper concludes that the interpretations are mutually exclusive and refer to distinct behaviors, but that the distinction between any two of the interpretations requires more than one experimental procedure. PMID:22478568

  17. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  18. Propagating Resource Constraints Using Mutual Exclusion Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Sanchez, Romeo; Do, Minh B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the most recent techniques for propagating resource constraints in Constraint Based scheduling is Energy Constraint. This technique focuses in precedence based scheduling, where precedence relations are taken into account rather than the absolute position of activities. Although, this particular technique proved to be efficient on discrete unary resources, it provides only loose bounds for jobs using discrete multi-capacity resources. In this paper we show how mutual exclusion reasoning can be used to propagate time bounds for activities using discrete resources. We show that our technique based on critical path analysis and mutex reasoning is just as effective on unary resources, and also shows that it is more effective on multi-capacity resources, through both examples and empirical study.

  19. On the Mutual Coupling Between Circular Resonant Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abou-Khousa, M. A.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2007-01-01

    For near- and far-field microwave imaging purposes, array of circular resonant slots can be utilized to sample the electric field at a given reference plane. In general, the sensitivity of such array probes is impaired by the mutual coupling present between the radiating elements. The mutual coupling problem poses a design tradeoff between the resolution of the array and its sensitivity. In this paper, we investigate the mutual coupling between circular resonant slots in conducting ground plane both numerically and experimentally. Based on the analysis of the dominant coupling mechanism, i.e., the surface currents, various remedies to reduce the slots' mutual coupling are proposed and verified.

  20. On the Mutual Coupling between Circular Resonant Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abou-Khousa, M. A.; Kharkovshy, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2007-01-01

    For near- and far-field microwave imaging purposes, array of circular resonant slots can be utilized to sample the electric field at a given reference plane. In general, the sensitivity of such an array is impaired by the existing mutual coupling between the radiating elements or in this case circular slots. The mutual coupling problem imposes a design tradeoff between the resolution of the array and the overall system sensitivity and dynamic range. In this paper, the mutual coupling between circular resonant slots in conducting ground plane is investigated both numerically and experimentally. In particular, the mutual coupling in the E- and H-plane configurations of two identical slots is studied.

  1. Mobile electric power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Valerie J.; Bloomfield, David P.; Johnson, Bradley Q.

    1992-01-01

    Analytic Power has proven the feasibility of a mobile electric power unit in the form of a hydride fueled ion-exchange membrane (IEM) fuel cell stack. We have over 5 years experience building and testing IEM fuel cells. The power section of a 350 watt fuel cell stack weighs 4.65 pounds based on our five cell sub-stack component weights. The composite stack structure is fabricated from two components; a unitized flow field and catalyzed membrane. The lightweight unitized flow field concept was proven in the first three months of the contract. A single unit flow field weighs 0.155 pounds and can seal to 60 psi. The single cell catalyzed Nafion membrane exceeded our performance goal of 0.6 volts at 100 ASF. Stack performance points were 0.42 volts at 113 ASF and .75 volts at 96 ASF.

  2. Mobile electric power

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, V.J.; Bloomfield, D.P.; Johnson, B.Q.

    1992-01-30

    Analytic Power has proven the feasibility of a mobile electric power unit in the form of a hydride fueled ion-exchange membrane (IEM) fuel cell stack. We have over 5 years experience building and testing IEM fuel cells. The power section of a 350 watt fuel cell stack weighs 4.65 pounds based on our five cell sub-stack component weights. The composite stack structure is fabricated from two components; a unitized flow field and catalyzed membrane. The lightweight unitized flow field concept was proven in the first three months of the contract. A single unit flow field weighs 0.155 pounds and can seal to 60 psi. The single cell catalyzed Nafion membrane exceeded our performance goal of 0.6 volts at 100 ASF. Stack performance points were 0.42 volts at 113 ASF and .75 volts at 96 asf.

  3. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, M.S.; Shlomo, G.; Anderson, M.A.

    1994-08-30

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range. 2 figs.

  4. Using Mutual Information to capture Major Concerns of Postural Control in a Tossing activity

    PubMed Central

    Gazula, Harshvardhan; Chang, Chien Chi; Lu, Ming-Lun; Hsiang, Simon M.

    2015-01-01

    Human body motion for load-tossing activity was partitioned into three phases using four critical events based on the load position viz. lift-off, closest to body, peak and release. For each phase, three objective functions values, viz. mobilization, stabilization and muscular torque utilization, used to control the motion patterns, were then calculated. We hypothesize that the relationships between different objective functions can be extracted using information theory. The kinematic data obtained with 36 treatment combinations (2 tossing distances, 2 tossing heights, 3 weights, and 3 target clearances) was used to estimate the mutual information between each pair of objective functions and construct Chow-Liu trees. Results from this research indicate that there was no dominant concern in the first two phases of the activity; however, torque utilization and mobilization were found to be important factors in the third phase of the load tossing activity. PMID:25680297

  5. Higher Education and Foster Grandparent Programs: Exploring Mutual Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, James R.; O'Quin, Jo Ann

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight ways in which programs within institutions of higher education and Foster Grandparent Programs can interact to their mutual benefit. Given federal and state initiatives to develop linkages between institutions of higher education and community service sites, mutual benefits exist at the program level for…

  6. 76 FR 20459 - Mutual to Stock Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual to Stock Conversion Application AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual to Stock Conversion Application. OMB Number: 1550-0014. Form Numbers... furnished in the application in order to determine the safety and soundness of the proposed stock...

  7. 76 FR 35084 - Mutual to Stock Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual to Stock Conversion Application AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision... following information collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual to Stock Conversion Application. OMB Number... proposed stock conversion. The purpose of the information collection is to provide OTS with the...

  8. Mutuality, Self-Silencing, and Disordered Eating in College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Lisa S.; Riggs, Shelley A.; Stabb, Sally D.; Marshall, David M.

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined patterns of association among mutuality, self-silencing, and disordered eating in an ethnically diverse sample of college women (N = 149). Partner mutuality and overall self-silencing were negatively correlated and together were associated with six disordered eating indices. All four self-silencing subscales were…

  9. 7 CFR 550.13 - Mutuality of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutuality of interest. 550.13 Section 550.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT.... Mutual interest exists when both parties benefit in the same qualitative way from the objectives of...

  10. 7 CFR 550.13 - Mutuality of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutuality of interest. 550.13 Section 550.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT.... Mutual interest exists when both parties benefit in the same qualitative way from the objectives of...

  11. 7 CFR 550.13 - Mutuality of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutuality of interest. 550.13 Section 550.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT.... Mutual interest exists when both parties benefit in the same qualitative way from the objectives of...

  12. 7 CFR 550.13 - Mutuality of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mutuality of interest. 550.13 Section 550.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT.... Mutual interest exists when both parties benefit in the same qualitative way from the objectives of...

  13. 7 CFR 550.13 - Mutuality of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mutuality of interest. 550.13 Section 550.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT.... Mutual interest exists when both parties benefit in the same qualitative way from the objectives of...

  14. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for mutually exclusive applications... filing dates) as acceptable for filing. (4) Window filing group. A window filing group comprises mutually exclusive applications whose filing date is within an announced filing window. An announced filing window...

  15. Molecular insights into seed dispersal mutualisms driving plant population recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Cristina; Grivet, Delphine

    2011-11-01

    Most plant species require mutualistic interactions with animals to fulfil their demographic cycle. In this regard frugivory (i.e., the intake of fruits by animals) enhances natural regeneration by mobilizing a large amount of seeds from source trees to deposition sites across the landscape. By doing so, frugivores move propagules, and the genotypes they harbour creating the spatial, ecological, and genetic environment under which subsequent recruitment proceeds. Recruitment patterns can be envisioned as the result of two density- and distance-dependent processes: seed dispersal and seed/seedling survival (the Janzen-Connell model). Population genetic studies add another layer of complexity for understanding the fate of dispersed propagules: the genetic relatedness among neighbouring seeds within a seed clump, a major outcome of frugivore activity, modifies their chances of germinating and surviving. Yet, we virtually ignore how the spatial distribution of maternal progenies and recruitment patterns relate with each other in frugivore-generated seed rains. Here we focus on the critical role of frugivore-mediated seed dispersal in shaping the spatial distribution of maternal progenies in the seed rain. We first examine which genetic mechanisms underlying recruitment are influenced by the spatial distribution of maternal progenies. Next, we examine those studies depicting the spatial distribution of maternal progenies in a frugivore-generated seed rain. In doing so, we briefly review the most suitable analytical approaches applied to track the contribution of fruiting trees to the seed rain based on molecular data. Then we look more specifically at the role of distinct frugivore guilds in determining maternal genetic correlations and their expected consequences for recruitment patterns. Finally we posit some general conclusions and suggest future research directions that would provide a more comprehensive understanding of the ecological and evolutionary consequences

  16. Economic game theory for mutualism and cooperation.

    PubMed

    Archetti, Marco; Scheuring, István; Hoffman, Moshe; Frederickson, Megan E; Pierce, Naomi E; Yu, Douglas W

    2011-12-01

    We review recent work at the interface of economic game theory and evolutionary biology that provides new insights into the evolution of partner choice, host sanctions, partner fidelity feedback and public goods. (1) The theory of games with asymmetrical information shows that the right incentives allow hosts to screen-out parasites and screen-in mutualists, explaining successful partner choice in the absence of signalling. Applications range from ant-plants to microbiomes. (2) Contract theory distinguishes two longstanding but weakly differentiated explanations of host response to defectors: host sanctions and partner fidelity feedback. Host traits that selectively punish misbehaving symbionts are parsimoniously interpreted as pre-adaptations. Yucca-moth and legume-rhizobia mutualisms are argued to be examples of partner fidelity feedback. (3) The theory of public goods shows that cooperation in multi-player interactions can evolve in the absence of assortment, in one-shot social dilemmas among non-kin. Applications include alarm calls in vertebrates and exoenzymes in microbes.

  17. Mutualism between tree shrews and pitcher plants

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Jonathan A; Chin, Lijin

    2010-01-01

    Three species of Nepenthes pitcher plants from Borneo engage in a mutualistic interaction with mountain tree shrews, the basis of which is the exchange of nutritional resources. The plants produce modified “toilet pitchers” that produce copious amounts of exudates, the latter serving as a food source for tree shrews. The exudates are only accessible to the tree shrews when they position their hindquarters over the pitcher orifice. Tree shrews mark valuable resources with feces and regularly defecate into the pitchers when they visit them to feed. Feces represent a valuable source of nitrogen for these Nepenthes species, but there are many facets of the mutualism that are yet to be investigated. These include, but are not limited to, seasonal variation in exudate production rates by the plants, behavioral ecology of visiting tree shrews and the mechanism by which the plants signal to tree shrews that their pitchers represent a food source. Further research into this extraordinary animal-plant interaction is required to gain a better understanding of the benefits to the participating species. PMID:20861680

  18. Observation of mutual neutralization in detached plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akira, Tonegawa; Isao, Shirota; Ken'ichi, Yoshida; Masataka, Ono; Kazutaka, Kawamura; Tuguhiro, Watanabe; Nobuyoshi, Ohyabu; Hajime, Suzuki; Kazuo, Takayama

    2001-10-01

    Mutual neutralization in collisions between negative ions and positive ions in molecular activated recombination (MAR) has been observed in a high density magnetized sheet plasma source TPDSHEET-IV(Test Plasma produced by Directed current for SHEET plasma) device. Measurements of the negative ion density of hydrogen atom, the electron density, electron temperature, and the heat load to the target plate were carried out in hydrogen high density plasma with hydrogen gas puff. A cylindrical probe made of tungsten ( 0.4 x 2 cm) was used to measure the spatial profiles of H- by a probe-assisted laser photodetachment The Balmer spectra of visible light emission from hydrogen or helium atoms were detected in front of the target plate. A small amount of secondary hydrogen gas puffing into a hydrogen plasma reduced strongly the heat flux to the target and increased rapidly the density of negative ions of hydrogen atom in the circumference of the plasma, while the conventional radiative and three-body recombination processes were disappeared. These results can be well explained by taking the charge exchange recombination of MAR in the detached plasma into account.

  19. Quantum mutual information along unitary orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jevtic, Sania; Jennings, David; Rudolph, Terry

    2012-05-01

    Motivated by thermodynamic considerations, we analyze the variation of the quantum mutual information on a unitary orbit of a bipartite system's state with and without global constraints such as energy conservation. We solve the full optimization problem for the smallest system of two qubits and explore thoroughly the effect of unitary operations on the space of reduced-state spectra. We then provide applications of these ideas to physical processes within closed quantum systems such as a generalized collision model approach to thermal equilibrium and a global Maxwell demon playing tricks on local observers. For higher dimensions, the maximization of correlations is relatively straightforward for equal-sized subsystems, however their minimization displays nontrivial structures. We characterize a set of separable states in which the minimally correlated state resides: a collection of classically correlated states admitting a particular “Young tableau” form. Furthermore, a partial order exists on this set with respect to individual marginal entropies, and the presence of a “see-saw effect” for these entropies forces a finer analysis to determine the optimal tableau.

  20. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  1. Mutual Information Between GPS Measurements and Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Bebbington, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    Prior to the wide deployment of Continuous GPS stations in the early 1990s, there were a number of well-documented deformation rate changes observed before large earthquakes. GPS measurements provide the opportunity for systematic investigation of pre-, co- and post-seismic deformation anomalies, but contain much noise that needs to be filtered out of the observations. Assuming the existence of an earthquake cycle (for example, mainshock--aftershock--quiescence--precursory seismicity), a hidden Markov model (HMM) provides a natural framework for analyzing the observed GPS data. For two case studies of a) deep earthquakes in the central North Island, New Zealand, and b) shallow earthquakes in Southern California, an HMM fitted to the trend ranges of the GPS measurements can classify the deformation data into different patterns which form proxies for states of the earthquake cycle. Mutual information can be used to examine whether there is any relation between these patterns, in particular the Viterbi path, and subsequent (or previous) earthquakes. One class of GPS movements (identified by the HMM as having the largest range of deformation rate changes) appears to have some precursory character for earthquakes with minimum magnitude 5.1 (central North Island, New Zealand, 26 earthquakes in 1747 days) and 4.5 (Southern California, 50 earthquakes in 3815 days). We define a ``Time of Increased Probability'' (TIP) as being a 10-day interval (central North Island, New Zealand) or a 20-day interval (Southern California) following entry (as identified by the Viterbi algorithm) to the `precursory' hidden state, and examine the performance of this in probabilistically forecasting subsequent earthquakes.

  2. Spatial Mutual Information Based Hyperspectral Band Selection for Classification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The amount of information involved in hyperspectral imaging is large. Hyperspectral band selection is a popular method for reducing dimensionality. Several information based measures such as mutual information have been proposed to reduce information redundancy among spectral bands. Unfortunately, mutual information does not take into account the spatial dependency between adjacent pixels in images thus reducing its robustness as a similarity measure. In this paper, we propose a new band selection method based on spatial mutual information. As validation criteria, a supervised classification method using support vector machine (SVM) is used. Experimental results of the classification of hyperspectral datasets show that the proposed method can achieve more accurate results. PMID:25918742

  3. Seed storage oil mobilization.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ian A

    2008-01-01

    Storage oil mobilization starts with the onset of seed germination. Oil bodies packed with triacylglycerol (TAG) exist in close proximity with glyoxysomes, the single membrane-bound organelles that house most of the biochemical machinery required to convert fatty acids derived from TAG to 4-carbon compounds. The 4-carbon compounds in turn are converted to soluble sugars that are used to fuel seedling growth. Biochemical analysis over the last 50 years has identified the main pathways involved in this process, including beta-oxidation, the glyoxylate cycle, and gluconeogenesis. In the last few years molecular genetic dissection of the overall process in the model oilseed species Arabidopsis has provided new insight into its complexity, particularly with respect to the specific role played by individual enzymatic steps and the subcellular compartmentalization of the glyoxylate cycle. Both abscisic acid (ABA) and sugars inhibit storage oil mobilization and a substantial degree of the control appears to operate at the transcriptional level.

  4. Entanglement patterns in mutually unbiased basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Jay

    2011-08-15

    A few simply stated rules govern the entanglement patterns that can occur in mutually unbiased basis sets (MUBs) and constrain the combinations of such patterns that can coexist in full complements of MUBs. We consider Hilbert spaces of prime power dimensions (D=p{sup N}), as realized by systems of N prime-state particles, where full complements of D+1 MUBs are known to exist, and we assume only that MUBs are eigenbases of generalized Pauli operators, without using any particular construction. The general rules include the following: (1) In any MUB, a given particle appears either in a pure state or totally entangled and (2) in any full MUB complement, each particle is pure in (p+1) bases (not necessarily the same ones) and totally entangled in the remaining (p{sup N}-p). It follows that the maximum number of product bases is p+1 and, when this number is realized, all remaining (p{sup N}-p) bases in the complement are characterized by the total entanglement of every particle. This ''standard distribution'' is inescapable for two-particle systems (of any p), where only product and generalized Bell bases are admissible MUB types. This and the following results generalize previous results for qubits [Phys. Rev. A 65. 032320 (2002); Phys. Rev. A 72, 062310 (2005)] and qutrits [Phys. Rev. A 70, 012302 (2004)], drawing particularly upon [Phys. Rev. A 72, 062310 (2005)]. With three particles there are three MUB types, and these may be combined in (p+2) different ways to form full complements. With N=4, there are 6 MUB types for p=2, but new MUB types become possible with larger p, and these are essential to realizing full complements. With this example, we argue that new MUB types that show new entanglement patterns should enter with every step in N and, also, when N is a prime plus 1, at a critical p value, p=N-1. Such MUBs should play critical roles in filling complements.

  5. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  6. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  7. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  8. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  9. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  10. Mutual intentions as a causal framework for social groups.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Alexander; Dunham, Yarrow

    2017-02-24

    Children's early emerging intuitive theories are specialized for different conceptual domains. Recently attention has turned to children's concepts of social groups, finding that children believe that many social groups mark uniquely social information such as allegiances and obligations. But another critical component of intuitive theories, the causal beliefs that underlie category membership, has received less attention. We propose that children believe membership in these groups is constituted by mutual intentions: i.e., all group members (including the individual) intend for an individual to be a member and all group members (including the individual) have common knowledge of these intentions. Children in a broad age range (4-9) applied a mutual-intentional framework to newly encountered social groups early in development (Experiment 1, 2, 4). Further, they deploy this mutual-intentional framework selectively, withholding it from essentialized social categories such as gender (Experiment 3). Mutual intentionality appears to be a vital aspect of children's naïve sociology.

  11. Nonlinear pattern analysis of ventricular premature beats by mutual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaka, M.; Saitoh, H.; Yokoshima, T.; Kishida, H.; Hayakawa, H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of ventricular premature beats (VPBs) has been related to the risk of mortality. However, little is known about the temporal pattern of occurrence of VPBs and its relationship to autonomic activity. Hence, we applied a general correlation measure, mutual information, to quantify how VPBs are generated over time. We also used mutual information to determine the correlation between VPB production and heart rate in order to evaluate effects of autonomic activity on VPB production. We examined twenty subjects with more than 3000 VPBs/day and simulated random time series of VPB occurrence. We found that mutual information values could be used to characterize quantitatively the temporal patterns of VPB generation. Our data suggest that VPB production is not random and VPBs generated with a higher value of mutual information may be more greatly affected by autonomic activity.

  12. Mutual impedance of nonplanar-skew sinusoidal dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.; Geary, N. H.

    1975-01-01

    The mutual impedance expressions for parallel dipoles in terms of sine-integrals and cosine-integrals have been published by King (1957). The investigation reported provides analogous expressions for nonparallel dipoles. The expressions presented are most useful when the monopoles are close together. The theory of moment methods shows an approach for employing the mutual impedance of filamentary sinusoidal dipoles to calculate the impedance and scattering properties of straight and bent wires with small but finite diameter.

  13. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, Sorin

    2005-05-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixture. We compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. For the case of viscosity we propose a predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion we discuss some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann-equation-based models.

  14. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric plasma mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2004-09-07

    The authors present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric two-component plasma (TCP). They compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. for the case of viscosity they propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion they point out some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models.

  15. Quantum process reconstruction based on mutually unbiased basis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Perez, A.; Saavedra, C.; Klimov, A. B.

    2011-05-15

    We study a quantum process reconstruction based on the use of mutually unbiased projectors (MUB projectors) as input states for a D-dimensional quantum system, with D being a power of a prime number. This approach connects the results of quantum-state tomography using mutually unbiased bases with the coefficients of a quantum process, expanded in terms of MUB projectors. We also study the performance of the reconstruction scheme against random errors when measuring probabilities at the MUB projectors.

  16. Scientists' Social Mobility and Problems of Its Regulation by the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erokhina, K. S.

    2009-01-01

    The present era is characterized by scientists' high level of mobility, which is due to the characteristics of science work and its dynamic nature. Scientific activity knows no boundaries, and mobility is a vital factor of the mutual cultural and professional enrichment of scientific communities. The international migration of scientists is…

  17. Continuum electromechanical modeling of protein-membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y C; Lu, Benzhuo; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2010-10-01

    A continuum electromechanical model is proposed to describe the membrane curvature induced by electrostatic interactions in a solvated protein-membrane system. The model couples the macroscopic strain energy of membrane and the electrostatic solvation energy of the system, and equilibrium membrane deformation is obtained by minimizing the electroelastic energy functional with respect to the dielectric interface. The model is illustrated with the systems with increasing geometry complexity and captures the sensitivity of membrane curvature to the permanent and mobile charge distributions.

  18. Non-rigid registration using higher-order mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueckert, D.; Clarkson, M. J.; Hill, D. L. G.; Hawkes, D. J.

    2000-03-01

    Non-rigid registration of multi-modality images is an important tool for assessing temporal and structural changesbetween images. For rigid registration, voxel similarity measures like mutual information have been shown to alignimages from different modalities accurately and robustly. For non-rigid registration, mutual information can besensitive to local variations of intensity which in MR images may be caused by RF inhomogeneity. The reasonfor the sensitivity of mutual information towards intensity variations stems from the fact that mutual informationignores any spatial information. In this paper we propose an extension of the mutual information framework whichincorporates spatial information about higher-order image structure into the registration process and has the potentialto improve the accuracy and robustness of non-rigid registration in the presence of intensity variations. We haveapplied the non-rigid registration algorithm to a number of simulated MR brain images of a digital phantom whichhave been degraded by a simulated intensity shading and a known deformation. In addition, we have applied thealgorithm for the non-rigid registration of eight pre- and post-operative brain MR images which were acquired withan interventional MR scanner and therefore have substantial intensity shading due to RF field inhomogeneities. Inall cases the second-order estimate of mutual information leads to robust and accurate registration.

  19. An invasive plant-fungal mutualism reduces arthropod diversity.

    PubMed

    Rudgers, Jennifer A; Clay, Keith

    2008-08-01

    Ecological theory holds that competition and predation are the most important biotic forces affecting the composition of communities. Here, we expand this framework by demonstrating that mutualism can fundamentally alter community and food web structure. In large, replicated field plots, we manipulated the mutualism between a dominant plant (Lolium arundinaceum) and symbiotic fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum). The presence of the mutualism reduced arthropod abundance up to 70%, reduced arthropod diversity nearly 20%, shifted arthropod species composition relative to endophyte-free plots and suppressed the biomass and richness of other plant species in the community. Herbivorous arthropods were more strongly affected than carnivores, and for both herbivores and carnivores, effects of the mutualism appeared to propagate indirectly via organisms occurring more basally in the food web. The influence of the mutualism was as great or greater than previously documented effects of competition and predation on arthropod communities. Our work demonstrates that a keystone mutualism can significantly reduce arthropod biodiversity at a broad community scale.

  20. Spectral image analysis of mutual illumination between florescent objects.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kato, Keiji; Hirai, Keita; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a method for modeling and component estimation of the spectral images of the mutual illumination phenomenon between two fluorescent objects. First, we briefly describe the bispectral characteristics of a single fluorescent object, which are summarized as a Donaldson matrix. We suppose that two fluorescent objects with different bispectral characteristics are located close together under a uniform illumination. Second, we model the mutual illumination between two objects. It is shown that the spectral composition of the mutual illumination is summarized with four components: (1) diffuse reflection, (2) diffuse-diffuse interreflection, (3) fluorescent self-luminescence, and (4) interreflection by mutual fluorescent illumination. Third, we develop algorithms for estimating the spectral image components from the observed images influenced by the mutual illumination. When the exact Donaldson matrices caused by the mutual illumination influence are unknown, we have to solve a non-linear estimation problem to estimate both the spectral functions and the location weights. An iterative algorithm is then proposed to solve the problem based on the alternate estimation of the spectral functions and the location weights. In our experiments, the feasibility of the proposed method is shown in three cases: the known Donaldson matrices, weak interreflection, and strong interreflection.

  1. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the current research, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature in air. Based on these measurements, the charge carrier concentration, net acceptor dopant concentration, activation energy of conduction and mobility were estimated. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature have been completed and reported previously. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affects the mechanical properties. To study the effect of temperature on the membranes when exposed to an inert environment, the membranes (LAFT and Dual phase) were heat treated at 1000 C in air and N{sub 2} atmosphere and hardness and fracture toughness of the membranes were studied after the treatment. The indentation method was used to find the fracture toughness and the effect of the heat treatment on the mechanical properties of the membranes. Further results on the investigation of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appears to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model will serve to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

  2. Mutualism Breakdown by Amplification of Wolbachia Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chrostek, Ewa; Teixeira, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Most insect species are associated with vertically transmitted endosymbionts. Because of the mode of transmission, the fitness of these symbionts is dependent on the fitness of the hosts. Therefore, these endosymbionts need to control their proliferation in order to minimize their cost for the host. The genetic bases and mechanisms of this regulation remain largely undetermined. The maternally inherited bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are the most common endosymbionts of insects, providing some of them with fitness benefits. In Drosophila melanogaster, Wolbachia wMelPop is a unique virulent variant that proliferates massively in the hosts and shortens their lifespan. The genetic bases of wMelPop virulence are unknown, and their identification would allow a better understanding of how Wolbachia levels are regulated. Here we show that amplification of a region containing eight Wolbachia genes, called Octomom, is responsible for wMelPop virulence. Using Drosophila lines selected for carrying Wolbachia with different Octomom copy numbers, we demonstrate that the number of Octomom copies determines Wolbachia titers and the strength of the lethal phenotype. Octomom amplification is unstable, and reversion of copy number to one reverts all the phenotypes. Our results provide a link between genotype and phenotype in Wolbachia and identify a genomic region regulating Wolbachia proliferation. We also prove that these bacteria can evolve rapidly. Rapid evolution by changes in gene copy number may be common in endosymbionts with a high number of mobile elements and other repeated regions. Understanding wMelPop pathogenicity and variability also allows researchers to better control and predict the outcome of releasing mosquitoes transinfected with this variant to block human vector-borne diseases. Our results show that transition from a mutualist to a pathogen may occur because of a single genomic change in the endosymbiont. This implies that there must be constant selection on

  3. Mutualism breakdown by amplification of Wolbachia genes.

    PubMed

    Chrostek, Ewa; Teixeira, Luis

    2015-02-01

    Most insect species are associated with vertically transmitted endosymbionts. Because of the mode of transmission, the fitness of these symbionts is dependent on the fitness of the hosts. Therefore, these endosymbionts need to control their proliferation in order to minimize their cost for the host. The genetic bases and mechanisms of this regulation remain largely undetermined. The maternally inherited bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are the most common endosymbionts of insects, providing some of them with fitness benefits. In Drosophila melanogaster, Wolbachia wMelPop is a unique virulent variant that proliferates massively in the hosts and shortens their lifespan. The genetic bases of wMelPop virulence are unknown, and their identification would allow a better understanding of how Wolbachia levels are regulated. Here we show that amplification of a region containing eight Wolbachia genes, called Octomom, is responsible for wMelPop virulence. Using Drosophila lines selected for carrying Wolbachia with different Octomom copy numbers, we demonstrate that the number of Octomom copies determines Wolbachia titers and the strength of the lethal phenotype. Octomom amplification is unstable, and reversion of copy number to one reverts all the phenotypes. Our results provide a link between genotype and phenotype in Wolbachia and identify a genomic region regulating Wolbachia proliferation. We also prove that these bacteria can evolve rapidly. Rapid evolution by changes in gene copy number may be common in endosymbionts with a high number of mobile elements and other repeated regions. Understanding wMelPop pathogenicity and variability also allows researchers to better control and predict the outcome of releasing mosquitoes transinfected with this variant to block human vector-borne diseases. Our results show that transition from a mutualist to a pathogen may occur because of a single genomic change in the endosymbiont. This implies that there must be constant selection on

  4. Mutually exclusive redox forms of HMGB1 promote cell recruitment or proinflammatory cytokine release

    PubMed Central

    Venereau, Emilie; Casalgrandi, Maura; Schiraldi, Milena; Antoine, Daniel J.; Cattaneo, Angela; De Marchis, Francesco; Liu, Jaron; Antonelli, Antonella; Preti, Alessandro; Raeli, Lorenzo; Shams, Sara Samadi; Yang, Huan; Varani, Luca; Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J.; Bachi, Angela; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia

    2012-01-01

    Tissue damage causes inflammation, by recruiting leukocytes and activating them to release proinflammatory mediators. We show that high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) orchestrates both processes by switching among mutually exclusive redox states. Reduced cysteines make HMGB1 a chemoattractant, whereas a disulfide bond makes it a proinflammatory cytokine and further cysteine oxidation to sulfonates by reactive oxygen species abrogates both activities. We show that leukocyte recruitment and activation can be separated. A nonoxidizable HMGB1 mutant in which serines replace all cysteines (3S-HMGB1) does not promote cytokine production, but is more effective than wild-type HMGB1 in recruiting leukocytes in vivo. BoxA, a HMGB1 inhibitor, interferes with leukocyte recruitment but not with activation. We detected the different redox forms of HMGB1 ex vivo within injured muscle. HMGB1 is completely reduced at first and disulfide-bonded later. Thus, HMGB1 orchestrates both key events in sterile inflammation, leukocyte recruitment and their induction to secrete inflammatory cytokines, by adopting mutually exclusive redox states. PMID:22869893

  5. Mobile healthcare.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stephen A; Agee, Nancy Howell

    2012-01-01

    Mobile technology's presence in healthcare has exploded over the past five years. The increased use of mobile devices by all segments of the US population has driven healthcare systems, providers, and payers to accept this new form of communication and to develop strategies to implement and leverage the use of mobile healthcare (mHealth) within their organizations and practices. As healthcare systems move toward a more value-driven model of care, patient centeredness and engagement are the keys to success. Mobile healthcare will provide the medium to allow patients to participate more in their care. Financially, mHealth brings to providers the ability to improve efficiency and deliver savings to both them and the healthcare consumer. However, mHealth is not without challenges. Healthcare IT departments have been reluctant to embrace this shift in technology without fully addressing security and privacy concerns. Providers have been hesitant to adopt mHealth as a form of communication with patients because it breaks with traditional models. Our healthcare system has just started the journey toward the development of mHealth. We offer an overview of the mobile healthcare environment and our approach to solving the challenges it brings to healthcare organizations.

  6. Multicomponent membranes

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    A multicomponent membrane which may be used for separating various components which are present in a fluid feed mixture comprises a mixture of a plasticizer such as a glycol and an organic polymer cast upon a porous organic polymer support. The membrane may be prepared by casting an emulsion or a solution of the plasticizer and polymer on the porous support, evaporating the solvent and recovering the membrane after curing.

  7. A general framework for effectiveness concepts in mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Eugene W; Jordano, Pedro; Gómez, José María

    2017-03-28

    A core interest in studies of mutualistic interactions is the 'effectiveness' of mutualists in providing benefits to their partners. In plant-animal mutualisms it is widely accepted that the total effect of a mutualist on its partner is estimated as (1) a 'quantity' component multiplied by (2) a 'quality' component, although the meanings of 'effectiveness,' 'quantity,' and 'quality' and which terms are applied to these metrics vary greatly across studies. In addition, a similar quantity × quality = total effect approach has not been applied to other types of mutualisms, although it could be informative. Lastly, when a total effect approach has been applied, it has invariably been from a phytocentric perspective, focussing on the effects of animal mutualists on their plant partner. This lack of a common framework of 'effectiveness' of mutualistic interactions limits generalisation and the development of a broader understanding of the ecology and evolution of mutualisms. In this paper, we propose a general framework and demonstrate its utility by applying it to both partners in five different types of mutualisms: pollination, seed dispersal, plant protection, rhizobial, and mycorrhizal mutualisms. We then briefly discuss the flexibility of the framework, potential limitations, and relationship to other approaches.

  8. Persistence of pollination mutualisms in the presence of ants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wang, Shikun

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers plant-pollinator-ant systems in which the plant-pollinator interaction is mutualistic but ants have both positive and negative effects on plants. The ants also interfere with pollinators by preventing them from accessing plants. While a Beddington-DeAngelis (BD) formula can describe the plant-pollinator interaction, the formula is extended in this paper to characterize the pollination mutualism under the ant interference. Then, a plant-pollinator-ant system with the extended BD functional response is discussed, and global dynamics of the model demonstrate the mechanisms by which pollination mutualism can persist in the presence of ants. When the ant interference is strong, it can result in extinction of pollinators. Moreover, if the ants depend on pollination mutualism for survival, the strong interference could drive pollinators into extinction, which consequently lead to extinction of the ants themselves. When the ant interference is weak, a cooperation between plant-ant and plant-pollinator mutualisms could occur, which promotes survival of both ants and pollinators, especially in the case that ants (respectively, pollinators) cannot survive in the absence of pollinators (respectively, ants). Even when the level of ant interference remains invariant, varying ants' negative effect on plants can result in survival/extinction of both ants and pollinators. Therefore, our results provide an explanation for the persistence of pollination mutualism when there exist ants.

  9. Population dynamics and mutualism: Functional responses of benefits and costs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2002-01-01

    We develop an approach for studying population dynamics resulting from mutualism by employing functional responses based on density‐dependent benefits and costs. These functional responses express how the population growth rate of a mutualist is modified by the density of its partner. We present several possible dependencies of gross benefits and costs, and hence net effects, to a mutualist as functions of the density of its partner. Net effects to mutualists are likely a monotonically saturating or unimodal function of the density of their partner. We show that fundamental differences in the growth, limitation, and dynamics of a population can occur when net effects to that population change linearly, unimodally, or in a saturating fashion. We use the mutualism between senita cactus and its pollinating seed‐eating moth as an example to show the influence of different benefit and cost functional responses on population dynamics and stability of mutualisms. We investigated two mechanisms that may alter this mutualism's functional responses: distribution of eggs among flowers and fruit abortion. Differences in how benefits and costs vary with density can alter the stability of this mutualism. In particular, fruit abortion may allow for a stable equilibrium where none could otherwise exist.

  10. Mutualism Disruption Threatens Global Plant Biodiversity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Clare E.; Zavaleta, Erika S.; Tershy, Bernie; Croll, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Background As global environmental change accelerates, biodiversity losses can disrupt interspecific interactions. Extinctions of mutualist partners can create “widow” species, which may face reduced ecological fitness. Hypothetically, such mutualism disruptions could have cascading effects on biodiversity by causing additional species coextinctions. However, the scope of this problem – the magnitude of biodiversity that may lose mutualist partners and the consequences of these losses – remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a systematic review and synthesis of data from a broad range of sources to estimate the threat posed by vertebrate extinctions to the global biodiversity of vertebrate-dispersed and -pollinated plants. Though enormous research gaps persist, our analysis identified Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and global oceanic islands as geographic regions at particular risk of disruption of these mutualisms; within these regions, percentages of plant species likely affected range from 2.1–4.5%. Widowed plants are likely to experience reproductive declines of 40–58%, potentially threatening their persistence in the context of other global change stresses. Conclusions Our systematic approach demonstrates that thousands of species may be impacted by disruption in one class of mutualisms, but extinctions will likely disrupt other mutualisms, as well. Although uncertainty is high, there is evidence that mutualism disruption directly threatens significant biodiversity in some geographic regions. Conservation measures with explicit focus on mutualistic functions could be necessary to bolster populations of widowed species and maintain ecosystem functions. PMID:23840571

  11. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Charter

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Charter A Appendix... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Pt. 239, App. A Appendix A to Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Charter FEDERAL MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANY CHARTER Section 1: Corporate...

  12. 12 CFR >appendix A to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Charter

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Charter A... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Pt. 239, App. A >Appendix A to Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Charter FEDERAL MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANY CHARTER Section...

  13. 12 CFR Appendix C to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws C Appendix... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Pt. 239, App. C Appendix C to Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws MODEL BYLAWS FOR MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES The term “trustees” may...

  14. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Charter

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Charter A Appendix... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Pt. 239, App. A Appendix A to Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Charter FEDERAL MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANY CHARTER Section 1: Corporate...

  15. 12 CFR Appendix C to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws C Appendix... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Pt. 239, App. C Appendix C to Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws MODEL BYLAWS FOR MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES The term “trustees” may...

  16. 12 CFR Appendix C to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws C Appendix... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Pt. 239, App. C Appendix C to Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws MODEL BYLAWS FOR MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES The term “trustees” may...

  17. Lipid membranes on nanostructured silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, Andrea Lynn; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Ista, Linnea K.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bisong, Paul; Zeineldin, Reema R.; Last, Julie A.; Brueck, Stephen R. J.

    2004-12-01

    A unique composite nanoscale architecture that combines the self-organization and molecular dynamics of lipid membranes with a corrugated nanotextured silicon wafer was prepared and characterized with fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The goal of this project was to understand how such structures can be assembled for supported membrane research and how the interfacial interactions between the solid substrate and the soft, self-assembled material create unique physical and mechanical behavior through the confinement of phases in the membrane. The nanometer scale structure of the silicon wafer was produced through interference lithography followed by anisotropic wet etching. For the present study, a line pattern with 100 nm line widths, 200 nm depth and a pitch of 360 nm pitch was fabricated. Lipid membranes were successfully adsorbed on the structured silicon surface via membrane fusion techniques. The surface topology of the bilayer-Si structure was imaged using in situ tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The membrane was observed to drape over the silicon structure producing an undulated topology with amplitude of 40 nm that matched the 360 nm pitch of the silicon structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments found that on the microscale those same structures exhibit anisotropic lipid mobility that was coincident with the silicon substructure. The results showed that while the lipid membrane maintains much of its self-assembled structure in the composite architecture, the silicon substructure indeed influences the dynamics of the molecular motion within the membrane.

  18. Long-range RNA pairings contribute to mutually exclusive splicing.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Yang, Yun; Dai, Lanzhi; Cao, Guozheng; Chen, Ran; Hong, Weiling; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Yang; Meng, Yijun; Shi, Feng; Xiao, Mu; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing is an important means of increasing the protein repertoire, by which the Down's syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene potentially generates 38,016 different isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the regulatory mechanisms remain obscure due to the complexity of the Dscam exon cluster. Here, we reveal a molecular model for the regulation of the mutually exclusive splicing of the serpent pre-mRNA based on competition between upstream and downstream RNA pairings. Such dual RNA pairings confer fine tuning of the inclusion of alternative exons. Moreover, we demonstrate that the splicing outcome of alternative exons is mediated in relative pairing strength-correlated mode. Combined comparative genomics analysis and experimental evidence revealed similar bidirectional structural architectures in exon clusters 4 and 9 of the Dscam gene. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic framework for the regulation of mutually exclusive splicing and may offer potentially applicable insights into long-range RNA-RNA interactions in gene regulatory networks.

  19. Sparse Bayesian Learning for DOA Estimation with Mutual Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jisheng; Hu, Nan; Xu, Weichao; Chang, Chunqi

    2015-01-01

    Sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) has given renewed interest to the problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. It is generally assumed that the measurement matrix in SBL is precisely known. Unfortunately, this assumption may be invalid in practice due to the imperfect manifold caused by unknown or misspecified mutual coupling. This paper describes a modified SBL method for joint estimation of DOAs and mutual coupling coefficients with uniform linear arrays (ULAs). Unlike the existing method that only uses stationary priors, our new approach utilizes a hierarchical form of the Student t prior to enforce the sparsity of the unknown signal more heavily. We also provide a distinct Bayesian inference for the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, which can update the mutual coupling coefficients more efficiently. Another difference is that our method uses an additional singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the computational complexity of the signal reconstruction process and the sensitivity to the measurement noise. PMID:26501284

  20. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  1. Arrays of mutually coupled receiver coils: theory and application.

    PubMed

    Wright, S M; Magin, R L; Kelton, J R

    1991-01-01

    Specialized receiver coils having a small sensitive region can provide an improvement in SNR for MR imaging and spectroscopy, at the expense of limiting the usable field of view. This work presents a technique for designing coil arrays that allows the size and location of the sensitive region to be selected remotely. Only one element of the coil array is directly connected to the receiver, allowing flexibility in system design and implementation. A method is presented for the analysis and design of mutually coupled coil arrays of any number of elements of arbitrary shape. The analysis includes mutual coupling effects between primary coils, to allow multiple primary coils to be used simultaneously. A controller system allows remote selection of the sensitive region and automatically matches the impedance of the array to the preamplifier. Results obtained using a mutually coupled coil array designed for spine imaging are shown.

  2. Homosexual mutuality: variation on a theme by Erik Erikson.

    PubMed

    Sohier, R

    The exploratory descriptive study described here was conducted in order to produce the initial empirical evidence to support reformulation of the theoretical construct of heterosexual mutuality (Erikson, 1975). Six persons were interviewed in depth on tape in order to locate them on one of four identity statuses constructed by Marcia (1964, 1966, 1973). The tool was modified and extended to meet the purposes of the study. The questions are directed toward illumination of conflictual moments in the life cycle when the ability to make appropriate decisions engenders character growth, and supports the personality integration of adulthood. An ability to make decisions results in personality integration. The small study provides evidence that there exists a homosexual mutuality (contrary to Erikson's position) which is no less valuable than heterosexual mutuality, and forms an equal basis for adult personality integration.

  3. Empirical study of the tails of mutual fund size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzkopf, Yonathan; Farmer, J. Doyne

    2010-06-01

    The mutual fund industry manages about a quarter of the assets in the U.S. stock market and thus plays an important role in the U.S. economy. The question of how much control is concentrated in the hands of the largest players is best quantitatively discussed in terms of the tail behavior of the mutual fund size distribution. We study the distribution empirically and show that the tail is much better described by a log-normal than a power law, indicating less concentration than, for example, personal income. The results are highly statistically significant and are consistent across fifteen years. This contradicts a recent theory concerning the origin of the power law tails of the trading volume distribution. Based on the analysis in a companion paper, the log-normality is to be expected, and indicates that the distribution of mutual funds remains perpetually out of equilibrium.

  4. Analysis of the Mutual Inductance Particle Velocimeter (MIPV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    yKeU’v-T-.-’j-i^fi.T mmmmmm AD/A-004 219 ANALYSIS OF THE MUTUAL INDUCTANCE PARTICLE VELOCIMETER (MIPV) Joseph D. Renick Air Force...REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 1. REPORT NUMBER AFWL-TR-74-205 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO 4. TITLE fand SubtUU.) ANALYSIS OF THE MUTUAL INDUCTANCE...Resistance as a Function of Stress for Several Metals 109 C-2 Geometry for One-Dimensional Shock Response Analysis HI C-3 Shock Equilibration of

  5. Cross Correlation versus Normalized Mutual Information on Image Registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Bin; Tilton, James C.; Lin, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to quantitatively assess and compare cross correlation and normalized mutual information methods used to register images in subpixel scale. The study shows that the normalized mutual information method is less sensitive to unaligned edges due to the spectral response differences than is cross correlation. This characteristic makes the normalized image resolution a better candidate for band to band registration. Improved band-to-band registration in the data from satellite-borne instruments will result in improved retrievals of key science measurements such as cloud properties, vegetation, snow and fire.

  6. Analysis and Synthesis of Microstrip Antennas Including Mutual Coupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    E N 11. TITLE (/b*I* Secwfty OuodlCaUOn~) Analysis and Synthesis of Microstrip Antennas Including Mutual Coupling 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) K~oichiro...GROUP SUB-GROUP Array Antennas, Microstrip Antennas, Array Analysis, Array Synthesis, Array Theory, Microwave Network Analysi! 19. ABSTRACT (Continue...VIRGI-J~NIA TECH ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS OF [. MICROSTRIP ANTENNAS INCLUDING MUTUAL COUPLING o0000 0 0 a o 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 00 0 00 o00000 0o000 0 0 0 a 0 0 0o

  7. Biochemical Machines for the Interconversion of Mutual Information and Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Thomas; Jones, Nick S.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Ouldridge, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a physically realizable information-driven device consisting of an enzyme in a chemical bath, interacting with pairs of molecules prepared in correlated states. These correlations persist without direct interaction and thus store free energy equal to the mutual information. The enzyme can harness this free energy, and that stored in the individual molecular states, to do chemical work. Alternatively, the enzyme can use the chemical driving to create mutual information. A modified system can function without external intervention, approaching biological systems more closely.

  8. Separability criteria via sets of mutually unbiased measurements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Gao, Ting; Yan, Fengli

    2015-08-17

    Mutually unbiased measurements (MUMs) are generalized from the concept of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) and include the complete set of MUBs as a special case, but they are superior to MUBs as they do not need to be rank one projectors. We investigate entanglement detection using sets of MUMs and derive separability criteria for multipartite qudit systems, arbitrary high-dimensional bipartite systems of a d1-dimensional subsystem and a d2-dimensional subsystem, and multipartite systems of multi-level subsystems. These criteria are of the advantages of more effective and wider application range than previous criteria. They provide experimental implementation in detecting entanglement of unknown quantum states.

  9. Mobility Demonstrator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-22

    Resilient Technologies (Polaris Defense) Technology: Non- Pneumatic Tire Description: Airless Tire/wheel with honeycombed shaped polymer supporting...self-adjusting track tensioners • The biggest advancement in these systems has been pneumatic external road-arm design (external suspensions...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release. 90 Payoff:  Enabler for silent mobility, hybridization , and export power capabilities

  10. Cellular calcium mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    In vascular and other smooth muscles, occurrence of intracellular Ca stores which can be mobilized to support contraction may be a general phenomenon. The Ca stores are characterized by the requirement for release by high concentrations of agonists acting on plasma membrane receptors, by the failure of the released Ca2+ to recycle to the store, by the occurrence of rapid refilling of the store from the extracellular space, and by disappearance of the store when the plasma membrane is made leaky by saponin. In contrast to agonist-released Ca stores, those released by caffeine to support contraction in Ca2+-free solutions are more slowly lost and refilled, are not always emptied when the agonist-related store is emptied, and do not disappear after saponin treatment. Stores released by agonists have been suggested to be in the endoplasmic reticulum near the plasma membrane or at the inner aspect of the plasma membrane related to high affinity, pH-dependent Ca-binding sites. Caffeine-released stores are assumed to be in endoplasmic reticulum. Continued exposure of some tissues to Ca2+-free solutions unmasks what is considered to be a recycling Ca store releasable by agonists. Release of Ca2+ and its reaccumulation in this store appear to be slower than at the nonrecycling store. The contractions which persist for many hours in Ca2+-free solution are inhibited temporarily by Ca2+ restoration. Existence of a recycling store of releasable Ca2+ requires occurrence of mechanisms to abolish Ca2+ extrusion or leak-out of the cell and to ensure recycling to the same store.

  11. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  12. Crystalline Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapatsis, Michael (Inventor); Lai, Zhiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    In certain aspects, the invention features methods for forming crystalline membranes (e.g., a membrane of a framework material, such as a zeolite) by inducing secondary growth in a layer of oriented seed crystals. The rate of growth of the seed crystals in the plane of the substrate is controlled to be comparable to the rate of growth out of the plane. As a result, a crystalline membrane can form a substantially continuous layer including grains of uniform crystallographic orientation that extend through the depth of the layer.

  13. A Mutual Support Group for Young Problem Gamblers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binde, Per

    2012-01-01

    A Swedish mutual support group for young problem gamblers is described and discussed. During the study period, 116 weekly meetings occurred, usually involving six to ten participants; in total, 69 problem gamblers (66 male and three female), aged 17-25, and 23 partners and friends attended the meetings. Half the gamblers had problems with Internet…

  14. 77 FR 48566 - The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc., et al.;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc., et al.; Notice of Application August 8, 2012. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission''). ACTION: Notice of an application under section 6(c) of...

  15. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled to... not available in other bands. During the initial filing window, frequency coordination is not...

  16. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled to... not available in other bands. During the initial filing window, frequency coordination is not...

  17. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled to... not available in other bands. During the initial filing window, frequency coordination is not...

  18. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled to... not available in other bands. During the initial filing window, frequency coordination is not...

  19. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled to... not available in other bands. During the initial filing window, frequency coordination is not...

  20. Mutual Funds as a Form of Collective Investment in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tershukova, Marina B.; Savinov, Oleg G.; Zhegalova, Elena V.; Zhuruhinc, Georgy I.; Zhegalova, Alexandra S.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research problem inspired with the fact nowadays there is a need for theoretical generalization based on international experience the essence of the collective investment system and the rationale for prioritizing the mutual funds development as the most attractive form of collective investment. The goal of the article lies in…

  1. Is Action Research Necessarily Collaborative? Changing Mutuality within a Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a study on collaboration within an action research project that was conducted by university researchers and elementary school teachers in the Azores, Portugal. More specifically, it examines how different kinds of participants worked together in different phases of the project. The notion of mutuality (i.e., the relative…

  2. Mutual Intercultural Relations among University Students in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gui, Yongxia; Safdar, Saba; Berry, John

    2016-01-01

    The current study examies the views of both international and domestic students in Canada using the conceptual and empirical framework from the MIRIPS (Mutual Intercultural Relations in Plural Societies) project (http://www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr/research/mirips). Two hypotheses were examined. First is the "multiculturalism hypothesis"…

  3. Mutual information area laws for thermal free fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernigau, H.; Kastoryano, M. J.; Eisert, J.

    2015-02-01

    We provide a rigorous and asymptotically exact expression of the mutual information of translationally invariant free fermionic lattice systems in a Gibbs state. In order to arrive at this result, we introduce a novel framework for computing determinants of Töplitz operators with smooth symbols, and for treating Töplitz matrices with system size dependent entries. The asymptotically exact mutual information for a partition of the 1D lattice satisfies an area law, with a prefactor which we compute explicitly. As examples, we discuss the fermionic XX model in one dimension and free fermionic models on the torus in higher dimensions in detail. Special emphasis is put on the discussion of the temperature dependence of the mutual information, scaling like the logarithm of the inverse temperature, hence confirming an expression suggested by conformal field theory. We also comment on the applicability of the formalism to treat open systems driven by quantum noise. In the appendix, we derive useful bounds to the mutual information in terms of purities. Finally, we provide a detailed error analysis for finite system sizes. This analysis is valuable in its own right for the abstract theory of Töplitz determinants.

  4. Mutual Aid: A Key to Survival for Black Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Alex J.

    1977-01-01

    In the Brotherhood Crusade, a black mutual aid, self-help organization, Los Angeles blacks joined together to effect independence within the professions and the social service delivery systems, rejecting incorporation into the United Way, the major L.A. fund-raising organization. This article presents findings of a study of Crusade participants.…

  5. 12 CFR 563.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... dividend may be paid if such payment would constitute a violation of 12 U.S.C. 1828(b); (v) Not be... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutual capital certificates. 563.74 Section 563... of filing of the application are in accordance with the provisions of this section. (b)...

  6. 12 CFR 563.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... dividend may be paid if such payment would constitute a violation of 12 U.S.C. 1828(b); (v) Not be... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual capital certificates. 563.74 Section 563... of filing of the application are in accordance with the provisions of this section. (b)...

  7. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... by the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  8. 12 CFR 144.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the institution... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  9. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... by the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  10. 12 CFR 144.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the institution... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  11. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... by the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  12. 12 CFR 144.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the institution... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  13. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... by the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  14. Using Mutual Information for Adaptive Item Comparison and Student Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chao-Lin

    2005-01-01

    The author analyzes properties of mutual information between dichotomous concepts and test items. The properties generalize some common intuitions about item comparison, and provide principled foundations for designing item-selection heuristics for student assessment in computer-assisted educational systems. The proposed item-selection strategies…

  15. Mutual Suppression: Comment on Paulhus et Al. (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Paulhus, Robins, Trzesniewski, and Tracy ("Multivariate Behavioral Research," 2004, 39, 305-328) suggested that the three types of two-predictor suppression situations--classical suppression, cooperative suppression, and net suppression--can all be considered special cases of mutual suppression, in that the magnitude of each of the two…

  16. The blind leading the blind: Mutual refinement of approximate theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, Smadar T.; Bresina, John L.; Dent, C. Lisa

    1991-01-01

    The mutual refinement theory, a method for refining world models in a reactive system, is described. The method detects failures, explains their causes, and repairs the approximate models which cause the failures. The approach focuses on using one approximate model to refine another.

  17. Mutual Information Item Selection in Adaptive Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    A general approach for item selection in adaptive multiple-category classification tests is provided. The approach uses mutual information (MI), a special case of the Kullback-Leibler distance, or relative entropy. MI works efficiently with the sequential probability ratio test and alleviates the difficulties encountered with using other local-…

  18. Multi-Transiting Systems and Exoplanet Mutual Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Jared; Ragozzine, D.; Holman, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, studies of transiting exoplanets- planets that cross in front of their host star- have focused almost exclusively upon systems where there is only one transiting planet. Those studies that have considered additional planets have mostly done so with the goal of determining the perturbing effects that additional planets would have upon the orbit, and therefore the light curve, of the transiting planet. This work considers, in detail, a specific type of event known as an exoplanet mutual event. Such events occur when one planet passes in front of another. While such events can occur whether or not these planets are transiting, predicting and understanding these events is best done in systems with multiple transiting planets. We estimate, through an ensemble simulation, how frequently exoplanet mutual events occur and which systems are most likely to undergo exoplanet mutual events. We also investigate what information can be learned about not only the planets themselves but also the orbital architecture in such systems. We conclude that while ODT (overlapping double-transit) events occur with a much lower frequency than PPO (planet-planet occultation) events, ODT mutual events are capable of producing detectable signals, that Kepler will detect a few, and recommend that candidate systems for these events, such as KOI 191, be observed in short cadence(Steffen et. al 2010, Holman et. al 2010). This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 0754568 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  19. Mutual information in a dilute, asymmetric neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Elliot

    We study the computational properties of a neural network consisting of binary neurons with dilute asymmetric synaptic connections. This simple model allows us to simulate large networks which can reflect more of the architecture and dynamics of real neural networks. Our main goal is to determine the dynamical behavior that maximizes the network's ability to perform computations. To this end, we apply information theory, measuring the average mutual information between pairs of pre- and post-synaptic neurons. Communication of information between neurons is an essential requirement for collective computation. Previous workers have demonstrated that neural networks with asymmetric connections undergo a transition from ordered to chaotic behavior as certain network parameters, such as the connectivity, are changed. We find that the average mutual information has a peak near the order-chaos transition, implying that the network can most efficiently communicate information between cells in this region. The mutual information peak becomes increasingly pronounced when the basic model is extended to incorporate more biologically realistic features, such as a variable threshold and nonlinear summation of inputs. We find that the peak in mutual information near the phase transition is a robust feature of the system for a wide range of assumptions about post-synaptic integration.

  20. A Swedish Mutual Support Society of Problem Gamblers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binde, Per

    2012-01-01

    Mutual support societies for problem gamblers have existed in Sweden for 20 years. They have helped more people with gambling problems than any other institution inside or outside the Swedish health care system. This paper outlines the background of these societies and describes the meetings of one of them. Data come from interviews with members…

  1. Antagonists in Mutual Antipathies: A Person-Oriented Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guroglu, Berna; Haselager, Gerbert J. T.; van Lieshout, Cornelis F. M.; Scholte, Ron H. J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the heterogeneity of mutual antipathy relationships. Separate cluster analyses of peer interactions of early adolescents (mean age 11 years) and adolescents (mean age of 14) yielded 3 "types of individuals" in each age group, namely Prosocial, Antisocial, and Withdrawn. Prevalence analysis of the 6 possible combinations of…

  2. No effect of diffraction on Pluto-Charon mutual events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, D. J.; Hubbard, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    Mulholland and Gustafson (1987) made the interesting suggestion that observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events might show significant dependence on both wavelength and telescope aperture because of diffraction effects. In this letter, observations are presented that show the predicted effects to be absent and demonstrate that the parameters of the system are such that the events can be accurately analyzed with geometrical optics.

  3. Evolution of the Fusarium–Euwallacea ambrosia beetle mutualism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Euwallacea – Fusarium mutualistic symbiosis represents one of the independent evolutionary origins of fungus-farming. Diversification time estimates place the evolutionary origin of this mutualism in the early Miocene approximately 21 million years ago. Fusarium is best known as one of the most ...

  4. Synchronization and symmetry breaking in mutually coupled fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Rogers-Dakin, Elizabeth A; García-Ojalvo, Jordi; DeShazer, David J; Roy, Rajarshi

    2006-04-01

    We experimentally study the synchronization and the emergence of leader-follower dynamics in two time-delayed mutually coupled fiber ring lasers. We utilize spatiotemporal representations of time series to establish the roles of leader and follower in the synchronized dynamics.

  5. Synchronization and symmetry breaking in mutually coupled fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers-Dakin, Elizabeth A.; García-Ojalvo, Jordi; Deshazer, David J.; Roy, Rajarshi

    2006-04-01

    We experimentally study the synchronization and the emergence of leader-follower dynamics in two time-delayed mutually coupled fiber ring lasers. We utilize spatiotemporal representations of time series to establish the roles of leader and follower in the synchronized dynamics.

  6. Ecological genomics of mutualism decline in nitrogen-fixing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Christie R.; Lau, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic changes can influence mutualism evolution; however, the genomic regions underpinning mutualism that are most affected by environmental change are generally unknown, even in well-studied model mutualisms like the interaction between legumes and their nitrogen (N)-fixing rhizobia. Such genomic information can shed light on the agents and targets of selection maintaining cooperation in nature. We recently demonstrated that N-fertilization has caused an evolutionary decline in mutualistic partner quality in the rhizobia that form symbiosis with clover. Here, population genomic analyses of N-fertilized versus control rhizobium populations indicate that evolutionary differentiation at a key symbiosis gene region on the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) contributes to partner quality decline. Moreover, patterns of genetic variation at selected loci were consistent with recent positive selection within N-fertilized environments, suggesting that N-rich environments might select for less beneficial rhizobia. By studying the molecular population genomics of a natural bacterial population within a long-term ecological field experiment, we find that: (i) the N environment is indeed a potent selective force mediating mutualism evolution in this symbiosis, (ii) natural variation in rhizobium partner quality is mediated in part by key symbiosis genes on the symbiotic plasmid, and (iii) differentiation at selected genes occurred in the context of otherwise recombining genomes, resembling eukaryotic models of adaptation. PMID:26962142

  7. Functional analysis of mutual behavior in laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lavinia; Hackenberg, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    Three pairs of rats were trained to synchronize their lever pressing according to a mutual reinforcement contingency, in which alternating lever presses that fell within a 500-ms window were reinforced with food. In Experiment 1, rats worked in adjacent chambers separated by a transparent barrier, and the effects of the mutual reinforcement contingency were compared to those under yoked-control conditions that provided the same rate of food reinforcement but without the temporal coordination response requirement. In Experiment 2, coordinated behavior was compared with and without a barrier, and across different barrier types: transparent, opaque, wire mesh. In Experiment 3, the effects of social familiarity were assessed by switching partners, enabling a comparison of coordinated behavior with familiar and unfamiliar partners. The overall pattern of results shows that the coordinated behavior of two rats was (a) maintained by mutual reinforcement contingencies, (b) unrelated to the type or presence of a barrier separating the rats, and (c) sufficiently flexible to adjust to the presence and behavior of an unfamiliar partner. Taken as a whole, the study illustrates a promising approach to conceptualizing and analyzing behavioral mechanisms of mutual behavior, an important component of an integrated study of social behavior. PMID:26479279

  8. A Delicate Balance: Maintaining Mutualism to Prevent Disease

    PubMed Central

    Van Tyne, Daria; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbial ecosystem is complex, and few of the principles that contribute to homeostasis in health are well understood. Pham et al. (2014) show that a network including the epithelial interleukin-22 receptor protects against infection with the opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis through promotion of host-microbiota mutualism. PMID:25299326

  9. Mobility Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Abele, G.; Walker, D.A.; Brown, J .; Brewer, M.C.; Atwood, D.M. TI - Effects of low ground pressure vehicle traffic on tundra aL Lonely, Alaska SO...resistance, bulldozing resistance. NTIS ’ DT ’ . [ Acces. J "D-4 CONTENTS Chapter I Snow vehicles or snowmobiles Chapter II Rolling resistance Chapter III...Russian Swe Swedish Eng English Jap Japanese Ger German Pol Polish Czech Czechoslovakian Nor Norwegian P reface This mobility bibliography was

  10. Membranes, mechanics, and intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-10-01

    Cellular membranes are remarkable materials -- self-assembled, flexible, two-dimensional fluids. Understanding how proteins manipulate membrane curvature is crucial to understanding the transport of cargo in cells, yet the mechanical activities of trafficking proteins remain poorly understood. Using an optical-trap based assay involving dynamic deformation of biomimetic membranes, we have examined the behavior of Sar1, a key component of the COPII family of transport proteins. We find that Sar1 from yeast (S. cerevisiae) lowers membrane rigidity by up to 100% as a function of its concentration, thereby lowering the energetic cost of membrane deformation. Human Sar1 proteins can also lower the mechanical rigidity of the membranes to which they bind. However, unlike the yeast proteins, the rigidity is not a monotonically decreasing function of concentration but rather shows increased rigidity and decreased mobility at high concentrations that implies interactions between proteins. In addition to describing this study of membrane mechanics, I'll also discuss some topics relevant to a range of biophysical investigations, such as the insights provided by imaging methods and open questions in the dynamics of multicellular systems.

  11. Evolutionary origin of insect–Wolbachia nutritional mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Nikoh, Naruo; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Moriyama, Minoru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Fukatsu, Takema

    2014-01-01

    Obligate insect–bacterium nutritional mutualism is among the most sophisticated forms of symbiosis, wherein the host and the symbiont are integrated into a coherent biological entity and unable to survive without the partnership. Originally, however, such obligate symbiotic bacteria must have been derived from free-living bacteria. How highly specialized obligate mutualisms have arisen from less specialized associations is of interest. Here we address this evolutionary issue by focusing on an exceptional insect–Wolbachia nutritional mutualism. Although Wolbachia endosymbionts are ubiquitously found in diverse insects and generally regarded as facultative/parasitic associates for their insect hosts, a Wolbachia strain associated with the bedbug Cimex lectularius, designated as wCle, was shown to be essential for host’s growth and reproduction via provisioning of B vitamins. We determined the 1,250,060-bp genome of wCle, which was generally similar to the genomes of insect-associated facultative Wolbachia strains, except for the presence of an operon encoding the complete biotin synthetic pathway that was acquired via lateral gene transfer presumably from a coinfecting endosymbiont Cardinium or Rickettsia. Nutritional and physiological experiments, in which wCle-infected and wCle-cured bedbugs of the same genetic background were fed on B-vitamin–manipulated blood meals via an artificial feeding system, demonstrated that wCle certainly synthesizes biotin, and the wCle-provisioned biotin significantly contributes to the host fitness. These findings strongly suggest that acquisition of a single gene cluster consisting of biotin synthesis genes underlies the bedbug–Wolbachia nutritional mutualism, uncovering an evolutionary transition from facultative symbiosis to obligate mutualism facilitated by lateral gene transfer in an endosymbiont lineage. PMID:24982177

  12. Evolutionary origin of insect-Wolbachia nutritional mutualism.

    PubMed

    Nikoh, Naruo; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Moriyama, Minoru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Fukatsu, Takema

    2014-07-15

    Obligate insect-bacterium nutritional mutualism is among the most sophisticated forms of symbiosis, wherein the host and the symbiont are integrated into a coherent biological entity and unable to survive without the partnership. Originally, however, such obligate symbiotic bacteria must have been derived from free-living bacteria. How highly specialized obligate mutualisms have arisen from less specialized associations is of interest. Here we address this evolutionary issue by focusing on an exceptional insect-Wolbachia nutritional mutualism. Although Wolbachia endosymbionts are ubiquitously found in diverse insects and generally regarded as facultative/parasitic associates for their insect hosts, a Wolbachia strain associated with the bedbug Cimex lectularius, designated as wCle, was shown to be essential for host's growth and reproduction via provisioning of B vitamins. We determined the 1,250,060-bp genome of wCle, which was generally similar to the genomes of insect-associated facultative Wolbachia strains, except for the presence of an operon encoding the complete biotin synthetic pathway that was acquired via lateral gene transfer presumably from a coinfecting endosymbiont Cardinium or Rickettsia. Nutritional and physiological experiments, in which wCle-infected and wCle-cured bedbugs of the same genetic background were fed on B-vitamin-manipulated blood meals via an artificial feeding system, demonstrated that wCle certainly synthesizes biotin, and the wCle-provisioned biotin significantly contributes to the host fitness. These findings strongly suggest that acquisition of a single gene cluster consisting of biotin synthesis genes underlies the bedbug-Wolbachia nutritional mutualism, uncovering an evolutionary transition from facultative symbiosis to obligate mutualism facilitated by lateral gene transfer in an endosymbiont lineage.

  13. Going mobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brus, Eric

    1987-12-01

    By 1990, all metropolitan areas in the U.S. and rural areas close to major cities or towns are expected to have cellular telephone service; 22 Canadian cities also feature cellular service. To supply mobile telecommunication services to sparsely-populated rural areas, a mobile satellite service (MSS) is now being developed. In this paper the projected possibilities of the MSS system are discussed, including a possibility that a piggyback-MSS payload be added to the GSTAR-4 satellite which is scheduled for a launch in 1988 or 1989; one in which some of the hardware from aborted direct-broadcast satellites would be used; and the possibility of building a new MSS satellite with large servicing capacity. Canada is planning to launch its own mobile satellite, MSAT, in the early 1990s. The MSS is expected to be 'generic', serving not only people on land but maritime and aeronautical users as well. It will also offer major benefits to truck and automobile drivers, making it possible for them to conduct business or to call for assistance from locations beyond the range of cellular systems.

  14. Biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes allow life as we know it to exist. They form cells and enable separation between the inside and outside of an organism, controlling by means of their selective permeability which substances enter and leave. By allowing gradients of ions to be created across them, membranes also enable living organisms to generate energy. In addition, they control the flow of messages between cells by sending, receiving and processing information in the form of chemical and electrical signals. This essay summarizes the structure and function of membranes and the proteins within them, and describes their role in trafficking and transport, and their involvement in health and disease. Techniques for studying membranes are also discussed. PMID:26504250

  15. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... insurance companies not carrying on an insurance business within the United States, and all mutual marine...) Foreign insurance companies not carrying on an insurance business within the United States are not taxable... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life...

  16. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... foreign insurance companies not carrying on an insurance business within the United States, and all mutual... Code. (d) Foreign insurance companies not carrying on an insurance business within the United States... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life...

  17. Mutual relations between sleep deprivation, sleep stealers and risk behaviours in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Teresa; Gaspar, Tania; Matos, Margarida Gaspar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim is to evaluate the mutual influences between sleep duration/sleep deprivation (SD) and the sleep stealers/adolescent risk behaviours. Methods The national survey is a component of the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, it is based on a school-based self-completed questionnaire; 3476 students were randomly selected from 139 randomly chosen Portuguese schools using as an unit the class, 53.8% were girls; 45.9% attended the 8th grade and 54.1% the 10th grade; the mean age was 14.9 years. The measured variables were: 1) gender and age; 2) sociodemographics; 3) sleep duration during the week and during weekends and computed SD; 4) screen time (computer use during the week and during the week end (PC use); watching TV and mobile phone use; 5) earlier sexual behaviour; 6) violent behaviours: fights, use of weapons; 7) use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs. The statistical analysis included Pearson chi-square tests and logistic regression. Results Excessive use of mobile phone, of computer use during weekdays, and internet facilities; substance use; violence and earlier sexual relations had significantly higher prevalence in sleep deprived adolescents. By logistic regression only using PC during weekdays, tobacco, drugs and weapons were associated to SD, while SD was associated to PC use during weekdays, tobacco use and drugs’ use. Computer uses tend to be associated among themselves. Mobile phone is associated with computer practices and with alcohol and tobacco use. Tobacco is associated with most risk behaviours. Alcohol use is associated with other substance use, computer use and violent behaviours. Violence behaviours, earlier sex and drugs use tend to be associated among themselves. Conclusions Sleep stealers use and risk behaviours are more prevalent in sleep deprived adolescents, but, in spite of significant individual associations, models of risk behaviours are still lacking. PMID:27226817

  18. The Mutual Impedance Probe (RPC-MIP) onboard ROSETTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Pierre; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Béghin, Christian; Décréau, Pierrette; Grard, Réjean; Hamelin, Michel; Mazelle, Christian; Randriamboarison, Orélien; Schmidt, Walter; Winterhalter, Daniel; Aouad, Youcef; Lagoutte, Dominique; Vallières, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The ROSETTA mission will reach the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014 and enable, for the first time, the in situ survey of a comet activity during along orbit. On board the ROSETTA orbiter, the Mutual Impedance Probe (MIP) is one of the instruments of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) that aims at monitoring the cometary plasma environment. MIP is a quadrupolar probe that measures the frequency response of the coupling impedance between two emitting and two receiving dipoles. The electron density and temperature are derived from the resonance peak and the interference pattern of the mutual impedance spectrum. We will describe this instrument and discuss the preliminary results obtained during the third ROSETTA Earth flyby to show its expected capabilities. The RPC switch ON for the post-hibernation recommissioning is planned at the end of March. The health status of the instrument will be discussed.

  19. Abiotic mediation of a mutualism drives herbivore abundance.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Emily H; Phillips, Joseph S; Tillberg, Chadwick V; Sandrow, Cheryl; Nelson, Annika S; Mooney, Kailen A

    2016-01-01

    Species abundance is typically determined by the abiotic environment, but the extent to which such effects occur through the mediation of biotic interactions, including mutualisms, is unknown. We explored how light environment (open meadow vs. shaded understory) mediates the abundance and ant tending of the aphid Aphis helianthi feeding on the herb Ligusticum porteri. Yearly surveys consistently found aphids to be more than 17-fold more abundant on open meadow plants than on shaded understory plants. Manipulations demonstrated that this abundance pattern was not due to the direct effects of light environment on aphid performance, or indirectly through host plant quality or the effects of predators. Instead, open meadows had higher ant abundance and per capita rates of aphid tending and, accordingly, ants increased aphid population growth in meadow but not understory environments. The abiotic environment thus drives the abundance of this herbivore exclusively through the mediation of a protection mutualism.

  20. Refining and Mutual Separation of Rare Earths Using Biomass Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi; Alam, Shafiq

    2013-10-01

    Two different types of adsorption gels were prepared from biomass wastes. The first gel was produced from astringent persimmon peel rich in persimmon tannin, a polyphenol compound, which was prepared by means of simple dehydration condensation reaction using concentrated sulfuric acid for crosslinking. This adsorption gel was intended to be employed for the removal of radioactive elements, uranium (U(VI)) and thorium (Th(IV)), from rare earths. The second gel was prepared from chitosan, a basic polysaccharide, produced from shells of crustaceans such as crabs, shrimps, prawns, and other biomass wastes generated in marine product industry, by immobilizing functional groups of complexanes such as ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid and diethylentriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). This gel was developed for the mutual separation of rare earths. Of the two adsorption gels evaluated, the DTPA immobilized chitosan exhibited the most effective mutual separation among light rare earths.

  1. Integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ling-Xiu; Liu, Bo-Wen; Lv, Xiao-Meng; Yang, Yue-De; Xiao, Jin-Long; Huang, Yong-Zhen

    2015-05-11

    We experimentally study the characteristics of an integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection through a connected optical waveguide. Based on the lasing spectra, four-wave mixing, injection locking, and period-two oscillation states are observed due to the mutually optical injection by adjusting the injected currents applied to the two microdisks. The enhanced 3 dB bandwidth is realized for the microdisk laser at the injection locking state, and photonic microwave is obtained from the electrode of the microdisk laser under the period-two oscillation state. The plentifully dynamical states similar as semiconductor lasers subject to external optical injection are realized due to strong optical interaction between the two microdisks.

  2. Bias reduction in the estimation of mutual information.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Shu, Huazhong; Yang, Chunfeng; Le Bouquin Jeannès, Régine

    2014-11-01

    This paper deals with the control of bias estimation when estimating mutual information from a nonparametric approach. We focus on continuously distributed random data and the estimators we developed are based on a nonparametric k-nearest-neighbor approach for arbitrary metrics. Using a multidimensional Taylor series expansion, a general relationship between the estimation error bias and the neighboring size for the plug-in entropy estimator is established without any assumption on the data for two different norms. The theoretical analysis based on the maximum norm developed coincides with the experimental results drawn from numerical tests made by Kraskov et al. [Phys. Rev. E 69, 066138 (2004)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.69.066138]. To further validate the novel relation, a weighted linear combination of distinct mutual information estimators is proposed and, using simulated signals, the comparison of different strategies allows for corroborating the theoretical analysis.

  3. Bias reduction in the estimation of mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Shu, Huazhong; Yang, Chunfeng; Le Bouquin Jeannès, Régine

    2014-11-01

    This paper deals with the control of bias estimation when estimating mutual information from a nonparametric approach. We focus on continuously distributed random data and the estimators we developed are based on a nonparametric k -nearest-neighbor approach for arbitrary metrics. Using a multidimensional Taylor series expansion, a general relationship between the estimation error bias and the neighboring size for the plug-in entropy estimator is established without any assumption on the data for two different norms. The theoretical analysis based on the maximum norm developed coincides with the experimental results drawn from numerical tests made by Kraskov et al. [Phys. Rev. E 69, 066138 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevE.69.066138]. To further validate the novel relation, a weighted linear combination of distinct mutual information estimators is proposed and, using simulated signals, the comparison of different strategies allows for corroborating the theoretical analysis.

  4. Role of mutual punishment in the snowdrift game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    The effects of punishment on cooperation have drawn increasing attention. In this paper, we propose a new mechanism of punishment, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. We incorporate the mutual punishment into the snowdrift game. Results for well-mixed and structured populations have shown that, for no punishment or small values of punishment fine, the fraction of cooperators continuously decreases with the temptation to defect. However, for large values of punishment fine, there exists an abrupt transition point, at which the fraction of cooperators suddenly drops from 1 to 0. Compared to no punishment, mutual punishment promotes cooperation when the temptation to defect is small but inhibits cooperation when the temptation to defect is large. For weak (strong) temptation to defect, the cooperation level increases (decreases) with the punishment fine. For moderate temptation to defect, there exists an optimal value of the punishment fine that leads to the highest cooperation level.

  5. Kepler-108: A Mutually Inclined Giant Planet System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Sean M.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of well studied giant-planet systems, including the solar system, are nearly coplanar, which implies dissipation within a primordial gas disk. However, intrinsic instability may lead to planet–planet scattering, which often produces non-coplanar, eccentric orbits. Planet scattering theories have been developed to explain observed high-eccentricity systems and also hot Jupiters; thus far their predictions for mutual inclination (I) have barely been tested. Here we characterize a highly mutually inclined (I={24}-8+11°), moderately eccentric (e≳ 0.1) giant planet system: Kepler-108. This system consists of two approximately Saturn-mass planets with periods of approximately 49 and 190 days around a star with a wide (∼300 au) binary companion in an orbital configuration inconsistent with a purely disk migration origin.

  6. Driven diffusive systems with mutually interactive Langmuir kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuijk, H. D.; Rens, R.; Vahabi, M.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Sharma, A.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the simple one-dimensional driven model, the totally asymmetric exclusion process, coupled to mutually interactive Langmuir kinetics. This model is motivated by recent studies on clustering of motor proteins on microtubules. In the proposed model, the attachment and detachment rates of a particle are modified depending upon the occupancy of neighboring sites. We first obtain continuum mean-field equations and in certain limiting cases obtain analytic solutions. We show how mutual interactions increase (decrease) the effects of boundaries on the phase behavior of the model. We perform Monte Carlo simulations and demonstrate that our analytical approximations are in good agreement with the numerics over a wide range of model parameters. We present phase diagrams over a selective range of parameters.

  7. Circumstances for Pluto-Charon mutual events in 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, David J.; Buie, Marc W.; Swift, Catherine E.

    1987-01-01

    Circumstances are tabulated for 88 Pluto-Charon mutual events occurring during the 1987 opposition. Charon is predicted to be completely obscured either by Pluto or Pluto's shadow during each passage behind Pluto during this opposition, providing several opportunities to study Pluto uncontaminated by the light of Charon. The duration of these total events is predicted to be from 32 to 79 min. The mutual-event season is now expected to conclude during the 1990 opposition. Two new stars have been selected as comparison stars for events occurring prior to opposition in 1987. Standardization of the primary comparison stars used in 1985 and 1986 has yielded the following magnitudes: B = 12.6044 + or - 0.0015 and V = 11.7956 + or - 0.0017 (1985 Primary); B = 13.1238 + or 0.0008 and V = 12.3885 + or - 0.0014 (1986 Primary).

  8. Mutualism supports biodiversity when the direct competition is weak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual-García, Alberto; Bastolla, Ugo

    2017-02-01

    A key question of theoretical ecology is which properties of ecosystems favour their stability and help maintaining biodiversity. This question recently reconsidered mutualistic systems, generating intense controversy about the role of mutualistic interactions and their network architecture. Here we show analytically and verify with simulations that reducing the effective interspecific competition and the propagation of perturbations positively influences structural stability against environmental perturbations, enhancing persistence. Noteworthy, mutualism reduces the effective interspecific competition only when the direct interspecific competition is weaker than a critical value. This critical competition is in almost all cases larger in pollinator networks than in random networks with the same connectance. Highly connected mutualistic networks reduce the propagation of environmental perturbations, a mechanism reminiscent of MacArthur's proposal that ecosystem complexity enhances stability. Our analytic framework rationalizes previous contradictory results, and it gives valuable insight on the complex relationship between mutualism and biodiversity.

  9. Onset of fights and mutual assessment in ant founding queens.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Kévin; Portugal, Felipe Ramon; Jeanson, Raphaël

    2017-03-01

    In animals, the progress and outcome of contests can be influenced by an individual's own condition, their opponent's condition or a combination of the two. The use of chemical information to assess the quality of rivals has been underestimated despite its central role in the regulation of social interactions in many taxa. Here, we studied pairwise contests between founding queens of the ant Lasius niger to investigate whether the decision to engage in agonistic interactions relies on self-assessment or mutual assessment. Queens modulated their aggressive behaviours depending on both their own status and their opponent's status. We found no influence of lipid stores or size on the onset of fights. However, differences in cuticular chemical signatures linked to fertility status accurately predicted the probability of behaving aggressively in pairs. Our study thus suggests that ant queens could rely on mutual assessment via chemical cues to make informed decisions about fight initiation.

  10. Improving quantum state estimation with mutually unbiased bases.

    PubMed

    Adamson, R B A; Steinberg, A M

    2010-07-16

    When used in quantum state estimation, projections onto mutually unbiased bases have the ability to maximize information extraction per measurement and to minimize redundancy. We present the first experimental demonstration of quantum state tomography of two-qubit polarization states to take advantage of mutually unbiased bases. We demonstrate improved state estimation as compared to standard measurement strategies and discuss how this can be understood from the structure of the measurements we use. We experimentally compared our method to the standard state estimation method for three different states and observe that the infidelity was up to 1.84 ± 0.06 times lower by using our technique than it was by using standard state estimation methods.

  11. Networks in financial markets based on the mutual information rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedor, Paweł

    2014-05-01

    In the last few years there have been many efforts in econophysics studying how network theory can facilitate understanding of complex financial markets. These efforts consist mainly of the study of correlation-based hierarchical networks. This is somewhat surprising as the underlying assumptions of research looking at financial markets are that they are complex systems and thus behave in a nonlinear manner, which is confirmed by numerous studies, making the use of correlations which are inherently dealing with linear dependencies only baffling. In this paper we introduce a way to incorporate nonlinear dynamics and dependencies into hierarchical networks to study financial markets using mutual information and its dynamical extension: the mutual information rate. We show that this approach leads to different results than the correlation-based approach used in most studies, on the basis of 91 companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange 100 between 2003 and 2013, using minimal spanning trees and planar maximally filtered graphs.

  12. Qualitative teamwork issues and strategies: coordination through mutual adjustment.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wendy A; Long, Bonita; Bermbach, Nicole; Jordan, Sharalyn; Patterson, Kathryn

    2005-03-01

    Multidisciplinary research teams that include faculty, students, and volunteers can be challenging and enriching for all participants. Although such teams are becoming commonplace, minimal guidance is available about strategies to enhance team effectiveness. In this article, the authors highlight strategies to guide qualitative teamwork through coordination of team members and tasks based on mutual adjustment. Using a grounded theory exemplar, they focus on issues of (a) building the team, (b) developing reflexivity and theoretical sensitivity, (c) tackling analytic and methodological procedures, and (d) developing dissemination guidelines. Sharing information, articulating project goals and elements, acknowledging variation in individual goals, and engaging in reciprocity and respectful collaboration are key elements of mutual adjustment. The authors summarize conclusions about the costs and benefits of the process.

  13. Networks in financial markets based on the mutual information rate.

    PubMed

    Fiedor, Paweł

    2014-05-01

    In the last few years there have been many efforts in econophysics studying how network theory can facilitate understanding of complex financial markets. These efforts consist mainly of the study of correlation-based hierarchical networks. This is somewhat surprising as the underlying assumptions of research looking at financial markets are that they are complex systems and thus behave in a nonlinear manner, which is confirmed by numerous studies, making the use of correlations which are inherently dealing with linear dependencies only baffling. In this paper we introduce a way to incorporate nonlinear dynamics and dependencies into hierarchical networks to study financial markets using mutual information and its dynamical extension: the mutual information rate. We show that this approach leads to different results than the correlation-based approach used in most studies, on the basis of 91 companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange 100 between 2003 and 2013, using minimal spanning trees and planar maximally filtered graphs.

  14. Breakdown and delayed cospeciation in the arbuscular mycorrhizal mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Merckx, Vincent; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2008-01-01

    The ancient arbuscular mycorrhizal association between the vast majority of plants and the fungal phylum Glomeromycota is a dominant nutritional mutualism worldwide. In the mycorrhizal mutualism, plants exchange photosynthesized carbohydrates for mineral nutrients acquired by fungi from the soil. This widespread cooperative arrangement is broken by ‘cheater’ plant species that lack the ability to photosynthesize and thus become dependent upon three-partite linkages (cheater–fungus–photosynthetic plant). Using the first fine-level coevolutionary analysis of mycorrhizas, we show that extreme fidelity towards fungi has led cheater plants to lengthy evolutionary codiversification. Remarkably, the plants' evolutionary history closely mirrors that of their considerably older mycorrhizal fungi. This demonstrates that one of the most diffuse mutualistic networks is vulnerable to the emergence, persistence and speciation of highly specific cheaters. PMID:18270159

  15. Gas transmission through microporous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turel, Tacibaht

    2008-10-01

    An ideal protective clothing material should be a good barrier against harmful gases or vapor while allowing moisture vapor and air passage through the material. In the study and design of barrier materials, one of the critical issues is to balance these requirements, which may sometimes be mutually exclusive. Therefore it is critical to understand the macroscopic and microscopic structure of the attack mechanisms as well as the barrier materials and the transport phenomena in such systems. In this study, air and gas transmission through barrier systems consisting of porous membranes was investigated experimentally and a molecular-level probabilistic model was constructed to evaluate the effect of various parameters on the gas flow. The effect of membrane parameters such as porosity, pore size distribution, thickness as well as gas parameters such as molecule diameters were examined at single layer as well as multiple layers. To understand the gas behavior for harmful chemicals and to ensure safety during experimental studies, mimics of such gases were obtained which were comparable to the actual gases in shape, molecular weight and other chemical properties. Air, ammonia and several mimic gases of harmful chemical agents were studied. Beta-pinene was used as a mimic of sarin and prenol was used as a mimic of nitrogen mustard. Gas transmission experiments were conducted on polyester, nylon and polypropylene membranes each of which had different porosity and pore size distributions. Experiments were done at different pressure values and a comparison was made between permeability testing machines based on volumetric and manometric principles as to their ability to accommodate high permeability membranes. Physical and chemical adsorption of such gases on porous membranes was also investigated after the addition of active elements on the membrane surfaces which can interact with the gas molecules. An experimental setup was developed to measure concentration changes

  16. Jupiter's Galilean satellites mutual events as a teaching tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, J. F.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present a set of observations of the mutual phenomena (occultations and eclipses) between Jupiter's Galilean satellites in 2014 and 2015 obtained with a Celestron 11 telescope from the Aula EspaZio Gela at E.T.S.I. - UPV/EHU. These observations are used as a practical teaching tool for photometry and astrodynamics in different matters of the Master in Space Science and Technology UPV/EHU.

  17. Finite difference time domain calculations of antenna mutual coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique was applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic analysis problems, including shielding and scattering. However, the method has not been exclusively applied to antennas. Here, calculations of self and mutual admittances between wire antennas are made using FDTD and compared with results obtained during the method of moments. The agreement is quite good, indicating the possibilities for FDTD application to antenna impedance and coupling.

  18. Finite difference time domain calculations of antenna mutual coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique has been applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic analysis problems, including shielding and scattering. However, the method has not been extensively applied to antennas. In this short paper calculations of self and mutual admittances between wire antennas are made using FDTD and compared with results obtained using the Method of Moments. The agreement is quite good, indicating the possibilities for FDTD application to antenna impedance and coupling.

  19. Extracting an entanglement signature from only classical mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starling, David J.; Broadbent, Curtis J.; Howell, John C.

    2011-09-01

    We introduce a quantity which is formed using classical notions of mutual information and which is computed using the results of projective measurements. This quantity constitutes a sufficient condition for entanglement and represents the amount of information that can be extracted from a bipartite system for spacelike separated observers. In addition to discussion, we provide simulations as well as experimental results for the singlet and maximally correlated mixed states.

  20. Resolving Dynamical Properties for Four 2007 Uranus Satellite Mutual Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Charles; Chanover, N. J.

    2008-09-01

    Uranus reached equinox in December 2007, an event that occurs once every 42 years. The 2007 equinox provided an opportunity to observe a number of mutual satellite encounters - occultations and eclipses - as the equatorial plane of Uranus pointed at Earth. The mean orbital motions of the Uranian satellites, specifically their relative mean anomalies and relative velocities, dictate the precise midpoint timing of an occultation. Likewise, the relative orbital inclinations of the interacting satellites determine the impact parameter of each event, which affects the magnitude drop. Therefore, identifying the precise midpoint timing and magnitude drop of mutual satellite encounters provides a check on the ephemerides used to predict these mutual events, which in turn places constraints on the satellite orbital models used to derive the ephemerides. We observed four Uranus satellite mutual encounters - occultations of Titania and Ariel by Umbriel in August 2007, and eclipses of Ariel by Umbriel and of Umbriel by Ariel in December 2007. We observed all events using the Astrophysical Research Consortium's 3.5 meter telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in Sunspot, NM with the Agile high-speed time-series photometer and a Johnson I-band filter. We obtained light curves with a time resolution of 0.5 second for both occultations and 1.0 second for both eclipses. We fit data from simulated occultations and eclipses to our light curves to determine values for four free parameters - event midpoint, relative albedo, relative velocity, and impact parameter - and compared them to predicted values. We find that all four midpoints occurred later than predicted, with delays ranging from 21.2 to 37.6 seconds. We present our results and discuss our occultation and eclipse models. This study was funded through the NMSU 21st Space and Aerospace Research Cluster Graduate Fellowship.

  1. Observation and Analysis of Jovian and Saturnian Satellite Mutual Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, David J.

    2001-01-01

    The main goal of this research was to acquire high time resolution photometry of satellite-satellite mutual events during the equatorial plane crossing for Saturn in 1995 and Jupiter in 1997. The data would be used to improve the orbits of the Saturnian satellites to support Cassini mission requirements, and also to monitor the secular acceleration of Io's orbit to compare with heat flow measurements.

  2. Extracting an entanglement signature from only classical mutual information

    SciTech Connect

    Starling, David J.; Howell, John C.; Broadbent, Curtis J.

    2011-09-15

    We introduce a quantity which is formed using classical notions of mutual information and which is computed using the results of projective measurements. This quantity constitutes a sufficient condition for entanglement and represents the amount of information that can be extracted from a bipartite system for spacelike separated observers. In addition to discussion, we provide simulations as well as experimental results for the singlet and maximally correlated mixed states.

  3. 47 CFR 73.5002 - Application and certification procedures; return of mutually exclusive applications not subject...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...; return of mutually exclusive applications not subject to competitive bidding procedures; prohibition of... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Procedures for Competitive Bidding and for Applications for... procedures; return of mutually exclusive applications not subject to competitive bidding...

  4. 47 CFR 73.5002 - Application and certification procedures; return of mutually exclusive applications not subject...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...; return of mutually exclusive applications not subject to competitive bidding procedures; prohibition of... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Procedures for Competitive Bidding and for Applications for... procedures; return of mutually exclusive applications not subject to competitive bidding...

  5. Neotropical mutualism between Acacia and Pseudomyrmex: phylogeny and divergence times.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Acevedo, Sandra; Rico-Arce, Lourdes; Delgado-Salinas, Alfonso; Magallón, Susana; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2010-07-01

    The interaction between Acacia and Pseudomyrmex is a textbook example of mutualism between ants and plants, nevertheless aspects of its evolutionary biology have not been formally explored. In this paper we analyze primarily the phylogenies of both New World Acacia and of their associated species of ants, and the geographic origin of this mutualism. Until now, there has been no molecular analysis of this relationship in terms of its origin and age. We analyzed three chloroplast markers (matK, psaB-rps14, and trnL-trnF) on a total of 70 taxa of legumes from the subfamily Mimosoideae, and two nuclear regions (long-wavelength rhodopsine and wingless) on a total of 43 taxa of ants from subfamily Pseudomyrmecinae. The monophyly of subgenus Acacia and within the New World lineages that of the myrmecophilous Acacia group was established. In addition, our results supported the monophyly of the genus Pseudomyrmex and of the associated acacia-ants P. ferrugineus group. Using Bayesian methods and calibration data, the estimated divergence times for the groups involved in the mutualism are: 5.44+/-1.93 My for the myrmecophilous acacias and 4.58+/-0.82 My for their associated ant species, implying that their relationship originated in Mesoamerica between the late Miocene to the middle Pliocene, with eventual diversification of both groups in Mexico.

  6. Dispersal Mutualism Incorporated into Large-Scale, Infrequent Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Parker, V. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Because of their influence on succession and other community interactions, large-scale, infrequent natural disturbances also should play a major role in mutualistic interactions. Using field data and experiments, I test whether mutualisms have been incorporated into large-scale wildfire by whether the outcomes of a mutualism depend on disturbance. In this study a seed dispersal mutualism is shown to depend on infrequent, large-scale disturbances. A dominant shrubland plant (Arctostaphylos species) produces seeds that make up a persistent soil seed bank and requires fire to germinate. In post-fire stands, I show that seedlings emerging from rodent caches dominate sites experiencing higher fire intensity. Field experiments show that rodents (Perimyscus californicus, P. boylii) do cache Arctostaphylos fruit and bury most seed caches to a sufficient depth to survive a killing heat pulse that a fire might drive into the soil. While the rodent dispersal and caching behavior itself has not changed compared to other habitats, the environmental transformation caused by wildfire converts the caching burial of seed from a dispersal process to a plant fire adaptive trait, and provides the context for stimulating subsequent life history evolution in the plant host. PMID:26151560

  7. Stability of an intraguild predation system with mutual predation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanshi; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2016-04-01

    We examine intraguild predation (IGP), in which species both compete for resources or space and prey on each other. The IGP system is modeled here by a lattice gas model of the mean-field theory. First, we consider the IGP system of one species in which individuals of the same species cannibalize each other. The dynamical behavior of the model demonstrates a mechanism by which the intraspecific predation promotes persistence of the species. Then we consider the IGP system of two species with mutual predation. Global dynamics of the model exhibit basic properties of IGP: (i) When both species' efficiencies in converting the consumptions into fitness are large, the outcome of their interaction is mutualistic in form and the IGP promotes persistence of both species. (ii) When one species' efficiency is large but the other's is small, the interaction outcomes become parasitic in nature, in which an obligate species can survive through the mutual predation with a facultative one. (iii) When both species' efficiencies are small, the interaction outcomes are competitive in nature and the IGP leads to extinction of one of the species. A novel result of this work is that varying one parameter or population density of the species can lead to transition of interaction outcomes between mutualism, parasitism and competition. On the other hand, dynamics of the models demonstrate that over-predation or under-predation will result in extinction of one/both species, while intermediate predation is favorable under certain parameter ranges.

  8. Basolateral amygdala lesions abolish mutual reward preferences in rats.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Lallement, Julen; van Wingerden, Marijn; Schäble, Sandra; Kalenscher, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In a recent study, we demonstrated that rats prefer mutual rewards in a Prosocial Choice Task. Here, employing the same task, we show that the integrity of basolateral amygdala was necessary for the expression of mutual reward preferences. Actor rats received bilateral excitotoxic (n=12) or sham lesions (n=10) targeting the basolateral amygdala and were subsequently tested in a Prosocial Choice Task where they could decide between rewarding ("Both Reward") or not rewarding a partner rat ("Own Reward"), either choice yielding identical reward to the actors themselves. To manipulate the social context and control for secondary reinforcement sources, actor rats were paired with either a partner rat (partner condition) or with an inanimate rat toy (toy condition). Sham-operated animals revealed a significant preference for the Both-Reward-option in the partner condition, but not in the toy condition. Amygdala-lesioned animals exhibited significantly lower Both-Reward preferences than the sham group in the partner but not in the toy condition, suggesting that basolateral amygdala was required for the expression of mutual reward preferences. Critically, in a reward magnitude discrimination task in the same experimental setup, both sham-operated and amygdala-lesioned animals preferred large over small rewards, suggesting that amygdala lesion effects were restricted to decision making in social contexts, leaving self-oriented behavior unaffected.

  9. Using MEMo to discover mutual exclusivity modules in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, Giovanni; Cerami, Ethan; Aksoy, Bulent Arman; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus

    2013-03-01

    Although individual tumors show surprisingly diverse genomic alterations, these events tend to occur in a limited number of pathways, and alterations that affect the same pathway tend to not co-occur in the same patient. While pathway analysis has been a powerful tool in cancer genomics, our knowledge of oncogenic pathway modules is incomplete. To systematically identify such modules, we have developed a novel method, Mutual Exclusivity Modules in Cancer (MEMo). The method searches and identifies modules characterized by three properties: (1) member genes are recurrently altered across a set of tumor samples; (2) member genes are known to or are likely to participate in the same biological process; and (3) alteration events within the modules are mutually exclusive. MEMo integrates multiple data types and maps genomic alterations to biological pathways. MEMo's mutual exclusivity uses a statistical model that preserves the number of alterations per gene and per sample. The MEMo software, source code and sample data sets are available for download at: http://cbio.mskcc.org/memo.

  10. Feature Selection for Chemical Sensor Arrays Using Mutual Information

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X. Rosalind; Lizier, Joseph T.; Nowotny, Thomas; Berna, Amalia Z.; Prokopenko, Mikhail; Trowell, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    We address the problem of feature selection for classifying a diverse set of chemicals using an array of metal oxide sensors. Our aim is to evaluate a filter approach to feature selection with reference to previous work, which used a wrapper approach on the same data set, and established best features and upper bounds on classification performance. We selected feature sets that exhibit the maximal mutual information with the identity of the chemicals. The selected features closely match those found to perform well in the previous study using a wrapper approach to conduct an exhaustive search of all permitted feature combinations. By comparing the classification performance of support vector machines (using features selected by mutual information) with the performance observed in the previous study, we found that while our approach does not always give the maximum possible classification performance, it always selects features that achieve classification performance approaching the optimum obtained by exhaustive search. We performed further classification using the selected feature set with some common classifiers and found that, for the selected features, Bayesian Networks gave the best performance. Finally, we compared the observed classification performances with the performance of classifiers using randomly selected features. We found that the selected features consistently outperformed randomly selected features for all tested classifiers. The mutual information filter approach is therefore a computationally efficient method for selecting near optimal features for chemical sensor arrays. PMID:24595058

  11. Oscillatory dynamics in a bacterial cross-protection mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Yurtsev, Eugene Anatoly; Conwill, Arolyn; Gore, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation between microbes can enable microbial communities to survive in harsh environments. Enzymatic deactivation of antibiotics, a common mechanism of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, is a cooperative behavior that can allow resistant cells to protect sensitive cells from antibiotics. Understanding how bacterial populations survive antibiotic exposure is important both clinically and ecologically, yet the implications of cooperative antibiotic deactivation on the population and evolutionary dynamics remain poorly understood, particularly in the presence of more than one antibiotic. Here, we show that two Escherichia coli strains can form an effective cross-protection mutualism, protecting each other in the presence of two antibiotics (ampicillin and chloramphenicol) so that the coculture can survive in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either strain alone. Moreover, we find that daily dilutions of the coculture lead to large oscillations in the relative abundance of the two strains, with the ratio of abundances varying by nearly four orders of magnitude over the course of the 3-day period of the oscillation. At modest antibiotic concentrations, the mutualistic behavior enables long-term survival of the oscillating populations; however, at higher antibiotic concentrations, the oscillations destabilize the population, eventually leading to collapse. The two strains form a successful cross-protection mutualism without a period of coevolution, suggesting that similar mutualisms may arise during antibiotic treatment and in natural environments such as the soil. PMID:27194723

  12. Synchronization in human musical rhythms and mutually interacting complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Though the music produced by an ensemble is influenced by multiple factors, including musical genre, musician skill, and individual interpretation, rhythmic synchronization is at the foundation of musical interaction. Here, we study the statistical nature of the mutual interaction between two humans synchronizing rhythms. We find that the interbeat intervals of both laypeople and professional musicians exhibit scale-free (power law) cross-correlations. Surprisingly, the next beat to be played by one person is dependent on the entire history of the other person’s interbeat intervals on timescales up to several minutes. To understand this finding, we propose a general stochastic model for mutually interacting complex systems, which suggests a physiologically motivated explanation for the occurrence of scale-free cross-correlations. We show that the observed long-term memory phenomenon in rhythmic synchronization can be imitated by fractal coupling of separately recorded or synthesized audio tracks and thus applied in electronic music. Though this study provides an understanding of fundamental characteristics of timing and synchronization at the interbrain level, the mutually interacting complex systems model may also be applied to study the dynamics of other complex systems where scale-free cross-correlations have been observed, including econophysics, physiological time series, and collective behavior of animal flocks. PMID:25114228

  13. Synchronization in human musical rhythms and mutually interacting complex systems.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Holger

    2014-09-09

    Though the music produced by an ensemble is influenced by multiple factors, including musical genre, musician skill, and individual interpretation, rhythmic synchronization is at the foundation of musical interaction. Here, we study the statistical nature of the mutual interaction between two humans synchronizing rhythms. We find that the interbeat intervals of both laypeople and professional musicians exhibit scale-free (power law) cross-correlations. Surprisingly, the next beat to be played by one person is dependent on the entire history of the other person's interbeat intervals on timescales up to several minutes. To understand this finding, we propose a general stochastic model for mutually interacting complex systems, which suggests a physiologically motivated explanation for the occurrence of scale-free cross-correlations. We show that the observed long-term memory phenomenon in rhythmic synchronization can be imitated by fractal coupling of separately recorded or synthesized audio tracks and thus applied in electronic music. Though this study provides an understanding of fundamental characteristics of timing and synchronization at the interbrain level, the mutually interacting complex systems model may also be applied to study the dynamics of other complex systems where scale-free cross-correlations have been observed, including econophysics, physiological time series, and collective behavior of animal flocks.

  14. Part mutual information for quantifying direct associations in networks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Zhou, Yiwei; Zhang, Xiujun; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-03

    Quantitatively identifying direct dependencies between variables is an important task in data analysis, in particular for reconstructing various types of networks and causal relations in science and engineering. One of the most widely used criteria is partial correlation, but it can only measure linearly direct association and miss nonlinear associations. However, based on conditional independence, conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to quantify nonlinearly direct relationships among variables from the observed data, superior to linear measures, but suffers from a serious problem of underestimation, in particular for those variables with tight associations in a network, which severely limits its applications. In this work, we propose a new concept, "partial independence," with a new measure, "part mutual information" (PMI), which not only can overcome the problem of CMI but also retains the quantification properties of both mutual information (MI) and CMI. Specifically, we first defined PMI to measure nonlinearly direct dependencies between variables and then derived its relations with MI and CMI. Finally, we used a number of simulated data as benchmark examples to numerically demonstrate PMI features and further real gene expression data from Escherichia coli and yeast to reconstruct gene regulatory networks, which all validated the advantages of PMI for accurately quantifying nonlinearly direct associations in networks.

  15. Metamaterial membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new class of metamaterial device to achieve separation of compounds by using coordinate transformations and metamaterial theory. By rationally designing the spatial anisotropy for mass diffusion, we simultaneously concentrate different compounds in different spatial locations, leading to separation of mixtures across a metamaterial membrane. The separation of mixtures into their constituent compounds is critically important in biophysics, biomedical, and chemical applications. We present a practical case where a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen diffusing through a polymeric planar matrix is separated. This work opens doors to new paradigms in membrane separations via coordinate transformations and metamaterials by introducing novel properties and unconventional mass diffusion phenomena.

  16. A spatial model showing differences between juxtacrine and paracrine mutual oocyte-granulosa cells interactions.

    PubMed

    Saadeldin, Islam M; Elsayed, Asmaa; Kim, Su Jin; Moon, Joon Hu; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-02-01

    The bidirectional communication between oocytes and granulosa cells are mediated by several factors via a local feedback loop(s). The current model was carried out to study the spatial mutual interaction of porcine denuded oocytes and granulosa cells either in direct contact (juxtacrine) or paracrine co-culture using transwell system. Transwell 0.4 μm polyester membrane inserts were used to permit oocytes-granulosa cells paracrine communication with a distance of 2 mm between them in co-culture. Oocytes were cultured with granulosa cells in a defined basic maturation medium for 44 h. In results, oocyte secreted factors (OSFs; GDF9 and BMP15) temporal expression showed progressive decrement by the end of culture in case of direct contact with granulosa cells while it was increased progressively in the paracrine co-culture groups. However, oocytes that were cultured in direct contact showed a significant increase in blastocyst development after parthenogenetic activation than the paracrine co-cultured ones (20% vs. 11.5%, respectively). By the end of culture, granulosa cell count in direct contact showed a significant decrease than the indirect co-culture group (1.2 x 105 cell/mL vs. 2.1 x 10(5) cell/mL, respectively). Steroids (P4 and E2) and steriodogenesis enzymes mRNA levels showed significant temporal alterations either after 22 h and 44 h of IVM in both juxtacrine and paracrine co-culture systems (P ≤ 0.05). CX43 was much more highly expressed in the granulosa of the direct contact group than the indirect co-culture group. These results indicate the difference in mutual communication between oocytes and granulosa cells that were cocultured either in direct contact (juxtacrine) or with a short distance (paracrine) and propose a new paradigm to study different ovarian follicular cells interaction.

  17. 24 CFR 203.420 - Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. 203.420 Section 203.420 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... and Distributive Shares § 203.420 Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. The Mutual...

  18. 24 CFR 203.420 - Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. 203.420 Section 203.420 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... and Distributive Shares § 203.420 Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. The Mutual...

  19. Mutuality in Mother-Child Interactions in an Antillean Intervention Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boomstra, Nienke W.; van Dijk, Marijn W. G.; van Geert, Paul L. C.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a study on mutuality in mother-child interaction during reading and playing sessions. Within mother-child interaction, mutuality is seen as important in language acquisition. The study was executed within a group of Netherlands Antillean mother-child dyads who participated in an intervention programme. Mutuality was…

  20. Mutuality as an Aspect of Family Functioning in Predicting Eating Disorder Symptoms in College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanftner, Jennifer L.; Cameron, Rebecca P.; Tantillo, Mary; Heigel, Caron P.; Martin, David Myron; Sippel-Silowash, Julie Ann; Taggart, Jane M.

    2006-01-01

    We examined mutuality, an aspect of Relational Cultural Theory, in an ethnically diverse sample of 397 college women from Midwestern and Western universities. We hypothesized that mutuality would predict scores on an eating disorder scale after controlling for traditional family variables, such as expressed emotion. As predicted, mutuality, as…

  1. 12 CFR 575.12 - Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... companies. 575.12 Section 575.12 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.12 Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies. (a) Conversion—(1) Generally. A mutual holding company may convert to the stock form in accordance with the...

  2. 12 CFR 575.12 - Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... companies. 575.12 Section 575.12 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.12 Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies. (a) Conversion—(1) Generally. A mutual holding company may convert to the stock form in accordance with the...

  3. 12 CFR 575.12 - Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... companies. 575.12 Section 575.12 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.12 Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies. (a) Conversion—(1) Generally. A mutual holding company may convert to the stock form in accordance with the...

  4. Parent-Child Mutuality in Early Childhood: Two Behavioral Genetic Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deater-Deckard, Kirby; O'Connor, Thomas G.

    2000-01-01

    Used quantitative genetic design to examine between- and within-family variations and gene-environment processes in parent-child mutuality among 3-year-old identical and same-sex fraternal twins. Found that greater mutuality was associated with higher socioeconomic status. Moderate sibling similarity in parent-child mutuality was accounted for by…

  5. 12 CFR 250.406 - Serving member bank and investment advisor with mutual fund affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... several years served a number of different open-end or mutual funds, as well as individuals, institutions... has consistently held that an open-end or mutual fund is engaged in the activities described in... open-end or mutual funds, the Board has expressed the view in a number of cases that where...

  6. 12 CFR 250.406 - Serving member bank and investment advisor with mutual fund affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... several years served a number of different open-end or mutual funds, as well as individuals, institutions... has consistently held that an open-end or mutual fund is engaged in the activities described in... open-end or mutual funds, the Board has expressed the view in a number of cases that where...

  7. 12 CFR 250.406 - Serving member bank and investment advisor with mutual fund affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... several years served a number of different open-end or mutual funds, as well as individuals, institutions... has consistently held that an open-end or mutual fund is engaged in the activities described in... open-end or mutual funds, the Board has expressed the view in a number of cases that where...

  8. 12 CFR 250.406 - Serving member bank and investment advisor with mutual fund affiliation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... several years served a number of different open-end or mutual funds, as well as individuals, institutions... has consistently held that an open-end or mutual fund is engaged in the activities described in... open-end or mutual funds, the Board has expressed the view in a number of cases that where...

  9. Membrane magic

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, B.

    2005-09-01

    The Kansas Power and Light Co.'s La Cyne generating station has found success with membrane filtration water pretreatment technology. The article recounts the process followed in late 2004 to install a Pall Aria 4 microfilter in Unit 1 makeup water system at the plant to produce cleaner water for reverse osmosis feed. 2 figs., 2 photos.

  10. Effects of fading and interference in narrowband land-mobile networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnartz, Johan Paul Marie Gerard

    1991-05-01

    The performance of mobile radio systems with narrowband radio channels is studied. Several results of previous research are included. In particular, the effects of multipath and shadow 'fading' and of mutual 'interference' between mobile users is investigated. To this end, initially the relevant propagation mechanisms are addressed, focusing on statistical channel models. For the planning of real systems, the suitability of some propagation models using terrain data is empirically evaluated. The statistical channel description is used to compute the performance of mobile radio links. Expressions are given for the outage probability and for the average duration of fades, taking account of mutual interference between users. A simplified model for the bit error rate in digital transmission is proposed. Numerical results are given for mobile telephone networks.

  11. Volume 4 - Mobile Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mobile source reference material for activity data collection from the Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP). Provides complete methods for collecting key inputs to onroad mobile and nonroad mobile emissions models.

  12. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  13. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  14. Characterization of actinobacteria associated with three ant-plant mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Hanshew, Alissa S; McDonald, Bradon R; Díaz Díaz, Carol; Djiéto-Lordon, Champlain; Blatrix, Rumsaïs; Currie, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Ant-plant mutualisms are conspicuous and ecologically important components of tropical ecosystems that remain largely unexplored in terms of insect-associated microbial communities. Recent work has revealed that ants in some ant-plant systems cultivate fungi (Chaetothyriales) within their domatia, which are fed to larvae. Using Pseudomyrmex penetrator/Tachigali sp. from French Guiana and Petalomyrmex phylax/Leonardoxa africana and Crematogaster margaritae/Keetia hispida, both from Cameroon, as models, we tested the hypothesis that ant-plant-fungus mutualisms co-occur with culturable Actinobacteria. Using selective media, we isolated 861 putative Actinobacteria from the three systems. All C. margaritae/K. hispida samples had culturable Actinobacteria with a mean of 10.0 colony forming units (CFUs) per sample, while 26 % of P. penetrator/Tachigali samples (mean CFUs 1.3) and 67 % of P. phylax/L. africana samples (mean CFUs 3.6) yielded Actinobacteria. The largest number of CFUs was obtained from P. penetrator workers, P. phylax alates, and C. margaritae pupae. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of four main clades of Streptomyces and one clade of Nocardioides within these three ant-plant mutualisms. Streptomyces with antifungal properties were isolated from all three systems, suggesting that they could serve as protective symbionts, as found in other insects. In addition, a number of isolates from a clade of Streptomyces associated with P. phylax/L. africana and C. margaritae/K. hispida were capable of degrading cellulose, suggesting that Streptomyces in these systems may serve a nutritional role. Repeated isolation of particular clades of Actinobacteria from two geographically distant locations supports these isolates as residents in ant-plant-fungi niches.

  15. Thirty Years of Natural Satellites Mutual Events Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlot, Jean-eudes; Events Observers, Mutual

    2009-09-01

    Phenomena in the Solar System have been observed for years: solar and lunar eclipses, occultations of stars by the Moon and the asteroids, eclipses of the satellites of Jupiter. Since 1973, mutual occultations and eclipses of the satellites of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus were observed extensively during each opportunity i.e. the equinox on the planet: why? The study of the systems of natural satellites needs to explore the dynamics of these objects: each small dynamical effect is the signature of some physical property. In order to validate the theoretical models, very accurate observations are needed. Most of the direct astrometric observations have their accuracy limited by the diffraction of the light in the telescope and by the star catalogues used for calibration. Phenomena have not this limitation: the accuracy is not in angle but in kilometres in space. Since, the observed satellites have no atmosphere, these photometric events are easy to analyse providing relative positions accurate to a few kilometres corresponding to a few mas in geocentric angle. More, during an occultation, the surface of the satellites may be studied: volcanoes of Io (positions and fluxes) were observed that way. Mutual events observations together with the best observations made since several decades allowed improving dynamical models of the satellites systems of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. Concerning Io, the dissipation of energy in its internal structure by the Jovian tides has been made into evidence thanks to fitting the models on accurate observations including mutual events. Eight observational campaigns were organized for the Jovian satellites, three for the Saturnians and one for the Uranians providing more than 1400 light curves (see the data base at http://www.imcce.fr/fr/ephemerides/generateur/saimirror/obsindhe.htm ). The author acknowledges the numerous observers worldwide who provide the observations, the observatories permitting observations and the French CNRS who

  16. Excess mutual catalysis is required for effective evolvability.

    PubMed

    Markovitch, Omer; Lancet, Doron

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that autocatalysis constitutes a crucial facet of effective replication and evolution (e.g., in Eigen's hypercycle model). Other models for early evolution (e.g., by Dyson, Gánti, Varela, and Kauffman) invoke catalytic networks, where cross-catalysis is more apparent. A key question is how the balance between auto- (self-) and cross- (mutual) catalysis shapes the behavior of model evolving systems. This is investigated using the graded autocatalysis replication domain (GARD) model, previously shown to capture essential features of reproduction, mutation, and evolution in compositional molecular assemblies. We have performed numerical simulations of an ensemble of GARD networks, each with a different set of lognormally distributed catalytic values. We asked what is the influence of the catalytic content of such networks on beneficial evolution. Importantly, a clear trend was observed, wherein only networks with high mutual catalysis propensity (p(mc)) allowed for an augmented diversity of composomes, quasi-stationary compositions that exhibit high replication fidelity. We have reexamined a recent analysis that showed meager selection in a single GARD instance and for a few nonstationary target compositions. In contrast, when we focused here on compotypes (clusters of composomes) as targets for selection in populations of compositional assemblies, appreciable selection response was observed for a large portion of the networks simulated. Further, stronger selection response was seen for high p(mc) values. Our simulations thus demonstrate that GARD can help analyze important facets of evolving systems, and indicate that excess mutual catalysis over self-catalysis is likely to be important for the emergence of molecular systems capable of evolutionlike behavior.

  17. Asymmetric Mutualism in Two- and Three-Dimensional Range Expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Nelson, David R.

    2014-04-01

    Genetic drift at the frontiers of two-dimensional range expansions of microorganisms can frustrate local cooperation between different genetic variants, demixing the population into distinct sectors. In a biological context, mutualistic or antagonistic interactions will typically be asymmetric between variants. By taking into account both the asymmetry and the interaction strength, we show that the much weaker demixing in three dimensions allows for a mutualistic phase over a much wider range of asymmetric cooperative benefits, with mutualism prevailing for any positive, symmetric benefit. We also demonstrate that expansions with undulating fronts roughen dramatically at the boundaries of the mutualistic phase, with severe consequences for the population genetics along the transition lines.

  18. Reconstruction of the mutual coherence function for a moving source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic radiation of a randomly fluctuating source in motion is characterized analytically to determine the mutual coherence function (MCF). A far-field relation is derived via a series of invertible transformations, and a higher-dimension Radon transformation is performed to reconstruct the MCF; explicit formulas for computing the MCF from the transformed radiation data are provided. The technique is applied to the cases of an axisymmetric line source of finite extent moving at constant velocity along a line and a spatially incoherent line source. Applications to X-ray tomography and analysis of the noise emitted by a moving jet aircraft are suggested.

  19. Cryptanalysis of Controlled Mutual Quantum Entity Authentication Using Entanglement Swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gan; Wang, Yue

    2017-01-01

    By using GHZ-like states and entanglement swapping, Kang et al. [Chin. Phys. B 24 (2015) 090306] proposed a controlled mutual quantum entity authentication protocol. We find that the proposed protocol is not secure, that is, the center, Charlie can eavesdrop the secret keys shared between Alice and Bob without being detected. Supported by the 2014-year Program for Excellent Youth Talents in University of Anhui Province and the Talent Scientific Research Fundation of Tongling University under Grant No. 2015tlxyrc01 and the Program for Academic Leader Reserve Candidates in Tongling University under Grant No. 2014tlxyxs30

  20. Stochastic mutualism model with Lévy jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qun; Jiang, Daqing; Shi, Ningzhong; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider a stochastic mutualism model with Lévy jumps. First of all, we show that the positive solution of the system is stochastically ultimate bounded. Then under a simple assumption, we establish sufficient and necessary conditions for the stochastic permanence and extinction of the system. The results show an important property of the Lévy jumps: they are unfavorable for the permanence of the species. Moreover, when there are no Lévy jumps, we show that there is a unique ergodic stationary distribution of the corresponding system under certain conditions. Some numerical simulations are introduced to validate the theoretical results.

  1. Mutual phenomena involving J5 Amalthea in 2002-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachier, F.; Arlot, J. E.; Thuillot, W.

    2002-10-01

    Every six years mutual eclipses and occultations occur among the Jovian system of satellites. Very accurate astrometric measurements and several physical characteristics of the surfaces can be infered from their observation. This paper is provide predictions of this type of events involving the fifth satellite J5 Amalthea, spanning from November 2002 to June 2003 and to urge astronomers to observe them. Only the predictions of the eclipses of Amalthea by Io are presented, when the distance between Amalthea-Io and Amalthea-Jutpiter is large enough for photometric purposes. A full list of phenomena is available on the server http://www.imcce.fr/Phemu03/phemu03_eng.html

  2. Quantised vortices and mutual friction in relativistic superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, N.; Wells, S.; Vickers, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the detailed dynamics of an array of quantised superfluid vortices in the framework of general relativity, as required for quantitative modelling of realistic neutron star cores. Our model builds on the variational approach to relativistic (multi-) fluid dynamics, where the vorticity plays a central role. The description provides a natural extension of, and a better insight into, existing Newtonian models. In particular, we account for the mutual friction associated with scattering of a second ‘normal’ component in the mixture off of the superfluid vortices. This is an important step which facilitates the connection with the involved microphysics.

  3. Optimization of stable quadruped locomotion using mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pedro; Santos, Cristina P.; Polani, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    Central Pattern Generators (CPG)s have been widely used in the field of robotics to address the task of legged locomotion generation. The adequate configuration of these structures for a given platform can be accessed through evolutionary strategies, according to task dependent selection pressures. Information driven evolution, accounts for information theoretical measures as selection pressures, as an alternative to a fully task dependent selection pressure. In this work we exploit this concept and evaluate the use of mean Mutual Information, as a selection pressure towards a CPG configuration capable of faster, yet more coordinated and stabler locomotion than when only a task dependent selection pressure is used.

  4. Estimation and classification by sigmoids based on mutual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram

    1994-01-01

    An estimate of the probability density function of a random vector is obtained by maximizing the mutual information between the input and the output of a feedforward network of sigmoidal units with respect to the input weights. Classification problems can be solved by selecting the class associated with the maximal estimated density. Newton's s method, applied to an estimated density, yields a recursive maximum likelihood estimator, consisting of a single internal layer of sigmoids, for a random variable or a random sequence. Applications to the diamond classification and to the prediction of a sun-spot process are demonstrated.

  5. Paul Drude's Prediction of Nonreciprocal Mutual Inductance for Tesla Transformers

    PubMed Central

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed. PMID:25542040

  6. Mutual moral caring actions: a framework for community nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Lange, Bernadette

    2006-01-01

    A community practice framework is presented as the synthesis of research findings from the analysis of a critical ethnonursing study of women in recovery from chemical dependence. Critical Social Theory is used to examine the paradoxical experiences of women from their lifeworld and system within the community. The framework focuses on the mutual moral caring actions of the community nurse and the women in the recovery. It is supported by the concepts of transcultural nursing ethics. The utility of the framework is to promote clarity of speech and parity of community membership for women in recovery from chemical dependence and their return to the community.

  7. 2007 Mutual events within the binary system of (22) Kalliope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, P.; Marchis, F.; Pollock, J.; Berthier, J.; Birlan, M.; Vachier, F.; Colas, F.

    2008-11-01

    In 2007, the asteroid Kalliope will reach one of its annual equinoxes. As a consequence, its small satellite Linus orbiting in the equatorial plane will undergo a season of mutual eclipses and occultations very similar to the one that the Galilean satellites undergo every 6 years. This paper is aimed at preparing a campaign of observations of these mutual events occurring from February to May 2007. This opportunity occurs only under favorable geometric conditions when the Sun and/or the Earth are close to the orbital plane of the system. This is the first international campaign devoted to the observation of photometric events within an asynchronous asteroidal binary system. We took advantage of a reliable orbit solution of Linus to predict a series of 24 mutual eclipses and 12 mutual occultations observable in the spring of 2007. Thanks to the brightness of Kalliope ( mv≃11), these observations are easy to perform even with a small telescope. Anomalous attenuation events could be observed lasting for about 1-3 h with amplitude up to 0.09 mag. The attenuations are of two distinct types that can clearly be identified as primary and secondary eclipses similar to those that have been previously observed in other minor planet binary systems [Pravec, P., Scheirich, P., Kusnirák, P., Sarounová, L., Mottola, S., Hahn, G., Brown, P., Esquerdo, G., Kaiser, N., Krzeminski, Z., Pray, D.P., Warner, B.D., Harris, A.W., Nolan, M.C., Howell, E.S., Benner, L.A.M., Margot, J.-L., Galád, A., Holliday, W., Hicks, M.D., Krugly, Yu.N., Tholen, D., Whiteley, R., Marchis, F., Degraff, D.R., Grauer, A., Larson, S., Velichko, F.P., Cooney, W.R., Stephens, R., Zhu, J., Kirsch, K., Dyvig, R., Snyder, L., Reddy, V., Moore, S., Gajdos, S., Világi, J., Masi, G., Higgins, D., Funkhouser, G., Knight, B., Slivan, S., Behrend, R., Grenon, M., Burki, G., Roy, R., Demeautis, C., Matter, D., Waelchli, N., Revaz, Y., Klotz, A., Rieugné, M., Thierry, P., Cotrez, V., Brunetto, L., Kober, G., 2006

  8. Depth-Dependent Organization and Dynamics of Archaeal and Eukaryotic Membranes: Development of Membrane Anisotropy Gradient with Natural Evolution.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Hirak; Haldar, Sourav; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau; Kombrabail, Mamata; Krishnamoorthy, G; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-10-27

    The lipid composition of archaea is unique and has been correlated with increased stability under extreme environmental conditions. In this article, we have focused on the evolution of membrane organization and dynamics with natural evolution. Dynamic anisotropy along the membrane normal (i.e., gradients of mobility, polarity, and heterogeneity) is a hallmark of fluid phase diester or diether phospholipid membranes. We monitored gradients of mobility, polarity, and heterogeneity along the membrane normal in membranes made of a representative archaeal lipid using a series of membrane depth-dependent fluorescent probes, and compared them to membranes prepared from a typical diether lipid from higher organisms (eukaryotes). Our results show that the representative dynamic anisotropy gradient along the membrane normal is absent in membranes made from archaeal lipids. We hypothesize that the dynamic gradient observed in membranes of diester and diether phospholipids is a consequence of natural evolution of membrane lipids in response to the requirement of carrying out complex cellular functions by membrane proteins.

  9. The Impact on the Education Service of Teacher Mobility: A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Metais, Joanna

    In December 1988 the Council of the European Communities adopted a directive to promote teacher mobility throughout the European Community (EC) by defining mutual qualifications. The purpose of this report is to assess the impact of the initiative on educational services. Chapter 1 is an introduction. Chapter 2 examines teacher recruitment…

  10. Measuring The Electric Properties of Planetary Surface Materials With Mutual Impedance (mi) Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautner, R.; Grard, R.

    Mutual Impedance Probes have been developed for a number of ongoing space mis- sions. The HASI/PWA MI probe will determine the electric properties of the atmo- sphere and surface of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, in 2004. The Permittivity Probe of the SESAME instrument package on the Rosetta Lander will attempt to measure the conductivity and permittivity of the cometary surface material. While both instruments have similar objectives, their architecture (design and integration into the spacecraft, electrode geometry) and properties (measurement range and precision) differ signif- icantly. The main features of the Huygens PWA and Rosetta Lander SESAME MI probes are first recapitulated and their expected performances are assessed. A new MI probe prototype employing a linear electrode array for application on mobile platforms or penetrator devices is then described. Results from a recent field test campaign in the Australian desert are presented and the prototype performance is evaluated. New application areas for future MI probes and relevant technology requirements are dis- cussed.

  11. Measuring the electric properties of planetary environments with Mutual Impedance (MI) Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautner, R.; Grard, R.

    2002-10-01

    Mutual Impedance Probes measure the complex permittivity of material by means of a quadrupolar array of electrodes and associated electronics for generating, recording and processing waveforms. MI instruments have been developed for a number of ongoing space missions. The HASI/PWA MI probe will determine the electric properties of the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon, during the descent of the Huygens probe. After landing, the instrument will provide data on the properties of Titan's surface materials. The permittivity probe PP, as part of the SESAME instrument package for the Rosetta Lander, will determine the electrical properties of comet Wirtanen's surface. The main features of MI probes are first recapitulated. Instrument architectures for atmospheric, surface and subsurface investigations are described. Results from recent field test campaigns in harsh environments are presented. A new MI probe prototype employing a linear electrode array for application on mobile platforms or on penetrator devices is described. New application areas for future MI probes and relevant technology requirements are discussed.

  12. Design, Synthesis and Hydrolytic Behavior of Mutual Prodrugs of NSAIDs with Gabapentin Using Glycol Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Monther Faisal; Alsaad, Hiba Najeh

    2012-01-01

    The free –COOH present in NSAIDs is thought to be responsible for the GI irritation associated with all traditional NSAIDs. Exploitation of mutual prodrugs is an approach wherein the NSAID is covalently bounded to a second pharmacologically active carrier/drug with the ultimate aim of reducing the gastric irritation. In this study some NSAIDs were conjugated with gabapentin via ester bonds using glycol spacers with the expectation of reducing gastric adverse effects and obtaining synergistic analgesic effects. The kinetics of ester hydrolysis were studied in two different non enzymatic buffer solutions at pH 1.2 and 7.4, as well as in 80% human plasma using HPLC with chloroform -methanol as mobile phase. Compounds 9a–c with ethylene glycol spacers showed significant stability at buffer solutions with half lives ranging from about 8–25 h, while the underwent a reasonable plasma hydrolysis (49%–88%) in 2 h. Compound 9d with a propylene glycol spacer shows a higher rate of enzymatic hydrolysis than the corresponding ethylene glycol compound 9c. The result of compounds 9a-c indicate that these compounds may be stable during their passage through the GIT until reaching the blood circulation. PMID:24281258

  13. A novel plant-fungal mutualism associated with fire.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Melissa; Newcombe, George; Dixon, Linley; Castlebury, Lisa; O'Donnell, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Bromus tectorum, or cheatgrass, is native to Eurasia and widely invasive in western North America. By late spring, this annual plant has dispersed its seed and died; its aboveground biomass then becomes fine fuel that burns as frequently as once every 3-5 y in its invaded range. Cheatgrass has proven to be better adapted to fire there than many competing plants, but the contribution of its fungal symbionts to this adaptation had not previously been studied. In sampling cheatgrass endophytes, many fire-associated fungi were found, including Morchella in three western states (New Mexico, Idaho, and Washington). In greenhouse experiments, a New Mexico isolate of Morchella increased both the biomass and fecundity of its local cheatgrass population, thus simultaneously increasing both the probability of fire and survival of that event, via more fuel and a greater, belowground seed bank, respectively. Re-isolation efforts proved that Morchella could infect cheatgrass roots in a non-mycorrhizal manner and then grow up into aboveground tissues. The same Morchella isolate also increased survival of seed exposed to heat typical of that which develops in the seed bank during a cheatgrass fire. Phylogenetic analysis of Eurasian and North American Morchella revealed that this fire-associated mutualism was evolutionarily novel, in that cheatgrass isolates belonged to two phylogenetically distinct species, or phylotypes, designated Mel-6 and Mel-12 whose evolutionary origin appears to be within western North America. Mutualisms with fire-associated fungi may be contributing to the cheatgrass invasion of western North America.

  14. Mutual influences of pain and emotional face processing

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Matthias J.; Gerdes, Antje B. M.; Reicherts, Philipp; Pauli, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The perception of unpleasant stimuli enhances whereas the perception of pleasant stimuli decreases pain perception. In contrast, the effects of pain on the processing of emotional stimuli are much less known. Especially given the recent interest in facial expressions of pain as a special category of emotional stimuli, a main topic in this research line is the mutual influence of pain and facial expression processing. Therefore, in this mini-review we selectively summarize research on the effects of emotional stimuli on pain, but more extensively turn to the opposite direction namely how pain influences concurrent processing of affective stimuli such as facial expressions. Based on the motivational priming theory one may hypothesize that the perception of pain enhances the processing of unpleasant stimuli and decreases the processing of pleasant stimuli. This review reveals that the literature is only partly consistent with this assumption: pain reduces the processing of pleasant pictures and happy facial expressions, but does not – or only partly – affect processing of unpleasant pictures. However, it was demonstrated that pain selectively enhances the processing of facial expressions if these are pain-related (i.e., facial expressions of pain). Extending a mere affective modulation theory, the latter results suggest pain-specific effects which may be explained by the perception-action model of empathy. Together, these results underscore the important mutual influence of pain and emotional face processing. PMID:25352817

  15. Sufficient dimension reduction via squared-loss mutual information estimation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Taiji; Sugiyama, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    The goal of sufficient dimension reduction in supervised learning is to find the low-dimensional subspace of input features that contains all of the information about the output values that the input features possess. In this letter, we propose a novel sufficient dimension-reduction method using a squared-loss variant of mutual information as a dependency measure. We apply a density-ratio estimator for approximating squared-loss mutual information that is formulated as a minimum contrast estimator on parametric or nonparametric models. Since cross-validation is available for choosing an appropriate model, our method does not require any prespecified structure on the underlying distributions. We elucidate the asymptotic bias of our estimator on parametric models and the asymptotic convergence rate on nonparametric models. The convergence analysis utilizes the uniform tail-bound of a U-process, and the convergence rate is characterized by the bracketing entropy of the model. We then develop a natural gradient algorithm on the Grassmann manifold for sufficient subspace search. The analytic formula of our estimator allows us to compute the gradient efficiently. Numerical experiments show that the proposed method compares favorably with existing dimension-reduction approaches on artificial and benchmark data sets.

  16. Symbolic representation on geographic concepts and their mutual relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Li; Chen, Yijin; Zhou, Danhui

    2006-10-01

    Cartographic language has the characteristics of natural language. As the vocabulary in cartographic language, cartographic symbols are composed of exterior form and idealistic content. Geographic concepts are the essential attribute of geographic objects and cell of geographic thinking. Geographic concepts are thinking form of human brain and are invisible, which only needed to be represented by a certain form. Aiming at the problem of symbolic representation in geographic concepts and their mutual relationships, the geometrical composition of symbols of large scale topographic maps and the semantic and geometrical relationships among symbols were analyzed, the symbols system of topographic maps was regarded as a two-dimensional graphic language, and the relationship between symbols and geographic concepts was discussed. According to concept of logic and geometrical shape of symbols the represented categories of geographic concepts and their mutual relationships on the basis of symbols of topographic maps were defined and the actual examples were given, which provides the use for reference for studying cartographic language by logic method.

  17. Mutual information measures applied to EEG signals for sleepiness characterization.

    PubMed

    Melia, Umberto; Guaita, Marc; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Embid, Cristina; Vilaseca, Isabel; Salamero, Manel; Santamaria, Joan

    2015-03-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is one of the main symptoms of several sleep related disorders with a great impact on the patient lives. While many studies have been carried out in order to assess daytime sleepiness, the automatic EDS detection still remains an open problem. In this work, a novel approach to this issue based on non-linear dynamical analysis of EEG signal was proposed. Multichannel EEG signals were recorded during five maintenance of wakefulness (MWT) and multiple sleep latency (MSLT) tests alternated throughout the day from patients suffering from sleep disordered breathing. A group of 20 patients with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) was compared with a group of 20 patients without daytime sleepiness (WDS), by analyzing 60-s EEG windows in waking state. Measures obtained from cross-mutual information function (CMIF) and auto-mutual-information function (AMIF) were calculated in the EEG. These functions permitted a quantification of the complexity properties of the EEG signal and the non-linear couplings between different zones of the scalp. Statistical differences between EDS and WDS groups were found in β band during MSLT events (p-value < 0.0001). WDS group presented more complexity than EDS in the occipital zone, while a stronger nonlinear coupling between occipital and frontal zones was detected in EDS patients than in WDS. The AMIF and CMIF measures yielded sensitivity and specificity above 80% and AUC of ROC above 0.85 in classifying EDS and WDS patients.

  18. Aggressive mimicry coexists with mutualism in an aphid.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Adrián; Fürstenau, Benjamin; Quero, Carmen; Pérez-Hidalgo, Nicolás; Carazo, Pau; Font, Enrique; Martínez-Torres, David

    2015-01-27

    Understanding the evolutionary transition from interspecific exploitation to cooperation is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Ant-aphid relationships represent an ideal system to this end because they encompass a coevolutionary continuum of interactions ranging from mutualism to antagonism. In this study, we report an unprecedented interaction along this continuum: aggressive mimicry in aphids. We show that two morphs clonally produced by the aphid Paracletus cimiciformis during its root-dwelling phase establish relationships with ants at opposite sides of the mutualism-antagonism continuum. Although one of these morphs exhibits the conventional trophobiotic (mutualistic) relationship with ants of the genus Tetramorium, aphids of the alternative morph are transported by the ants to their brood chamber and cared for as if they were true ant larvae. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses reveal that the innate cuticular hydrocarbon profile of the mimic morph resembles the profile of ant larvae more than that of the alternative, genetically identical nonmimic morph. Furthermore, we show that, once in the brood chamber, mimic aphids suck on ant larva hemolymph. These results not only add aphids to the limited list of arthropods known to biosynthesize the cuticular chemicals of their deceived hosts to exploit their resources but describe a remarkable case of plastic aggressive mimicry. The present work adds a previously unidentified dimension to the classical textbook paradigm of aphid-ant relationships by showcasing a complex system at the evolutionary interface between cooperation and exploitation.

  19. Reward value comparison via mutual inhibition in ventromedial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Strait, Caleb E.; Blanchard, Tommy C.; Hayden, Benjamin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Recent theories suggest that reward-based choice reflects competition between value signals in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). We tested this idea by recording vmPFC neurons while macaques performed a gambling task with asynchronous offer presentation. We found that neuronal activity shows four patterns consistent with selection via mutual inhibition. (1) Correlated tuning for probability and reward size, suggesting that vmPFC carries an integrated value signal, (2) anti-correlated tuning curves for the two options, suggesting mutual inhibition, (3) neurons rapidly come to signal the value of the chosen offer, suggesting the circuit serves to produce a choice, (4) after regressing out the effects of option values, firing rates still could predict choice – a choice probability signal. In addition, neurons signaled gamble outcomes, suggesting that vmPFC contributes to both monitoring and choice processes. These data suggest a possible mechanism for reward-based choice and endorse the centrality of vmPFC in that process. PMID:24881835

  20. An invasive slug exploits an ant-seed dispersal mutualism.

    PubMed

    Meadley Dunphy, Shannon A; Prior, Kirsten M; Frederickson, Megan E

    2016-05-01

    Plant-animal mutualisms, such as seed dispersal, are often vulnerable to disruption by invasive species. Here, we show for the first time how a non-ant invasive species negatively affects seed dispersal by ants. We examined the effects of several animal species that co-occur in a temperate deciduous forest-including native and invasive seed-dispersing ants (Aphaenogaster rudis and Myrmica rubra, respectively), an invasive slug (Arion subfuscus), and native rodents-on a native myrmecochorous plant, Asarum canadense. We experimentally manipulated ant, slug, and rodent access to seed depots and measured seed removal. We also video-recorded depots to determine which other taxa interact with seeds. We found that A. rudis was the main disperser of seeds and that A. subfuscus consumed elaiosomes without dispersing seeds. Rodent visitation was rare, and rodent exclusion had no significant effect on seed or elaiosome removal. We then used data obtained from laboratory and field mesocosm experiments to determine how elaiosome robbing by A. subfuscus affects seed dispersal by A. rudis and M. rubra. We found that elaiosome robbing by slugs reduced seed dispersal by ants, especially in mesocosms with A. rudis, which picks up seeds more slowly than M. rubra. Taken together, our results show that elaiosome robbing by an invasive slug reduces seed dispersal by ants, suggesting that invasive slugs can have profound negative effects on seed dispersal mutualisms.

  1. Mutual positive effects between shrubs in an arid ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Tirado, Reyes; Bråthen, Kari Anne; Pugnaire, Francisco I.

    2015-01-01

    One-way facilitation in plants has been found in many harsh environments and their role as structural forces governing species composition in plant communities is now well established. However, reciprocal positive effects benefiting two interacting species have seldom been reported and, in recent reviews, conceptually considered merely as facilitation when in fact there is room for adaptive strategies and evolutionary responses. We tested the existence of such reciprocal positive effects in an arid environment in SE Spain using spatial pattern analysis, a species removal experiment, and a natural experiment. We found that the spatial association between Maytenus senegalensis and Whitania frutescens, two shrub species of roughly similar size intimately interacting in our community, resulted in mutual benefit for both species. Benefits included improved water relations and nutritional status and protection against browsing, and did occur despite simultaneous competition for resources. Our data suggest two-way facilitation or, rather, a facultative mutualism among higher plant species, a process often overlooked which could be a main driver of plant community dynamics allowing for evolutionary processes. PMID:26419958

  2. Permutation auto-mutual information of electroencephalogram in anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Voss, Logan J.; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Li, Xiaoli

    2013-04-01

    Objective. The dynamic change of brain activity in anesthesia is an interesting topic for clinical doctors and drug designers. To explore the dynamical features of brain activity in anesthesia, a permutation auto-mutual information (PAMI) method is proposed to measure the information coupling of electroencephalogram (EEG) time series obtained in anesthesia. Approach. The PAMI is developed and applied on EEG data collected from 19 patients under sevoflurane anesthesia. The results are compared with the traditional auto-mutual information (AMI), SynchFastSlow (SFS, derived from the BIS index), permutation entropy (PE), composite PE (CPE), response entropy (RE) and state entropy (SE). Performance of all indices is assessed by pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and prediction probability. Main results. The PK/PD modeling and prediction probability analysis show that the PAMI index correlates closely with the anesthetic effect. The coefficient of determination R2 between PAMI values and the sevoflurane effect site concentrations, and the prediction probability Pk are higher in comparison with other indices. The information coupling in EEG series can be applied to indicate the effect of the anesthetic drug sevoflurane on the brain activity as well as other indices. The PAMI of the EEG signals is suggested as a new index to track drug concentration change. Significance. The PAMI is a useful index for analyzing the EEG dynamics during general anesthesia.

  3. Inflammation and colorectal cancer, when microbiota-host mutualism breaks.

    PubMed

    Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Carbonero, Franck; Rampelli, Simone; Fiorentini, Carla; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2014-01-28

    Structural changes in the gut microbial community have been shown to accompany the progressive development of colorectal cancer. In this review we discuss recent hypotheses on the mechanisms involved in the bacteria-mediated carcinogenesis, as well as the triggering factors favoring the shift of the gut microbiota from a mutualistic to a pro-carcinogenic configuration. The possible role of inflammation, bacterial toxins and toxic microbiota metabolites in colorectal cancer onset is specifically discussed. On the other hand, the strategic role of inflammation as the keystone factor in driving microbiota to become carcinogenic is suggested. As a common outcome of different environmental and endogenous triggers, such as diet, aging, pathogen infection or genetic predisposition, inflammation can compromise the microbiota-host mutualism, forcing the increase of pathobionts at the expense of health-promoting groups, and allowing the microbiota to acquire an overall pro-inflammatory configuration. Consolidating inflammation in the gut, and favoring the bloom of toxigenic bacterial drivers, these changes in the gut microbial ecosystem have been suggested as pivotal in promoting carcinogenesis. In this context, it will become of primary importance to implement dietary or probiotics-based interventions aimed at preserving the microbiota-host mutualism along aging, counteracting deviations that favor a pro-carcinogenic microbiota asset.

  4. Mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Shakibian, Hadi; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a number of meta-path based similarity indices like PathSim, HeteSim, and random walk have been proposed for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. However, these indices suffer from two major drawbacks. Firstly, they are primarily dependent on the connectivity degrees of node pairs without considering the further information provided by the given meta-path. Secondly, most of them are required to use a single and usually symmetric meta-path in advance. Hence, employing a set of different meta-paths is not straightforward. To tackle with these problems, we propose a mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. The proposed model, called as Meta-path based Mutual Information Index (MMI), introduces meta-path based link entropy to estimate the link likelihood and could be carried on a set of available meta-paths. This estimation measures the amount of information through the paths instead of measuring the amount of connectivity between the node pairs. The experimental results on a Bibliography network show that the MMI obtains high prediction accuracy compared with other popular similarity indices. PMID:28344326

  5. Classical mutual information in mean-field spin glass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba, Vincenzo; Inglis, Stephen; Pollet, Lode

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the classical Rényi entropy Sn and the associated mutual information In in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (S-K) model, which is the paradigm model of mean-field spin glasses. Using classical Monte Carlo simulations and analytical tools we investigate the S-K model in the n -sheet booklet. This is achieved by gluing together n independent copies of the model, and it is the main ingredient for constructing the Rényi entanglement-related quantities. We find a glassy phase at low temperatures, whereas at high temperatures the model exhibits paramagnetic behavior, consistent with the regular S-K model. The temperature of the paramagnetic-glassy transition depends nontrivially on the geometry of the booklet. At high temperatures we provide the exact solution of the model by exploiting the replica symmetry. This is the permutation symmetry among the fictitious replicas that are used to perform disorder averages (via the replica trick). In the glassy phase the replica symmetry has to be broken. Using a generalization of the Parisi solution, we provide analytical results for Sn and In and for standard thermodynamic quantities. Both Sn and In exhibit a volume law in the whole phase diagram. We characterize the behavior of the corresponding densities, Sn/N and In/N , in the thermodynamic limit. Interestingly, at the critical point the mutual information does not exhibit any crossing for different system sizes, in contrast with local spin models.

  6. Electrophoretic Transport of Biomolecules through Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinghua; Su, Xin; Wu, Ji; Hinds, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophoretic transport of proteins across electrochemically oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes has been investigated. Small charged protein, lysozyme, was successfully pumped across MWCNT membranes by electric field while rejecting larger bovine serum albumin (BSA). Transport of the lysozome was reduced by a factor of about 30 in comparison to bulk mobility and consistent with prediction for hindered transport. Mobilities between 0.33-1.4×10-9 m2/V-s were observed and are approximately 10 fold faster than comparable ordered nanoporous membranes and are consistent with continuum models. For mixtures of BSA and lysozyme, complete rejection of BSA is seen with electrophoretic separations PMID:21338104

  7. Omniphobic Membrane for Robust Membrane Distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, SH; Nejati, S; Boo, C; Hu, YX; Osuji, CO; Ehmelech, M

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we fabricate an omniphobic microporous membrane for membrane distillation (MD) by modifying a hydrophilic glass fiber membrane with silica nanoparticles followed by surface fluorination and polymer coating. The modified glass fiber membrane exhibits an anti-wetting property not only against water but also against low surface tension organic solvents that easily wet a hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane that is commonly used in MD applications. By comparing the performance of the PTFE and omniphobic membranes in direct contact MD experiments in the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), we show that SDS wets the hydrophobic PTFE membrane but not the omniphobic membrane. Our results suggest that omniphobic membranes are critical for MD applications with feed waters containing surface active species, such as oil and gas produced water, to prevent membrane pore wetting.

  8. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O’Neill, Hugh; Liberton, Michelle; ...

    2016-01-21

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolutionmore » inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. We find our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. Lastly, these observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture.« less

  9. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O’Neill, Hugh; Urban, Volker S.; Ohl, Michael

    2016-01-21

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. We find our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. Lastly, these observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture.

  10. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O’Neill, Hugh; Liberton, Michelle; Urban, Volker S.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ohl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. Our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. These observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture.

  11. Interaction of tau protein with model lipid membranes induces tau structural compaction and membrane disruption

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emmalee M.; Dubey, Manish; Camp, Phillip J.; Vernon, Briana C.; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Chi, Eva Y.

    2012-01-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of the intrinsically disordered, microtubule-associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanisms of tau aggregation and toxicity remain unknown. Recent work has shown that lipid membrane can induce tau aggregation and that membrane permeabilization may serve as a pathway by which protein aggregates exert toxicity, suggesting that the plasma membrane may play dual roles in tau pathology. This prompted our investigation to assess tau's propensity to interact with membranes and to elucidate the mutually disruptive structural perturbations the interactions induce in both tau and the membrane. We show that although highly charged and soluble, the full-length tau (hTau40) is also highly surface active, selectively inserts into anionic DMPG lipid monolayers and induces membrane morphological changes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of hTau40 associated with lipid membranes, X-ray and neutron scattering techniques are utilized. X-ray reflectivity indicates hTau40's presence underneath a DMPG monolayer and penetration into the lipid headgroups and tailgroups, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction shows that hTau40 insertion disrupts lipid packing. Moreover, both air/water and DMPG lipid membrane interfaces induce the disordered hTau40 to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to that of a folded protein. Neutron reflectivity shows that tau completely disrupts supported DMPG bilayers while leaving the neutral DPPC bilayer intact. Our results show that hTau40's strong interaction with anionic lipids induces tau structural compaction and membrane disruption, suggesting possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation and toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22401494

  12. Geometry of membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Vadim A; Escalada, Artur; Akimov, Sergey A; Shnyrova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes define the functional geometry of intracellular space. Formation of new membrane compartments and maintenance of complex organelles require division and disconnection of cellular membranes, a process termed membrane fission. Peripheral membrane proteins generally control membrane remodeling during fission. Local membrane stresses, reflecting molecular geometry of membrane-interacting parts of these proteins, sum up to produce the key membrane geometries of fission: the saddle-shaped neck and hour-glass hemifission intermediate. Here, we review the fundamental principles behind the translation of molecular geometry into membrane shape and topology during fission. We emphasize the central role the membrane insertion of specialized protein domains plays in orchestrating fission in vitro and in cells. We further compare individual to synergistic action of the membrane insertion during fission mediated by individual protein species, proteins complexes or membrane domains. Finally, we describe how local geometry of fission intermediates defines the functional design of the protein complexes catalyzing fission of cellular membranes.

  13. Miniature Ion-Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would be fabricated by micromachining. Unlike prior ion-mobility spectrometers, the proposed instrument would not be based on a time-of-flight principle and, consequently, would not have some of the disadvantageous characteristics of prior time-of-flight ion-mobility spectrometers. For example, one of these characteristics is the need for a bulky carrier-gas-feeding subsystem that includes a shutter gate to provide short pulses of gas in order to generate short pulses of ions. For another example, there is need for a complex device to generate pulses of ions from the pulses of gas and the device is capable of ionizing only a fraction of the incoming gas molecules; these characteristics preclude miniaturization. In contrast, the proposed instrument would not require a carrier-gas-feeding subsystem and would include a simple, highly compact device that would ionize all the molecules passing through it. The ionization device in the proposed instrument would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several megavolts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. Ionization (but not avalanche arcing) would occur because the distance between the ionizing electrodes would be less than the mean free path of gas molecules at the operating pressure of instrument. An accelerating grid would be located inside the instrument, downstream from the ionizing membrane. The electric potential applied to this grid would be negative relative to the potential on the inside electrode of the ionizing membrane and would be of a magnitude sufficient to

  14. Mutual Events in the Uranian satellite system in 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlot, J. E.

    2008-09-01

    The equinox time on the giant planets When the Sun crosses the equatorial plane of a giant planet, it is the equinox time occurring every half orbit of the planet, i.e. every 6 years for Jupiter, 14 years for Saturn, 42 years for Uranus and 82 years for Neptune. Except Neptune, each planet have several major satellites orbiting in the equatorial plane, then, during the equinox time, the satellites will eclipse each other mutually. Since the Earth follows the Sun, during the equinox time, a terrestrial observer will see each satellite occulting each other during the same period. These events may be observed with photometric receivers since the light from the satellites will decrease during the events. The light curve will provide information on the geometric configuration of the the satellites at the time of the event with an accuracy of a few kilometers, not depending on the distance of the satellite system. Then, we are able to get an astrometric observation with an accuracy several times better than using direct imaging for positions. Equinox on Uranus in 2007 In 2007, it was equinox time on Uranus. The Sun crossed the equatorial plane of Uranus on December 6, 2007. Since the opposition Uranus-Sun was at the end of August 2007, observations were performed from May to December 2007. Since the declination of Uranus was between -5 and -6 degrees, observations were better to make in the southern hemisphere. However, some difficulties had to be solved: the faintness of the satellites (magnitude between 14 and 16), the brightness of the planet (magnitude 5) making difficult the photometric observation of the satellites. The used of K' filter associated to a large telescope allows to increase the number of observable events. Dynamics of the Uranian satellites One of the goals of the observations was to evaluate the accuracy of the current dynamical models of the motion of the satellites. This knowledge is important for several reasons: most of time the Uranian system is

  15. Discriminative host sanctions in a fig-wasp mutualism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Wu; Dunn, Derek W; Sun, Bao Fa

    2014-05-01

    In some mutualisms, cooperation in symbionts is promoted by hosts sanctioning "cheats," who obtain benefits but fail to reciprocate. In fig-wasp mutualisms, agaonid wasps pollinate the trees (Ficus spp.), but are also exploitative by using some flowers as larval food. Ficus can sanction cheats that fail to pollinate by aborting some un-pollinated figs. However, in those un-pollinated figs retained by trees, cheats successfully reproduce. When this occurs, wasp broods are reduced, suggesting sanctions increase offspring mortality within un-pollinated figs. We investigated sanction mechanisms of abortion and larval mortality against wasp cheats in the monoecious Ficus racemosa by introducing into figs 1, 3, 5, 7, or 9 female wasps (foundresses) that were either all pollen-laden (P+) or all pollen-free (P-). The abortion rates of P- figs were highest (-60%) when single foundresses were present. Abortion declined with increased foundresses and ceased with seven or more wasps present, irrespective of pollination. In un-aborted figs, wasp fitness (mean offspring per foundress) declined as foundress number increased, especially in P- figs. Reduced broods in P- figs resulted from increased larval mortality of female offspring as foundress number increased, resulting in more male-biased sex ratios. Overall sanctions estimated from both abortion rates and reduced offspring production strengthened as the number of cheats increased. In a second experiment, we decoupled pollination from wasp oviposition by introducing one pollen-free foundress, followed 24 h later by seven pollen-laden ovipositor-excised wasps. Compared with P+ and P- single-foundress figs, delayed pollination resulted in intermediate larval mortality and wasp fitness, which concurred with patterns of female offspring production. We conclude that fig abortion reflects both pollinator numbers and pollen presence. Sanctions within P- figs initiate soon after oviposition and discriminate against female offspring

  16. Semipermeable thin-film membranes comprising siloxane, alkoxysilyl and aryloxysilyl oligomers and copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Babcock, W.C.; Friesen, D.T.

    1988-11-01

    Novel semipermeable membranes and thin film composite (TFC) gas separation membranes useful in the separation of oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, water vapor, methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, lower hydrocarbons, and other gases are disclosed. The novel semipermeable membranes comprise the polycondensation reaction product of two complementary polyfunctional compounds, each having at least two functional groups that are mutually reactive in a condensation polymerization reaction, and at least one of which is selected from siloxanes, alkoxsilyls and aryloxysilyls. The TFC membrane comprises a microporous polymeric support, the surface of which has the novel semipermeable film formed thereon, preferably by interfacial polymerization.

  17. Semipermeable thin-film membranes comprising siloxane, alkoxysilyl and aryloxysilyl oligomers and copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Babcock, Walter C.; Friesen, Dwayne T.

    1988-01-01

    Novel semiperimeable membranes and thin film composite (TFC) gas separation membranes useful in the separation of oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, water vapor, methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, lower hydrocarbons, and other gases are disclosed. The novel semipermeable membranes comprise the polycondensation reaction product of two complementary polyfunctional compounds, each having at least two functional groups that are mutually reactive in a condensation polymerization reaction, and at least one of which is selected from siloxanes, alkoxsilyls and aryloxysilyls. The TFC membrane comprises a microporous polymeric support, the surface of which has the novel semipermeable film formed thereon, preferably by interfacial polymerization.

  18. Mutual Aid Agreements: Essential Legal Tools for Public Health Preparedness and Response

    PubMed Central

    Stier, Daniel D.; Goodman, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Mutual aid is the sharing of supplies, equipment, personnel, and information across political boundaries. States must have agreements in place to ensure mutual aid to facilitate effective responses to public health emergencies and to detect and control potential infectious disease outbreaks. The 2005 hurricanes triggered activation of the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), a mutual aid agreement among the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands. Although EMAC facilitated the movement of an unprecedented amount of mutual aid to disaster areas, inadequacies in the response demonstrated a need for improvement. Mutual aid may also be beneficial in circumstances where EMAC is not activated. We discuss the importance of mutual aid, examine obstacles, and identify legal “gaps” that must be filled to strengthen preparedness. PMID:17413085

  19. Plant-fungus mutualism affects spider composition in successional fields.

    PubMed

    Finkes, Laura K; Cady, Alan B; Mulroy, Juliana C; Clay, Keith; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2006-03-01

    Mutualistic symbionts are widespread in plants and may have strong, bottom-up influences on community structure. Here we show that a grass-endophyte mutualism shifts the composition of a generalist predator assemblage. In replicated, successional fields we manipulated endophyte infection by Neotyphodium coenophialum in a dominant, non-native plant (Lolium arundinaceum). We compared the magnitude of the endophyte effect with manipulations of thatch biomass, a habitat feature of known importance to spiders. The richness of both spider families and morphospecies was greater in the absence of the endophyte, although total spider abundance was not affected. Thatch removal reduced both spider abundance and richness, and endophyte and thatch effects were largely additive. Spider families differed in responses, with declines in Linyphiidae and Thomisidae due to the endophyte and declines in Lycosidae due to thatch removal. Results demonstrate that the community impacts of non-native plants can depend on plants' mutualistic associates, such as fungal endophytes.

  20. Eavesdropping on cooperative communication within an ant-butterfly mutualism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgar, Mark A.; Nash, David R.; Pierce, Naomi E.

    2016-10-01

    Signalling is necessary for the maintenance of interspecific mutualisms but is vulnerable to exploitation by eavesdropping. While eavesdropping of intraspecific signals has been studied extensively, such exploitation of interspecific signals has not been widely documented. The juvenile stages of the Australian lycaenid butterfly, Jalmenus evagoras, form an obligate association with several species of attendant ants, including Iridomyrmex mayri. Ants protect the caterpillars and pupae, and in return are rewarded with nutritious secretions. Female and male adult butterflies use ants as signals for oviposition and mate searching, respectively. Our experiments reveal that two natural enemies of J. evagoras, araneid spiders and braconid parasitoid wasps, exploit ant signals as cues for increasing their foraging and oviposition success, respectively. Intriguingly, selection through eavesdropping is unlikely to modify the ant signal.

  1. Modeling mutual feedback between users and recommender systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, An; Yeung, Chi Ho; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Recommender systems daily influence our decisions on the Internet. While considerable attention has been given to issues such as recommendation accuracy and user privacy, the long-term mutual feedback between a recommender system and the decisions of its users has been neglected so far. We propose here a model of network evolution which allows us to study the complex dynamics induced by this feedback, including the hysteresis effect which is typical for systems with non-linear dynamics. Despite the popular belief that recommendation helps users to discover new things, we find that the long-term use of recommendation can contribute to the rise of extremely popular items and thus ultimately narrow the user choice. These results are supported by measurements of the time evolution of item popularity inequality in real systems. We show that this adverse effect of recommendation can be tamed by sacrificing part of short-term recommendation accuracy.

  2. Graph embedded nonparametric mutual information for supervised dimensionality reduction.

    PubMed

    Bouzas, Dimitrios; Arvanitopoulos, Nikolaos; Tefas, Anastasios

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for dimensionality reduction that uses as a criterion the mutual information (MI) between the transformed data and their corresponding class labels. The MI is a powerful criterion that can be used as a proxy to the Bayes error rate. Furthermore, recent quadratic nonparametric implementations of MI are computationally efficient and do not require any prior assumptions about the class densities. We show that the quadratic nonparametric MI can be formulated as a kernel objective in the graph embedding framework. Moreover, we propose its linear equivalent as a novel linear dimensionality reduction algorithm. The derived methods are compared against the state-of-the-art dimensionality reduction algorithms with various classifiers and on various benchmark and real-life datasets. The experimental results show that nonparametric MI as an optimization objective for dimensionality reduction gives comparable and in most of the cases better results compared with other dimensionality reduction methods.

  3. Mutual coupling effects in antenna arrays, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collin, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Mutual coupling between rectangular apertures in a finite antenna array, in an infinite ground plane, is analyzed using the vector potential approach. The method of moments is used to solve the equations that result from setting the tangential magnetic fields across each aperture equal. The approximation uses a set of vector potential model functions to solve for equivalent magnetic currents. A computer program was written to carry out this analysis and the resulting currents were used to determine the co- and cross-polarized far zone radiation patterns. Numerical results for various arrays using several modes in the approximation are presented. Results for one and two aperture arrays are compared against published data to check on the agreement of this model with previous work. Computer derived results are also compared against experimental results to test the accuracy of the model. These tests of the accuracy of the program showed that it yields valid data.

  4. Theoretical study of mutual neutralization in He++H- collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Åsa; Nkambule, Sifiso M.; Orel, Ann E.

    2016-08-01

    Total and differential cross sections for mutual neutralization in He+ and H- collisions at low to intermediate (0.001 eV to 100 eV) are calculated ab initio and fully quantum mechanically. Atomic final-state distributions and isotope effects are investigated. The theoretical model includes dynamics on eleven coupled states of +2Σ symmetry, where autoionization is incorporated. The potential-energy curves, autoionization widths, and nonadiabatic couplings of electronic resonant states of HeH are computed by combining structure calculations with electron scattering calculations. The nuclear dynamics is studied using a strict diabatic representation of the resonant states. Effects of rotational couplings between +2Σ and 2Π electronic states are investigated in the pure precession approximation.

  5. Peer pressure: enhancement of cooperation through mutual punishment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Rong, Zhihai; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    An open problem in evolutionary game dynamics is to understand the effect of peer pressure on cooperation in a quantitative manner. Peer pressure can be modeled by punishment, which has been proved to be an effective mechanism to sustain cooperation among selfish individuals. We investigate a symmetric punishment strategy, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. Because of the symmetry in imposing the punishment, one might intuitively expect the strategy to have little effect on cooperation. Utilizing the prisoner's dilemma game as a prototypical model of interactions at the individual level, we find, through simulation and theoretical analysis, that proper punishment, when even symmetrically imposed on individuals, can enhance cooperation. Also, we find that the initial density of cooperators plays an important role in the evolution of cooperation driven by mutual punishment.

  6. Peer pressure: Enhancement of cooperation through mutual punishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Rong, Zhihai; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    An open problem in evolutionary game dynamics is to understand the effect of peer pressure on cooperation in a quantitative manner. Peer pressure can be modeled by punishment, which has been proved to be an effective mechanism to sustain cooperation among selfish individuals. We investigate a symmetric punishment strategy, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. Because of the symmetry in imposing the punishment, one might intuitively expect the strategy to have little effect on cooperation. Utilizing the prisoner's dilemma game as a prototypical model of interactions at the individual level, we find, through simulation and theoretical analysis, that proper punishment, when even symmetrically imposed on individuals, can enhance cooperation. Also, we find that the initial density of cooperators plays an important role in the evolution of cooperation driven by mutual punishment.

  7. Eavesdropping on cooperative communication within an ant-butterfly mutualism.

    PubMed

    Elgar, Mark A; Nash, David R; Pierce, Naomi E

    2016-10-01

    Signalling is necessary for the maintenance of interspecific mutualisms but is vulnerable to exploitation by eavesdropping. While eavesdropping of intraspecific signals has been studied extensively, such exploitation of interspecific signals has not been widely documented. The juvenile stages of the Australian lycaenid butterfly, Jalmenus evagoras, form an obligate association with several species of attendant ants, including Iridomyrmex mayri. Ants protect the caterpillars and pupae, and in return are rewarded with nutritious secretions. Female and male adult butterflies use ants as signals for oviposition and mate searching, respectively. Our experiments reveal that two natural enemies of J. evagoras, araneid spiders and braconid parasitoid wasps, exploit ant signals as cues for increasing their foraging and oviposition success, respectively. Intriguingly, selection through eavesdropping is unlikely to modify the ant signal.

  8. Extending the scope of holographic mutual information and chaotic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Nilanjan; Sonnenschein, Jacob; Tangarife, Walter

    2016-05-01

    We extend the use of holography to investigate the scrambling properties of various physical systems. Specifically, we consider: (i) non-conformal backgrounds of black Dp branes, (ii) asymptotically Lifshitz black holes, and (iii) black AdS solutions of Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We use the disruption of the entanglement entropy as a probe of the chaotic features of such systems. Our analysis shows that these theories share the same type of behavior as conformal theories as they undergo chaos; however, in the case of Gauss-Bonnet gravity, we find a stark difference in the evolution of the mutual information for negative Gauss-Bonnet coupling. This may signal an inconsistency of the latter.

  9. Mutuality and solidarity: assessing risks and sharing losses.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, D

    1997-08-29

    Mutuality is the principle of private, commercial insurance; individuals enter the pool for sharing losses, and pay according to the best estimate of the risk they bring with them. Solidarity is the sharing of losses with payment according to some other scheme; this is the principle of state social insurance; essential features of solidarity are comprehensiveness and compulsion. Private insurance is subject to the uberrima fides principle, or utmost good faith; each side declares all it knows about the risk. The Disability Discrimination Act requires insurers to justify disability discrimination on the basis of relevant information, acturial, statistical or medical, on which it is reasonable to rely. It could be very damaging to private insurance to abandon uberrima fides. However, although some genetic information is clearly useful to underwriters, other information may be so general as to be of little use. The way in which mortality rates are assessed is also explained.

  10. Blasting and Zipping: Sequence Alignment and Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Orion; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2009-03-01

    Alignment of biological sequences such as DNA, RNA or proteins is one of the most widely used tools in computational bioscience. While the accomplishments of sequence alignment algorithms are undeniable the fact remains that these algorithms are based upon heuristic scoring schemes. Therefore, these algorithms do not provide model independent and objective measures for how similar two (or more) sequences actually are. Although information theory provides such a similarity measure - the mutual information (MI) - numerous previous attempts to connect sequence alignment and information have not produced realistic estimates for the MI from a given alignment. We report on a simple and flexible approach to get robust estimates of MI from global alignments. The presented results may help establish MI as a reliable tool for evaluating the quality of global alignments, judging the relative merits of different alignment algorithms, and estimating the significance of specific alignments.

  11. Galois-unitary operators that cycle mutually-unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hoan; Appleby, Marcus; Bengtsson, Ingemar

    2015-03-01

    Wigner's theorem states that probability-preserving transformations of quantum states must be either unitary or anti-unitary. However, if we restrict ourselves to a subspace of a Hilbert space, it is possible to generalize the notion of anti-unitaries. Such transformations were recently constructed in search of Symmetric Informationally-Complete (SIC) states. They are called Galois-unitaries (g-unitaries for short), as they are unitaries composed with Galois automorphisms of a chosen number field extension. Despite certain bizarre behaviors of theirs, we show that g-unitaries are indeed useful in the theory of Mutually-Unbiased Bases (MUBs), as they help solve the MUB-cycling problem and provide a construction of MUB-balanced states. HD was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship

  12. An analytic function approach to weak mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olupitan, T.; Lei, C.; Vourdas, A.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum systems with variables in Z(d) are considered, and three different structures are studied. The first is weak mutually unbiased bases, for which the absolute value of the overlap of any two vectors in two different bases is 1 /√{ k } (where k | d) or 0. The second is maximal lines through the origin in the Z(d) × Z(d) phase space. The third is an analytic representation in the complex plane based on Theta functions, and their zeros. It is shown that there is a correspondence (triality) that links strongly these three apparently different structures. For simplicity, the case where d =p1 ×p2, where p1 ,p2 are odd prime numbers different from each other, is considered.

  13. The bonobo-dialium positive interactions: seed dispersal mutualism.

    PubMed

    Beaune, David; Bretagnolle, François; Bollache, Loïc; Hohmann, Gottfried; Surbeck, Martin; Bourson, Chloé; Fruth, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    A positive interaction is any interaction between individuals of the same or different species (mutualism) that provides a benefit to both partners such as increased fitness. Here we focus on seed dispersal mutualism between an animal (bonobo, Pan paniscus) and a plant (velvet tamarind trees, Dialium spp.). In the LuiKotale rainforest southwest of Salonga National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo, seven species of the genus Dialium account for 29.3% of all trees. Dialium is thus the dominant genus in this forest. Dialium fruits make up a large proportion of the diet of a habituated bonobo community in this forest. During the 6 months of the fruiting season, more than half of the bonobos' feeding time is devoted to Dialium fruits. Furthermore, Dialium fruits contribute a considerable proportion of sugar and protein to bonobos' dietary intake, being among the richest fruits for these nutrients. Bonobos in turn ingest fruits with seeds that are disseminated in their feces (endozoochory) at considerable distances (average: 1.25 km after 24 hr of average transit time). Endozoochory through the gut causes loss of the cuticle protection and tegumentary dormancy, as well as an increase in size by water uptake. Thus, after gut passage, seeds are better able to germinate. We consider other primate species as a potential seed disperser and conclude that Dialium germination is dependent on passage through bonobo guts. This plant-animal interaction highlights positive effects between two major organisms of the Congo basin rainforest, and establishes the role of the bonobo as an efficient disperser of Dialium seeds. Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mutual inhibition of RecQ molecules in DNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing-Yi; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Yang, Ye; Xu, Ya-Nan; Bugnard, Elisabeth; Ding, Xiu-Yan; Zhang, Lingyun; Wang, Peng-Ye; Li, Ming; Xi, Xu Guang

    2010-05-21

    Helicases make conformational changes and mechanical movements through hydrolysis of NTP to unwind duplex DNA (or RNA). Most helicases require a single-stranded overhang for loading onto the duplex DNA substrates. Some helicases have been observed to exhibit an enhanced unwinding efficiency with increasing length of the single-stranded DNA tail both by preventing reannealing of the unwound DNA and by compensating for premature dissociation of the leading monomers. Here we report a previously unknown mutual inhibition of neighboring monomers in DNA unwinding by the monomeric Escherichia coli RecQ helicase. With single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy, we observed that the unwinding initiation of RecQ at saturating concentrations was more delayed for a long rather than a short tailed DNA. In stopped-flow kinetic studies under both single and multiple turnover conditions, the unwinding efficiency decreased with increasing enzyme concentration for long tailed substrates. In addition, preincubation of RecQ and DNA in the presence of 5'-adenylyl-beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate was observed to alleviate the inhibition. We propose that the mutual inhibition effect results from a forced closure of cleft between the two RecA-like domains of a leading monomer by a trailing one, hence the forward movements of both monomers are stalled by prohibition of ATP binding to the leading one. This effect represents direct evidence for the relative movements of the two RecA-like domains of RecQ in DNA unwinding. It may occur for all superfamily I and II helicases possessing two RecA-like domains.

  15. Trade-offs in an ant-plant-fungus mutualism.

    PubMed

    Orivel, Jérôme; Malé, Pierre-Jean; Lauth, Jérémie; Roux, Olivier; Petitclerc, Frédéric; Dejean, Alain; Leroy, Céline

    2017-03-15

    Species engaged in multiple, simultaneous mutualisms are subject to trade-offs in their mutualistic investment if the traits involved in each interaction are overlapping, which can lead to conflicts and affect the longevity of these associations. We investigate this issue via a tripartite mutualism involving an ant plant, two competing ant species and a fungus the ants cultivate to build galleries under the stems of their host plant to capture insect prey. The use of the galleries represents an innovative prey capture strategy compared with the more typical strategy of foraging on leaves. However, because of a limited worker force in their colonies, the prey capture behaviour of the ants results in a trade-off between plant protection (i.e. the ants patrol the foliage and attack intruders including herbivores) and ambushing prey in the galleries, which has a cascading effect on the fitness of all of the partners. The quantification of partners' traits and effects showed that the two ant species differed in their mutualistic investment. Less investment in the galleries (i.e. in fungal cultivation) translated into more benefits for the plant in terms of less herbivory and higher growth rates and vice versa. However, the greater vegetative growth of the plants did not produce a positive fitness effect for the better mutualistic ant species in terms of colony size and production of sexuals nor was the mutualist compensated by the wider dispersal of its queens. As a consequence, although the better ant mutualist is the one that provides more benefits to its host plant, its lower host-plant exploitation does not give this ant species a competitive advantage. The local coexistence of the ant species is thus fleeting and should eventually lead to the exclusion of the less competitive species.

  16. MIDER: Network Inference with Mutual Information Distance and Entropy Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Villaverde, Alejandro F.; Ross, John; Morán, Federico; Banga, Julio R.

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of links among variables from a given dataset is a task referred to as network inference or reverse engineering. It is an open problem in bioinformatics and systems biology, as well as in other areas of science. Information theory, which uses concepts such as mutual information, provides a rigorous framework for addressing it. While a number of information-theoretic methods are already available, most of them focus on a particular type of problem, introducing assumptions that limit their generality. Furthermore, many of these methods lack a publicly available implementation. Here we present MIDER, a method for inferring network structures with information theoretic concepts. It consists of two steps: first, it provides a representation of the network in which the distance among nodes indicates their statistical closeness. Second, it refines the prediction of the existing links to distinguish between direct and indirect interactions and to assign directionality. The method accepts as input time-series data related to some quantitative features of the network nodes (such as e.g. concentrations, if the nodes are chemical species). It takes into account time delays between variables, and allows choosing among several definitions and normalizations of mutual information. It is general purpose: it may be applied to any type of network, cellular or otherwise. A Matlab implementation including source code and data is freely available (http://www.iim.csic.es/~gingproc/mider.html). The performance of MIDER has been evaluated on seven different benchmark problems that cover the main types of cellular networks, including metabolic, gene regulatory, and signaling. Comparisons with state of the art information–theoretic methods have demonstrated the competitive performance of MIDER, as well as its versatility. Its use does not demand any a priori knowledge from the user; the default settings and the adaptive nature of the method provide good results for a wide

  17. Dynamics of the force exchanged between membrane inclusions.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-03-28

    We study the dynamical response of a fluid membrane to the sudden conformation change of active inclusions linearly coupled to the membrane curvature. The mutual force between two inclusions triggered simultaneously is shown to exhibit a transient maximum much larger than the equilibrium force. Even in the presence of tension, this dynamical interaction is long range over distances much larger than the correlation length. We derive the scaling laws describing these phenomena analytically, and we stress the importance of the damping due to intermonolayer friction.

  18. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The efforts on the synthesis of polymer anion redox membranes were mainly concentrated in two areas, membrane development and membrane fabrication. Membrane development covered the preparation and evaluation of experimental membranes systems with improved resistance stability and/or lower permeability. Membrane fabrication covered the laboratory scale production of prime candidate membranes in quantities of up to two hundred and sizes up to 18 inches x 18 inches (46 cm x 46 cm). These small (10 in x 11 in) and medium sized membranes were mainly for assembly into multicell units. Improvements in processing procedures and techniques for preparing such membrane sets lifted yields to over 90 percent.

  19. Resource Availability Modulates the Cooperative and Competitive Nature of a Microbial Cross-Feeding Mutualism.

    PubMed

    Hoek, Tim A; Axelrod, Kevin; Biancalani, Tommaso; Yurtsev, Eugene A; Liu, Jinghui; Gore, Jeff

    2016-08-01

    Mutualisms between species play an important role in ecosystem function and stability. However, in some environments, the competitive aspects of an interaction may dominate the mutualistic aspects. Although these transitions could have far-reaching implications, it has been difficult to study the causes and consequences of this mutualistic-competitive transition in experimentally tractable systems. Here, we study a microbial cross-feeding mutualism in which each yeast strain supplies an essential amino acid for its partner strain. We find that, depending upon the amount of freely available amino acid in the environment, this pair of strains can exhibit an obligatory mutualism, facultative mutualism, competition, parasitism, competitive exclusion, or failed mutualism leading to extinction of the population. A simple model capturing the essential features of this interaction explains how resource availability modulates the interaction and predicts that changes in the dynamics of the mutualism in deteriorating environments can provide advance warning that collapse of the mutualism is imminent. We confirm this prediction experimentally by showing that, in the high nutrient competitive regime, the strains rapidly reach a common carrying capacity before slowly reaching the equilibrium ratio between the strains. However, in the low nutrient regime, before collapse of the obligate mutualism, we find that the ratio rapidly reaches its equilibrium and it is the total abundance that is slow to reach equilibrium. Our results provide a general framework for how mutualisms may transition between qualitatively different regimes of interaction in response to changes in nutrient availability in the environment.

  20. Abnormal functional connectivity in focal hand dystonia: mutual information analysis in EEG.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Lin, Peter; Auh, Sungyoung; Hallett, Mark

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate functional connectivity in focal hand dystonia patients to understand the pathophysiology underlying their abnormality in movement. We recorded EEGs from 58 electrodes in 15 focal hand dystonia patients and 15 healthy volunteers during rest and a simple finger-tapping task that did not induce any dystonic symptoms. We investigated mutual information, which provides a quantitative measure of linear and nonlinear coupling, in the alpha, beta, and gamma bands. Mean mutual information of all 58 channels and mean of the channels of interest representative of regional functional connectivity over sensorimotor areas (C3, CP3, C4, CP4, FCz, and Cz) were evaluated. For both groups, we found enhanced mutual information during the task compared with the rest condition, specifically in the beta and gamma bands for mean mutual information of all channels, and in all bands for mean mutual information of channels of interest. Comparing the focal hand dystonia patients with the healthy volunteers for both rest and task, there was reduced mutual information in the beta band for both mean mutual information of all channels and mean mutual information of channels of interest. Regarding the properties of the connectivity in the beta band, we found that the majority of the mutual information differences were from linear connectivity. The abnormal beta-band functional connectivity in focal hand dystonia patients suggests deficient brain connectivity.

  1. Resource Availability Modulates the Cooperative and Competitive Nature of a Microbial Cross-Feeding Mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Hoek, Tim A.; Axelrod, Kevin; Biancalani, Tommaso; Yurtsev, Eugene A.; Gore, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Mutualisms between species play an important role in ecosystem function and stability. However, in some environments, the competitive aspects of an interaction may dominate the mutualistic aspects. Although these transitions could have far-reaching implications, it has been difficult to study the causes and consequences of this mutualistic–competitive transition in experimentally tractable systems. Here, we study a microbial cross-feeding mutualism in which each yeast strain supplies an essential amino acid for its partner strain. We find that, depending upon the amount of freely available amino acid in the environment, this pair of strains can exhibit an obligatory mutualism, facultative mutualism, competition, parasitism, competitive exclusion, or failed mutualism leading to extinction of the population. A simple model capturing the essential features of this interaction explains how resource availability modulates the interaction and predicts that changes in the dynamics of the mutualism in deteriorating environments can provide advance warning that collapse of the mutualism is imminent. We confirm this prediction experimentally by showing that, in the high nutrient competitive regime, the strains rapidly reach a common carrying capacity before slowly reaching the equilibrium ratio between the strains. However, in the low nutrient regime, before collapse of the obligate mutualism, we find that the ratio rapidly reaches its equilibrium and it is the total abundance that is slow to reach equilibrium. Our results provide a general framework for how mutualisms may transition between qualitatively different regimes of interaction in response to changes in nutrient availability in the environment. PMID:27557335

  2. Magnetic Membrane System

    DOEpatents

    McElfresh, Michael W.; ; Lucas, Matthew S.

    2004-12-30

    The present invention provides a membrane with magnetic particles. In one embodiment the membrane is created by mixing particles in a non-magnetic base. The membrane may act as an actuator, a sensor, a pump, a valve, or other device. A magnet is operatively connected to the membrane. The magnet acts on and changes the shape of the membrane.

  3. Investigating cell membrane structure and dynamics with TCSPC-FLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Marois, Alix; Owen, Dylan M.; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    We report the use of Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) in a polarization-resolved Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) setup for the investigation of cell membrane structural and dynamic properties. This technique allows us to study the orientation and mobility of fluorescent membrane dyes, namely di-4-ANEPPDHQ and DiO, in model bilayers of different lipid compositions. Dipole alignment and extent of rotational motion can be linked to membrane order and fluidity. Comparison of the time-resolved anisotropy decays of the two fluorescent dyes suggests that rotational motion of membrane constituents is restricted in liquid-ordered phases, and appears to be limited to the region of aliphatic tails in liquid-disordered phases. In living cells, understanding the membrane structure provides crucial information on its functional properties, such as exo- and endocytosis, cell mobility and signal transduction.

  4. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  5. Carotenoid incorporation into microsomes: yields, stability and membrane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socaciu, Carmen; Jessel, Robert; Diehl, Horst A.

    2000-12-01

    The carotenoids β-carotene (BC), lycopene (LYC), lutein (LUT), zeaxanthin (ZEA), canthaxanthin (CTX) and astaxanthin (ASTA) have been incorporated into pig liver microsomes. Effective incorporation concentrations in the range of about 1-6 nmol/mg microsomal protein were obtained. A stability test at room temperature revealed that after 3 h BC and LYC had decayed totally whereas, gradually, CTX (46%), LUT (21%), ASTA (17%) and ZEA (5%) decayed. Biophysical parameters of the microsomal membrane were changed hardly by the incorporation of carotenoids. A small rigidification may occur. Membrane anisotropy seems to offer only a small tolerance for incorporation of carotenoids and seems to limit the achievable incorporation concentrations of the carotenoids into microsomes. Microsomes instead of liposomes should be preferred as a membrane model to study mutual effects of carotenoids and membrane dynamics.

  6. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-01-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  7. Membrane Systems in Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Liberton, Michelle L.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes with highly differentiated membrane systems. In addition to a Gram-negative-type cell envelope with plasma membrane and outer membrane separated by a periplasmic space, cyanobacteria have an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the fully functional electron transfer chains of photosynthesis and respiration reside. The presence of different membrane systems lends these cells a unique complexity among bacteria. Cyanobacteria must be able to reorganize the membranes, synthesize new membrane lipids, and properly target proteins to the correct membrane system. The outer membrane, plasma membrane, and thylakoid membranes each have specialized roles in the cyanobacterial cell. Understanding the organization, functionality, protein composition and dynamics of the membrane systems remains a great challenge in cyanobacterial cell biology.

  8. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  9. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  10. ECG by mobile technologies.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Przemyslaw; Malik, Marek

    Mobile electrocardiographs consist of three components: a mobile device (e.g. a smartphone), an electrocardiographic device or accessory, and a mobile application. Mobile platforms are small computers with sufficient computational power, good quality display, suitable data storage, and several possibilities of data transmission. Electrocardiographic electrodes and sensors for mobile use utilize unconventional materials, e.g. rubber, e-textile, and inkjet-printed nanoparticle electrodes. Mobile devices can be handheld, worn as vests or T-shirts, or attached to patient's skin as biopatches. Mobile electrocardiographic devices and accessories may additionally record other signals including respiratory rate, activity level, and geolocation. Large-scale clinical studies that utilize electrocardiography are easier to conduct using mobile technologies and the collected data are suitable for "big data" processing. This is expected to reveal phenomena so far inaccessible by standard electrocardiographic techniques.

  11. Mobility and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue deals with the phenomenon of mobility or transience in India, Kenya, Greece, Ireland, Malaysia, Thailand and Israel. The primary focus is on mobility's effect on young children, specifically their health and education; some of the broader concerns also addressed by the newsletter are the causes of mobility and its…

  12. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  13. 31 CFR 1024.210 - Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds. 1024.210 Section 1024.210 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... FUNDS Programs § 1024.210 Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds. (a) Effective July 24,...

  14. 31 CFR 1024.210 - Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds. 1024.210 Section 1024.210 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... FUNDS Programs § 1024.210 Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds. (a) Effective July 24,...

  15. 31 CFR 1024.210 - Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds. 1024.210 Section 1024.210 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... FUNDS Programs § 1024.210 Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds. (a) Effective July 24,...

  16. 31 CFR 1024.210 - Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds. 1024.210 Section 1024.210 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... FUNDS Programs § 1024.210 Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds. (a) Effective July 24,...

  17. Mutual Vulnerability: A Key Principle in a Humanising Pedagogy in Post-Conflict Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinn, Denise; Proteus, Kimberley; Keet, Andre

    2009-01-01

    In this article we argue that education in post-conflict and traumatised societies should be partly underpinned by the principle of "mutual vulnerability" as central to a humanising pedagogy. We explain the conceptual links between "reconciliation pedagogies", "mutual vulnerability" and "humanising pedagogies" and associate them with the broader…

  18. 47 CFR 101.1317 - Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA applications. 101.1317 Section 101.1317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... License Requirements § 101.1317 Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA...

  19. 26 CFR 1.809-8 - Limitation on deductions for certain mutualization distributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... mutualization distributions. 1.809-8 Section 1.809-8 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Limitation on deductions for certain mutualization distributions. (a) Deduction not to reduce taxable... distributions. This limitation provides that such deduction shall not exceed the amount (if any) by which...

  20. 12 CFR 12.101 - National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions. 12.101 Section 12.101 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT... Interpretations § 12.101 National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions. A national...

  1. 12 CFR 12.101 - National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions. 12.101 Section 12.101 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT... Interpretations § 12.101 National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions. A national...

  2. 12 CFR 239.12 - Communication between members of a mutual holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Communication between members of a mutual holding company. 239.12 Section 239.12 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF... Companies § 239.12 Communication between members of a mutual holding company. (a) Right of...

  3. The state of the science of family caregiver-care receiver mutuality: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Park, Esther O; Schumacher, Karen L

    2014-06-01

    This review critically examines the current state of the science on the concept of family caregiver-care receiver mutuality, summarizes accomplishments and gaps and identifies directions for future theory development and research. Mutuality between family caregivers and care receivers is of increasing interest to researchers. However, no analysis of the current state of the science of this important concept has been published. Our literature search revealed 34 research articles that met inclusion criteria. The studies were assessed in terms of conceptualization of mutuality, instrument development, populations studied, research designs and methods and findings. Significant scientific progress during the past 30 years includes the development of clear definitions and new instruments, expansion of research beyond the clinical populations in which mutuality was first studied, the use of a variety of research designs, and increasingly sophisticated methods of data analysis. Growing evidence suggests that mutuality is associated with caregiver emotional health outcomes and may decrease over time in the context of chronic illness. Directions for future research include development of new theoretical frameworks grounded in relational theory, development of theory on the dynamics of mutuality over time, exploration of mutuality in diverse cultures and populations, and intervention studies aimed at enhancing mutuality.

  4. Mutual Alignment Comparison Facilitates Abstraction and Transfer of a Complex Scientific Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orton, Judy M.; Anggoro, Florencia K.; Jee, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    Learning about a scientific concept often occurs in the context of unfamiliar examples. Mutual alignment analogy--a type of analogical comparison in which the analogues are only partially understood--has been shown to facilitate learning from unfamiliar examples . In the present study, we examined the role of mutual alignment analogy in the…

  5. 12 CFR 544.8 - Communication between members of a Federal mutual savings association.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Communication between members of a Federal mutual savings association. 544.8 Section 544.8 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION... Communication between members of a Federal mutual savings association. (a) Right of communication with...

  6. Mutuality in Cambodian International University Partnerships: Looking beyond the Global Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leng, Phirom

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the mutuality issue in international partnership programs between Cambodian universities and universities in France, the USA, Japan and South Korea. It adopts Galtung's and Held's four aspects of mutuality as its conceptual framework and follows a qualitative case study research design. The study finds that most partnership…

  7. Strangers and Orphans: Knowledge and Mutuality in Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Claudia Rozas

    2013-01-01

    Paulo Freire consistently upheld humanization and mutuality as educational ideals. This article argues that conceptualizations of knowledge and how knowledge is sought and produced play a role in fostering humanization and mutuality in educational contexts. Drawing on Mary Shelley's novel "Frankenstein," this article focuses on the…

  8. Freedom and imperative: mutual care between older spouses with physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Torgé, Cristina Joy

    2014-05-01

    This article explores mutual caregiving between older spouses aging with physical disabilities. Nine older couples, where both partners had lived long lives with physical disabilities, were interviewed as dyads about mutual caregiving. The couples not only had access to different kinds and degrees of formal support but also provided mutual care to each other in a variety of ways. Interview coding using grounded theory led to two overarching categories from which motivation for mutual caregiving could be understood. These categories were Mutual care as freedom and Mutual care as imperative. The results extend understanding about how older couples with disabilities attached meaning to their mutual caregiving, and why mutual care was sometimes preferable, despite the availability of other sources of help and despite practical difficulties of providing this help. These findings suggest that health care professionals need to be sensitive to the dynamics of the couple relationship and carefully explore the couple's preferences for how formal support can best be provided in ways that honor and sustain the integrity of the couple relationship.

  9. 78 FR 77175 - Catalyst Capital Advisors LLC and Mutual Fund Series Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... COMMISSION Catalyst Capital Advisors LLC and Mutual Fund Series Trust; Notice of Application December 16... agreements without shareholder approval. APPLICANTS: Catalyst Capital Advisors LLC (``CCA'' or the ``Adviser'') and Mutual Fund Series Trust (formerly Catalyst Funds) (the ``Trust''). DATES: Filing Dates:...

  10. 26 CFR 1.822-5 - Mutual insurance company taxable income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mutual insurance company taxable income. 1.822-5... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Mutual Insurance Companies (other Than Life and Certain Marine Insurance Companies and Other Than Fire Or Flood Insurance Companies Which Operate on Basis...

  11. 26 CFR 1.822-5 - Mutual insurance company taxable income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mutual insurance company taxable income. 1.822-5... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Mutual Insurance Companies (other Than Life and Certain Marine Insurance Companies and Other Than Fire Or Flood Insurance Companies Which Operate on Basis...

  12. 77 FR 8956 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Mutual Casualty Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Mutual Casualty Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Grange Mutual Casualty Company (NAIC 14060). Business Address: 671 South... long as the companies remain qualified (see 31 CFR part 223). A list of qualified companies...

  13. 77 FR 25349 - Mutual Insurance Holding Company Treated as Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... 380 RIN 3064-AD89 Mutual Insurance Holding Company Treated as Insurance Company AGENCY: Federal... (``Final Rule'') that treats a mutual insurance holding company as an insurance company for purposes of...''). The Final Rule clarifies that the liquidation and rehabilitation of a covered financial company...

  14. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(15)-1 - Mutual insurance companies or associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mutual insurance companies or associations. 1... Mutual insurance companies or associations. (a) Taxable years beginning after December 31, 1962. An insurance company or association described in section 501(c)(15) is exempt under section 501(a) if it is...

  15. 26 CFR 1.822-5 - Mutual insurance company taxable income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mutual insurance company taxable income. 1.822-5... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Mutual Insurance Companies (other Than Life and Certain Marine Insurance Companies and Other Than Fire Or Flood Insurance Companies Which Operate on Basis...

  16. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(15)-1 - Mutual insurance companies or associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Mutual insurance companies or associations. 1.501... Mutual insurance companies or associations. (a) Taxable years beginning after December 31, 1962. An insurance company or association described in section 501(c)(15) is exempt under section 501(a) if it is...

  17. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(15)-1 - Mutual insurance companies or associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Mutual insurance companies or associations. 1.501... Mutual insurance companies or associations. (a) Taxable years beginning after December 31, 1962. An insurance company or association described in section 501(c)(15) is exempt under section 501(a) if it is...

  18. 26 CFR 1.822-5 - Mutual insurance company taxable income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mutual insurance company taxable income. 1.822-5... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Mutual Insurance Companies (other Than Life and Certain Marine Insurance Companies and Other Than Fire Or Flood Insurance Companies Which Operate on Basis...

  19. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(15)-1 - Mutual insurance companies or associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mutual insurance companies or associations. 1... Mutual insurance companies or associations. (a) Taxable years beginning after December 31, 1962. An insurance company or association described in section 501(c)(15) is exempt under section 501(a) if it is...

  20. 76 FR 77442 - Mutual Insurance Holding Company Treated as Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... CORPORATION 12 CFR Part 380 RIN 3064-AD89 Mutual Insurance Holding Company Treated as Insurance Company AGENCY... insurance holding company as an insurance company for the purpose of Section 203(e) of the Dodd-Frank Wall... clarifies that the liquidation and rehabilitation of a covered financial company that is a mutual...

  1. 77 FR 8956 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Integrity Mutual Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Integrity Mutual Insurance Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Integrity Mutual Insurance Company (NAIC 14303). Business Address: P.O... Certificates are subject to subsequent annual renewal as long as the companies remain qualified (see 31...

  2. 26 CFR 1.822-5 - Mutual insurance company taxable income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mutual insurance company taxable income. 1.822-5... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Mutual Insurance Companies (other Than Life and Certain Marine Insurance Companies and Other Than Fire Or Flood Insurance Companies Which Operate on Basis of Perpetual Policies...

  3. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(15)-1 - Mutual insurance companies or associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Mutual insurance companies or associations. 1.501... Mutual insurance companies or associations. (a) Taxable years beginning after December 31, 1962. An insurance company or association described in section 501(c)(15) is exempt under section 501(a) if it is...

  4. Pebbles in a Pond: Learner, Teacher, and Policy Perspectives on Mutual Obligation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Literacy and Numeracy Australian Research Consortium, Melbourne (Victoria). Victorian Centre.

    This book contains nine chapters, by various authors, containing research and policy perspectives on issues of mutual obligation between teachers and students, especially in Australia. The following are included: (1) "Researching Literacy, Language, and Numeracy and Mutual Obligation: An Introduction to Some Issues" (Sheilagh Kelly and…

  5. The Impact of Mutuality in Doctoral Students and Faculty Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillian-Roberts, Kathleen D.

    2014-01-01

    Mentoring is a close and dynamic helping relationship, which is characteristic of doctoral student-faculty relationships. Mutuality, a primary relational tenant in relational cultural theory (RCT), enables participants to mutually benefit from this shared learning experience where both contribute, respect, and affect each other in a relationship…

  6. 31 CFR 1024.320 - Reports by mutual funds of suspicious transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....S.C. 80a-3) (“Investment Company Act”) that is an open-end company (as defined in section 5 of the... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reports by mutual funds of suspicious... (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR MUTUAL FUNDS...

  7. 31 CFR 103.131 - Customer identification programs for mutual funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Act (15 U.S.C. 80a-3)) that is an “open-end company” (as that term is defined in section 5 of the... should describe: (A) When the mutual fund should not open an account; (B) The terms under which a... mutual funds. 103.131 Section 103.131 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money...

  8. Utilizing Mutual Aid in Reducing Adolescent Substance Use and Developing Group Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogro-Wilson, Cristina; Letendre, Joan; Toi, Hiroki; Bryan, Janelle

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the effectiveness of mutual aid groups for high school students. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was applied to 242 adolescents, where every other adolescent was assigned to the intervention or the control condition. The study evaluated the influence of implementing mutual aid groups in decreasing perceived risk…

  9. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(14)-1 - Credit unions and mutual insurance funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Credit unions and mutual insurance funds. 1.501(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(c)(14)-1 Credit unions and mutual insurance funds. Credit unions (other than Federal credit unions described in...

  10. A new determination of radii and limb parameters for Pluto and Charon from mutual event lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eliot F.; Binzel, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past several years Pluto-Charon mutual events have yielded progressively more accurate estimates of Charon's orbital elements and the radii of Pluto and Charon (e.g., Buie, Tholen, and Horne, 1992). Analysis of the 1988 stellar occultation by Pluto indicates a radius for Pluto that is about 4%, or 50 km, larger than the mutual event radius of 1151 km. One possible explanation for the discrepancy is that the mutual event modeling treats Pluto and Charon as uniformly bright disks. If they are limb-darkened, the mutual event fits could underestimate their radii. In this paper we use an independent mutual event data set (Young and Binzel, 1992) to fit for Pluto and Charon's radii in a manner independent of either object's limb profile or albedo distribution. Our least-squares solution indicates that Pluto's radius is 1164 +/- 22.9 km and Charon's radius is 621 +/- 20.6 km.

  11. Monolingual and bilingual children's use of mutual exclusivity in the naming of whole objects.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Denise; Tell, Dina

    2005-09-01

    In two experiments, the use of mutual exclusivity in the naming of whole objects was examined in monolingual and bilingual 3- and 6-year-olds. Once an object has a known name, then via principles of mutual exclusivity it is often assumed that a new name given to the object must refer to some part, substance, or other property of the object. However, because bilingual children must suspend mutual exclusivity assumptions between languages, they may be more willing to accept two names for an object within a language. In the current research, the use of mutual exclusivity in the naming of whole objects was found across monolingual and bilingual children, although older bilingual children were significantly less inclined to use mutual exclusivity than were older monolingual children. These results are discussed in terms of differences in monolingual and bilingual children's word learning.

  12. Multiple mutualist effects: conflict and synergy in multispecies mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Afkhami, Michelle E; Rudgers, Jennifer A; Stachowicz, John J

    2014-04-01

    Most organisms interact with multiple mutualistic species that confer different functional benefits, yet current conceptual frameworks do not fully address this complexity. A network approach considers multiple mutualistic interactions within a functional type and has been largely nonmechanistic, with little attention to the fitness consequences of specific interactions. Alternatively, consumer-resource approaches have explicitly characterized the mechanisms and fitness consequences of resource exchange, but have not been extended to functionally divergent partners. First, we merge these approaches using graphical models to define the multiple mutualist effects (MMEs) that occur when a focal species has multiple partner mutualists. This approach mirrors food web research that has been advanced by studies of multiple predator effects as well as by detailed investigations of modules nested within larger networks. Second, we define the pathways through which a focal mutualist and two or more partner species could interact, reviewing examples of MMEs that span a range from positive to negative fitness effects. Third, given the potential for nonadditivity demonstrated by the existing literature, we pose new hypotheses for species-interaction outcomes by examining factors such as the extent of overlap in rewards exchanged among partners and their resulting network topologies. Our synthesis illustrates how the consideration of MMEs can improve the ability to predict the outcomes of losses or gains of mutualisms from ecosystems.

  13. Human attribute concepts: relative ubiquity across twelve mutually isolated languages.

    PubMed

    Saucier, Gerard; Thalmayer, Amber Gayle; Bel-Bahar, Tarik S

    2014-07-01

    It has been unclear which human-attribute concepts are most universal across languages. To identify common-denominator concepts, we used dictionaries for 12 mutually isolated languages-Maasai, Supyire Senoufo, Khoekhoe, Afar, Mara Chin, Hmong, Wik-Mungkan, Enga, Fijian, Inuktitut, Hopi, and Kuna-representing diverse cultural characteristics and language families, from multiple continents. A composite list of every person-descriptive term in each lexicon was closely examined to determine the content (in terms of English translation) most ubiquitous across languages. Study 1 identified 28 single-word concepts used to describe persons in all 12 languages, as well as 41 additional terms found in 11 of 12. Results indicated that attribute concepts related to morality and competence appear to be as cross-culturally ubiquitous as basic-emotion concepts. Formulations of universal-attribute concepts from Osgood and Wierzbicka were well-supported. Study 2 compared lexically based personality models on the relative ubiquity of key associated terms, finding that 1- and 2-dimensional models draw on markedly more ubiquitous terms than do 5- or 6-factor models. We suggest that ubiquitous attributes reflect common cultural as well as common biological processes.

  14. Graphical Calculi and Mutually Unbiassed Embeddings of Classical Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Ross

    2008-03-01

    While arbitrary quantum states may not be freely cloned or deleted [1], we note, following [2], that these distinctively classical operations may be performed on states which lie within a given basis. Each basis therefore provides an embedding of classical logic into a quantum state space. This work provides a categorical axiomatisation (cf [3]) of the interaction of such embeddings when distinct mutually unbiassed bases [4] are used. We provide a graphical language (cf. [5]) for the classical operations that each embedding provides, and demonstrate that this system captures many properties of multi-partite entangled states and can simulate quantum algorithms. [1] W. Wootters and W. Zurek. A single quantum cannot be cloned, 1982. A.K. Pati and S. L. Braunstein. Impossibility of deleting an unknown quantum state, 2000. [2] B. Coecke and D. Pavlovic (2007) Quantum measurements without sums. arXiv:quant-ph/0608035. [3] S. Abramsky and B. Coecke (2004) A categorical semantics of quantum protocols. arXiv:quant-ph/0402130. [4] J. Schwinger (1960) Unitary operator bases. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the U.S.A. 46 [5] B. Coecke (2005) Kindergarten quantum mechanics. arXiv:quant-ph/0510032

  15. Phase-locked laser array through global antenna mutual coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Tsung -Yu; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Here, phase locking of an array of lasers is a highly effective way in beam shaping, to increase the output power, and to reduce lasing threshold. In this work, we present a novel phase-locking mechanism based on "antenna mutual coupling" wherein laser elements interact through far-field radiations with definite phase relations. This allows long-range global coupling among array elements to achieve robust 2-dimensional phase-locked laser array. The new scheme is ideal for lasers with deep sub-wavelength confined cavity such as nanolasers, where the divergent beam pattern could be used to form strong coupling among elements in the array. We experimentally demonstrated such a scheme using sub-wavelength short-cavity surface-emitting lasers at terahertz frequency. More than 37 laser elements are phase-locked to each other, delivering up to 6.5 mW single-mode radiations at ~3 terahertz, with maximum 450-mW/A slope efficiency and near diffraction limit beam divergence.

  16. Phase-locked laser array through global antenna mutual coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Kao, Tsung -Yu; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Here, phase locking of an array of lasers is a highly effective way in beam shaping, to increase the output power, and to reduce lasing threshold. In this work, we present a novel phase-locking mechanism based on "antenna mutual coupling" wherein laser elements interact through far-field radiations with definite phase relations. This allows long-range global coupling among array elements to achieve robust 2-dimensional phase-locked laser array. The new scheme is ideal for lasers with deep sub-wavelength confined cavity such as nanolasers, where the divergent beam pattern could be used to form strong coupling among elements in the array. We experimentallymore » demonstrated such a scheme using sub-wavelength short-cavity surface-emitting lasers at terahertz frequency. More than 37 laser elements are phase-locked to each other, delivering up to 6.5 mW single-mode radiations at ~3 terahertz, with maximum 450-mW/A slope efficiency and near diffraction limit beam divergence.« less

  17. The mutual shaping of life insurance and medicine in Finland.

    PubMed

    Jauho, Mikko

    2015-08-01

    This article examines the mutual shaping of medicine and private life insurance in Finland before the Second World War. Based on historical texts and archival material, it shows the important effects that the involvement of medicine in client selection for life insurance companies had on medical knowledge and practice. The analysis focuses on the tensions between the main actors in life insurance underwriting--candidates, insurance agents, examining physicians and the central office--as well as the medical examination as the key site of these tensions. The article shows how the introduction of a set of procedural and technical innovations reshaped the medical examination and helped to stabilize the fraught network of life insurance underwriting. These innovations re-scripted medical work. They stressed objective measurable knowledge over the personal skill and clinical acumen of the examining physician, propagated the physical examination and the use of diagnostic technologies and vital standards, multiplied medicine's administrative tasks, and contributed to the introduction of a risk factor approach to medicine. Moreover, the social organization of life insurance promoted the spread of these objects, practices and tasks to other fields of medicine. The case displays how medical innovations are developed through the situated interplay of multiple actors that cuts across the science-society boundary.

  18. A Synchronous Mutual Position Control for Vertical Pneumatic Servo System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Satoru; Yamamoto, Tomonori; Jindai, Mitsuru

    Synchronous control of mutual position for two vertical-type pneumatic servo systems is discussed for practical use in this study. In the proposed control system, a fuzzy controller is used in each pneumatic servo system so that the output of each plant can follow the reference input. A PD controller is introduced to realize the synchronization of both pneumatic servo systems, in which the outputs from this controller are the inputs for revision to both plants. A fuzzy virtual reference generator that can adjust the reference input to both fuzzy controllers adaptively by fuzzy rules is constructed to improve the transient performances of both axes. In addition, the adjustment controller produces a representative value of both cylinder outputs, which is used to synthesize the inputs to the fuzzy virtual reference generator, in order to reach a compromise between the follow-up ability to the reference input in each axis and synchronization of both axes. The applicability of the proposed method is confirmed by experiments using two existent vertical-type pneumatic servo systems.

  19. A syndrome of mutualism reinforces the lifestyle of a sloth

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, Jonathan N.; Mendoza, Jorge E.; Steffan, Shawn A.; Carey, Cayelan C.; Weimer, Paul J.; Peery, M. Zachariah

    2014-01-01

    Arboreal herbivory is rare among mammals. The few species with this lifestyle possess unique adaptions to overcome size-related constraints on nutritional energetics. Sloths are folivores that spend most of their time resting or eating in the forest canopy. A three-toed sloth will, however, descend its tree weekly to defecate, which is risky, energetically costly and, until now, inexplicable. We hypothesized that this behaviour sustains an ecosystem in the fur of sloths, which confers cryptic nutritional benefits to sloths. We found that the more specialized three-toed sloths harboured more phoretic moths, greater concentrations of inorganic nitrogen and higher algal biomass than the generalist two-toed sloths. Moth density was positively related to inorganic nitrogen concentration and algal biomass in the fur. We discovered that sloths consumed algae from their fur, which was highly digestible and lipid-rich. By descending a tree to defecate, sloths transport moths to their oviposition sites in sloth dung, which facilitates moth colonization of sloth fur. Moths are portals for nutrients, increasing nitrogen levels in sloth fur, which fuels algal growth. Sloths consume these algae-gardens, presumably to augment their limited diet. These linked mutualisms between moths, sloths and algae appear to aid the sloth in overcoming a highly constrained lifestyle. PMID:24452028

  20. Link Prediction in Weighted Networks: A Weighted Mutual Information Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Boyao; Xia, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    The link-prediction problem is an open issue in data mining and knowledge discovery, which attracts researchers from disparate scientific communities. A wealth of methods have been proposed to deal with this problem. Among these approaches, most are applied in unweighted networks, with only a few taking the weights of links into consideration. In this paper, we present a weighted model for undirected and weighted networks based on the mutual information of local network structures, where link weights are applied to further enhance the distinguishable extent of candidate links. Empirical experiments are conducted on four weighted networks, and results show that the proposed method can provide more accurate predictions than not only traditional unweighted indices but also typical weighted indices. Furthermore, some in-depth discussions on the effects of weak ties in link prediction as well as the potential to predict link weights are also given. This work may shed light on the design of algorithms for link prediction in weighted networks. PMID:26849659

  1. Analysis of fMRI time series with mutual information.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Verdejo, Vanessa; Martínez-Ramón, Manel; Florensa-Vila, José; Oliviero, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    Neuroimaging plays a fundamental role in the study of human cognitive neuroscience. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), based on the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent signal, is currently considered as a standard technique for a system level understanding of the human brain. The problem of identifying regionally specific effects in neuroimaging data is usually solved by applying Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM). Here, a mutual information (MI) criterion is used to identify regionally specific effects produced by a task. In particular, two MI estimators are presented for its use in fMRI data. The first one uses a Parzen probability density estimation, and the second one is based on a K Nearest Neighbours (KNN) estimation. Additionally, a statistical measure has been introduced to automatically detect the voxels which are relevant to the fMRI task. Experiments demonstrate the advantages of MI estimators over SPM maps; firstly, providing more significant differences between relevant and irrelevant voxels; secondly, presenting more focalized activation; and, thirdly, detecting small areas related to the task. These findings, and the improved performance of KNN MI estimator in multisubject and multistimuli studies, make the proposed methods a good alternative to SPM.

  2. A new mutually reinforcing network node and link ranking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenghua; Dueñas-Osorio, Leonardo; Padgett, Jamie E.

    2015-10-01

    This study proposes a novel Normalized Wide network Ranking algorithm (NWRank) that has the advantage of ranking nodes and links of a network simultaneously. This algorithm combines the mutual reinforcement feature of Hypertext Induced Topic Selection (HITS) and the weight normalization feature of PageRank. Relative weights are assigned to links based on the degree of the adjacent neighbors and the Betweenness Centrality instead of assigning the same weight to every link as assumed in PageRank. Numerical experiment results show that NWRank performs consistently better than HITS, PageRank, eigenvector centrality, and edge betweenness from the perspective of network connectivity and approximate network flow, which is also supported by comparisons with the expensive N-1 benchmark removal criteria based on network efficiency. Furthermore, it can avoid some problems, such as the Tightly Knit Community effect, which exists in HITS. NWRank provides a new inexpensive way to rank nodes and links of a network, which has practical applications, particularly to prioritize resource allocation for upgrade of hierarchical and distributed networks, as well as to support decision making in the design of networks, where node and link importance depend on a balance of local and global integrity.

  3. Aggressive mimicry coexists with mutualism in an aphid

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Adrián; Fürstenau, Benjamin; Quero, Carmen; Pérez-Hidalgo, Nicolás; Carazo, Pau; Font, Enrique; Martínez-Torres, David

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary transition from interspecific exploitation to cooperation is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Ant–aphid relationships represent an ideal system to this end because they encompass a coevolutionary continuum of interactions ranging from mutualism to antagonism. In this study, we report an unprecedented interaction along this continuum: aggressive mimicry in aphids. We show that two morphs clonally produced by the aphid Paracletus cimiciformis during its root-dwelling phase establish relationships with ants at opposite sides of the mutualism–antagonism continuum. Although one of these morphs exhibits the conventional trophobiotic (mutualistic) relationship with ants of the genus Tetramorium, aphids of the alternative morph are transported by the ants to their brood chamber and cared for as if they were true ant larvae. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses reveal that the innate cuticular hydrocarbon profile of the mimic morph resembles the profile of ant larvae more than that of the alternative, genetically identical nonmimic morph. Furthermore, we show that, once in the brood chamber, mimic aphids suck on ant larva hemolymph. These results not only add aphids to the limited list of arthropods known to biosynthesize the cuticular chemicals of their deceived hosts to exploit their resources but describe a remarkable case of plastic aggressive mimicry. The present work adds a previously unidentified dimension to the classical textbook paradigm of aphid–ant relationships by showcasing a complex system at the evolutionary interface between cooperation and exploitation. PMID:25583474

  4. Mutualism or parasitism? The variable outcome of cleaning symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Cheney, Karen L; Côté, Isabelle M

    2005-01-01

    The exact nature of many interspecific interactions remains unclear, with some evidence suggesting mutualism and other evidence pointing to parasitism for the same pair of interacting species. Here, we show spatial variation in the outcome of the cleaning relationship between Caribbean cleaning gobies (Elacatinus evelynae) and longfin damselfish (Stegastes diencaeus) over the distribution range of these species, and link this variation to the availability of ectoparasites. Cleaning interactions at sites with more ectoparasites were characterized by greater reductions in ectoparasite loads on damselfish clients and lower rates of removal of scales and mucus (i.e. cheating) by cleaning gobies, whereas the opposite was observed at sites where ectoparasite abundance was lower. For damselfish clients, cleaning was therefore clearly mutualistic in some locations, but sometimes neutral or even parasitic in others. Seasonal variability in ectoparasite abundance may ensure that locally low parasite availability, which promotes cleanerfish cheating, may be a transient condition at any given site. Conflicting conclusions about the nature of cleaning symbioses may, therefore, be explained by variation in ectoparasite abundance. PMID:17148155

  5. Finding Mutual Exclusion Invariants in Temporal Planning Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardini, Sara; Smith, David E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for automatically extracting temporal mutual exclusion invariants from PDDL2.2 planning instances. We first identify a set of invariant candidates by inspecting the domain and then check these candidates against properties that assure invariance. If these properties are violated, we show that it is sometimes possible to refine a candidate by adding additional propositions and turn it into a real invariant. Our technique builds on other approaches to invariant synthesis presented in the literature, but departs from their limited focus on instantaneous discrete actions by addressing temporal and numeric domains. To deal with time, we formulate invariance conditions that account for both the entire structure of the operators (including the conditions, rather than just the effects) and the possible interactions between operators. As a result, we construct a technique that is not only capable of identifying invariants for temporal domains, but is also able to find a broader set of invariants for non-temporal domains than the previous techniques.

  6. Improved elastic medical image registration using mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ens, Konstantin; Schumacher, Hanno; Franz, Astrid; Fischer, Bernd

    2007-03-01

    One of the future-oriented areas of medical image processing is to develop fast and exact algorithms for image registration. By joining multi-modal images we are able to compensate the disadvantages of one imaging modality with the advantages of another modality. For instance, a Computed Tomography (CT) image containing the anatomy can be combined with metabolic information of a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) image. It is quite conceivable that a patient will not have the same position in both imaging systems. Furthermore some regions for instance in the abdomen can vary in shape and position due to different filling of the rectum. So a multi-modal image registration is needed to calculate a deformation field for one image in order to maximize the similarity between the two images, described by a so-called distance measure. In this work, we present a method to adapt a multi-modal distance measure, here mutual information (MI), with weighting masks. These masks are used to enhance relevant image structures and suppress image regions which otherwise would disturb the registration process. The performance of our method is tested on phantom data and real medical images.

  7. A syndrome of mutualism reinforces the lifestyle of a sloth.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Jonathan N; Mendoza, Jorge E; Steffan, Shawn A; Carey, Cayelan C; Weimer, Paul J; Peery, M Zachariah

    2014-03-07

    Arboreal herbivory is rare among mammals. The few species with this lifestyle possess unique adaptions to overcome size-related constraints on nutritional energetics. Sloths are folivores that spend most of their time resting or eating in the forest canopy. A three-toed sloth will, however, descend its tree weekly to defecate, which is risky, energetically costly and, until now, inexplicable. We hypothesized that this behaviour sustains an ecosystem in the fur of sloths, which confers cryptic nutritional benefits to sloths. We found that the more specialized three-toed sloths harboured more phoretic moths, greater concentrations of inorganic nitrogen and higher algal biomass than the generalist two-toed sloths. Moth density was positively related to inorganic nitrogen concentration and algal biomass in the fur. We discovered that sloths consumed algae from their fur, which was highly digestible and lipid-rich. By descending a tree to defecate, sloths transport moths to their oviposition sites in sloth dung, which facilitates moth colonization of sloth fur. Moths are portals for nutrients, increasing nitrogen levels in sloth fur, which fuels algal growth. Sloths consume these algae-gardens, presumably to augment their limited diet. These linked mutualisms between moths, sloths and algae appear to aid the sloth in overcoming a highly constrained lifestyle.

  8. Mutual information-based feature selection for radiomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oubel, Estanislao; Beaumont, Hubert; Iannessi, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    Background The extraction and analysis of image features (radiomics) is a promising field in the precision medicine era, with applications to prognosis, prediction, and response to treatment quantification. In this work, we present a mutual information - based method for quantifying reproducibility of features, a necessary step for qualification before their inclusion in big data systems. Materials and Methods Ten patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) lesions were followed over time (7 time points in average) with Computed Tomography (CT). Five observers segmented lesions by using a semi-automatic method and 27 features describing shape and intensity distribution were extracted. Inter-observer reproducibility was assessed by computing the multi-information (MI) of feature changes over time, and the variability of global extrema. Results The highest MI values were obtained for volume-based features (VBF). The lesion mass (M), surface to volume ratio (SVR) and volume (V) presented statistically significant higher values of MI than the rest of features. Within the same VBF group, SVR showed also the lowest variability of extrema. The correlation coefficient (CC) of feature values was unable to make a difference between features. Conclusions MI allowed to discriminate three features (M, SVR, and V) from the rest in a statistically significant manner. This result is consistent with the order obtained when sorting features by increasing values of extrema variability. MI is a promising alternative for selecting features to be considered as surrogate biomarkers in a precision medicine context.

  9. Ungulate saliva inhibits a grass-endophyte mutualism.

    PubMed

    Tanentzap, Andrew J; Vicari, Mark; Bazely, Dawn R

    2014-07-01

    Fungal endophytes modify plant-herbivore interactions by producing toxic alkaloids that deter herbivory. However, studies have neglected the direct effects herbivores may have on endophytes. Antifungal properties and signalling effectors in herbivore saliva suggest that evolutionary pressures may select for animals that mitigate the effects of endophyte-produced alkaloids. Here, we tested whether saliva of moose (Alces alces) and European reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) reduced hyphal elongation and production of ergot alkaloids by the foliar endophyte Epichloë festucae associated with the globally distributed red fescue Festuca rubra. Both moose and reindeer saliva reduced the growth of isolated endophyte hyphae when compared with a treatment of distilled water. Induction of the highly toxic alkaloid ergovaline was also inhibited in plants from the core of F. rubra's distribution when treated with moose saliva following simulated grazing. In genotypes from the southern limit of the species' distribution, ergovaline was constitutively expressed, as predicted where growth is environmentally limited. Our results now present the first evidence, to our knowledge, that ungulate saliva can combat plant defences produced by a grass-endophyte mutualism.

  10. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A+ + B- + e- → A + B + e-. Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl3- and POCl2-) and one diatomic species (Br2-) each with two monatomic cations (Ar+and Kr+) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions (˜1 × 10-18 cm6 s-1 at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br2- [(5.5 ± 2) × 10-19 cm6 s-1 at 300 K].

  11. Mutually Exclusive CBC-Containing Complexes Contribute to RNA Fate.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Simone; Benbahouche, Nour El Houda; Domanski, Michal; Robert, Marie-Cécile; Meola, Nicola; Lubas, Michal; Bukenborg, Jakob; Andersen, Jens S; Schulze, Wiebke M; Verheggen, Celine; Kudla, Grzegorz; Jensen, Torben Heick; Bertrand, Edouard

    2017-03-14

    The nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) stimulates processing reactions of capped RNAs, including their splicing, 3'-end formation, degradation, and transport. CBC effects are particular for individual RNA families, but how such selectivity is achieved remains elusive. Here, we analyze three main CBC partners known to impact different RNA species. ARS2 stimulates 3'-end formation/transcription termination of several transcript types, ZC3H18 stimulates degradation of a diverse set of RNAs, and PHAX functions in pre-small nuclear RNA/small nucleolar RNA (pre-snRNA/snoRNA) transport. Surprisingly, these proteins all bind capped RNAs without strong preferences for given transcripts, and their steady-state binding correlates poorly with their function. Despite this, PHAX and ZC3H18 compete for CBC binding and we demonstrate that this competitive binding is functionally relevant. We further show that CBC-containing complexes are short lived in vivo, and we therefore suggest that RNA fate involves the transient formation of mutually exclusive CBC complexes, which may only be consequential at particular checkpoints during RNA biogenesis.

  12. A new mutually reinforcing network node and link ranking algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenghua; Dueñas-Osorio, Leonardo; Padgett, Jamie E.

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a novel Normalized Wide network Ranking algorithm (NWRank) that has the advantage of ranking nodes and links of a network simultaneously. This algorithm combines the mutual reinforcement feature of Hypertext Induced Topic Selection (HITS) and the weight normalization feature of PageRank. Relative weights are assigned to links based on the degree of the adjacent neighbors and the Betweenness Centrality instead of assigning the same weight to every link as assumed in PageRank. Numerical experiment results show that NWRank performs consistently better than HITS, PageRank, eigenvector centrality, and edge betweenness from the perspective of network connectivity and approximate network flow, which is also supported by comparisons with the expensive N-1 benchmark removal criteria based on network efficiency. Furthermore, it can avoid some problems, such as the Tightly Knit Community effect, which exists in HITS. NWRank provides a new inexpensive way to rank nodes and links of a network, which has practical applications, particularly to prioritize resource allocation for upgrade of hierarchical and distributed networks, as well as to support decision making in the design of networks, where node and link importance depend on a balance of local and global integrity. PMID:26492958

  13. Mutual synchronization between structure and central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongu, Junichi; Iba, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    This paper shows an evaluating method of synchronization between a structure and Central Pattern Generators (CPGs), which are embedded in a controller designed for an active mass damper. A neural oscillator composing the CPGs has nonlinear and entrainment properties. Therefore, the proposed controller has possibility to exhibit the characteristic of robustness, when the structural parameters, i.e. stiffness or damping, are changed by earthquakes and the like. Our earlier studies have proposed the new controller and ascertained the efficacy of vibration suppression. However, there has been no study to evaluate the controller's above-mentioned properties. For tuning into practical application, the reliability and robustness along with the controller's vibration mitigation performance must be analyzed. In this paper, phase reduction theory is tried to appraise the synchronization between a structure and the CPGs. In this case, the synchronization between the target structure and a single neural oscillator constituting the CPGs is required to be investigated. Therefore, the single neural oscillator's the harmonization characteristic with sinusoidal input is firstly examined, and the synchronization region is expressed using phase response curves. In addition, the mutual synchronization between the structure and the single neural oscillator is studied under sinusoidal input using the result of the harmonization characteristic.

  14. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-14

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A{sup +}+ B{sup -}+ e{sup -}{yields} A + B + e{sup -}. Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl{sub 3}{sup -} and POCl{sub 2}{sup -}) and one diatomic species (Br{sub 2}{sup -}) each with two monatomic cations (Ar{sup +}and Kr{sup +}) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions ({approx}1 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br{sub 2}{sup -}[(5.5 {+-} 2) x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K].

  15. Pupil dilation as an index of preferred mutual gaze duration

    PubMed Central

    Binetti, Nicola; Harrison, Charlotte; Coutrot, Antoine; Johnston, Alan; Mareschal, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Most animals look at each other to signal threat or interest. In humans, this social interaction is usually punctuated with brief periods of mutual eye contact. Deviations from this pattern of gazing behaviour generally make us feel uncomfortable and are a defining characteristic of clinical conditions such as autism or schizophrenia, yet it is unclear what constitutes normal eye contact. Here, we measured, across a wide range of ages, cultures and personality types, the period of direct gaze that feels comfortable and examined whether autonomic factors linked to arousal were indicative of people's preferred amount of eye contact. Surprisingly, we find that preferred period of gaze duration is not dependent on fundamental characteristics such as gender, personality traits or attractiveness. However, we do find that subtle pupillary changes, indicative of physiological arousal, correlate with the amount of eye contact people find comfortable. Specifically, people preferring longer durations of eye contact display faster increases in pupil size when viewing another person than those preferring shorter durations. These results reveal that a person's preferred duration of eye contact is signalled by physiological indices (pupil dilation) beyond volitional control that may play a modulatory role in gaze behaviour. PMID:27493767

  16. NSECT sinogram sampling optimization by normalized mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, Rodrigo S.; Galarreta-Valverde, Miguel A.; Mekkaoui, Choukri; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Jackowski, Marcel P.

    2015-03-01

    Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT) is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique that measures the distribution of isotopes from biological tissue using fast-neutron inelastic scattering reaction. As a high-energy neutron beam illuminates the sample, the excited nuclei emit gamma rays whose energies are unique to the emitting nuclei. Tomographic images of each element in the spectrum can then be reconstructed to represent the spatial distribution of elements within the sample using a first generation tomographic scan. NSECT's high radiation dose deposition, however, requires a sampling strategy that can yield maximum image quality under a reasonable radiation dose. In this work, we introduce an NSECT sinogram sampling technique based on the Normalized Mutual Information (NMI) of the reconstructed images. By applying the Radon Transform on the ground-truth image obtained from a carbon-based synthetic phantom, different NSECT sinogram configurations were simulated and compared by using the NMI as a similarity measure. The proposed methodology was also applied on NSECT images acquired using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations of the same phantom to validate our strategy. Results show that NMI can be used to robustly predict the quality of the reconstructed NSECT images, leading to an optimal NSECT acquisition and a minimal absorbed dose by the patient.

  17. Mutual information and redundancy in spontaneous communication between cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Szczepanski, J; Arnold, M; Wajnryb, E; Amigó, J M; Sanchez-Vives, M V

    2011-03-01

    An important question in neural information processing is how neurons cooperate to transmit information. To study this question, we resort to the concept of redundancy in the information transmitted by a group of neurons and, at the same time, we introduce a novel concept for measuring cooperation between pairs of neurons called relative mutual information (RMI). Specifically, we studied these two parameters for spike trains generated by neighboring neurons from the primary visual cortex in the awake, freely moving rat. The spike trains studied here were spontaneously generated in the cortical network, in the absence of visual stimulation. Under these conditions, our analysis revealed that while the value of RMI oscillated slightly around an average value, the redundancy exhibited a behavior characterized by a higher variability. We conjecture that this combination of approximately constant RMI and greater variable redundancy makes information transmission more resistant to noise disturbances. Furthermore, the redundancy values suggest that neurons can cooperate in a flexible way during information transmission. This mostly occurs via a leading neuron with higher transmission rate or, less frequently, through the information rate of the whole group being higher than the sum of the individual information rates-in other words in a synergetic manner. The proposed method applies not only to the stationary, but also to locally stationary neural signals.

  18. [Mutualism in a Reduced Gravity Environment (MuRGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Karishma

    2010-01-01

    MuRGE (Mutualism in a Reduced Gravity Environment) is a NASA flight-research experiment to investigate the microgravity effects associated with cell-cell communication and beneficial microbe-host interactions using a plant-fungal model system. This investigation will use a clinostat, an instrument that slowly rotates the plants to negate the effects of gravitational pull on plant growth (gravitropism) and development, to simulate microgravity. I will be using the endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica (Pi) and the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (At). P. indica has been shown to colonize roots of various plant species, including A. thaliana, and to increase plant growth and resistance to stress. The fungus has the ability to grow from spores or in axenic cultures without the presence of a host. P. indica spores and P. indica extract will be used to inoculate Arabidopsis seeds germinated on a clinostat in order to determine if simulated microgravity affects the interaction between the fungus and its plant host.

  19. Mutualism in a Reduced Gravity Environment (MuRGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Karishma K.

    2010-01-01

    MuRGE (Mutualism in a Reduced Gravity Environment) is a NASA flight-research experiment to investigate the microgravity effects associated with cell-cell communication and beneficial microbe-host interactions using a plant-fungal model system. This investigation will use a clinostat, an instrument that slowly rotates the plants to negate the effects of gravitational pull on plant growth (gravitropism) and development, to simulate microgravity. I will be using the endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica (Pi) and the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (At). P. indica has been shown to colonize roots of various plant species, including A. thaliana, and to increase plant growth and resistance to stress. The fungus has the ability to grow from spores or in axenic cultures without the presence of a host. P. indica spores and P. indica extract will be used to inoculate Arabidopsis seeds germinated on a clinostat in order to determine if simulated microgravity affects the interaction between the fungus and its plant host.

  20. Conditional mutual information of bipartite unitaries and scrambling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dawei; Hayden, Patrick; Walter, Michael

    2016-12-01

    One way to diagnose chaos in bipartite unitary channels is via the tripartite information of the corresponding Choi state, which for certain choices of the subsystems reduces to the negative conditional mutual information (CMI). We study this quantity from a quantum information-theoretic perspective to clarify its role in diagnosing scrambling. When the CMI is zero, we find that the channel has a special normal form consisting of local channels between individual inputs and outputs. However, we find that arbitrarily low CMI does not imply arbitrary proximity to a channel of this form, although it does imply a type of approximate recoverability of one of the inputs. When the CMI is maximal, we find that the residual channel from an individual input to an individual output is completely depolarizing when the other input is maximally mixed. However, we again find that this result is not robust. We also extend some of these results to the multipartite case and to the case of Haar-random pure input states. Finally, we look at the relationship between tripartite information and its Rényi-2 version which is directly related to out-of-time-order correlation functions. In particular, we demonstrate an arbitrarily large gap between the two quantities.

  1. Fast registration algorithm using a variational principle for mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Murray E.; Summers, Randy

    2003-05-01

    A method is proposed for cross-modal image registration based on mutual information (MI) matching criteria. Both conventional and "normalized" MI are considered. MI may be expressed as a functional of a general image displacement field u. The variational principle for MI provides a field equation for u. The method employs a set of "registration points" consisting of a prescribed number of strongest edge points of the reference image, and minimizes an objective function D defined as the sum of the square residuals of the field equation for u at these points, where u is expressed as a sum over a set of basis functions (the affine model is presented here). D has a global minimum when the images are aligned, with a "basin of attraction" typically of width ~0.3 pixels. By pre-filtering with a low-pass filter, and using a multiresolution image pyramid, the basin may be significantly widened. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to minimize D. Tests using randomly distributed misalignments of image pairs show that registration accuracy of 0.02 - 0.07 pixels is achieved, when using cubic B-splines for image representation, interpolation, and Parzen window estimation.

  2. A reliable RFID mutual authentication scheme for healthcare environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Lichin; Wu, Ju-Chuan

    2013-04-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) applications have the potential to increase the reliability of healthcare environments. However, there are obvious security and privacy concerns with regard to storing personal and medical data in RFID tags, and the lack of secure authentication systems in healthcare environments remains as a challenge the further use of this technology, one that touches on issues of confidentiality, unforgeability, location privacy, and scalability. This study proposes a novel mutual authentication protocol that considers all of these issues and solves the tradeoff between location privacy and scalability in healthcare environments. A formal proof and analysis is demonstrated to prove the effectiveness of the proposed scheme, and that high reliability has and can be easily deployed and managed. This study also provides a scenario example that applied proposed protocol in the newborn care and management. The result shows that the proposed scheme solves the related tradeoff problem, and is capable of providing both location privacy and scalability. To apply the authentication scheme proposed in this work would be able to increase confidence in future implementations of RFID systems in healthcare environments.

  3. Mutually unbiased bases as minimal Clifford covariant 2-designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huangjun

    2015-06-01

    Mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) are interesting for various reasons. The most attractive example of (a complete set of) MUBs is the one constructed by Ivanović as well as Wootters and Fields, which is referred to as the canonical MUB. Nevertheless, little is known about anything that is unique to this MUB. We show that the canonical MUB in any prime power dimension is uniquely determined by an extremal orbit of the (restricted) Clifford group except in dimension 3, in which case the orbit defines a special symmetric informationally complete measurement (SIC), known as the Hesse SIC. Here the extremal orbit is the orbit with the smallest number of pure states. Quite surprisingly, this characterization does not rely on any concept that is related to bases or unbiasedness. As a corollary, the canonical MUB is the unique minimal 2-design covariant with respect to the Clifford group except in dimension 3. In addition, these MUBs provide an infinite family of highly symmetric frames and positive-operator-valued measures (POVMs), which are of independent interest.

  4. By-product mutualism with evolving common enemies.

    PubMed

    Jaegher, Kris De

    2017-03-01

    The common-enemy hypothesis of by-product mutualism states that organisms cooperate when it is in their individual interests to do so, with benefits for other organisms arising as a by-product; in particular, such cooperation is hypothesized to arise when organisms face the common enemy of a sufficiently adverse environment. In an evolutionary game where two defenders can cooperate to defend a common resource, this paper analyzes the common-enemy hypothesis when adversity is endogenous, in that an attacker sets the number of attacks. As a benchmark, we first consider exogenous adversity, where adversity is not subject to evolution. In this case, the common-enemy hypothesis is predicted when the degree of complementarity between defenders' defensive efforts is sufficiently low. When the degree of complementarity is high, the hypothesis is predicted only when cooperation costs are high; when cooperation costs are instead low, a competing hypothesis is predicted, where adversity discourages cooperation. Second, we consider the case of endogenous adversity. In this case, we continue to predict the competing hypothesis for a high degree of complementarity and low cooperation costs. The common-enemy hypothesis, however, only continues to be predicted for the lowest degrees of complementarity.

  5. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  6. Residential mobility microsimulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifei; Wu, Lun

    2010-09-01

    Residential mobility refers to the spatial movement of individuals and households between dwellings within an urban area. This considerable amount of intra-urban movement affects the urban structure and has significant repercussions for urban transportation. In order to understand and project related impacts, a considerable number of residential mobility models has been developed and used in the regional planning process. Within this context, the history and state-of-art residential mobility models are discussed and indicated. Meanwhile, a residential mobility Microsimulation model, called URM-Microsim (Urban Residential Mobility Microsimulation), is introduced and discussed.

  7. Ion mobility sensor

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  8. Mutual enhancement of differentiation of osteoblasts and osteocytes occurs through direct cell-cell contact.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Koji; Xing, Qian; Khosla, Sundeep; Monroe, David G

    2014-11-01

    There is increasing evidence that osteocytes regulate multiple aspects of bone remodeling through bi-directional communication with osteoblasts. This is potentially mediated through cell-cell contact via osteocytic dendritic processes, through the activity of secreted factors, or both. To test whether cell-cell contact affects gene expression patterns in osteoblasts and osteocytes, we used a co-culture system where calvarial osteoblasts and IDG-SW3 osteocytes were allowed to touch through a porous membrane, while still being physically separated to allow for phenotypic characterization. Osteoblast/osteocyte cell-contact resulted in up-regulation of osteoblast differentiation genes in the osteoblasts, when compared to wells where no cell contact was allowed. Examination of osteocyte gene expression when in direct contact with osteoblasts also revealed increased expression of osteocyte-specific genes. These data suggest that physical contact mutually enhances both the osteoblastic and osteocytic character of each respective cell type. Interestingly, Gja1 (a gap junction protein) was increased in the osteoblasts only when in direct contact with the osteocytes, suggesting that Gja1 may mediate some of the effects of direct cell contact. To test this hypothesis, we treated the direct contact system with the gap junction inhibitor 18-alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid and found that Bglap expression was significantly inhibited. This suggests that osteocytes may regulate late osteoblast differentiation at least in part through Gja1. Identification of the specific factors involved in the enhancement of differentiation of both osteoblasts and osteocytes when in direct contact will uncover new biology concerning how these bone cells communicate.

  9. The C-terminal domain controls the mobility of Crumbs 3 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Djuric, Ivona; Siebrasse, Jan Peter; Schulze, Ulf; Granado, Daniel; Schlüter, Marc A; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Weide, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The physiological function of epithelia depends on an asymmetric distribution of their membrane domains. Polarity proteins play a crucial role for distribution processes, however, little is known about their mobility in epithelial cells. In this study, we analyzed the intracellular and plasma-membrane-associated mobility of fluorescence-labeled Crb3A and Crb3B. Both variants belong to the Crumbs protein family, which control size and identity of apical membranes in epithelial cells. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching measurements revealed different mobilities for the two Crb3 variants. They also differentially affected mobility and localization of the Pals1/Mpp5 protein, which binds to Crb3A but not to Crb3B. In addition, tracking of intracellular vesicles indicated that Crb3A containing vesicles are slightly more immobile than Crb3B ones. Taken together, our data revealed different intracellular mobility patterns for Crb3A and Crb3B.

  10. Composite sensor membrane

    DOEpatents

    Majumdar, Arun; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Yue, Min

    2008-03-18

    A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

  11. Behavioral mechanisms underlie an ant-plant mutualism.

    PubMed

    Rudgers, Jennifer A; Hodgen, Jillian G; White, J Wilson

    2003-03-01

    Predators can reduce herbivory by consuming herbivores (a consumptive effect) and by altering herbivore behavior, life history, physiology or distribution (non-consumptive effects). The non-consumptive, or trait-mediated, effects of predators on prey may have important functions in the dynamics of communities. In a facultative ant-plant mutualism, we investigated whether these non-consumptive effects influenced the host plants of prey. Here, predaceous ants (Forelius pruinosus) consume and disturb a dominant lepidopteran folivore (Bucculatrix thurberiella) of wild cotton plants (Gossypium thurberi). Season-long ant exclusion experiments revealed that ants had a larger proportional effect on damage by B. thurberiella than on caterpillar abundance, a result that suggests ants have a strong non-consumptive effect. Behavioral experiments conducted in two populations over 2 years demonstrated that B. thurberiella caterpillars were substantially less likely to damage wild cotton leaves in the presence of ants due to ant-induced changes in caterpillar behavior. In the absence of ants caterpillars spent more time stationary (potential feeding time) and less time dropping from leaves by a thread of silk than when ants were present. Furthermore, ants altered the spatial distribution of both caterpillars and damage; caterpillars spent relatively more time on the upper surfaces of leaves and caused damage further from the leaf margin in ant exclusion treatments. Both direct encounters with ants and information conveyed when ants walked onto leaves were key events leading to the anti-predator behaviors of caterpillars. This study contributes to a small body of evidence from terrestrial systems demonstrating that the trait-mediated effects of predators can cascade to the host plants of prey.

  12. Mutual attraction between emigrant cells from transected denervated nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Abernethy, D A; Thomas, P K; Rud, A; King, R H

    1994-01-01

    It is known that regenerating axons emerging from the proximal stump of a transected nerve are attracted towards the distal stump. It is not certain whether this neurotropic effect is on the axons themselves or whether it is on supporting cells such as Schwann cells that the axons then follow. In order to investigate this question in rats, segments of the sciatic nerve were either isolated or removed and reinserted as grafts, and then sutured into the opposing ends of double-Y silicone tubes. In these tubes, a central conduit was formed by connecting the centrally facing limb of each Y tube. The nerve segments were sutured into one of the limbs at either end. The third limbs of the Y tubes formed side arms, one of which was left open; a plug of mobilised fatty connective tissue was sutured into the other. A gap of 6 mm was left between the cut ends and the fat pads (or openings from the side arms). After 2-3 wk a significantly greater outgrowth (P < 0.001) was found to link the nerve segments than to invade the side arms. The major cell component in the outgrowth was Schwann cells, supported by fibroblasts and capillaries and surrounded by a lamellated layer of flattened fibroblasts. The growth into the side arms had a looser cellular architecture and contained considerably fewer Schwann cells. The results strongly suggest the existence of mutual attraction between emigrant Schwann cells, or possibly endoneurial fibroblasts, from the 2 cut ends of transected nerves. This conclusion has implications for the guidance of axons across gaps in nerves. It does not exclude an additional neurotropic effect from the distal stump on axons. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8014117

  13. Solar flux forecasting using mutual information with an optimal delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Conway, D.; Rokni, M.; Sperling, R.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flux F(sub 10.7) directly affects the atmospheric density, thereby changing the lifetime and prediction of satellite orbits. For this reason, accurate forecasting of F(sub 10.7) is crucial for orbit determination of spacecraft. Our attempts to model and forecast F(sub 10.7) uncovered highly entangled dynamics. We concluded that the general lack of predictability in solar activity arises from its nonlinear nature. Nonlinear dynamics allow us to predict F(sub 10.7) more accurately than is possible using stochastic methods for time scales shorter than a characteristic horizon, and with about the same accuracy as using stochastic techniques when the forecasted data exceed this horizon. The forecast horizon is a function of two dynamical invariants: the attractor dimension and the Lyapunov exponent. In recent years, estimation of the attractor dimension reconstructed from a time series has become an important tool in data analysis. In calculating the invariants of the system, the first necessary step is the reconstruction of the attractor for the system from the time-delayed values of the time series. The choice of the time delay is critical for this reconstruction. For an infinite amount of noise-free data, the time delay can, in principle, be chosen almost arbitrarily. However, the quality of the phase portraits produced using the time-delay technique is determined by the value chosen for the delay time. Fraser and Swinney have shown that a good choice for this time delay is the one suggested by Shaw, which uses the first local minimum of the mutual information rather than the autocorrelation function to determine the time delay. This paper presents a refinement of this criterion and applies the refined technique to solar flux data to produce a forecast of the solar activity.

  14. Mutualism in a Reduced Gravity Environment (MuRGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haire, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    Mutualism in a Reduced Gravity Environment (MuRGE) is a ground research study to determine the feasibility of assessing fungi-plant (Piriformospora indica-Arabidopsis thaliana) interactions in microgravity. Seeds from the plant Arabiddospsis thaliana (At) will be grown in the presence of Piriformospora indica (Pi) an endophytic Sebacinacae family fungus. Pi is capable of colonizing the roots of a wide variety of plant species, including non-mycorrhizal hosts like At, and promoting plant growth similarly to AMF (arbusuclar mychorrizal fungi) unlike most AMF, Pi is not an obligate plant symbiont and can be grown in the absence of a host. In the presence of a suitable plant host, Pi can attach to and colonize root tips. Interaction visualization is accomplished with strong autofluorescence in the roots, followed by root colonization via fungal hyphae, and chlamydospore production. Increased root growth can be observed even before root colonization is detectable. In addition, Pi chlamydospores generated from axenic culture in microgravity will be used to inoculate roots of At grown in 1g to determine the effect of microgravity upon the inherent virulence or beneficial effects. Based on recent reports of increased virulence of S. typhimurium, P. aeruginosa, and S. Pneumoniae in reduced gravity, differences in microbial pathogenic responses and host plant systemic acquired resistance are expected. The focus of this project within MuRGE involved the development P. indica culture media evaluation and microscopy protocol development. High, clean spore harvest yields for the detection of fungi-plant interactions microscopically was the immediate goal of this experiment.

  15. Population dynamics and the ecological stability of obligate pollination mutualisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    Mutualistic interactions almost always produce both costs and benefits for each of the interacting species. It is the difference between gross benefits and costs that determines the net benefit and the per-capita effect on each of the interacting populations. For example, the net benefit of obligate pollinators, such as yucca and senita moths, to plants is determined by the difference between the number of ovules fertilized from moth pollination and the number of ovules eaten by the pollinator's larvae. It is clear that if pollinator populations are large, then, because many eggs are laid, costs to plants are large, whereas, if pollinator populations are small, gross benefits are low due to lack of pollination. Even though the size and dynamics of the pollinator population are likely to be crucial, their importance has been neglected in the investigation of mechanisms, such as selective fruit abortion, that can limit costs and increase net benefits. Here, we suggest that both the population size and dynamics of pollinators are important in determining the net benefits to plants, and that fruit abortion can significantly affect these. We develop a model of mutualism between populations of plants and their pollinating seed-predators to explore the ecological consequences of fruit abortion on pollinator population dynamics and the net effect on plants. We demonstrate that the benefit to a plant population is unimodal as a function of pollinator abundance, relative to the abundance of flowers. Both selective abortion of fruit with eggs and random abortion of fruit, without reference to whether they have eggs or not, can limit pollinator population size. This can increase the net benefits to the plant population by limiting the number of eggs laid, if the pollination rate remains high. However, fruit abortion can possibly destabilize the pollinator population, with negative consequences for the plant population.

  16. Solvation of polymers as mutual association. II. Basic thermodynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2013-04-01

    The theory of equilibrium solvation of polymers B by a relatively low molar mass solvent A, developed in the simplest form in Paper I, is used to explore some essential trends in basic thermodynamic properties of solvated polymer solutions, such as the equilibrium concentrations of solvated polymers AiB and free solvent molecules A, the mass distribution φ _{{AiB}}(i) of solvated clusters, the extent of solvation of the polymer Φsolv, the solvation transition lines T_{solv}(φ _{{B}}o), the specific heat CV, the osmotic second virial coefficient B2, phase stability boundaries, and the critical temperatures associated with closed loop phase diagrams. We discuss the differences between the basic thermodynamic properties of solvated polymers and those derived previously for hierarchical mutual association processes involving the association of two different species A and B into AB complexes and the subsequent polymerization of these AB complexes into linear polymeric structures. The properties of solvated polymer solutions are also compared to those for solutions of polymers in a self-associating solvent. Closed loop phase diagrams for solvated polymer solutions arise in the theory from the competition between the associative and van der Waals interactions, a behavior also typical for dispersed molecular and nanoparticle species that strongly associate with the host fluid. Our analysis of the temperature dependence of the second osmotic virial coefficient reveals that the theory must be generalized to describe the association of multiple solvent molecules with each chain monomer, and this complex extension of the present model will be developed in subsequent papers aimed at a quantitative rather than qualitative treatment of solvated polymer solutions.

  17. Membrane position control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A membrane structure includes at least one electroactive bending actuator fixed to a supporting base. Each electroactive bending actuator is operatively connected to the membrane for controlling membrane position. Any displacement of each electroactive bending actuator effects displacement of the membrane. More specifically, the operative connection is provided by a guiding wheel assembly and a track, wherein displacement of the bending actuator effects translation of the wheel assembly along the track, thereby imparting movement to the membrane.

  18. Nanoporous Membrane Immunosensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Another aspect of the invention is a method for detecting an analyte in a test sample, having 5 the steps: (a) modifying a side of a semipermeable... side of the membrane with the membrane modifiers; (c) drawing the test sample through the membrane, osmotically or with the application of...immunoassay labels on the side of the membrane with the membrane modifiers, where these labels have label binding ligands where these label binding

  19. A consumer-resource approach to the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Like predation and competition, mutualism is now recognized as a consumer resource (C-R) interaction, including, in particular, bi-directional (e.g., coral, plant- mycorrhizae) and uni-directional (e.g., ant-plant defense, plant-pollinator) C-R mutualisms. Here, we develop general theory for the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism based on the C-R mechanism of interspecific interaction. To test the influence of C-R interactions on the dynamics and stability of bi- and uni-directional C-R mutualisms, we developed simple models that link consumer functional response of one mutualistic species with the resources supplied by another. Phase-plane analyses show that the ecological dynamics of C-R mutualisms are stable in general. Most transient behavior leads to an equilibrium of mutualistic coexistence, at which both species densities are greater than in the absence of interactions. However, due to the basic nature of C-R interactions, certain density-dependent conditions can lead to C-R dynamics characteristic of predator-prey interactions, in which one species overexploits and causes the other to go extinct. Consistent with empirical phenomena, these results suggest that the C-R interaction can provide a broad mechanism for understanding density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism. By unifying predation, competition, and mutualism under the common ecological framework of consumer-resource theory, we may also gain a better understanding of the universal features of interspecific interactions in general.

  20. Density-dependent outcomes in a digestive mutualism between carnivorous Roridula plants and their associated hemipterans.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Bruce; Midgley, Jeremy J

    2007-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that mutualisms often have variable outcomes in space and time. In particular, the outcomes may be dependent on the density of the partners with unimodal or saturating outcomes providing stability to the mutualism. We examine density-dependent outcomes of an obligate, species-specific mutualism between a South African carnivorous plant (Roridula dentata) and a hemipteran (Pameridea) that facilitates prey digestion, but also sucks plant sap. Plants occur in sandy, leached, nitrogen-poor soils and have no digestive enzymes to digest prey. Instead they rely on obligately dependent hemipterans to supply nitrogen by digesting prey for them and defecating on their leaves. We documented the densities of Pameridea on Roridula in the field. In the greenhouse, we manipulated the hemipteran densities on Roridula and measured the mean relative growth rates of plants with differing hemipteran densities. Plants exhibited a unimodal response to the density of their mutualist partners. Those with no hemipterans had negative growth rates, suggesting that hemipterans are important in facilitating nitrogen absorption. Plants with intermediate hemipteran densities had positive growth rates but growth rates were negative under very high hemipteran densities. Our research provides support for variable and unimodal outcomes in mutualism. Unimodal outcomes may be particularly important in obligate mutualisms and this is one of the few studied outside of pollinating seed parasite mutualisms. In this system, extrinsic factors such as other predators may affect the mutualism by altering the numbers of hemipterans.