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Sample records for mutually unbiased bases

  1. Weak mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, M.; Vourdas, A.

    2012-02-01

    Quantum systems with variables in { Z}(d) are considered. The properties of lines in the { Z}(d)\\times { Z}(d) phase space of these systems are studied. Weak mutually unbiased bases in these systems are defined as bases for which the overlap of any two vectors in two different bases is equal to d-1/2 or alternatively to one of the d-1/2i, 0 (where di is a divisor of d apart from d, 1). They are designed for the geometry of the { Z}(d)\\times { Z}(d) phase space, in the sense that there is a duality between the weak mutually unbiased bases and the maximal lines through the origin. In the special case of prime d, there are no divisors of d apart from 1, d and the weak mutually unbiased bases are mutually unbiased bases.

  2. Covariant mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    The connection between maximal sets of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) in a prime-power dimensional Hilbert space and finite phase-space geometries is well known. In this article, we classify MUBs according to their degree of covariance with respect to the natural symmetries of a finite phase-space, which are the group of its affine symplectic transformations. We prove that there exist maximal sets of MUBs that are covariant with respect to the full group only in odd prime-power dimensional spaces, and in this case, their equivalence class is actually unique. Despite this limitation, we show that in dimension 2r covariance can still be achieved by restricting to proper subgroups of the symplectic group, that constitute the finite analogues of the oscillator group. For these subgroups, we explicitly construct the unitary operators yielding the covariance.

  3. Mutually unbiased product bases for multiple qudits

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, Daniel; Pammer, Bogdan; Weigert, Stefan

    2016-03-15

    We investigate the interplay between mutual unbiasedness and product bases for multiple qudits of possibly different dimensions. A product state of such a system is shown to be mutually unbiased to a product basis only if each of its factors is mutually unbiased to all the states which occur in the corresponding factors of the product basis. This result implies both a tight limit on the number of mutually unbiased product bases which the system can support and a complete classification of mutually unbiased product bases for multiple qubits or qutrits. In addition, only maximally entangled states can be mutually unbiased to a maximal set of mutually unbiased product bases.

  4. Mutually unbiased bases and generalized Bell states

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, Andrei B.; Sych, Denis; Sanchez-Soto, Luis L.; Leuchs, Gerd

    2009-05-15

    We employ a straightforward relation between mutually unbiased and Bell bases to extend the latter in terms of a direct construction for the former. We analyze in detail the properties of these generalized Bell states, showing that they constitute an appropriate tool for testing entanglement in bipartite multiqudit systems.

  5. Arithmetic, mutually unbiased bases and complementary observables

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppeard, M. D.

    2010-02-15

    Complementary observables in quantum mechanics may be viewed as Frobenius structures in a dagger monoidal category, such as the category of finite dimensional Hilbert spaces over the complex numbers. On the other hand, their properties crucially depend on the discrete Fourier transform and its associated quantum torus, requiring only the finite fields that underlie mutually unbiased bases. In axiomatic topos theory, the complex numbers are difficult to describe and should not be invoked unnecessarily. This paper surveys some fundamentals of quantum arithmetic using finite field complementary observables, with a view considering more general axiom systems.

  6. Mutually unbiased bases and bound entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.; Löffler, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    In this contribution we relate two different key concepts: mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) and entanglement. We provide a general toolbox for analyzing and comparing entanglement of quantum states for different dimensions and numbers of particles. In particular we focus on bound entanglement, i.e. highly mixed states which cannot be distilled by local operations and classical communications. For a certain class of states—for which the state-space forms a ‘magic’ simplex—we analyze the set of bound entangled states detected by the MUB criterion for different dimensions d and number of particles n. We find that the geometry is similar for different d and n, consequently the MUB criterion opens possibilities to investigate the typicality of positivity under partial transposition (PPT)-bound and multipartite bound entanglement more deeply and provides a simple experimentally feasible tool to detect bound entanglement.

  7. Quantum process reconstruction based on mutually unbiased basis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Perez, A.; Saavedra, C.; Klimov, A. B.

    2011-05-15

    We study a quantum process reconstruction based on the use of mutually unbiased projectors (MUB projectors) as input states for a D-dimensional quantum system, with D being a power of a prime number. This approach connects the results of quantum-state tomography using mutually unbiased bases with the coefficients of a quantum process, expanded in terms of MUB projectors. We also study the performance of the reconstruction scheme against random errors when measuring probabilities at the MUB projectors.

  8. Improving quantum state estimation with mutually unbiased bases.

    PubMed

    Adamson, R B A; Steinberg, A M

    2010-07-16

    When used in quantum state estimation, projections onto mutually unbiased bases have the ability to maximize information extraction per measurement and to minimize redundancy. We present the first experimental demonstration of quantum state tomography of two-qubit polarization states to take advantage of mutually unbiased bases. We demonstrate improved state estimation as compared to standard measurement strategies and discuss how this can be understood from the structure of the measurements we use. We experimentally compared our method to the standard state estimation method for three different states and observe that the infidelity was up to 1.84 ± 0.06 times lower by using our technique than it was by using standard state estimation methods.

  9. An analytic function approach to weak mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olupitan, T.; Lei, C.; Vourdas, A.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum systems with variables in Z(d) are considered, and three different structures are studied. The first is weak mutually unbiased bases, for which the absolute value of the overlap of any two vectors in two different bases is 1 /√{ k } (where k | d) or 0. The second is maximal lines through the origin in the Z(d) × Z(d) phase space. The third is an analytic representation in the complex plane based on Theta functions, and their zeros. It is shown that there is a correspondence (triality) that links strongly these three apparently different structures. For simplicity, the case where d =p1 ×p2, where p1 ,p2 are odd prime numbers different from each other, is considered.

  10. Galois-unitary operators that cycle mutually-unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hoan; Appleby, Marcus; Bengtsson, Ingemar

    2015-03-01

    Wigner's theorem states that probability-preserving transformations of quantum states must be either unitary or anti-unitary. However, if we restrict ourselves to a subspace of a Hilbert space, it is possible to generalize the notion of anti-unitaries. Such transformations were recently constructed in search of Symmetric Informationally-Complete (SIC) states. They are called Galois-unitaries (g-unitaries for short), as they are unitaries composed with Galois automorphisms of a chosen number field extension. Despite certain bizarre behaviors of theirs, we show that g-unitaries are indeed useful in the theory of Mutually-Unbiased Bases (MUBs), as they help solve the MUB-cycling problem and provide a construction of MUB-balanced states. HD was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship

  11. Mutually unbiased bases as minimal Clifford covariant 2-designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huangjun

    2015-06-01

    Mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) are interesting for various reasons. The most attractive example of (a complete set of) MUBs is the one constructed by Ivanović as well as Wootters and Fields, which is referred to as the canonical MUB. Nevertheless, little is known about anything that is unique to this MUB. We show that the canonical MUB in any prime power dimension is uniquely determined by an extremal orbit of the (restricted) Clifford group except in dimension 3, in which case the orbit defines a special symmetric informationally complete measurement (SIC), known as the Hesse SIC. Here the extremal orbit is the orbit with the smallest number of pure states. Quite surprisingly, this characterization does not rely on any concept that is related to bases or unbiasedness. As a corollary, the canonical MUB is the unique minimal 2-design covariant with respect to the Clifford group except in dimension 3. In addition, these MUBs provide an infinite family of highly symmetric frames and positive-operator-valued measures (POVMs), which are of independent interest.

  12. Entropic uncertainty relations and locking: Tight bounds for mutually unbiased bases

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, Manuel A.; Wehner, Stephanie

    2007-02-15

    We prove tight entropic uncertainty relations for a large number of mutually unbiased measurements. In particular, we show that a bound derived from the result by Maassen and Uffink [Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 1103 (1988)] for two such measurements can in fact be tight for up to {radical}(d) measurements in mutually unbiased bases. We then show that using more mutually unbiased bases does not always lead to a better locking effect. We prove that the optimal bound for the accessible information using up to {radical}(d) specific mutually unbiased bases is log d/2, which is the same as can be achieved by using only two bases. Our result indicates that merely using mutually unbiased bases is not sufficient to achieve a strong locking effect and we need to look for additional properties.

  13. Operational link between mutually unbiased bases and symmetric informationally complete positive operator-valued measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneduci, Roberto; Bullock, Thomas J.; Busch, Paul; Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Toigo, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    We exhibit an operational connection between mutually unbiased bases and symmetric informationally complete positive operator-valued measures. Assuming that the latter exists, we show that there is a strong link between these two structures in all prime power dimensions. We also demonstrate that a similar link cannot exist in dimension 6.

  14. About mutually unbiased bases in even and odd prime power dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durt, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    Mutually unbiased bases generalize the X, Y and Z qubit bases. They possess numerous applications in quantum information science. It is well known that in prime power dimensions N = pm (with p prime and m a positive integer), there exists a maximal set of N + 1 mutually unbiased bases. In the present paper, we derive an explicit expression for those bases, in terms of the (operations of the) associated finite field (Galois division ring) of N elements. This expression is shown to be equivalent to the expressions previously obtained by Ivanovic (1981 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 14 3241) in odd prime dimensions, and Wootters and Fields (1989 Ann. Phys. 191 363) in odd prime power dimensions. In even prime power dimensions, we derive a new explicit expression for the mutually unbiased bases. The new ingredients of our approach are, basically, the following: we provide a simple expression of the generalized Pauli group in terms of the additive characters of the field, and we derive an exact groupal composition law between the elements of the commuting subsets of the generalized Pauli group, renormalized by a well-chosen phase-factor.

  15. Comment on ''Mutually unbiased bases, orthogonal Latin squares, and hidden-variable models''

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Joanne L.; Rao, Asha

    2011-03-15

    In a recent article Paterek, Dakic, and Brukner [Phys. Rev. A 79, 012109 (2009)] show an algorithm for generating mutually unbiased bases from sets of orthogonal Latin squares. They claim that this algorithm works for every set of orthogonal Latin squares. We show that the algorithm only works for particular sets of orthogonal Latin squares. Furthermore, the algorithm is a more readable version of work previously published [Phys. Rev. A 70, 062101 (2004)].

  16. Test of mutually unbiased bases for six-dimensional photonic quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Cardano, Filippo; Karimi, Ebrahim; Nagali, Eleonora; Santamato, Enrico; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    In quantum information, complementarity of quantum mechanical observables plays a key role. The eigenstates of two complementary observables form a pair of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs). More generally, a set of MUBs consists of bases that are all pairwise unbiased. Except for specific dimensions of the Hilbert space, the maximal sets of MUBs are unknown in general. Even for a dimension as low as six, the identification of a maximal set of MUBs remains an open problem, although there is strong numerical evidence that no more than three simultaneous MUBs do exist. Here, by exploiting a newly developed holographic technique, we implement and test different sets of three MUBs for a single photon six-dimensional quantum state (a “qusix”), encoded exploiting polarization and orbital angular momentum of photons. A close agreement is observed between theory and experiments. Our results can find applications in state tomography, quantitative wave-particle duality, quantum key distribution. PMID:24067548

  17. Two Types of Maximally Entangled Bases and Their Mutually Unbiased Property in Cd⊗ C^{d^' }}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Laizhen; Li, Xiaoyu; Tao, Yuanhong

    2016-12-01

    We first construct a new maximally entangled basis in bipartite systems Cd ⊗ C^{kd} (kin Z+) which is diffrent from the one in Tao et al. (Quantum Inf. Process. 14, 2291 (2015)), then we generalize such maximally entangled basis into arbitrary bipartite systems Cd ⊗ C^{d^' }}. We also study the mutual unbiased property of the two types of maximally entangled bases in bipartite systems Cd ⊗ C^{kd}. In particular, explicit examples in C2 ⊗ C4, C2 ⊗ C8 and C3 ⊗ C3 are presented.

  18. Temporal steering and security of quantum key distribution with mutually unbiased bases against individual attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2016-06-01

    Temporal steering, which is a temporal analog of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering, refers to temporal quantum correlations between the initial and final state of a quantum system. Our analysis of temporal steering inequalities in relation to the average quantum bit error rates reveals the interplay between temporal steering and quantum cloning, which guarantees the security of quantum key distribution based on mutually unbiased bases against individual attacks. The key distributions analyzed here include the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol and the six-state 1998 protocol by Bruss. Moreover, we define a temporal steerable weight, which enables us to identify a kind of monogamy of temporal correlation that is essential to quantum cryptography and useful for analyzing various scenarios of quantum causality.

  19. Construction of mutually unbiased maximally entangled bases through permutations of Hadamard matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    xu, Dengming

    2017-03-01

    We construct mutually unbiased maximally entangled bases (MUMEBs) in bipartite system C^d⊗ C^d (d≥ 3) with d a power of a prime number. Precisely, by means of permutation matrices and Hadamard matrices, we construct 2(d-1) MUMEBs in C^d⊗ C}^d. It follows that M(d,d)≥ 2(d-1), which is twice the number given in Liu et al. (2016), where M( d, d) denotes the maximal size of all sets of MUMEBs in C^d⊗ C}^d. In addition, let q be another power of a prime number, we construct MUMEBs in C^d⊗ C^{qd} from those in C^d⊗ C^d by the use of the tensor product of unitary matrices.

  20. Nonexistence of sharply covariant mutually unbiased bases in odd prime dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huangjun

    2015-09-01

    Mutually unbiased bases (MUB) are useful in a number of research areas. The symmetry of MUB is an elusive and interesting subject. A (complete set of) MUB in dimension d is sharply covariant if it can be generated by a group of order d (d +1 ) from a basis state. Such MUB, if they exist, would be most appealing to theoretical studies and practical applications. Unfortunately, they seem to be quite rare. Here we prove that no MUB in odd prime dimensions is sharply covariant, by virtue of clever applications of Mersenne primes, Galois fields, and Frobenius groups. This conclusion provides valuable insight about the symmetry of MUB and the geometry of quantum state space. It complements and strengthens the earlier result of the author that only two stabilizer MUB are sharply covariant. Our study leads to the conjecture that no MUB other than those in dimensions 2 and 4 is sharply covariant.

  1. Reply to ''Comment on 'Mutually unbiased bases, orthogonal Latin squares, and hidden-variable models'''

    SciTech Connect

    Paterek, Tomasz; Dakic, Borivoje; Brukner, Caslav

    2011-03-15

    In this Reply to the preceding Comment by Hall and Rao [Phys. Rev. A 83, 036101 (2011)], we motivate terminology of our original paper and point out that further research is needed in order to (dis)prove the claimed link between every orthogonal Latin square of order being a power of a prime and a mutually unbiased basis.

  2. Block-circulant matrices with circulant blocks, Weil sums, and mutually unbiased bases. II. The prime power case

    SciTech Connect

    Combescure, Monique

    2009-03-15

    In our previous paper [Combescure, M., 'Circulant matrices, Gauss sums and the mutually unbiased bases. I. The prime number case', Cubo A Mathematical Journal (unpublished)] we have shown that the theory of circulant matrices allows to recover the result that there exists p+1 mutually unbiased bases in dimension p, p being an arbitrary prime number. Two orthonormal bases B, B{sup '} of C{sup d} are said mutually unbiased if for all b(set-membership sign)B, for all b{sup '}(set-membership sign)B{sup '} one has that |b{center_dot}b{sup '}|=1/{radical}(d) (b{center_dot}b{sup '} Hermitian scalar product in C{sup d}). In this paper we show that the theory of block-circulant matrices with circulant blocks allows to show very simply the known result that if d=p{sup n} (p a prime number and n any integer) there exists d+1 mutually unbiased bases in C{sup d}. Our result relies heavily on an idea of Klimov et al. [''Geometrical approach to the discrete Wigner function,'' J. Phys. A 39, 14471 (2006)]. As a subproduct we recover properties of quadratic Weil sums for p{>=}3, which generalizes the fact that in the prime case the quadratic Gauss sum properties follow from our results.

  3. Separability criteria via sets of mutually unbiased measurements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Gao, Ting; Yan, Fengli

    2015-08-17

    Mutually unbiased measurements (MUMs) are generalized from the concept of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) and include the complete set of MUBs as a special case, but they are superior to MUBs as they do not need to be rank one projectors. We investigate entanglement detection using sets of MUMs and derive separability criteria for multipartite qudit systems, arbitrary high-dimensional bipartite systems of a d1-dimensional subsystem and a d2-dimensional subsystem, and multipartite systems of multi-level subsystems. These criteria are of the advantages of more effective and wider application range than previous criteria. They provide experimental implementation in detecting entanglement of unknown quantum states.

  4. Entanglement patterns in mutually unbiased basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Jay

    2011-08-15

    A few simply stated rules govern the entanglement patterns that can occur in mutually unbiased basis sets (MUBs) and constrain the combinations of such patterns that can coexist in full complements of MUBs. We consider Hilbert spaces of prime power dimensions (D=p{sup N}), as realized by systems of N prime-state particles, where full complements of D+1 MUBs are known to exist, and we assume only that MUBs are eigenbases of generalized Pauli operators, without using any particular construction. The general rules include the following: (1) In any MUB, a given particle appears either in a pure state or totally entangled and (2) in any full MUB complement, each particle is pure in (p+1) bases (not necessarily the same ones) and totally entangled in the remaining (p{sup N}-p). It follows that the maximum number of product bases is p+1 and, when this number is realized, all remaining (p{sup N}-p) bases in the complement are characterized by the total entanglement of every particle. This ''standard distribution'' is inescapable for two-particle systems (of any p), where only product and generalized Bell bases are admissible MUB types. This and the following results generalize previous results for qubits [Phys. Rev. A 65. 032320 (2002); Phys. Rev. A 72, 062310 (2005)] and qutrits [Phys. Rev. A 70, 012302 (2004)], drawing particularly upon [Phys. Rev. A 72, 062310 (2005)]. With three particles there are three MUB types, and these may be combined in (p+2) different ways to form full complements. With N=4, there are 6 MUB types for p=2, but new MUB types become possible with larger p, and these are essential to realizing full complements. With this example, we argue that new MUB types that show new entanglement patterns should enter with every step in N and, also, when N is a prime plus 1, at a critical p value, p=N-1. Such MUBs should play critical roles in filling complements.

  5. Bi-orthogonal mutually unbiased bases for N-qubit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Juan J.; Sainz, Isabel; Klimov, Andrei B.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a general method for constructing a set of non-orthogonal bases with equal separations between all different basis’ states for N-qubit systems. Using these bases we derive an explicit expression for the optimal tomography in non-orthogonal bases and discuss the amount of non-classical resources required for the bases preparation and the precision of the reconstructed state. The special two-qubit case is analysed separately.

  6. States that "look the same" with respect to every basis in a mutually unbiased set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amburg, Ilya; Sharma, Roshan; Sussman, Daniel M.; Wootters, William K.

    2014-12-01

    A complete set of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) in a Hilbert space of dimension d defines a set of d + 1 orthogonal measurements. Relative to such a set, we define a MUB-balanced state to be a pure state for which the list of probabilities of the d outcomes of any of these measurements is independent of the choice of measurement, up to permutations. In this paper, we explicitly construct a MUB-balanced state for each prime power dimension d for which d = 3 (mod 4). These states have already been constructed by Appleby in unpublished notes, but our presentation here is different in that both the expression for the states themselves and the proof of MUB-balancedness are given in terms of the discrete Wigner function, rather than the density matrix or state vector. The discrete Wigner functions of these states are "rotationally symmetric" in a sense roughly analogous to the rotational symmetry of the energy eigenstates of a harmonic oscillator in the continuous two-dimensional phase space. Upon converting the Wigner function to a density matrix, we find that the states are expressible as real state vectors in the standard basis. We observe numerically that when d is large (and not a power of 3), a histogram of the components of such a state vector appears to form a semicircular distribution.

  7. Personalized recommendation based on unbiased consistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuzhen; Tian, Hui; Zhang, Ping; Hu, Zheng; Zhou, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Recently, in physical dynamics, mass-diffusion-based recommendation algorithms on bipartite network provide an efficient solution by automatically pushing possible relevant items to users according to their past preferences. However, traditional mass-diffusion-based algorithms just focus on unidirectional mass diffusion from objects having been collected to those which should be recommended, resulting in a biased causal similarity estimation and not-so-good performance. In this letter, we argue that in many cases, a user's interests are stable, and thus bidirectional mass diffusion abilities, no matter originated from objects having been collected or from those which should be recommended, should be consistently powerful, showing unbiased consistence. We further propose a consistence-based mass diffusion algorithm via bidirectional diffusion against biased causality, outperforming the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in disparate real data sets, including Netflix, MovieLens, Amazon and Rate Your Music.

  8. Uncertainty relation based on unbiased parameter estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liang-Liang; Song, Yong-Shun; Qiao, Cong-Feng; Yu, Sixia; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2017-02-01

    Heisenberg's uncertainty relation has been extensively studied in spirit of its well-known original form, in which the inaccuracy measures used exhibit some controversial properties and don't conform with quantum metrology, where the measurement precision is well defined in terms of estimation theory. In this paper, we treat the joint measurement of incompatible observables as a parameter estimation problem, i.e., estimating the parameters characterizing the statistics of the incompatible observables. Our crucial observation is that, in a sequential measurement scenario, the bias induced by the first unbiased measurement in the subsequent measurement can be eradicated by the information acquired, allowing one to extract unbiased information of the second measurement of an incompatible observable. In terms of Fisher information we propose a kind of information comparison measure and explore various types of trade-offs between the information gains and measurement precisions, which interpret the uncertainty relation as surplus variance trade-off over individual perfect measurements instead of a constraint on extracting complete information of incompatible observables.

  9. Clifford tori and unbiased vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Ole; Bengtsson, Ingemar

    2017-02-01

    The existence problem for mutually unbiased bases is an unsolved problem in quantum information theory. A related question is whether every pair of bases admits vectors that are unbiased to both. Mathematically this translates to the question whether two Lagrangian Clifford tori intersect, and a body of results exists concerning it. These results are however rather weak from the point of view of the first problem. We make a detailed study of how the intersections behave in the simplest nontrivial case, that of complex projective 2-space (the qutrit), for which the set of pairs of Clifford tori can be usefully parametrized by the unistochastic subset of Birkhoff's polytope. Pairs that do not intersect transversally are located. Some calculations in higher dimensions are included to see which results are special to the qutrit.

  10. Unbiased methods for population-based association studies.

    PubMed

    Devlin, B; Roeder, K; Bacanu, S A

    2001-12-01

    Large, population-based samples and large-scale genotyping are being used to evaluate disease/gene associations. A substantial drawback to such samples is the fact that population substructure can induce spurious associations between genes and disease. We review two methods, called genomic control (GC) and structured association (SA), that obviate many of the concerns about population substructure by using the features of the genomes present in the sample to correct for stratification. The GC approach exploits the fact that population substructure generates "over dispersion" of statistics used to assess association. By testing multiple polymorphisms throughout the genome, only some of which are pertinent to the disease of interest, the degree of overdispersion generated by population substructure can be estimated and taken into account. The SA approach assumes that the sampled population, although heterogeneous, is composed of subpopulations that are themselves homogeneous. By using multiple polymorphisms throughout the genome, this "latent class method" estimates the probability sampled individuals derive from each of these latent subpopulations. GC has the advantage of robustness, simplicity, and wide applicability, even to experimental designs such as DNA pooling. SA is a bit more complicated but has the advantage of greater power in some realistic settings, such as admixed populations or when association varies widely across subpopulations. It, too, is widely applicable. Both also have weaknesses, as elaborated in our review.

  11. Mutual Coupling Compensation on Spectral-based DOA Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanudin, R.

    2016-11-01

    Direction of arrival (DOA) estimation using isotropic antenna arrays are commonly being implemented without considering the mutual coupling effect in between the array elements. This paper presents an analysis of DOA estimation with mutual coupling compensation using a linear antenna array. Mutual coupling effect is represented by mutual coupling coefficients and taken into account when calculating the array output. The mutual coupling compensation technique exploits a banded mutual coupling matrix to reduce the computational complexity. The banded matrix reflects the relationship between mutual coupling effect and the element spacing in an antenna array. The analysis is being carried out using the Capon algorithm, one of spectral-based DOA algorithms, for estimating the DOA of incoming signals. Computer simulations are performed to show the performance of the mutual coupling compensation technique on DOA estimation. Simulation results show that, in term of estimation resolution, the mutual coupling compensation technique manages to obtain a comparable results compared to the case without mutual coupling consideration. However, the mutual coupling compensation technique produces significant estimation error compared to the case without mutual coupling. The study concludes that the banded matrix of mutual coupling coefficients should be properly designed to improve the performance of mutual coupling compensation technique in DOA estimation.

  12. Mutual information-based facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazar, Mliki; Hammami, Mohamed; Hanêne, Ben-Abdallah

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel low-computation discriminative regions representation for expression analysis task. The proposed approach relies on interesting studies in psychology which show that most of the descriptive and responsible regions for facial expression are located around some face parts. The contributions of this work lie in the proposition of new approach which supports automatic facial expression recognition based on automatic regions selection. The regions selection step aims to select the descriptive regions responsible or facial expression and was performed using Mutual Information (MI) technique. For facial feature extraction, we have applied Local Binary Patterns Pattern (LBP) on Gradient image to encode salient micro-patterns of facial expressions. Experimental studies have shown that using discriminative regions provide better results than using the whole face regions whilst reducing features vector dimension.

  13. An Unbiased Cell Morphology–Based Screen for New, Biologically Active Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Bateman, Raynard; Rauh, Daniel; Vaisberg, Eugeni; Ramachandani, Shyam; Zhang, Chao; Hansen, Kirk C; Burlingame, Alma L; Trautman, Jay K; Adams, Cynthia L

    2005-01-01

    We have implemented an unbiased cell morphology–based screen to identify small-molecule modulators of cellular processes using the Cytometrix (TM) automated imaging and analysis system. This assay format provides unbiased analysis of morphological effects induced by small molecules by capturing phenotypic readouts of most known classes of pharmacological agents and has the potential to read out pathways for which little is known. Four human-cancer cell lines and one noncancerous primary cell type were treated with 107 small molecules comprising four different protein kinase–inhibitor scaffolds. Cellular phenotypes induced by each compound were quantified by multivariate statistical analysis of the morphology, staining intensity, and spatial attributes of the cellular nuclei, microtubules, and Golgi compartments. Principal component analysis was used to identify inhibitors of cellular components not targeted by known protein kinase inhibitors. Here we focus on a hydroxyl-substituted analog (hydroxy-PP) of the known Src-family kinase inhibitor PP2 because it induced cell-specific morphological features distinct from all known kinase inhibitors in the collection. We used affinity purification to identify a target of hydroxy-PP, carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1), a short-chain dehydrogenase-reductase. We solved the X-ray crystal structure of the CBR1/hydroxy-PP complex to 1.24 Å resolution. Structure-based design of more potent and selective CBR1 inhibitors provided probes for analyzing the biological function of CBR1 in A549 cells. These studies revealed a previously unknown function for CBR1 in serum-withdrawal-induced apoptosis. Further studies indicate CBR1 inhibitors may enhance the effectiveness of anticancer anthracyclines. Morphology-based screening of diverse cancer cell types has provided a method for discovering potent new small-molecule probes for cell biological studies and anticancer drug candidates. PMID:15799708

  14. Spatial Mutual Information Based Hyperspectral Band Selection for Classification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The amount of information involved in hyperspectral imaging is large. Hyperspectral band selection is a popular method for reducing dimensionality. Several information based measures such as mutual information have been proposed to reduce information redundancy among spectral bands. Unfortunately, mutual information does not take into account the spatial dependency between adjacent pixels in images thus reducing its robustness as a similarity measure. In this paper, we propose a new band selection method based on spatial mutual information. As validation criteria, a supervised classification method using support vector machine (SVM) is used. Experimental results of the classification of hyperspectral datasets show that the proposed method can achieve more accurate results. PMID:25918742

  15. Public-channel cryptography based on mutual chaos pass filters.

    PubMed

    Klein, Einat; Gross, Noam; Kopelowitz, Evi; Rosenbluh, Michael; Khaykovich, Lev; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2006-10-01

    We study the mutual coupling of chaotic lasers and observe both experimentally and in numeric simulations that there exists a regime of parameters for which two mutually coupled chaotic lasers establish isochronal synchronization, while a third laser coupled unidirectionally to one of the pair does not synchronize. We then propose a cryptographic scheme, based on the advantage of mutual coupling over unidirectional coupling, where all the parameters of the system are public knowledge. We numerically demonstrate that in such a scheme the two communicating lasers can add a message signal (compressed binary message) to the transmitted coupling signal and recover the message in both directions with high fidelity by using a mutual chaos pass filter procedure. An attacker, however, fails to recover an errorless message even if he amplifies the coupling signal.

  16. An Unbiased Method To Build Benchmarking Sets for Ligand-Based Virtual Screening and its Application To GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Benchmarking data sets have become common in recent years for the purpose of virtual screening, though the main focus had been placed on the structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) approaches. Due to the lack of crystal structures, there is great need for unbiased benchmarking sets to evaluate various ligand-based virtual screening (LBVS) methods for important drug targets such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). To date these ready-to-apply data sets for LBVS are fairly limited, and the direct usage of benchmarking sets designed for SBVS could bring the biases to the evaluation of LBVS. Herein, we propose an unbiased method to build benchmarking sets for LBVS and validate it on a multitude of GPCRs targets. To be more specific, our methods can (1) ensure chemical diversity of ligands, (2) maintain the physicochemical similarity between ligands and decoys, (3) make the decoys dissimilar in chemical topology to all ligands to avoid false negatives, and (4) maximize spatial random distribution of ligands and decoys. We evaluated the quality of our Unbiased Ligand Set (ULS) and Unbiased Decoy Set (UDS) using three common LBVS approaches, with Leave-One-Out (LOO) Cross-Validation (CV) and a metric of average AUC of the ROC curves. Our method has greatly reduced the “artificial enrichment” and “analogue bias” of a published GPCRs benchmarking set, i.e., GPCR Ligand Library (GLL)/GPCR Decoy Database (GDD). In addition, we addressed an important issue about the ratio of decoys per ligand and found that for a range of 30 to 100 it does not affect the quality of the benchmarking set, so we kept the original ratio of 39 from the GLL/GDD. PMID:24749745

  17. An unbiased method to build benchmarking sets for ligand-based virtual screening and its application to GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jie; Jin, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenming; Zhang, Liangren; Wang, Xiang Simon

    2014-05-27

    Benchmarking data sets have become common in recent years for the purpose of virtual screening, though the main focus had been placed on the structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) approaches. Due to the lack of crystal structures, there is great need for unbiased benchmarking sets to evaluate various ligand-based virtual screening (LBVS) methods for important drug targets such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). To date these ready-to-apply data sets for LBVS are fairly limited, and the direct usage of benchmarking sets designed for SBVS could bring the biases to the evaluation of LBVS. Herein, we propose an unbiased method to build benchmarking sets for LBVS and validate it on a multitude of GPCRs targets. To be more specific, our methods can (1) ensure chemical diversity of ligands, (2) maintain the physicochemical similarity between ligands and decoys, (3) make the decoys dissimilar in chemical topology to all ligands to avoid false negatives, and (4) maximize spatial random distribution of ligands and decoys. We evaluated the quality of our Unbiased Ligand Set (ULS) and Unbiased Decoy Set (UDS) using three common LBVS approaches, with Leave-One-Out (LOO) Cross-Validation (CV) and a metric of average AUC of the ROC curves. Our method has greatly reduced the "artificial enrichment" and "analogue bias" of a published GPCRs benchmarking set, i.e., GPCR Ligand Library (GLL)/GPCR Decoy Database (GDD). In addition, we addressed an important issue about the ratio of decoys per ligand and found that for a range of 30 to 100 it does not affect the quality of the benchmarking set, so we kept the original ratio of 39 from the GLL/GDD.

  18. Networks in financial markets based on the mutual information rate.

    PubMed

    Fiedor, Paweł

    2014-05-01

    In the last few years there have been many efforts in econophysics studying how network theory can facilitate understanding of complex financial markets. These efforts consist mainly of the study of correlation-based hierarchical networks. This is somewhat surprising as the underlying assumptions of research looking at financial markets are that they are complex systems and thus behave in a nonlinear manner, which is confirmed by numerous studies, making the use of correlations which are inherently dealing with linear dependencies only baffling. In this paper we introduce a way to incorporate nonlinear dynamics and dependencies into hierarchical networks to study financial markets using mutual information and its dynamical extension: the mutual information rate. We show that this approach leads to different results than the correlation-based approach used in most studies, on the basis of 91 companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange 100 between 2003 and 2013, using minimal spanning trees and planar maximally filtered graphs.

  19. Networks in financial markets based on the mutual information rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedor, Paweł

    2014-05-01

    In the last few years there have been many efforts in econophysics studying how network theory can facilitate understanding of complex financial markets. These efforts consist mainly of the study of correlation-based hierarchical networks. This is somewhat surprising as the underlying assumptions of research looking at financial markets are that they are complex systems and thus behave in a nonlinear manner, which is confirmed by numerous studies, making the use of correlations which are inherently dealing with linear dependencies only baffling. In this paper we introduce a way to incorporate nonlinear dynamics and dependencies into hierarchical networks to study financial markets using mutual information and its dynamical extension: the mutual information rate. We show that this approach leads to different results than the correlation-based approach used in most studies, on the basis of 91 companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange 100 between 2003 and 2013, using minimal spanning trees and planar maximally filtered graphs.

  20. Iron-based magnetic superhalogens with pseudohalogens as ligands: An unbiased structure search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping Ding, Li; Shao, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Hui Zhang, Fang; Wang, Li Ya

    2017-03-01

    We have performed an unbiased structure search for a series of neutral and anionic FeL4 (L = BO2, CN, NO2, NO3, OH, CH3, NH2, BH4 and Li2H3) clusters using the CALYPSO (Crystal structure Analysis by Particle Swarm Optimization) structure search method. To probe the superhalogen properties of neutral and anionic FeL4 clusters, we used density-functional theory with the B3LYP functional to examine three factors, including distribution of extra electron, pattern of bonding and the nature of the ligands. Theoretical results show that Fe(BO2)4, Fe(NO3)4 and Fe(NO2)4 can be classified as magnetic superhalogen due to that their electron affinities even exceed those of the constituent ligands. The magnetic moment of Fe atom is almost entirly maintained when it is decorated with various ligands except for neutral and anionic (Li2H3)4. Moreover, the current work is also extended to the salt moieties formed by hyperhalogen/superhalogen anion and Na+ ion. It is found that these salts against dissociation into Na + FeL4 are thermodynamic stable except for Na[Fe(OH)4]. These results provides a wealth of electronic structure information about FeL4 magnetic superhalogens and offer insights into the synthesis mechanisms.

  1. Iron-based magnetic superhalogens with pseudohalogens as ligands: An unbiased structure search

    PubMed Central

    Ping Ding, Li; Shao, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Hui Zhang, Fang; Wang, Li Ya

    2017-01-01

    We have performed an unbiased structure search for a series of neutral and anionic FeL4 (L = BO2, CN, NO2, NO3, OH, CH3, NH2, BH4 and Li2H3) clusters using the CALYPSO (Crystal structure Analysis by Particle Swarm Optimization) structure search method. To probe the superhalogen properties of neutral and anionic FeL4 clusters, we used density-functional theory with the B3LYP functional to examine three factors, including distribution of extra electron, pattern of bonding and the nature of the ligands. Theoretical results show that Fe(BO2)4, Fe(NO3)4 and Fe(NO2)4 can be classified as magnetic superhalogen due to that their electron affinities even exceed those of the constituent ligands. The magnetic moment of Fe atom is almost entirly maintained when it is decorated with various ligands except for neutral and anionic (Li2H3)4. Moreover, the current work is also extended to the salt moieties formed by hyperhalogen/superhalogen anion and Na+ ion. It is found that these salts against dissociation into Na + FeL4 are thermodynamic stable except for Na[Fe(OH)4]. These results provides a wealth of electronic structure information about FeL4 magnetic superhalogens and offer insights into the synthesis mechanisms. PMID:28327547

  2. Iron-based magnetic superhalogens with pseudohalogens as ligands: An unbiased structure search.

    PubMed

    Ping Ding, Li; Shao, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Hui Zhang, Fang; Wang, Li Ya

    2017-03-22

    We have performed an unbiased structure search for a series of neutral and anionic FeL4 (L = BO2, CN, NO2, NO3, OH, CH3, NH2, BH4 and Li2H3) clusters using the CALYPSO (Crystal structure Analysis by Particle Swarm Optimization) structure search method. To probe the superhalogen properties of neutral and anionic FeL4 clusters, we used density-functional theory with the B3LYP functional to examine three factors, including distribution of extra electron, pattern of bonding and the nature of the ligands. Theoretical results show that Fe(BO2)4, Fe(NO3)4 and Fe(NO2)4 can be classified as magnetic superhalogen due to that their electron affinities even exceed those of the constituent ligands. The magnetic moment of Fe atom is almost entirly maintained when it is decorated with various ligands except for neutral and anionic (Li2H3)4. Moreover, the current work is also extended to the salt moieties formed by hyperhalogen/superhalogen anion and Na(+) ion. It is found that these salts against dissociation into Na + FeL4 are thermodynamic stable except for Na[Fe(OH)4]. These results provides a wealth of electronic structure information about FeL4 magnetic superhalogens and offer insights into the synthesis mechanisms.

  3. Predicting Genetic Values: A Kernel-Based Best Linear Unbiased Prediction With Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Ulrike; Erbe, Malena; Long, Nanye; Porcu, Emilio; Schlather, Martin; Simianer, Henner

    2011-01-01

    Genomic data provide a valuable source of information for modeling covariance structures, allowing a more accurate prediction of total genetic values (GVs). We apply the kriging concept, originally developed in the geostatistical context for predictions in the low-dimensional space, to the high-dimensional space spanned by genomic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) vectors and study its properties in different gene-action scenarios. Two different kriging methods [“universal kriging” (UK) and “simple kriging” (SK)] are presented. As a novelty, we suggest use of the family of Matérn covariance functions to model the covariance structure of SNP vectors. A genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP) is applied as a reference method. The three approaches are compared in a whole-genome simulation study considering additive, additive-dominance, and epistatic gene-action models. Predictive performance is measured in terms of correlation between true and predicted GVs and average true GVs of the individuals ranked best by prediction. We show that UK outperforms GBLUP in the presence of dominance and epistatic effects. In a limiting case, it is shown that the genomic covariance structure proposed by VanRaden (2008) can be considered as a covariance function with corresponding quadratic variogram. We also prove theoretically that if a specific linear relationship exists between covariance matrices for two linear mixed models, the GVs resulting from BLUP are linked by a scaling factor. Finally, the relation of kriging to other models is discussed and further options for modeling the covariance structure, which might be more appropriate in the genomic context, are suggested. PMID:21515573

  4. Constraining Binary Asteroid Mass Distributions Based On Mutual Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Alex B.; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2017-06-01

    The mutual gravitational potential and torques of binary asteroid systems results in a complex coupling of attitude and orbital motion based on the mass distribution of each body. For a doubly-synchronous binary system observations of the mutual motion can be leveraged to identify and measure the unique mass distributions of each body. By implementing arbitrary shape and order computation of the full two-body problem (F2BP) equilibria we study the influence of asteroid asymmetries on separation and orientation of a doubly-synchronous system. Additionally, simulations of binary systems perturbed from doubly-synchronous behavior are studied to understand the effects of mass distribution perturbations on precession and nutation rates such that unique behaviors can be isolated and used to measure asteroid mass distributions. We apply our investigation to the Trojan binary asteroid system 617 Patroclus and Menoetius (1906 VY), which will be the final flyby target of the recently announced LUCY Discovery mission in March 2033. This binary asteroid system is of particular interest due to the results of a recent stellar occultation study (DPS 46, id.506.09) that suggests the system to be doubly-synchronous and consisting of two-similarly sized oblate ellipsoids, in addition to suggesting the presence mass asymmetries resulting from an impact crater on the southern limb of Menoetius.

  5. Mutual information-based feature selection for radiomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oubel, Estanislao; Beaumont, Hubert; Iannessi, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    Background The extraction and analysis of image features (radiomics) is a promising field in the precision medicine era, with applications to prognosis, prediction, and response to treatment quantification. In this work, we present a mutual information - based method for quantifying reproducibility of features, a necessary step for qualification before their inclusion in big data systems. Materials and Methods Ten patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) lesions were followed over time (7 time points in average) with Computed Tomography (CT). Five observers segmented lesions by using a semi-automatic method and 27 features describing shape and intensity distribution were extracted. Inter-observer reproducibility was assessed by computing the multi-information (MI) of feature changes over time, and the variability of global extrema. Results The highest MI values were obtained for volume-based features (VBF). The lesion mass (M), surface to volume ratio (SVR) and volume (V) presented statistically significant higher values of MI than the rest of features. Within the same VBF group, SVR showed also the lowest variability of extrema. The correlation coefficient (CC) of feature values was unable to make a difference between features. Conclusions MI allowed to discriminate three features (M, SVR, and V) from the rest in a statistically significant manner. This result is consistent with the order obtained when sorting features by increasing values of extrema variability. MI is a promising alternative for selecting features to be considered as surrogate biomarkers in a precision medicine context.

  6. Unbiased Identification of Blood-based Biomarkers for Pulmonary Tuberculosis by Modeling and Mining Molecular Interaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Sambarey, Awanti; Devaprasad, Abhinandan; Mohan, Abhilash; Ahmed, Asma; Nayak, Soumya; Swaminathan, Soumya; D'Souza, George; Jesuraj, Anto; Dhar, Chirag; Babu, Subash; Vyakarnam, Annapurna; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2017-02-01

    Efficient diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is met with multiple challenges, calling for a shift of focus from pathogen-centric diagnostics towards identification of host-based multi-marker signatures. Transcriptomics offer a list of differentially expressed genes, but cannot by itself identify the most influential contributors to the disease phenotype. Here, we describe a computational pipeline that adopts an unbiased approach to identify a biomarker signature. Data from RNA sequencing from whole blood samples of TB patients were integrated with a curated genome-wide molecular interaction network, from which we obtain a comprehensive perspective of variations that occur in the host due to TB. We then implement a sensitive network mining method to shortlist gene candidates that are most central to the disease alterations. We then apply a series of filters that include applicability to multiple publicly available datasets as well as additional validation on independent patient samples, and identify a signature comprising 10 genes - FCGR1A, HK3, RAB13, RBBP8, IFI44L, TIMM10, BCL6, SMARCD3, CYP4F3 and SLPI, that can discriminate between TB and healthy controls as well as distinguish TB from latent tuberculosis and HIV in most cases. The signature has the potential to serve as a diagnostic marker of TB.

  7. Applying network analysis and Nebula (neighbor-edges based and unbiased leverage algorithm) to ToxCast data.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hao; Luo, Heng; Ng, Hui Wen; Meehan, Joe; Ge, Weigong; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    ToxCast data have been used to develop models for predicting in vivo toxicity. To predict the in vivo toxicity of a new chemical using a ToxCast data based model, its ToxCast bioactivity data are needed but not normally available. The capability of predicting ToxCast bioactivity data is necessary to fully utilize ToxCast data in the risk assessment of chemicals. We aimed to understand and elucidate the relationships between the chemicals and bioactivity data of the assays in ToxCast and to develop a network analysis based method for predicting ToxCast bioactivity data. We conducted modularity analysis on a quantitative network constructed from ToxCast data to explore the relationships between the assays and chemicals. We further developed Nebula (neighbor-edges based and unbiased leverage algorithm) for predicting ToxCast bioactivity data. Modularity analysis on the network constructed from ToxCast data yielded seven modules. Assays and chemicals in the seven modules were distinct. Leave-one-out cross-validation yielded a Q(2) of 0.5416, indicating ToxCast bioactivity data can be predicted by Nebula. Prediction domain analysis showed some types of ToxCast assay data could be more reliably predicted by Nebula than others. Network analysis is a promising approach to understand ToxCast data. Nebula is an effective algorithm for predicting ToxCast bioactivity data, helping fully utilize ToxCast data in the risk assessment of chemicals. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Enhancing Web-Based Courses through a Mutual Aid Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilke, Dina J.; Randolph, Karen A.; Vinton, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Students taking a class together belong to a group where members typically develop a sense of connection to each other by engaging in mutual support and assistance through shared experiences and knowledge. Some have argued that the lack of face-to-face interaction precludes such processes and prevents the effective teaching of social work in an…

  9. Studies of the Unbiased Fir Filter for the Time Error Model in Applications to GPS-Based Timekeeping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    TIMEKEEPING1 Yu. Shmaliy and O. Ibarra-Manzano Guanajuato University, FIMEE, Mexico E-mail: shmaliy@salamanca.ugto.mx Abstract The unbiased FIR filter...5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Guanajuato University,FIMEE, Mexico, 8. PERFORMING

  10. Estimation and classification by sigmoids based on mutual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram

    1994-01-01

    An estimate of the probability density function of a random vector is obtained by maximizing the mutual information between the input and the output of a feedforward network of sigmoidal units with respect to the input weights. Classification problems can be solved by selecting the class associated with the maximal estimated density. Newton's s method, applied to an estimated density, yields a recursive maximum likelihood estimator, consisting of a single internal layer of sigmoids, for a random variable or a random sequence. Applications to the diamond classification and to the prediction of a sun-spot process are demonstrated.

  11. Intraguild mutualism.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Philip H; Cox, John J

    2011-12-01

    Although studies of species linked by a common resource (i.e. ecological guilds) have so far mainly focused on competition and predation, guilds are also good places to find mutualism. In this review we consider some three- and four-species community modules to illustrate examples of wide relevance. Mutualism arises from various direct and indirect trophic and non-trophic interactions between species--and within modules both with and without intraguild predation. Species removal and augmentation experiments, other manipulations, direct measurements, and path-analytic methods can determine the presence and intensity of mutualism within guilds. Such studies, particularly when associated with existing theory and new theoretical development, can help advance an interaction-based approach to community analysis that recognizes linkages among mutualism, predation and competition in natural systems.

  12. Designing redox potential-controlled protein switches based on mutually exclusive proteins.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qing; Kong, Na; Wang, Hui-Chuan Eileen; Li, Hongbin

    2012-08-01

    Synthetic/artificial protein switches provide an efficient means of controlling protein functions using chemical signals and stimuli. Mutually exclusive proteins, in which only the host or guest domain can remain folded at a given time owing to conformational strain, have been used to engineer novel protein switches that can switch enzymatic functions on and off in response to ligand binding. To further explore the potential of mutually exclusive proteins as protein switches and sensors, we report here a new redox-based approach to engineer a mutually exclusive folding-based protein switch. By introducing a disulfide bond into the host domain of a mutually exclusive protein, we demonstrate that it is feasible to use redox potential to switch the host domain between its folded and unfolded conformations via the mutually exclusive folding mechanism, and thus switching the functionality of the host domain on and off. Our study opens a new and potentially general avenue that uses mutually exclusive proteins to design novel switches able to control the function of a variety of proteins.

  13. School-Based Mutual Support Groups for Low-Income Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoni, Jane M.; Adelman, Howard S.

    1993-01-01

    School-based mutual support groups (MSGs) are proposed to enhance school involvement of parents from lower socioeconomic and ethnic minority backgrounds. A school-based MSG format is presented with results of a survey of interests from 62 parents (36 respondents and 26 nonrespondents) and a discussion of a pilot demonstration in 3 urban elementary…

  14. Groups in Latin America: Comunidades Eclesial de Base as Mutual Support Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhirter, Benedict T.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes Comunidades Eclesial de Base (CEBs) or base communities which are self-help and mutual aid groups that assist in alleviating the effects of poverty and powerlessness in Latin America. Discusses two potential problems of CEBs - that they may encourage either passivity or increased violence. (Author/NB)

  15. Model-based image processing using snakes and mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Klinski, Sebastian; Derz, Claus; Weese, David; Tolxdorff, Thomas

    2000-06-01

    Any segmentation approach assumes certain knowledge concerning data modalities, relevant organs and their imaging characteristics. These assumptions are necessary for developing criteria by which to separate the organ in question from the surrounding tissue. Typical assumptions are that the organs have homogeneous gray-value characteristics (region growing, region merging, etc.), specific gray-value patterns (classification methods), continuous edges (edge-based approaches), smooth and strong edges (snake approaches), or any combination of these. In most cases, such assumptions are invalid, at least locally. Consequently, these approaches prove to be time consuming either in their parameterization or execution. Further, the low result quality makes post- processing necessary. Our aim was to develop a segmentation approach for large 3D data sets (e.g., CT and MRI) that requires a short interaction time and that can easily be adapted to different organs and data materials. This has been achieved by exploiting available knowledge about data material and organ topology using anatomical models that have been constructed from previously segmented data sets. In the first step, the user manually specifies the general context of the data material and specifies anatomical landmarks. Then this information is used to automatically select a corresponding reference model, which is geometrically adjusted to the current data set. In the third step, a model-based snake approach is applied to determine the correct segmentation of the organ in question. Analogously, this approach can be used for model-based interpolation and registration.

  16. Statistical reconstruction of optical quantum states based on mutually complementary quadrature quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Yu. I. Avosopyants, G. V.; Belinskii, L. V.; Katamadze, K. G.; Kulik, S. P.; Lukichev, V. F.

    2016-08-15

    We describe a new method for reconstructing the quantum state of the electromagnetic field from the results of mutually complementary optical quadrature measurements. This method is based on the root approach and displaces squeezed Fock states are used as the basis. Theoretical analysis and numerical experiments demonstrate the considerable advantage of the developed tools over those described in the literature.

  17. Managing Mutual Orientation in the Absence of Physical Copresence: Multiparty Voice-Based Chat Room Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenks, Christopher Joseph; Brandt, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the interactional work involved in ratifying mutual participation in online, multiparty, voice-based chat rooms. The purpose of this article is to provide a preliminary sketch of how talk and participation is managed in a spoken communication environment that comprises interactants who are not physically copresent but are…

  18. A Secure ECC-based RFID Mutual Authentication Protocol to Enhance Patient Medication Safety.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chunhua; Xu, Chunxiang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Li, Fagen

    2016-01-01

    Patient medication safety is an important issue in patient medication systems. In order to prevent medication errors, integrating Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology into automated patient medication systems is required in hospitals. Based on RFID technology, such systems can provide medical evidence for patients' prescriptions and medicine doses, etc. Due to the mutual authentication between the medication server and the tag, RFID authentication scheme is the best choice for automated patient medication systems. In this paper, we present a RFID mutual authentication scheme based on elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) to enhance patient medication safety. Our scheme can achieve security requirements and overcome various attacks existing in other schemes. In addition, our scheme has better performance in terms of computational cost and communication overhead. Therefore, the proposed scheme is well suitable for patient medication systems.

  19. The Usage of an SNP-SNP Relationship Matrix for Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP) Analysis Using a Community-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sup; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Cho, Seoae

    2014-01-01

    Best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) has been used to estimate the fixed effects and random effects of complex traits. Traditionally, genomic relationship matrix-based (GRM) and random marker-based BLUP analyses are prevalent to estimate the genetic values of complex traits. We used three methods: GRM-based prediction (G-BLUP), random marker-based prediction using an identity matrix (so-called single-nucleotide polymorphism [SNP]-BLUP), and SNP-SNP variance-covariance matrix (so-called SNP-GBLUP). We used 35,675 SNPs and R package "rrBLUP" for the BLUP analysis. The SNP-SNP relationship matrix was calculated using the GRM and Sherman-Morrison-Woodbury lemma. The SNP-GBLUP result was very similar to G-BLUP in the prediction of genetic values. However, there were many discrepancies between SNP-BLUP and the other two BLUPs. SNP-GBLUP has the merit to be able to predict genetic values through SNP effects. PMID:25705167

  20. Mutual Lewis acid-base interactions of cations and anions in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Holzweber, Markus; Lungwitz, Ralf; Doerfler, Denise; Spange, Stefan; Koel, Mihkel; Hutter, Herbert; Linert, Wolfgang

    2013-01-02

    Solute properties are known to be strongly influenced by solvent molecules due to solvation. This is due to mutual interaction as both the properties of the solute and of the solvent strongly depend on each other. The present paper is based on the idea that ionic liquids are cations solvated by anions and anions solvated by cations. To show this (in this system strongly pronounced) interaction the long time established donor-acceptor concept for solvents and ions in solution by Viktor Gutmann is extended to ionic liquids. A number of solvent parameters, such as the Kamlet-Abboud-Taft and the Dimroth-Reichardt E(T) scale for ionic liquids neglect this mutual influence, which, however, seems to be in fact necessary to get a proper description of ionic liquid properties. It is shown how strong such parameters vary when the influence of the counter ion is taken into account. Furthermore, acceptor and donor numbers for ionic liquids are presented.

  1. A hybrid WDM transport system based on mutually injection-locked Fabry Perot laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Cheng-Ling; Lu, Hai-Han; Tzeng, Shah-Jye; Ma, Hsien-Li; Chuang, Yao-Wei

    2007-08-01

    A hybrid wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) transport system based on mutually injection-locked Fabry-Perot laser diodes (FP LDs) for CATV, 256-QAM and OC-48 transmission is proposed and demonstrated. Mutually injection-locked FP LDs as broadband light source could be relatively simple and cost-effective compared with other demonstrated light source schemes. The proposed hybrid WDM transport system employs four filtered wavelengths (modes) to transmit 111 AM-VSB channels, four 256-QAM digital passband channels, and one OC-48 digital baseband channel simultaneously. Since our proposed system does not use multiple distributed feedback (DFB) LDs, it reveals a prominent one with simpler and more economic advantages.

  2. Artifact reduction in mutual-information-based CT-MR image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mingxiu; Liu, Jundong; Liu, Junhong

    2004-05-01

    Abstract Mutual information (MI) is currently the most popular match metric in handling the registration problem for multi modality images. However, interpolation artifacts impose deteriorating effects to the accuracy and robustness of MI-based methods. This paper analyzes the generation mechanism of the artifacts inherent in linear partial volume interpolation (PVI) and shows that the mutual information resulted from PVI is a convex function within each voxel grid. We conclude that the generation of the artifacts is due to two facts: 1) linear interpolation causes the histogram bin values to change at a synchronized pace; 2) entropy computation function Σxlgx is convex. As a remedy we propose to use non-uniform interpolation functions as the interpolation kernels in estimating the joint histogram. Cubic B-splin and Gaussian interpolators are compared and we demonstrate the improvements via experiments on misalignments between CT/MR brain scans.

  3. Mutual information-based feature selection for low-cost BCIs based on motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Schiatti, L; Faes, L; Tessadori, J; Barresi, G; Mattos, L

    2016-08-01

    In the present study a feature selection algorithm based on mutual information (MI) was applied to electro-encephalographic (EEG) data acquired during three different motor imagery tasks from two dataset: Dataset I from BCI Competition IV including full scalp recordings from four subjects, and new data recorded from three subjects using the popular low-cost Emotiv EPOC EEG headset. The aim was to evaluate optimal channels and band-power (BP) features for motor imagery tasks discrimination, in order to assess the feasibility of a portable low-cost motor imagery based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) system. The minimal sub set of features most relevant to task description and less redundant to each other was determined, and the corresponding classification accuracy was assessed offline employing linear support vector machine (SVM) in a 10-fold cross validation scheme. The analysis was performed: (a) on the original full Dataset I from BCI competition IV, (b) on a restricted channels set from Dataset I corresponding to available Emotiv EPOC electrodes locations, and (c) on data recorded with the EPOC system. Results from (a) showed that an offline classification accuracy above 80% can be reached using only 5 features. Limiting the analysis to EPOC channels caused a decrease of classification accuracy, although it still remained above chance level, both for data from (b) and (c). A top accuracy of 70% was achieved using 2 optimal features. These results encourage further research towards the development of portable low cost motor imagery-based BCI systems.

  4. Robust Feature Selection from Microarray Data Based on Cooperative Game Theory and Qualitative Mutual Information.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Atiyeh; Moattar, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    High dimensionality of microarray data sets may lead to low efficiency and overfitting. In this paper, a multiphase cooperative game theoretic feature selection approach is proposed for microarray data classification. In the first phase, due to high dimension of microarray data sets, the features are reduced using one of the two filter-based feature selection methods, namely, mutual information and Fisher ratio. In the second phase, Shapley index is used to evaluate the power of each feature. The main innovation of the proposed approach is to employ Qualitative Mutual Information (QMI) for this purpose. The idea of Qualitative Mutual Information causes the selected features to have more stability and this stability helps to deal with the problem of data imbalance and scarcity. In the third phase, a forward selection scheme is applied which uses a scoring function to weight each feature. The performance of the proposed method is compared with other popular feature selection algorithms such as Fisher ratio, minimum redundancy maximum relevance, and previous works on cooperative game based feature selection. The average classification accuracy on eleven microarray data sets shows that the proposed method improves both average accuracy and average stability compared to other approaches.

  5. Robust Feature Selection from Microarray Data Based on Cooperative Game Theory and Qualitative Mutual Information

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Atiyeh; Moattar, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    High dimensionality of microarray data sets may lead to low efficiency and overfitting. In this paper, a multiphase cooperative game theoretic feature selection approach is proposed for microarray data classification. In the first phase, due to high dimension of microarray data sets, the features are reduced using one of the two filter-based feature selection methods, namely, mutual information and Fisher ratio. In the second phase, Shapley index is used to evaluate the power of each feature. The main innovation of the proposed approach is to employ Qualitative Mutual Information (QMI) for this purpose. The idea of Qualitative Mutual Information causes the selected features to have more stability and this stability helps to deal with the problem of data imbalance and scarcity. In the third phase, a forward selection scheme is applied which uses a scoring function to weight each feature. The performance of the proposed method is compared with other popular feature selection algorithms such as Fisher ratio, minimum redundancy maximum relevance, and previous works on cooperative game based feature selection. The average classification accuracy on eleven microarray data sets shows that the proposed method improves both average accuracy and average stability compared to other approaches. PMID:27127506

  6. [Prediction of regional soil quality based on mutual information theory integrated with decision tree algorithm].

    PubMed

    Lin, Fen-Fang; Wang, Ke; Yang, Ning; Yan, Shi-Guang; Zheng, Xin-Yu

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, some main factors such as soil type, land use pattern, lithology type, topography, road, and industry type that affect soil quality were used to precisely obtain the spatial distribution characteristics of regional soil quality, mutual information theory was adopted to select the main environmental factors, and decision tree algorithm See 5.0 was applied to predict the grade of regional soil quality. The main factors affecting regional soil quality were soil type, land use, lithology type, distance to town, distance to water area, altitude, distance to road, and distance to industrial land. The prediction accuracy of the decision tree model with the variables selected by mutual information was obviously higher than that of the model with all variables, and, for the former model, whether of decision tree or of decision rule, its prediction accuracy was all higher than 80%. Based on the continuous and categorical data, the method of mutual information theory integrated with decision tree could not only reduce the number of input parameters for decision tree algorithm, but also predict and assess regional soil quality effectively.

  7. An efficient and adaptive mutual authentication framework for heterogeneous wireless sensor network-based applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pardeep; Ylianttila, Mika; Gurtov, Andrei; Lee, Sang-Gon; Lee, Hoon-Jae

    2014-02-11

    Robust security is highly coveted in real wireless sensor network (WSN) applications since wireless sensors' sense critical data from the application environment. This article presents an efficient and adaptive mutual authentication framework that suits real heterogeneous WSN-based applications (such as smart homes, industrial environments, smart grids, and healthcare monitoring). The proposed framework offers: (i) key initialization; (ii) secure network (cluster) formation (i.e., mutual authentication and dynamic key establishment); (iii) key revocation; and (iv) new node addition into the network. The correctness of the proposed scheme is formally verified. An extensive analysis shows the proposed scheme coupled with message confidentiality, mutual authentication and dynamic session key establishment, node privacy, and message freshness. Moreover, the preliminary study also reveals the proposed framework is secure against popular types of attacks, such as impersonation attacks, man-in-the-middle attacks, replay attacks, and information-leakage attacks. As a result, we believe the proposed framework achieves efficiency at reasonable computation and communication costs and it can be a safeguard to real heterogeneous WSN applications.

  8. An Efficient and Adaptive Mutual Authentication Framework for Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network-Based Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pardeep; Ylianttila, Mika; Gurtov, Andrei; Lee, Sang-Gon; Lee, Hoon-Jae

    2014-01-01

    Robust security is highly coveted in real wireless sensor network (WSN) applications since wireless sensors' sense critical data from the application environment. This article presents an efficient and adaptive mutual authentication framework that suits real heterogeneous WSN-based applications (such as smart homes, industrial environments, smart grids, and healthcare monitoring). The proposed framework offers: (i) key initialization; (ii) secure network (cluster) formation (i.e., mutual authentication and dynamic key establishment); (iii) key revocation; and (iv) new node addition into the network. The correctness of the proposed scheme is formally verified. An extensive analysis shows the proposed scheme coupled with message confidentiality, mutual authentication and dynamic session key establishment, node privacy, and message freshness. Moreover, the preliminary study also reveals the proposed framework is secure against popular types of attacks, such as impersonation attacks, man-in-the-middle attacks, replay attacks, and information-leakage attacks. As a result, we believe the proposed framework achieves efficiency at reasonable computation and communication costs and it can be a safeguard to real heterogeneous WSN applications. PMID:24521942

  9. Mutual perception of communication between general practitioners and hospital-based specialists.

    PubMed

    Vermeir, P; Vandijck, D; Degroote, S; Ommeslag, D; Van De Putte, M; Heytens, S; Reniers, J; Hanoulle, I; Peleman, R; Vogelaers, D

    2015-10-01

    Communication between general practitioners (GPs) and specialists is an important aspect of qualitative care. Efficient communication exchange is essential and key in guaranteeing continuity of care. Inefficient communication is related to several negative outcomes, including patient harm. This study aimed to investigate the perception of GPs and hospital-based specialists in Belgium of the quality of their mutual communication. A cross-sectional study was conducted among GPs and specialists. Participants were asked to complete a validated questionnaire on several aspects of their mutual communication. Response rates of 17.9% (343/1.912) for GPs and 17.3% (392/2.263) for specialists were obtained. Both specialists and GPs qualify their mutual telephone accessibility as suboptimal. Specialists think poorly of the GP referral letter, in contrast to GP perception. Eighty per cent of the GPs feel that specialists address their questions appropriately; specialists have a similar perception of their own performance. According to 16.7% of the specialists, GPs not always follow their recommendations. Contrarily, GPs rate their compliance much higher (90.7%). Less than half of the GPs feel that the specialists' letter arrives on time, whereas specialists have a different and a more positive perception. GPs and specialists disagree on several aspects of their mutual communication. These include the perception of accessibility, in both directions, and of the timeliness of written communication. Feedback is positively appreciated, again in both directions. Nevertheless, specialists feel that uptake of their recommendations is insufficient. Hence, there may remain significant room for improvement, which could contribute significantly to continuity of care and patient safety.

  10. Rational design of FRET sensor proteins based on mutually exclusive domain interactions.

    PubMed

    Merkx, Maarten; Golynskiy, Misha V; Lindenburg, Laurens H; Vinkenborg, Jan L

    2013-10-01

    Proteins that switch between distinct conformational states are ideal to monitor and control molecular processes within the complexity of biological systems. Inspired by the modular architecture of natural signalling proteins, our group explores generic design strategies for the construction of FRET-based sensor proteins and other protein switches. In the present article, I show that designing FRET sensors based on mutually exclusive domain interactions provides a robust method to engineer sensors with predictable properties and an inherently large change in emission ratio. The modularity of this approach should make it easily transferable to other applications of protein switches in fields ranging from synthetic biology, optogenetics and molecular diagnostics.

  11. A stable, unbiased, long-term satellite based data record of sea surface temperature from ESA's Climate Change Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Nick; Good, Simon; Merchant, Chris

    2013-04-01

    The study of climate change demands long-term, stable observational records of climate variables such as sea surface temperature (SST). ESA's Climate Change Initiative was set up to unlock the potential of satellite data records for this purpose. As part of this initiative, 13 projects were established to develop the data records for different essential climate variables - aerosol, cloud, fire, greenhouse gases, glaciers, ice sheets, land cover, ocean colour, ozone, sea ice, sea level, soil moisture and SST. In this presentation we describe the development work that has taken place in the SST project and present new prototype data products that are available now for users to trial. The SST project began in 2010 and has now produced two prototype products. The first is a long-term product (covering mid-1991 - 2010 currently, but with a view to update this in the future), which prioritises length of data record and stability over other considerations. It is based on data from the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) and Advanced Very-High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) series of satellite instruments. The product aims to combine the favourable stability and bias characteristics of ATSR data with the geographical coverage achieved with the AVHRR series. Following an algorithm selection process, an optimal estimation approach to retrieving SST from the satellite measurements from both sensors was adopted. The retrievals do not depend on in situ data and so this data record represents an independent assessment of SST change. In situ data are, however, being used to validate the resulting data. The second data product demonstrates the coverage that can be achieved using the modern satellite observing system including, for example, geostationary satellite data. Six months worth of data have been processed for this demonstration product. The prototype SST products will be released in April to users to trial in their work. The long term product will be available as

  12. The (w)hole survey: An unbiased sample study of transition disk candidates based on Spitzer catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marel, N.; Verhaar, B. W.; van Terwisga, S.; Merín, B.; Herczeg, G.; Ligterink, N. F. W.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding disk evolution and dissipation is essential for studies of planet formation. Transition disks, i.e., disks with large dust cavities and gaps, are promising candidates of active evolution. About two dozen candidates, selected by their spectral energy distribution (SED), have been confirmed to have dust cavities through millimeter interferometric imaging, but this sample is biased toward the brightest disks. The Spitzer surveys of nearby low-mass star-forming regions have resulted in more than 4000 young stellar objects. Using color criteria, we selected a sample of ~150 candidates and an additional 40 candidates and known transition disks from the literature. The Spitzer data were complemented by new observations at longer wavelengths, including new JCMT and APEX submillimeter photometry, and WISE and Herschel-PACS mid- and far-infrared photometry. Furthermore, optical spectroscopy was obtained and stellar types were derived for 85% of the sample, including information from the literature. The SEDs were fit to a grid of RADMC-3D disk models with a limited number of parameters: disk mass, inner disk mass, scale height and flaring, and disk cavity radius, where the latter is the main parameter of interest. About 72% of our targets possibly have dust cavities based on the SED. The derived cavity sizes are consistent with imaging/modeling results in the literature, where available. Trends are found with Ldisk over L∗ ratio and stellar mass and a possible connection with exoplanet orbital radii. A comparison with a previous study where color observables are used reveals large overlap between their category of planet-forming disks and our transition disks with cavities. A large number of the new transition disk candidates are suitable for follow-up observations with ALMA. Full Tables 4, 5, A.1-A.3, C.1, and D.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  13. Unbiased Detection of Respiratory Viruses by Use of RNA Sequencing-Based Metagenomics: a Systematic Comparison to a Commercial PCR Panel

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Erin H.; Simmon, Keith E.; Tardif, Keith D.; Hymas, Weston; Flygare, Steven; Eilbeck, Karen; Yandell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Current infectious disease molecular tests are largely pathogen specific, requiring test selection based on the patient's symptoms. For many syndromes caused by a large number of viral, bacterial, or fungal pathogens, such as respiratory tract infections, this necessitates large panels of tests and has limited yield. In contrast, next-generation sequencing-based metagenomics can be used for unbiased detection of any expected or unexpected pathogen. However, barriers for its diagnostic implementation include incomplete understanding of analytical performance and complexity of sequence data analysis. We compared detection of known respiratory virus-positive (n = 42) and unselected (n = 67) pediatric nasopharyngeal swabs using an RNA sequencing (RNA-seq)-based metagenomics approach and Taxonomer, an ultrarapid, interactive, web-based metagenomics data analysis tool, with an FDA-cleared respiratory virus panel (RVP; GenMark eSensor). Untargeted metagenomics detected 86% of known respiratory virus infections, and additional PCR testing confirmed RVP results for only 2 (33%) of the discordant samples. In unselected samples, untargeted metagenomics had excellent agreement with the RVP (93%). In addition, untargeted metagenomics detected an additional 12 viruses that were either not targeted by the RVP or missed due to highly divergent genome sequences. Normalized viral read counts for untargeted metagenomics correlated with viral burden determined by quantitative PCR and showed high intrarun and interrun reproducibility. Partial or full-length viral genome sequences were generated in 86% of RNA-seq-positive samples, allowing assessment of antiviral resistance, strain-level typing, and phylogenetic relatedness. Overall, untargeted metagenomics had high agreement with a sensitive RVP, detected viruses not targeted by the RVP, and yielded epidemiologically and clinically valuable sequence information. PMID:26818672

  14. Unbiased Detection of Respiratory Viruses by Use of RNA Sequencing-Based Metagenomics: a Systematic Comparison to a Commercial PCR Panel.

    PubMed

    Graf, Erin H; Simmon, Keith E; Tardif, Keith D; Hymas, Weston; Flygare, Steven; Eilbeck, Karen; Yandell, Mark; Schlaberg, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Current infectious disease molecular tests are largely pathogen specific, requiring test selection based on the patient's symptoms. For many syndromes caused by a large number of viral, bacterial, or fungal pathogens, such as respiratory tract infections, this necessitates large panels of tests and has limited yield. In contrast, next-generation sequencing-based metagenomics can be used for unbiased detection of any expected or unexpected pathogen. However, barriers for its diagnostic implementation include incomplete understanding of analytical performance and complexity of sequence data analysis. We compared detection of known respiratory virus-positive (n= 42) and unselected (n= 67) pediatric nasopharyngeal swabs using an RNA sequencing (RNA-seq)-based metagenomics approach and Taxonomer, an ultrarapid, interactive, web-based metagenomics data analysis tool, with an FDA-cleared respiratory virus panel (RVP; GenMark eSensor). Untargeted metagenomics detected 86% of known respiratory virus infections, and additional PCR testing confirmed RVP results for only 2 (33%) of the discordant samples. In unselected samples, untargeted metagenomics had excellent agreement with the RVP (93%). In addition, untargeted metagenomics detected an additional 12 viruses that were either not targeted by the RVP or missed due to highly divergent genome sequences. Normalized viral read counts for untargeted metagenomics correlated with viral burden determined by quantitative PCR and showed high intrarun and interrun reproducibility. Partial or full-length viral genome sequences were generated in 86% of RNA-seq-positive samples, allowing assessment of antiviral resistance, strain-level typing, and phylogenetic relatedness. Overall, untargeted metagenomics had high agreement with a sensitive RVP, detected viruses not targeted by the RVP, and yielded epidemiologically and clinically valuable sequence information. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Mutual injection phase locking coherent combination of solid-state lasers based on corner cube.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yong; Liu, Xu; Wan, Qiang; Zhu, Mengzhen; Mi, Chaowei; Tan, Chaoyong; Wei, Shangfang; Chen, Xia

    2013-12-01

    Coherent beam combination is an effective way to develop high-power lasers with high beam quality and high brightness. Coherent combination of six solid-state lasers based on the technique of mutual injection phase locking by using the natural coherent combination property of corner cube is first investigated. The coherent combination with 15.3 J of output energy, 1.7 mrad of divergent angle is obtained, and the combining efficiency is as high as 95.6% at 10 Hz and 85 A. The far-field profile is flattened protuberance.

  16. Registration of infrared and visual images based on phase grouping and mutual information of gradient orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhilong; Yang, Guopeng; Chen, Dong; Li, Jicheng; Yang, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a novel infrared and visual image registration method based on phase grouping and mutual information of gradient orientation. The method is specially designed for infrared image navigation, which is different from familiar multi-sensor image registration methods in the field of remote sensing. The central idea is to firstly extract common salient structural features from visual and infrared images through phase grouping, then registering infrared image to visual image and estimating the exterior parameters of the infrared camera. Two subjects are involved in this reports: (1) In order to estimate image gradient orientation accurately, a new method based on Leguerre-Gauss filter is presented. Then the image are segmented by grouping of pixels based on their gradient orientations and ling support regions are extracted as common salient structural features from infrared and visual images of the same ground scene. (2)In order for registering infrared and visual image, coordinate systems are constructed, coordinate transformations are formularized, and the new similarity measures based on orientation mutual information is presented. Quantitative evaluations on real and simulated image data reviews that the proposed method can provide registration results with improved robustness and accuracy.

  17. Uncertainty relation for mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeloch, James; Broadbent, Curtis J.; Howell, John C.

    2014-12-01

    We postulate the existence of a universal uncertainty relation between the quantum and classical mutual informations between pairs of quantum systems. Specifically, we propose that the sum of the classical mutual information, determined by two mutually unbiased pairs of observables, never exceeds the quantum mutual information. We call this the complementary-quantum correlation (CQC) relation and prove its validity for pure states, for states with one maximally mixed subsystem, and for all states when one measurement is minimally disturbing. We provide results of a Monte Carlo simulation suggesting that the CQC relation is generally valid. Importantly, we also show that the CQC relation represents an improvement to an entropic uncertainty principle in the presence of a quantum memory, and that it can be used to verify an achievable secret key rate in the quantum one-time pad cryptographic protocol.

  18. A Semidefinite Programming Based Search Strategy for Feature Selection with Mutual Information Measure.

    PubMed

    Naghibi, Tofigh; Hoffmann, Sarah; Pfister, Beat

    2015-08-01

    Feature subset selection, as a special case of the general subset selection problem, has been the topic of a considerable number of studies due to the growing importance of data-mining applications. In the feature subset selection problem there are two main issues that need to be addressed: (i) Finding an appropriate measure function than can be fairly fast and robustly computed for high-dimensional data. (ii) A search strategy to optimize the measure over the subset space in a reasonable amount of time. In this article mutual information between features and class labels is considered to be the measure function. Two series expansions for mutual information are proposed, and it is shown that most heuristic criteria suggested in the literature are truncated approximations of these expansions. It is well-known that searching the whole subset space is an NP-hard problem. Here, instead of the conventional sequential search algorithms, we suggest a parallel search strategy based on semidefinite programming (SDP) that can search through the subset space in polynomial time. By exploiting the similarities between the proposed algorithm and an instance of the maximum-cut problem in graph theory, the approximation ratio of this algorithm is derived and is compared with the approximation ratio of the backward elimination method. The experiments show that it can be misleading to judge the quality of a measure solely based on the classification accuracy, without taking the effect of the non-optimum search strategy into account.

  19. Mutual associations between intellectual disability and epilepsy-related psychiatry disability: Population-based study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjie; Guo, Chao; Chen, Gong; Zhang, Lei; Wen, Xun; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2017-05-01

    Epilepsy is the third-leading cause of psychiatry disability in China, and intellectual disability (ID) is also 1 major type of disabilities in China. This study estimates the prevalence of comorbidities with ID and epilepsy-related psychiatry disability (EPD) and examines mutual associations within ID and EPD.Data were taken from the Second China National Sample Survey on Disability, which was a nationally representative, population-based survey. To derive a nationally representative sample, the survey used multistage, stratified, cluster random sampling with probability proportional to size. The disabled people who had ID and EPD based on the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases. The cox-proportional hazards model was used to examine the associations between ID and EPD considering the happened sequence of ID and EPD.The prevalence of ID with EPD was 0.14 (95% confidence interval: 0.09-0.19) per 1000 people. Age was strongly associated with the risk of EPD, which was diagnosed after ID, especially among young ID population. Except for age, other variables were also associated between ID and EPD considering sequence of ID and EPD.This study is the first national study to explore mutual associations with ID and EPD and highlights the young ID children with high risk of development of epilepsy. To address the challenge of ID with EPD disability in China, the government should adjust its strategies for healthcare systems to prevent disability.

  20. Multimodality medical image registration and fusion techniques using mutual information and genetic algorithm-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Mahua; Das, Arpita

    2011-01-01

    Medical image fusion has been used to derive the useful complimentary information from multimodal images. The prior step of fusion is registration or proper alignment of test images for accurate extraction of detail information. For this purpose, the images to be fused are geometrically aligned using mutual information (MI) as similarity measuring metric followed by genetic algorithm to maximize MI. The proposed fusion strategy incorporating multi-resolution approach extracts more fine details from the test images and improves the quality of composite fused image. The proposed fusion approach is independent of any manual marking or knowledge of fiducial points and starts the procedure automatically. The performance of proposed genetic-based fusion methodology is compared with fuzzy clustering algorithm-based fusion approach, and the experimental results show that genetic-based fusion technique improves the quality of the fused image significantly over the fuzzy approaches.

  1. The evolution of mutualism.

    PubMed

    Leigh, E G

    2010-12-01

    Like altruism, mutualism, cooperation between species, evolves only by enhancing all participants' inclusive fitness. Mutualism evolves most readily between members of different kingdoms, which pool complementary abilities for mutual benefit: some of these mutualisms represent major evolutionary innovations. Mutualism cannot persist if cheating annihilates its benefits. In long-term mutualisms, symbioses, at least one party associates with the other nearly all its life. Usually, a larger host harbours smaller symbionts. Cheating is restrained by vertical transmission, as in Buchnera; partner fidelity, as among bull-thorn acacias and protective ants; test-based choice of symbionts, as bobtail squid choose bioluminescent bacteria; or sanctioning nonperforming symbionts, as legumes punish nonperforming nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Mutualisms involving brief exchanges, as among plants and seed-dispersers, however, persist despite abundant cheating. Both symbioses and brief-exchange mutualisms have transformed whole ecosystems. These mutualisms may be steps towards ecosystems which, like Adam Smith's ideal economy, serve their members' common good. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  2. Power Spectrum and Mutual Information Analyses of DNA Base (Nucleotide) Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isohata, Yasuhiko; Hayashi, Masaki

    2003-03-01

    On the basis of the power spectrum analyses for the base (nucleotide) sequences of various genes, we have studied long-range correlations in total base sequences which are expressed as 1/fα, behaviour of the exponent α for the accumulated base sequences as well as periodicities at short range. In particular from the analysis of content rate distributions of α we have obtained the average value \\barα=0.40± 0.01 and \\barα=0.20± 0.01 for the human genes and S. cerevisiae genes, respectively. We have also performed the analyses using the mutual information function. We show that there exists a clear difference between the content rate distributions of correlation lengths for the sample human genes and the S. cerevisiae genes. We are led to a conjecture that the elongation of the correlation length in the base sequences of genes from the early eukaryote (S. cerevisiae) to the late eukaryote (human) should be the definite reflection of the evolutionary process.

  3. Registration of 2D to 3D joint images using phase-based mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi, Rupin; Abugharbieh, Rafeef; Pickering, Mark; Scarvell, Jennie; Smith, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Registration of two dimensional to three dimensional orthopaedic medical image data has important applications particularly in the area of image guided surgery and sports medicine. Fluoroscopy to computer tomography (CT) registration is an important case, wherein digitally reconstructed radiographs derived from the CT data are registered to the fluoroscopy data. Traditional registration metrics such as intensity-based mutual information (MI) typically work well but often suffer from gross misregistration errors when the image to be registered contains a partial view of the anatomy visible in the target image. Phase-based MI provides a robust alternative similarity measure which, in addition to possessing the general robustness and noise immunity that MI provides, also employs local phase information in the registration process which makes it less susceptible to the aforementioned errors. In this paper, we propose using the complex wavelet transform for computing image phase information and incorporating that into a phase-based MI measure for image registration. Tests on a CT volume and 6 fluoroscopy images of the knee are presented. The femur and the tibia in the CT volume were individually registered to the fluoroscopy images using intensity-based MI, gradient-based MI and phase-based MI. Errors in the coordinates of fiducials present in the bone structures were used to assess the accuracy of the different registration schemes. Quantitative results demonstrate that the performance of intensity-based MI was the worst. Gradient-based MI performed slightly better, while phase-based MI results were the best consistently producing the lowest errors.

  4. Spacer/Linker Based Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Mutual Prodrugs as Antiinflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    Velingkar, V. S.; Jain, D. R.; Ahire, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    Mutual prodrugs of some antiinflammatory agents were synthesized with the aim of improving the therapeutic index through prevention of gastrointestinal complications and to check the efficiency of release of the parent drug in presence of spacer. These mutual prodrugs were synthesized by direct condensation method using dicyclohexyl carbodiimide as a coupling agent and glycine as a spacer. The title compounds were characterized by spectral techniques and the release of the parent drug from mutual prodrug was studied in two different non-enzymatic buffer solutions at pH 1.2, pH 7.4 and in 80% human plasma. All mutual prodrugs exhibited encouraging hydrolysis profile in 80% human plasma. Biological activity of title compounds was studied by carrageenan-induced paw edema method. From the results obtained, it was concluded that these compounds retain the antiinflammatory action. PMID:21694998

  5. An ensemble method based on uninformative variable elimination and mutual information for spectral multivariate calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chao; Wang, Jinyue; Wu, Tong; Qin, Xin; Li, Menglong

    2010-12-01

    Based on the combination of uninformative variable elimination (UVE), bootstrap and mutual information (MI), a simple ensemble algorithm, named ESPLS, is proposed for spectral multivariate calibration (MVC). In ESPLS, those uninformative variables are first removed; and then a preparatory training set is produced by bootstrap, on which a MI spectrum of retained variables is calculated. The variables that exhibit higher MI than a defined threshold form a subspace on which a candidate partial least-squares (PLS) model is constructed. This process is repeated. After a number of candidate models are obtained, a small part of models is picked out to construct an ensemble model by simple/weighted average. Four near/mid-infrared (NIR/MIR) spectral datasets concerning the determination of six components are used to verify the proposed ESPLS. The results indicate that ESPLS is superior to UVEPLS and its combination with MI-based variable selection (SPLS) in terms of both the accuracy and robustness. Besides, from the perspective of end-users, ESPLS does not increase the complexity of a calibration when enhancing its performance.

  6. Fully Integrated Passive UHF RFID Tag for Hash-Based Mutual Authentication Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Shugo; Watanabe, Dai; Li, Yang; Sakiyama, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Passive radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag has been used in many applications. While the RFID market is expected to grow, concerns about security and privacy of the RFID tag should be overcome for the future use. To overcome these issues, privacy-preserving authentication protocols based on cryptographic algorithms have been designed. However, to the best of our knowledge, evaluation of the whole tag, which includes an antenna, an analog front end, and a digital processing block, that runs authentication protocols has not been studied. In this paper, we present an implementation and evaluation of a fully integrated passive UHF RFID tag that runs a privacy-preserving mutual authentication protocol based on a hash function. We design a single chip including the analog front end and the digital processing block. We select a lightweight hash function supporting 80-bit security strength and a standard hash function supporting 128-bit security strength. We show that when the lightweight hash function is used, the tag completes the protocol with a reader-tag distance of 10 cm. Similarly, when the standard hash function is used, the tag completes the protocol with the distance of 8.5 cm. We discuss the impact of the peak power consumption of the tag on the distance of the tag due to the hash function. PMID:26491714

  7. Comparison and evaluation of joint histogram estimation methods for mutual information based image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yongfang; Chen, Hua-mei

    2005-04-01

    Joint histogram is the only quantity required to calculate the mutual information (MI) between two images. For MI based image registration, joint histograms are often estimated through linear interpolation or partial volume interpolation (PVI). It has been pointed out that both methods may result in a phenomenon known as interpolation induced artifacts. In this paper, we implemented a wide range of interpolation/approximation kernels for joint histogram estimation. Some kernels are nonnegative. In this case, these kernels are applied in two ways as the linear kernel is applied in linear interpolation and PVI. In addition, we implemented two other joint histogram estimation methods devised to overcome the interpolation artifact problem. They are nearest neighbor interpolation with jittered sampling with/without histogram blurring and data resampling. We used the clinical data obtained from Vanderbilt University for all of the experiments. The objective of this study is to perform a comprehensive comparison and evaluation of different joint histogram estimation methods for MI based image registration in terms of artifacts reduction and registration accuracy.

  8. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-01-01

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds. PMID:27824161

  9. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-11-08

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds.

  10. Mutually Exclusive Uncertainty Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-11-01

    The uncertainty principle is one of the characteristic properties of quantum theory based on incompatibility. Apart from the incompatible relation of quantum states, mutually exclusiveness is another remarkable phenomenon in the information- theoretic foundation of quantum theory. We investigate the role of mutual exclusive physical states in the recent work of stronger uncertainty relations for all incompatible observables by Mccone and Pati and generalize the weighted uncertainty relation to the product form as well as their multi-observable analogues. The new bounds capture both incompatibility and mutually exclusiveness, and are tighter compared with the existing bounds.

  11. A Temporal Credential-Based Mutual Authentication with Multiple-Password Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Ruisheng; Liu, Qidong

    2017-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which consist of a large number of sensor nodes, have become among the most important technologies in numerous fields, such as environmental monitoring, military surveillance, control systems in nuclear reactors, vehicle safety systems, and medical monitoring. The most serious drawback for the widespread application of WSNs is the lack of security. Given the resource limitation of WSNs, traditional security schemes are unsuitable. Approaches toward withstanding related attacks with small overhead have thus recently been studied by many researchers. Numerous studies have focused on the authentication scheme for WSNs, but most of these works cannot achieve the security performance and overhead perfectly. Nam et al. proposed a two-factor authentication scheme with lightweight sensor computation for WSNs. In this paper, we review this scheme, emphasize its drawbacks, and propose a temporal credential-based mutual authentication with a multiple-password scheme for WSNs. Our scheme uses multiple passwords to achieve three-factor security performance and generate a session key between user and sensor nodes. The security analysis phase shows that our scheme can withstand related attacks, including a lost password threat, and the comparison phase shows that our scheme involves a relatively small overhead. In the comparison of the overhead phase, the result indicates that more than 95% of the overhead is composed of communication and not computation overhead. Therefore, the result motivates us to pay further attention to communication overhead than computation overhead in future research.

  12. Characteristics analysis of acupuncture electroencephalograph based on mutual information Lempel—Ziv complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xi-Liu; Wang, Jiang; Han, Chun-Xiao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Bian, Hong-Rui

    2012-02-01

    As a convenient approach to the characterization of cerebral cortex electrical information, electroencephalograph (EEG) has potential clinical application in monitoring the acupuncture effects. In this paper, a method composed of the mutual information method and Lempel—Ziv complexity method (MILZC) is proposed to investigate the effects of acupuncture on the complexity of information exchanges between different brain regions based on EEGs. In the experiments, eight subjects are manually acupunctured at ‘Zusanli’ acupuncture point (ST-36) with different frequencies (i.e., 50, 100, 150, and 200 times/min) and the EEGs are recorded simultaneously. First, MILZC values are compared in general. Then average brain connections are used to quantify the effectiveness of acupuncture under the above four frequencies. Finally, significance index P values are used to study the spatiality of the acupuncture effect on the brain. Three main findings are obtained: (i) MILZC values increase during the acupuncture; (ii) manual acupunctures (MAs) with 100 times/min and 150 times/min are more effective than with 50 times/min and 200 times/min; (iii) contralateral hemisphere activation is more prominent than ipsilateral hemisphere's. All these findings suggest that acupuncture contributes to the increase of brain information exchange complexity and the MILZC method can successfully describe these changes.

  13. A Temporal Credential-Based Mutual Authentication with Multiple-Password Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruisheng; Liu, Qidong

    2017-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which consist of a large number of sensor nodes, have become among the most important technologies in numerous fields, such as environmental monitoring, military surveillance, control systems in nuclear reactors, vehicle safety systems, and medical monitoring. The most serious drawback for the widespread application of WSNs is the lack of security. Given the resource limitation of WSNs, traditional security schemes are unsuitable. Approaches toward withstanding related attacks with small overhead have thus recently been studied by many researchers. Numerous studies have focused on the authentication scheme for WSNs, but most of these works cannot achieve the security performance and overhead perfectly. Nam et al. proposed a two-factor authentication scheme with lightweight sensor computation for WSNs. In this paper, we review this scheme, emphasize its drawbacks, and propose a temporal credential-based mutual authentication with a multiple-password scheme for WSNs. Our scheme uses multiple passwords to achieve three-factor security performance and generate a session key between user and sensor nodes. The security analysis phase shows that our scheme can withstand related attacks, including a lost password threat, and the comparison phase shows that our scheme involves a relatively small overhead. In the comparison of the overhead phase, the result indicates that more than 95% of the overhead is composed of communication and not computation overhead. Therefore, the result motivates us to pay further attention to communication overhead than computation overhead in future research. PMID:28135288

  14. Adaptive design optimization: a mutual information-based approach to model discrimination in cognitive science.

    PubMed

    Cavagnaro, Daniel R; Myung, Jay I; Pitt, Mark A; Kujala, Janne V

    2010-04-01

    Discriminating among competing statistical models is a pressing issue for many experimentalists in the field of cognitive science. Resolving this issue begins with designing maximally informative experiments. To this end, the problem to be solved in adaptive design optimization is identifying experimental designs under which one can infer the underlying model in the fewest possible steps. When the models under consideration are nonlinear, as is often the case in cognitive science, this problem can be impossible to solve analytically without simplifying assumptions. However, as we show in this letter, a full solution can be found numerically with the help of a Bayesian computational trick derived from the statistics literature, which recasts the problem as a probability density simulation in which the optimal design is the mode of the density. We use a utility function based on mutual information and give three intuitive interpretations of the utility function in terms of Bayesian posterior estimates. As a proof of concept, we offer a simple example application to an experiment on memory retention.

  15. Reproducing the location-based context-specific proportion congruent effect for frequency unbiased items: A reply to Hutcheon and Spieler (2016).

    PubMed

    Crump, Matthew J C; Brosowsky, Nicholaus P; Milliken, Bruce

    2017-09-01

    Stroop effects can be modulated by context-specific cues associated with different levels of proportion congruent, even for items that appear equally frequently in each context. This result has important theoretical implications, because it rules out frequency-driven learning explanations of context-specific proportion congruent (CSPC) effects and leaves open the possibility that a cue-driven retrieval process can reinstate attentional control settings in a rapid online fashion. The purpose of the present work was to address reproducibility concerns that have been raised about this finding. We conducted several reproductions and novel extensions using Amazon's mechanical Turk in both Stroop and flanker tasks. We successfully replicated the central finding that CSPC effects can be observed for frequency-unbiased items. We also provide new Monte Carlo simulation analyses to estimate reproducibility of the phenomena that show important limitations on these designs for measuring contextual control.

  16. The application of mutual information-based feature selection and fuzzy LS-SVM-based classifier in motion classification.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiguo; Wang, Zhizhong; Xie, Hongbo

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents an effective mutual information-based feature selection approach for EMG-based motion classification task. The wavelet packet transform (WPT) is exploited to decompose the four-class motion EMG signals to the successive and non-overlapped sub-bands. The energy characteristic of each sub-band is adopted to construct the initial full feature set. For reducing the computation complexity, mutual information (MI) theory is utilized to get the reduction feature set without compromising classification accuracy. Compared with the extensively used feature reduction methods such as principal component analysis (PCA), sequential forward selection (SFS) and backward elimination (BE) etc., the comparison experiments demonstrate its superiority in terms of time-consuming and classification accuracy. The proposed strategy of feature extraction and reduction is a kind of filter-based algorithms which is independent of the classifier design. Considering the classification performance will vary with the different classifiers, we make the comparison between the fuzzy least squares support vector machines (LS-SVMs) and the conventional widely used neural network classifier. In the further study, our experiments prove that the combination of MI-based feature selection and SVM techniques outperforms other commonly used combination, for example, the PCA and NN. The experiment results show that the diverse motions can be identified with high accuracy by the combination of MI-based feature selection and SVM techniques. Compared with the combination of PCA-based feature selection and the classical Neural Network classifier, superior performance of the proposed classification scheme illustrates the potential of the SVM techniques combined with WPT and MI in EMG motion classification.

  17. New direction of arrival estimation of coherent signals based on reconstructing matrix under unknown mutual coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Li, Weixing; Zhang, Yue; Chen, Zengping

    2016-01-01

    A direction of arrival (DOA) estimation algorithm for coherent signals in the presence of unknown mutual coupling is proposed. A group of auxiliary sensors in a uniform linear array are applied to eliminate the effects on the orthogonality of subspaces brought by mutual coupling. Then, a Toeplitz matrix, whose rank is independent of the coherency between impinging signals, is reconstructed to eliminate the rank loss of the spatial covariance matrix. Therefore, the signal and noise subspaces can be estimated properly. This method can estimate the DOAs of coherent signals under unknown mutual coupling accurately without any iteration and calibration sources. It has a low computational burden and high accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  18. Task-Driven Dictionary Learning Based on Mutual Information for Medical Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Diamant, Idit; Klang, Eyal; Amitai, Michal; Konen, Eli; Goldberger, Jacob; Greenspan, Hayit

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel variant of the bag-of-visual-words (BoVW) method for automated medical image classification. Our approach improves the BoVW model by learning a task-driven dictionary of the most relevant visual words per task using a mutual information-based criterion. Additionally, we generate relevance maps to visualize and localize the decision of the automatic classification algorithm. These maps demonstrate how the algorithm works and show the spatial layout of the most relevant words. We applied our algorithm to three different tasks: chest x-ray pathology identification (of four pathologies: cardiomegaly, enlarged mediastinum, right consolidation, and left consolidation), liver lesion classification into four categories in computed tomography (CT) images and benign/malignant clusters of microcalcifications (MCs) classification in breast mammograms. Validation was conducted on three datasets: 443 chest x-rays, 118 portal phase CT images of liver lesions, and 260 mammography MCs. The proposed method improves the classical BoVW method for all tested applications. For chest x-ray, area under curve of 0.876 was obtained for enlarged mediastinum identification compared to 0.855 using classical BoVW (with p-value 0.01). For MC classification, a significant improvement of 4% was achieved using our new approach (with p-value = 0.03). For liver lesion classification, an improvement of 6% in sensitivity and 2% in specificity were obtained (with p-value 0.001). We demonstrated that classification based on informative selected set of words results in significant improvement. Our new BoVW approach shows promising results in clinically important domains. Additionally, it can discover relevant parts of images for the task at hand without explicit annotations for training data. This can provide computer-aided support for medical experts in challenging image analysis tasks.

  19. A multilocus linkage disequilibrium measure based on mutual information theory and its applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Jianfeng; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2009-12-01

    Evaluating the patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) is important for association mapping study as well as for studying the genomic architecture of human genome (e.g., haplotype block structures). Commonly used bi-allelic pairwise measures for assessing LD between two loci, such as r(2) and D', may not make full and efficient use of modern multilocus data. Though extended to multilocus scenarios, their performance is still questionable. Meanwhile, most existing measures for an entire multilocus region, such as normalized entropy difference, do not consider existence of LD heterogeneity across the region under investigation. Additionally, these existing multilocus measures cannot handle distant regions where long-range LD patterns may exist. In this study, we proposed a novel multilocus LD measure developed based on mutual information theory. Our proposed measure described LD pattern between two chromosome regions each of which may consist of multiple loci (including multi-allele loci). As such, the proposed measure can better characterize LD patterns between two arbitrary regions. As potential applications, we developed algorithms on the proposed measure for partitioning haplotype blocks and for selecting haplotype tagging SNPs (htSNPs), which were helpful for follow-up association tests. The results on both simulated and empirical data showed that our LD measure had distinct advantages over pairwise and other multilocus measures. First, our measure was more robust, and can capture comprehensively the LD information between neighboring as well as disjointed regions. Second, haplotype blocks were better described via our proposed measure. Furthermore, association tests with htSNPs from the proposed algorithm had improved power over tests on single markers and on haplotypes.

  20. School-Based Mutual Support Groups for Parents: An Intervention Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoni, Jane M.

    This handbook focuses on steps and tasks related to establishing mutual support groups for parents in a school setting. A sequential approach is described that involves: working within the school to get started; recruiting members; training parents how to run their own meetings; and offering off-site consultation as requested. The first section…

  1. Unbiased Cell-based Screening in a Neuronal Cell Model of Batten Disease Highlights an Interaction between Ca2+ Homeostasis, Autophagy, and CLN3 Protein Function*

    PubMed Central

    Chandrachud, Uma; Walker, Mathew W.; Simas, Alexandra M.; Heetveld, Sasja; Petcherski, Anton; Klein, Madeleine; Oh, Hyejin; Wolf, Pavlina; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Norton, Stephanie; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Cotman, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of undigested macromolecules, often disease-specific, is a major feature of lysosomal and neurodegenerative disease and is frequently attributed to defective autophagy. The mechanistic underpinnings of the autophagy defects are the subject of intense research, which is aided by genetic disease models. To gain an improved understanding of the pathways regulating defective autophagy specifically in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or Batten disease), a neurodegenerative disease of childhood, we developed and piloted a GFP-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) screening assay to identify, in an unbiased fashion, genotype-sensitive small molecule autophagy modifiers, employing a JNCL neuronal cell model bearing the most common disease mutation in CLN3. Thapsigargin, a sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) Ca2+ pump inhibitor, reproducibly displayed significantly more activity in the mouse JNCL cells, an effect that was also observed in human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived JNCL neural progenitor cells. The mechanism of thapsigargin sensitivity was Ca2+-mediated, and autophagosome accumulation in JNCL cells could be reversed by Ca2+ chelation. Interrogation of intracellular Ca2+ handling highlighted alterations in endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial, and lysosomal Ca2+ pools and in store-operated Ca2+ uptake in JNCL cells. These results further support an important role for the CLN3 protein in intracellular Ca2+ handling and in autophagic pathway flux and establish a powerful new platform for therapeutic screening. PMID:25878248

  2. A new EEG synchronization strength analysis method: S-estimator based normalized weighted-permutation mutual information.

    PubMed

    Cui, Dong; Pu, Weiting; Liu, Jing; Bian, Zhijie; Li, Qiuli; Wang, Lei; Gu, Guanghua

    2016-10-01

    Synchronization is an important mechanism for understanding information processing in normal or abnormal brains. In this paper, we propose a new method called normalized weighted-permutation mutual information (NWPMI) for double variable signal synchronization analysis and combine NWPMI with S-estimator measure to generate a new method named S-estimator based normalized weighted-permutation mutual information (SNWPMI) for analyzing multi-channel electroencephalographic (EEG) synchronization strength. The performances including the effects of time delay, embedding dimension, coupling coefficients, signal to noise ratios (SNRs) and data length of the NWPMI are evaluated by using Coupled Henon mapping model. The results show that the NWPMI is superior in describing the synchronization compared with the normalized permutation mutual information (NPMI). Furthermore, the proposed SNWPMI method is applied to analyze scalp EEG data from 26 amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects and 20 age-matched controls with normal cognitive function, who both suffer from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The proposed methods NWPMI and SNWPMI are suggested to be an effective index to estimate the synchronization strength. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. a Method of Tomato Image Segmentation Based on Mutual Information and Threshold Iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongxia; Li, Mingxi

    Threshold Segmentation is a kind of important image segmentation method and one of the important preconditioning steps of image detection and recognition, and it has very broad application during the research scopes of the computer vision. According to the internal relation between segment image and original image, a tomato image automatic optimization segmentation method (MI-OPT) which mutual information associate with optimum threshold iteration was presented. Simulation results show that this method has a better image segmentation effect on the tomato images of mature period and little background color difference or different color.

  4. Bases for qudits from a nonstandard approach to SU(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibler, M. R.

    2011-06-01

    Bases of finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces (in dimension d) of relevance for quantum information and quantum computation are constructed from angular momentum theory and su(2) Lie algebraic methods. We report on a formula for deriving in one step the (1 + p) p qupits (i.e., qudits with d = p a prime integer) of a complete set of 1 + p mutually unbiased bases in C p . Repeated application of the formula can be used for generating mutually unbiased bases in C d with d = p e ( e ≥ 2) a power of a prime integer. A connection between mutually unbiased bases and the unitary group SU( d) is briefly discussed in the case d = p e .

  5. Bases for qudits from a nonstandard approach to SU(2)

    SciTech Connect

    Kibler, M. R.

    2011-06-15

    Bases of finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces (in dimension d) of relevance for quantum information and quantum computation are constructed from angular momentum theory and su(2) Lie algebraic methods. We report on a formula for deriving in one step the (1 + p)p qupits (i.e., qudits with d = p a prime integer) of a complete set of 1 + p mutually unbiased bases in C{sup p}. Repeated application of the formula can be used for generating mutually unbiased bases in C{sup d} with d = p{sup e} (e {>=} 2) a power of a prime integer. A connection between mutually unbiased bases and the unitary group SU(d) is briefly discussed in the case d = p{sup e}.

  6. Mutual Adaptaion in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siskin, Leslie Santee

    2016-01-01

    Building on an expanded concept of mutual adaptation, this chapter explores a distinctive and successful aspect of International Baccalaureate's effort to scale up, as they moved to expand their programs and support services in Title I schools. Based on a three-year, mixed-methods study, it offers a case where we see not only local adaptations…

  7. Mutual Adaptaion in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siskin, Leslie Santee

    2016-01-01

    Building on an expanded concept of mutual adaptation, this chapter explores a distinctive and successful aspect of International Baccalaureate's effort to scale up, as they moved to expand their programs and support services in Title I schools. Based on a three-year, mixed-methods study, it offers a case where we see not only local adaptations…

  8. Equilibrium population dynamics when mating is by mutual choice based on age.

    PubMed

    Alpern, Steve; Katrantzi, Ioanna; Ramsey, David

    2014-06-01

    We consider a steady state model of mutual mate choice in which an individual's mate preferences depend on his/her age, and the preferences are over the ages of prospective mates of the opposite sex. We present a discrete time (and age) model corresponding to successive mating seasons. Males are fertile for m periods (corresponding to 'age' i=1 to m) and females for n≤m periods (they have ages j=1 to n), which is all that distinguishes the sexes. Although we can deal with arbitrary preferences, we concentrate on a simple fertility model where the common utility to a male age i and female age j who mate is the number K=min(m-i+1,n-j+1) of future periods of joint fertility. The incoming sex ratio R of age 1 males to age 1 females is given exogenously. In each period individuals are randomly (non assortatively) matched and form a mated couple by mutual consent; otherwise they go into the next period unmated and older. We derive properties of equilibrium threshold acceptance strategies and establish the existence of time-invariant age distributions. Our methods determine the age distribution of couples at marriage (mating) and the population sex ratio (OSR) at equilibrium. Since this can be determined empirically in a population, our model can be used to rule out most systems of age preferences (those not consistent with the observed distribution). This extends earlier models of mutual choice with one dimensional types of Alpern and Reyniers [1999. Strategic mating with homotypic preferences. J. Theor. Biol. 198, 71-88; 2005. Strategic mating with common preferences. J. Theor. Biol. 237, 337-354] where individuals sought, respectively, individuals with similar or high types, but in those models an individual's type was fixed over time. Under the simple fertility model, at equilibrium the maximum age of an acceptable partner is increasing in the age of the searcher. Our results relate to discussions in the literature regarding optimal parental age differences, age

  9. Minimum mutual information based level set clustering algorithm for fast MRI tissue segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shuanglu; Man, Hong; Zhan, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and accelerated MRI tissue recognition is a crucial preprocessing for real-time 3d tissue modeling and medical diagnosis. This paper proposed an information de-correlated clustering algorithm implemented by variational level set method for fast tissue segmentation. The key idea is to design a local correlation term between original image and piecewise constant into the variational framework. The minimized correlation will then lead to de-correlated piecewise regions. Firstly, by introducing a continuous bounded variational domain describing the image, a probabilistic image restoration model is assumed to modify the distortion. Secondly, regional mutual information is introduced to measure the correlation between piecewise regions and original images. As a de-correlated description of the image, piecewise constants are finally solved by numerical approximation and level set evolution. The converged piecewise constants automatically clusters image domain into discriminative regions. The segmentation results show that our algorithm performs well in terms of time consuming, accuracy, convergence and clustering capability.

  10. Feature selection based on fusing mutual information and cross-validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-wei; Liu, Chun-ping; Chen, Ning-qiang; Wang, Zhao-hui

    2009-10-01

    Many algorithms have been proposed in literature for feature selection; unfortunately, none of them ensures a perfect result. Here we propose an adaptive sequential floating forward feature selection algorithm which achieves accuracy results higher than that of already existing algorithms and naturally adaptive for implementation into the number of best feature subset to be selected. The basic idea of the proposed algorithm is to adopt two relatively well-settled algorithms for the problem at hand and combine mutual information and Cross-Validation through suitable fusion techniques, with the aim of taking advantage of the adopted algorithms' capabilities, at the same time, limiting their deficiencies. This method adaptively obtains the number of features to be selected according to dimensions of original feature set, and Dempster-Shafer Evidential Theory is used to fuse Max-Relevance, Min-Redundancy and CVFS. Extensive experiments show that the higher accuracy of classification and the less redundancy of features could be achieved.

  11. Plant-wide process monitoring based on mutual information-multiblock principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qingchao; Yan, Xuefeng

    2014-09-01

    Multiblock principal component analysis (MBPCA) methods are gaining increasing attentions in monitoring plant-wide processes. Generally, MBPCA assumes that some process knowledge is incorporated for block division; however, process knowledge is not always available. A new totally data-driven MBPCA method, which employs mutual information (MI) to divide the blocks automatically, has been proposed. By constructing sub-blocks using MI, the division not only considers linear correlations between variables, but also takes into account non-linear relations thereby involving more statistical information. The PCA models in sub-blocks reflect more local behaviors of process, and the results in all blocks are combined together by support vector data description. The proposed method is implemented on a numerical process and the Tennessee Eastman process. Monitoring results demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency.

  12. Parallel Mutual Information Based Construction of Genome-Scale Networks on the Intel® Xeon Phi™ Coprocessor.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sanchit; Pamnany, Kiran; Aluru, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Construction of whole-genome networks from large-scale gene expression data is an important problem in systems biology. While several techniques have been developed, most cannot handle network reconstruction at the whole-genome scale, and the few that can, require large clusters. In this paper, we present a solution on the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor, taking advantage of its multi-level parallelism including many x86-based cores, multiple threads per core, and vector processing units. We also present a solution on the Intel® Xeon® processor. Our solution is based on TINGe, a fast parallel network reconstruction technique that uses mutual information and permutation testing for assessing statistical significance. We demonstrate the first ever inference of a plant whole genome regulatory network on a single chip by constructing a 15,575 gene network of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana from 3,137 microarray experiments in only 22 minutes. In addition, our optimization for parallelizing mutual information computation on the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor holds out lessons that are applicable to other domains.

  13. Mutual information algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ai-Hua; Huang, Xiu-Chang; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Li, Jun; Zhang, Zhi-Yi; Hua, Hong-Xin

    2010-11-01

    Three new mutual information algorithms are raised for time delay in the phase space reconstruction process. Firstly, Cellucci's mutual information algorithm is analyzed based on partitioning plane, which is constructed by a pair of Lorenz series with the same size, into four and sixteen grids with equal distribution probability in elements on each axis. Then three new mutual information algorithms are promoted based on the original probability matrix that shows the distribution of points corresponding to the data pairs of Lorenz series on the plane, the matrix excluding the last column and the last row of the original one as well as the proportionally revised matrix from the original one. Synchronously, an algorithm to compute the probability matrix is also advanced by sorting two series and replacing each numerical value with its order number in its own series so as to judge the element in which data sets are located. The optimal time delay of the three new mutual information algorithms as well as the computing time is also compared when series sizes are different. Finally, after reconstructing phase space with the optimal time delay, comparison between the maximal Lyapunov exponent calculated by Rosenstein's algorithm from time series and that gained by Jacobi matrix from Lorenz equation is used to confirm the validity of the new mutual information algorithms. The results show that Cellucci's mutual information algorithm will lead to wrong optimal time delay when series size is not a multiple of elements. The three new algorithms, whose results are more steady when a large number of data pairs are used, can not only eliminate the default of Cellucci's algorithm but also is very speedy, and the time spent on calculations by three algorithms nearly enhances linearly with the increase in series size. Moreover, the algorithm using original probability distribution matrix is more accurate than the others when small size series are used, and is also faster than the

  14. Mutual-information-based approach for neural connectivity during self-paced finger lifting task.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chuan; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Wu, Yu-Zu; Lee, Po-Lei; Chen, Shyan-Shiou; Niddam, David M; Yeh, Tzu-Chen; Wu, Yu-Te

    2008-03-01

    Frequency-dependent modulation between neuronal assemblies may provide insightful mechanisms of functional organization in the context of neural connectivity. We present a conjoined time-frequency cross mutual information (TFCMI) method to explore the subtle brain neural connectivity by magnetoencephalography (MEG) during a self-paced finger lifting task. Surface electromyogram (sEMG) was obtained from the extensor digitorum communis. Both within-modality (MEG-MEG) and between-modality studies (sEMG-MEG) were conducted. The TFCMI method measures both the linear and nonlinear dependencies of the temporal dynamics of signal power within a pre-specified frequency band. Each single trial of MEG across channels and sEMG signals was transformed into time-frequency domain with use of the Morlet wavelet to obtain better temporal spectral (power) information. As compared to coherence approach (linear dependency only) in broadband analysis, the TFCMI method demonstrated advantages in encompassing detection for the mesial frontocentral cortex and bilateral primary sensorimotor areas, clear demarcation of event- and non-event-related regions, and robustness for sEMG - MEG between-modality study, i.e., corticomuscular communication. We conclude that this novel TFCMI method promises a possibility to better unravel the intricate functional organizations of brain in the context of oscillation-coded communication.

  15. Tbits/s physical random bit generation based on mutually coupled semiconductor laser chaotic entropy source.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xi; Wu, Zheng-Mao; Wu, Jia-Gui; Deng, Tao; Chen, Jian-Jun; Fan, Li; Zhong, Zhu-Qiang; Xia, Guang-Qiong

    2015-12-28

    Using two mutually coupled semiconductor lasers (MC-SLs) outputs as chaotic entropy sources, a scheme for generating Tbits/s ultra-fast physical random bit (PRB) is demonstrated and analyzed experimentally. Firstly, two entropy sources originating from two chaotic outputs of MC-SLs are obtained in parallel. Secondly, by adopting multiple optimized post-processing methods, two PRB streams with the generation rate of 0.56 Tbits/s are extracted from the two entropy sources and their randomness are verified by using NIST Special Publication 800-22 statistical tests. Through merging the two sets of 0.56 Tbits/s PRB streams by an interleaving operation, a third set of 1.12 Tbits/s PRB stream, which meets all the quality criteria of NIST statistical tests, can be further acquired. Finally, after additionally taking into account the restriction of the min-entropy, the generation rate of two sets of PRB stream from the two entropy sources can still attain 0.48 Tbits/s, and then a third set of merging PRB stream is 0.96 Tbits/s. Moreover, for the sequence length of the order of 10 Gbits, the statistical bias and serial correlation coefficient of three sets of PRB streams are also analyzed.

  16. Unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids.

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    We use a statistical-mechanical identity closely related to the familiar virial theorem, to derive unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids. In particular, we obtain estimators for both the fluid density rho(r) in the vicinity of a fixed solute and the pair correlation g(r) of a homogeneous classical fluid. We illustrate the utility of our estimators with numerical examples, which reveal advantages over traditional histogram-based methods of computing such distributions.

  17. Discovering Genome-Wide Tag SNPs Based on the Mutual Information of the Variants

    PubMed Central

    Elmas, Abdulkadir; Ou Yang, Tai-Hsien; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Exploring linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns among the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites can improve the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of genomic association studies, whereby representative (tag) SNPs are identified to sufficiently represent the genomic diversity in populations. There has been considerable amount of effort in developing efficient algorithms to select tag SNPs from the growing large-scale data sets. Methods using the classical pairwise-LD and multi-locus LD measures have been proposed that aim to reduce the computational complexity and to increase the accuracy, respectively. The present work solves the tag SNP selection problem by efficiently balancing the computational complexity and accuracy, and improves the coverage in genomic diversity in a cost-effective manner. The employed algorithm makes use of mutual information to explore the multi-locus association between SNPs and can handle different data types and conditions. Experiments with benchmark HapMap data sets show comparable or better performance against the state-of-the-art algorithms. In particular, as a novel application, the genome-wide SNP tagging is performed in the 1000 Genomes Project data sets, and produced a well-annotated database of tagging variants that capture the common genotype diversity in 2,504 samples from 26 human populations. Compared to conventional methods, the algorithm requires as input only the genotype (or haplotype) sequences, can scale up to genome-wide analyses, and produces accurate solutions with more information-rich output, providing an improved platform for researchers towards the subsequent association studies. PMID:27992465

  18. Efficient and Unbiased Estimation of Population Size

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marcos; Gómez, Domingo; Cruz-Orive, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Population sizing from still aerial pictures is of wide applicability in ecological and social sciences. The problem is long standing because current automatic detection and counting algorithms are known to fail in most cases, and exhaustive manual counting is tedious, slow, difficult to verify and unfeasible for large populations. An alternative is to multiply population density with some reference area but, unfortunately, sampling details, handling of edge effects, etc., are seldom described. For the first time we address the problem using principles of geometric sampling. These principles are old and solid, but largely unknown outside the areas of three dimensional microscopy and stereology. Here we adapt them to estimate the size of any population of individuals lying on an essentially planar area, e.g. people, animals, trees on a savanna, etc. The proposed design is unbiased irrespective of population size, pattern, perspective artifacts, etc. The implementation is very simple—it is based on the random superimposition of coarse quadrat grids. Also, an objective error assessment is often lacking. For the latter purpose the quadrat counts are often assumed to be independent. We demonstrate that this approach can perform very poorly, and we propose (and check via Monte Carlo resampling) a new theoretical error prediction formula. As far as efficiency, counting about 50 (100) individuals in 20 quadrats, can yield relative standard errors of about 8% (5%) in typical cases. This fact effectively breaks the barrier hitherto imposed by the current lack of automatic face detection algorithms, because semiautomatic sampling and manual counting becomes an attractive option. PMID:26535587

  19. Registration of PET and CT images based on multiresolution gradient of mutual information demons algorithm for positioning esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shuo; Li, Dengwang; Wang, Hongjun; Yin, Yong

    2013-01-07

    Accurate registration of 18F-FDG PET (positron emission tomography) and CT (computed tomography) images has important clinical significance in radiation oncology. PET and CT images are acquired from (18)F-FDG PET/CT scanner, but the two acquisition processes are separate and take a long time. As a result, there are position errors in global and deformable errors in local caused by respiratory movement or organ peristalsis. The purpose of this work was to implement and validate a deformable CT to PET image registration method in esophageal cancer to eventually facilitate accurate positioning the tumor target on CT, and improve the accuracy of radiation therapy. Global registration was firstly utilized to preprocess position errors between PET and CT images, achieving the purpose of aligning these two images on the whole. Demons algorithm, based on optical flow field, has the features of fast process speed and high accuracy, and the gradient of mutual information-based demons (GMI demons) algorithm adds an additional external force based on the gradient of mutual information (GMI) between two images, which is suitable for multimodality images registration. In this paper, GMI demons algorithm was used to achieve local deformable registration of PET and CT images, which can effectively reduce errors between internal organs. In addition, to speed up the registration process, maintain its robustness, and avoid the local extremum, multiresolution image pyramid structure was used before deformable registration. By quantitatively and qualitatively analyzing cases with esophageal cancer, the registration scheme proposed in this paper can improve registration accuracy and speed, which is helpful for precisely positioning tumor target and developing the radiation treatment planning in clinical radiation therapy application.

  20. An Advanced Temporal Credential-Based Security Scheme with Mutual Authentication and Key Agreement for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Ta; Weng, Chi-Yao; Lee, Cheng-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) can be quickly and randomly deployed in any harsh and unattended environment and only authorized users are allowed to access reliable sensor nodes in WSNs with the aid of gateways (GWNs). Secure authentication models among the users, the sensor nodes and GWN are important research issues for ensuring communication security and data privacy in WSNs. In 2013, Xue et al. proposed a temporal-credential-based mutual authentication and key agreement scheme for WSNs. However, in this paper, we point out that Xue et al.'s scheme cannot resist stolen-verifier, insider, off-line password guessing, smart card lost problem and many logged-in users' attacks and these security weaknesses make the scheme inapplicable to practical WSN applications. To tackle these problems, we suggest a simple countermeasure to prevent proposed attacks while the other merits of Xue et al.'s authentication scheme are left unchanged. PMID:23887085

  1. An advanced temporal credential-based security scheme with mutual authentication and key agreement for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Ta; Weng, Chi-Yao; Lee, Cheng-Chi

    2013-07-24

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) can be quickly and randomly deployed in any harsh and unattended environment and only authorized users are allowed to access reliable sensor nodes in WSNs with the aid of gateways (GWNs). Secure authentication models among the users, the sensor nodes and GWN are important research issues for ensuring communication security and data privacy in WSNs. In 2013, Xue et al. proposed a temporal-credential-based mutual authentication and key agreement scheme for WSNs. However, in this paper, we point out that Xue et al.'s scheme cannot resist stolen-verifier, insider, off-line password guessing, smart card lost problem and many logged-in users' attacks and these security weaknesses make the scheme inapplicable to practical WSN applications. To tackle these problems, we suggest a simple countermeasure to prevent proposed attacks while the other merits of Xue et al.'s authentication scheme are left unchanged.

  2. A novel mutual information-based Boolean network inference method from time-series gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Shohag; Kwon, Yung-Keun

    2017-01-01

    Background Inferring a gene regulatory network from time-series gene expression data in systems biology is a challenging problem. Many methods have been suggested, most of which have a scalability limitation due to the combinatorial cost of searching a regulatory set of genes. In addition, they have focused on the accurate inference of a network structure only. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop a network inference method to search regulatory genes efficiently and to predict the network dynamics accurately. Results In this study, we employed a Boolean network model with a restricted update rule scheme to capture coarse-grained dynamics, and propose a novel mutual information-based Boolean network inference (MIBNI) method. Given time-series gene expression data as an input, the method first identifies a set of initial regulatory genes using mutual information-based feature selection, and then improves the dynamics prediction accuracy by iteratively swapping a pair of genes between sets of the selected regulatory genes and the other genes. Through extensive simulations with artificial datasets, MIBNI showed consistently better performance than six well-known existing methods, REVEAL, Best-Fit, RelNet, CST, CLR, and BIBN in terms of both structural and dynamics prediction accuracy. We further tested the proposed method with two real gene expression datasets for an Escherichia coli gene regulatory network and a fission yeast cell cycle network, and also observed better results using MIBNI compared to the six other methods. Conclusions Taken together, MIBNI is a promising tool for predicting both the structure and the dynamics of a gene regulatory network. PMID:28178334

  3. Unbiased Estimation of Refractive State of Aberrated Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jesson; Vasudevan, Balamurali; Himebaugh, Nikole; Bradley, Arthur; Thibos, Larry

    2011-01-01

    To identify unbiased methods for estimating the target vergence required to maximize visual acuity based on wavefront aberration measurements. Experiments were designed to minimize the impact of confounding factors that have hampered previous research. Objective wavefront refractions and subjective acuity refractions were obtained for the same monochromatic wavelength. Accommodation and pupil fluctuations were eliminated by cycloplegia. Unbiased subjective refractions that maximize visual acuity for high contrast letters were performed with a computer controlled forced choice staircase procedure, using 0.125 diopter steps of defocus. All experiments were performed for two pupil diameters (3mm and 6mm). As reported in the literature, subjective refractive error does not change appreciably when the pupil dilates. For 3 mm pupils most metrics yielded objective refractions that were about 0.1D more hyperopic than subjective acuity refractions. When pupil diameter increased to 6 mm, this bias changed in the myopic direction and the variability between metrics also increased. These inaccuracies were small compared to the precision of the measurements, which implies that most metrics provided unbiased estimates of refractive state for medium and large pupils. A variety of image quality metrics may be used to determine ocular refractive state for monochromatic (635nm) light, thereby achieving accurate results without the need for empirical correction factors. PMID:21777601

  4. Mutual information-based template matching scheme for detection of breast masses: from mammography to digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mazurowski, Maciej A; Lo, Joseph Y; Harrawood, Brian P; Tourassi, Georgia D

    2011-10-01

    Development of a computational decision aid for a new medical imaging modality typically is a long and complicated process. It consists of collecting data in the form of images and annotations, development of image processing and pattern recognition algorithms for analysis of the new images and finally testing of the resulting system. Since new imaging modalities are developed more rapidly than ever before, any effort for decreasing the time and cost of this development process could result in maximizing the benefit of the new imaging modality to patients by making the computer aids quickly available to radiologists that interpret the images. In this paper, we make a step in this direction and investigate the possibility of translating the knowledge about the detection problem from one imaging modality to another. Specifically, we present a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for mammographic masses that uses a mutual information-based template matching scheme with intelligently selected templates. We presented principles of template matching with mutual information for mammography before. In this paper, we present an implementation of those principles in a complete computer-aided detection system. The proposed system, through an automatic optimization process, chooses the most useful templates (mammographic regions of interest) using a large database of previously collected and annotated mammograms. Through this process, the knowledge about the task of detecting masses in mammograms is incorporated in the system. Then, we evaluate whether our system developed for screen-film mammograms can be successfully applied not only to other mammograms but also to digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructed slices without adding any DBT cases for training. Our rationale is that since mutual information is known to be a robust inter-modality image similarity measure, it has high potential of transferring knowledge between modalities in the context of the mass detection

  5. Reconciliation and Transformation through Mutual Learning: Outlining a Framework for Arts-Based Service Learning with Indigenous Communities in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartleet, Brydie-Leigh; Bennett, Dawn; Marsh, Kathryn; Power, Anne; Sunderland, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Service learning is described as a socially just educational process that develops two-way learning and social outcomes for community and student participants. Despite the focus on mutuality in service learning, very little of this literature specifically deals with the intense importance of mutuality and reciprocity when working with Indigenous…

  6. Mutual exclusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1991-01-01

    Almost all computers today operate as part of a network, where they assist people in coordinating actions. Sometimes what appears to be a single computer is actually a network of cooperating computers; e.g., some supercomputers consist of many processors operating in parallel and exchanging synchronization signals. One of the most fundamental requirements in all these systems is that certain operations be indivisible: the steps of one must not be interleaved with the steps of another. Two approaches were designed to implement this requirement, one based on central locks and the other on distributed order tickets. Practicing scientists and engineers need to come to be familiar with these methods.

  7. A Support Method with Changeable Training Strategies Based on Mutual Adaptation between a Ubiquitous Pet and a Learner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xianzhi; Jing, Lei; Kansen, Mizuo; Wang, Junbo; Ota, Kaoru; Cheng, Zixue

    With the progress of ubiquitous technology, ubiquitous learning presents new opportunities to learners. Situations of a learner can be grasped through analyzing the learner's actions collected by sensors, RF-IDs, or cameras in order to provide support at proper time, proper place, and proper situation. Training for acquiring skills and enhancing physical abilities through exercise and experience in the real world is an important domain in u-learning. A training program may last for several days and has one or more training units (exercises) for a day. A learner's performance in a unit is considered as short term state. The performance in a series of units may change with patterns: progress, plateau, and decline. Long term state in a series of units is accumulatively computed based on short term states. In a learning/training program, it is necessary to apply different support strategies to adapt to different states of the learner. Adaptation in learning support is significant, because a learner loses his/her interests easily without adaptation. Systems with the adaptive support usually provide stimulators to a learner, and a learner can have a great motivation in learning at beginning. However, when the stimulators reach some levels, the learner may lose his/her motivation, because the long term state of the learner changes dynamically, which means a progress state may change to a plateau state or a decline state. In different long term learning states, different types of stimulators are needed. However, the stimulators and advice provided by the existing systems are monotonic without changeable support strategies. We propose a mutual adaptive support. The mutual adaptation means each of the system and the learner has their own states. On one hand, the system tries to change its state to adapt to the learner's state for providing adaptive support. On the other hand, the learner can change its performance following the advice given based on the state of the system

  8. Design of a mutual authentication based on NTRUsign with a perturbation and inherent multipoint control protocol frames in an Ethernet-based passive optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Aihan; Ding, Yisheng

    2014-11-01

    Identity-related security issues inherently present in passive optical networks (PON) still exist in the current (1G) and next-generation (10G) Ethernet-based passive optical network (EPON) systems. We propose a mutual authentication scheme that integrates an NTRUsign digital signature algorithm with inherent multipoint control protocol (MPCP) frames over an EPON system between the optical line terminal (OLT) and optical network unit (ONU). Here, a primitive NTRUsign algorithm is significantly modified through the use of a new perturbation so that it can be effectively used for simultaneously completing signature and authentication functions on the OLT and the ONU sides. Also, in order to transmit their individual sensitive messages, which include public key, signature, and random value and so forth, to each other, we redefine three unique frames according to MPCP format frame. These generated messages can be added into the frames and delivered to each other, allowing the OLT and the ONU to go ahead with a mutual identity authentication process to verify their legal identities. Our simulation results show that this proposed scheme performs very well in resisting security attacks and has low influence on the registration efficiency to to-be-registered ONUs. A performance comparison with traditional authentication algorithms is also presented. To the best of our knowledge, no detailed design of mutual authentication in EPON can be found in the literature up to now.

  9. A hash based mutual RFID tag authentication protocol in telecare medicine information system.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Keerti; Awasthi, Amit K; Kaul, Sonam D; Mittal, R C

    2015-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a technology which has multidimensional applications to reduce the complexity of today life. Everywhere, like access control, transportation, real-time inventory, asset management and automated payment systems etc., RFID has its enormous use. Recently, this technology is opening its wings in healthcare environments, where potential applications include patient monitoring, object traceability and drug administration systems etc. In this paper, we propose a secure RFID-based protocol for the medical sector. This protocol is based on hash operation with synchronized secret. The protocol is safe against active and passive attacks such as forgery, traceability, replay and de-synchronization attack.

  10. Using a Search Engine-Based Mutually Reinforcing Approach to Assess the Semantic Relatedness of Biomedical Terms

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yi-Yu; Chen, Hung-Yu; Kao, Hung-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Background Determining the semantic relatedness of two biomedical terms is an important task for many text-mining applications in the biomedical field. Previous studies, such as those using ontology-based and corpus-based approaches, measured semantic relatedness by using information from the structure of biomedical literature, but these methods are limited by the small size of training resources. To increase the size of training datasets, the outputs of search engines have been used extensively to analyze the lexical patterns of biomedical terms. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we propose the Mutually Reinforcing Lexical Pattern Ranking (ReLPR) algorithm for learning and exploring the lexical patterns of synonym pairs in biomedical text. ReLPR employs lexical patterns and their pattern containers to assess the semantic relatedness of biomedical terms. By combining sentence structures and the linking activities between containers and lexical patterns, our algorithm can explore the correlation between two biomedical terms. Conclusions/Significance The average correlation coefficient of the ReLPR algorithm was 0.82 for various datasets. The results of the ReLPR algorithm were significantly superior to those of previous methods. PMID:24348899

  11. Using a search engine-based mutually reinforcing approach to assess the semantic relatedness of biomedical terms.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Yu; Chen, Hung-Yu; Kao, Hung-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Determining the semantic relatedness of two biomedical terms is an important task for many text-mining applications in the biomedical field. Previous studies, such as those using ontology-based and corpus-based approaches, measured semantic relatedness by using information from the structure of biomedical literature, but these methods are limited by the small size of training resources. To increase the size of training datasets, the outputs of search engines have been used extensively to analyze the lexical patterns of biomedical terms. In this work, we propose the Mutually Reinforcing Lexical Pattern Ranking (ReLPR) algorithm for learning and exploring the lexical patterns of synonym pairs in biomedical text. ReLPR employs lexical patterns and their pattern containers to assess the semantic relatedness of biomedical terms. By combining sentence structures and the linking activities between containers and lexical patterns, our algorithm can explore the correlation between two biomedical terms. The average correlation coefficient of the ReLPR algorithm was 0.82 for various datasets. The results of the ReLPR algorithm were significantly superior to those of previous methods.

  12. Estimating the mutual information of an EEG-based Brain-Computer Interface.

    PubMed

    Schlögl, A; Neuper, C; Pfurtscheller, G

    2002-01-01

    An EEG-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) could be used as an additional communication channel between human thoughts and the environment. The efficacy of such a BCI depends mainly on the transmitted information rate. Shannon's communication theory was used to quantify the information rate of BCI data. For this purpose, experimental EEG data from four BCI experiments was analyzed off-line. Subjects imaginated left and right hand movements during EEG recording from the sensorimotor area. Adaptive autoregressive (AAR) parameters were used as features of single trial EEG and classified with linear discriminant analysis. The intra-trial variation as well as the inter-trial variability, the signal-to-noise ratio, the entropy of information, and the information rate were estimated. The entropy difference was used as a measure of the separability of two classes of EEG patterns.

  13. Cross-kingdom chemical communication drives a heritable, mutually beneficial prion-based transformation of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jarosz, Daniel F; Brown, Jessica C S; Walker, Gordon A; Datta, Manoshi S; Ung, W Lloyd; Lancaster, Alex K; Rotem, Assaf; Chang, Amelia; Newby, Gregory A; Weitz, David A; Bisson, Linda F; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-08-28

    In experimental science, organisms are usually studied in isolation, but in the wild, they compete and cooperate in complex communities. We report a system for cross-kingdom communication by which bacteria heritably transform yeast metabolism. An ancient biological circuit blocks yeast from using other carbon sources in the presence of glucose. [GAR(+)], a protein-based epigenetic element, allows yeast to circumvent this "glucose repression" and use multiple carbon sources in the presence of glucose. Some bacteria secrete a chemical factor that induces [GAR(+)]. [GAR(+)] is advantageous to bacteria because yeast cells make less ethanol and is advantageous to yeast because their growth and long-term viability is improved in complex carbon sources. This cross-kingdom communication is broadly conserved, providing a compelling argument for its adaptive value. By heritably transforming growth and survival strategies in response to the selective pressures of life in a biological community, [GAR(+)] presents a unique example of Lamarckian inheritance.

  14. A web-based care-requiring client and Home Helper mutual support system.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hidekuni; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Hahn, Allen W; Caldwell, W Morton

    2005-01-01

    For the improved efficiency of home care of the elderly, a web-based system has been developed to enable faster communications between care-requiring clients, their Home Helper and the care manager. Changes to care items, such as cooking, bathing, washing, cleaning and shopping are usually requested by the elderly client over the telephone. However, the care central office often requires 24 hours to process and respond to such spoken requests. The system we have developed consists of Internet client computers with liquid crystal input tablets, wireless Internet Java enabled mobile phones and a central office server that yields almost instant communication. The care clients enter requests on the liquid crystal tablet at their home and then their computer sends these requests to the server at the Home Helper central office. The server automatically creates a new file of the requested items, and then immediately transfers them to the care manager and Home Helper's mobile phone. With this non-vocal and paperless system, the care-requiring clients, who can easily operate the liquid crystal tablet, can very quickly communicate their needed care change requests to their Home Helper.

  15. [Construction and simplification of the calibration model for spectral analysis of fuel oil properties based on mutual information method].

    PubMed

    Hao, Yong; Sun, Xu-dong; Cai, Li-jun; Liu, Yan-de

    2012-01-01

    Near infrared diffuse reflectance (NIRS) and ultraviolet (UV) spectral analysis were adopted for quantitative determination of octane number and monoaromatics in fuel oil. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was used for construction of vibrational spectral calibration models. Variables selection strategy based on mutual information (MI) theory was introduced to optimize the models for improving the precision and reducing the complexity. The results indicate that MI-PLSR method can effectively improve the predictive ability of the models and simplify them. For octane number models, the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and the number of calibration variables were reduced from 0.288 and 401 to 0.111 and 112, respectively, and correlation coefficient (R) was improved from 0.985 to 0.998. For monoaromatics models, RMSEP and the number of calibration variables were reduced from 0.753 and 572 to 0.478 and 37, respectively, and R was improved from 0.996 to 0.998. Vibrational spectral analysis combined with MI-PLSR method can be used for quantitative analysis of fuel oil properties, and improve the cost-effectiveness.

  16. Linear and nonlinear information flow based on time-delayed mutual information method and its application to corticomuscular interaction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Lin, Peter; Hallett, Mark

    2010-03-01

    To propose a model-free method to show linear and nonlinear information flow based on time-delayed mutual information (TDMI) by employing uni- and bi-variate surrogate tests and to investigate whether there are contributions of the nonlinear information flow in corticomuscular (CM) interaction. Using simulated data, we tested whether our method would successfully detect the direction of information flow and identify a relationship between two simulated time series. As an experimental data application, we applied this method to investigate CM interaction during a right wrist extension task. Results of simulation tests show that we can correctly detect the direction of information flow and the relationship between two time series without a prior knowledge of the dynamics of their generating systems. As experimental results, we found both linear and nonlinear information flow from contralateral sensorimotor cortex to muscle. Our method is a viable model-free measure of temporally varying causal interactions that is capable of distinguishing linear and nonlinear information flow. With respect to experimental application, there are both linear and nonlinear information flows in CM interaction from contralateral sensorimotor cortex to muscle, which may reflect the motor command from brain to muscle. This is the first study to show separate linear and nonlinear information flow in CM interaction.

  17. Mutual-information-based image to patient re-registration using intraoperative ultrasound in image-guided neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Songbai; Wu, Ziji; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2008-01-01

    An image-based re-registration scheme has been developed and evaluated that uses fiducial registration as a starting point to maximize the normalized mutual information (nMI) between intraoperative ultrasound (iUS) and preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR). We show that this scheme significantly (p⪡0.001) reduces tumor boundary misalignment between iUS pre-durotomy and pMR from an average of 2.5 mm to 1.0 mm in six resection surgeries. The corrected tumor alignment before dural opening provides a more accurate reference for assessing subsequent intraoperative tumor displacement, which is important for brain shift compensation as surgery progresses. In addition, we report the translational and rotational capture ranges necessary for successful convergence of the nMI registration technique (5.9 mm and 5.2 deg, respectively). The proposed scheme is automatic, sufficiently robust, and computationally efficient (<2 min), and holds promise for routine clinical use in the operating room during image-guided neurosurgical procedures. PMID:18975707

  18. Unbiased sampling of lattice Hamilton path ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Marc L.

    2006-10-01

    Hamilton paths, or Hamiltonian paths, are walks on a lattice which visit each site exactly once. They have been proposed as models of globular proteins and of compact polymers. A previously published algorithm [Mansfield, Macromolecules 27, 5924 (1994)] for sampling Hamilton paths on simple square and simple cubic lattices is tested for bias and for efficiency. Because the algorithm is a Metropolis Monte Carlo technique obviously satisfying detailed balance, we need only demonstrate ergodicity to ensure unbiased sampling. Two different tests for ergodicity (exact enumeration on small lattices, nonexhaustive enumeration on larger lattices) demonstrate ergodicity unequivocally for small lattices and provide strong support for ergodicity on larger lattices. Two other sampling algorithms [Ramakrishnan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 7592 (1995); Lua et al., Polymer 45, 717 (2004)] are both known to produce biases on both 2×2×2 and 3×3×3 lattices, but it is shown here that the current algorithm gives unbiased sampling on these same lattices. Successive Hamilton paths are strongly correlated, so that many iterations are required between statistically independent samples. Rules for estimating the number of iterations needed to dissipate these correlations are given. However, the iteration time is so fast that the efficiency is still very good except on extremely large lattices. For example, even on lattices of total size 10×10×10 we are able to generate tens of thousands of uncorrelated Hamilton paths per hour of CPU time.

  19. SU-E-J-132: Automated Segmentation with Post-Registration Atlas Selection Based On Mutual Information

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X; Gao, H; Sharp, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The delineation of targets and organs-at-risk is a critical step during image-guided radiation therapy, for which manual contouring is the gold standard. However, it is often time-consuming and may suffer from intra- and inter-rater variability. The purpose of this work is to investigate the automated segmentation. Methods: The automatic segmentation here is based on mutual information (MI), with the atlas from Public Domain Database for Computational Anatomy (PDDCA) with manually drawn contours.Using dice coefficient (DC) as the quantitative measure of segmentation accuracy, we perform leave-one-out cross-validations for all PDDCA images sequentially, during which other images are registered to each chosen image and DC is computed between registered contour and ground truth. Meanwhile, six strategies, including MI, are selected to measure the image similarity, with MI to be the best. Then given a target image to be segmented and an atlas, automatic segmentation consists of: (a) the affine registration step for image positioning; (b) the active demons registration method to register the atlas to the target image; (c) the computation of MI values between the deformed atlas and the target image; (d) the weighted image fusion of three deformed atlas images with highest MI values to form the segmented contour. Results: MI was found to be the best among six studied strategies in the sense that it had the highest positive correlation between similarity measure (e.g., MI values) and DC. For automated segmentation, the weighted image fusion of three deformed atlas images with highest MI values provided the highest DC among four proposed strategies. Conclusion: MI has the highest correlation with DC, and therefore is an appropriate choice for post-registration atlas selection in atlas-based segmentation. Xuhua Ren and Hao Gao were partially supported by the NSFC (#11405105), the 973 Program (#2015CB856000) and the Shanghai Pujiang Talent Program (#14PJ1404500)

  20. Mutual information based CT registration of the lung at exhale and inhale breathing states using thin-plate splines.

    PubMed

    Coselmon, Martha M; Balter, James M; McShan, Daniel L; Kessler, Marc L

    2004-11-01

    The advent of dynamic radiotherapy modeling and treatment techniques requires an infrastructure to weigh the merits of various interventions (breath holding, gating, tracking). The creation of treatment planning models that account for motion and deformation can allow the relative worth of such techniques to be evaluated. In order to develop a treatment planning model of a moving and deforming organ such as the lung, registration tools that account for deformation are required. We tested the accuracy of a mutual information based image registration tool using thin-plate splines driven by the selection of control points and iterative alignment according to a simplex algorithm. Eleven patients each had sequential CT scans at breath-held normal inhale and exhale states. The exhale right lung was segmented from CT and served as the reference model. For each patient, thirty control points were used to align the inhale CT right lung to the exhale CT right lung. Alignment accuracy (the standard deviation of the difference in the actual and predicted inhale position) was determined from locations of vascular and bronchial bifurcations, and found to be 1.7, 3.1, and 3.6 mm about the RL, AP, and IS directions. The alignment accuracy was significantly different from the amount of measured movement during breathing only in the AP and IS directions. The accuracy of alignment including thin-plate splines was more accurate than using affine transformations and the same iteration and scoring methodology. This technique shows promise for the future development of dynamic models of the lung for use in four-dimensional (4-D) treatment planning.

  1. Two Phase Non-Rigid Multi-Modal Image Registration Using Weber Local Descriptor-Based Similarity Metrics and Normalized Mutual Information

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Yi; Hu, Jiani

    2013-01-01

    Non-rigid multi-modal image registration plays an important role in medical image processing and analysis. Existing image registration methods based on similarity metrics such as mutual information (MI) and sum of squared differences (SSD) cannot achieve either high registration accuracy or high registration efficiency. To address this problem, we propose a novel two phase non-rigid multi-modal image registration method by combining Weber local descriptor (WLD) based similarity metrics with the normalized mutual information (NMI) using the diffeomorphic free-form deformation (FFD) model. The first phase aims at recovering the large deformation component using the WLD based non-local SSD (wldNSSD) or weighted structural similarity (wldWSSIM). Based on the output of the former phase, the second phase is focused on getting accurate transformation parameters related to the small deformation using the NMI. Extensive experiments on T1, T2 and PD weighted MR images demonstrate that the proposed wldNSSD-NMI or wldWSSIM-NMI method outperforms the registration methods based on the NMI, the conditional mutual information (CMI), the SSD on entropy images (ESSD) and the ESSD-NMI in terms of registration accuracy and computation efficiency. PMID:23765270

  2. Decision rules for unbiased inventory estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argentiero, P. D.; Koch, D.

    1979-01-01

    An efficient and accurate procedure for estimating inventories from remote sensing scenes is presented. In place of the conventional and expensive full dimensional Bayes decision rule, a one-dimensional feature extraction and classification technique was employed. It is shown that this efficient decision rule can be used to develop unbiased inventory estimates and that for large sample sizes typical of satellite derived remote sensing scenes, resulting accuracies are comparable or superior to more expensive alternative procedures. Mathematical details of the procedure are provided in the body of the report and in the appendix. Results of a numerical simulation of the technique using statistics obtained from an observed LANDSAT scene are included. The simulation demonstrates the effectiveness of the technique in computing accurate inventory estimates.

  3. Clustering of individuals given SNPs similarity based on normalized mutual information: F7 SNPs in the GAIT sample.

    PubMed

    Perera, Alexandre; Buil, Alfonso; Di Bernardo, Maria Chiara; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Pattini, Linda; Souto, Juan Carlos; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Vallverdu, Montserrat; Soria, Jose Manuel; Caminal, Pere

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes the clustering of individuals given their genotype using a normalized Mutual Information dissimilarity distance. This method is applied to a Single Nucleotyde Polymorphism set belonging to F7 gene, uncovering the intrinsic genetic variability on one Spanish population. This genetic variability corresponds to results published using a complete different approach in population genetics literature. Identified groups are shown to express significant differences in the level of FVII concentration.

  4. Unbiased Deep Sequencing of RNA Viruses from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Matranga, Christian B.; Gladden-Young, Adrianne; Qu, James; Winnicki, Sarah; Nosamiefan, Dolo; Levin, Joshua Z.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2016-01-01

    Here we outline a next-generation RNA sequencing protocol that enables de novo assemblies and intra-host variant calls of viral genomes collected from clinical and biological sources. The method is unbiased and universal; it uses random primers for cDNA synthesis and requires no prior knowledge of the viral sequence content. Before library construction, selective RNase H-based digestion is used to deplete unwanted RNA — including poly(rA) carrier and ribosomal RNA — from the viral RNA sample. Selective depletion improves both the data quality and the number of unique reads in viral RNA sequencing libraries. Moreover, a transposase-based 'tagmentation' step is used in the protocol as it reduces overall library construction time. The protocol has enabled rapid deep sequencing of over 600 Lassa and Ebola virus samples-including collections from both blood and tissue isolates-and is broadly applicable to other microbial genomics studies. PMID:27403729

  5. A Note on the Unbiased Estimation of the Intraclass Correlation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoghue, John R.; Collins, Linda M.

    1990-01-01

    I. Olkin and J. W. Pratt (1958) derived the minimum variance unbiased estimator of intraclass correlation, but use of the estimator has been impeded by lack of a closed form solution. The unbiased estimator is reviewed, and a FORTRAN-77 subroutine (UNBIAS) is proposed to calculate the estimator. (SLD)

  6. Unbiased simulation of near-Clifford quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennink, Ryan S.; Ferragut, Erik M.; Humble, Travis S.; Laska, Jason A.; Nutaro, James J.; Pleszkoch, Mark G.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2017-06-01

    Modeling and simulation are essential for predicting and verifying the behavior of fabricated quantum circuits, but existing simulation methods are either impractically costly or require an unrealistic simplification of error processes. We present a method of simulating noisy Clifford circuits that is both accurate and practical in experimentally relevant regimes. In particular, the cost is weakly exponential in the size and the degree of non-Cliffordness of the circuit. Our approach is based on the construction of exact representations of quantum channels as quasiprobability distributions over stabilizer operations, which are then sampled, simulated, and weighted to yield unbiased statistical estimates of circuit outputs and other observables. As a demonstration of these techniques, we simulate a Steane [[7,1,3

  7. Unbiased approaches to biomarker discovery in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Plotkin, Alice S.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and frontotemporal dementia have several important features in common. They are progressive, they affect a relatively inaccessible organ, and we have no disease-modifying therapies for them. For these brain-based diseases, current diagnosis and evaluation of disease severity rely almost entirely on clinical examination, which may only be a rough approximation of disease state. Thus, the development of biomarkers – objective, relatively easily measured and precise indicators of pathogenic processes – could improve patient care and accelerate therapeutic discovery. Yet existing, rigorously tested neurodegenerative disease biomarkers are few, and even fewer biomarkers have translated into clinical use. To find new biomarkers for these diseases, an unbiased, high-throughput screening approach may be needed. In this review, I will describe the potential utility of such an approach to biomarker discovery, using Parkinson’s disease as a case example. PMID:25442938

  8. Evolution of mutualism between species

    SciTech Connect

    Post, W.M.; Travis, C.C.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent theoretical work on mutualism, the interaction between species populations that is mutually beneficial, is reviewed. Several ecological facts that should be addressed in the construction of dynamic models for mutualism are examined. Basic terminology is clarified. (PSB)

  9. Why mutual helping in most natural systems is neither conflict-free nor based on maximal conflict.

    PubMed

    Bshary, Redouan; Zuberbühler, Klaus; van Schaik, Carel P

    2016-02-05

    Mutual helping for direct benefits can be explained by various game theoretical models, which differ mainly in terms of the underlying conflict of interest between two partners. Conflict is minimal if helping is self-serving and the partner benefits as a by-product. In contrast, conflict is maximal if partners are in a prisoner's dilemma with both having the pay-off-dominant option of not returning the other's investment. Here, we provide evolutionary and ecological arguments for why these two extremes are often unstable under natural conditions and propose that interactions with intermediate levels of conflict are frequent evolutionary endpoints. We argue that by-product helping is prone to becoming an asymmetric investment game since even small variation in by-product benefits will lead to the evolution of partner choice, leading to investments by the chosen class. Second, iterated prisoner's dilemmas tend to take place in stable social groups where the fitness of partners is interdependent, with the effect that a certain level of helping is self-serving. In sum, intermediate levels of mutual helping are expected in nature, while efficient partner monitoring may allow reaching higher levels. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Why mutual helping in most natural systems is neither conflict-free nor based on maximal conflict

    PubMed Central

    Bshary, Redouan; Zuberbühler, Klaus; van Schaik, Carel P.

    2016-01-01

    Mutual helping for direct benefits can be explained by various game theoretical models, which differ mainly in terms of the underlying conflict of interest between two partners. Conflict is minimal if helping is self-serving and the partner benefits as a by-product. In contrast, conflict is maximal if partners are in a prisoner's dilemma with both having the pay-off-dominant option of not returning the other's investment. Here, we provide evolutionary and ecological arguments for why these two extremes are often unstable under natural conditions and propose that interactions with intermediate levels of conflict are frequent evolutionary endpoints. We argue that by-product helping is prone to becoming an asymmetric investment game since even small variation in by-product benefits will lead to the evolution of partner choice, leading to investments by the chosen class. Second, iterated prisoner's dilemmas tend to take place in stable social groups where the fitness of partners is interdependent, with the effect that a certain level of helping is self-serving. In sum, intermediate levels of mutual helping are expected in nature, while efficient partner monitoring may allow reaching higher levels. PMID:26729931

  11. Unbiased plotting positions for the general extreme value distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnell, Nigel W.; Beran, Max; Hosking, J. R. M.

    1986-09-01

    Probability plots maintain their popularity for flood frequency analysis, and are used to fit distributions, to identify outliers and to assess goodness-of-fit. If the objective of a plot is to determine quantiles or distribution parameters then one must employ unbiased plotting positions, defined as the mean of the rth order statistic in samples from the reduced variate population. These plotting positions differ from one distribution to another. The general extreme value (GEV) distribution is commonly used for flood frequency analysis, and contains the Gumbel distribution as a special case. Whilst plotting position formulae for this special case are well established, results are not available for the general case. By careful sequencing of the individual terms it is possible to integrate numerically the basic expression for expected order statistics to compute plotting positions for all practical sample sizes. However this integration consumes considerable computer resources, and for sample sizes of 35 and less exact unbiased plotting positions can be more readily evaluated using expressions derived using probability weighted moment theory. Numerical problems force an alternative approach for larger samples, and an asymptotic approximation has been developed. This has been found to be very accurate even for small samples, although an exact formula should be used for the largest flood in a sample. An even simpler level of calculation may be appropriate in some circumstances, and plotting position formulae have been developed based on expressions for the non-exceedance probability of the form F r = {(r - α)}/{(n - β)}. The parameters α and β are allowed to vary with sample size and the shape parameter of the general extreme value distribution.

  12. Behavioral Ecology: Manipulative Mutualism.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David P

    2015-09-21

    A new study reveals that an apparent mutualism between lycaenid caterpillars and their attendant ants may not be all it seems, as the caterpillars produce secretions that modify the brains and behavior of their attendant ants.

  13. Estimating mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraskov, Alexander; Stögbauer, Harald; Grassberger, Peter

    2004-06-01

    We present two classes of improved estimators for mutual information M(X,Y) , from samples of random points distributed according to some joint probability density μ(x,y) . In contrast to conventional estimators based on binnings, they are based on entropy estimates from k -nearest neighbor distances. This means that they are data efficient (with k=1 we resolve structures down to the smallest possible scales), adaptive (the resolution is higher where data are more numerous), and have minimal bias. Indeed, the bias of the underlying entropy estimates is mainly due to nonuniformity of the density at the smallest resolved scale, giving typically systematic errors which scale as functions of k/N for N points. Numerically, we find that both families become exact for independent distributions, i.e. the estimator M̂ (X,Y) vanishes (up to statistical fluctuations) if μ(x,y)=μ(x)μ(y) . This holds for all tested marginal distributions and for all dimensions of x and y . In addition, we give estimators for redundancies between more than two random variables. We compare our algorithms in detail with existing algorithms. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our estimators for assessing the actual independence of components obtained from independent component analysis (ICA), for improving ICA, and for estimating the reliability of blind source separation.

  14. The joint effect of ethnicity and gender on occupational segregation. An approach based on the Mutual Information Index.

    PubMed

    Guinea-Martin, Daniel; Mora, Ricardo; Ruiz-Castillo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we study the effects of ethnicity and gender on occupational segregation. Traditionally, researchers have examined the two sources of segregation separately. In contrast, we measure their joint effect by applying a multigroup segregation index-the Mutual Information or M index-to the product of the seven ethnic groups and two genders distinguished in our 2001 Census data for England and Wales. We exploit M's additive decomposability property to pose the following two questions: (i) Is there an interaction effect? (ii) How much does each source contribute to occupational segregation, controlling for the effect of the other? Although the role of ethnicity is non-negligible in the areas where minorities are concentrated, our findings confirm the greater importance of gender over ethnicity as a source of segregation. Moreover, we find a small "dwindling" interaction effect between the two sources of segregation: ethnicity slightly weakens the segregating power of gender and vice versa.

  15. Mutual alignment errors analysis based on wavelet due to antenna deformations in inter-satellite laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wanqing; Tan, Liying; Ma, Jing

    2012-02-01

    Wavelet analysis is employed in the paper to model diversified optical antenna deformations in inter-satellite laser communications. Mutual alignment errors, which comprise pointing and tracking errors, caused by the deformations are investigated with the model. Theoretical and numerical analysis show that both errors increase with the dilation factor of the model. Tracking error increases monotonously with the shift factor of the model, while pointing error increases first, and then decreases. When the deformation can be well approximated to a constant, both errors fluctuate periodically with the coefficient of the model. Otherwise, there is no obvious regularity for both errors with the increase of the coefficient. A reference for the machining precision of optical antennas is presented, and a method to reduce the effect of deformations is recommended. It is hoped that the study can contribute to improve the performance of inter-satellite laser communication systems.

  16. Non-rigid MR-TRUS image registration for image-guided prostate biopsy using correlation ratio-based mutual information.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lun; Wang, Haifeng; Peng, Chengtao; Dai, Yakang; Ding, Min; Sun, Yinghao; Yang, Xiaodong; Zheng, Jian

    2017-01-10

    To improve the accuracy of ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate, the non-rigid registration of magnetic resonance (MR) images onto transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images has gained increasing attention. Mutual information (MI) is a widely used similarity criterion in MR-TRUS image registration. However, the use of MI has been challenged because of intensity distortion, noise and down-sampling. Hence, we need to improve the MI measure to get better registration effect. We present a novel two-dimensional non-rigid MR-TRUS registration algorithm that uses correlation ratio-based mutual information (CRMI) as the similarity criterion. CRMI includes a functional mapping of intensity values on the basis of a generalized version of intensity class correspondence. We also analytically acquire the derivative of CRMI with respect to deformation parameters. Furthermore, we propose an improved stochastic gradient descent (ISGD) optimization method based on the Metropolis acceptance criteria to improve the global optimization ability and decrease the registration time. The performance of the proposed method is tested on synthetic images and 12 pairs of clinical prostate TRUS and MR images. By comparing label map registration frame (LMRF) and conditional mutual information (CMI), the proposed algorithm has a significant improvement in the average values of Hausdorff distance and target registration error. Although the average Dice Similarity coefficient is not significantly better than CMI, it still has a crucial increase over LMRF. The average computation time consumed by the proposed method is similar to LMRF, which is 16 times less than CMI. With more accurate matching performance and lower sensitivity to noise and down-sampling, the proposed algorithm of minimizing CRMI by ISGD is more robust and has the potential for use in aligning TRUS and MR images for needle biopsy.

  17. Unbiased estimation of precise temporal correlations between spike trains.

    PubMed

    Stark, Eran; Abeles, Moshe

    2009-04-30

    A key issue in systems neuroscience is the contribution of precise temporal inter-neuronal interactions to information processing in the brain, and the main analytical tool used for studying pair-wise interactions is the cross-correlation histogram (CCH). Although simple to generate, a CCH is influenced by multiple factors in addition to precise temporal correlations between two spike trains, thus complicating its interpretation. A Monte-Carlo-based technique, the jittering method, has been suggested to isolate the contribution of precise temporal interactions to neural information processing. Here, we show that jittering spike trains is equivalent to convolving the CCH derived from the original trains with a finite window and using a Poisson distribution to estimate probabilities. Both procedures over-fit the original spike trains and therefore the resulting statistical tests are biased and have low power. We devise an alternative method, based on convolving the CCH with a partially hollowed window, and illustrate its utility using artificial and real spike trains. The modified convolution method is unbiased, has high power, and is computationally fast. We recommend caution in the use of the jittering method and in the interpretation of results based on it, and suggest using the modified convolution method for detecting precise temporal correlations between spike trains.

  18. TINKTEP: A fully self-consistent, mutually polarizable QM/MM approach based on the AMOEBA force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziedzic, Jacek; Mao, Yuezhi; Shao, Yihan; Ponder, Jay; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Head-Gordon, Martin; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach in which a quantum subsystem is coupled to a classical subsystem described by the AMOEBA polarizable force field. Our approach permits mutual polarization between the QM and MM subsystems, effected through multipolar electrostatics. Self-consistency is achieved for both the QM and MM subsystems through a total energy minimization scheme. We provide an expression for the Hamiltonian of the coupled QM/MM system, which we minimize using gradient methods. The QM subsystem is described by the onetep linear-scaling DFT approach, which makes use of strictly localized orbitals expressed in a set of periodic sinc basis functions equivalent to plane waves. The MM subsystem is described by the multipolar, polarizable force field AMOEBA, as implemented in tinker. Distributed multipole analysis is used to obtain, on the fly, a classical representation of the QM subsystem in terms of atom-centered multipoles. This auxiliary representation is used for all polarization interactions between QM and MM, allowing us to treat them on the same footing as in AMOEBA. We validate our method in tests of solute-solvent interaction energies, for neutral and charged molecules, demonstrating the simultaneous optimization of the quantum and classical degrees of freedom. Encouragingly, we find that the inclusion of explicit polarization in the MM part of QM/MM improves the agreement with fully QM calculations.

  19. MIrExpress: A Database for Gene Coexpression Correlation in Immune Cells Based on Mutual Information and Pearson Correlation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luman; Mo, Qiaochu; Wang, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Most current gene coexpression databases support the analysis for linear correlation of gene pairs, but not nonlinear correlation of them, which hinders precisely evaluating the gene-gene coexpression strengths. Here, we report a new database, MIrExpress, which takes advantage of the information theory, as well as the Pearson linear correlation method, to measure the linear correlation, nonlinear correlation, and their hybrid of cell-specific gene coexpressions in immune cells. For a given gene pair or probe set pair input by web users, both mutual information (MI) and Pearson correlation coefficient (r) are calculated, and several corresponding values are reported to reflect their coexpression correlation nature, including MI and r values, their respective rank orderings, their rank comparison, and their hybrid correlation value. Furthermore, for a given gene, the top 10 most relevant genes to it are displayed with the MI, r, or their hybrid perspective, respectively. Currently, the database totally includes 16 human cell groups, involving 20,283 human genes. The expression data and the calculated correlation results from the database are interactively accessible on the web page and can be implemented for other related applications and researches.

  20. The mutual climatic range method of palaeoclimate reconstruction based on insect fossils: New applications and interhemispheric comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Scott A.

    The Mutual Climatic Range (MCR) method of palaeoclimate reconstruction has been employed in Europe for the last decade. A quantitative, calibrated method, MCR has many advantages over qualitative methods. More recent applications deal with eastern and central North America, and the method is also being developed for desert and arctic faunas. The climate envelopes for North American beetles have been compiled using a 25-km gridded North American climate database that pairs climate parameters with modern collection sites. Modern tests of the reliability of the MCR method for North American species yielded similar results to prior European tests. Linear regressions of predicted on observed values yielded equations used to calibrate the MCR estimates. Work is under way to develop MCR estimates of mean annual precipitation for fossil assemblages from the desert southwest, where moisture conditions may play a more important role in determining beetle species' ranges. An examination of British and North American mean July temperature reconstructions during the Late Wisconsinan glacial interval compares and contrasts three sets of records. The North American records show no indication of the Younger Dryas cooling that is clearly marked in records from northwest Europe. The MCR method adds vigour to our reconstructions, and allows us to compare between regions and with other palaeoenvironmental methods.

  1. Unbiased determination of polarized parton distributions and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Forte, Stefano; Guffanti, Alberto; Nocera, Emanuele R.; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Rojo, Juan

    2013-09-01

    We present a determination of a set of polarized parton distributions (PDFs) of the nucleon, at next-to-leading order, from a global set of longitudinally polarized deep-inelastic scattering data: NNPDFpol1.0. The determination is based on the NNPDF methodology: a Monte Carlo approach, with neural networks used as unbiased interpolants, previously applied to the determination of unpolarized parton distributions, and designed to provide a faithful and statistically sound representation of PDF uncertainties. We present our dataset, its statistical features, and its Monte Carlo representation. We summarize the technique used to solve the polarized evolution equations and its benchmarking, and the method used to compute physical observables. We review the NNPDF methodology for parametrization and fitting of neural networks, the algorithm used to determine the optimal fit, and its adaptation to the polarized case. We finally present our set of polarized parton distributions. We discuss its statistical properties, test for its stability upon various modifications of the fitting procedure, and compare it to other recent polarized parton sets, and in particular obtain predictions for polarized first moments of PDFs based on it. We find that the uncertainties on the gluon, and to a lesser extent the strange PDF, were substantially underestimated in previous determinations.

  2. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  3. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  4. Computational analysis of an autophagy/translation switch based on mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1

    SciTech Connect

    Szymańska, Paulina; Martin, Katie R.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.; Hlavacek, William S.; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-03-11

    We constructed a mechanistic, computational model for regulation of (macro)autophagy and protein synthesis (at the level of translation). The model was formulated to study the system-level consequences of interactions among the following proteins: two key components of MTOR complex 1 (MTORC1), namely the protein kinase MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) and the scaffold protein RPTOR; the autophagy-initiating protein kinase ULK1; and the multimeric energy-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Inputs of the model include intrinsic AMPK kinase activity, which is taken as an adjustable surrogate parameter for cellular energy level or AMP:ATP ratio, and rapamycin dose, which controls MTORC1 activity. Outputs of the model include the phosphorylation level of the translational repressor EIF4EBP1, a substrate of MTORC1, and the phosphorylation level of AMBRA1 (activating molecule in BECN1-regulated autophagy), a substrate of ULK1 critical for autophagosome formation. The model incorporates reciprocal regulation of mTORC1 and ULK1 by AMPK, mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1, and ULK1-mediated negative feedback regulation of AMPK. Through analysis of the model, we find that these processes may be responsible, depending on conditions, for graded responses to stress inputs, for bistable switching between autophagy and protein synthesis, or relaxation oscillations, comprising alternating periods of autophagy and protein synthesis. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the prediction of oscillatory behavior is robust to changes of the parameter values of the model. The model provides testable predictions about the behavior of the AMPK-MTORC1-ULK1 network, which plays a central role in maintaining cellular energy and nutrient homeostasis.

  5. Computational analysis of an autophagy/translation switch based on mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1

    DOE PAGES

    Szymańska, Paulina; Martin, Katie R.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.; ...

    2015-03-11

    We constructed a mechanistic, computational model for regulation of (macro)autophagy and protein synthesis (at the level of translation). The model was formulated to study the system-level consequences of interactions among the following proteins: two key components of MTOR complex 1 (MTORC1), namely the protein kinase MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) and the scaffold protein RPTOR; the autophagy-initiating protein kinase ULK1; and the multimeric energy-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Inputs of the model include intrinsic AMPK kinase activity, which is taken as an adjustable surrogate parameter for cellular energy level or AMP:ATP ratio, and rapamycin dose, which controls MTORC1 activity. Outputsmore » of the model include the phosphorylation level of the translational repressor EIF4EBP1, a substrate of MTORC1, and the phosphorylation level of AMBRA1 (activating molecule in BECN1-regulated autophagy), a substrate of ULK1 critical for autophagosome formation. The model incorporates reciprocal regulation of mTORC1 and ULK1 by AMPK, mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1, and ULK1-mediated negative feedback regulation of AMPK. Through analysis of the model, we find that these processes may be responsible, depending on conditions, for graded responses to stress inputs, for bistable switching between autophagy and protein synthesis, or relaxation oscillations, comprising alternating periods of autophagy and protein synthesis. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the prediction of oscillatory behavior is robust to changes of the parameter values of the model. The model provides testable predictions about the behavior of the AMPK-MTORC1-ULK1 network, which plays a central role in maintaining cellular energy and nutrient homeostasis.« less

  6. Unbiased methods for removing systematics from galaxy clustering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Franz; Leistedt, Boris; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2016-02-01

    Measuring the angular clustering of galaxies as a function of redshift is a powerful method for extracting information from the three-dimensional galaxy distribution. The precision of such measurements will dramatically increase with ongoing and future wide-field galaxy surveys. However, these are also increasingly sensitive to observational and astrophysical contaminants. Here, we study the statistical properties of three methods proposed for controlling such systematics - template subtraction, basic mode projection, and extended mode projection - all of which make use of externally supplied template maps, designed to characterize and capture the spatial variations of potential systematic effects. Based on a detailed mathematical analysis, and in agreement with simulations, we find that the template subtraction method in its original formulation returns biased estimates of the galaxy angular clustering. We derive closed-form expressions that should be used to correct results for this shortcoming. Turning to the basic mode projection algorithm, we prove it to be free of any bias, whereas we conclude that results computed with extended mode projection are biased. Within a simplified setup, we derive analytical expressions for the bias and discuss the options for correcting it in more realistic configurations. Common to all three methods is an increased estimator variance induced by the cleaning process, albeit at different levels. These results enable unbiased high-precision clustering measurements in the presence of spatially varying systematics, an essential step towards realizing the full potential of current and planned galaxy surveys.

  7. Within-subject template estimation for unbiased longitudinal image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Martin; Schmansky, Nicholas J.; Rosas, H. Diana; Fischl, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal image analysis has become increasingly important in clinical studies of normal aging and neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, there is a growing appreciation of the potential utility of longitudinally acquired structural images and reliable image processing to evaluate disease modifying therapies. Challenges have been related to the variability that is inherent in the available cross-sectional processing tools, to the introduction of bias in longitudinal processing and to potential over-regularization. In this paper we introduce a novel longitudinal image processing framework, based on unbiased, robust, within-subject template creation, for automatic surface reconstruction and segmentation of brain MRI of arbitrarily many time points. We demonstrate that it is essential to treat all input images exactly the same as removing only interpolation asymmetries is not sufficient to remove processing bias. We successfully reduce variability and avoid over-regularization by initializing the processing in each time point with common information from the subject template. The presented results show a significant increase in precision and discrimination power while preserving the ability to detect large anatomical deviations; as such they hold great potential in clinical applications, e.g. allowing for smaller sample sizes or shorter trials to establish disease specific biomarkers or to quantify drug effects. PMID:22430496

  8. An unbiased Hessian representation for Monte Carlo PDFs.

    PubMed

    Carrazza, Stefano; Forte, Stefano; Kassabov, Zahari; Latorre, José Ignacio; Rojo, Juan

    We develop a methodology for the construction of a Hessian representation of Monte Carlo sets of parton distributions, based on the use of a subset of the Monte Carlo PDF replicas as an unbiased linear basis, and of a genetic algorithm for the determination of the optimal basis. We validate the methodology by first showing that it faithfully reproduces a native Monte Carlo PDF set (NNPDF3.0), and then, that if applied to Hessian PDF set (MMHT14) which was transformed into a Monte Carlo set, it gives back the starting PDFs with minimal information loss. We then show that, when applied to a large Monte Carlo PDF set obtained as combination of several underlying sets, the methodology leads to a Hessian representation in terms of a rather smaller set of parameters (MC-H PDFs), thereby providing an alternative implementation of the recently suggested Meta-PDF idea and a Hessian version of the recently suggested PDF compression algorithm (CMC-PDFs). The mc2hessian conversion code is made publicly available together with (through LHAPDF6) a Hessian representations of the NNPDF3.0 set, and the MC-H PDF set.

  9. Identifying Homogeneous Subgroups in Neurological Disorders: Unbiased Recursive Partitioning in Cervical Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Tanadini, Lorenzo G; Steeves, John D; Hothorn, Torsten; Abel, Rainer; Maier, Doris; Schubert, Martin; Weidner, Norbert; Rupp, Rüdiger; Curt, Armin

    2014-07-01

    Background The reliable stratification of homogeneous subgroups and the prediction of future clinical outcomes within heterogeneous neurological disorders is a particularly challenging task. Nonetheless, it is essential for the implementation of targeted care and effective therapeutic interventions. Objective This study was designed to assess the value of a recently developed regression tool from the family of unbiased recursive partitioning methods in comparison to established statistical approaches (eg, linear and logistic regression) for predicting clinical endpoints and for prospective patients' stratification for clinical trials. Methods A retrospective, longitudinal analysis of prospectively collected neurological data from the European Multicenter study about Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI) network was undertaken on C4-C6 cervical sensorimotor complete subjects. Predictors were based on a broad set of early (<2 weeks) clinical assessments. Endpoints were based on later clinical examinations of upper extremity motor scores and recovery of motor levels, at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Prediction accuracy for each statistical analysis was quantified by resampling techniques. Results For all settings, overlapping confidence intervals indicated similar prediction accuracy of unbiased recursive partitioning to established statistical approaches. In addition, unbiased recursive partitioning provided a direct way of identification of more homogeneous subgroups. The partitioning is carried out in a data-driven manner, independently from a priori decisions or predefined thresholds. Conclusion Unbiased recursive partitioning techniques may improve prediction of future clinical endpoints and the planning of future SCI clinical trials by providing easily implementable, data-driven rationales for early patient stratification based on simple decision rules and clinical read-outs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Rapid purification of quantum systems by measuring in a feedback-controlled unbiased basis

    SciTech Connect

    Combes, Joshua; Wiseman, Howard M.; Jacobs, Kurt; O'Connor, Anthony J.

    2010-08-15

    Rapid purification by feedback--specifically, reducing the mean impurity faster than by measurement alone--can be achieved by choosing the eigenbasis of the density matrix to be unbiased relative to the measurement basis. Here we further examine the protocol introduced by Combes and Jacobs [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 010504 (2006)] involving continuous measurement of the observable J{sub z} for a D-dimensional system. We rigorously rederive the lower bound (2/3)(D+1) on the achievable speedup factor and also an upper bound, namely D{sup 2}/2, for all feedback protocols that use measurements in unbiased bases. Finally, we extend our results to n independent measurements on a register of n qubits and derive an upper bound on the achievable speedup factor that scales linearly with n.

  11. BUFET: boosting the unbiased miRNA functional enrichment analysis using bitsets.

    PubMed

    Zagganas, Konstantinos; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Skiadopoulos, Spiros; Dalamagas, Theodore

    2017-09-06

    A group of miRNAs can regulate a biological process by targeting genes involved in the process. The unbiased miRNA functional enrichment analysis is the most precise in silico approach to predict the biological processes that may be regulated by a given miRNA group. However, it is computationally intensive and significantly more expensive than its alternatives. We introduce BUFET, a new approach to significantly reduce the time required for the execution of the unbiased miRNA functional enrichment analysis. It derives its strength from the utilization of efficient bitset-based methods and parallel computation techniques. BUFET outperforms the state-of-the-art implementation, in regard to computational efficiency, in all scenarios (both single- and multi-core), being, in some cases, more than one order of magnitude faster.

  12. Unbiased Estimates of Variance Components with Bootstrap Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides general procedures for obtaining unbiased estimates of variance components for any random-model balanced design under any bootstrap sampling plan, with the focus on designs of the type typically used in generalizability theory. The results reported here are particularly helpful when the bootstrap is used to estimate standard…

  13. Unbiased Estimates of Variance Components with Bootstrap Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides general procedures for obtaining unbiased estimates of variance components for any random-model balanced design under any bootstrap sampling plan, with the focus on designs of the type typically used in generalizability theory. The results reported here are particularly helpful when the bootstrap is used to estimate standard…

  14. PET-MR image fusion in soft tissue sarcoma: accuracy, reliability and practicality of interactive point-based and automated mutual information techniques.

    PubMed

    Somer, Edward J R; Marsden, Paul K; Benatar, Nigel A; Goodey, Joanne; O'Doherty, Michael J; Smith, Michael A

    2003-01-01

    The fusion of functional positron emission tomography (PET) data with anatomical magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography images, using a variety of interactive and automated techniques, is becoming commonplace, with the technique of choice dependent on the specific application. The case of PET-MR image fusion in soft tissue is complicated by a lack of conspicuous anatomical features and deviation from the rigid-body model. Here we compare a point-based external marker technique with an automated mutual information algorithm and discuss the practicality, reliability and accuracy of each when applied to the study of soft tissue sarcoma. Ten subjects with suspected sarcoma in the knee, thigh, groin, flank or back underwent MR and PET scanning after the attachment of nine external fiducial markers. In the assessment of the point-based technique, three error measures were considered: fiducial localisation error (FLE), fiducial registration error (FRE) and target registration error (TRE). FLE, which represents the accuracy with which the fiducial points can be located, is related to the FRE minimised by the registration algorithm. The registration accuracy is best characterised by the TRE, which is the distance between corresponding points in each image space after registration. In the absence of salient features within the target volume, the TRE can be measured at fiducials excluded from the registration process. To assess the mutual information technique, PET data, acquired after physically removing the markers, were reconstructed in a variety of ways and registered with MR. Having applied the transform suggested by the algorithm to the PET scan acquired before the markers were removed, the residual distance between PET and MR marker-pairs could be measured. The manual point-based technique yielded the best results (RMS TRE =8.3 mm, max =22.4 mm, min =1.7 mm), performing better than the automated algorithm (RMS TRE =20.0 mm, max =30.5 mm, min =7.7 mm) when

  15. Mutual help in SETIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, F.; Frisch, D. H.

    1985-06-01

    Techniques to establish communication between earth and extraterrestrial intelligent beings are examined analytically, emphasizing that the success of searches for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETIs) depends on the selection by both sender and receiver of one of a few mutually helpful SETI strategies. An equation for estimating the probability that an SETI will result in the recognition of an ETI signal is developed, and numerical results for various SETI strategies are presented in tables. A minimum approach employing 10 40-m 20-kW dish antennas for a 30-yr SETI in a 2500-light-year disk is proposed.

  16. Statistical properties of Jacobian maps and the realization of unbiased large-deformation nonlinear image registration.

    PubMed

    Leow, Alex D; Yanovsky, Igor; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Lee, Agatha D; Klunder, Andrea D; Lu, Allen; Becker, James T; Davis, Simon W; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2007-06-01

    Maps of local tissue compression or expansion are often computed by comparing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using nonlinear image registration. The resulting changes are commonly analyzed using tensor-based morphometry to make inferences about anatomical differences, often based on the Jacobian map, which estimates local tissue gain or loss. Here, we provide rigorous mathematical analyses of the Jacobian maps, and use themto motivate a new numerical method to construct unbiased nonlinear image registration. First, we argue that logarithmic transformation is crucial for analyzing Jacobian values representing morphometric differences. We then examine the statistical distributions of log-Jacobian maps by defining the Kullback-Leibler (KL) distance on material density functions arising in continuum-mechanical models. With this framework, unbiased image registration can be constructed by quantifying the symmetric KL-distance between the identity map and the resulting deformation. Implementation details, addressing the proposed unbiased registration as well as the minimization of symmetric image matching functionals, are then discussed and shown to be applicable to other registration methods, such as inverse consistent registration. In the results section, we test the proposed framework, as well as present an illustrative application mapping detailed 3-D brain changes in sequential magnetic resonance imaging scans of a patient diagnosed with semantic dementia. Using permutation tests, we show that the symmetrization of image registration statistically reduces skewness in the log-Jacobian map.

  17. Extending unbiased stereology of brain ultrastructure to three-dimensional volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiala, J. C.; Harris, K. M.; Koslow, S. H. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Analysis of brain ultrastructure is needed to reveal how neurons communicate with one another via synapses and how disease processes alter this communication. In the past, such analyses have usually been based on single or paired sections obtained by electron microscopy. Reconstruction from multiple serial sections provides a much needed, richer representation of the three-dimensional organization of the brain. This paper introduces a new reconstruction system and new methods for analyzing in three dimensions the location and ultrastructure of neuronal components, such as synapses, which are distributed non-randomly throughout the brain. DESIGN AND MEASUREMENTS: Volumes are reconstructed by defining transformations that align the entire area of adjacent sections. Whole-field alignment requires rotation, translation, skew, scaling, and second-order nonlinear deformations. Such transformations are implemented by a linear combination of bivariate polynomials. Computer software for generating transformations based on user input is described. Stereological techniques for assessing structural distributions in reconstructed volumes are the unbiased bricking, disector, unbiased ratio, and per-length counting techniques. A new general method, the fractional counter, is also described. This unbiased technique relies on the counting of fractions of objects contained in a test volume. A volume of brain tissue from stratum radiatum of hippocampal area CA1 is reconstructed and analyzed for synaptic density to demonstrate and compare the techniques. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Reconstruction makes practicable volume-oriented analysis of ultrastructure using such techniques as the unbiased bricking and fractional counter methods. These analysis methods are less sensitive to the section-to-section variations in counts and section thickness, factors that contribute to the inaccuracy of other stereological methods. In addition, volume reconstruction facilitates visualization

  18. Unbiased average age-appropriate atlases for pediatric studies.

    PubMed

    Fonov, Vladimir; Evans, Alan C; Botteron, Kelly; Almli, C Robert; McKinstry, Robert C; Collins, D Louis

    2011-01-01

    Spatial normalization, registration, and segmentation techniques for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) often use a target or template volume to facilitate processing, take advantage of prior information, and define a common coordinate system for analysis. In the neuroimaging literature, the MNI305 Talairach-like coordinate system is often used as a standard template. However, when studying pediatric populations, variation from the adult brain makes the MNI305 suboptimal for processing brain images of children. Morphological changes occurring during development render the use of age-appropriate templates desirable to reduce potential errors and minimize bias during processing of pediatric data. This paper presents the methods used to create unbiased, age-appropriate MRI atlas templates for pediatric studies that represent the average anatomy for the age range of 4.5-18.5 years, while maintaining a high level of anatomical detail and contrast. The creation of anatomical T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density-weighted templates for specific developmentally important age-ranges, used data derived from the largest epidemiological, representative (healthy and normal) sample of the U.S. population, where each subject was carefully screened for medical and psychiatric factors and characterized using established neuropsychological and behavioral assessments. Use of these age-specific templates was evaluated by computing average tissue maps for gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid for each specific age range, and by conducting an exemplar voxel-wise deformation-based morphometry study using 66 young (4.5-6.9 years) participants to demonstrate the benefits of using the age-appropriate templates. The public availability of these atlases/templates will facilitate analysis of pediatric MRI data and enable comparison of results between studies in a common standardized space specific to pediatric research. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Unbiased Average Age-Appropriate Atlases for Pediatric Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fonov, Vladimir; Evans, Alan C.; Botteron, Kelly; Almli, C. Robert; McKinstry, Robert C.; Collins, D. Louis

    2010-01-01

    Spatial normalization, registration, and segmentation techniques for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) often use a target or template volume to facilitate processing, take advantage of prior information, and define a common coordinate system for analysis. In the neuroimaging literature, the MNI305 Talairach-like coordinate system is often used as a standard template. However, when studying pediatric populations, variation from the adult brain makes the MNI305 suboptimal for processing brain images of children. Morphological changes occurring during development render the use of age-appropriate templates desirable to reduce potential errors and minimize bias during processing of pediatric data. This paper presents the methods used to create unbiased, age-appropriate MRI atlas templates for pediatric studies that represent the average anatomy for the age range of 4.5–18.5 years, while maintaining a high level of anatomical detail and contrast. The creation of anatomical T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density-weighted templates for specific developmentally important age-ranges, used data derived from the largest epidemiological, representative (healthy and normal) sample of the U.S. population, where each subject was carefully screened for medical and psychiatric factors and characterized using established neuropsychological and behavioral assessments. . Use of these age-specific templates was evaluated by computing average tissue maps for gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid for each specific age range, and by conducting an exemplar voxel-wise deformation-based morphometry study using 66 young (4.5–6.9 years) participants to demonstrate the benefits of using the age-appropriate templates. The public availability of these atlases/templates will facilitate analysis of pediatric MRI data and enable comparison of results between studies in a common standardized space specific to pediatric research. PMID:20656036

  20. Conjunction of wavelet transform and SOM-mutual information data pre-processing approach for AI-based Multi-Station nitrate modeling of watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourani, Vahid; Andalib, Gholamreza; Dąbrowska, Dominika

    2017-05-01

    Accurate nitrate load predictions can elevate decision management of water quality of watersheds which affects to environment and drinking water. In this paper, two scenarios were considered for Multi-Station (MS) nitrate load modeling of the Little River watershed. In the first scenario, Markovian characteristics of streamflow-nitrate time series were proposed for the MS modeling. For this purpose, feature extraction criterion of Mutual Information (MI) was employed for input selection of artificial intelligence models (Feed Forward Neural Network, FFNN and least square support vector machine). In the second scenario for considering seasonality-based characteristics of the time series, wavelet transform was used to extract multi-scale features of streamflow-nitrate time series of the watershed's sub-basins to model MS nitrate loads. Self-Organizing Map (SOM) clustering technique which finds homogeneous sub-series clusters was also linked to MI for proper cluster agent choice to be imposed into the models for predicting the nitrate loads of the watershed's sub-basins. The proposed MS method not only considers the prediction of the outlet nitrate but also covers predictions of interior sub-basins nitrate load values. The results indicated that the proposed FFNN model coupled with the SOM-MI improved the performance of MS nitrate predictions compared to the Markovian-based models up to 39%. Overall, accurate selection of dominant inputs which consider seasonality-based characteristics of streamflow-nitrate process could enhance the efficiency of nitrate load predictions.

  1. Unbiased rigid registration using transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Dieter A.; Hornegger, Joachim; Bautz, Werner; Kuwert, Torsten; Roemer, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    The evaluation of tumor growth as regression under therapy is an important clinical issue. Rigid registration of sequentially acquired 3D-images has proven its value for this purpose. Existing approaches to rigid image registration use the whole volume for the estimation of the rigid transform. Non-rigid soft tissue deformation, however, will imply a bias to the registration result, because local deformations cannot be modeled by rigid transforms. Anatomical substructures, like bones or teeth, are not affected by these deformations, but follow a rigid transform. This important observation is incorporated in the proposed registration algorithm. The selection of anatomical substructure is done by manual interaction of medical experts adjusting the transfer function of the volume rendering software. The parameters of the transfer function are used to identify the voxels that are considered for registration. A rigid transform is estimated by a quaternion gradient descent algorithm based on the intensity values of the specified tissue classes. Commonly used voxel intensity measures are adjusted to the modified registration algorithm. The contribution describes the mathematical framework of the proposed registration method and its implementation in a commercial software package. The experimental evaluation includes the discussion of different similarity measures, the comparison of the proposed method to established rigid registration techniques and the evaluation of the efficiency of the new method. We conclude with the discussion of potential medical applications of the proposed registration algorithm.

  2. Cheaters in mutualism networks.

    PubMed

    Genini, Julieta; Morellato, L Patrícia C; Guimarães, Paulo R; Olesen, Jens M

    2010-08-23

    Mutualism-network studies assume that all interacting species are mutualistic partners and consider that all links are of one kind. However, the influence of different types of links, such as cheating links, on network organization remains unexplored. We studied two flower-visitation networks (Malpighiaceae and Bignoniaceae and their flower visitors), and divide the types of link into cheaters (i.e. robbers and thieves of flower rewards) and effective pollinators. We investigated if there were topological differences among networks with and without cheaters, especially with respect to nestedness and modularity. The Malpighiaceae network was nested, but not modular, and it was dominated by pollinators and had much fewer cheater species than Bignoniaceae network (28% versus 75%). The Bignoniaceae network was mainly a plant-cheater network, being modular because of the presence of pollen robbers and showing no nestedness. In the Malpighiaceae network, removal of cheaters had no major consequences for topology. In contrast, removal of cheaters broke down the modularity of the Bignoniaceae network. As cheaters are ubiquitous in all mutualisms, the results presented here show that they have a strong impact upon network topology.

  3. Cheaters in mutualism networks

    PubMed Central

    Genini, Julieta; Morellato, L. Patrícia C.; Guimarães, Paulo R.; Olesen, Jens M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutualism-network studies assume that all interacting species are mutualistic partners and consider that all links are of one kind. However, the influence of different types of links, such as cheating links, on network organization remains unexplored. We studied two flower-visitation networks (Malpighiaceae and Bignoniaceae and their flower visitors), and divide the types of link into cheaters (i.e. robbers and thieves of flower rewards) and effective pollinators. We investigated if there were topological differences among networks with and without cheaters, especially with respect to nestedness and modularity. The Malpighiaceae network was nested, but not modular, and it was dominated by pollinators and had much fewer cheater species than Bignoniaceae network (28% versus 75%). The Bignoniaceae network was mainly a plant–cheater network, being modular because of the presence of pollen robbers and showing no nestedness. In the Malpighiaceae network, removal of cheaters had no major consequences for topology. In contrast, removal of cheaters broke down the modularity of the Bignoniaceae network. As cheaters are ubiquitous in all mutualisms, the results presented here show that they have a strong impact upon network topology. PMID:20089538

  4. Unbiased quantitative testing of conventional orthodontic beliefs.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S

    1998-03-01

    This study used a preexisting database to test in hypothesis from the appropriateness of some common orthodontic beliefs concerning upper first molar displacement and changes in facial morphology associated with conventional full bonded/banded treatment in growing subjects. In an initial pass, the author used data from a stratified random sample of 48 subjects drawn retrospectively from the practice of a single, experienced orthodontist. This sample consisted of 4 subgroups of 12 subjects each: Class I nonextraction, Class I extraction, Class II nonextraction, and Class II extraction. The findings indicate that, relative to the facial profile, chin point did not, on average, displace anteriorly during treatment, either overall or in any subgroup. Relative to the facial profile, Point A became significantly less prominent during treatment, both overall and in each subgroup. The best estimate of the mean displacement of the upper molar cusp relative to superimposition on Anterior Cranial Base was in the mesial direction in each of the four subgroups. In only one extraction subject out of 24 did the cusp appear to be displaced distally. Mesial molar cusp displacement was significantly greater in the Class II extraction subgroup than in the Class II nonextraction subgroup. Relative to superimposition on anatomical "best fit" of maxillary structures, the findings for molar cusp displacement were similar, but even more dramatic. Mean mesial migration was highly significant in both the Class II nonextraction and Class II extraction subgroups. In no subject in the entire sample was distal displacement noted relative to this superimposition. Mean increase in anterior Total Face Height was significantly greater in the Class II extraction subgroup than in the Class II nonextraction subgroup. (This finding was contrary to the author's original expectation.) The generalizability of the findings from the initial pass to other treated growing subjects was then assessed by

  5. Quantitative evaluation for brain CT/MRI coregistration based on maximization of mutual information in patients with focal epilepsy investigated with subdural electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ken, Soléakhéna; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Giulietti, Giovanni; Sebastiano, Fabio; De Carli, Diego; Garreffa, Girolamo; Colonnese, Claudio; Passariello, Roberto; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2007-07-01

    Patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy may require intracranial investigations with subdural electrodes. These must be correctly localized with respect to the brain cortical surface and require appropriate monitoring. For this purpose, coregistration techniques, which fuse preimplantation 3D magnetic resonance imaging scans with postimplantation computed tomography scans, have been implemented. In order to reduce localization errors due to the fusion process, we used a coregistration method based on the maximization of mutual information (MI) in 11 patients with extratemporal epilepsy who were invasively investigated. Our registration method is based on three processing steps: rigid-body transformation for coregistration, computation of MI as a similarity measure and the use of the Downhill Simplex optimization method. After consistency analysis, the shift of the registration method reached 0.14+/-0.27 mm in translation and 0.03+/-0.14 degrees in rotation, and the accuracies assessed on voxels of skull surface and voxels of the center of the brain volume were 1.42+/-0.61 and 1.15+/-0.53 mm, respectively. The accuracy of the fusion process reached submillimeter range, and results were considered reliable for surgical planning in all studied patients.

  6. Research on the relationships of the domestic mutual investment of China based on the cross-shareholding networks of the listed companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuan-yuan; Zhuang, Xin-tian; Li, Ling-xuan

    2011-02-01

    Enterprises are the core power and the carriers to promote the country's economy developing sustainably and rapidly; the listed enterprises are the outstanding companies which can represent the economic level at the places where the enterprises are located, so we establish the cross-shareholding networks of the listed companies between 2002 and 2009, and then analyze the mutual investment at company-level, province-level and region-level. We have researched the overall trend of economic development and the overall tendency of capital flow of China in the recent 8 years based on the cross-shareholding networks, the influence of a global economic crisis on the stock markets and the overall economics of China in 2008 and the recovery of the economy after the economic crisis. Moreover, we analyze the variations of the cross-shareholding networks and the influence of the state-owned large and medium enterprises listing frequently on Chinese stock markets. We divide the provinces of China into 3 main categories according to their industrial situations. Though the analysis, we find that the wealth gap between the different areas is not significantly reduced even though the government has carried out strategies such as the Development of the West Regions and the Rejuvenation of Old Industrial Bases in Northeastern China. We analyze the cumulative distribution function of the degree of the vertices and use large amounts of data to do empirical analysis. The methods used include the hierarchical cluster analysis, regression analysis, etc.

  7. Mutual information and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamma, A.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the metastable, symmetry-breaking ground states of quantum many-body Hamiltonians have vanishing quantum mutual information between macroscopically separated regions and are thus the most classical ones among all possible quantum ground states. This statement is obvious only when the symmetry-breaking ground states are simple product states, e.g., at the factorization point. On the other hand, symmetry-breaking states are in general entangled along the entire ordered phase, and to show that they actually feature the least macroscopic correlations compared to their symmetric superpositions is highly nontrivial. We prove this result in general, by considering the quantum mutual information based on the two-Rényi entanglement entropy and using a locality result stemming from quasiadiabatic continuation. Moreover, in the paradigmatic case of the exactly solvable one-dimensional quantum X Y model, we further verify the general result by considering also the quantum mutual information based on the von Neumann entanglement entropy.

  8. A configuration space of homologous proteins conserving mutual information and allowing a phylogeny inference based on pair-wise Z-score probabilities.

    PubMed

    Bastien, Olivier; Ortet, Philippe; Roy, Sylvaine; Maréchal, Eric

    2005-03-10

    Popular methods to reconstruct molecular phylogenies are based on multiple sequence alignments, in which addition or removal of data may change the resulting tree topology. We have sought a representation of homologous proteins that would conserve the information of pair-wise sequence alignments, respect probabilistic properties of Z-scores (Monte Carlo methods applied to pair-wise comparisons) and be the basis for a novel method of consistent and stable phylogenetic reconstruction. We have built up a spatial representation of protein sequences using concepts from particle physics (configuration space) and respecting a frame of constraints deduced from pair-wise alignment score properties in information theory. The obtained configuration space of homologous proteins (CSHP) allows the representation of real and shuffled sequences, and thereupon an expression of the TULIP theorem for Z-score probabilities. Based on the CSHP, we propose a phylogeny reconstruction using Z-scores. Deduced trees, called TULIP trees, are consistent with multiple-alignment based trees. Furthermore, the TULIP tree reconstruction method provides a solution for some previously reported incongruent results, such as the apicomplexan enolase phylogeny. The CSHP is a unified model that conserves mutual information between proteins in the way physical models conserve energy. Applications include the reconstruction of evolutionary consistent and robust trees, the topology of which is based on a spatial representation that is not reordered after addition or removal of sequences. The CSHP and its assigned phylogenetic topology, provide a powerful and easily updated representation for massive pair-wise genome comparisons based on Z-score computations.

  9. Mutual Information Rate and Bounds for It

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Murilo S.; Rubinger, Rero M.; Viana, Emilson R.; Sartorelli, José C.; Parlitz, Ulrich; Grebogi, Celso

    2012-01-01

    The amount of information exchanged per unit of time between two nodes in a dynamical network or between two data sets is a powerful concept for analysing complex systems. This quantity, known as the mutual information rate (MIR), is calculated from the mutual information, which is rigorously defined only for random systems. Moreover, the definition of mutual information is based on probabilities of significant events. This work offers a simple alternative way to calculate the MIR in dynamical (deterministic) networks or between two time series (not fully deterministic), and to calculate its upper and lower bounds without having to calculate probabilities, but rather in terms of well known and well defined quantities in dynamical systems. As possible applications of our bounds, we study the relationship between synchronisation and the exchange of information in a system of two coupled maps and in experimental networks of coupled oscillators. PMID:23112809

  10. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire... marine insurance companies and mutual fire insurance companies exclusively issuing either...

  11. On the Mutual Coupling Between Circular Resonant Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abou-Khousa, M. A.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2007-01-01

    For near- and far-field microwave imaging purposes, array of circular resonant slots can be utilized to sample the electric field at a given reference plane. In general, the sensitivity of such array probes is impaired by the mutual coupling present between the radiating elements. The mutual coupling problem poses a design tradeoff between the resolution of the array and its sensitivity. In this paper, we investigate the mutual coupling between circular resonant slots in conducting ground plane both numerically and experimentally. Based on the analysis of the dominant coupling mechanism, i.e., the surface currents, various remedies to reduce the slots' mutual coupling are proposed and verified.

  12. Effective incorporation of spatial information in a mutual information based 3D-2D registration of a CT volume to X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating the 3D rigid pose of a CT volume of an object from its 2D X-ray projections. We use maximization of mutual information, an accurate similarity measure for multi-modal and mono-modal image registration tasks. However, it is known that the standard mutual information measure only takes intensity values into account without considering spatial information and its robustness is questionable. In this paper, instead of directly maximizing mutual information, we propose to use a variational approximation derived from the Kullback-Leibler bound. Spatial information is then incorporated into this variational approximation using a Markov random field model. The newly derived similarity measure has a least-squares form and can be effectively minimized by a multi-resolution Levenberg-Marquardt optimizer. Experimental results are presented on X-ray and CT datasets of a plastic phantom and a cadaveric spine segment.

  13. [Biological mutualism, concepts and models].

    PubMed

    Perru, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Mutualism is a biological association for a mutual benefit between two different species. In this paper, firstly, we examine the history and signification of mutualism in relation to symbiosis. Then, we consider the link between concepts and models of mutualism. Models of mutualism depend on different concepts we use: If mutualism is situated at populations' level, it will be expressed by Lotka-Volterra models, concerning exclusively populations' size. If mutualism is considered as a resources' exchange or a biological market increasing the fitness of these organisms, it will be described at an individual level by a cost-benefit model. Our analysis will be limited to the history and epistemology of Lotka-Volterra models and we hypothesize that these models are adapted at first to translate dynamic evolutions of mutualism. They render stability or variations of size and assume that there are clear distinctions and a state of equilibrium between populations of different species. Italian mathematician Vito Volterra demonstrated that biological associations consist in a constant relation between some species. In 1931 and 1935, Volterra described the general form of antagonistic or mutualistic biological associations by the same differential equations. We recognize that these equations have been more used to model competition or prey-predator interactions, but a simple sign change allows describing mutualism. The epistemological problem is the following: Volterra's equations help us to conceptualize a global phenomenon. However, mutualistic interactions may have stronger effects away from equilibrium and these effects may be better understood at individual level. We conclude that, between 1985 and 2000, some researchers carried on working and converting Lotka-Volterra models but this description appeared as insufficient. So, other researchers adopted an economical viewpoint, considering mutualism as a biological market.

  14. Classical method of coherence estimation based on mutual wavelet-spectra of time variations of studied processes observed in the Earth atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrutdinova, Antonina; Rizhov, Dmitriy; Magdeev, Konstantin

    In the present article the authors offer to conduct a research into influence exerted by solar effects (Wolf number) on time variations of average monthly values of the zonal wind, obtained in Kazan Federal University with the help of a meteoric radar complex KGU-M5 within the mesosphere - lower thermosphere during the period from 1978 to 2007. There exists a wide variety of signal processing methods that can be used to identify connection between two processes. A classical method of coherence calculation based on a mutual wavelet-spectrum has become widely used. Due to limited duration of the studied time series of dynamic parameters we have found coherent structures of time variations in solar activity (Wolf number) and zonal wind within the mesosphere-lower thermosphere for the scales of about 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, and 4-5 years. SCM values have been calculated for the most pronounced periodicities observed for scales of about 3 years during the period from 1986 to 1997. The average SCM value was equal to 0.75. Confidence interval of obtained SCM values was in the range of [0.54, 0.88] for the significance level As the atmosphere is a non-linear medium, this can lead to shifting and broadening of spectral components. In addition to the above mentioned periodicities (0.5 - 5 years), a wavelet spectrum calculated in the zonal wind field indicates possible presence of time periodicities in the range of 11-20 years.

  15. Child Temperament Moderates Effects of Parent-Child Mutuality on Self-Regulation: A Relationship-Based Path for Emotionally Negative Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sanghag; Kochanska, Grazyna

    2012-01-01

    This study examined infants' negative emotionality as moderating the effect of parent-child mutually responsive orientation (MRO) on children's self-regulation (n = 102). Negative emotionality was observed in anger-eliciting episodes and in interactions with parents at 7 months. MRO was coded in naturalistic interactions at 15 months.…

  16. Evaluating true BCI communication rate through mutual information and language models.

    PubMed

    Speier, William; Arnold, Corey; Pouratian, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems are a promising means for restoring communication to patients suffering from "locked-in" syndrome. Research to improve system performance primarily focuses on means to overcome the low signal to noise ratio of electroencephalogric (EEG) recordings. However, the literature and methods are difficult to compare due to the array of evaluation metrics and assumptions underlying them, including that: 1) all characters are equally probable, 2) character selection is memoryless, and 3) errors occur completely at random. The standardization of evaluation metrics that more accurately reflect the amount of information contained in BCI language output is critical to make progress. We present a mutual information-based metric that incorporates prior information and a model of systematic errors. The parameters of a system used in one study were re-optimized, showing that the metric used in optimization significantly affects the parameter values chosen and the resulting system performance. The results of 11 BCI communication studies were then evaluated using different metrics, including those previously used in BCI literature and the newly advocated metric. Six studies' results varied based on the metric used for evaluation and the proposed metric produced results that differed from those originally published in two of the studies. Standardizing metrics to accurately reflect the rate of information transmission is critical to properly evaluate and compare BCI communication systems and advance the field in an unbiased manner.

  17. Unbiased descriptor and parameter selection confirms the potential of proteochemometric modelling

    PubMed Central

    Freyhult, Eva; Prusis, Peteris; Lapinsh, Maris; Wikberg, Jarl ES; Moulton, Vincent; Gustafsson, Mats G

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteochemometrics is a new methodology that allows prediction of protein function directly from real interaction measurement data without the need of 3D structure information. Several reported proteochemometric models of ligand-receptor interactions have already yielded significant insights into various forms of bio-molecular interactions. The proteochemometric models are multivariate regression models that predict binding affinity for a particular combination of features of the ligand and protein. Although proteochemometric models have already offered interesting results in various studies, no detailed statistical evaluation of their average predictive power has been performed. In particular, variable subset selection performed to date has always relied on using all available examples, a situation also encountered in microarray gene expression data analysis. Results A methodology for an unbiased evaluation of the predictive power of proteochemometric models was implemented and results from applying it to two of the largest proteochemometric data sets yet reported are presented. A double cross-validation loop procedure is used to estimate the expected performance of a given design method. The unbiased performance estimates (P2) obtained for the data sets that we consider confirm that properly designed single proteochemometric models have useful predictive power, but that a standard design based on cross validation may yield models with quite limited performance. The results also show that different commercial software packages employed for the design of proteochemometric models may yield very different and therefore misleading performance estimates. In addition, the differences in the models obtained in the double CV loop indicate that detailed chemical interpretation of a single proteochemometric model is uncertain when data sets are small. Conclusion The double CV loop employed offer unbiased performance estimates about a given proteochemometric

  18. [Analyzing moiré pattern spectra based on the mutual transform between signals' waveform in time domain and their spectra in frequency space].

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Song, Yi-Zhong

    2013-11-01

    The mutual evolving processes of signals' waveforms and their spectra were numerically analyzed in time and frequency domains. The purpose was to research the essential relation between the signals' waveforms and their spectra. Then, the mutual transform principle was applied to analyze moiré pattern spectra, acquiring phase distribution information of the pattern. The rectangular window function was used to simulate the mutual transform between the impulse signal and direct-current waveform. Many rectangular window signals with deferent widths were obtained by changing the window width The unit impulse signal was obtained by changing the width down to zero, and the direct-current waveform obtained by changing the width up to +infinity. For smart, quick, and easy implementation of discrete Fourier transforms to rectangular pulses and obtain signals' spectra, a simple FFT system was worked out. With its calculating, the mutual evolving processes of signals' waveforms and their spectra were tracked deeply. All signals here were transformed with it. As the result, first, the spectra of rectangular window signals were in the form of sampling function [Sa(x) = sin(x)/x]. Second, with the change in the window's width, the waveform of Sa(x) changed. Third, when the width decreased, the waveform of Sa(x) extended, and vibrated more slowly. It changed into direct-current waveform when the width decreased to zero. Last, when the width increased, the waveform of Sa(x) shranked, and vibrated faster. It changed into impulse waveform when the width increased to +infinity. Signals' waveforms were in mutual transforms between the time and frequency domain. The transforming essence was considered as that the frequency component principle in Fourier series theory is reflected in the frequency domain. According to the principle of mutual transforms between signals' waveforms and their spectra, the first order spectrum of the moiré pattern was extracted out and normalized to a

  19. Mutual Help for the Widowed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Ruby Banks

    1972-01-01

    The Widowed Service Line, a mutual help program in metropolitan Boston that provided service by telephone, effectively meeting the various problems and needs of differing stages of widowhood, is described. (Author)

  20. Toward automated quantification of biological microstructures using unbiased stereology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonam, Om P.; Elozory, Daniel; Kramer, Kurt; Goldgof, Dmitry; Hall, Lawrence O.; Mangual, Osvaldo; Mouton, Peter R.

    2011-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of biological microstructures using unbiased stereology plays a large and growing role in bioscience research. Our aim is to add a fully automatic, high-throughput mode to a commercially available, computerized stereology device (Stereologer). The current method for estimation of first- and second order parameters of biological microstructures, requires a trained user to manually select objects of interest (cells, fibers etc.,) while stepping through the depth of a stained tissue section in fixed intervals. The proposed approach uses a combination of color and gray-level processing. Color processing is used to identify the objects of interest, by training on the images to obtain the threshold range for objects of interest. In gray-level processing, a region-growing approach was used to assign a unique identity to the objects of interest and enumerate them. This automatic approach achieved an overall object detection rate of 93.27%. Thus, these results support the view that automatic color and gray-level processing combined with unbiased sampling and assumption and model-free geometric probes can provide accurate and efficient quantification of biological objects.

  1. Improving Agricultural Drought Monitoring in East Africa with Unbiased Rainfall Fields and Detailed Land Surface Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, A.; Yatheendradas, S.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Michaelsen, J.

    2010-12-01

    Monitoring drought is particularly challenging within rainfed agricultural and pastoral systems, where it can serve the greatest need. Such locations often have sparse or non-existent ground based measurements of precipitation, evapotranspiration (ET), and soil moisture. For more effective drought monitoring with limited hydroclimate observations, we simulate land surface states using the Community Noah Land Surface Model forced with different merged rainfall products inside a Land Information System (LIS). Using model outputs we will answer the questions: How sensitive are soil moisture and ET fields to differences in rainfall forcing and model physics? What are acceptable drought-specific tradeoffs between near-real time availability and skill of rainfall data? Preliminary results with the African Rainfall Estimation Algorithm Version 2 (RFE2.0) outperformed global products, suggesting that sub-global rainfall estimates are the way forward for regional drought monitoring. Specifically, the Noah model forced with RFE2.0 better resolved the heterogeneous patterns in crop stress than the Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS NET) operational Water Requirement Satisfaction Index (WRSI) model. To further investigate the improvement in drought monitoring while maintaining timeliness, we unbias (using Africa specific climatology) the precipitation products from CPC Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP), Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM), and RFE2.0. The skill (relative accuracy) and reliability (average agreement) of the unbiased rainfall are calculated against an unbiased precipitation product augmented with station data from Ethiopia and Kenya. Soil moisture and ET fields from Noah are compared to the operational FEWS NET WRSI, soil water anomaly index, and the World Food Program’s Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission reports. We anticipate that the unbiased rainfall fields will improve the accuracy, spatio-temporal resolution, and

  2. Far-infrared observations of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, S. A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Bourne, N.; Baes, M.; Fritz, J.; Cooray, A.; De Looze, I.; De Zotti, G.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, S. J.; Scott, D.; Smith, D. J. B.; Smith, M. W. L.; Symeonidis, M.; Valiante, E.

    2015-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic phenomena in the Universe; believed to result from the collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars. Even though it has profound consequences for our understanding of their nature and selection biases, little is known about the dust properties of the galaxies hosting GRBs. We present analysis of the far-infrared properties of an unbiased sample of 20 BeppoSAX and Swift GRB host galaxies (at an average redshift of z = 3.1) located in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey, the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, the Herschel Fornax Cluster Survey, the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, totalling 880 deg2, or ˜3 per cent of the sky in total. Our sample selection is serendipitous, based only on whether the X-ray position of a GRB lies within a large-scale Herschel survey - therefore our sample can be considered completely unbiased. Using deep data at wavelengths of 100-500 μm, we tentatively detected 1 out of 20 GRB hosts located in these fields. We constrain their dust masses and star formation rates (SFRs), and discuss these in the context of recent measurements of submillimetre galaxies and ultraluminous infrared galaxies. The average far-infrared flux of our sample gives an upper limit on SFR of <114 M⊙ yr-1. The detection rate of GRB hosts is consistent with that predicted assuming that GRBs trace the cosmic SFR density in an unbiased way, i.e. that the fraction of GRB hosts with SFR > 500 M⊙ yr-1 is consistent with the contribution of such luminous galaxies to the cosmic star formation density.

  3. Quantitative Assessment of In-solution Digestion Efficiency Identifies Optimal Protocols for Unbiased Protein Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    León, Ileana R.; Schwämmle, Veit; Jensen, Ole N.; Sprenger, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of mass spectrometry-based protein quantification studies uses peptide-centric analytical methods and thus strongly relies on efficient and unbiased protein digestion protocols for sample preparation. We present a novel objective approach to assess protein digestion efficiency using a combination of qualitative and quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem MS methods and statistical data analysis. In contrast to previous studies we employed both standard qualitative as well as data-independent quantitative workflows to systematically assess trypsin digestion efficiency and bias using mitochondrial protein fractions. We evaluated nine trypsin-based digestion protocols, based on standard in-solution or on spin filter-aided digestion, including new optimized protocols. We investigated various reagents for protein solubilization and denaturation (dodecyl sulfate, deoxycholate, urea), several trypsin digestion conditions (buffer, RapiGest, deoxycholate, urea), and two methods for removal of detergents before analysis of peptides (acid precipitation or phase separation with ethyl acetate). Our data-independent quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem MS workflow quantified over 3700 distinct peptides with 96% completeness between all protocols and replicates, with an average 40% protein sequence coverage and an average of 11 peptides identified per protein. Systematic quantitative and statistical analysis of physicochemical parameters demonstrated that deoxycholate-assisted in-solution digestion combined with phase transfer allows for efficient, unbiased generation and recovery of peptides from all protein classes, including membrane proteins. This deoxycholate-assisted protocol was also optimal for spin filter-aided digestions as compared with existing methods. PMID:23792921

  4. On the Keyhole Hypothesis: High Mutual Information between Ear and Scalp EEG

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Kaare B.; Kidmose, Preben; Hansen, Lars K.

    2017-01-01

    We propose and test the keyhole hypothesis—that measurements from low dimensional EEG, such as ear-EEG reflect a broadly distributed set of neural processes. We formulate the keyhole hypothesis in information theoretical terms. The experimental investigation is based on legacy data consisting of 10 subjects exposed to a battery of stimuli, including alpha-attenuation, auditory onset, and mismatch-negativity responses and a new medium-long EEG experiment involving data acquisition during 13 h. Linear models were estimated to lower bound the scalp-to-ear capacity, i.e., predicting ear-EEG data from simultaneously recorded scalp EEG. A cross-validation procedure was employed to ensure unbiased estimates. We present several pieces of evidence in support of the keyhole hypothesis: There is a high mutual information between data acquired at scalp electrodes and through the ear-EEG “keyhole,” furthermore we show that the view—represented as a linear mapping—is stable across both time and mental states. Specifically, we find that ear-EEG data can be predicted reliably from scalp EEG. We also address the reverse view, and demonstrate that large portions of the scalp EEG can be predicted from ear-EEG, with the highest predictability achieved in the temporal regions and when using ear-EEG electrodes with a common reference electrode. PMID:28713253

  5. Construction of An Unbiased Spatio-Temporal Atlas of the Tongue During Speech.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jonghye; Xing, Fangxu; Lee, Junghoon; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative characterization and comparison of tongue motion during speech and swallowing present fundamental challenges because of striking variations in tongue structure and motion across subjects. A reliable and objective description of the dynamics tongue motion requires the consistent integration of inter-subject variability to detect the subtle changes in populations. To this end, in this work, we present an approach to constructing an unbiased spatio-temporal atlas of the tongue during speech for the first time, based on cine-MRI from twenty two normal subjects. First, we create a common spatial space using images from the reference time frame, a neutral position, in which the unbiased spatio-temporal atlas can be created. Second, we transport images from all time frames of all subjects into this common space via the single transformation. Third, we construct atlases for each time frame via groupwise diffeomorphic registration, which serves as the initial spatio-temporal atlas. Fourth, we update the spatio-temporal atlas by realigning each time sequence based on the Lipschitz norm on diffeomorphisms between each subject and the initial atlas. We evaluate and compare different configurations such as similarity measures to build the atlas. Our proposed method permits to accurately and objectively explain the main pattern of tongue surface motion.

  6. Unbiased identification of finite impulse response linear systems operating in closed-loop.

    PubMed

    Westwick, David T; Perreault, Eric J

    2006-01-01

    The force and position data issued to construct models of joint dynamics are often obtained from closed-loop experiments, where the joint position is perturbed using an actuator configured as a position servo. If the position servo is orders of magnitude staffer than the joint, as is often the case, it is possible to treat the data as if they were obtained in open loop. It may be more relevant to study joint dynamics in compliant environments. This can be accomplished by adding an admittance controller, programmed to simulate a compliant environment, into the servo. Under these conditions, the presence of feedback cannot be ignored. Unbiased estimates of a system can be directly obtained from closed-loop data using the prediction error method. However, this is not true, in general, when linear regression or correlation-based analysis is used to fit nonparametric time- or frequency domain models. We develop a prediction error minimization based identification method for a nonparametric time-domain model, augmented with a parametric noise model. Simulations suggest that the method produces unbiased estimates of the dynamics of a system operating inside a feedback loop, even though linear regression results in substantial biases.

  7. Unbiased water and methanol maser surveys of NGC 1333

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, A-Ran; Kim, Jongsoo; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Ho-Gyu

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of unbiased 22 GHz H{sub 2}O water and 44 GHz class I CH{sub 3}OH methanol maser surveys in the central 7' × 10' area of NGC 1333 and two additional mapping observations of a 22 GHz water maser in a ∼3' × 3' area of the IRAS4A region. In the 22 GHz water maser survey of NGC 1333 with a sensitivity of σ ∼ 0.3 Jy, we confirmed the detection of masers toward H{sub 2}O(B) in the region of HH 7-11 and IRAS4B. We also detected new water masers located ∼20'' away in the western direction of IRAS4B or ∼25'' away in the southern direction of IRAS4A. We could not, however, find young stellar objects or molecular outflows associated with them. They showed two different velocity components of ∼0 and ∼16 km s{sup –1}, which are blue- and redshifted relative to the adopted systemic velocity of ∼7 km s{sup –1} for NGC 1333. They also showed time variabilities in both intensity and velocity from multi-epoch observations and an anti-correlation between the intensities of the blue- and redshifted velocity components. We suggest that the unidentified power source of these masers might be found in the earliest evolutionary stage of star formation, before the onset of molecular outflows. Finding this kind of water maser is only possible through an unbiased blind survey. In the 44 GHz methanol maser survey with a sensitivity of σ ∼ 0.5 Jy, we confirmed masers toward IRAS4A2 and the eastern shock region of IRAS2A. Both sources are also detected in 95 and 132 GHz methanol maser lines. In addition, we had new detections of methanol masers at 95 and 132 GHz toward IRAS4B. In terms of the isotropic luminosity, we detected methanol maser sources brighter than ∼5 × 10{sup 25} erg s{sup –1} from our unbiased survey.

  8. Mutual Coupling Analysis for Conformal Microstrip Antennas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    coated cylinder. Certain orthogonality properties of the cylindrical vector wave functions [ 15 ] are established in this chapter. The dielectric coated...forms of orthogonal properties of these vector - wave functions have previously been investigated by Stratton [ 15 ] who used a mixed domain of (p,O,X...based upon appropriate Green’s functions are employed to rigorously treat the mutual coupling of microstrip patches on 1) an infinite grounded dielectric

  9. Unbiased atlas formation via large deformations metric mapping.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Peter; Davis, Brad; Joshi, Sarang

    2005-01-01

    The construction of population atlases is a key issue in medical image analysis, and particularly in brain mapping. Large sets of images are mapped into a common coordinate system to study intra-population variability and inter-population differences, to provide voxel-wise mapping of functional sites, and to facilitate tissue and object segmentation via registration of anatomical labels. We formulate the unbiased atlas construction problem as a Fréchet mean estimation in the space of diffeomorphisms via large deformations metric mapping. A novel method for computing constant speed velocity fields and an analysis of atlas stability and robustness using entropy are presented. We address the question: how many images are required to build a stable brain atlas?

  10. Unbiased estimation of cell number using the automatic optical fractionator.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Peter R; Phoulady, Hady Ahmady; Goldgof, Dmitry; Hall, Lawrence O; Gordon, Marcia; Morgan, David

    2017-03-01

    A novel stereology approach, the automatic optical fractionator, is presented for obtaining unbiased and efficient estimates of the number of cells in tissue sections. Used in combination with existing segmentation algorithms and ordinary immunostaining methods, automatic estimates of cell number are obtainable from extended depth of field images built from three-dimensional volumes of tissue (disector stacks). The automatic optical fractionator is more accurate, 100% objective and 8-10 times faster than the manual optical fractionator. An example of the automatic fractionator is provided for counts of immunostained neurons in neocortex of a genetically modified mouse model of neurodegeneration. Evidence is presented for the often overlooked prerequisite that accurate counting by the optical fractionator requires a thin focal plane generated by a high optical resolution lens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Maximum likelihood: Extracting unbiased information from complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlaschelli, Diego; Loffredo, Maria I.

    2008-07-01

    The choice of free parameters in network models is subjective, since it depends on what topological properties are being monitored. However, we show that the maximum likelihood (ML) principle indicates a unique, statistically rigorous parameter choice, associated with a well-defined topological feature. We then find that, if the ML condition is incompatible with the built-in parameter choice, network models turn out to be intrinsically ill defined or biased. To overcome this problem, we construct a class of safely unbiased models. We also propose an extension of these results that leads to the fascinating possibility to extract, only from topological data, the “hidden variables” underlying network organization, making them “no longer hidden.” We test our method on World Trade Web data, where we recover the empirical gross domestic product using only topological information.

  12. The Central Symbiosis of Molecular Biology: Molecules in Mutualism.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Kathryn A; Petrov, Anton S; Williams, Loren Dean

    2017-08-07

    As illustrated by the mitochondrion and the eukaryotic cell, little in biology makes sense except in light of mutualism. Mutualisms are persistent, intimate, and reciprocal exchanges; an organism proficient in obtaining certain benefits confers those on a partner, which reciprocates by conferring different benefits. Mutualisms (i) increase fitness, (ii) inspire robustness, (iii) are resilient and resistant to change, (iv) sponsor co-evolution, (v) foster innovation, and (vi) involve partners that are distantly related with contrasting yet complementary proficiencies. Previous to this work, mutualisms were understood to operate on levels of cells, organisms, ecosystems, and even societies and economies. Here, the concepts of mutualism are extended to molecules and are seen to apply to the relationship between RNA and protein. Polynucleotide and polypeptide are Molecules in Mutualism. RNA synthesizes protein in the ribosome and protein synthesizes RNA in polymerases. RNA and protein are codependent, and trade proficiencies. Protein has proficiency in folding into complex three-dimensional states, contributing enzymes, fibers, adhesives, pumps, pores, switches, and receptors. RNA has proficiency in direct molecular recognition, achieved by complementary base pairing interactions, which allow it to maintain, record, and transduce information. The large phylogenetic distance that characterizes partnerships in organismal mutualism has close analogy with large distance in chemical space between RNA and protein. The RNA backbone is anionic and self-repulsive and cannot form hydrophobic structural cores. The protein backbone is neutral and cohesive and commonly forms hydrophobic cores. Molecules in Mutualism extends beyond RNA and protein. A cell is a consortium of molecules in which nucleic acids, proteins, polysaccharides, phospholipids, and other molecules form a mutualism consortium that drives metabolism and replication. Analogies are found in systems such as

  13. An Example of an Improvable Rao–Blackwell Improvement, Inefficient Maximum Likelihood Estimator, and Unbiased Generalized Bayes Estimator

    PubMed Central

    Galili, Tal; Meilijson, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    The Rao–Blackwell theorem offers a procedure for converting a crude unbiased estimator of a parameter θ into a “better” one, in fact unique and optimal if the improvement is based on a minimal sufficient statistic that is complete. In contrast, behind every minimal sufficient statistic that is not complete, there is an improvable Rao–Blackwell improvement. This is illustrated via a simple example based on the uniform distribution, in which a rather natural Rao–Blackwell improvement is uniformly improvable. Furthermore, in this example the maximum likelihood estimator is inefficient, and an unbiased generalized Bayes estimator performs exceptionally well. Counterexamples of this sort can be useful didactic tools for explaining the true nature of a methodology and possible consequences when some of the assumptions are violated. [Received December 2014. Revised September 2015.] PMID:27499547

  14. An Example of an Improvable Rao-Blackwell Improvement, Inefficient Maximum Likelihood Estimator, and Unbiased Generalized Bayes Estimator.

    PubMed

    Galili, Tal; Meilijson, Isaac

    2016-01-02

    The Rao-Blackwell theorem offers a procedure for converting a crude unbiased estimator of a parameter θ into a "better" one, in fact unique and optimal if the improvement is based on a minimal sufficient statistic that is complete. In contrast, behind every minimal sufficient statistic that is not complete, there is an improvable Rao-Blackwell improvement. This is illustrated via a simple example based on the uniform distribution, in which a rather natural Rao-Blackwell improvement is uniformly improvable. Furthermore, in this example the maximum likelihood estimator is inefficient, and an unbiased generalized Bayes estimator performs exceptionally well. Counterexamples of this sort can be useful didactic tools for explaining the true nature of a methodology and possible consequences when some of the assumptions are violated. [Received December 2014. Revised September 2015.].

  15. Effective incorporating spatial information in a mutual information based 3D-2D registration of a CT volume to X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan

    2010-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating the 3D rigid poses of a CT volume of an object from its 2D X-ray projection(s). We use maximization of mutual information, an accurate similarity measure for multi-modal and mono-modal image registration tasks. However, it is known that the standard mutual information measures only take intensity values into account without considering spatial information and their robustness is questionable. In this paper, instead of directly maximizing mutual information, we propose to use a variational approximation derived from the Kullback-Leibler bound. Spatial information is then incorporated into this variational approximation using a Markov random field model. The newly derived similarity measure has a least-squares form and can be effectively minimized by a multi-resolution Levenberg-Marquardt optimizer. Experiments were conducted on datasets from two applications: (a) intra-operative patient pose estimation from a limited number (e.g. 2) of calibrated fluoroscopic images, and (b) post-operative cup orientation estimation from a single standard X-ray radiograph with/without gonadal shielding. The experiment on intra-operative patient pose estimation showed a mean target registration accuracy of 0.8mm and a capture range of 11.5mm, while the experiment on estimating the post-operative cup orientation from a single X-ray radiograph showed a mean accuracy below 2 degrees for both anteversion and inclination. More importantly, results from both experiments demonstrated that the newly derived similarity measures were robust to occlusions in the X-ray image(s).

  16. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric plasma mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2004-09-07

    The authors present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric two-component plasma (TCP). They compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. for the case of viscosity they propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion they point out some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models.

  17. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, Sorin

    2005-05-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixture. We compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. For the case of viscosity we propose a predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion we discuss some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann-equation-based models.

  18. Sequence comparisons via algorithmic mutual information

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavijevic, A.

    1994-12-31

    One of the main problems in DNA and protein sequence comparisons is to decide whether observed similarity of two sequences should be explained by their relatedness or by mere presence of some shared internal structure, e.g., shared internal tandem repeats. The standard methods that are based on statistics or classical information theory can be used to discover either internal structure or mutual sequence similarity, but cannot take into account both. Consequently, currently used methods for sequence comparison employ {open_quotes}masking{close_quotes} techniques that simply eliminate sequences that exhibit internal repetitive structure prior to sequence comparisons. The {open_quotes}masking{close_quotes} approach precludes discovery of homologous sequences of moderate or low complexity, which abound at both DNA and protein levels. As a solution to this problem, we propose a general method that is based on algorithmic information theory and minimal length encoding. We show that algorithmic mutual information factors out the sequence similarity that is due to shared internal structure and thus enables discovery of truly related sequences. We extend the recently developed algorithmic significance method to show that significance depends exponentially on algorithmic mutual information.

  19. Unbiased free energy estimates in fast nonequilibrium transformations using Gaussian mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Procacci, Piero

    2015-04-21

    In this paper, we present an improved method for obtaining unbiased estimates of the free energy difference between two thermodynamic states using the work distribution measured in nonequilibrium driven experiments connecting these states. The method is based on the assumption that any observed work distribution is given by a mixture of Gaussian distributions, whose normal components are identical in either direction of the nonequilibrium process, with weights regulated by the Crooks theorem. Using the prototypical example for the driven unfolding/folding of deca-alanine, we show that the predicted behavior of the forward and reverse work distributions, assuming a combination of only two Gaussian components with Crooks derived weights, explains surprisingly well the striking asymmetry in the observed distributions at fast pulling speeds. The proposed methodology opens the way for a perfectly parallel implementation of Jarzynski-based free energy calculations in complex systems.

  20. Unbiased free energy estimates in fast nonequilibrium transformations using Gaussian mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procacci, Piero

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present an improved method for obtaining unbiased estimates of the free energy difference between two thermodynamic states using the work distribution measured in nonequilibrium driven experiments connecting these states. The method is based on the assumption that any observed work distribution is given by a mixture of Gaussian distributions, whose normal components are identical in either direction of the nonequilibrium process, with weights regulated by the Crooks theorem. Using the prototypical example for the driven unfolding/folding of deca-alanine, we show that the predicted behavior of the forward and reverse work distributions, assuming a combination of only two Gaussian components with Crooks derived weights, explains surprisingly well the striking asymmetry in the observed distributions at fast pulling speeds. The proposed methodology opens the way for a perfectly parallel implementation of Jarzynski-based free energy calculations in complex systems.

  1. Unbiased free energy estimates in fast nonequilibrium transformations using Gaussian mixtures.

    PubMed

    Procacci, Piero

    2015-04-21

    In this paper, we present an improved method for obtaining unbiased estimates of the free energy difference between two thermodynamic states using the work distribution measured in nonequilibrium driven experiments connecting these states. The method is based on the assumption that any observed work distribution is given by a mixture of Gaussian distributions, whose normal components are identical in either direction of the nonequilibrium process, with weights regulated by the Crooks theorem. Using the prototypical example for the driven unfolding/folding of deca-alanine, we show that the predicted behavior of the forward and reverse work distributions, assuming a combination of only two Gaussian components with Crooks derived weights, explains surprisingly well the striking asymmetry in the observed distributions at fast pulling speeds. The proposed methodology opens the way for a perfectly parallel implementation of Jarzynski-based free energy calculations in complex systems.

  2. Herbivory eliminates fitness costs of mutualism exploiters.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Anna K; Stinchcombe, John R

    2014-04-01

    A common empirical observation in mutualistic interactions is the persistence of variation in partner quality and, in particular, the persistence of exploitative phenotypes. For mutualisms between hosts and symbionts, most mutualism theory assumes that exploiters always impose fitness costs on their host. We exposed legume hosts to mutualistic (nitrogen-fixing) and exploitative (non-nitrogen-fixing) symbiotic rhizobia in field conditions, and manipulated the presence or absence of insect herbivory to determine if the costly fitness effects of exploitative rhizobia are context-dependent. Exploitative rhizobia predictably reduced host fitness when herbivores were excluded. However, insects caused greater damage on hosts associating with mutualistic rhizobia, as a consequence of feeding preferences related to leaf nitrogen content, resulting in the elimination of fitness costs imposed on hosts by exploitative rhizobia. Our experiment shows that herbivory is potentially an important factor in influencing the evolutionary dynamic between legumes and rhizobia. Partner choice and host sanctioning are theoretically predicted to stabilize mutualisms by reducing the frequency of exploitative symbionts. We argue that herbivore pressure may actually weaken selection on choice and sanction mechanisms, thus providing one explanation of why host-based discrimination mechanisms may not be completely effective in eliminating nonbeneficial partners.

  3. Mutual Respect and Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary theories of civic education frequently appeal to an ideal of mutual respect in the context of ethical, ethical and religious disagreement. This paper critically examines two recently popular criticisms of this ideal. The first, coming from a postmodern direction, charges that the ideal is hypocritical in its effort to be maximally…

  4. Hospital mutual aid evacuation plan.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R

    1997-02-01

    Health care facilities need to be prepared for disasters such as floods, tornadoes and earthquakes. Rochester, NY, and its surrounding communities devised a hospital mutual aid evacuation plan in the event a disaster occurs and also to comply with the Joint Commission. This document discusses the plan's development process and also provides the end result.

  5. Mutual Respect and Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary theories of civic education frequently appeal to an ideal of mutual respect in the context of ethical, ethical and religious disagreement. This paper critically examines two recently popular criticisms of this ideal. The first, coming from a postmodern direction, charges that the ideal is hypocritical in its effort to be maximally…

  6. Harnessing RNA sequencing for global, unbiased evaluation of two new adjuvants for dendritic-cell immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mathan, Till S M; Textor, Johannes; Sköld, Annette E; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; van Oorschot, Tom; Brüning, Mareke; Figdor, Carl G; Buschow, Sonja I; Bakdash, Ghaith; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2017-02-08

    Effective stimulation of immune cells is crucial for the success of cancer immunotherapies. Current approaches to evaluate the efficiency of stimuli are mainly defined by known flow cytometry-based cell activation or cell maturation markers. This method however does not give a complete overview of the achieved activation state and may leave important side effects unnoticed. Here, we used an unbiased RNA sequencing (RNA-seq)-based approach to compare the capacity of four clinical-grade dendritic cell (DC) activation stimuli used to prepare DC-vaccines composed of various types of DC subsets; the already clinically applied GM-CSF and Frühsommer meningoencephalitis (FSME) prophylactic vaccine and the novel clinical grade adjuvants protamine-RNA complexes (pRNA) and CpG-P. We found that GM-CSF and pRNA had similar effects on their target cells, whereas pRNA and CpG-P induced stronger type I interferon (IFN) expression than FSME. In general, the pathways most affected by all stimuli were related to immune activity and cell migration. GM-CSF stimulation, however, also induced a significant increase of genes related to nonsense-mediated decay, indicating a possible deleterious effect of this stimulus. Taken together, the two novel stimuli appear to be promising alternatives. Our study demonstrates how RNA-seq based investigation of changes in a large number of genes and gene groups can be exploited for fast and unbiased, global evaluation of clinical-grade stimuli, as opposed to the general limited evaluation of a pre-specified set of genes, by which one might miss important biological effects that are detrimental for vaccine efficacy.

  7. Estimation of the squared modulus of the mutual intensity from high-light-level intensity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Timothy J.

    1995-06-01

    The problem of estimating the squared modulus of the mutual intensity (or the complex coherence factor) from high-light-level intensity measurements is addressed for the situation in which the fluctuations of the complex-valued amplitude are governed by circular-Gaussian statistics and the light level is high enough that all nonclassical fluctuations of the measurements can be ignored. A lower bound on the variance of any unbiased estimator is presented, and this bound is compared with the variance of Ebstein's polynomial estimators [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 8, 1450 (1991)] along with the variance of the maximum-likelihood estimator.

  8. Unbiased bootstrap error estimation for linear discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Vu, Thang; Sima, Chao; Braga-Neto, Ulisses M; Dougherty, Edward R

    2014-12-01

    Convex bootstrap error estimation is a popular tool for classifier error estimation in gene expression studies. A basic question is how to determine the weight for the convex combination between the basic bootstrap estimator and the resubstitution estimator such that the resulting estimator is unbiased at finite sample sizes. The well-known 0.632 bootstrap error estimator uses asymptotic arguments to propose a fixed 0.632 weight, whereas the more recent 0.632+ bootstrap error estimator attempts to set the weight adaptively. In this paper, we study the finite sample problem in the case of linear discriminant analysis under Gaussian populations. We derive exact expressions for the weight that guarantee unbiasedness of the convex bootstrap error estimator in the univariate and multivariate cases, without making asymptotic simplifications. Using exact computation in the univariate case and an accurate approximation in the multivariate case, we obtain the required weight and show that it can deviate significantly from the constant 0.632 weight, depending on the sample size and Bayes error for the problem. The methodology is illustrated by application on data from a well-known cancer classification study.

  9. Unbiased, scalable sampling of protein loop conformations from probabilistic priors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein loops are flexible structures that are intimately tied to function, but understanding loop motion and generating loop conformation ensembles remain significant computational challenges. Discrete search techniques scale poorly to large loops, optimization and molecular dynamics techniques are prone to local minima, and inverse kinematics techniques can only incorporate structural preferences in adhoc fashion. This paper presents Sub-Loop Inverse Kinematics Monte Carlo (SLIKMC), a new Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for generating conformations of closed loops according to experimentally available, heterogeneous structural preferences. Results Our simulation experiments demonstrate that the method computes high-scoring conformations of large loops (>10 residues) orders of magnitude faster than standard Monte Carlo and discrete search techniques. Two new developments contribute to the scalability of the new method. First, structural preferences are specified via a probabilistic graphical model (PGM) that links conformation variables, spatial variables (e.g., atom positions), constraints and prior information in a unified framework. The method uses a sparse PGM that exploits locality of interactions between atoms and residues. Second, a novel method for sampling sub-loops is developed to generate statistically unbiased samples of probability densities restricted by loop-closure constraints. Conclusion Numerical experiments confirm that SLIKMC generates conformation ensembles that are statistically consistent with specified structural preferences. Protein conformations with 100+ residues are sampled on standard PC hardware in seconds. Application to proteins involved in ion-binding demonstrate its potential as a tool for loop ensemble generation and missing structure completion. PMID:24565175

  10. Nematode-bacteria mutualism: Selection within the mutualism supersedes selection outside of the mutualism.

    PubMed

    Morran, Levi T; Penley, McKenna J; Byrd, Victoria S; Meyer, Andrew J; O'Sullivan, Timothy S; Bashey, Farrah; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Lively, Curtis M

    2016-03-01

    The coevolution of interacting species can lead to codependent mutualists. Little is known about the effect of selection on partners within verses apart from the association. Here, we determined the effect of selection on bacteria (Xenorhabdus nematophila) both within and apart from its mutualistic partner (a nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae). In nature, the two species cooperatively infect and kill arthropods. We passaged the bacteria either together with (M+), or isolated from (M-), nematodes under two different selection regimes: random selection (S-) and selection for increased virulence against arthropod hosts (S+). We found that the isolated bacteria evolved greater virulence under selection for greater virulence (M-S+) than under random selection (M-S-). In addition, the response to selection in the isolated bacteria (M-S+) caused a breakdown of the mutualism following reintroduction to the nematode. Finally, selection for greater virulence did not alter the evolutionary trajectories of bacteria passaged within the mutualism (M+S+ = M+S-), indicating that selection for the maintenance of the mutualism was stronger than selection for increased virulence. The results show that selection on isolated mutualists can rapidly breakdown beneficial interactions between species, but that selection within a mutualism can supersede external selection, potentially generating codependence over time.

  11. Nematode-Bacteria Mutualism: Selection Within the Mutualism Supersedes Selection Outside of the Mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Morran, Levi T.; Penley, McKenna J.; Byrd, Victoria S.; Meyer, Andrew J.; O’Sullivan, Timothy S.; Bashey, Farrah; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Lively, Curtis M.

    2016-01-01

    The coevolution of interacting species can lead to co-dependent mutualists. Little is known about the effect of selection on partners within verses apart from the association. Here, we determined the effect of selection on bacteria (Xenorhabdus nematophila) both within and apart from its mutualistic partner (a nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae). In nature, the two species cooperatively infect and kill arthropods. We passaged the bacteria either together with (M+), or isolated from (M−), nematodes under two different selection regimes: random selection (S−) and selection for increased virulence against arthropod hosts (S+). We found that the isolated bacteria evolved greater virulence under selection for greater virulence (M−S+) than under random selection (M−S−). In addition, the response to selection in the isolated bacteria (M−S+) caused a breakdown of the mutualism following reintroduction to the nematode. Finally, selection for greater virulence did not alter the evolutionary trajectories of bacteria passaged within the mutualism (M+S+ = M+S−), indicating that selection for the maintenance of the mutualism was stronger than selection for increased virulence. The results show that selection on isolated mutualists can rapidly breakdown beneficial interactions between species, but that selection within a mutualism can supersede external selection, potentially generating co-dependence over time. PMID:26867502

  12. Unbiased volume estimation with coaxial sections: an application to the human bladder.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Orive, L M; Roberts, N

    1993-04-01

    A problem of current medical interest is how to estimate the volume of an object from coaxial sections. Such images can be produced in ultrasound scanning, when the planar scan sections all emanate from a common axis. Two unbiased volume estimators for this sampling regime, previously published without derivation, are derived and presented here in some detail. The estimators are based on an ancient theorem of Pappus of Alexandria (c. AD 320). One of the estimators was used to estimate the volume of urine in the bladder of six human volunteers. The case example was attractive because the corresponding volumes could be voided and directly measured after the scanning session, thus confirming the unbiasedness of the estimator used. Sample size guidelines are also given.

  13. Cluster-span threshold: An unbiased threshold for binarising weighted complete networks in functional connectivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Keith; Azami, Hamed; Parra, Mario A; Starr, John M; Escudero, Javier

    2015-08-01

    We propose a new unbiased threshold for network analysis named the Cluster-Span Threshold (CST). This is based on the clustering coefficient, C, following logic that a balance of `clustering' to `spanning' triples results in a useful topology for network analysis and that the product of complementing properties has a unique value only when perfectly balanced. We threshold networks by fixing C at this balanced value, rather than fixing connection density at an arbitrary value, as has been the trend. We compare results from an electroencephalogram data set of volunteers performing visual short term memory tasks of the CST alongside other thresholds, including maximum spanning trees. We find that the CST holds as a sensitive threshold for distinguishing differences in the functional connectivity between tasks. This provides a sensitive and objective method for setting a threshold on weighted complete networks which may prove influential on the future of functional connectivity research.

  14. Constructing an un-biased whole body atlas from clinical imaging data by fragment bundling.

    PubMed

    Dorfer, Matthias; Donner, René; Langs, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Atlases have a tremendous impact on the study of anatomy and function, such as in neuroimaging, or cardiac analysis. They provide a means to compare corresponding measurements across populations, or model the variability in a population. Current approaches to construct atlases rely on examples that show the same anatomical structure (e.g., the brain). If we study large heterogeneous clinical populations to capture subtle characteristics of diseases, we cannot assume consistent image acquisition any more. Instead we have to build atlases from imaging data that show only parts of the overall anatomical structure. In this paper we propose a method for the automatic contruction of an un-biased whole body atlas from so-called fragments. Experimental results indicate that the fragment based atlas improves the representation accuracy of the atlas over an initial whole body template initialization.

  15. Unbiased Quantitative Models of Protein Translation Derived from Ribosome Profiling Data.

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, Alexey A; Hulsman, Marc; Reinders, Marcel J T; de Ridder, Dick

    2015-08-01

    Translation of RNA to protein is a core process for any living organism. While for some steps of this process the effect on protein production is understood, a holistic understanding of translation still remains elusive. In silico modelling is a promising approach for elucidating the process of protein synthesis. Although a number of computational models of the process have been proposed, their application is limited by the assumptions they make. Ribosome profiling (RP), a relatively new sequencing-based technique capable of recording snapshots of the locations of actively translating ribosomes, is a promising source of information for deriving unbiased data-driven translation models. However, quantitative analysis of RP data is challenging due to high measurement variance and the inability to discriminate between the number of ribosomes measured on a gene and their speed of translation. We propose a solution in the form of a novel multi-scale interpretation of RP data that allows for deriving models with translation dynamics extracted from the snapshots. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach by simultaneously determining for the first time per-codon translation elongation and per-gene translation initiation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from RP data for two versions of the Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Process (TASEP) model of translation. We do this in an unbiased fashion, by fitting the models using only RP data with a novel optimization scheme based on Monte Carlo simulation to keep the problem tractable. The fitted models match the data significantly better than existing models and their predictions show better agreement with several independent protein abundance datasets than existing models. Results additionally indicate that the tRNA pool adaptation hypothesis is incomplete, with evidence suggesting that tRNA post-transcriptional modifications and codon context may play a role in determining codon elongation rates.

  16. Unbiased Quantitative Models of Protein Translation Derived from Ribosome Profiling Data

    PubMed Central

    Gritsenko, Alexey A.; Hulsman, Marc; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; de Ridder, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Translation of RNA to protein is a core process for any living organism. While for some steps of this process the effect on protein production is understood, a holistic understanding of translation still remains elusive. In silico modelling is a promising approach for elucidating the process of protein synthesis. Although a number of computational models of the process have been proposed, their application is limited by the assumptions they make. Ribosome profiling (RP), a relatively new sequencing-based technique capable of recording snapshots of the locations of actively translating ribosomes, is a promising source of information for deriving unbiased data-driven translation models. However, quantitative analysis of RP data is challenging due to high measurement variance and the inability to discriminate between the number of ribosomes measured on a gene and their speed of translation. We propose a solution in the form of a novel multi-scale interpretation of RP data that allows for deriving models with translation dynamics extracted from the snapshots. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach by simultaneously determining for the first time per-codon translation elongation and per-gene translation initiation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from RP data for two versions of the Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Process (TASEP) model of translation. We do this in an unbiased fashion, by fitting the models using only RP data with a novel optimization scheme based on Monte Carlo simulation to keep the problem tractable. The fitted models match the data significantly better than existing models and their predictions show better agreement with several independent protein abundance datasets than existing models. Results additionally indicate that the tRNA pool adaptation hypothesis is incomplete, with evidence suggesting that tRNA post-transcriptional modifications and codon context may play a role in determining codon elongation rates. PMID:26275099

  17. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE...-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

  18. Pluto-charon mutual events

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, R.P. )

    1989-11-01

    Since 1985, planetary astronomers have been working to take advantage of a once-per-century apparent alignment between Pluto and its satellite, Charon, which has allowed mutual occultation and transit events to be observed. There events, which will cease in 1990, have permitted the first precise determinations of their individual radii, densities, and surface compositions. In addition, information on their surface albedo distributions can be obtained.

  19. Mutuality in the provision of Scottish healthcare.

    PubMed

    Howieson, Brian

    2015-11-01

    The backdrop to this article is provided by the Better Health, Better Care Action Plan (Scottish Government, 2007), Section 1 of which is entitled 'Towards a Mutual NHS'. According to Better Health, Better Care (Scottish Government, 2007: 5): 'Mutual organisations are designed to serve their members. They are designed to gather people around a common sense of purpose. They are designed to bring the organisation together in what people often call "co-production."' The aim of this article is to précis the current knowledge of mutuality in the provision of Scottish healthcare. In detail, it will: introduce the 'mutual' organisation; offer a historical perspective of mutuality; suggest why healthcare mutuality is important; and briefly, detail the differences in mutual health-care policy in England and Scotland. It is hoped that this analysis will help researchers and practitioners alike appreciate further the philosophy of mutuality in the provision of Scottish healthcare.

  20. UNBIASED INCLINATION DISTRIBUTIONS FOR OBJECTS IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Gulbis, A. A. S.; Elliot, J. L.; Adams, E. R.; Benecchi, S. D.; Buie, M. W.; Trilling, D. E.; Wasserman, L. H. E-mail: jle@mit.ed E-mail: lhw@lowell.ed E-mail: buie@boulder.swri.ed

    2010-08-15

    Using data from the Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES), we investigate the inclination distributions of objects in the Kuiper Belt. We present a derivation for observational bias removal and use this procedure to generate unbiased inclination distributions for Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) of different DES dynamical classes, with respect to the Kuiper Belt plane. Consistent with previous results, we find that the inclination distribution for all DES KBOs is well fit by the sum of two Gaussians, or a Gaussian plus a generalized Lorentzian, multiplied by sin i. Approximately 80% of KBOs are in the high-inclination grouping. We find that Classical object inclinations are well fit by sin i multiplied by the sum of two Gaussians, with roughly even distribution between Gaussians of widths 2.0{sup +0.6}{sub -0.5}{sup 0} and 8.1{sup +2.6}{sub -2.1}{sup 0}. Objects in different resonances exhibit different inclination distributions. The inclinations of Scattered objects are best matched by sin i multiplied by a single Gaussian that is centered at 19.1{sup +3.9}{sub -3.6}{sup 0} with a width of 6.9{sup +4.1}{sub -2.7}{sup 0}. Centaur inclinations peak just below 20{sup 0}, with one exceptionally high-inclination object near 80{sup 0}. The currently observed inclination distribution of the Centaurs is not dissimilar to that of the Scattered Extended KBOs and Jupiter-family comets, but is significantly different from the Classical and Resonant KBOs. While the sample sizes of some dynamical classes are still small, these results should begin to serve as a critical diagnostic for models of solar system evolution.

  1. Highly sensitive and unbiased approach for elucidating antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sherry G.; Ba, Zhaoqing; Du, Zhou; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Jiazhi; Alt, Frederick W.

    2016-01-01

    Developing B lymphocytes undergo V(D)J recombination to assemble germ-line V, D, and J gene segments into exons that encode the antigen-binding variable region of Ig heavy (H) and light (L) chains. IgH and IgL chains associate to form the B-cell receptor (BCR), which, upon antigen binding, activates B cells to secrete BCR as an antibody. Each of the huge number of clonally independent B cells expresses a unique set of IgH and IgL variable regions. The ability of V(D)J recombination to generate vast primary B-cell repertoires results from a combinatorial assortment of large numbers of different V, D, and J segments, coupled with diversification of the junctions between them to generate the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) for antigen contact. Approaches to evaluate in depth the content of primary antibody repertoires and, ultimately, to study how they are further molded by secondary mutation and affinity maturation processes are of great importance to the B-cell development, vaccine, and antibody fields. We now describe an unbiased, sensitive, and readily accessible assay, referred to as high-throughput genome-wide translocation sequencing-adapted repertoire sequencing (HTGTS-Rep-seq), to quantify antibody repertoires. HTGTS-Rep-seq quantitatively identifies the vast majority of IgH and IgL V(D)J exons, including their unique CDR3 sequences, from progenitor and mature mouse B lineage cells via the use of specific J primers. HTGTS-Rep-seq also accurately quantifies DJH intermediates and V(D)J exons in either productive or nonproductive configurations. HTGTS-Rep-seq should be useful for studies of human samples, including clonal B-cell expansions, and also for following antibody affinity maturation processes. PMID:27354528

  2. Quantitative and unbiased analysis of directional persistence in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Roman; Gautreau, Alexis

    2014-08-01

    The mechanism by which cells control directional persistence during migration is a major question. However, the common index measuring directional persistence, namely the ratio of displacement to trajectory length, is biased, particularly by cell speed. An unbiased method is to calculate direction autocorrelation as a function of time. This function depends only on the angles of the vectors tangent to the trajectory. This method has not been widely used, because it is more difficult to compute. Here we discuss biases of the classical index and introduce a custom-made open-source computer program, DiPer, which calculates direction autocorrelation. In addition, DiPer also plots and calculates other essential parameters to analyze cell migration in two dimensions: it displays cell trajectories individually and collectively, and it calculates average speed and mean square displacements (MSDs) to assess the area explored by cells over time. This user-friendly program is executable through Microsoft Excel, and it generates plots of publication-level quality. The protocol takes ∼15 min to complete. We have recently used DiPer to analyze cell migration of three different mammalian cell types in 2D cultures: the mammary carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231, the motile amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and fish-scale keratocytes. DiPer can potentially be used not only for random migration in 2D but also for directed migration and for migration in 3D (direction autocorrelation only). Moreover, it can be used for any types of tracked particles: cellular organelles, bacteria and whole organisms.

  3. Testing assumptions for unbiased estimation of survival of radiomarked harlequin ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esler, Daniel; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Jarvis, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    Unbiased estimates of survival based on individuals outfitted with radiotransmitters require meeting the assumptions that radios do not affect survival, and animals for which the radio signal is lost have the same survival probability as those for which fate is known. In most survival studies, researchers have made these assumptions without testing their validity. We tested these assumptions by comparing interannual recapture rates (and, by inference, survival) between radioed and unradioed adult female harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus), and for radioed females, between right-censored birds (i.e., those for which the radio signal was lost during the telemetry monitoring period) and birds with known fates. We found that recapture rates of birds equipped with implanted radiotransmitters (21.6 ± 3.0%; x̄ ± SE) were similar to unradioed birds (21.7 ± 8.6%), suggesting that radios did not affect survival. Recapture rates also were similar between right-censored (20.6 ± 5.1%) and known-fate individuals (22.1 ± 3.8%), suggesting that missing birds were not subject to differential mortality. We also determined that capture and handling resulted in short-term loss of body mass for both radioed and unradioed females and that this effect was more pronounced for radioed birds (the difference between groups was 15.4 ± 7.1 g). However, no difference existed in body mass after recapture 1 year later. Our study suggests that implanted radios are an unbiased method for estimating survival of harlequin ducks and likely other species under similar circumstances.

  4. 76 FR 36625 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  5. 76 FR 20458 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  6. Spectral image analysis of mutual illumination between florescent objects.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kato, Keiji; Hirai, Keita; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a method for modeling and component estimation of the spectral images of the mutual illumination phenomenon between two fluorescent objects. First, we briefly describe the bispectral characteristics of a single fluorescent object, which are summarized as a Donaldson matrix. We suppose that two fluorescent objects with different bispectral characteristics are located close together under a uniform illumination. Second, we model the mutual illumination between two objects. It is shown that the spectral composition of the mutual illumination is summarized with four components: (1) diffuse reflection, (2) diffuse-diffuse interreflection, (3) fluorescent self-luminescence, and (4) interreflection by mutual fluorescent illumination. Third, we develop algorithms for estimating the spectral image components from the observed images influenced by the mutual illumination. When the exact Donaldson matrices caused by the mutual illumination influence are unknown, we have to solve a non-linear estimation problem to estimate both the spectral functions and the location weights. An iterative algorithm is then proposed to solve the problem based on the alternate estimation of the spectral functions and the location weights. In our experiments, the feasibility of the proposed method is shown in three cases: the known Donaldson matrices, weak interreflection, and strong interreflection.

  7. No mutual mate choice for quality in zebra finches: Time to question a widely-held assumption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daiping; Forstmeier, Wolfgang; Kempenaers, Bart

    2017-08-31

    Studies of mate choice typically assume that individuals prefer high quality mates and select them based on condition-dependent indicator traits. In species with bi-parental care, mutual mate choice is expected to result in assortative mating for quality. When assortment is not perfect, the lower quality pair members are expected to compensate by increased parental investment to secure their partner (positive differential allocation). This framework has been assumed to hold for monogamous species like the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), but progress has been hampered by the difficulty to define individual quality. By combining multiple measures of causes (inbreeding, early nutrition) and consequences (ornaments, displays, fitness components) of variation in quality into a single principal component, we here show that quality variation can be quantified successfully. We further show that variation in quality indeed predicts individual pairing success, presumably because it reflects an individual's vigor or ability to invest in reproduction. However, despite high statistical power, we found no evidence for either assortative mating or for positive differential allocation. We suggest that zebra finch ornaments and displays are not sufficiently reliable for the benefits of choosiness to exceed the costs of competition for the putative best partner. To assess the generality of these findings unbiased quantification of signal honesty and preference strength is required, rather than selective reporting of significant results. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Generalized mutual information of quantum critical chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, F. C.; Rajabpour, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    We study the generalized mutual information I˜n of the ground state of different critical quantum chains. The generalized mutual information definition that we use is based on the well established concept of the Rényi divergence. We calculate this quantity numerically for several distinct quantum chains having either discrete Z (Q ) symmetries (Q -state Potts model with Q =2 ,3 ,4 and Z (Q ) parafermionic models with Q =5 ,6 ,7 ,8 and also Ashkin-Teller model with different anisotropies) or the U (1 ) continuous symmetries (Klein-Gordon field theory, X X Z and spin-1 Fateev-Zamolodchikov quantum chains with different anisotropies). For the spin chains these calculations were done by expressing the ground-state wave functions in two special bases. Our results indicate some general behavior for particular ranges of values of the parameter n that defines I˜n. For a system, with total size L and subsystem sizes ℓ and L -ℓ , the I˜n has a logarithmic leading behavior given by c/˜n4 log[L/π sin(π/ℓ L ) ] where the coefficient c˜n is linearly dependent on the central charge c of the underlying conformal field theory describing the system's critical properties.

  9. Waveguide mutually pumped phase conjugators.

    PubMed

    James, S W; Youden, K E; Jeffrey, P M; Eason, R W; Chandler, P J; Zhang, L; Townsend, P D

    1993-09-20

    The operation of the bridge mutually pumped phase conjugator is reported in a planar waveguide structure in photorefractive BaTiO(3). The waveguide was fabricated by the technique of ion implantation, using 1.5-MeVH(+) ions at a dose of 10(16) ions/cm(2). An order of magnitude decrease in response time is observed in the waveguide as compared with typical values obtained in bulk crystals, probably as a result of a combination of the optical confinement within the waveguide and possible modification of the charge-transport properties induced by the implantation process.

  10. Spectroscopic classification of two supernova by NUTS (Nordic Optical Telescope Un-biased Transient Survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M.; Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Mattila, S.; Lundqvist, P.; Stritzinger, M.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Harmanen, J.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Blagorodnova, N.; Davis, S.; Dong, S.; Fraser, M.; Gall, C.; Harrison, D.; Hodgkin, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Jonker, P.; Kangas, T.; Kankare, E.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Ochner, P.; Prieto, J. L.; Reynolds, T.; Romero-Canizales, C.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Wyrzykowski, L.

    2016-10-01

    The NOT Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports spectroscopic classification of: ASASSN-16lm in 2MASX J09033461+4142367 (Atel# 9611) and Master OT J025606.21+274206.8 in PGC090644 (Atel# 9593).

  11. Spectroscopic observation of SN2017gkk by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onori, F.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Losada, Illa R.; Gafton, E.; NUTS Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of supernova SN2017gkk (=MASTER OT J091344.71762842.5) in host galaxy NGC 2748.

  12. Spectroscopic observation of SN 2017pp by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, A.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Tronsgaard, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN 2017pp in PGC 1378162. The candidate was discovered by F. Ciabattari, E. Mazzoni, S. Donati (ISSP; http://italiansupernovae.org).

  13. Propagating Resource Constraints Using Mutual Exclusion Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Sanchez, Romeo; Do, Minh B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the most recent techniques for propagating resource constraints in Constraint Based scheduling is Energy Constraint. This technique focuses in precedence based scheduling, where precedence relations are taken into account rather than the absolute position of activities. Although, this particular technique proved to be efficient on discrete unary resources, it provides only loose bounds for jobs using discrete multi-capacity resources. In this paper we show how mutual exclusion reasoning can be used to propagate time bounds for activities using discrete resources. We show that our technique based on critical path analysis and mutex reasoning is just as effective on unary resources, and also shows that it is more effective on multi-capacity resources, through both examples and empirical study.

  14. Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Marjorie G.; Agrawal, Anurag A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in which species have evolved extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), sugar-secreting organs that recruit arthropod mutualists, have twofold higher diversification rates than families that lack species with EFNs. Zooming in on six distantly related plant clades, trait-dependent diversification models confirmed the tendency for lineages with EFNs to display increased rates of diversification. These results were consistent across methodological approaches. Inference using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to model the placement and number of rate shifts revealed that high net diversification rates in EFN clades were driven by an increased number of positive rate shifts following EFN evolution compared with sister clades, suggesting that EFNs may be indirect facilitators of diversification. Our replicated analysis indicates that defense mutualisms put lineages on a path toward increased diversification rates within and between clades, and is concordant with the hypothesis that mutualistic interactions with animals can have an impact on deep macroevolutionary patterns and enhance plant diversity. PMID:25349406

  15. Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marjorie G; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2014-11-18

    The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in which species have evolved extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), sugar-secreting organs that recruit arthropod mutualists, have twofold higher diversification rates than families that lack species with EFNs. Zooming in on six distantly related plant clades, trait-dependent diversification models confirmed the tendency for lineages with EFNs to display increased rates of diversification. These results were consistent across methodological approaches. Inference using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to model the placement and number of rate shifts revealed that high net diversification rates in EFN clades were driven by an increased number of positive rate shifts following EFN evolution compared with sister clades, suggesting that EFNs may be indirect facilitators of diversification. Our replicated analysis indicates that defense mutualisms put lineages on a path toward increased diversification rates within and between clades, and is concordant with the hypothesis that mutualistic interactions with animals can have an impact on deep macroevolutionary patterns and enhance plant diversity.

  16. Enhanced methods for unbiased deep sequencing of Lassa and Ebola RNA viruses from clinical and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Matranga, Christian B; Andersen, Kristian G; Winnicki, Sarah; Busby, Michele; Gladden, Adrianne D; Tewhey, Ryan; Stremlau, Matthew; Berlin, Aaron; Gire, Stephen K; England, Eleina; Moses, Lina M; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E; Folarin, Onikepe; Goba, Augustine; Kahn, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Honko, Anna; Hensley, Lisa; Happi, Christian; Garry, Robert F; Malboeuf, Christine M; Birren, Bruce W; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a robust RNA sequencing method for generating complete de novo assemblies with intra-host variant calls of Lassa and Ebola virus genomes in clinical and biological samples. Our method uses targeted RNase H-based digestion to remove contaminating poly(rA) carrier and ribosomal RNA. This depletion step improves both the quality of data and quantity of informative reads in unbiased total RNA sequencing libraries. We have also developed a hybrid-selection protocol to further enrich the viral content of sequencing libraries. These protocols have enabled rapid deep sequencing of both Lassa and Ebola virus and are broadly applicable to other viral genomics studies.

  17. Multifractals embedded in short time series: An unbiased estimation of probability moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lu; Yang, Tianguang; Yin, Yanhua; Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie

    2016-12-01

    An exact estimation of probability moments is the base for several essential concepts, such as the multifractals, the Tsallis entropy, and the transfer entropy. By means of approximation theory we propose a new method called factorial-moment-based estimation of probability moments. Theoretical prediction and computational results show that it can provide us an unbiased estimation of the probability moments of continuous order. Calculations on probability redistribution model verify that it can extract exactly multifractal behaviors from several hundred recordings. Its powerfulness in monitoring evolution of scaling behaviors is exemplified by two empirical cases, i.e., the gait time series for fast, normal, and slow trials of a healthy volunteer, and the closing price series for Shanghai stock market. By using short time series with several hundred lengths, a comparison with the well-established tools displays significant advantages of its performance over the other methods. The factorial-moment-based estimation can evaluate correctly the scaling behaviors in a scale range about three generations wider than the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis and the basic estimation. The estimation of partition function given by the wavelet transform modulus maxima has unacceptable fluctuations. Besides the scaling invariance focused in the present paper, the proposed factorial moment of continuous order can find its various uses, such as finding nonextensive behaviors of a complex system and reconstructing the causality relationship network between elements of a complex system.

  18. Explaining mutualism variation: a new evolutionary paradox?

    PubMed

    Heath, Katy D; Stinchcombe, John R

    2014-02-01

    The paradox of mutualism is typically framed as the persistence of interspecific cooperation, despite the potential advantages of cheating. Thus, mutualism research has tended to focus on stabilizing mechanisms that prevent the invasion of low-quality partners. These mechanisms alone cannot explain the persistence of variation for partner quality observed in nature, leaving a large gap in our understanding of how mutualisms evolve. Studying partner quality variation is necessary for applying genetically explicit models to predict evolution in natural populations, a necessary step for understanding the origins of mutualisms as well as their ongoing dynamics. An evolutionary genetic approach, which is focused on naturally occurring mutualist variation, can potentially synthesize the currently disconnected fields of mutualism evolution and coevolutionary genetics. We outline explanations for the maintenance of genetic variation for mutualism and suggest approaches necessary to address them.

  19. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. 1.831-1 Section 1.831-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual...

  20. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. 1.831-1 Section 1.831-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual...

  1. Phytophagous insect-microbe mutualisms and adaptive evolutionary diversification.

    PubMed

    Janson, Eric M; Stireman, John O; Singer, Michael S; Abbot, Patrick

    2008-05-01

    Adaptive diversification is a process intrinsically tied to species interactions. Yet, the influence of most types of interspecific interactions on adaptive evolutionary diversification remains poorly understood. In particular, the role of mutualistic interactions in shaping adaptive radiations has been largely unexplored, despite the ubiquity of mutualisms and increasing evidence of their ecological and evolutionary importance. Our aim here is to encourage empirical inquiry into the relationship between mutualism and evolutionary diversification, using herbivorous insects and their microbial mutualists as exemplars. Phytophagous insects have long been used to test theories of evolutionary diversification; moreover, the diversification of a number of phytophagous insect lineages has been linked to mutualisms with microbes. In this perspective, we examine microbial mutualist mediation of ecological opportunity and ecologically based divergent natural selection for their insect hosts. We also explore the conditions and mechanisms by which microbial mutualists may either facilitate or impede adaptive evolutionary diversification. These include effects on the availability of novel host plants or adaptive zones, modifying host-associated fitness trade-offs during host shifts, creating or reducing enemy-free space, and, overall, shaping the evolution of ecological (host plant) specialization. Although the conceptual framework presented here is built on phytophagous insect-microbe mutualisms, many of the processes and predictions are broadly applicable to other mutualisms in which host ecology is altered by mutualistic interactions.

  2. Population dynamics and mutualism: Functional responses of benefits and costs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2002-01-01

    We develop an approach for studying population dynamics resulting from mutualism by employing functional responses based on density‐dependent benefits and costs. These functional responses express how the population growth rate of a mutualist is modified by the density of its partner. We present several possible dependencies of gross benefits and costs, and hence net effects, to a mutualist as functions of the density of its partner. Net effects to mutualists are likely a monotonically saturating or unimodal function of the density of their partner. We show that fundamental differences in the growth, limitation, and dynamics of a population can occur when net effects to that population change linearly, unimodally, or in a saturating fashion. We use the mutualism between senita cactus and its pollinating seed‐eating moth as an example to show the influence of different benefit and cost functional responses on population dynamics and stability of mutualisms. We investigated two mechanisms that may alter this mutualism's functional responses: distribution of eggs among flowers and fruit abortion. Differences in how benefits and costs vary with density can alter the stability of this mutualism. In particular, fruit abortion may allow for a stable equilibrium where none could otherwise exist.

  3. Construction of bacteria-eukaryote synthetic mutualism.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Isao; Hosoda, Kazufumi; Suzuki, Shingo; Yamamoto, Kayo; Kihara, Kumiko; Mori, Kotaro; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2013-08-01

    Mutualism is ubiquitous in nature but is known to be intrinsically vulnerable with regard to both population dynamics and evolution. Synthetic ecology has indicated that it is feasible for organisms to establish novel mutualism merely through encountering each other by showing that it is feasible to construct synthetic mutualism between organisms. However, bacteria-eukaryote mutualism, which is ecologically important, has not yet been constructed. In this study, we synthetically constructed mutualism between a bacterium and a eukaryote by using two model organisms. We mixed a bacterium, Escherichia coli (a genetically engineered glutamine auxotroph), and an amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum, in 14 sets of conditions in which each species could not grow in monoculture but potentially could grow in coculture. Under a single condition in which the bacterium and amoeba mutually compensated for the lack of required nutrients (lipoic acid and glutamine, respectively), both species grew continuously through several subcultures, essentially establishing mutualism. Our results shed light on the establishment of bacteria-eukaryote mutualism and indicate that a bacterium and eukaryote pair in nature also has a non-negligible possibility of establishing novel mutualism if the organisms are potentially mutualistic.

  4. Empirical study of the tails of mutual fund size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzkopf, Yonathan; Farmer, J. Doyne

    2010-06-01

    The mutual fund industry manages about a quarter of the assets in the U.S. stock market and thus plays an important role in the U.S. economy. The question of how much control is concentrated in the hands of the largest players is best quantitatively discussed in terms of the tail behavior of the mutual fund size distribution. We study the distribution empirically and show that the tail is much better described by a log-normal than a power law, indicating less concentration than, for example, personal income. The results are highly statistically significant and are consistent across fifteen years. This contradicts a recent theory concerning the origin of the power law tails of the trading volume distribution. Based on the analysis in a companion paper, the log-normality is to be expected, and indicates that the distribution of mutual funds remains perpetually out of equilibrium.

  5. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine...

  6. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine...

  7. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance...

  8. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.831-3 Section 1.831-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance...

  9. Institutionalized Mutuality in Canada-China Management Education Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Shuguang; Liu, Xianjun

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the Canada-China Management Education Program (CCMEP, 1983-1996) between the University of Toronto (UT) and Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). In this paper, we create a "Three Levels/Four Parameters" analytical framework, based on the concept of mutuality from Johan Galtung (1980) and the concept…

  10. Mutual Funds as a Form of Collective Investment in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tershukova, Marina B.; Savinov, Oleg G.; Zhegalova, Elena V.; Zhuruhinc, Georgy I.; Zhegalova, Alexandra S.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research problem inspired with the fact nowadays there is a need for theoretical generalization based on international experience the essence of the collective investment system and the rationale for prioritizing the mutual funds development as the most attractive form of collective investment. The goal of the article lies in…

  11. The Environment of Classification: The Concept of Mutual Exclusivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kevin P.

    1973-01-01

    Classification is interpreted so as to incorporate all attempts at the imposition of order upon our observations of the universe. In this article, the fundamental bases of classification are examined: in particular the alien notions of mutual exclusivity and the use of inflexible structures to mirror a dynamic universe. (26 references) (Author/KE)

  12. Unraveling cognitive traits using the Morris water maze unbiased strategy classification (MUST-C) algorithm.

    PubMed

    Illouz, Tomer; Madar, Ravit; Louzon, Yoram; Griffioen, Kathleen J; Okun, Eitan

    2016-02-01

    The assessment of spatial cognitive learning in rodents is a central approach in neuroscience, as it enables one to assess and quantify the effects of treatments and genetic manipulations from a broad perspective. Although the Morris water maze (MWM) is a well-validated paradigm for testing spatial learning abilities, manual categorization of performance in the MWM into behavioral strategies is subject to individual interpretation, and thus to biases. Here we offer a support vector machine (SVM) - based, automated, MWM unbiased strategy classification (MUST-C) algorithm, as well as a cognitive score scale. This model was examined and validated by analyzing data obtained from five MWM experiments with changing platform sizes, revealing a limitation in the spatial capacity of the hippocampus. We have further employed this algorithm to extract novel mechanistic insights on the impact of members of the Toll-like receptor pathway on cognitive spatial learning and memory. The MUST-C algorithm can greatly benefit MWM users as it provides a standardized method of strategy classification as well as a cognitive scoring scale, which cannot be derived from typical analysis of MWM data.

  13. Unbiased and robust quantification of synchronization between spikes and local field potential.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohui; Cui, Dong; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-08-30

    In neuroscience, relating the spiking activity of individual neurons to the local field potential (LFP) of neural ensembles is an increasingly useful approach for studying rhythmic neuronal synchronization. Many methods have been proposed to measure the strength of the association between spikes and rhythms in the LFP recordings, and most existing measures are dependent upon the total number of spikes. In the present work, we introduce a robust approach for quantifying spike-LFP synchronization which performs reliably for limited samples of data. The measure is termed as spike-triggered correlation matrix synchronization (SCMS), which takes LFP segments centered on each spike as multi-channel signals and calculates the index of spike-LFP synchronization by constructing a correlation matrix. The simulation based on artificial data shows that the SCMS output almost does not change with the sample size. This property is of crucial importance when making comparisons between different experimental conditions. When applied to actual neuronal data recorded from the monkey primary visual cortex, it is found that the spike-LFP synchronization strength shows orientation selectivity to drifting gratings. In comparison to another unbiased method, pairwise phase consistency (PPC), the proposed SCMS behaves better for noisy spike trains by means of numerical simulations. This study demonstrates the basic idea and calculating process of the SCMS method. Considering its unbiasedness and robustness, the measure is of great advantage to characterize the synchronization between spike trains and rhythms present in LFP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Unbiased Rare Event Sampling in Spatial Stochastic Systems Biology Models Using a Weighted Ensemble of Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Rory M.; Tapia, Jose-Juan; Sullivan, Devin P.; Faeder, James R.; Murphy, Robert F.; Dittrich, Markus; Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    The long-term goal of connecting scales in biological simulation can be facilitated by scale-agnostic methods. We demonstrate that the weighted ensemble (WE) strategy, initially developed for molecular simulations, applies effectively to spatially resolved cell-scale simulations. The WE approach runs an ensemble of parallel trajectories with assigned weights and uses a statistical resampling strategy of replicating and pruning trajectories to focus computational effort on difficult-to-sample regions. The method can also generate unbiased estimates of non-equilibrium and equilibrium observables, sometimes with significantly less aggregate computing time than would be possible using standard parallelization. Here, we use WE to orchestrate particle-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, which include spatial geometry (e.g., of organelles, plasma membrane) and biochemical interactions among mobile molecular species. We study a series of models exhibiting spatial, temporal and biochemical complexity and show that although WE has important limitations, it can achieve performance significantly exceeding standard parallel simulation—by orders of magnitude for some observables. PMID:26845334

  15. Unbiased Discovery of Glypican as a Novel Receptor for LRRTM4 in Regulating Excitatory Synapse Development

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Joris; O’Sullivan, Matthew L.; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Condomitti, Giuseppe; Caccese, Max C.; Vennekens, Kristel M.; Yates, John R.; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins have recently been identified as important regulators of synapse development and function, but for many LRR proteins the ligand-receptor interactions are not known. Here we identify the heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan glypican as a novel receptor for LRRTM4 using an unbiased proteomics-based approach. Glypican binds LRRTM4, but not LRRTM2, in a HS-dependent manner. Glypican 4 (GPC4) and LRRTM4 localize to the pre- and postsynaptic membranes of excitatory synapses, respectively. Consistent with a trans-synaptic interaction, LRRTM4 triggers GPC4 clustering in contacting axons and GPC4 induces clustering of LRRTM4 in contacting dendrites in a HS-dependent manner. LRRTM4 positively regulates excitatory synapse development in cultured neurons and in vivo, and the synaptogenic activity of LRRTM4 requires the presence of HS on the neuronal surface. Our results identify glypican as a novel LRRTM4 receptor and indicate that a trans-synaptic glypican-LRRTM4 interaction regulates excitatory synapse development. PMID:23911103

  16. An unbiased index to quantify participant’s phenotypic contribution to an open-access cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yingleong; Tung, Michael; Garruss, Alexander S.; Zaranek, Sarah W.; Chan, Ying Kai; Lunshof, Jeantine E.; Zaranek, Alexander W.; Ball, Madeleine P.; Chou, Michael F.; Lim, Elaine T.; Church, George M.

    2017-01-01

    The Personal Genome Project (PGP) is an effort to enroll many participants to create an open-access repository of genome, health and trait data for research. However, PGP participants are not enrolled for studying any specific traits and participants choose the phenotypes to disclose. To measure the extent and willingness and to encourage and guide participants to contribute phenotypes, we developed an algorithm to score and rank the phenotypes and participants of the PGP. The scoring algorithm calculates the participation index (P-index) for every participant, where 0 indicates no reported phenotypes and 100 indicate complete phenotype reporting. We calculated the P-index for all 5,015 participants in the PGP and they ranged from 0 to 96.7. We found that participants mainly have either high scores (P-index > 90, 29.5%) or low scores (P-index < 10, 57.8%). While, there are significantly more males than female participants (1,793 versus 1,271), females tend to have on average higher P-indexes (P = 0.015). We also reported the P-indexes of participants based on demographics and states like Missouri and Massachusetts have better P-indexes than states like Utah and Minnesota. The P-index can therefore be used as an unbiased way to measure and rank participant’s phenotypic contribution towards the PGP. PMID:28387241

  17. Predicting hybrid performance in rice using genomic best linear unbiased prediction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shizhong; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Qifa

    2014-08-26

    Genomic selection is an upgrading form of marker-assisted selection for quantitative traits, and it differs from the traditional marker-assisted selection in that markers in the entire genome are used to predict genetic values and the QTL detection step is skipped. Genomic selection holds the promise to be more efficient than the traditional marker-assisted selection for traits controlled by polygenes. Genomic selection for pure breed improvement is based on marker information and thus leads to cost-saving due to early selection before phenotypes are measured. When applied to hybrid breeding, genomic selection is anticipated to be even more efficient because genotypes of hybrids are predetermined by their inbred parents. Hybrid breeding has been an important tool to increase crop productivity. Here we proposed and applied an advanced method to predict hybrid performance, in which a subset of all potential hybrids is used as a training sample to predict trait values of all potential hybrids. The method is called genomic best linear unbiased prediction. The technology applied to hybrids is called genomic hybrid breeding. We used 278 randomly selected hybrids derived from 210 recombinant inbred lines of rice as a training sample and predicted all 21,945 potential hybrids. The average yield of top 100 selection shows a 16% increase compared with the average yield of all potential hybrids. The new strategy of marker-guided prediction of hybrid yields serves as a proof of concept for a new technology that may potentially revolutionize hybrid breeding.

  18. An unbiased index to quantify participant's phenotypic contribution to an open-access cohort.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yingleong; Tung, Michael; Garruss, Alexander S; Zaranek, Sarah W; Chan, Ying Kai; Lunshof, Jeantine E; Zaranek, Alexander W; Ball, Madeleine P; Chou, Michael F; Lim, Elaine T; Church, George M

    2017-04-07

    The Personal Genome Project (PGP) is an effort to enroll many participants to create an open-access repository of genome, health and trait data for research. However, PGP participants are not enrolled for studying any specific traits and participants choose the phenotypes to disclose. To measure the extent and willingness and to encourage and guide participants to contribute phenotypes, we developed an algorithm to score and rank the phenotypes and participants of the PGP. The scoring algorithm calculates the participation index (P-index) for every participant, where 0 indicates no reported phenotypes and 100 indicate complete phenotype reporting. We calculated the P-index for all 5,015 participants in the PGP and they ranged from 0 to 96.7. We found that participants mainly have either high scores (P-index > 90, 29.5%) or low scores (P-index < 10, 57.8%). While, there are significantly more males than female participants (1,793 versus 1,271), females tend to have on average higher P-indexes (P = 0.015). We also reported the P-indexes of participants based on demographics and states like Missouri and Massachusetts have better P-indexes than states like Utah and Minnesota. The P-index can therefore be used as an unbiased way to measure and rank participant's phenotypic contribution towards the PGP.

  19. Unbiased feature selection in learning random forests for high-dimensional data.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh-Tung; Huang, Joshua Zhexue; Nguyen, Thuy Thi

    2015-01-01

    Random forests (RFs) have been widely used as a powerful classification method. However, with the randomization in both bagging samples and feature selection, the trees in the forest tend to select uninformative features for node splitting. This makes RFs have poor accuracy when working with high-dimensional data. Besides that, RFs have bias in the feature selection process where multivalued features are favored. Aiming at debiasing feature selection in RFs, we propose a new RF algorithm, called xRF, to select good features in learning RFs for high-dimensional data. We first remove the uninformative features using p-value assessment, and the subset of unbiased features is then selected based on some statistical measures. This feature subset is then partitioned into two subsets. A feature weighting sampling technique is used to sample features from these two subsets for building trees. This approach enables one to generate more accurate trees, while allowing one to reduce dimensionality and the amount of data needed for learning RFs. An extensive set of experiments has been conducted on 47 high-dimensional real-world datasets including image datasets. The experimental results have shown that RFs with the proposed approach outperformed the existing random forests in increasing the accuracy and the AUC measures.

  20. Unbiased discovery of glypican as a receptor for LRRTM4 in regulating excitatory synapse development.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Joris; O'Sullivan, Matthew L; Savas, Jeffrey N; Condomitti, Giuseppe; Caccese, Max C; Vennekens, Kristel M; Yates, John R; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2013-08-21

    Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins have recently been identified as important regulators of synapse development and function, but for many LRR proteins the ligand-receptor interactions are not known. Here we identify the heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan glypican as a receptor for LRRTM4 using an unbiased proteomics-based approach. Glypican binds LRRTM4, but not LRRTM2, in an HS-dependent manner. Glypican 4 (GPC4) and LRRTM4 localize to the pre- and postsynaptic membranes of excitatory synapses, respectively. Consistent with a trans-synaptic interaction, LRRTM4 triggers GPC4 clustering in contacting axons and GPC4 induces clustering of LRRTM4 in contacting dendrites in an HS-dependent manner. LRRTM4 positively regulates excitatory synapse development in cultured neurons and in vivo, and the synaptogenic activity of LRRTM4 requires the presence of HS on the neuronal surface. Our results identify glypican as an LRRTM4 receptor and indicate that a trans-synaptic glypican-LRRTM4 interaction regulates excitatory synapse development.

  1. Physiological Aspects of Communication via Mutual Gaze.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, Allan; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reports on various social science projects undertaken to investigate nonverbal communication. Findings indicated that mutual gaze influences physiological arousal, an actor can gaze in such a way that he or she manipulates the other person's physiology, and a subject's response to a mutual gaze is a good predictor of dominance or submission in…

  2. Economic contract theory tests models of mutualism.

    PubMed

    Weyl, E Glen; Frederickson, Megan E; Yu, Douglas W; Pierce, Naomi E

    2010-09-07

    Although mutualisms are common in all ecological communities and have played key roles in the diversification of life, our current understanding of the evolution of cooperation applies mostly to social behavior within a species. A central question is whether mutualisms persist because hosts have evolved costly punishment of cheaters. Here, we use the economic theory of employment contracts to formulate and distinguish between two mechanisms that have been proposed to prevent cheating in host-symbiont mutualisms, partner fidelity feedback (PFF) and host sanctions (HS). Under PFF, positive feedback between host fitness and symbiont fitness is sufficient to prevent cheating; in contrast, HS posits the necessity of costly punishment to maintain mutualism. A coevolutionary model of mutualism finds that HS are unlikely to evolve de novo, and published data on legume-rhizobia and yucca-moth mutualisms are consistent with PFF and not with HS. Thus, in systems considered to be textbook cases of HS, we find poor support for the theory that hosts have evolved to punish cheating symbionts; instead, we show that even horizontally transmitted mutualisms can be stabilized via PFF. PFF theory may place previously underappreciated constraints on the evolution of mutualism and explain why punishment is far from ubiquitous in nature.

  3. Economic contract theory tests models of mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Weyl, E. Glen; Frederickson, Megan E.; Yu, Douglas W.; Pierce, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Although mutualisms are common in all ecological communities and have played key roles in the diversification of life, our current understanding of the evolution of cooperation applies mostly to social behavior within a species. A central question is whether mutualisms persist because hosts have evolved costly punishment of cheaters. Here, we use the economic theory of employment contracts to formulate and distinguish between two mechanisms that have been proposed to prevent cheating in host–symbiont mutualisms, partner fidelity feedback (PFF) and host sanctions (HS). Under PFF, positive feedback between host fitness and symbiont fitness is sufficient to prevent cheating; in contrast, HS posits the necessity of costly punishment to maintain mutualism. A coevolutionary model of mutualism finds that HS are unlikely to evolve de novo, and published data on legume–rhizobia and yucca–moth mutualisms are consistent with PFF and not with HS. Thus, in systems considered to be textbook cases of HS, we find poor support for the theory that hosts have evolved to punish cheating symbionts; instead, we show that even horizontally transmitted mutualisms can be stabilized via PFF. PFF theory may place previously underappreciated constraints on the evolution of mutualism and explain why punishment is far from ubiquitous in nature. PMID:20733067

  4. Promoting Mutual Help Groups Among Older Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    1983-01-01

    Describes several kinds of mutual help groups and two ways to initiate them: (1) through conferences, and (2) through short-term training programs. A substantial need continues for mutual help groups in an era of reduced professional and consumer resources. Research is needed to document their extensiveness, impact and longevity. (JAC)

  5. [Maintaining solidarity: is mutuality the solution?].

    PubMed

    Gevers, J K M; Ploem, M C

    2013-01-01

    Solidarity is essentially the willingness to contribute to the community and its demands, which may even involve contributing more than one is expecting to receive. Another principle is mutuality: this refers to a balance between rights and obligations or between mutual obligations. In its advisory document 'The importance of mutuality......solidarity takes work!', The Dutch Council for Public Health and Health Care underlines the importance of ensuring solidarity within the Dutch health care system, e.g. by encouraging patients to take responsibility for their own health, possibly by introducing elements of mutuality. In our contribution, we comment on the Council's advice. Although we fully agree with the overall conclusion that solidarity should be maintained within the system, we do not see how the introduction of increased mutuality will contribute to this goal.

  6. A Method for Unbiased High-Resolution Aerosol Retrieval from Landsat.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapustin, Alexei; Williams, D. L.; Markham, B.; Irons, J.; Holben, B.; Wang, Y.

    2004-06-01

    Because the land surface reflectance varies spatially, the atmospheric radiative transfer over land in clear-sky conditions is essentially three-dimensional. This is manifested through horizontal radiative fluxes that blur satellite images. It is important that the atmospheric blurring systematically increases the apparent brightness of the dark pixels. As a consequence, there are systematic biases in the satellite products of aerosol optical thickness and surface albedo over dark targets based on 1D theory, which may have a negative impact on climate research. Below, a new dark target method is presented for unbiased simultaneous retrieval of the aerosol model and optical thickness over land from Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data, based on 3D radiative transfer theory. The method automatically selects an aerosol model from a large set of candidate models using a statistical approach of the probability distribution function. The dark target method of aerosol retrieval in the blue and red bands relies on prediction of the surface reflectance in these bands from the shortwave infrared region (2.1 2.2 μm) based on the linear regression. In the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) algorithm, the regression coefficients are constants, whereas different studies indicate that they have seasonal and geographic variations. The work here shows that the accuracy of aerosol retrieval over land can be significantly increased based on ancillary information on the regional and seasonal distribution of the regression coefficients. This information, which is called surface climatology, can be derived globally around Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites, using AERONET aerosol and water vapor information for accurate atmospheric correction. This paper describes the developed method in application to Landsat data and its initial validation with AERONET measurements for a set of ETM+ images of the Washington Baltimore area, and studies biases of 1D

  7. An in-depth investigation of the causes of persistent low membership of community-based health insurance: a case study of the mutual health organisation of Dar Naïm, Mauritania.

    PubMed

    Waelkens, Maria-Pia; Coppieters, Yves; Laokri, Samia; Criel, Bart

    2017-08-07

    Persistent low membership is observed in many community-based health insurance (CBHI) schemes in Africa. Causes for low membership have been identified and solutions suggested, but this did not result in increased membership. In this case study of the mutual health organisation of Dar Naïm in Mauritania we explore the underlying drivers that may explain why membership continued to stagnate although several plans for change had been designed. We used a systems approach focussed on processes, underlying dynamics and complex interactions that produce the outcomes, to delve into 10 years of data collected between 2003 and 2012. We used qualitative research methods to analyse the data and interpret patterns. Direct causes of stagnation and possible solutions had been identified in the early years of operations, but most of the possible solutions were not implemented. A combination of reasons explains why consecutive action plans were not put into practice, showing the complexity of implementation and the considerable management capacity required, as well as the challenges of integrating a novel organisational structure into exiting social structures. For any CBHI project aiming at high membership, skilled professional management seems essential, with capacity to question and adapt routine procedures and interpret interactions within the wider society. Countries that include community-based health insurance in their strategic plan towards universal coverage will have to pay more attention to management capacity and the minutiae of implementation.

  8. Mutual benefit for foreign medical students and Chinese postgraduates: A mixed team-based learning method overcomes communication problems in hematology clerkship.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianling; Chen, Buyuan; Li, Xiaofan; Song, Qingxiao; Chen, Yuanzhong

    2017-03-04

    Hematology is difficult for students to learn. A beneficial education method for hematology clerkship training is required to help students develop clinical skills. Foreign medical students often encounter communication issues in China. To address this issue, Chinese post-graduates from our institute are willing to assist with educating foreign students. Therefore, we propose a mixed team-based learning method (MTBL) which might overcome communication problems in hematology clerkship. Twenty-two foreign medical Students attended a 2-week hematology clerkship in Fujian Medical University Union Hospital. Twenty-one foreign African medical students were assigned randomly into two groups. Fourteen foreign African medical students were assigned to MTBL group. Each MTBL team included two foreign African medical students and one Chinese post-graduate. Seven foreign African medical students were assigned to lecture-based learning method (LBL) group, which had a foreign medical classmate from Hong Kong or Chinese intern volunteers to serve as translators. The practice test scores of MTBL were significantly higher than LBL group (p < 0.05). The MTBL group had increased motivation to prepare before class, an engaged classroom atmosphere, and an improvement in their understanding of difficult topics. Interestingly, the Chinese post-graduates also benefited from this setting, as they found that this interaction improved their communication in the English language. The mixed team-based learning method overcomes communication problems in hematology clerkship. Foreign medical students and Chinese post-graduates alike can benefit from MTBL. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(2):93-96, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  10. 12 CFR 239.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 239.3... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. (a) A mutual savings association may not reorganize to become...

  11. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  12. 12 CFR 239.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 239.3... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. (a) A mutual savings association may not reorganize to become...

  13. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  14. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  15. 12 CFR 239.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 239.3... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. (a) A mutual savings association may not reorganize to become...

  16. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  17. Mutual coupling, channel model, and BER for curvilinear antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiyong

    interferers, Doppler spread and convergence are investigated. The tracking mode is introduced to the adaptive array system, and it further improves the BER. The benefit of using faster data rate (wider bandwidth) is discussed. In order to have better performance in a 3D space, the geometries of uniform spherical array (USAs) are presented and different configurations of USAs are discussed. The LMS algorithm based on temporal a priori information is applied to UCAs and USAs to beamform the patterns. Their performances are compared based on simulation results. Based on the analytical and simulation results, it can be concluded that mutual coupling slightly influences the performance of the adaptive array in communication systems. In addition, arrays with curvilinear geometries perform well in AWGN and fading channels.

  18. Does RAIM with Correct Exclusion Produce Unbiased Positions?

    PubMed Central

    Teunissen, Peter J. G.; Imparato, Davide; Tiberius, Christian C. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    As the navigation solution of exclusion-based RAIM follows from a combination of least-squares estimation and a statistically based exclusion-process, the computation of the integrity of the navigation solution has to take the propagated uncertainty of the combined estimation-testing procedure into account. In this contribution, we analyse, theoretically as well as empirically, the effect that this combination has on the first statistical moment, i.e., the mean, of the computed navigation solution. It will be shown, although statistical testing is intended to remove biases from the data, that biases will always remain under the alternative hypothesis, even when the correct alternative hypothesis is properly identified. The a posteriori exclusion of a biased satellite range from the position solution will therefore never remove the bias in the position solution completely. PMID:28672862

  19. Does RAIM with Correct Exclusion Produce Unbiased Positions?

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Peter J G; Imparato, Davide; Tiberius, Christian C J M

    2017-06-26

    As the navigation solution of exclusion-based RAIM follows from a combination of least-squares estimation and a statistically based exclusion-process, the computation of the integrity of the navigation solution has to take the propagated uncertainty of the combined estimation-testing procedure into account. In this contribution, we analyse, theoretically as well as empirically, the effect that this combination has on the first statistical moment, i.e., the mean, of the computed navigation solution. It will be shown, although statistical testing is intended to remove biases from the data, that biases will always remain under the alternative hypothesis, even when the correct alternative hypothesis is properly identified. The a posteriori exclusion of a biased satellite range from the position solution will therefore never remove the bias in the position solution completely.

  20. Unbiased statistical analysis for multi-stage proteomic search strategies.

    PubMed

    Everett, Logan J; Bierl, Charlene; Master, Stephen R

    2010-02-05

    "Multi-stage" search strategies have become widely accepted for peptide identification and are implemented in a number of available software packages. We describe limitations of these strategies for validation and decoy-based statistical analyses and demonstrate these limitations using a set of control sample spectra. We propose a solution that corrects the statistical deficiencies and describe its implementation using the open-source software X!Tandem.

  1. Measurement reduction for mutual coupling calibration in DOA estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Taylan; Tuncer, T. Engin

    2012-01-01

    Mutual coupling is an important source of error in antenna arrays that should be compensated for super resolution direction-of-arrival (DOA) algorithms, such as Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm. A crucial step in array calibration is the determination of the mutual coupling coefficients for the antenna array. In this paper, a system theoretic approach is presented for the mutual coupling characterization of antenna arrays. The comprehension and implementation of this approach is simple leading to further advantages in calibration measurement reduction. In this context, a measurement reduction method for antenna arrays with omni-directional and identical elements is proposed which is based on the symmetry planes in the array geometry. The proposed method significantly decreases the number of measurements during the calibration process. This method is evaluated using different array types whose responses and the mutual coupling characteristics are obtained through numerical electromagnetic simulations. It is shown that a single calibration measurement is sufficient for uniform circular arrays. Certain important and interesting characteristics observed during the experiments are outlined.

  2. Conflicting selection in the course of adaptive diversification: the interplay between mutualism and intraspecific competition.

    PubMed

    Raimundo, Rafael L G; Gibert, Jean P; Hembry, David H; Guimarães, Paulo R

    2014-03-01

    Adaptive speciation can occur when a population undergoes assortative mating and disruptive selection caused by frequency-dependent intraspecific competition. However, other interactions, such as mutualisms based on trait matching, may generate conflicting selective pressures that constrain species diversification. We used individual-based simulations to explore how different types of mutualism affect adaptive diversification. A magic trait was assumed to simultaneously mediate mate choice, intraspecific competition, and mutualisms. In scenarios of intimate, specialized mutualisms, individuals interact with one or few individual mutualistic partners, and diversification is constrained only if the mutualism is obligate. In other scenarios, increasing numbers of different partners per individual limit diversification by generating stabilizing selection. Stabilizing selection emerges from the greater likelihood of trait mismatches for rare, extreme phenotypes than for common intermediate phenotypes. Constraints on diversification imposed by increased numbers of partners decrease if the trait matching degree has smaller positive effects on fitness. These results hold after the relaxation of various assumptions. When trait matching matters, mutualism-generated stabilizing selection would thus often constrain diversification in obligate mutualisms, such as ant-myrmecophyte associations, and in low-intimacy mutualisms, including plant-seed disperser systems. Hence, different processes, such as trait convergence favoring the incorporation of nonrelated species, are needed to explain the higher richness of low-intimacy assemblages--shown here to be up to 1 order of magnitude richer than high-intimacy systems.

  3. Estimating Unbiased Treatment Effects in Education Using a Regression Discontinuity Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, William C.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of regression discontinuity (RD) designs to provide an unbiased treatment effect while overcoming the ethical concerns plagued by Random Control Trials (RCTs) make it a valuable and useful approach in education evaluation. RD is the only explicitly recognized quasi-experimental approach identified by the Institute of Education…

  4. Simultaneous unbiased estimates of multiple downed wood attributes in perpendicular distance sampling

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Ducey; Michael S. Williams; Jeffrey H. Gove; Harry T. Valentine

    2008-01-01

    Perpendicular distance sampling (PDS) is a fast probability-proportional-to-size method for inventory of downed wood. However, previous development of PDS had limited the method to estimating only one variable (such as volume per hectare, or surface area per hectare) at a time. Here, we develop a general design-unbiased estimator for PDS. We then show how that...

  5. Critical point relascope sampling for unbiased volume estimation of downed coarse woody debris

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey H. Gove; Michael S. Williams; Goran Stahl; Mark J. Ducey; Mark J. Ducey

    2005-01-01

    Critical point relascope sampling is developed and shown to be design-unbiased for the estimation of log volume when used with point relascope sampling for downed coarse woody debris. The method is closely related to critical height sampling for standing trees when trees are first sampled with a wedge prism. Three alternative protocols for determining the critical...

  6. Mycorrhiza: A Common Form of Mutualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medve, Richard J.

    1978-01-01

    Mycorrhizae are among the most common examples of mutualism. This article discusses their structure, symbolic relationship, factors affecting formation and applying research. Questions are posed and answers suggested. (MA)

  7. Mycorrhiza: A Common Form of Mutualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medve, Richard J.

    1978-01-01

    Mycorrhizae are among the most common examples of mutualism. This article discusses their structure, symbolic relationship, factors affecting formation and applying research. Questions are posed and answers suggested. (MA)

  8. Magnetotelluric inversion based on mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolesi, Eric; Jones, Alan G.

    2014-10-01

    Joint inversion of different geophysical data sets is becoming a more popular and powerful tool, and it has been performed on data sensitive both to the same physical parameter and to different physical parameters. Joint inversion is undertaken to reduce acceptable model space and to increase sensitivity to model parameters that one method alone is unable to resolve adequately. We examine and implement a novel hybrid joint inversion approach. In our inversion scheme a model-the reference model-is fixed, and the information shared with the subsurface structure obtained from another method will be maximized; in our case conductivity structures from magnetotelluric (MT) inversion. During inversion, the joint probability distribution of the MT and the specified reference model is estimated and its entropy minimized in order to guide the inversion result towards a solution that is statistically compatible with the reference model. The powerful feature of this technique is that no explicit relationships between estimated model parameters and reference model ones are presumed: if a link exists in data then it is highlighted in the estimation of the joint probability distribution, if no link is required, then none is enforced. Tests performed verify the robustness of this method and the advantages of it in a 1-D anisotropic scenario are demonstrated. A case study was performed with data from Central Germany, effectively fitting an MT data set from a single station within as minimal an amount of anisotropy as required.

  9. Inhibitory impact of 3'-terminal 2'-O-methylated small silencing RNA on target-primed polymerization and unbiased amplified quantification of the RNA in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Fan, Chunhai; Zhao, Yongxi

    2015-09-01

    3'-terminal 2'-O-methylation has been found in several kinds of small silencing RNA, regarded as a protective mechanism against enzymatic 3' → 5' degradation and 3'-end uridylation. The influence of this modification on enzymatic polymerization, however, remains unknown. Herein, a systematic investigation is performed to explore this issue. We found these methylated small RNAs exhibited a suppression behavior in target-primed polymerization, revealing biased result for the manipulation of these small RNAs by conventional polymerization-based methodology. The related potential mechanism is investigated and discussed, which is probably ascribed to the big size of modified group and its close location to 3'-OH. Furthermore, two novel solutions each utilizing base-stacking hybridization and three-way junction structure have been proposed to realize unbiased recognition of small RNAs. On the basis of phosphorothioate against nicking, a creative amplified strategy, phosphorothioate-protected polymerization/binicking amplification, has also been developed for the unbiased quantification of methylated small RNA in Arabidopsis thaliana, demonstrating its promising potential for real sample analysis. Collectively, our studies uncover the polymerization inhibition by 3'-terminal 2'-O-methylated small RNAs with mechanistic discussion, and propose novel unbiased solutions for amplified quantification of small RNAs in real sample.

  10. Unbiased polarized PDFs upgraded with new inclusive DIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocera, Emanuele R.

    2016-02-01

    I present a determination of longitudinally-polarized parton distribution functions of the proton from inclusive deep-inelastic scattering data: NNPDFpol1.0+. This determination, based on the NNPDF methodology, upgrades a previous analysis, NNPDFpol1.0, in two respects: first, it includes all new data sets which have recently become available from the COMPASS experiment at CERN and from the E93-009, EG1-DVCS and E06-014 experiments at JLAB; second, it uses the state-of-the-art unpolarized parton set NNPDF3.0 as a baseline for the reconstruction of fitted observables and for the determination of positivity constraints. I discuss the impact of both these new inputs on the uncertainty of parton distribution functions.

  11. Unbiased simulation of near-Clifford quantum circuits

    DOE PAGES

    Bennink, Ryan S.; Ferragut, Erik M.; Humble, Travis S.; ...

    2017-06-28

    Modeling and simulation are essential for predicting and verifying the behavior of fabricated quantum circuits, but existing simulation methods are either impractically costly or require an unrealistic simplification of error processes. In this paper, we present a method of simulating noisy Clifford circuits that is both accurate and practical in experimentally relevant regimes. In particular, the cost is weakly exponential in the size and the degree of non-Cliffordness of the circuit. Our approach is based on the construction of exact representations of quantum channels as quasiprobability distributions over stabilizer operations, which are then sampled, simulated, and weighted to yield unbiasedmore » statistical estimates of circuit outputs and other observables. As a demonstration of these techniques, we simulate a Steane [[7,1,3

  12. Identifying Unbiased Items for Screening Preschoolers for Disruptive Behavior Problems.

    PubMed

    Studts, Christina R; Polaha, Jodi; van Zyl, Michiel A

    2016-10-25

    OBJECTIVE : Efficient identification and referral to behavioral services are crucial in addressing early-onset disruptive behavior problems. Existing screening instruments for preschoolers are not ideal for pediatric primary care settings serving diverse populations. Eighteen candidate items for a new brief screening instrument were examined to identify those exhibiting measurement bias (i.e., differential item functioning, DIF) by child characteristics. METHOD : Parents/guardians of preschool-aged children (N = 900) from four primary care settings completed two full-length behavioral rating scales. Items measuring disruptive behavior problems were tested for DIF by child race, sex, and socioeconomic status using two approaches: item response theory-based likelihood ratio tests and ordinal logistic regression. RESULTS : Of 18 items, eight were identified with statistically significant DIF by at least one method. CONCLUSIONS : The bias observed in 8 of 18 items made them undesirable for screening diverse populations of children. These items were excluded from the new brief screening tool.

  13. Phenological shifts and the fate of mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Nicole E.; CaraDonna, Paul J.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is altering the timing of life history events in a wide array of species, many of which are involved in mutualistic interactions. Because many mutualisms can form only if partner species are able to locate each other in time, differential phenological shifts are likely to influence their strength, duration and outcome. At the extreme, climate change-driven shifts in phenology may result in phenological mismatch: the partial or complete loss of temporal overlap of mutualistic species. We have a growing understanding of how, when, and why phenological change can alter one type of mutualism–pollination. However, as we show here, there has been a surprising lack of attention to other types of mutualism. We generate a set of predictions about the characteristics that may predispose mutualisms in general to phenological mismatches. We focus not on the consequences of such mismatches but rather on the likelihood that mismatches will develop. We explore the influence of three key characteristics of mutualism: 1) intimacy, 2) seasonality and duration, and 3) obligacy and specificity. We predict that the following characteristics of mutualism may increase the likelihood of phenological mismatch: 1) a non-symbiotic life history in which co-dispersal is absent; 2) brief, seasonal interactions; and 3) facultative, generalized interactions. We then review the limited available data in light of our a priori predictions and point to mutualisms that are more and less likely to be at risk of becoming phenologically mismatched, emphasizing the need for research on mutualisms other than plant–pollinator interactions. Future studies should explicitly focus on mutualism characteristics to determine whether and how changing phenologies will affect mutualistic interactions. PMID:25883391

  14. Direction Finding With Mutually Orthogonal Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    BIB - 1 ix List of Figures Figure Page 1 - 1 : Mutually...Likelihood Results 50mm Antennas 0.5GHz, with MUTUAL COUPLING Figure C - 79 : α = 1 ° Figure C - 80: α = 10° Figure C - 81: α = 20...146: α = 10° Figure C - 147: α = 20° Figure C - 148: α = 30° Figure C - 149: α = 40° Figure C - 150: α = 50° BIB - 1 BIBLIOGRAPHY [ 1

  15. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. III. REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsson, P.; Chapman, R.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Tanvir, N. R.; Starling, R. L. C.; Letawe, G.

    2012-06-10

    We present 10 new gamma-ray burst (GRB) redshifts and another five redshift limits based on host galaxy spectroscopy obtained as part of a large program conducted at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The redshifts span the range 0.345 {<=} z {approx}< 2.54. Three of our measurements revise incorrect values from the literature. The homogeneous host sample researched here consists of 69 hosts that originally had a redshift completeness of 55% (with 38 out of 69 hosts having redshifts considered secure). Our project, including VLT/X-shooter observations reported elsewhere, increases this fraction to 77% (53/69), making the survey the most comprehensive in terms of redshift completeness of any sample to the full Swift depth, analyzed to date. We present the cumulative redshift distribution and derive a conservative, yet small, associated uncertainty. We constrain the fraction of Swift GRBs at high redshift to a maximum of 14% (5%) for z > 6 (z > 7). The mean redshift of the host sample is assessed to be (z) {approx}> 2.2, with the 10 new redshifts reducing it significantly. Using this more complete sample, we confirm previous findings that the GRB rate at high redshift (z {approx}> 3) appears to be in excess of predictions based on assumptions that it should follow conventional determinations of the star formation history of the universe, combined with an estimate of its likely metallicity dependence. This suggests that either star formation at high redshifts has been significantly underestimated, for example, due to a dominant contribution from faint, undetected galaxies, or that GRB production is enhanced in the conditions of early star formation, beyond that usually ascribed to lower metallicity.

  16. A/T/N: An unbiased descriptive classification scheme for Alzheimer disease biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, David A.; Blennow, Kaj; Carrillo, Maria C.; Feldman, Howard H.; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Hampel, Harald; Jagust, William J.; Johnson, Keith A.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Scheltens, Philip; Sperling, Reisa A.; Dubois, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers have become an essential component of Alzheimer disease (AD) research and because of the pervasiveness of AD pathology in the elderly, the same biomarkers are used in cognitive aging research. A number of current issues suggest that an unbiased descriptive classification scheme for these biomarkers would be useful. We propose the “A/T/N” system in which 7 major AD biomarkers are divided into 3 binary categories based on the nature of the pathophysiology that each measures. “A” refers to the value of a β-amyloid biomarker (amyloid PET or CSF Aβ42); “T,” the value of a tau biomarker (CSF phospho tau, or tau PET); and “N,” biomarkers of neurodegeneration or neuronal injury ([18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose–PET, structural MRI, or CSF total tau). Each biomarker category is rated as positive or negative. An individual score might appear as A+/T+/N−, or A+/T−/N−, etc. The A/T/N system includes the new modality tau PET. It is agnostic to the temporal ordering of mechanisms underlying AD pathogenesis. It includes all individuals in any population regardless of the mix of biomarker findings and therefore is suited to population studies of cognitive aging. It does not specify disease labels and thus is not a diagnostic classification system. It is a descriptive system for categorizing multidomain biomarker findings at the individual person level in a format that is easy to understand and use. Given the present lack of consensus among AD specialists on terminology across the clinically normal to dementia spectrum, a biomarker classification scheme will have broadest acceptance if it is independent from any one clinically defined diagnostic scheme. PMID:27371494

  17. Bayesian Network Inference Enables Unbiased Phenotypic Anchoring of Transcriptomic Responses to Cigarette Smoke in Humans.

    PubMed

    Jennen, Danyel G J; van Leeuwen, Danitsja M; Hendrickx, Diana M; Gottschalk, Ralph W H; van Delft, Joost H M; Kleinjans, Jos C S

    2015-10-19

    Microarray-based transcriptomic analysis has been demonstrated to hold the opportunity to study the effects of human exposure to, e.g., chemical carcinogens at the whole genome level, thus yielding broad-ranging molecular information on possible carcinogenic effects. Since genes do not operate individually but rather through concerted interactions, analyzing and visualizing networks of genes should provide important mechanistic information, especially upon connecting them to functional parameters, such as those derived from measurements of biomarkers for exposure and carcinogenic risk. Conventional methods such as hierarchical clustering and correlation analyses are frequently used to address these complex interactions but are limited as they do not provide directional causal dependence relationships. Therefore, our aim was to apply Bayesian network inference with the purpose of phenotypic anchoring of modified gene expressions. We investigated a use case on transcriptomic responses to cigarette smoking in humans, in association with plasma cotinine levels as biomarkers of exposure and aromatic DNA-adducts in blood cells as biomarkers of carcinogenic risk. Many of the genes that appear in the Bayesian networks surrounding plasma cotinine, and to a lesser extent around aromatic DNA-adducts, hold biologically relevant functions in inducing severe adverse effects of smoking. In conclusion, this study shows that Bayesian network inference enables unbiased phenotypic anchoring of transcriptomics responses. Furthermore, in all inferred Bayesian networks several dependencies are found which point to known but also to new relationships between the expression of specific genes, cigarette smoke exposure, DNA damaging-effects, and smoking-related diseases, in particular associated with apoptosis, DNA repair, and tumor suppression, as well as with autoimmunity.

  18. Best linear unbiased prediction and optimum allocation of test resources in maize breeding with doubled haploids.

    PubMed

    Mi, Xuefei; Wegenast, Thilo; Utz, H Friedrich; Dhillon, Baldev S; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2011-06-01

    With best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP), information from genetically related candidates is combined to obtain more precise estimates of genotypic values of test candidates and thereby increase progress from selection. We developed and applied theory and Monte Carlo simulations implementing BLUP in 2 two-stage maize breeding schemes and various selection strategies. Our objectives were to (1) derive analytical solutions of the mixed model equations under two breeding schemes, (2) determine the optimum allocation of test resources with BLUP under different assumptions regarding the variance component ratios for grain yield in maize, (3) compare the progress from selection using BLUP and conventional phenotypic selection based on mean performance solely of the candidates, and (4) analyze the potential of BLUP for further improving the progress from selection. The breeding schemes involved selection for testcross performance either of DH lines at both stages (DHTC) or of S(1) families at the first stage and DH lines at the second stage (S(1)TC-DHTC). Our analytical solutions allowed much faster calculations of the optimum allocations and superseded matrix inversions to solve the mixed model equations. Compared to conventional phenotypic selection, the progress from selection was slightly higher with BLUP for both optimization criteria, namely the selection gain and the probability to select the best genotypes. The optimum allocation of test resources in S(1)TC-DHTC involved ≥ 10 test locations at both stages, a low number of crosses (≤ 6) each with 100-300 S(1) families at the first stage, and 500-1,000 DH lines at the second stage. In breeding scheme DHTC, the optimum number of test candidates at the first stage was 5-10 times larger, whereas the number of test locations at the first stage and the number of test candidates at the second stage were strongly reduced compared to S(1)TC-DHTC.

  19. Unbiased estimation of chloroplast number in mesophyll cells: advantage of a genuine three-dimensional approach

    PubMed Central

    Kubínová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast number per cell is a frequently examined quantitative anatomical parameter, often estimated by counting chloroplast profiles in two-dimensional (2D) sections of mesophyll cells. However, a mesophyll cell is a three-dimensional (3D) structure and this has to be taken into account when quantifying its internal structure. We compared 2D and 3D approaches to chloroplast counting from different points of view: (i) in practical measurements of mesophyll cells of Norway spruce needles, (ii) in a 3D model of a mesophyll cell with chloroplasts, and (iii) using a theoretical analysis. We applied, for the first time, the stereological method of an optical disector based on counting chloroplasts in stacks of spruce needle optical cross-sections acquired by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. This estimate was compared with counting chloroplast profiles in 2D sections from the same stacks of sections. Comparing practical measurements of mesophyll cells, calculations performed in a 3D model of a cell with chloroplasts as well as a theoretical analysis showed that the 2D approach yielded biased results, while the underestimation could be up to 10-fold. We proved that the frequently used method for counting chloroplasts in a mesophyll cell by counting their profiles in 2D sections did not give correct results. We concluded that the present disector method can be efficiently used for unbiased estimation of chloroplast number per mesophyll cell. This should be the method of choice, especially in coniferous needles and leaves with mesophyll cells with lignified cell walls where maceration methods are difficult or impossible to use. PMID:24336344

  20. A/T/N: An unbiased descriptive classification scheme for Alzheimer disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Jack, Clifford R; Bennett, David A; Blennow, Kaj; Carrillo, Maria C; Feldman, Howard H; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Hampel, Harald; Jagust, William J; Johnson, Keith A; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Scheltens, Philip; Sperling, Reisa A; Dubois, Bruno

    2016-08-02

    Biomarkers have become an essential component of Alzheimer disease (AD) research and because of the pervasiveness of AD pathology in the elderly, the same biomarkers are used in cognitive aging research. A number of current issues suggest that an unbiased descriptive classification scheme for these biomarkers would be useful. We propose the "A/T/N" system in which 7 major AD biomarkers are divided into 3 binary categories based on the nature of the pathophysiology that each measures. "A" refers to the value of a β-amyloid biomarker (amyloid PET or CSF Aβ42); "T," the value of a tau biomarker (CSF phospho tau, or tau PET); and "N," biomarkers of neurodegeneration or neuronal injury ([(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, structural MRI, or CSF total tau). Each biomarker category is rated as positive or negative. An individual score might appear as A+/T+/N-, or A+/T-/N-, etc. The A/T/N system includes the new modality tau PET. It is agnostic to the temporal ordering of mechanisms underlying AD pathogenesis. It includes all individuals in any population regardless of the mix of biomarker findings and therefore is suited to population studies of cognitive aging. It does not specify disease labels and thus is not a diagnostic classification system. It is a descriptive system for categorizing multidomain biomarker findings at the individual person level in a format that is easy to understand and use. Given the present lack of consensus among AD specialists on terminology across the clinically normal to dementia spectrum, a biomarker classification scheme will have broadest acceptance if it is independent from any one clinically defined diagnostic scheme. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Prediction of complex human traits using the genomic best linear unbiased predictor.

    PubMed

    de Los Campos, Gustavo; Vazquez, Ana I; Fernando, Rohan; Klimentidis, Yann C; Sorensen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Despite important advances from Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS), for most complex human traits and diseases, a sizable proportion of genetic variance remains unexplained and prediction accuracy (PA) is usually low. Evidence suggests that PA can be improved using Whole-Genome Regression (WGR) models where phenotypes are regressed on hundreds of thousands of variants simultaneously. The Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (G-BLUP, a ridge-regression type method) is a commonly used WGR method and has shown good predictive performance when applied to plant and animal breeding populations. However, breeding and human populations differ greatly in a number of factors that can affect the predictive performance of G-BLUP. Using theory, simulations, and real data analysis, we study the performance of G-BLUP when applied to data from related and unrelated human subjects. Under perfect linkage disequilibrium (LD) between markers and QTL, the prediction R-squared (R(2)) of G-BLUP reaches trait-heritability, asymptotically. However, under imperfect LD between markers and QTL, prediction R(2) based on G-BLUP has a much lower upper bound. We show that the minimum decrease in prediction accuracy caused by imperfect LD between markers and QTL is given by (1-b)(2), where b is the regression of marker-derived genomic relationships on those realized at causal loci. For pairs of related individuals, due to within-family disequilibrium, the patterns of realized genomic similarity are similar across the genome; therefore b is close to one inducing small decrease in R(2). However, with distantly related individuals b reaches very low values imposing a very low upper bound on prediction R(2). Our simulations suggest that for the analysis of data from unrelated individuals, the asymptotic upper bound on R(2) may be of the order of 20% of the trait heritability. We show how PA can be enhanced with use of variable selection or differential shrinkage of estimates of marker effects.

  2. Unbiased estimation of chloroplast number in mesophyll cells: advantage of a genuine three-dimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, Zuzana; Janácek, Jirí; Lhotáková, Zuzana; Kubínová, Lucie; Albrechtová, Jana

    2014-02-01

    Chloroplast number per cell is a frequently examined quantitative anatomical parameter, often estimated by counting chloroplast profiles in two-dimensional (2D) sections of mesophyll cells. However, a mesophyll cell is a three-dimensional (3D) structure and this has to be taken into account when quantifying its internal structure. We compared 2D and 3D approaches to chloroplast counting from different points of view: (i) in practical measurements of mesophyll cells of Norway spruce needles, (ii) in a 3D model of a mesophyll cell with chloroplasts, and (iii) using a theoretical analysis. We applied, for the first time, the stereological method of an optical disector based on counting chloroplasts in stacks of spruce needle optical cross-sections acquired by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. This estimate was compared with counting chloroplast profiles in 2D sections from the same stacks of sections. Comparing practical measurements of mesophyll cells, calculations performed in a 3D model of a cell with chloroplasts as well as a theoretical analysis showed that the 2D approach yielded biased results, while the underestimation could be up to 10-fold. We proved that the frequently used method for counting chloroplasts in a mesophyll cell by counting their profiles in 2D sections did not give correct results. We concluded that the present disector method can be efficiently used for unbiased estimation of chloroplast number per mesophyll cell. This should be the method of choice, especially in coniferous needles and leaves with mesophyll cells with lignified cell walls where maceration methods are difficult or impossible to use.

  3. Unbiased pseudo-Cℓ power spectrum estimation with mode projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Franz; Leistedt, Boris; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2017-02-01

    With the steadily improving sensitivity afforded by current and future galaxy surveys, a robust extraction of two-point correlation function measurements may become increasingly hampered by the presence of astrophysical foregrounds or observational systematics. The concept of mode projection has been introduced as a means to remove contaminants for which it is possible to construct a spatial map, reflecting the expected signal contribution. Owing to its computational efficiency compared to minimum-variance methods, the sub-optimal pseudo-Cℓ (PCL) power spectrum estimator is a popular tool for the analysis of high-resolution data sets. Here, we integrate mode projection into the framework of PCL power spectrum estimation. In contrast to results obtained with optimal estimators, we show that the uncorrected projection of template maps leads to biased power spectra. Based on analytical calculations, we find exact closed-form expressions for the expectation value of the bias and demonstrate that they can be recast in a form which allows a numerically efficient evaluation, preserving the favourable O( ℓ_{max} ^3 ) time complexity of PCL estimator algorithms. Using simulated data sets, we assess the scaling of the bias with various analysis parameters and demonstrate that it can be reliably removed. We conclude that in combination with mode projection, PCL estimators allow for a fast and robust computation of power spectra in the presence of systematic effects - properties in high demand for the analysis of ongoing and future large-scale structure surveys.

  4. Unbiased Identification of Patients with Disorders of Sex Development

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David A.; Gardner, Melissa; Sandberg, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) represent a collection of rare diseases that generate substantial controversy regarding best practices for diagnosis and treatment. A significant barrier preventing a better understanding of how patients with these conditions should be evaluated and treated, especially from a psychological standpoint, is the lack of systematic and standardized approaches to identify cases for study inclusion. Common approaches include “hand-picked” subjects already known to the practice, which could introduce bias. We implemented an informatics-based approach to identify patients with DSD from electronic health records (EHRs) at three large, academic children’s hospitals. The informatics approach involved comprehensively searching EHRs at each hospital using a combination of structured billing codes as an initial filtering strategy followed by keywords applied to the free text clinical documentation. The informatics approach was implemented to replicate the functionality of an EHR search engine (EMERSE) available at one of the hospitals. At the two hospitals that did not have EMERSE, we compared case ascertainment using the informatics method to traditional approaches employed for identifying subjects. Potential cases identified using all approaches were manually reviewed by experts in DSD to verify eligibility criteria. At the two institutions where both the informatics and traditional approaches were applied, the informatics approach identified substantially higher numbers of potential study subjects. The traditional approaches yielded 14 and 28 patients with DSD, respectively; the informatics approach yielded 226 and 77 patients, respectively. The informatics approach missed only a few cases that the traditional approaches identified, largely because those cases were known to the study team, but patient data were not in the particular children’s hospital EHR. The use of informatics approaches to search electronic documentation can

  5. Unbiased Evaluation of Bioactive Secondary Metabolites in Complex Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Taichi; Wang, Yuehong; Pro, Samuel M.; Franzblau, Scott G.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of bioactive principles in a complex matrix such as natural products and botanical medicines are secondary rather than primary metabolites. In addition to being chemically diverse, the bioactivity of an ethnobotanical can comprise from one to several bioactive compounds, present in a complex mixture. Conventional discovery efforts utilize bioassay-guided fractionation (BGF) to isolate individual active compounds. When applied to complex natural products, BGF is often challenged by an apparent loss of activity during fractionation, resulting in weakly active isolated compounds. Metabolomic analysis can potentially complement existing the BGF paradigm by capturing the chemical complexity of the metabolites. The proposed biochemometric approach establishes a link between the chemistry of a secondary metabolome and a deserved health impact, using a high-throughput, high-resolution capable biological endpoint. The proof of principle is demonstrated for the anti-tuberculosis (TB) activity of the Alaskan ethnobotanical, Oplopanax horridus. Biochemometric analysis identified the 100 most active constituents from thousands of metabolites in the active extract by means of 2D orthogonal chromatography using countercurrent and GC-MS methods. Previously isolated O. horridus phytoconstituents were used as reference markers of known structure and bio(in)activity. Positive correlations allowed distinction of anti-TB actives from inactive compounds. A total of 29 bioactives from 3 main structural classes were assigned based on MS data. Biochemometric analysis is a new tool for the standardization of herbal medicines and ethnobotanicals, as well as for drug discovery from nature. The method can assign multiple active compounds in complex mixtures without their prior isolation or structure elucidation, while still providing an interface to structural information. PMID:22766306

  6. Unbiased dynamical and physical characteristics of the near-Earth-object population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granvik, M.; Morbidelli, A.; Jedicke, R.; Bottke, W.; Bolin, B.; Beshore, E.; Delbo, M.; Vokrouhlicky, D.; Penttilä, A.; Nesvorny, D.; Michel, P.

    2014-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a renewed interest in the population-level characteristics of near-Earth objects (NEOs) in terms of their unbiased orbital and absolute-magnitude distributions. The interest has been driven by the realization that the Bottke et al.NEO model [1,2] has started fraying at the edges after a decade of success. The number of known NEOs is currently about two orders of magnitude larger than the number of calibration targets used for the Bottke model and a new population model is needed to explain the discrepancy between the observed and predicted NEO distributions. The recent update [3] of the Bottke model improved the statistics of the orbital distributions and made some new predictions such as the existence of near-Earth asteroids on retrograde orbits, but did not attempt a full re-calibration of the model. Our new NEO model is an improvement on the approach originally developed by Bottke et al. [1,2]. The orbital distributions for NEOs originating in different regions of the main asteroid belt have been re-computed from scratch. We start with a forward integration of an unbiased sample of known main-belt objects (MBOs) to locate all possible NEO source regions in the main asteroid belt. We then record the orbital evolution of particles that enter the NEO region until they are ejected from the solar system or collide with the Sun or the planets in order to build up the so-called NEO residence-time distributions. We calibrate the model with some 4,550 NEOs detected by the Catalina Sky Survey's (CSS) Mt.Lemmon (G96) and Catalina (703) stations in 2005--2012 during untargeted observations. The nightly detection efficiencies measured by CSS are turned into likelihoods that an NEO with a given semimajor axis 0.6 au < a < 3.5 au, eccentricity 0 < e < 1, inclination 0° < i < 180° and absolute magnitude 15 < H < 25 would have been detected by CSS in the above timeframe. We use a novel, computationally efficient approach to numerically estimate the

  7. Bias reduction in the estimation of mutual information.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Shu, Huazhong; Yang, Chunfeng; Le Bouquin Jeannès, Régine

    2014-11-01

    This paper deals with the control of bias estimation when estimating mutual information from a nonparametric approach. We focus on continuously distributed random data and the estimators we developed are based on a nonparametric k-nearest-neighbor approach for arbitrary metrics. Using a multidimensional Taylor series expansion, a general relationship between the estimation error bias and the neighboring size for the plug-in entropy estimator is established without any assumption on the data for two different norms. The theoretical analysis based on the maximum norm developed coincides with the experimental results drawn from numerical tests made by Kraskov et al. [Phys. Rev. E 69, 066138 (2004)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.69.066138]. To further validate the novel relation, a weighted linear combination of distinct mutual information estimators is proposed and, using simulated signals, the comparison of different strategies allows for corroborating the theoretical analysis.

  8. Bias reduction in the estimation of mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Shu, Huazhong; Yang, Chunfeng; Le Bouquin Jeannès, Régine

    2014-11-01

    This paper deals with the control of bias estimation when estimating mutual information from a nonparametric approach. We focus on continuously distributed random data and the estimators we developed are based on a nonparametric k -nearest-neighbor approach for arbitrary metrics. Using a multidimensional Taylor series expansion, a general relationship between the estimation error bias and the neighboring size for the plug-in entropy estimator is established without any assumption on the data for two different norms. The theoretical analysis based on the maximum norm developed coincides with the experimental results drawn from numerical tests made by Kraskov et al. [Phys. Rev. E 69, 066138 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevE.69.066138]. To further validate the novel relation, a weighted linear combination of distinct mutual information estimators is proposed and, using simulated signals, the comparison of different strategies allows for corroborating the theoretical analysis.

  9. Exometabolomics Assisted Design and Validation of Synthetic Obligate Mutualism.

    PubMed

    Kosina, Suzanne M; Danielewicz, Megan A; Mohammed, Mujahid; Ray, Jayashree; Suh, Yumi; Yilmaz, Suzan; Singh, Anup K; Arkin, Adam P; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Northen, Trent R

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic microbial ecology has the potential to enhance the productivity and resiliency of biotechnology processes compared to approaches using single isolates. Engineering microbial consortia is challenging; however, one approach that has attracted significant attention is the creation of synthetic obligate mutualism using auxotrophic mutants that depend on each other for exchange or cross-feeding of metabolites. Here, we describe the integration of mutant library fitness profiling with mass spectrometry based exometabolomics as a method for constructing synthetic mutualism based on cross-feeding. Two industrially important species lacking known ecological interactions, Zymomonas mobilis and Escherichia coli, were selected as the test species. Amino acid exometabolites identified in the spent medium of Z. mobilis were used to select three corresponding E. coli auxotrophs (proA, pheA and IlvA), as potential E. coli counterparts for the coculture. A pooled mutant fitness assay with a Z. mobilis transposon mutant library was used to identify mutants with improved growth in the presence of E. coli. An auxotroph mutant in a gene (ZMO0748) with sequence similarity to cysteine synthase A (cysK), was selected as the Z. mobilis counterpart for the coculture. Exometabolomic analysis of spent E. coli medium identified glutathione related metabolites as potentially available for rescue of the Z. mobilis cysteine synthase mutant. Three sets of cocultures between the Z. mobilis auxotroph and each of the three E. coli auxotrophs were monitored by optical density for growth and analyzed by flow cytometry to confirm high cell counts for each species. Taken together, our methods provide a technological framework for creating synthetic mutualisms combining existing screening based methods and exometabolomics for both the selection of obligate mutualism partners and elucidation of metabolites involved in auxotroph rescue.

  10. 75 FR 77048 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of the... Thrift Supervision has determined that the renewal of the ] Charter of the OTS Mutual Savings Association... facing mutual savings associations. DATES: The Charter of the OTS Mutual Savings Association Advisory...

  11. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal mutual savings association bylaws. 544... MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-CHARTER AND BYLAWS Bylaws § 544.5 Federal mutual savings association bylaws. (a) General. A Federal mutual savings association shall operate under bylaws that contain provisions...

  12. Revisiting AFLP fingerprinting for an unbiased assessment of genetic structure and differentiation of taurine and zebu cattle.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Yuri Tani; Bomba, Lorenzo; Lucente, Giordana; Colli, Licia; Negrini, Riccardo; Lenstra, Johannes Arjen; Erhardt, Georg; Garcia, José Fernando; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo

    2014-04-17

    Descendants from the extinct aurochs (Bos primigenius), taurine (Bos taurus) and zebu cattle (Bos indicus) were domesticated 10,000 years ago in Southwestern and Southern Asia, respectively, and colonized the world undergoing complex events of admixture and selection. Molecular data, in particular genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, can complement historic and archaeological records to elucidate these past events. However, SNP ascertainment in cattle has been optimized for taurine breeds, imposing limitations to the study of diversity in zebu cattle. As amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers are discovered and genotyped as the samples are assayed, this type of marker is free of ascertainment bias. In order to obtain unbiased assessments of genetic differentiation and structure in taurine and zebu cattle, we analyzed a dataset of 135 AFLP markers in 1,593 samples from 13 zebu and 58 taurine breeds, representing nine continental areas. We found a geographical pattern of expected heterozygosity in European taurine breeds decreasing with the distance from the domestication centre, arguing against a large-scale introgression from European or African aurochs. Zebu cattle were found to be at least as diverse as taurine cattle. Western African zebu cattle were found to have diverged more from Indian zebu than South American zebu. Model-based clustering and ancestry informative markers analyses suggested that this is due to taurine introgression. Although a large part of South American zebu cattle also descend from taurine cows, we did not detect significant levels of taurine ancestry in these breeds, probably because of systematic backcrossing with zebu bulls. Furthermore, limited zebu introgression was found in Podolian taurine breeds in Italy. The assessment of cattle diversity reported here contributes an unbiased global view to genetic differentiation and structure of taurine and zebu cattle populations, which is essential for an

  13. Revisiting AFLP fingerprinting for an unbiased assessment of genetic structure and differentiation of taurine and zebu cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Descendants from the extinct aurochs (Bos primigenius), taurine (Bos taurus) and zebu cattle (Bos indicus) were domesticated 10,000 years ago in Southwestern and Southern Asia, respectively, and colonized the world undergoing complex events of admixture and selection. Molecular data, in particular genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, can complement historic and archaeological records to elucidate these past events. However, SNP ascertainment in cattle has been optimized for taurine breeds, imposing limitations to the study of diversity in zebu cattle. As amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers are discovered and genotyped as the samples are assayed, this type of marker is free of ascertainment bias. In order to obtain unbiased assessments of genetic differentiation and structure in taurine and zebu cattle, we analyzed a dataset of 135 AFLP markers in 1,593 samples from 13 zebu and 58 taurine breeds, representing nine continental areas. Results We found a geographical pattern of expected heterozygosity in European taurine breeds decreasing with the distance from the domestication centre, arguing against a large-scale introgression from European or African aurochs. Zebu cattle were found to be at least as diverse as taurine cattle. Western African zebu cattle were found to have diverged more from Indian zebu than South American zebu. Model-based clustering and ancestry informative markers analyses suggested that this is due to taurine introgression. Although a large part of South American zebu cattle also descend from taurine cows, we did not detect significant levels of taurine ancestry in these breeds, probably because of systematic backcrossing with zebu bulls. Furthermore, limited zebu introgression was found in Podolian taurine breeds in Italy. Conclusions The assessment of cattle diversity reported here contributes an unbiased global view to genetic differentiation and structure of taurine and zebu cattle

  14. Contextual classification of multispectral image data: An unbiased estimator for the context distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, J. C.; Swain, P. H. (Principal Investigator); Vardeman, S. B.

    1981-01-01

    A key input to a statistical classification algorithm, which exploits the tendency of certain ground cover classes to occur more frequently in some spatial context than in others, is a statistical characterization of the context: the context distribution. An unbiased estimator of the context distribution is discussed which, besides having the advantage of statistical unbiasedness, has the additional advantage over other estimation techniques of being amenable to an adaptive implementation in which the context distribution estimate varies according to local contextual information. Results from applying the unbiased estimator to the contextual classification of three real LANDSAT data sets are presented and contrasted with results from non-contextual classifications and from contextual classifications utilizing other context distribution estimation techniques.

  15. Contextual classification of multispectral image data - An unbiased estimator for the context distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, J. C.; Swain, P. H.; Vardeman, S. B.

    1981-01-01

    Recent investigations have demonstrated the effectiveness of a contextual classifier that combines spatial and spectral information employing a general statistical approach. This statistical classification algorithm exploits the tendency of certain ground-cover classes to occur more frequently in some spatial contexts than in others. Indeed, a key input to this algorithm is a statistical characterization of the context: the context distribution. Here a discussion is given of an unbiased estimator of the context distribution which, besides having the advantage of statistical unbiasedness, has the additional advantage over other estimation techniques of being amenable to an adaptive implementation in which the context distribution estimate varies according to local contextual information. Results from applying the unbiased estimator to the contextual classification of three real Landsat data sets are presented and contrasted with results from noncontextual classifications and from contextual classifications utilizing other context distribution estimation techniques.

  16. Integrating plant carbon dynamics with mutualism ecology.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Elizabeth G

    2016-04-01

    Plants reward microbial and animal mutualists with carbohydrates to obtain nutrients, defense, pollination, and dispersal. Under a fixed carbon budget, plants must allocate carbon to their mutualists at the expense of allocation to growth, reproduction, or storage. Such carbon trade-offs are indirectly expressed when a plant exhibits reduced growth or fecundity in the presence of its mutualist. Because carbon regulates the costs of all plant mutualisms, carbon dynamics are a common platform for integrating these costs in the face of ecological complexity and context dependence. The ecophysiology of whole-plant carbon allocation could thus elucidate the ecology and evolution of plant mutualisms. If mutualisms are costly to plants, then they must be important but frequently underestimated sinks in the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  17. Mutual entropy production in bipartite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Giovanni; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2014-04-01

    It was recently shown by Barato et al (2013 Phys. Rev. E 87 042104) that the mutual information at the trajectory level of a bipartite Markovian system is not bounded by the entropy production. In the same way as Gaspard showed (2004 J. Stat. Phys. 117 599) that the entropy production is not directly related to the Shannon entropy at the trajectory level but is in fact equal to its difference from the so-called time-reversed Shannon entropy, we show in this paper that the difference between the mutual information and its time-reversed form is equal to the mutual entropy production (MEP), i.e. the difference between the full entropy production and that of the two marginal processes. Evaluation of the MEP is in general a difficult task due to non-Markovian effects. For bipartite systems, we provide closed expressions in various limiting regimes which we verify by numerical simulations.

  18. Comment on "Unbiased statistical analysis for multi-stage proteomic search strategies".

    PubMed

    Bern, Marshall; Kil, Yong J

    2011-04-01

    Everett et al. recently reported on a statistical bias that arises in the target-decoy approach to false discovery rate estimation in two-pass proteomics search strategies as exemplified by X!Tandem. This bias can cause serious underestimation of the false discovery rate. We argue here that the "unbiased" solution proposed by Everett et al., however, is also biased and under certain circumstances can also result in a serious underestimate of the FDR, especially at the protein level.

  19. A Cramer-Rao Type Lower Bound for Essentially Unbiased Parameter Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-03

    should apply to the entire class of estimators with acceptably small bias. In this report a new CR-type lower bound is derived which takes into account a...unbiased CR bound. If an upper bound on the bias gradient ot tne estimator is specified, our lower bound on estimator variance can subsequently be applied ...multiple parameters. Finally, Section 8 applies the new bound to covariance estimation for a pair of HD Gaussian sequences. 2 2. PRELIMINARIES 2.1

  20. Qualitative teamwork issues and strategies: coordination through mutual adjustment.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wendy A; Long, Bonita; Bermbach, Nicole; Jordan, Sharalyn; Patterson, Kathryn

    2005-03-01

    Multidisciplinary research teams that include faculty, students, and volunteers can be challenging and enriching for all participants. Although such teams are becoming commonplace, minimal guidance is available about strategies to enhance team effectiveness. In this article, the authors highlight strategies to guide qualitative teamwork through coordination of team members and tasks based on mutual adjustment. Using a grounded theory exemplar, they focus on issues of (a) building the team, (b) developing reflexivity and theoretical sensitivity, (c) tackling analytic and methodological procedures, and (d) developing dissemination guidelines. Sharing information, articulating project goals and elements, acknowledging variation in individual goals, and engaging in reciprocity and respectful collaboration are key elements of mutual adjustment. The authors summarize conclusions about the costs and benefits of the process.

  1. Integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ling-Xiu; Liu, Bo-Wen; Lv, Xiao-Meng; Yang, Yue-De; Xiao, Jin-Long; Huang, Yong-Zhen

    2015-05-11

    We experimentally study the characteristics of an integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection through a connected optical waveguide. Based on the lasing spectra, four-wave mixing, injection locking, and period-two oscillation states are observed due to the mutually optical injection by adjusting the injected currents applied to the two microdisks. The enhanced 3 dB bandwidth is realized for the microdisk laser at the injection locking state, and photonic microwave is obtained from the electrode of the microdisk laser under the period-two oscillation state. The plentifully dynamical states similar as semiconductor lasers subject to external optical injection are realized due to strong optical interaction between the two microdisks.

  2. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    DOE PAGES

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima; ...

    2015-01-15

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the workmore » of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong’s estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors Δg/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.« less

  3. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze

    2015-01-15

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong’s estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors Δg/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.

  4. Unbiased Mitoproteome Analyses Confirm Non-canonical RNA, Expanded Codon Translations.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic MS/MS mass spectrometry detections are usually biased towards peptides cleaved by experimentally added digestion enzyme(s). Hence peptides resulting from spontaneous degradation and natural proteolysis usually remain undetected. Previous analyses of tryptic human proteome data (cleavage after K, R) detected non-canonical tryptic peptides translated according to tetra- and pentacodons (codons expanded by silent mono- and dinucleotides), and from transcripts systematically (a) deleting mono-, dinucleotides after trinucleotides (delRNAs), (b) exchanging nucleotides according to 23 bijective transformations. Nine symmetric and fourteen asymmetric nucleotide exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C; and X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A) produce swinger RNAs. Here unbiased reanalyses of these proteomic data detect preferentially non-canonical tryptic peptides despite assuming random cleavage. Unbiased analyses couldn't reconstruct experimental tryptic digestion if most detected non-canonical peptides were false positives. Detected non-tryptic non-canonical peptides map preferentially on corresponding, previously described non-canonical transcripts, as for tryptic non-canonical peptides. Hence unbiased analyses independently confirm previous trypsin-biased analyses that showed translations of del- and swinger RNA and expanded codons. Accounting for natural proteolysis completes trypsin-biased mitopeptidome analyses, independently confirms non-canonical transcriptions and translations.

  5. Building unbiased estimators from non-Gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Sehgal, Neelima; McDonald, Patrick; Slosar, Anže E-mail: pvmcdonald@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2015-01-01

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong's estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors Δg/g for shears up to |g|=0.2.

  6. Wideband Direction of Arrival Estimation in the Presence of Unknown Mutual Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weixing; Zhang, Yue; Lin, Jianzhi; Guo, Rui; Chen, Zengping

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates a subarray based algorithm for direction of arrival (DOA) estimation of wideband uniform linear array (ULA), under the presence of frequency-dependent mutual coupling effects. Based on the Toeplitz structure of mutual coupling matrices, the whole array is divided into the middle subarray and the auxiliary subarray. Then two-sided correlation transformation is applied to the correlation matrix of the middle subarray instead of the whole array. In this way, the mutual coupling effects can be eliminated. Finally, the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) method is utilized to derive the DOAs. For the condition when the blind angles exist, we refine DOA estimation by using a simple approach based on the frequency-dependent mutual coupling matrixes (MCMs). The proposed method can achieve high estimation accuracy without any calibration sources. It has a low computational complexity because iterative processing is not required. Simulation results validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed algorithm. PMID:28178177

  7. Wideband Direction of Arrival Estimation in the Presence of Unknown Mutual Coupling.

    PubMed

    Li, Weixing; Zhang, Yue; Lin, Jianzhi; Guo, Rui; Chen, Zengping

    2017-02-06

    This paper investigates a subarray based algorithm for direction of arrival (DOA) estimation of wideband uniform linear array (ULA), under the presence of frequency-dependent mutual coupling effects. Based on the Toeplitz structure of mutual coupling matrices, the whole array is divided into the middle subarray and the auxiliary subarray. Then two-sided correlation transformation is applied to the correlation matrix of the middle subarray instead of the whole array. In this way, the mutual coupling effects can be eliminated. Finally, the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) method is utilized to derive the DOAs. For the condition when the blind angles exist, we refine DOA estimation by using a simple approach based on the frequency-dependent mutual coupling matrixes (MCMs). The proposed method can achieve high estimation accuracy without any calibration sources. It has a low computational complexity because iterative processing is not required. Simulation results validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed algorithm.

  8. Brain activity: connectivity, sparsity, and mutual information.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Ben; Rae, Caroline; Solo, Victor

    2015-04-01

    We develop a new approach to functional brain connectivity analysis, which deals with four fundamental aspects of connectivity not previously jointly treated. These are: temporal correlation, spurious spatial correlation, sparsity, and network construction using trajectory (as opposed to marginal) Mutual Information. We call the new method Sparse Conditional Trajectory Mutual Information (SCoTMI). We demonstrate SCoTMI on simulated and real fMRI data, showing that SCoTMI gives more accurate and more repeatable detection of network links than competing network estimation methods.

  9. Conceptual Alignment: How Brains Achieve Mutual Understanding.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Arjen; Verhagen, Lennart; Toni, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    We share our thoughts with other minds, but we do not understand how. Having a common language certainly helps, but infants' and tourists' communicative success clearly illustrates that sharing thoughts does not require signals with a pre-assigned meaning. In fact, human communicators jointly build a fleeting conceptual space in which signals are a means to seek and provide evidence for mutual understanding. Recent work has started to capture the neural mechanisms supporting those fleeting conceptual alignments. The evidence suggests that communicators and addressees achieve mutual understanding by using the same computational procedures, implemented in the same neuronal substrate, and operating over temporal scales independent from the signals' occurrences.

  10. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. I. SURVEY DESIGN AND CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Hjorth, Jens; Malesani, Daniele; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Kruehler, Thomas; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Watson, Darach; Jakobsson, Pall; Schulze, Steve; Jaunsen, Andreas O.; Gorosabel, Javier; Levan, Andrew J.; Michalowski, Michal J.; Moller, Palle; Tanvir, Nial R.

    2012-09-10

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful tracers of star-forming galaxies. We have defined a homogeneous subsample of 69 Swift GRB-selected galaxies spanning a very wide redshift range. Special attention has been devoted to making the sample optically unbiased through simple and well-defined selection criteria based on the high-energy properties of the bursts and their positions on the sky. Thanks to our extensive follow-up observations, this sample has now achieved a comparatively high degree of redshift completeness, and thus provides a legacy sample, useful for statistical studies of GRBs and their host galaxies. In this paper, we present the survey design and summarize the results of our observing program conducted at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) aimed at obtaining the most basic properties of galaxies in this sample, including a catalog of R and K{sub s} magnitudes and redshifts. We detect the host galaxies for 80% of the GRBs in the sample, although only 42% have K{sub s} -band detections, which confirms that GRB-selected host galaxies are generally blue. The sample is not uniformly blue, however, with two extremely red objects detected. Moreover, galaxies hosting GRBs with no optical/NIR afterglows, whose identification therefore relies on X-ray localizations, are significantly brighter and redder than those with an optical/NIR afterglow. This supports a scenario where GRBs occurring in more massive and dusty galaxies frequently suffer high optical obscuration. Our spectroscopic campaign has resulted in 77% now having redshift measurements, with a median redshift of 2.14 {+-} 0.18. TOUGH alone includes 17 detected z > 2 Swift GRB host galaxies suitable for individual and statistical studies-a substantial increase over previous samples. Seven hosts have detections of the Ly{alpha} emission line and we can exclude an early indication that Ly{alpha} emission is ubiquitous among GRB hosts, but confirm that Ly{alpha} is stronger in GRB

  11. X-ray Properties of an Unbiased Hard X-ray Detected Sample of AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Lisa M.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Tueller, Jack; Markwardt, Craig

    2007-01-01

    The SWIFT gamma ray observatory's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) has detected a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) based solely on their hard X-ray flux (14-195keV). In this paper, we present for the first time XMM-Newton X-ray spectra for 22 BAT AGXs with no previously analyzed X-ray spectra. If our sources are a representative sample of the BAT AGN, as we claim, our results present for the first time global X-ray properties of an unbiased towards absorption (n(sub H) < 3 x 10(exp 25)/sq cm), local (< z >= 0.03), AGN sample. We find 9/22 low absorption (n(sub H) < 10(exp 23)/sq cm), simple power law model sources, where 4 of these sources have a statistically significant soft component. Among these sources, we find the presence of a warm absorber statistically significant for only one Seyfert 1 source, contrasting with the ASCA results of Reynolds (1997) and George et al. (1998), who find signatures of warm absorption in half or more of their Seyfert 1 samples at similar redshifts. Additionally, the remaining sources (13122) have more complex spectra, well-fit by an absorbed power law at E > 2.0 keV. Five of the complex sources (NGC 612, ESO 362-G018, MRK 417, ESO 506-G027, and NGC 6860) are classified as Compton-thick candidates. Further, we find four more sources (SWIFT J0641.3+3257, SWIFT J0911.2+4533, SWIFT J1200.8+0650, and NGC 4992) with properties consistent with the hidden/buried AGN reported by Ueda et al. (2007). Finally, we include a comparison of the XMM EPIC spectra with available SWIFT X-ray Telescope (XRT) observations. From these comparisons, we find 6/16 sources with varying column densities, 6/16 sources with varying power law indices, and 13/16 sources with varying fluxes, over periods of hours to months. Flux and power law index are correlated for objects where both parameters vary.

  12. Unbiased Estimate of Dark Energy Density from Type Ia Supernova Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Lovelace, Geoffrey

    2001-12-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are currently the best probes of the dark energy in the universe. To constrain the nature of dark energy, we assume a flat universe and that the weak energy condition is satisfied, and we allow the density of dark energy, ρX(z), to be an arbitrary function of redshift. Using simulated data from a space-based SN pencil-beam survey, we find that by optimizing the number of parameters used to parameterize the dimensionless dark energy density, f(z)=ρX(z)/ρX(z=0), we can obtain an unbiased estimate of both f(z) and the fractional matter density of the universe, Ωm. A plausible SN pencil-beam survey (with a square degree field of view and for an observational duration of 1 yr) can yield about 2000 SNe Ia with 0<=z<=2. Such a survey in space would yield SN peak luminosities with a combined intrinsic and observational dispersion of σ(mint)=0.16 mag. We find that for such an idealized survey, Ωm can be measured to 10% accuracy, and the dark energy density can be estimated to ~20% to z~1.5, and ~20%-40% to z~2, depending on the time dependence of the true dark energy density. Dark energy densities that vary more slowly can be more accurately measured. For the anticipated Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission, Ωm can be measured to 14% accuracy, and the dark energy density can be estimated to ~20% to z~1.2. Our results suggest that SNAP may gain much sensitivity to the time dependence of the dark energy density and Ωm by devoting more observational time to the central pencil-beam fields to obtain more SNe Ia at z>1.2. We use both a maximum likelihood analysis and a Monte Carlo analysis (when appropriate) to determine the errors of estimated parameters. We find that the Monte Carlo analysis gives a more accurate estimate of the dark energy density than the maximum likelihood analysis.

  13. Probing the effects of external irradiation on low-mass protostars through unbiased line surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, J. E.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Watanabe, Y.; Bisschop, S. E.; Sakai, N.; Yamamoto, S.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The envelopes of molecular gas around embedded low-mass protostars show different chemistries, which can be used to trace their formation history and physical conditions. The excitation conditions of some molecular species can also be used to trace these physical conditions, making it possible to constrain for instance sources of heating and excitation. Aims: We study the range of influence of an intermediate-mass Herbig Be protostar. We also study the effect of feedback from the environment on the chemical and physical properties of embedded protostars. Methods: We followed up on an earlier line survey of the Class 0/I source R CrA IRS7B in the 0.8 mm window with an unbiased line survey of the same source in the 1.3 mm window using the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope. We also studied the excitation of the key species H2CO, CH3OH, and c-C3H2 in a complete sample of the 18 embedded protostars in the Corona Australis star-forming region. Radiative transfer models were employed to establish abundances of the molecular species. Results: We detect line emission from 20 molecular species (32 including isotopologues) in the two surveys. The most complex species detected are CH3OH, CH3CCH, CH3CHO, and CH3CN (the latter two are only tentatively detected). CH3CN and several other complex organic molecules are significantly under-abundant in comparison with what is found towards hot corino protostars. The H2CO rotational temperatures of the sources in the region decrease with the distance to the Herbig Be star R CrA, whereas the c-C3H2 temperatures remain constant across the star-forming region. Conclusions: The high H2CO temperatures observed towards objects close to R CrA suggest that this star has a sphere of influence of several 10 000 AU in which it increases the temperature of the molecular gas to 30-50 K through irradiation. The chemistry in the IRS7B envelope differs significantly from many other embedded protostars, which could be an effect of

  14. Fast Mutual Exclusion for Uniprocessors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    compile and search that execute out of the Andrew File System [Satya- naranyanyan et al. 85]. • parthenon -n. A resolution-based theorem prover that...have the greatest ef- fect on applications that use threads explicitly, such as Parthenon with 1 or 10 threads, and procon-64 which Program Elapsed...231.1 2191276 42 8856 9876 Parthenon -1 25.8 18.5 1395534 4 412 354 Parthenon -10 26.1 18.6 1576714 7 610 499 procon-64 30.4

  15. A consumer-resource approach to the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism.

    PubMed

    Holland, J Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L

    2010-05-01

    Like predation and competition, mutualism is now recognized as a consumer-resource (C-R) interaction, including, in particular, bi-directional (e.g., coral, plant-mycorrhizae) and uni-directional (e.g., ant-plant defense, plant-pollinator) C-R mutualisms. Here, we develop general theory for the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism based on the C-R mechanism of interspecific interaction. To test the influence of C-R interactions on the dynamics and stability of bi- and uni-directional C-R mutualisms, we developed simple models that link consumer functional response of one mutualistic species with the resources supplied by another. Phase-plane analyses show that the ecological dynamics of C-R mutualisms are stable in general. Most transient behavior leads to an equilibrium of mutualistic coexistence, at which both species densities are greater than in the absence of interactions. However, due to the basic nature of C-R interactions, certain density-dependent conditions can lead to C-R dynamics characteristic of predator-prey interactions, in which one species overexploits and causes the other to go extinct. Consistent with empirical phenomena, these results suggest that the C-R interaction can provide a broad mechanism for understanding density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism. By unifying predation, competition, and mutualism under the common ecological framework of consumer-resource theory, we may also gain a better understanding of the universal features of interspecific interactions in general.

  16. Best friends: children use mutual gaze to identify friendships in others.

    PubMed

    Nurmsoo, Erika; Einav, Shiri; Hood, Bruce M

    2012-05-01

    This study examined children's ability to use mutual eye gaze as a cue to friendships in others. In Experiment 1, following a discussion about friendship, 4-, 5-, and 6-year-olds were shown animations in which three cartoon children looked at one another, and were told that one target character had a best friend. Although all age groups accurately detected the mutual gaze between the target and another character, only 5- and 6-year-olds used this cue to infer friendship. Experiment 2 replicated the effect with 5- and 6-year-olds when the target character was not explicitly identified. Finally, in Experiment 3, where the attribution of friendship could only be based on synchronized mutual gaze, 6-year-olds made this attribution, while 4- and 5-year-olds did not. Children occasionally referred to mutual eye gaze when asked to justify their responses in Experiments 2 and 3, but it was only by the age of 6 that reference to these cues correlated with the use of mutual gaze in judgements of affiliation. Although younger children detected mutual gaze, it was not until 6 years of age that children reliably detected and justified mutual gaze as a cue to friendship. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. A consumer-resource approach to the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Like predation and competition, mutualism is now recognized as a consumer resource (C-R) interaction, including, in particular, bi-directional (e.g., coral, plant- mycorrhizae) and uni-directional (e.g., ant-plant defense, plant-pollinator) C-R mutualisms. Here, we develop general theory for the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism based on the C-R mechanism of interspecific interaction. To test the influence of C-R interactions on the dynamics and stability of bi- and uni-directional C-R mutualisms, we developed simple models that link consumer functional response of one mutualistic species with the resources supplied by another. Phase-plane analyses show that the ecological dynamics of C-R mutualisms are stable in general. Most transient behavior leads to an equilibrium of mutualistic coexistence, at which both species densities are greater than in the absence of interactions. However, due to the basic nature of C-R interactions, certain density-dependent conditions can lead to C-R dynamics characteristic of predator-prey interactions, in which one species overexploits and causes the other to go extinct. Consistent with empirical phenomena, these results suggest that the C-R interaction can provide a broad mechanism for understanding density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism. By unifying predation, competition, and mutualism under the common ecological framework of consumer-resource theory, we may also gain a better understanding of the universal features of interspecific interactions in general.

  18. Part mutual information for quantifying direct associations in networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juan; Zhou, Yiwei; Zhang, Xiujun; Chen, Luonan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitatively identifying direct dependencies between variables is an important task in data analysis, in particular for reconstructing various types of networks and causal relations in science and engineering. One of the most widely used criteria is partial correlation, but it can only measure linearly direct association and miss nonlinear associations. However, based on conditional independence, conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to quantify nonlinearly direct relationships among variables from the observed data, superior to linear measures, but suffers from a serious problem of underestimation, in particular for those variables with tight associations in a network, which severely limits its applications. In this work, we propose a new concept, “partial independence,” with a new measure, “part mutual information” (PMI), which not only can overcome the problem of CMI but also retains the quantification properties of both mutual information (MI) and CMI. Specifically, we first defined PMI to measure nonlinearly direct dependencies between variables and then derived its relations with MI and CMI. Finally, we used a number of simulated data as benchmark examples to numerically demonstrate PMI features and further real gene expression data from Escherichia coli and yeast to reconstruct gene regulatory networks, which all validated the advantages of PMI for accurately quantifying nonlinearly direct associations in networks. PMID:27092000

  19. Long-range RNA pairings contribute to mutually exclusive splicing

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yuan; Yang, Yun; Dai, Lanzhi; Cao, Guozheng; Chen, Ran; Hong, Weiling; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Yang; Meng, Yijun; Shi, Feng; Xiao, Mu; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing is an important means of increasing the protein repertoire, by which the Down's syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene potentially generates 38,016 different isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the regulatory mechanisms remain obscure due to the complexity of the Dscam exon cluster. Here, we reveal a molecular model for the regulation of the mutually exclusive splicing of the serpent pre-mRNA based on competition between upstream and downstream RNA pairings. Such dual RNA pairings confer fine tuning of the inclusion of alternative exons. Moreover, we demonstrate that the splicing outcome of alternative exons is mediated in relative pairing strength-correlated mode. Combined comparative genomics analysis and experimental evidence revealed similar bidirectional structural architectures in exon clusters 4 and 9 of the Dscam gene. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic framework for the regulation of mutually exclusive splicing and may offer potentially applicable insights into long-range RNA–RNA interactions in gene regulatory networks. PMID:26554032

  20. Long-range RNA pairings contribute to mutually exclusive splicing.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Yang, Yun; Dai, Lanzhi; Cao, Guozheng; Chen, Ran; Hong, Weiling; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Yang; Meng, Yijun; Shi, Feng; Xiao, Mu; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing is an important means of increasing the protein repertoire, by which the Down's syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene potentially generates 38,016 different isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the regulatory mechanisms remain obscure due to the complexity of the Dscam exon cluster. Here, we reveal a molecular model for the regulation of the mutually exclusive splicing of the serpent pre-mRNA based on competition between upstream and downstream RNA pairings. Such dual RNA pairings confer fine tuning of the inclusion of alternative exons. Moreover, we demonstrate that the splicing outcome of alternative exons is mediated in relative pairing strength-correlated mode. Combined comparative genomics analysis and experimental evidence revealed similar bidirectional structural architectures in exon clusters 4 and 9 of the Dscam gene. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic framework for the regulation of mutually exclusive splicing and may offer potentially applicable insights into long-range RNA-RNA interactions in gene regulatory networks. © 2015 Yue et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Part mutual information for quantifying direct associations in networks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Zhou, Yiwei; Zhang, Xiujun; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-03

    Quantitatively identifying direct dependencies between variables is an important task in data analysis, in particular for reconstructing various types of networks and causal relations in science and engineering. One of the most widely used criteria is partial correlation, but it can only measure linearly direct association and miss nonlinear associations. However, based on conditional independence, conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to quantify nonlinearly direct relationships among variables from the observed data, superior to linear measures, but suffers from a serious problem of underestimation, in particular for those variables with tight associations in a network, which severely limits its applications. In this work, we propose a new concept, "partial independence," with a new measure, "part mutual information" (PMI), which not only can overcome the problem of CMI but also retains the quantification properties of both mutual information (MI) and CMI. Specifically, we first defined PMI to measure nonlinearly direct dependencies between variables and then derived its relations with MI and CMI. Finally, we used a number of simulated data as benchmark examples to numerically demonstrate PMI features and further real gene expression data from Escherichia coli and yeast to reconstruct gene regulatory networks, which all validated the advantages of PMI for accurately quantifying nonlinearly direct associations in networks.

  2. Competition as a mechanism structuring mutualisms

    Treesearch

    Robert J. Warren; Itamar Giladi; Mark A. Bradford

    2014-01-01

    Summary 1. Hutchinsonian niche theory posits that organisms have fundamental abiotic resource requirements from which they are limited by competition. Organisms also have fundamental biotic requirements, such as mutualists, for which they also might compete. 2. We test this idea with a widespread ant–plant mutualism. Ant-mediated seed dispersal (myrmecochory) in...

  3. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  4. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  5. Do Mutual Children Cement Bonds in Stepfamilies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1988-01-01

    Interviewed 105 midwestern stepfamilies, 39 of whom had reproduced together. Found no significant differences between families with mutual children and those without in terms of marital adjustment, stepparent- and parent-child relationships, and stepfamily affect. It was not possible to predict which families were most likely to reproduce together…

  6. Mutual diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    The generalized Stokes-Einstein equation is used, together with the two-dimensional pressure equation, to analyze mutual diffusion in concentrated membrane systems. These equations can be used to investigate the role that both direct and hydrodynamic interactions play in determining diffusive behavior. Here only direct interactions are explicitly incorporated into the theory at high densities; however, both direct and hydrodynamic interactions are analyzed for some dilute solutions. We look at diffusion in the presence of weak attractions, soft repulsions, and hard-core repulsions. It is found that, at low densities, attractions retard mutual diffusion while repulsions enhance it. Mechanistically, attractions tend to tether particles together and oppose the dissipation of gradients or fluctuations in concentration, while repulsions provide a driving force that pushes particles apart. At higher concentrations, changes in the structure of the fluid enhance mutual diffusion even in the presence of attractions. It is shown that the theoretical description of postelectrophoresis relaxation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments must be modified if interacting systems are studied. The effects of interactions on mutual diffusion coefficients have probably already been seen in postelectrophoresis relaxation experiments. PMID:2775829

  7. Empowering Public Welfare Workers through Mutual Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Wendy Ruth; Wenocur, Stanley

    1983-01-01

    Examines the organizational binds facing social workers concerned with the provision of services to clients in times of fiscal restraint. Suggests a mutual support group as a step toward empowerment. Workers may shift from a support group to a coalition for action as change agents within institutional settings. (JAC)

  8. Do Mutual Children Cement Bonds in Stepfamilies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1988-01-01

    Interviewed 105 midwestern stepfamilies, 39 of whom had reproduced together. Found no significant differences between families with mutual children and those without in terms of marital adjustment, stepparent- and parent-child relationships, and stepfamily affect. It was not possible to predict which families were most likely to reproduce together…

  9. Spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-17nb and CSS170922:172546+342249 by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmanen, J.; Mattila, S.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Reynolds, T.; Somero, A.; Kangas, T.; Lundqvist, P.; Taddia, F.; Ergon, M.; Dong, S.; Pastorello, A.; Pursimo, T.; NUTS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-17nb in MCG+06-17-007 and CSS170922:172546+342249 in an unknown host galaxy.

  10. Note on an Identity Between Two Unbiased Variance Estimators for the Grand Mean in a Simple Random Effects Model.

    PubMed

    Levin, Bruce; Leu, Cheng-Shiun

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the algebraic equivalence of two unbiased variance estimators for the sample grand mean in a random sample of subjects from an infinite population where subjects provide repeated observations following a homoscedastic random effects model.

  11. Spectroscopic observation of AT2016iyw and AT2016jal by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, F.; Lundqvist, P.; Ergon, M.; Kangas, T.; Mattila, S.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Harmanen, J.; Somero, A.; Reynolds, T.; Stritzinger, M.; Dong, S.; Blay, P.

    2017-01-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of two transients. The candidates were discovered by the ATLAS survey (Tonry et al., ATel #9685).

  12. Generalized approach for using unbiased symmetric metrics with negative values: normalized mean bias factor and normalized mean absolute error factor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unbiased symmetric metrics provide a useful measure to quickly compare two datasets, with similar interpretations for both under and overestimations. Two examples include the normalized mean bias factor and normalized mean absolute error factor. However, the original formulations...

  13. Application of Mutual Information Methods in Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keys, Dustin; Kholikov, Shukur; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2015-03-01

    We apply a new technique, the mutual information (MI) from information theory, to time-distance helioseismology, and demonstrate that it can successfully reproduce several classic results based on the widely used cross-covariance method. MI quantifies the deviation of two random variables from complete independence and represents a more general method for detecting dependencies in time series than the cross-covariance function, which only detects linear relationships. We briefly describe the MI-based technique and discuss the results of applying MI to derive the solar differential profile, a travel-time deviation map for a sunspot, and a time-distance diagram from quiet-Sun measurements.

  14. Plant invasions--the role of mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D M; Allsopp, N; D'Antonio, C M; Milton, S J; Rejmánek, M

    2000-02-01

    Many introduced plant species rely on mutualisms in their new habitats to overcome barriers to establishment and to become naturalized and, in some cases, invasive. Mutualisms involving animal-mediated pollination and seed dispersal, and symbioses between plant roots and microbiota often facilitate invasions. The spread of many alien plants, particularly woody ones, depends on pollinator mutualisms. Most alien plants are well served by generalist pollinators (insects and birds), and pollinator limitation does not appear to be a major barrier for the spread of introduced plants (special conditions relating to Ficus and orchids are described). Seeds of many of the most notorious plant invaders are dispersed by animals, mainly birds and mammals. Our review supports the view that tightly coevolved, plant-vertebrate seed dispersal systems are extremely rare. Vertebrate-dispersed plants are generally not limited reproductively by the lack of dispersers. Most mycorrhizal plants form associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi which, because of their low specificity, do not seem to play a major role in facilitating or hindering plant invasions (except possibly on remote islands such as the Galapagos which are poor in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi). The lack of symbionts has, however, been a major barrier for many ectomycorrhizal plants, notably for Pinus spp. in parts of the southern hemisphere. The roles of nitrogen-fixing associations between legumes and rhizobia and between actinorhizal plants and Frankia spp. in promoting or hindering invasions have been virtually ignored in the invasions literature. Symbionts required to induce nitrogen fixation in many plants are extremely widespread, but intentional introductions of symbionts have altered the invasibility of many, if not most, systems. Some of the world's worst invasive alien species only invaded after the introduction of symbionts. Mutualisms in the new environment sometimes re-unite the same species that form

  15. A mutualism-parasitism system modeling host and parasite with mutualism at low density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanshi; Deangelis, Donald L

    2012-04-01

    A mutualism-parasitism system of two species is considered, where mutualism is the dominant interaction when the predators (parasites) are at low density while parasitism is dominant when the predators are at high density. Our aim is to show that mutualism at low density promotes coexistence of the species and leads to high production of the prey (host). The mutualism-parasitism system presented here is a combination of the Lotka-Volterra cooperative model and Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model. By comparing dynamics of this system with those of the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model, we present the mechanisms by which the mutualism improves the coexistence of the species and production of the prey. Then the parameter space is divided into six regions, which correspond to the four outcomes of mutualism, commensalism, predation/parasitism and neutralism, respectively. When the parameters are varied continuously among the six regions, it is shown that the interaction outcomes of the system transition smoothly among the four outcomes. By comparing the dynamics of the specific system with those of the Lotka-Volterra cooperative model, we show that the parasitism at high density promotes stability of the system. A novel aspect of this paper is the simplicity of the model, which allows rigorous and thorough analysis and transparency of the results.

  16. Toward high-throughput phenotyping: unbiased automated feature extraction and selection from knowledge sources.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sheng; Liao, Katherine P; Shaw, Stanley Y; Gainer, Vivian S; Churchill, Susanne E; Szolovits, Peter; Murphy, Shawn N; Kohane, Isaac S; Cai, Tianxi

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of narrative (text) data from electronic health records (EHRs) can improve population-scale phenotyping for clinical and genetic research. Currently, selection of text features for phenotyping algorithms is slow and laborious, requiring extensive and iterative involvement by domain experts. This paper introduces a method to develop phenotyping algorithms in an unbiased manner by automatically extracting and selecting informative features, which can be comparable to expert-curated ones in classification accuracy. Comprehensive medical concepts were collected from publicly available knowledge sources in an automated, unbiased fashion. Natural language processing (NLP) revealed the occurrence patterns of these concepts in EHR narrative notes, which enabled selection of informative features for phenotype classification. When combined with additional codified features, a penalized logistic regression model was trained to classify the target phenotype. The authors applied our method to develop algorithms to identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis and coronary artery disease cases among those with rheumatoid arthritis from a large multi-institutional EHR. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) for classifying RA and CAD using models trained with automated features were 0.951 and 0.929, respectively, compared to the AUCs of 0.938 and 0.929 by models trained with expert-curated features. Models trained with NLP text features selected through an unbiased, automated procedure achieved comparable or slightly higher accuracy than those trained with expert-curated features. The majority of the selected model features were interpretable. The proposed automated feature extraction method, generating highly accurate phenotyping algorithms with improved efficiency, is a significant step toward high-throughput phenotyping. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All

  17. Detecting dynamical interdependence and generalized synchrony through mutual prediction in a neural ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven J.; So, Paul; Chang, Taeun; Burke, Robert E.; Sauer, Tim

    1996-12-01

    A method to characterize dynamical interdependence among nonlinear systems is derived based on mutual nonlinear prediction. Systems with nonlinear correlation will show mutual nonlinear prediction when standard analysis with linear cross correlation might fail. Mutual nonlinear prediction also provides information on the directionality of the coupling between systems. Furthermore, the existence of bidirectional mutual nonlinear prediction in unidirectionally coupled systems implies generalized synchrony. Numerical examples studied include three classes of unidirectionally coupled systems: systems with identical parameters, nonidentical parameters, and stochastic driving of a nonlinear system. This technique is then applied to the activity of motoneurons within a spinal cord motoneuron pool. The interrelationships examined include single neuron unit firing, the total number of neurons discharging at one time as measured by the integrated monosynaptic reflex, and intracellular measurements of integrated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSP's). Dynamical interdependence, perhaps generalized synchrony, was identified in this neuronal network between simultaneous single unit firings, between units and the population, and between units and intracellular EPSP's.

  18. Dense registration of CHRIS-Proba and Ikonos images using multi-dimensional mutual information maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariou, Claude; Chehdi, Kacem

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the potential of multidimensional mutual information for the registration of multi-spectral remote sensing images. We devise a gradient flow algorithm which iteratively maximizes the multidimensional mutual information with respect to a differentiable displacement map, accounting for partial derivatives of the multivariate joint distribution and the multivariate marginal of the float image with respect to each variable of the mutual information derivative. The resulting terms are shown to weight the band specific gradients of the warp image, and we propose in addition to compute them with a method based on the k-nearest neighbours. We apply our method to the registration of Ikonos and CHRIS-Proba images over the region of Baabdat, Lebanon, for purposes of cedar pines detection. A comparison between (crossed) single band and multi-band registration results obtained shows that using the multidimensional mutual information brings a significant gain in positional accuracy and is suitable for multispectral remote sensing image registration.

  19. Binding region of alanopine dehydrogenase predicted by unbiased molecular dynamics simulations of ligand diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Holger; Hergert, Ulrike; Meyer, Tatu; Mulnaes, Daniel; Grieshaber, Manfred K; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-10-28

    Opine dehydrogenases catalyze the reductive condensation of pyruvate with L-amino acids. Biochemical characterization of alanopine dehydrogenase from Arenicola marina revealed that this enzyme is highly specific for L-alanine. Unbiased molecular dynamics simulations with a homology model of alanopine dehydrogenase captured the binding of L-alanine diffusing from solvent to a putative binding region near a distinct helix-kink-helix motif. These results and sequence comparisons reveal how mutations and insertions within this motif dictate the L-amino acid specificity.

  20. Partner manipulation stabilises a horizontally transmitted mutualism.

    PubMed

    Heil, Martin; Barajas-Barron, Alejandro; Orona-Tamayo, Domancar; Wielsch, Natalie; Svatos, Ales

    2014-02-01

    Mutualisms require protection from non-reciprocating exploiters. Pseudomyrmex workers that engage in an obligate defensive mutualism with Acacia hosts feed exclusively on the sucrose-free extrafloral nectar (EFN) that is secreted by their hosts, a behaviour linking ant energy supply directly to host performance and thus favouring reciprocating behaviour. We tested the hypothesis that Acacia hosts manipulate this digestive specialisation of their ant mutualists. Invertase (sucrose hydrolytic) activity in the ant midguts was inhibited by chitinase, a dominant EFN protein. The inhibition occurred quickly in cell-free gut liquids and in native gels and thus likely results from an enzyme-enzyme interaction. Once a freshly eclosed worker ingests EFN as the first diet available, her invertase becomes inhibited and she, thus, continues feeding on host-derived EFN. Partner manipulation acts at the phenotypic level and means that one partner actively controls the phenotype of the other partner to enhance its dependency on host-derived rewards.

  1. Hardware device binding and mutual authentication

    DOEpatents

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-03-04

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

  2. Conditional mutual information and quantum steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Eneet; Wang, Xiaoting; Wilde, Mark M.

    2017-08-01

    Quantum steering has recently been formalized in the framework of a resource theory of steering, and several quantifiers have already been introduced. Here, we propose an information-theoretic quantifier for steering called intrinsic steerability, which uses conditional mutual information to measure the deviation of a given assemblage from one having a local-hidden-state model. We thus relate conditional mutual information to quantum steering and introduce monotones that satisfy certain desirable properties. The idea behind the quantifier is to suppress the correlations that can be explained by an inaccessible quantum system and then quantify the remaining intrinsic correlations. A variant of the intrinsic steerability finds operational meaning as the classical communication cost of sending the measurement choice and outcome to an eavesdropper who possesses a purifying system of the underlying bipartite quantum state that is being measured.

  3. Mutual synchronization of weakly coupled gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rozental, R. M.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The processes of synchronization of two weakly coupled gyrotrons are studied within the framework of non-stationary equations with non-fixed longitudinal field structure. With the allowance for a small difference of the free oscillation frequencies of the gyrotrons, we found a certain range of parameters where mutual synchronization is possible while a high electronic efficiency is remained. It is also shown that synchronization regimes can be realized even under random fluctuations of the parameters of the electron beams.

  4. Three-Ship Mutual Interference Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1965-11-16

    increase beyond this event; the data before Event 500 do not show these effects. Short duration transmit-receive misalignment as observed aboard GARCIA , is...on BELKNAP and GARCIA have not been noted on McCLOY. ii 10 CONFIDENTIAL CONFIDENTIAL TRACOR, jNC - , S, Aig? Te~oS 3. CORRECTED SEA TEST LOG Complete...frequency band causing mutual influence. In this example, chart #1 shows BELKNAP and GARCIA influencing McCLOY at a higher frequency band. Sanborn

  5. Combating isolation: Building mutual mentoring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Anne J.

    2015-12-01

    Women physicists can often feel isolated at work. Support from a grant through the ADVANCE program of the National Science Foundation (U.S. government funding) created mutual mentoring networks aimed at combating isolation specifically for women faculty at undergraduate-only institutions. This paper will discuss the organization of one such network, what contributed to its success, some of the outcomes, and how it might be implemented in other contexts.

  6. The proportionator: unbiased stereological estimation using biased automatic image analysis and non-uniform probability proportional to size sampling.

    PubMed

    Gardi, J E; Nyengaard, J R; Gundersen, H J G

    2008-03-01

    The proportionator is a novel and radically different approach to sampling with microscopes based on the well-known statistical theory (probability proportional to size-PPS sampling). It uses automatic image analysis, with a large range of options, to assign to every field of view in the section a weight proportional to some characteristic of the structure under study. A typical and very simple example, examined here, is the amount of color characteristic for the structure, marked with a stain with known properties. The color may be specific or not. In the recorded list of weights in all fields, the desired number of fields is sampled automatically with probability proportional to the weight and presented to the expert observer. Using any known stereological probe and estimator, the correct count in these fields leads to a simple, unbiased estimate of the total amount of structure in the sections examined, which in turn leads to any of the known stereological estimates including size distributions and spatial distributions. The unbiasedness is not a function of the assumed relation between the weight and the structure, which is in practice always a biased relation from a stereological (integral geometric) point of view. The efficiency of the proportionator depends, however, directly on this relation to be positive. The sampling and estimation procedure is simulated in sections with characteristics and various kinds of noises in possibly realistic ranges. In all cases examined, the proportionator is 2-15-fold more efficient than the common systematic, uniformly random sampling. The simulations also indicate that the lack of a simple predictor of the coefficient of error (CE) due to field-to-field variation is a more severe problem for uniform sampling strategies than anticipated. Because of its entirely different sampling strategy, based on known but non-uniform sampling probabilities, the proportionator for the first time allows the real CE at the section level to

  7. Observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, C.; Di Martino, M.; Ferreri, W.; Osservatorio Astronomico, Turin )

    1989-07-01

    As part of the planned 'Pluto-Charon Mutual Eclipse Season Campaign', one mutual event was observed at the ESO Observatory on July 10, 1986 and seven mutual events were observed at the Serra La Nave stellar station of Catania Astrophysical Observatory from April 29 to July 21, 1987. At ESO the measurements were performed at the 61-cm Bochum telescope equipped with a photon-counting system and U, B, V, filters; at Serra La Nave the Cassegrain focus of the 91-cm reflector was equipped with a photon-counting system and B and V filters. The observed light losses and contact times do not show relevant systematic deviations from the predicted ones. An examination of the behavior of the B and V light curves gives slight indications of a different slope of the B and V light loss of the same event for a superior or an inferior event, and shows that the superior events are shallower at wavelengths longer than B. 6 refs.

  8. Overcoming Addictions, a Web-Based Application, and SMART Recovery, an Online and In-Person Mutual Help Group for Problem Drinkers, Part 1: Three-Month Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lenberg, Kathryn L; Campbell, William; Delaney, Harold D

    2013-01-01

    Background Overcoming Addictions (OA) is an abstinence-oriented, cognitive behavioral, Web application based on the program of SMART Recovery. SMART Recovery is an organization that has adapted empirically supported treatment strategies for use in a mutual help framework with in-person meetings, online meetings, a forum, and other resources. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of OA and SMART Recovery (SR) with problem drinkers who were new to SMART Recovery. Our experimental hypotheses were: (1) all groups will reduce their drinking and alcohol/drug-related consequences at follow-up compared to their baseline levels, (2) the OA condition will reduce their drinking and alcohol/drug-related consequences more than the control group (SR), and (3) the OA+SR condition will reduce their drinking and alcohol/drug-related consequences more than the control group (SR only). Methods We recruited 189 heavy problem drinkers primarily through SMART Recovery’s website and in-person meetings throughout the United States. We randomly assigned participants to (1) OA alone, (2) OA+attend SMART Recovery (SR) meetings (OA+SR), or (3) attend SR only. Baseline and follow-ups were conducted via GoToMeeting sessions with a Research Assistant (RA) and the study participant. We interviewed significant others to corroborate the participant’s self-report. Primary outcome measures included percent days abstinent (PDA), mean drinks per drinking day (DDD), and alcohol/drug-related consequences. Results The intent-to-treat analysis of the 3-month outcomes supported the first hypothesis but not the others. Participants in all groups significantly increased their percent days abstinent from 44% to 72% (P<.001), decreased their mean drinks per drinking day from 8.0 to 4.6 (P<.001), and decreased their alcohol/drug-related problems (P<.001). Actual use relationships were found for the OA groups, between SR online meetings and improvement in PDA (r=.261, P=.033). In addition in the OA groups

  9. Experimental Strategies for Functional Annotation and Metabolism Discovery: Targeted Screening of Solute Binding Proteins and Unbiased Panning of Metabolomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rate at which genome sequencing data is accruing demands enhanced methods for functional annotation and metabolism discovery. Solute binding proteins (SBPs) facilitate the transport of the first reactant in a metabolic pathway, thereby constraining the regions of chemical space and the chemistries that must be considered for pathway reconstruction. We describe high-throughput protein production and differential scanning fluorimetry platforms, which enabled the screening of 158 SBPs against a 189 component library specifically tailored for this class of proteins. Like all screening efforts, this approach is limited by the practical constraints imposed by construction of the library, i.e., we can study only those metabolites that are known to exist and which can be made in sufficient quantities for experimentation. To move beyond these inherent limitations, we illustrate the promise of crystallographic- and mass spectrometric-based approaches for the unbiased use of entire metabolomes as screening libraries. Together, our approaches identified 40 new SBP ligands, generated experiment-based annotations for 2084 SBPs in 71 isofunctional clusters, and defined numerous metabolic pathways, including novel catabolic pathways for the utilization of ethanolamine as sole nitrogen source and the use of d-Ala-d-Ala as sole carbon source. These efforts begin to define an integrated strategy for realizing the full value of amassing genome sequence data. PMID:25540822

  10. Experimental Strategies for Functional Annotation and Metabolism Discovery: Targeted Screening of Solute Binding Proteins and Unbiased Panning of Metabolomes

    SciTech Connect

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Zhao, Suwen; San Francisco, Brian; Kim, Jungwook; Wichelecki, Daniel J.; Bouvier, Jason T.; Solbiati, Jose O.; Vu, Hoan; Zhang, Xinshuai; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Love, James D.; Hillerich, Brandan S.; Seidel, Ronald D.; Quinn, Ronald J.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Cronan, John E.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Gerlt, John A.; Almo, Steven C.

    2014-12-25

    The rate at which genome sequencing data is accruing demands enhanced methods for functional annotation and metabolism discovery. Solute binding proteins (SBPs) facilitate the transport of the first reactant in a metabolic pathway, thereby constraining the regions of chemical space and the chemistries that must be considered for pathway reconstruction. Here in this paper, we describe high-throughput protein production and differential scanning fluorimetry platforms, which enabled the screening of 158 SBPs against a 189 component library specifically tailored for this class of proteins. Like all screening efforts, this approach is limited by the practical constraints imposed by construction of the library, i.e., we can study only those metabolites that are known to exist and which can be made in sufficient quantities for experimentation. To move beyond these inherent limitations, we illustrate the promise of crystallographic- and mass spectrometric-based approaches for the unbiased use of entire metabolomes as screening libraries. Together, our approaches identified 40 new SBP ligands, generated experiment-based annotations for 2084 SBPs in 71 isofunctional clusters, and defined numerous metabolic pathways, including novel catabolic pathways for the utilization of ethanolamine as sole nitrogen source and the use of D-Ala-D-Ala as sole carbon source. These efforts begin to define an integrated strategy for realizing the full value of amassing genome sequence data.

  11. Experimental Strategies for Functional Annotation and Metabolism Discovery: Targeted Screening of Solute Binding Proteins and Unbiased Panning of Metabolomes

    DOE PAGES

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Zhao, Suwen; ...

    2014-12-25

    The rate at which genome sequencing data is accruing demands enhanced methods for functional annotation and metabolism discovery. Solute binding proteins (SBPs) facilitate the transport of the first reactant in a metabolic pathway, thereby constraining the regions of chemical space and the chemistries that must be considered for pathway reconstruction. Here in this paper, we describe high-throughput protein production and differential scanning fluorimetry platforms, which enabled the screening of 158 SBPs against a 189 component library specifically tailored for this class of proteins. Like all screening efforts, this approach is limited by the practical constraints imposed by construction of themore » library, i.e., we can study only those metabolites that are known to exist and which can be made in sufficient quantities for experimentation. To move beyond these inherent limitations, we illustrate the promise of crystallographic- and mass spectrometric-based approaches for the unbiased use of entire metabolomes as screening libraries. Together, our approaches identified 40 new SBP ligands, generated experiment-based annotations for 2084 SBPs in 71 isofunctional clusters, and defined numerous metabolic pathways, including novel catabolic pathways for the utilization of ethanolamine as sole nitrogen source and the use of D-Ala-D-Ala as sole carbon source. These efforts begin to define an integrated strategy for realizing the full value of amassing genome sequence data.« less

  12. 3-D Projected L1 inversion of gravity data using truncated unbiased predictive risk estimator for regularization parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatankhah, Saeed; Renaut, Rosemary A.; Ardestani, Vahid E.

    2017-09-01

    Sparse inversion of gravity data based on L1-norm regularization is discussed. An iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm is used to solve the problem. At each iteration the solution of a linear system of equations and the determination of a suitable regularization parameter are considered. The LSQR iteration is used to project the system of equations onto a smaller subspace that inherits the ill-conditioning of the full space problem. We show that the gravity kernel is only mildly to moderately ill-conditioned. Thus, while the dominant spectrum of the projected problem accurately approximates the dominant spectrum of the full space problem, the entire spectrum of the projected problem inherits the ill-conditioning of the full problem. Consequently, determining the regularization parameter based on the entire spectrum of the projected problem necessarily over compensates for the non-dominant portion of the spectrum and leads to inaccurate approximations for the full-space solution. In contrast, finding the regularization parameter using a truncated singular space of the projected operator is efficient and effective. Simulations for synthetic examples with noise demonstrate the approach using the method of unbiased predictive risk estimation for the truncated projected spectrum. The method is used on gravity data from the Mobrun ore body, northeast of Noranda, Quebec, Canada. The 3-D reconstructed model is in agreement with known drill-hole information.

  13. Smoothed Biasing Forces Yield Unbiased Free Energies with the Extended-System Adaptive Biasing Force Method.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Adrien; Lelièvre, Tony; Stoltz, Gabriel; Hénin, Jérôme

    2016-12-27

    We report a theoretical description and numerical tests of the extended-system adaptive biasing force method (eABF), together with an unbiased estimator of the free energy surface from eABF dynamics. Whereas the original ABF approach uses its running estimate of the free energy gradient as the adaptive biasing force, eABF is built on the idea that the exact free energy gradient is not necessary for efficient exploration, and that it is still possible to recover the exact free energy separately with an appropriate estimator. eABF does not directly bias the collective coordinates of interest, but rather fictitious variables that are harmonically coupled to them; therefore is does not require second derivative estimates, making it easily applicable to a wider range of problems than ABF. Furthermore, the extended variables present a smoother, coarse-grain-like sampling problem on a mollified free energy surface, leading to faster exploration and convergence. We also introduce CZAR, a simple, unbiased free energy estimator from eABF trajectories. eABF/CZAR converges to the physical free energy surface faster than standard ABF for a wide range of parameters.

  14. Estimating unbiased economies of scale of HIV prevention projects: a case study of Avahan.

    PubMed

    Lépine, Aurélia; Vassall, Anna; Chandrashekar, Sudha; Blanc, Elodie; Le Nestour, Alexis

    2015-04-01

    Governments and donors are investing considerable resources on HIV prevention in order to scale up these services rapidly. Given the current economic climate, providers of HIV prevention services increasingly need to demonstrate that these investments offer good 'value for money'. One of the primary routes to achieve efficiency is to take advantage of economies of scale (a reduction in the average cost of a health service as provision scales-up), yet empirical evidence on economies of scale is scarce. Methodologically, the estimation of economies of scale is hampered by several statistical issues preventing causal inference and thus making the estimation of economies of scale complex. In order to estimate unbiased economies of scale when scaling up HIV prevention services, we apply our analysis to one of the few HIV prevention programmes globally delivered at a large scale: the Indian Avahan initiative. We costed the project by collecting data from the 138 Avahan NGOs and the supporting partners in the first four years of its scale-up, between 2004 and 2007. We develop a parsimonious empirical model and apply a system Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) and fixed-effects Instrumental Variable (IV) estimators to estimate unbiased economies of scale. At the programme level, we find that, after controlling for the endogeneity of scale, the scale-up of Avahan has generated high economies of scale. Our findings suggest that average cost reductions per person reached are achievable when scaling-up HIV prevention in low and middle income countries.

  15. Magnetic stromal layers for enhanced and unbiased recovery of co-cultured hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Savvateeva, Maria V; Demin, Alexander M; Krasnov, Victor P; Belyavsky, Alexander V

    2016-09-15

    Cell co-culture systems have a long history of application in hematology and hold promise for successful hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell expansion. Here we report that various types of stromal cells used in such co-cultures can be rapidly and efficiently labeled with l-lysine-modified Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles. Hematopoiesis-supporting activity does not seem to be compromised after magnetic labeling of stromal cells, and the loss of the label by stromal layers during extended culturing is negligible. Magnetic labeling allows for simple and efficient removal of stromal component, yielding unbiased hematopoietic cell populations. When Lin(-) bone mouse marrow fraction was co-cultured with magnetic stromal layers and resulting cell populations were harvested by trypsinization, the yields of total nucleated cells, colony forming cells, and phenotypically primitive Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+) subset were substantially higher as compared with nonadherent cell fractions harvested after conventional stromal co-culture. The advantage offered by the magnetic stroma approach over the traditional one was even more significant after a second round of co-culture and was more dramatic for more primitive hematopoietic cells. We conclude that magnetic stromal layers represent a simple, efficient, and convenient tool for co-culturing and subsequent recovery of sufficiently pure unbiased populations of hematopoietic cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Weighted skewness and kurtosis unbiased by sample size and Gaussian uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimoldini, Lorenzo

    2014-07-01

    Central moments and cumulants are often employed to characterize the distribution of data. The skewness and kurtosis are particularly useful for the detection of outliers, the assessment of departures from normally distributed data, automated classification techniques and other applications. Estimators of higher order moments that are robust against outliers are more stable but might miss characteristic features of the data, as in the case of astronomical time series exhibiting brief events like stellar bursts or eclipses of binary systems, while weighting can help identify reliable measurements from uncertain or spurious outliers. Furthermore, noise is an unavoidable part of most measurements and their uncertainties need to be taken properly into account during the data analysis or biases are likely to emerge in the results, including basic descriptive statistics. This work provides unbiased estimates of the weighted skewness and kurtosis moments and cumulants, corrected for biases due to sample size and Gaussian noise, under the assumption of independent data. A comparison of biased and unbiased weighted estimators is illustrated with simulations as a function of sample size and signal-to-noise ratio, employing different data distributions and weighting schemes related to measurement uncertainties and the sampling of the signal. Detailed derivations and figures of simulation results are presented in the Appendices available online.

  17. 78 FR 26424 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of... Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee (MSAAC). DATES: A public meeting of the MSAAC will be held... savings associations, and other issues of concern to the existing mutual savings associations. On the day...

  18. 77 FR 74052 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY... Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee (MSAAC or Committee). DATES: A public meeting of the MSAAC... 8:30 a.m. EST. Agenda items include a discussion of the status of the mutual savings association...

  19. 12 CFR 563.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Application form; supporting information. An application for approval of the issuance of mutual capital... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mutual capital certificates. 563.74 Section 563...-OPERATIONS Securities and Borrowings § 563.74 Mutual capital certificates. (a) General. No savings...

  20. Unbiased high-throughput characterization of mussel transcriptomic responses to sublethal concentrations of the biotoxin okadaic acid.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Ulloa, Victoria; Fernandez-Tajes, Juan; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Prego-Faraldo, M Veronica; Florez-Barros, Fernanda; Sexto-Iglesias, Alexia; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) responsible for Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) represent a major threat for human consumers of shellfish. The biotoxin Okadaic Acid (OA), a well-known phosphatase inhibitor and tumor promoter, is the primary cause of acute DSP intoxications. Although several studies have described the molecular effects of high OA concentrations on sentinel organisms (e.g., bivalve molluscs), the effect of prolonged exposures to low (sublethal) OA concentrations is still unknown. In order to fill this gap, this work combines Next-Generation sequencing and custom-made microarray technologies to develop an unbiased characterization of the transcriptomic response of mussels during early stages of a DSP bloom. Methods. Mussel specimens were exposed to a HAB episode simulating an early stage DSP bloom (200 cells/L of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima for 24 h). The unbiased characterization of the transcriptomic responses triggered by OA was carried out using two complementary methods of cDNA library preparation: normalized and Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH). Libraries were sequenced and read datasets were mapped to Gene Ontology and KEGG databases. A custom-made oligonucleotide microarray was developed based on these data, completing the expression analysis of digestive gland and gill tissues. Results. Our findings show that exposure to sublethal concentrations of OA is enough to induce gene expression modifications in the mussel Mytilus. Transcriptomic analyses revealed an increase in proteasomal activity, molecular transport, cell cycle regulation, energy production and immune activity in mussels. Oppositely, a number of transcripts hypothesized to be responsive to OA (notably the Serine/Threonine phosphatases PP1 and PP2A) failed to show substantial modifications. Both digestive gland and gill tissues responded similarly to OA, although expression modifications were more dramatic in the former, supporting the choice of

  1. Unbiased high-throughput characterization of mussel transcriptomic responses to sublethal concentrations of the biotoxin okadaic acid

    PubMed Central

    Suarez-Ulloa, Victoria; Fernandez-Tajes, Juan; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Prego-Faraldo, M. Veronica; Florez-Barros, Fernanda; Sexto-Iglesias, Alexia; Mendez, Josefina

    2015-01-01

    Background. Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) responsible for Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) represent a major threat for human consumers of shellfish. The biotoxin Okadaic Acid (OA), a well-known phosphatase inhibitor and tumor promoter, is the primary cause of acute DSP intoxications. Although several studies have described the molecular effects of high OA concentrations on sentinel organisms (e.g., bivalve molluscs), the effect of prolonged exposures to low (sublethal) OA concentrations is still unknown. In order to fill this gap, this work combines Next-Generation sequencing and custom-made microarray technologies to develop an unbiased characterization of the transcriptomic response of mussels during early stages of a DSP bloom. Methods. Mussel specimens were exposed to a HAB episode simulating an early stage DSP bloom (200 cells/L of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima for 24 h). The unbiased characterization of the transcriptomic responses triggered by OA was carried out using two complementary methods of cDNA library preparation: normalized and Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH). Libraries were sequenced and read datasets were mapped to Gene Ontology and KEGG databases. A custom-made oligonucleotide microarray was developed based on these data, completing the expression analysis of digestive gland and gill tissues. Results. Our findings show that exposure to sublethal concentrations of OA is enough to induce gene expression modifications in the mussel Mytilus. Transcriptomic analyses revealed an increase in proteasomal activity, molecular transport, cell cycle regulation, energy production and immune activity in mussels. Oppositely, a number of transcripts hypothesized to be responsive to OA (notably the Serine/Threonine phosphatases PP1 and PP2A) failed to show substantial modifications. Both digestive gland and gill tissues responded similarly to OA, although expression modifications were more dramatic in the former, supporting the choice of

  2. Exploring Proxy Measures of Mutuality for Strategic Partnership Development: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Mayo-Gamble, Tilicia L; Barnes, Priscilla A; Sherwood-Laughlin, Catherine M; Reece, Michael; DeWeese, Sandy; Kennedy, Carol Weiss; Valenta, Mary Ann

    2017-07-01

    Partnerships between academic and clinical-based health organizations are becoming increasingly important in improving health outcomes. Mutuality is recognized as a vital component of these partnerships. If partnerships are to achieve mutuality, there is a need to define what it means to partnering organizations. Few studies have described the elements contributing to mutuality, particularly in new relationships between academic and clinical partners. This study seeks to identify how mutuality is expressed and to explore potential proxy measures of mutuality for an alliance consisting of a hospital system and a School of Public Health. Key informant interviews were conducted with faculty and hospital representatives serving on the partnership steering committee. Key informants were asked about perceived events that led to the development of the Alliance; perceived goals, expectations, and outcomes; and current/future roles with the Alliance. Four proxy measures of mutuality for an academic-clinical partnership were identified: policy directives, community beneficence, procurement of human capital, and partnership longevity. Findings can inform the development of tools for assisting in strengthening relationships and ensuring stakeholders' interests align with the mission and goal of the partnership by operationalizing elements necessary to evaluate the progress of the partnership.

  3. Mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Shakibian, Hadi; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a number of meta-path based similarity indices like PathSim, HeteSim, and random walk have been proposed for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. However, these indices suffer from two major drawbacks. Firstly, they are primarily dependent on the connectivity degrees of node pairs without considering the further information provided by the given meta-path. Secondly, most of them are required to use a single and usually symmetric meta-path in advance. Hence, employing a set of different meta-paths is not straightforward. To tackle with these problems, we propose a mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. The proposed model, called as Meta-path based Mutual Information Index (MMI), introduces meta-path based link entropy to estimate the link likelihood and could be carried on a set of available meta-paths. This estimation measures the amount of information through the paths instead of measuring the amount of connectivity between the node pairs. The experimental results on a Bibliography network show that the MMI obtains high prediction accuracy compared with other popular similarity indices. PMID:28344326

  4. An Unbiased Estimator of Gene Diversity with Improved Variance for Samples Containing Related and Inbred Individuals of any Ploidy.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alexandre M; DeGiorgio, Michael

    2017-02-09

    Gene diversity, or expected heterozygosity (H), is a common statistic for assessing genetic variation within populations. Estimation of this statistic decreases in accuracy and precision when individuals are related or inbred, due to increased dependence among allele copies in the sample. The original unbiased estimator of expected heterozygosity underestimates true population diversity in samples containing relatives, as it only accounts for sample size. More recently, a general unbiased estimator of expected heterozygosity was developed that explicitly accounts for related and inbred individuals in samples. Though unbiased, this estimator's variance is greater than that of the original estimator. To address this issue, we introduce a general unbiased estimator of gene diversity for samples containing related or inbred individuals, which employs the best linear unbiased estimator of allele frequencies, rather than the commonly used sample proportion. We examine the properties of this estimator, [Formula: see text] relative to alternative estimators using simulations and theoretical predictions, and show that it predominantly has the smallest mean squared error relative to others. Further, we empirically assess the performance of [Formula: see text] on a global human microsatellite dataset of 5795 individuals, from 267 populations, genotyped at 645 loci. Additionally, we show that the improved variance of [Formula: see text] leads to improved estimates of the population differentiation statistic, [Formula: see text] which employs measures of gene diversity within its calculation. Finally, we provide an R script, BestHet, to compute this estimator from genomic and pedigree data.

  5. An Unbiased Estimator of Gene Diversity with Improved Variance for Samples Containing Related and Inbred Individuals of any Ploidy

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Alexandre M.; DeGiorgio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Gene diversity, or expected heterozygosity (H), is a common statistic for assessing genetic variation within populations. Estimation of this statistic decreases in accuracy and precision when individuals are related or inbred, due to increased dependence among allele copies in the sample. The original unbiased estimator of expected heterozygosity underestimates true population diversity in samples containing relatives, as it only accounts for sample size. More recently, a general unbiased estimator of expected heterozygosity was developed that explicitly accounts for related and inbred individuals in samples. Though unbiased, this estimator’s variance is greater than that of the original estimator. To address this issue, we introduce a general unbiased estimator of gene diversity for samples containing related or inbred individuals, which employs the best linear unbiased estimator of allele frequencies, rather than the commonly used sample proportion. We examine the properties of this estimator, H∼BLUE, relative to alternative estimators using simulations and theoretical predictions, and show that it predominantly has the smallest mean squared error relative to others. Further, we empirically assess the performance of H∼BLUE on a global human microsatellite dataset of 5795 individuals, from 267 populations, genotyped at 645 loci. Additionally, we show that the improved variance of H∼BLUE leads to improved estimates of the population differentiation statistic, FST, which employs measures of gene diversity within its calculation. Finally, we provide an R script, BestHet, to compute this estimator from genomic and pedigree data. PMID:28040781

  6. Ultrafast fabrication of highly active BiVO4 photoanodes by hybrid microwave annealing for unbiased solar water splitting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Jo, Yim Hyun; Kim, Ju Hun; Lee, Jae Sung

    2016-10-14

    Hybrid microwave annealing (HMA) with a silicon susceptor in a household microwave oven produces BiVO4-based photoanodes of much improved performance in photoelectrochemical water oxidation in only 6 min relative to conventional thermal annealing in a traditional muffle furnace (FA) that needs a much longer time, 300 min. This technique can apply equally effectively to bare as well as modified BiVO4 by Mo-doping, heterojunction formation with WO3, and an oxygen evolution co-catalyst. Relative to FA, HMA forms BiVO4 films of smaller feature sizes, higher porosity, and increased three dimensional roughness, which decrease the diffusion distance of holes to the surface and thereby increase mainly the bulk charge separation efficiency (ηbulk) of the photoanodes. Thus, the HMA-treated BiVO4/WO3 film achieves the state-of-the art ηbulk of ∼90% for water oxidation. Combination of a photoanode of NiOOH/FeOOH/BiVO4/WO3 (HMA, 6 min) with a 2p c-Si solar cell allows a solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency of ∼5.0% in unbiased overall water splitting, which is also comparable to the state-of-the-art for a similar material combination.

  7. White matter microstructural characteristics in newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease: An unbiased whole-brain study

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming-Ching; Heng, Hannah S. E.; Ng, Samuel Y. E.; Tan, Louis C. S.; Chan, Ling Ling; Tan, Eng King

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder. Findings on specific white matter (WM) alterations in PD have been inconsistent. We hypothesized that WM changes occur in early PD patients and unbiased whole-brain analysis may provide additional evidence of pathological WM changes in PD. In this study, we examined various indexes of WM microstructure in newly diagnosed PD patients at the whole-brain level. 64 PDs with Hoehn & Yahr stage 1 (HY1PDs), 87 PDs with Hoehn & Yahr stage 2 (HYPD2s), and 60 controls (HCs) were recruited. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and diffusion connectometry were used to identify changes of WM pathways associated with PD. There were no significant differences in axial diffusivity, but HY1PDs exhibited greater fractional anisotropy (FA) and decreased mean and radial diffusivities (MD and RD) in callosal, projection, and association fibres than HCs and HY2PDs. Motor severity was inversely correlated with FA, but positively correlated with MD and RD in PD patients. Connectometry analysis also revealed increased WM density in the aforementioned tracts in PD patients, compared with HCs. Our study reveals WM enhancement, suggesting neural compensations in early PD. Longitudinal follow-up studies are warranted to identify the trajectory of WM changes alongside the progression of PD. PMID:27762307

  8. Identification of lipid-phosphatidylserine (PS) as the target of unbiasedly selected cancer specific peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1.

    PubMed

    Desai, Tanvi J; Toombs, Jason E; Minna, John D; Brekken, Rolf A; Udugamasooriya, Damith Gomika

    2016-05-24

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an anionic phospholipid maintained on the inner-leaflet of the cell membrane and is externalized in malignant cells. We previously launched a careful unbiased selection targeting biomolecules (e.g. protein, lipid or carbohydrate) distinct to cancer cells by exploiting HCC4017 lung cancer and HBEC30KT normal epithelial cells derived from the same patient, identifying HCC4017 specific peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1. In this current study, we identified PS as the target of PPS1. We validated direct PPS1 binding to PS using ELISA-like assays, lipid dot blot and liposome based binding assays. In addition, PPS1 recognized other negatively charged and cancer specific lipids such as phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylglycerol. PPS1 did not bind to neutral lipids such as phosphatidylethanolamine found in cancer and phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin found in normal cells. Further we found that the dimeric version of PPS1 (PPS1D1) displayed strong cytotoxicity towards lung cancer cell lines that externalize PS, but not normal cells. PPS1D1 showed potent single agent anti-tumor activity and enhanced the efficacy of docetaxel in mice bearing H460 lung cancer xenografts. Since PS and anionic phospholipid externalization is common across many cancer types, PPS1 may be an alternative to overcome limitations of protein targeted agents.

  9. Detection of variations in cognitive workload using multi-modality physiological sensors and a large margin unbiased regression machine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihong; Zhu, Yongwei; Maniyeri, Jayachandran; Guan, Cuntai

    2014-01-01

    Physiological sensor based workload estimation technology provides a real-time means for assessing cognitive workload and has a broad range of applications in cognitive ergonomics, mental health monitoring, etc. In this paper we report a study on detecting changes in workload using multi-modality physiological sensors and a novel feature extraction and classification algorithm. We conducted a cognitive workload experiment involving multiple subjects and collected an extensive data set of EEG, ECG and GSR signals. We show that the GSR signal is consistent with the variations of cognitive workload in 75% of the samples. To explore cardiac patterns in ECG that are potentially correlated with the cognitive workload process, we computed various heart-rate-variability features. To extract neuronal activity patterns in EEG related to cognitive workload, we introduced a filter bank common spatial pattern filtering technique. As there can be large variations in e.g. individual responses to the cognitive workload, we propose a large margin unbiased recursive feature extraction and regression method. Our leave-one-subject-out cross validation test shows that, using the proposed method, EEG can provide significantly better prediction of the cognitive workload variation than ECG, with 87.5% vs 62.5% in accuracy rate.

  10. Identification of lipid-phosphatidylserine (PS) as the target of unbiasedly selected cancer specific peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Tanvi J.; Toombs, Jason E.; Minna, John D.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Udugamasooriya, Damith Gomika

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an anionic phospholipid maintained on the inner-leaflet of the cell membrane and is externalized in malignant cells. We previously launched a careful unbiased selection targeting biomolecules (e.g. protein, lipid or carbohydrate) distinct to cancer cells by exploiting HCC4017 lung cancer and HBEC30KT normal epithelial cells derived from the same patient, identifying HCC4017 specific peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1. In this current study, we identified PS as the target of PPS1. We validated direct PPS1 binding to PS using ELISA-like assays, lipid dot blot and liposome based binding assays. In addition, PPS1 recognized other negatively charged and cancer specific lipids such as phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylglycerol. PPS1 did not bind to neutral lipids such as phosphatidylethanolamine found in cancer and phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin found in normal cells. Further we found that the dimeric version of PPS1 (PPS1D1) displayed strong cytotoxicity towards lung cancer cell lines that externalize PS, but not normal cells. PPS1D1 showed potent single agent anti-tumor activity and enhanced the efficacy of docetaxel in mice bearing H460 lung cancer xenografts. Since PS and anionic phospholipid externalization is common across many cancer types, PPS1 may be an alternative to overcome limitations of protein targeted agents. PMID:27120792

  11. Peer-reviewed and unbiased research, rather than 'sound science', should be used to evaluate endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Trasande, Leonardo; Vandenberg, Laura N; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Myers, John Peterson; Slama, Remy; Vom Saal, Frederick; Zoeller, Robert Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Evidence increasingly confirms that synthetic chemicals disrupt the endocrine system and contribute to disease and disability across the lifespan. Despite a United Nations Environment Programme/WHO report affirmed by over 100 countries at the Fourth International Conference on Chemicals Management, 'manufactured doubt' continues to be cast as a cloud over rigorous, peer-reviewed and independently funded scientific data. This study describes the sources of doubt and their social costs, and suggested courses of action by policymakers to prevent disease and disability. The problem is largely based on the available data, which are all too limited. Rigorous testing programmes should not simply focus on oestrogen, androgen and thyroid. Tests should have proper statistical power. 'Good laboratory practice' (GLP) hardly represents a proper or even gold standard for laboratory studies of endocrine disruption. Studies should be evaluated with regard to the contamination of negative controls, responsiveness to positive controls and dissection techniques. Flaws in many GLP studies have been identified, yet regulatory agencies rely on these flawed studies. Peer-reviewed and unbiased research, rather than 'sound science', should be used to evaluate endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

  12. Thirty Years of Natural Satellites Mutual Events Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlot, Jean-eudes; Events Observers, Mutual

    2009-09-01

    Phenomena in the Solar System have been observed for years: solar and lunar eclipses, occultations of stars by the Moon and the asteroids, eclipses of the satellites of Jupiter. Since 1973, mutual occultations and eclipses of the satellites of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus were observed extensively during each opportunity i.e. the equinox on the planet: why? The study of the systems of natural satellites needs to explore the dynamics of these objects: each small dynamical effect is the signature of some physical property. In order to validate the theoretical models, very accurate observations are needed. Most of the direct astrometric observations have their accuracy limited by the diffraction of the light in the telescope and by the star catalogues used for calibration. Phenomena have not this limitation: the accuracy is not in angle but in kilometres in space. Since, the observed satellites have no atmosphere, these photometric events are easy to analyse providing relative positions accurate to a few kilometres corresponding to a few mas in geocentric angle. More, during an occultation, the surface of the satellites may be studied: volcanoes of Io (positions and fluxes) were observed that way. Mutual events observations together with the best observations made since several decades allowed improving dynamical models of the satellites systems of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. Concerning Io, the dissipation of energy in its internal structure by the Jovian tides has been made into evidence thanks to fitting the models on accurate observations including mutual events. Eight observational campaigns were organized for the Jovian satellites, three for the Saturnians and one for the Uranians providing more than 1400 light curves (see the data base at http://www.imcce.fr/fr/ephemerides/generateur/saimirror/obsindhe.htm ). The author acknowledges the numerous observers worldwide who provide the observations, the observatories permitting observations and the French CNRS who

  13. Compositional genomes: Prebiotic information transfer in mutually catalytic noncovalent assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Segré, Daniel; Ben-Eli, Dafna; Lancet, Doron

    2000-01-01

    Mutually catalytic sets of simple organic molecules have been suggested to be capable of self-replication and rudimentary chemical evolution. Previous models for the behavior of such sets have analyzed the global properties of short biopolymer ensembles by using graph theory and a mean field approach. In parallel, experimental studies with the autocatalytic formation of amphiphilic assemblies (e.g., lipid vesicles or micelles) demonstrated self-replication properties resembling those of living cells. Combining these approaches, we analyze here the kinetic behavior of small heterogeneous assemblies of spontaneously aggregating molecules, of the type that could form readily under prebiotic conditions. A statistical formalism for mutual rate enhancement is used to numerically simulate the detailed chemical kinetics within such assemblies. We demonstrate that a straightforward set of assumptions about kinetically enhanced recruitment of simple amphiphilic molecules, as well as about the spontaneous growth and splitting of assemblies, results in a complex population behavior. The assemblies manifest a significant degree of homeostasis, resembling the previously predicted quasi-stationary states of biopolymer ensembles (Dyson, F. J. (1982) J. Mol. Evol. 18, 344–350). Such emergent catalysis-driven, compositionally biased entities may be viewed as having rudimentary “compositional genomes.” Our analysis addresses the question of how mutually catalytic metabolic networks, devoid of sequence-based biopolymers, could exhibit transfer of chemical information and might undergo selection and evolution. This computed behavior may constitute a demonstration of natural selection in populations of molecules without genetic apparatus, suggesting a pathway from random molecular assemblies to a minimal protocell. PMID:10760281

  14. Reward value comparison via mutual inhibition in ventromedial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Strait, Caleb E.; Blanchard, Tommy C.; Hayden, Benjamin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Recent theories suggest that reward-based choice reflects competition between value signals in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). We tested this idea by recording vmPFC neurons while macaques performed a gambling task with asynchronous offer presentation. We found that neuronal activity shows four patterns consistent with selection via mutual inhibition. (1) Correlated tuning for probability and reward size, suggesting that vmPFC carries an integrated value signal, (2) anti-correlated tuning curves for the two options, suggesting mutual inhibition, (3) neurons rapidly come to signal the value of the chosen offer, suggesting the circuit serves to produce a choice, (4) after regressing out the effects of option values, firing rates still could predict choice – a choice probability signal. In addition, neurons signaled gamble outcomes, suggesting that vmPFC contributes to both monitoring and choice processes. These data suggest a possible mechanism for reward-based choice and endorse the centrality of vmPFC in that process. PMID:24881835

  15. Reward value comparison via mutual inhibition in ventromedial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Strait, Caleb E; Blanchard, Tommy C; Hayden, Benjamin Y

    2014-06-18

    Recent theories suggest that reward-based choice reflects competition between value signals in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). We tested this idea by recording vmPFC neurons while macaques performed a gambling task with asynchronous offer presentation. We found that neuronal activity shows four patterns consistent with selection via mutual inhibition: (1) correlated tuning for probability and reward size, suggesting that vmPFC carries an integrated value signal; (2) anti-correlated tuning curves for the two options, suggesting mutual inhibition; (3) neurons rapidly come to signal the value of the chosen offer, suggesting the circuit serves to produce a choice; and (4) after regressing out the effects of option values, firing rates still could predict choice-a choice probability signal. In addition, neurons signaled gamble outcomes, suggesting that vmPFC contributes to both monitoring and choice processes. These data suggest a possible mechanism for reward-based choice and endorse the centrality of vmPFC in that process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of referent and expert power in mutual help.

    PubMed

    Salem, D A; Reischl, T M; Gallacher, F; Randall, K W

    2000-06-01

    This study explored the roles of referent power (i.e., influence based on sense of identification) and expert power (i.e., influence based on knowledge and expertise) in Schizophrenics Anonymous (SA), a mutual-help group for persons experiencing a schizophrenia-related illness. The study describes SA participants' experience of referent and expert power with SA members, SA leaders, and with mental health professionals. It also examines whether or not referent and expert power ascribed to fellow SA participants predicts the perceived helpfulness of the group. One hundred fifty-six SA participants were surveyed. Participants reported experiencing higher levels of referent power with fellow SA members and leaders than with mental health professionals. They reported higher levels of expert power for mental health professionals and SA leaders than for SA members. The respondents' ratings of their SA group's helpfulness was significantly correlated with ratings of referent and expert power. Although expert power was the best independent predictor of helpfulness, a significant interaction between referent and expert power indicated that when members reported high referent power, expert power was not related to helpfulness. These results are interpreted to suggest that there are multiple forms of social influence at work in mutual help.

  17. Creating a culture of mutual respect.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Kathryn; Mestel, Pamela; Feldman, David L

    2010-04-01

    The Joint Commission mandates that hospitals seeking accreditation have a process to define and address disruptive behavior. Leaders at Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, took the initiative to create a code of mutual respect that not only requires respectful behavior, but also encourages sensitivity and awareness to the causes of frustration that often lead to inappropriate behavior. Steps to implementing the code included selecting code advocates, setting up a system for mediating disputes, tracking and addressing operational system issues, providing training for personnel, developing a formal accountability process, and measuring the results.

  18. Partner selection in the mycorrhizal mutualism.

    PubMed

    Werner, Gijsbert D A; Kiers, E Toby

    2015-03-01

    Partner selection in the mycorrhizal symbiosis is thought to be a key factor stabilising the mutualism. Both plant hosts and mycorrhizal fungi have been shown to preferentially allocate resources to higher quality partners. This can help maintain underground cooperation, although it is likely that different plant species vary in the spatial precision with which they can select partners. Partner selection in the mycorrhizal symbiosis is presumably context-dependent and can be mediated by factors like (relative) resource abundance and resource fluctuations, competition among mycorrhizas, arrival order and cultivation history. Such factors complicate our current understanding of the importance of partner selection and its effectiveness in stimulating mutualistic cooperation.

  19. Identity theory and personality theory: mutual relevance.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Sheldon

    2007-12-01

    Some personality psychologists have found a structural symbolic interactionist frame and identity theory relevant to their work. This frame and theory, developed in sociology, are first reviewed. Emphasized in the review are a multiple identity conception of self, identities as internalized expectations derived from roles embedded in organized networks of social interaction, and a view of social structures as facilitators in bringing people into networks or constraints in keeping them out, subsequently, attention turns to a discussion of the mutual relevance of structural symbolic interactionism/identity theory and personality theory, looking to extensions of the current literature on these topics.

  20. A Serendipitous, Unbiased Survey of Dying Stars in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Kathleen

    We propose to use the Full Field Images (FFIs) from the 4-year Kepler mission, complemented by 2MASS, WISE, and Spitzer, to conduct the first accurate, unbiased census of long-period variables (LPVs) in the Galactic Disk. A fundamental question in stellar astrophysics is how stars shed the bulk of their mass as they die. Much of this mass is ejected during the LPV phase of stellar evolution. That material, enriched by the nucleosynthetic products created deep in a star's interior, is recycled into the interstellar medium (ISM) to form the next generations of stars and planets and, over time, changes the chemical composition of the Galaxy. The amplitude and period distribution of LPVs, and how long they remain in this stage, profoundly impact the type and amount of enriched material that is returned to the ISM. However, a profound impediment to our understanding of this important phase of stellar evolution is the lack of an unbiased sample for the Disk of the Milky Way. Recent variability surveys of the Magellanic Clouds and the Galactic Bulge have accurately counted LPVs in those environments as a function of luminosity, pulsation mode, and period - but no suitable comparison exists for the Galactic Disk. Current counts of Galactic LPVs are from heterogeneous compilations of countless observing programs, each with its own biases. Consequently, the impact of these populations of evolved stars on their host galaxies at solar metallicities remains unknown. Our project will use the FFIs from the Kepler archive to address this need by creating the first unbiased catalog of Disk LPVs and analyzing their properties. These images of the entire 116 square-degree field, taken at a cadence of about once every 30 days, make it possible for the first time to create an unbiased database of pulsating, dying stars on the asymptotic giant branch in the Disk. We will create an atlas of 1500+ day light curves to characterize their variability and mass-loss properties and to enable

  1. Unbiased reduced density matrices and electronic properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Overy, Catherine; Booth, George H; Blunt, N S; Shepherd, James J; Cleland, Deidre; Alavi, Ali

    2014-12-28

    Properties that are necessarily formulated within pure (symmetric) expectation values are difficult to calculate for projector quantum Monte Carlo approaches, but are critical in order to compute many of the important observable properties of electronic systems. Here, we investigate an approach for the sampling of unbiased reduced density matrices within the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo dynamic, which requires only small computational overheads. This is achieved via an independent replica population of walkers in the dynamic, sampled alongside the original population. The resulting reduced density matrices are free from systematic error (beyond those present via constraints on the dynamic itself) and can be used to compute a variety of expectation values and properties, with rapid convergence to an exact limit. A quasi-variational energy estimate derived from these density matrices is proposed as an accurate alternative to the projected estimator for multiconfigurational wavefunctions, while its variational property could potentially lend itself to accurate extrapolation approaches in larger systems.

  2. Unbiased reduced density matrices and electronic properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Overy, Catherine; Blunt, N. S.; Shepherd, James J.; Booth, George H.; Cleland, Deidre; Alavi, Ali

    2014-12-28

    Properties that are necessarily formulated within pure (symmetric) expectation values are difficult to calculate for projector quantum Monte Carlo approaches, but are critical in order to compute many of the important observable properties of electronic systems. Here, we investigate an approach for the sampling of unbiased reduced density matrices within the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo dynamic, which requires only small computational overheads. This is achieved via an independent replica population of walkers in the dynamic, sampled alongside the original population. The resulting reduced density matrices are free from systematic error (beyond those present via constraints on the dynamic itself) and can be used to compute a variety of expectation values and properties, with rapid convergence to an exact limit. A quasi-variational energy estimate derived from these density matrices is proposed as an accurate alternative to the projected estimator for multiconfigurational wavefunctions, while its variational property could potentially lend itself to accurate extrapolation approaches in larger systems.

  3. Comprehensive identification and quantification of microbial transcriptomes by genome-wide unbiased methods.

    PubMed

    Mäder, Ulrike; Nicolas, Pierre; Richard, Hugues; Bessières, Philippe; Aymerich, Stéphane

    2011-02-01

    Genomic tiling array transcriptomics and RNA-seq are two powerful and rapidly developing approaches for unbiased transcriptome analysis. Providing comprehensive identification and quantification of transcripts with an unprecedented resolution, they are leading to major breakthroughs in systems biology. Here we review each step of the analysis from library preparation to the interpretation of the data, with particular attention paid to the possible sources of artifacts. Methodological requirements and statistical frameworks are often similar in both the approaches despite differences in the nature of the data. Tiling array analysis does not require rRNA depletion and benefits from a more mature computational workflow, whereas RNA-Seq has a clear lead in terms of background noise and dynamic range with a considerable potential for evolution with the improvements of sequencing technologies. Being independent of prior sequence knowledge, RNA-seq will boost metatranscriptomics and evolutionary transcriptomics applications.

  4. Motor activity as an unbiased variable to assess anaphylaxis in allergic rats.

    PubMed

    Abril-Gil, Mar; Garcia-Just, Alba; Cambras, Trinitat; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castellote, Cristina; Franch, Àngels; Castell, Margarida

    2015-10-01

    The release of mediators by mast cells triggers allergic symptoms involving various physiological systems and, in the most severe cases, the development of anaphylactic shock compromising mainly the nervous and cardiovascular systems. We aimed to establish variables to objectively study the anaphylactic response (AR) after an oral challenge in an allergy model. Brown Norway rats were immunized by intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin with alum and toxin from Bordetella pertussis. Specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E antibodies were developed in immunized animals. Forty days after immunization, the rats were orally challenged with the allergen, and motor activity, body temperature and serum mast cell protease concentration were determined. The anaphylaxis induced a reduction in body temperature and a decrease in the number of animal movements, which was inversely correlated with serum mast cell protease release. In summary, motor activity is a reliable tool for assessing AR and also an unbiased method for screening new anti-allergic drugs.

  5. Cross cultural communication to help physician assistants provide unbiased health care.

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, S H; Bass, K

    1992-01-01

    Teaching cross cultural communication typically involves instruction in differences between groups. As part of this course in cross cultural communication, six specific underserved population groups are introduced to students as a cultural experience. Additionally, instruction is provided to sensitize students to their personal biases and prejudices through videotaped mock interviews. The combination of instruction and experience forms a paradigm for teaching cross cultural communication in a way that has personal and immediate impact on faculty members and students. The model, "Differences + Discomforts = Discoveries," inhibits factionalizing and promotes depth of knowledge about underserved groups as well as personal awareness of prejudicial feelings. As a result, students learn techniques to provide unbiased health care to these, and other, populations. PMID:1346725

  6. Denoising PET Images Using Singular Value Thresholding and Stein's Unbiased Risk Estimate*

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, Ulas; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Image denoising is an important pre-processing step for accurately quantifying functional morphology and measuring activities of the tissues using PET images. Unlike structural imaging modalities, PET images have two difficulties: (1) the Gaussian noise model does not necessarily fit into PET imaging because the exact nature of noise propagation in PET imaging is not well known, and (2) PET images are low resolution; therefore, it is challenging to denoise them while preserving structural information. To address these two difficulties, we introduce a novel methodology for denoising PET images. The proposed method uses the singular value thresholding concept and Stein's unbiased risk estimate to optimize a soft thresholding rule. Results, obtained from 40 MRI-PET images, demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is able to denoise PET images successfully, while still maintaining the quantitative information. PMID:24505751

  7. An unbiased X-ray sampling of stars within 25 parsecs of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.

    1986-01-01

    A search of all of the Einstein Laboratory IPC and HRI fields for untargeted stars in the Woolley, et al., Catalogue of the nearby stars is reported. Optical data and IPC coordinates, flux density F sub x, and luminosity L sub x, or upper limits, are tabulated for 126 single or blended systems, and HRI results for a few of them. IPC luminosity functions are derived for the systems, for 193 individual stars in the systems (with L sub x shared equally among blended components), and for 63 individual M dwarfs. These stars have relatively large X-ray flux densities that are free of interstellar extinction, because they are nearby, but they are otherwise unbiased with respect to the X-ray properties that are found in a defined small space around the sun.

  8. An unbiased X-ray sampling of stars within 25 parsecs of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    A search of all of the Einstein Observatory IPC and HRI fields for untargeted stars in the Woolley, et al., Catalogue of the nearby stars is reported. Optical data and IPC coordinates, flux density F sub x, and luminosity L sub x, or upper limits, are tabulated for 126 single or blended systems, and HRI results for a few of them. IPC luminosity functions are derived for the systems, for 193 individual stars in the systems (with L sub x shared equally among blended components), and for 63 individual M dwarfs. These stars have relatively large X-ray flux densities that are free of interstellar extinction, because they are nearby, but they are otherwise unbiased with respect to the X-ray properties that are found in a defined small space around the Sun.

  9. Size Unbiased Representative Enzymatically Generated RNAi (SURER) Library and Application for RNAi Therapeutic Screens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiejun; Chen, Li; Sun, Yuncheng; Yuan, Jian; Graham, Michael; French, Peter

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) libraries screens have become widely used for small RNA (sRNA) therapeutic targets development. However, conventional enzymatically libraries, typically prepared using the type 2 restriction enzyme MmeI, produce sRNAs between 18 and 20 bp, much shorter than the usual lengths of 19–23 bp. Here we develop a size unbiased representative enzymatically generated RNAi (SURER) library, which employs type 3 restriction modification enzyme EcoP15I to produce sRNAs ranging from 19 to 23 bp using a group of rationally designed linkers, which can completely mimic the length of sRNAs naturally generated by Dicer enzyme in living cells, and the screening results of SURER libraries showed high recombination rate and knockdown efficiency. SURER library provides a useful tool for RNAi therapeutics screening in a fast and simple way. PMID:25493330

  10. An unbiased X-ray sampling of stars within 25 parsecs of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.

    1986-01-01

    A search of all of the Einstein Laboratory IPC and HRI fields for untargeted stars in the Woolley, et al., Catalogue of the nearby stars is reported. Optical data and IPC coordinates, flux density F sub x, and luminosity L sub x, or upper limits, are tabulated for 126 single or blended systems, and HRI results for a few of them. IPC luminosity functions are derived for the systems, for 193 individual stars in the systems (with L sub x shared equally among blended components), and for 63 individual M dwarfs. These stars have relatively large X-ray flux densities that are free of interstellar extinction, because they are nearby, but they are otherwise unbiased with respect to the X-ray properties that are found in a defined small space around the sun.

  11. Motor activity as an unbiased variable to assess anaphylaxis in allergic rats

    PubMed Central

    Abril-Gil, Mar; Garcia-Just, Alba; Cambras, Trinitat; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castellote, Cristina; Franch, Àngels

    2015-01-01

    The release of mediators by mast cells triggers allergic symptoms involving various physiological systems and, in the most severe cases, the development of anaphylactic shock compromising mainly the nervous and cardiovascular systems. We aimed to establish variables to objectively study the anaphylactic response (AR) after an oral challenge in an allergy model. Brown Norway rats were immunized by intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin with alum and toxin from Bordetella pertussis. Specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E antibodies were developed in immunized animals. Forty days after immunization, the rats were orally challenged with the allergen, and motor activity, body temperature and serum mast cell protease concentration were determined. The anaphylaxis induced a reduction in body temperature and a decrease in the number of animal movements, which was inversely correlated with serum mast cell protease release. In summary, motor activity is a reliable tool for assessing AR and also an unbiased method for screening new anti-allergic drugs. PMID:25716015

  12. An unbiased survey for dense cores in the Lynds 1630 molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Elizabeth A.; Bally, John; Stark, Antony A.

    1991-01-01

    An unbiased, systematic survey for dense cores within the L1630 (Orion B) molecular cloud has been completed. This survey provides the first complete census of dense (n greater tha 10,000/cu cm) cores within a molecular cloud. To identify the dense gas, 3.6 square degrees of the L1630 cloud were surveyed in the J = 2-1 transition of CS. CS emission was detected over 10 percent of the area surveyed, and this emission is not uniformly distributed throughout the cloud but is confined to 42 dense cores. The size, shape, velocity dispersion, and mass of these cores are examined. Comparison of the mass contained within dense cores with the total gas mass within the surveyed region, estimated from CO emission, reveals that the dense cores constitute only a small fraction (not greater than 19 percent) of the total cloud mass.

  13. Intrinsic Atomic Orbitals: An Unbiased Bridge between Quantum Theory and Chemical Concepts.

    PubMed

    Knizia, Gerald

    2013-11-12

    Modern quantum chemistry can make quantitative predictions on an immense array of chemical systems. However, the interpretation of those predictions is often complicated by the complex wave function expansions used. Here we show that an exceptionally simple algebraic construction allows for defining atomic core and valence orbitals, polarized by the molecular environment, which can exactly represent self-consistent field wave functions. This construction provides an unbiased and direct connection between quantum chemistry and empirical chemical concepts, and can be used, for example, to calculate the nature of bonding in molecules, in chemical terms, from first principles. In particular, we find consistency with electronegativities (χ), C 1s core-level shifts, resonance substituent parameters (σR), Lewis structures, and oxidation states of transition-metal complexes.

  14. Unbiased metabolite profiling by liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and multivariate data analysis for herbal authentication: classification of seven Lonicera species flower buds.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen; Yang, Hua; Qi, Lian-Wen; Liu, E-Hu; Ren, Mei-Ting; Yan, Yu-Ting; Chen, Jun; Li, Ping

    2012-07-06

    Plant-based medicines become increasingly popular over the world. Authentication of herbal raw materials is important to ensure their safety and efficacy. Some herbs belonging to closely related species but differing in medicinal properties are difficult to be identified because of similar morphological and microscopic characteristics. Chromatographic fingerprinting is an alternative method to distinguish them. Existing approaches do not allow a comprehensive analysis for herbal authentication. We have now developed a strategy consisting of (1) full metabolic profiling of herbal medicines by rapid resolution liquid chromatography (RRLC) combined with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF MS), (2) global analysis of non-targeted compounds by molecular feature extraction algorithm, (3) multivariate statistical analysis for classification and prediction, and (4) marker compounds characterization. This approach has provided a fast and unbiased comparative multivariate analysis of the metabolite composition of 33-batch samples covering seven Lonicera species. Individual metabolic profiles are performed at the level of molecular fragments without prior structural assignment. In the entire set, the obtained classifier for seven Lonicera species flower buds showed good prediction performance and a total of 82 statistically different components were rapidly obtained by the strategy. The elemental compositions of discriminative metabolites were characterized by the accurate mass measurement of the pseudomolecular ions and their chemical types were assigned by the MS/MS spectra. The high-resolution, comprehensive and unbiased strategy for metabolite data analysis presented here is powerful and opens the new direction of authentication in herbal analysis.

  15. Unbiased split variable selection for random survival forests using maximally selected rank statistics.

    PubMed

    Wright, Marvin N; Dankowski, Theresa; Ziegler, Andreas

    2017-04-15

    The most popular approach for analyzing survival data is the Cox regression model. The Cox model may, however, be misspecified, and its proportionality assumption may not always be fulfilled. An alternative approach for survival prediction is random forests for survival outcomes. The standard split criterion for random survival forests is the log-rank test statistic, which favors splitting variables with many possible split points. Conditional inference forests avoid this split variable selection bias. However, linear rank statistics are utilized by default in conditional inference forests to select the optimal splitting variable, which cannot detect non-linear effects in the independent variables. An alternative is to use maximally selected rank statistics for the split point selection. As in conditional inference forests, splitting variables are compared on the p-value scale. However, instead of the conditional Monte-Carlo approach used in conditional inference forests, p-value approximations are employed. We describe several p-value approximations and the implementation of the proposed random forest approach. A simulation study demonstrates that unbiased split variable selection is possible. However, there is a trade-off between unbiased split variable selection and runtime. In benchmark studies of prediction performance on simulated and real datasets, the new method performs better than random survival forests if informative dichotomous variables are combined with uninformative variables with more categories and better than conditional inference forests if non-linear covariate effects are included. In a runtime comparison, the method proves to be computationally faster than both alternatives, if a simple p-value approximation is used. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Mutual influences of pain and emotional face processing.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Matthias J; Gerdes, Antje B M; Reicherts, Philipp; Pauli, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The perception of unpleasant stimuli enhances whereas the perception of pleasant stimuli decreases pain perception. In contrast, the effects of pain on the processing of emotional stimuli are much less known. Especially given the recent interest in facial expressions of pain as a special category of emotional stimuli, a main topic in this research line is the mutual influence of pain and facial expression processing. Therefore, in this mini-review we selectively summarize research on the effects of emotional stimuli on pain, but more extensively turn to the opposite direction namely how pain influences concurrent processing of affective stimuli such as facial expressions. Based on the motivational priming theory one may hypothesize that the perception of pain enhances the processing of unpleasant stimuli and decreases the processing of pleasant stimuli. This review reveals that the literature is only partly consistent with this assumption: pain reduces the processing of pleasant pictures and happy facial expressions, but does not - or only partly - affect processing of unpleasant pictures. However, it was demonstrated that pain selectively enhances the processing of facial expressions if these are pain-related (i.e., facial expressions of pain). Extending a mere affective modulation theory, the latter results suggest pain-specific effects which may be explained by the perception-action model of empathy. Together, these results underscore the important mutual influence of pain and emotional face processing.

  17. Inflammation and colorectal cancer, when microbiota-host mutualism breaks.

    PubMed

    Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Carbonero, Franck; Rampelli, Simone; Fiorentini, Carla; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2014-01-28

    Structural changes in the gut microbial community have been shown to accompany the progressive development of colorectal cancer. In this review we discuss recent hypotheses on the mechanisms involved in the bacteria-mediated carcinogenesis, as well as the triggering factors favoring the shift of the gut microbiota from a mutualistic to a pro-carcinogenic configuration. The possible role of inflammation, bacterial toxins and toxic microbiota metabolites in colorectal cancer onset is specifically discussed. On the other hand, the strategic role of inflammation as the keystone factor in driving microbiota to become carcinogenic is suggested. As a common outcome of different environmental and endogenous triggers, such as diet, aging, pathogen infection or genetic predisposition, inflammation can compromise the microbiota-host mutualism, forcing the increase of pathobionts at the expense of health-promoting groups, and allowing the microbiota to acquire an overall pro-inflammatory configuration. Consolidating inflammation in the gut, and favoring the bloom of toxigenic bacterial drivers, these changes in the gut microbial ecosystem have been suggested as pivotal in promoting carcinogenesis. In this context, it will become of primary importance to implement dietary or probiotics-based interventions aimed at preserving the microbiota-host mutualism along aging, counteracting deviations that favor a pro-carcinogenic microbiota asset.

  18. Inflammation and colorectal cancer, when microbiota-host mutualism breaks

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Carbonero, Franck; Rampelli, Simone; Fiorentini, Carla; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Structural changes in the gut microbial community have been shown to accompany the progressive development of colorectal cancer. In this review we discuss recent hypotheses on the mechanisms involved in the bacteria-mediated carcinogenesis, as well as the triggering factors favoring the shift of the gut microbiota from a mutualistic to a pro-carcinogenic configuration. The possible role of inflammation, bacterial toxins and toxic microbiota metabolites in colorectal cancer onset is specifically discussed. On the other hand, the strategic role of inflammation as the keystone factor in driving microbiota to become carcinogenic is suggested. As a common outcome of different environmental and endogenous triggers, such as diet, aging, pathogen infection or genetic predisposition, inflammation can compromise the microbiota-host mutualism, forcing the increase of pathobionts at the expense of health-promoting groups, and allowing the microbiota to acquire an overall pro-inflammatory configuration. Consolidating inflammation in the gut, and favoring the bloom of toxigenic bacterial drivers, these changes in the gut microbial ecosystem have been suggested as pivotal in promoting carcinogenesis. In this context, it will become of primary importance to implement dietary or probiotics-based interventions aimed at preserving the microbiota-host mutualism along aging, counteracting deviations that favor a pro-carcinogenic microbiota asset. PMID:24574765

  19. Mutual influences of pain and emotional face processing

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Matthias J.; Gerdes, Antje B. M.; Reicherts, Philipp; Pauli, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The perception of unpleasant stimuli enhances whereas the perception of pleasant stimuli decreases pain perception. In contrast, the effects of pain on the processing of emotional stimuli are much less known. Especially given the recent interest in facial expressions of pain as a special category of emotional stimuli, a main topic in this research line is the mutual influence of pain and facial expression processing. Therefore, in this mini-review we selectively summarize research on the effects of emotional stimuli on pain, but more extensively turn to the opposite direction namely how pain influences concurrent processing of affective stimuli such as facial expressions. Based on the motivational priming theory one may hypothesize that the perception of pain enhances the processing of unpleasant stimuli and decreases the processing of pleasant stimuli. This review reveals that the literature is only partly consistent with this assumption: pain reduces the processing of pleasant pictures and happy facial expressions, but does not – or only partly – affect processing of unpleasant pictures. However, it was demonstrated that pain selectively enhances the processing of facial expressions if these are pain-related (i.e., facial expressions of pain). Extending a mere affective modulation theory, the latter results suggest pain-specific effects which may be explained by the perception-action model of empathy. Together, these results underscore the important mutual influence of pain and emotional face processing. PMID:25352817

  20. Water stress strengthens mutualism among ants, trees, and scale insects.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Elizabeth G; Akçay, Erol; Raab, Ted K; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Gordon, Deborah M

    2013-11-01

    Abiotic environmental variables strongly affect the outcomes of species interactions. For example, mutualistic interactions between species are often stronger when resources are limited. The effect might be indirect: water stress on plants can lead to carbon stress, which could alter carbon-mediated plant mutualisms. In mutualistic ant-plant symbioses, plants host ant colonies that defend them against herbivores. Here we show that the partners' investments in a widespread ant-plant symbiosis increase with water stress across 26 sites along a Mesoamerican precipitation gradient. At lower precipitation levels, Cordia alliodora trees invest more carbon in Azteca ants via phloem-feeding scale insects that provide the ants with sugars, and the ants provide better defense of the carbon-producing leaves. Under water stress, the trees have smaller carbon pools. A model of the carbon trade-offs for the mutualistic partners shows that the observed strategies can arise from the carbon costs of rare but extreme events of herbivory in the rainy season. Thus, water limitation, together with the risk of herbivory, increases the strength of a carbon-based mutualism.

  1. Markov chain order estimation with conditional mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papapetrou, M.; Kugiumtzis, D.

    2013-04-01

    We introduce the Conditional Mutual Information (CMI) for the estimation of the Markov chain order. For a Markov chain of K symbols, we define CMI of order m, Ic(m), as the mutual information of two variables in the chain being m time steps apart, conditioning on the intermediate variables of the chain. We find approximate analytic significance limits based on the estimation bias of CMI and develop a randomization significance test of Ic(m), where the randomized symbol sequences are formed by random permutation of the components of the original symbol sequence. The significance test is applied for increasing m and the Markov chain order is estimated by the last order for which the null hypothesis is rejected. We present the appropriateness of CMI-testing on Monte Carlo simulations and compare it to the Akaike and Bayesian information criteria, the maximal fluctuation method (Peres-Shields estimator) and a likelihood ratio test for increasing orders using ϕ-divergence. The order criterion of CMI-testing turns out to be superior for orders larger than one, but its effectiveness for large orders depends on data availability. In view of the results from the simulations, we interpret the estimated orders by the CMI-testing and the other criteria on genes and intergenic regions of DNA chains.

  2. Water Stress Strengthens Mutualism Among Ants, Trees, and Scale Insects

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Elizabeth G.; Akçay, Erol; Raab, Ted K.; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Gordon, Deborah M.

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic environmental variables strongly affect the outcomes of species interactions. For example, mutualistic interactions between species are often stronger when resources are limited. The effect might be indirect: water stress on plants can lead to carbon stress, which could alter carbon-mediated plant mutualisms. In mutualistic ant–plant symbioses, plants host ant colonies that defend them against herbivores. Here we show that the partners' investments in a widespread ant–plant symbiosis increase with water stress across 26 sites along a Mesoamerican precipitation gradient. At lower precipitation levels, Cordia alliodora trees invest more carbon in Azteca ants via phloem-feeding scale insects that provide the ants with sugars, and the ants provide better defense of the carbon-producing leaves. Under water stress, the trees have smaller carbon pools. A model of the carbon trade-offs for the mutualistic partners shows that the observed strategies can arise from the carbon costs of rare but extreme events of herbivory in the rainy season. Thus, water limitation, together with the risk of herbivory, increases the strength of a carbon-based mutualism. PMID:24223521

  3. Using single-strand conformational polymorphism gel electrophoresis to analyze mutually exclusive alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Celotto, Alicia M; Graveley, Brenton R

    2004-01-01

    Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis has been used successfully to identify single nucleotide changes within sequences based on the fact that multidetection enhancement gels will separate molecules based on their conformation rather than their size. We have expanded the utility of this technique to analyze easily the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs containing multiple mutually exclusive exons of the same size. We have used this technique to study the Caenorhabditis elegans let-2 gene containing two alternative exons and the Drosophilia melanogaster Dscam gene, which contains 12 mutually exclusive exons. The ease and the quantitative nature of this technique should be very useful.

  4. Quantitative estimation of climatic parameters from vegetation data in North America by the mutual climatic range technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Katherine H.; Bartlein, Patrick J.; Strickland, Laura E.; Pelltier, Richard T.; Thompson, Robert S.; Shafer, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    The mutual climatic range (MCR) technique is perhaps the most widely used method for estimating past climatic parameters from fossil assemblages, largely because it can be conducted on a simple list of the taxa present in an assemblage. When applied to plant macrofossil data, this unweighted approach (MCRun) will frequently identify a large range for a given climatic parameter where the species in an assemblage can theoretically live together. To narrow this range, we devised a new weighted approach (MCRwt) that employs information from the modern relations between climatic parameters and plant distributions to lessen the influence of the "tails" of the distributions of the climatic data associated with the taxa in an assemblage. To assess the performance of the MCR approaches, we applied them to a set of modern climatic data and plant distributions on a 25-km grid for North America, and compared observed and estimated climatic values for each grid point. In general, MCRwt was superior to MCRun in providing smaller anomalies, less bias, and better correlations between observed and estimated values. However, by the same measures, the results of Modern Analog Technique (MAT) approaches were superior to MCRwt. Although this might be reason to favor MAT approaches, they are based on assumptions that may not be valid for paleoclimatic reconstructions, including that: 1) the absence of a taxon from a fossil sample is meaningful, 2) plant associations were largely unaffected by past changes in either levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide or in the seasonal distributions of solar radiation, and 3) plant associations of the past are adequately represented on the modern landscape. To illustrate the application of these MCR and MAT approaches to paleoclimatic reconstructions, we applied them to a Pleistocene paleobotanical assemblage from the western United States. From our examinations of the estimates of modern and past climates from vegetation assemblages, we conclude that

  5. A Bayesian Alternative to Mutual Information for the Hierarchical Clustering of Dependent Random Variables.

    PubMed

    Marrelec, Guillaume; Messé, Arnaud; Bellec, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The use of mutual information as a similarity measure in agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC) raises an important issue: some correction needs to be applied for the dimensionality of variables. In this work, we formulate the decision of merging dependent multivariate normal variables in an AHC procedure as a Bayesian model comparison. We found that the Bayesian formulation naturally shrinks the empirical covariance matrix towards a matrix set a priori (e.g., the identity), provides an automated stopping rule, and corrects for dimensionality using a term that scales up the measure as a function of the dimensionality of the variables. Also, the resulting log Bayes factor is asymptotically proportional to the plug-in estimate of mutual information, with an additive correction for dimensionality in agreement with the Bayesian information criterion. We investigated the behavior of these Bayesian alternatives (in exact and asymptotic forms) to mutual information on simulated and real data. An encouraging result was first derived on simulations: the hierarchical clustering based on the log Bayes factor outperformed off-the-shelf clustering techniques as well as raw and normalized mutual information in terms of classification accuracy. On a toy example, we found that the Bayesian approaches led to results that were similar to those of mutual information clustering techniques, with the advantage of an automated thresholding. On real functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) datasets measuring brain activity, it identified clusters consistent with the established outcome of standard procedures. On this application, normalized mutual information had a highly atypical behavior, in the sense that it systematically favored very large clusters. These initial experiments suggest that the proposed Bayesian alternatives to mutual information are a useful new tool for hierarchical clustering.

  6. A Bayesian Alternative to Mutual Information for the Hierarchical Clustering of Dependent Random Variables

    PubMed Central

    Marrelec, Guillaume; Messé, Arnaud; Bellec, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The use of mutual information as a similarity measure in agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC) raises an important issue: some correction needs to be applied for the dimensionality of variables. In this work, we formulate the decision of merging dependent multivariate normal variables in an AHC procedure as a Bayesian model comparison. We found that the Bayesian formulation naturally shrinks the empirical covariance matrix towards a matrix set a priori (e.g., the identity), provides an automated stopping rule, and corrects for dimensionality using a term that scales up the measure as a function of the dimensionality of the variables. Also, the resulting log Bayes factor is asymptotically proportional to the plug-in estimate of mutual information, with an additive correction for dimensionality in agreement with the Bayesian information criterion. We investigated the behavior of these Bayesian alternatives (in exact and asymptotic forms) to mutual information on simulated and real data. An encouraging result was first derived on simulations: the hierarchical clustering based on the log Bayes factor outperformed off-the-shelf clustering techniques as well as raw and normalized mutual information in terms of classification accuracy. On a toy example, we found that the Bayesian approaches led to results that were similar to those of mutual information clustering techniques, with the advantage of an automated thresholding. On real functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) datasets measuring brain activity, it identified clusters consistent with the established outcome of standard procedures. On this application, normalized mutual information had a highly atypical behavior, in the sense that it systematically favored very large clusters. These initial experiments suggest that the proposed Bayesian alternatives to mutual information are a useful new tool for hierarchical clustering. PMID:26406245

  7. Model, properties and imputation method of missing SNP genotype data utilizing mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Wan, Weiming; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Feng, Enmin

    2009-07-01

    Mutual information can be used as a measure for the association of a genetic marker or a combination of markers with the phenotype. In this paper, we study the imputation of missing genotype data. We first utilize joint mutual information to compute the dependence between SNP sites, then construct a mathematical model in order to find the two SNP sites having maximal dependence with missing SNP sites, and further study the properties of this model. Finally, an extension method to haplotype-based imputation is proposed to impute the missing values in genotype data. To verify our method, extensive experiments have been performed, and numerical results show that our method is superior to haplotype-based imputation methods. At the same time, numerical results also prove joint mutual information can better measure the dependence between SNP sites. According to experimental results, we also conclude that the dependence between the adjacent SNP sites is not necessarily strongest.

  8. Studies of an Optimally Unbiased MA Filter Intended for GPS-Based Timekeeping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    Shmaliy, 0. Ibarra-Manzano, R. Rojas-Laguna, and R. Vazguez-Bautista Electronics Dept., FIMEE, Guanajuato University, Salamanca 36730, Mexico E-mail...NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Guanajuato University,Electronics Dept., FIMEE

  9. Unbiased FIR Estimates vs. the Sawtooth-Corrected GPS-Based Measurements: Experimental Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION Y. S. Shmaliy, L. Arceo-Miquel, J. Munoz-Diaz, and O. Ibarra-Manzano Guanajuato University, FIMEE, Mexico E-mail: shmaliy...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Guanajuato University, FIMEE

  10. A novel hypothesis-unbiased method for Gene Ontology enrichment based on transcriptome data

    PubMed Central

    Fruzangohar, Mario; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Adelson, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Gene Ontology (GO) classification of statistically significantly differentially expressed genes is commonly used to interpret transcriptomics data as a part of functional genomic analysis. In this approach, all significantly expressed genes contribute equally to the final GO classification regardless of their actual expression levels. Gene expression levels can significantly affect protein production and hence should be reflected in GO term enrichment. Genes with low expression levels can also participate in GO term enrichment through cumulative effects. In this report, we have introduced a new GO enrichment method that is suitable for multiple samples and time series experiments that uses a statistical outlier test to detect GO categories with special patterns of variation that can potentially identify candidate biological mechanisms. To demonstrate the value of our approach, we have performed two case studies. Whole transcriptome expression profiles of Salmonella enteritidis and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) were analysed in order to determine GO term enrichment across the entire transcriptome instead of a subset of differentially expressed genes used in traditional GO analysis. Our result highlights the key role of inflammation related functional groups in AD pathology as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor binding, neuromedin U binding, and interleukin were remarkably upregulated in AD brain when all using all of the gene expression data in the transcriptome. Mitochondrial components and the molybdopterin synthase complex were identified as potential key cellular components involved in AD pathology. PMID:28199395

  11. Discrete Lognormal Model as an Unbiased Quantitative Measure of Scientific Performance Based on Empirical Citation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Joao; Zeng, Xiaohan; Amaral, Luis

    2013-03-01

    Assessing the career performance of scientists has become essential to modern science. Bibliometric indicators, like the h-index are becoming more and more decisive in evaluating grants and approving publication of articles. However, many of the more used indicators can be manipulated or falsified by publishing with very prolific researchers or self-citing papers with a certain number of citations, for instance. Accounting for these factors is possible but it introduces unwanted complexity that drives us further from the purpose of the indicator: to represent in a clear way the prestige and importance of a given scientist. Here we try to overcome this challenge. We used Thompson Reuter's Web of Science database and analyzed all the papers published until 2000 by ~1500 researchers in the top 30 departments of seven scientific fields. We find that over 97% of them have a citation distribution that is consistent with a discrete lognormal model. This suggests that our model can be used to accurately predict the performance of a researcher. Furthermore, this predictor does not depend on the individual number of publications and is not easily ``gamed'' on. The authors acknowledge support from FCT Portugal, and NSF grants

  12. A novel hypothesis-unbiased method for Gene Ontology enrichment based on transcriptome data.

    PubMed

    Fruzangohar, Mario; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Adelson, David L

    2017-01-01

    Gene Ontology (GO) classification of statistically significantly differentially expressed genes is commonly used to interpret transcriptomics data as a part of functional genomic analysis. In this approach, all significantly expressed genes contribute equally to the final GO classification regardless of their actual expression levels. Gene expression levels can significantly affect protein production and hence should be reflected in GO term enrichment. Genes with low expression levels can also participate in GO term enrichment through cumulative effects. In this report, we have introduced a new GO enrichment method that is suitable for multiple samples and time series experiments that uses a statistical outlier test to detect GO categories with special patterns of variation that can potentially identify candidate biological mechanisms. To demonstrate the value of our approach, we have performed two case studies. Whole transcriptome expression profiles of Salmonella enteritidis and Alzheimer's disease (AD) were analysed in order to determine GO term enrichment across the entire transcriptome instead of a subset of differentially expressed genes used in traditional GO analysis. Our result highlights the key role of inflammation related functional groups in AD pathology as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor binding, neuromedin U binding, and interleukin were remarkably upregulated in AD brain when all using all of the gene expression data in the transcriptome. Mitochondrial components and the molybdopterin synthase complex were identified as potential key cellular components involved in AD pathology.

  13. Bases for spin systems and qudits from angular momentum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibler, Maurice R.

    2010-03-01

    Spin bases of relevance for quantum systems with cyclic symmetry as well as for quantum information and quantum computation are constructed from angular momentum and Lie algebraic methods. This approach is connected to the use of generalized Pauli matrices (in dimension d) arising from a polar decomposition of the group SU(2). Such a decomposition leads to a Weyl pair which can be used as an integrity basis for constructing a generalized Pauli group and the Lie algebra of the unitary group U(d). The case where d is a prime integer yields a maximal set of d+1 mutually unbiased bases. Numerous examples are given for d=2,3 and 4.

  14. Random Tagging Genotyping by Sequencing (rtGBS), an Unbiased Approach to Locate Restriction Enzyme Sites across the Target Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hilario, Elena; Barron, Lorna; Deng, Cecilia H.; Datson, Paul M.; Davy, Marcus W.; Storey, Roy D.

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) is a restriction enzyme based targeted approach developed to reduce the genome complexity and discover genetic markers when a priori sequence information is unavailable. Sufficient coverage at each locus is essential to distinguish heterozygous from homozygous sites accurately. The number of GBS samples able to be pooled in one sequencing lane is limited by the number of restriction sites present in the genome and the read depth required at each site per sample for accurate calling of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Loci bias was observed using a slight modification of the Elshire et al. method: some restriction enzyme sites were represented in higher proportions while others were poorly represented or absent. This bias could be due to the quality of genomic DNA, the endonuclease and ligase reaction efficiency, the distance between restriction sites, the preferential amplification of small library restriction fragments, or bias towards cluster formation of small amplicons during the sequencing process. To overcome these issues, we have developed a GBS method based on randomly tagging genomic DNA (rtGBS). By randomly landing on the genome, we can, with less bias, find restriction sites that are far apart, and undetected by the standard GBS (stdGBS) method. The study comprises two types of biological replicates: six different kiwifruit plants and two independent DNA extractions per plant; and three types of technical replicates: four samples of each DNA extraction, stdGBS vs. rtGBS methods, and two independent library amplifications, each sequenced in separate lanes. A statistically significant unbiased distribution of restriction fragment size by rtGBS showed that this method targeted 49% (39,145) of BamH I sites shared with the reference genome, compared to only 14% (11,513) by stdGBS. PMID:26633193

  15. Influence of inhomogeneities on holographic mutual information and butterfly effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Zeng, Xiao-Xiong; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2017-07-01

    We study the effect of inhomogeneity, which is induced by the graviton mass in massive gravity, on the mutual information and the chaotic behavior of a 2+1-dimensional field theory from the gauge/gravity duality. When the system is near-homogeneous, the mutual information increases as the graviton mass grows. However, when the system is far from homogeneity, the mutual information decreases as the graviton mass increases. By adding the perturbations of energy into the system, we investigate the dynamical mutual information in the shock wave geometry. We find that the greater perturbations disrupt the mutual information more rapidly, which resembles the butterfly effect in chaos theory. Besides, the greater inhomogeneity reduces the dynamical mutual information more quickly just as in the static case.

  16. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  17. Concurrent behavior: Are the interpretations mutually exclusive?

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, David O.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental literature is replete with examples of behavior which occur concurrently with a schedule of reinforcement. These concurrent behaviors, often with similar topographies and occurring under like circumstances, may be interpreted as functionally autonomous, collateral, adjunctive, superstitious or mediating behavior. The degree to which the interaction of concurrent and schedule controlled behavior is used in the interpretation of behavior illustrated the importance of distinguishing among these interpretations by experimental procedure. The present paper reviews the characteristics of these interpretations, and discusses the experimental procedures necessary to distinguish among them. The paper concludes that the interpretations are mutually exclusive and refer to distinct behaviors, but that the distinction between any two of the interpretations requires more than one experimental procedure. PMID:22478568

  18. Spectroscopic observation of SN 2016ieq and SN 2016isg by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, T.; Mattila, S.; Stritzinger, M.; Dong, S.; Hsiao, E.; Lundqvist, P.; Taddia, F.; Kankare, E.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Harmanen, J.; Somero, A.; Reynolds, T.; Ergon, M.; Gafton, E.

    2016-12-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of the supernovae SN 2016ieq/Gaia16buy in the host galaxy APMUKS(BJ) B211942.51-120949.1 and SN 2016isg/ASASSN-16oo in the host galaxy 2MASX J01411858-0012382.

  19. Combination of an unbiased amplification method and a resequencing microarray for detecting and genotyping equine arteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Hans, Aymeric; Gaudaire, Delphine; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Leon, Albertine; Gessain, Antoine; Laugier, Claire; Berthet, Nicolas; Zientara, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    This study shows that an unbiased amplification method applied to equine arteritis virus RNA significantly improves the sensitivity of the real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) recommended by the World Organization for Animal Health. Twelve viral RNAs amplified using this method were hybridized on a high-density resequencing microarray for effective viral characterization.

  20. Understanding the coevolutionary dynamics of mutualism with population genomics.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Jeremy B

    2016-10-01

    Decades of research on the evolution of mutualism has generated a wealth of possible ways whereby mutually beneficial interactions between species persist in spite of the apparent advantages to individuals that accept the benefits of mutualism without reciprocating - but identifying how any particular empirical system is stabilized against cheating remains challenging. Different hypothesized models of mutualism stability predict different forms of coevolutionary selection, and emerging high-throughput sequencing methods allow examination of the selective histories of mutualism genes and, thereby, the form of selection acting on those genes. Here, I review the evolutionary theory of mutualism stability and identify how differing models make contrasting predictions for the population genomic diversity and geographic differentiation of mutualism-related genes. As an example of the possibilities offered by genomic data, I analyze genes with roles in the symbiosis of Medicago truncatula and nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria, the first classic mutualism in which extensive genomic resources have been developed for both partners. Medicago truncatula symbiosis genes, as a group, differ from the rest of the genome, but they vary in the form of selection indicated by their diversity and differentiation - some show signs of selection expected from roles in sanctioning noncooperative symbionts, while others show evidence of balancing selection expected from coevolution with symbiont signaling factors. I then assess the current state of development for similar resources in other mutualistic interactions and look ahead to identify ways in which modern sequencing technology can best inform our understanding of mutualists and mutualism.

  1. On the Mutual Coupling between Circular Resonant Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abou-Khousa, M. A.; Kharkovshy, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2007-01-01

    For near- and far-field microwave imaging purposes, array of circular resonant slots can be utilized to sample the electric field at a given reference plane. In general, the sensitivity of such an array is impaired by the existing mutual coupling between the radiating elements or in this case circular slots. The mutual coupling problem imposes a design tradeoff between the resolution of the array and the overall system sensitivity and dynamic range. In this paper, the mutual coupling between circular resonant slots in conducting ground plane is investigated both numerically and experimentally. In particular, the mutual coupling in the E- and H-plane configurations of two identical slots is studied.

  2. Unbiased analysis of pancreatic cancer radiation resistance reveals cholesterol biosynthesis as a novel target for radiosensitisation

    PubMed Central

    Souchek, J J; Baine, M J; Lin, C; Rachagani, S; Gupta, S; Kaur, S; Lester, K; Zheng, D; Chen, S; Smith, L; Lazenby, A; Johansson, S L; Jain, M; Batra, S K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite its promise as a highly useful therapy for pancreatic cancer (PC), the addition of external beam radiation therapy to PC treatment has shown varying success in clinical trials. Understanding PC radioresistance and discovery of methods to sensitise PC to radiation will increase patient survival and improve quality of life. In this study, we identified PC radioresistance-associated pathways using global, unbiased techniques. Methods: Radioresistant cells were generated by sequential irradiation and recovery, and global genome cDNA microarray analysis was performed to identify differentially expressed genes in radiosensitive and radioresistant cells. Ingenuity pathway analysis was performed to discover cellular pathways and functions associated with differential radioresponse and identify potential small-molecule inhibitors for radiosensitisation. The expression of FDPS, one of the most differentially expressed genes, was determined in human PC tissues by IHC and the impact of its pharmacological inhibition with zoledronic acid (ZOL, Zometa) on radiosensitivity was determined by colony-forming assays. The radiosensitising effect of Zol in vivo was determined using allograft transplantation mouse model. Results: Microarray analysis indicated that 11 genes (FDPS, ACAT2, AG2, CLDN7, DHCR7, ELFN2, FASN, SC4MOL, SIX6, SLC12A2, and SQLE) were consistently associated with radioresistance in the cell lines, a majority of which are involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. We demonstrated that knockdown of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDPS), a branchpoint enzyme of the cholesterol synthesis pathway, radiosensitised PC cells. FDPS was significantly overexpressed in human PC tumour tissues compared with healthy pancreas samples. Also, pharmacologic inhibition of FDPS by ZOL radiosensitised PC cell lines, with a radiation enhancement ratio between 1.26 and 1.5. Further, ZOL treatment resulted in radiosensitisation of PC tumours in an allograft mouse model

  3. Unbiased, High-Throughput Electron Microscopy Analysis of Experience-Dependent Synaptic Changes in the Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Santosh; Navlakha, Saket; Audette, Nicholas J.; McCreary, Dylan D.; Suhan, Joe; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2015-01-01

    Neocortical circuits can be altered by sensory and motor experience, with experimental evidence supporting both anatomical and electrophysiological changes in synaptic properties. Previous studies have focused on changes in specific neurons or pathways—for example, the thalamocortical circuitry, layer 4–3 (L4–L3) synapses, or in the apical dendrites of L5 neurons— but a broad-scale analysis of experience-induced changes across the cortical column has been lacking. Without this comprehensive approach, a full understanding of how cortical circuits adapt during learning or altered sensory input will be impossible. Here we adapt an electron microscopy technique that selectively labels synapses, in combination with a machine-learning algorithm for semiautomated synapse detection, to perform an unbiased analysis of developmental and experience-dependent changes in synaptic properties across an entire cortical column in mice. Synapse density and length were compared across development and during whisker-evoked plasticity. Between postnatal days 14 and 18, synapse density significantly increases most in superficial layers, and synapse length increases in L3 and L5B. Removal of all but a single whisker row for 24 h led to an apparent increase in synapse density in L2 and a decrease in L6, and a significant increase in length in L3. Targeted electrophysiological analysis of changes in miniature EPSC and IPSC properties in L2 pyramidal neurons showed that mEPSC frequency nearly doubled in the whisker-spared column, a difference that was highly significant. Together, this analysis shows that data-intensive analysis of column-wide changes in synapse properties can generate specific and testable hypotheses about experience-dependent changes in cortical organization. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Development and sensory experience can change synapse properties in the neocortex. Here we use a semiautomated analysis of electron microscopy images for an unbiased, column

  4. Coevolution and divergence in the Joshua tree/yucca moth mutualism.

    PubMed

    Godsoe, William; Yoder, Jeremy B; Smith, Christopher Irwin; Pellmyr, Olle

    2008-06-01

    Theory suggests that coevolution drives diversification in obligate pollination mutualism, but it has been difficult to disentangle the effects of coevolution from other factors. We test the hypothesis that differential selection by two sister species of pollinating yucca moths (Tegeticula spp.) drove divergence between two varieties of the Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia) by comparing measures of differentiation in floral and vegetative features. We show that floral features associated with pollination evolved more rapidly than vegetative features extrinsic to the interaction and that a key floral feature involved in the mutualism is more differentiated than any other and matches equivalent differences in the morphology of the pollinating moths. A phylogenetically based, ancestral states reconstruction shows that differences in moth morphology arose in the time since they first became associated with Joshua trees. These results suggest that coevolution, rather than extrinsic environmental factors, has driven divergence in this obligate pollination mutualism.

  5. Design of a compact optical see-through head-worn display with mutual occlusion capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakmakci, Ozan; Ha, Yonggang; Rolland, Jannick

    2005-08-01

    We present the first-order design details and preliminary lens design and performance analysis of a compact optical system that can achieve mutual occlusions. Mutual occlusion is the ability of real objects to occlude virtual objects and virtual objects to occlude real objects. Mutual occlusion is a desirable attribute for a certain class of augmented reality applications where realistic overlays based on the depth cue is important. Compactness is achieved through the use of polarization optics. First order layout of the system is similar to that of a Keplerian telescope operating at finite conjugates. Additionally, we require the image to lie on the plane of the object with unit magnification. We show that the same lens can be used as the objective and the eyepiece. The system is capable of having very close to zero distortion.

  6. Mutuality and reciprocity in the psychological contracts of employees and employers.

    PubMed

    Dabos, Guillermo E; Rousseau, Denise M

    2004-02-01

    The authors assessed the joint perceptions of the employee and his or her employer to examine mutuality and reciprocity in the employment relationship. Paired psychological contract reports were obtained from 80 employee-employer dyads in 16 university-based research centers. On the basis of in-depth study of the research setting, research directors were identified as primary agents for the university (employer) in shaping the terms of employment of staff scientists (employees). By assessing the extent of consistency between employee and employer beliefs regarding their exchange agreement, the present study mapped the variation and consequences of mutuality and reciprocity in psychological contracts. Results indicate that both mutuality and reciprocity are positively related to archival indicators of research productivity and career advancement, in addition to self-reported measures of Met Expectations and intention to continue working with the employer. Implications for psychological contract theory are presented.

  7. Fostering Practical Young Engineers through Mutual Exchange Internship Program between Japan and China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiaki; Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Shigematsu, Toshinobu; Ono, Bunji; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Morishita, Koji; Inoue, Masahiro

    Sasebo National College of Technology started a mutual exchange internship program in 2005 in partnership with Xiamen University of Technology. The aim of this program is to educate and train young Japanese engineers who can apply their knowledge and skills fully to their work in the factories in China. This program also aims to educate and train young Chinese engineers who will acquire not only technological knowledge and skills but also an understanding of the organizational structure and cultural background of Japanese companies. By deepening mutual understanding between Japan and China through this program, young Japanese and Chinese engineers can work toward their common goal of economic prosperity in their respective countries, while building partnerships based on mutual trust and respect.

  8. DOA Estimation under Unknown Mutual Coupling and Multipath with Improved Effective Array Aperture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexian; Trinkle, Matthew; Ng, Brian W.-H.

    2015-01-01

    Subspace-based high-resolution direction of arrival (DOA) estimation significantly deteriorates under array manifold perturbation and rank deficiency of the covariance matrix due to mutual coupling and multipath propagation, respectively. In this correspondence, the unknown mutual coupling can be circumvented by the proposed method without any passive or active calibration process, and the DOA of the coherent signals can be accurately estimated accordingly. With a newly constructed matrix, the deficient rank can be restored, and the effective array aperture can be extended compared with conventional spatial smoothing. The proposed method achieves a good robustness and DOA estimation accuracy with unknown mutual coupling. The simulation results demonstrate the validity and efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:26670235

  9. Nanoscale Synaptic Membrane Mimetic Allows Unbiased High Throughput Screen That Targets Binding Sites for Alzheimer’s-Associated Aβ Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Kyle C.; Marunde, Matthew R.; Das, Aditi; Velasco, Pauline T.; Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Marty, Michael T.; Jiang, Haoming; Luan, Chi-Hao; Sligar, Stephen G.; Klein, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their value as sources of therapeutic drug targets, membrane proteomes are largely inaccessible to high-throughput screening (HTS) tools designed for soluble proteins. An important example comprises the membrane proteins that bind amyloid β oligomers (AβOs). AβOs are neurotoxic ligands thought to instigate the synapse damage that leads to Alzheimer’s dementia. At present, the identities of initial AβO binding sites are highly uncertain, largely because of extensive protein-protein interactions that occur following attachment of AβOs to surface membranes. Here, we show that AβO binding sites can be obtained in a state suitable for unbiased HTS by encapsulating the solubilized synaptic membrane proteome into nanoscale lipid bilayers (Nanodiscs). This method gives a soluble membrane protein library (SMPL)—a collection of individualized synaptic proteins in a soluble state. Proteins within SMPL Nanodiscs showed enzymatic and ligand binding activity consistent with conformational integrity. AβOs were found to bind SMPL Nanodiscs with high affinity and specificity, with binding dependent on intact synaptic membrane proteins, and selective for the higher molecular weight oligomers known to accumulate at synapses. Combining SMPL Nanodiscs with a mix-incubate-read chemiluminescence assay provided a solution-based HTS platform to discover antagonists of AβO binding. Screening a library of 2700 drug-like compounds and natural products yielded one compound that potently reduced AβO binding to SMPL Nanodiscs, synaptosomes, and synapses in nerve cell cultures. Although not a therapeutic candidate, this small molecule inhibitor of synaptic AβO binding will provide a useful experimental antagonist for future mechanistic studies of AβOs in Alzheimer’s model systems. Overall, results provide proof of concept for using SMPLs in high throughput screening for AβO binding antagonists, and illustrate in general how a SMPL Nanodisc system can facilitate drug

  10. Mutual Comparative Filtering for Change Detection in Videos with Unstable Illumination Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidyakin, Sergey V.; Vishnyakov, Boris V.; Vizilter, Yuri V.; Roslov, Nikolay I.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a new approach for change detection and moving objects detection in videos with unstable, abrupt illumination changes. This approach is based on mutual comparative filters and background normalization. We give the definitions of mutual comparative filters and outline their strong advantage for change detection purposes. Presented approach allows us to deal with changing illumination conditions in a simple and efficient way and does not have drawbacks, which exist in models that assume different color transformation laws. The proposed procedure can be used to improve a number of background modelling methods, which are not specifically designed to work under illumination changes.

  11. A secure RFID mutual authentication protocol for healthcare environments using elliptic curve cryptography.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chunhua; Xu, Chunxiang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhao, Jining

    2015-03-01

    Radio Frequency Identification(RFID) is an automatic identification technology, which can be widely used in healthcare environments to locate and track staff, equipment and patients. However, potential security and privacy problems in RFID system remain a challenge. In this paper, we design a mutual authentication protocol for RFID based on elliptic curve cryptography(ECC). We use pre-computing method within tag's communication, so that our protocol can get better efficiency. In terms of security, our protocol can achieve confidentiality, unforgeability, mutual authentication, tag's anonymity, availability and forward security. Our protocol also can overcome the weakness in the existing protocols. Therefore, our protocol is suitable for healthcare environments.

  12. Computing the trajectory mutual information between a point process and an analog stochastic process.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Syed Ahmed; Solo, Victor

    2012-01-01

    In a number of application areas such as neural coding there is interest in computing, from real data, the information flows between stochastic processes one of which is a point process. Of particular interest is the calculation of the trajectory (as opposed to marginal) mutual information between an observed point process which is influenced by an underlying but unobserved analog stochastic process i.e. a state. Using particle filtering we develop a model based trajectory mutual information calculation for apparently the first time.

  13. Reservoir computing with a slowly modulated mask signal for preprocessing using a mutually coupled optoelectronic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Miwa; Kanno, Kazutaka; Bunsen, Masatoshi

    2016-08-01

    Reservoir computing is a machine-learning paradigm based on information processing in the human brain. We numerically demonstrate reservoir computing with a slowly modulated mask signal for preprocessing by using a mutually coupled optoelectronic system. The performance of our system is quantitatively evaluated by a chaotic time series prediction task. Our system can produce comparable performance with reservoir computing with a single feedback system and a fast modulated mask signal. We showed that it is possible to slow down the modulation speed of the mask signal by using the mutually coupled system in reservoir computing.

  14. Necessity of Mutual Understandings in Supply Chain Management of Lithium-Ion Battery for Space Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokawa, T.; Nakajima, M.; Mori, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Application of Lithium Ion Battery (LIB) is getting growth these days in space industry. Through the supply chain of LIB, it is very important to establish deepen mutual understandings between space industry people and non-space industry people in order to meet requirements of space grade quality control. Furthermore, this approach has positive effects for safety handling and safety transportation. This paper explains necessity of mutual understandings based on the analysis of aviation incident report. The study is focused on its background and issues on each related industry. These contents are studied and discussed in the New Work Item Proposal of the International Standard of LIB for space vehicle.

  15. Mutual neutralization at low collision energies: the power of imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassantachart, April K.; Romano, Shalynn L.; Martin, Merl F.; Andrianarijaona, Vola M.; O'Connor, Aodh; Urbain, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Mutual neutralization studies are generally limited to energies above a few eV, and do not specify the electronic state of the products, merely indicating a band of principal quantum numbers based on time-of-flight intervals. We upgraded our merged beam set-up to reach meV collision energies, and incorporated three-dimensional product imaging. Besides providing clear coincidence signals, this technique gives unambiguous identification of the electronic states of the products. Knowing their angular distribution at the different collision energies allows absolute cross sections to be retrieved. Results for the H+/H-andHe+/H- systems will be presented, providing detailed branching ratios for non-degenerate channels. This research is supported by the Fund for Scientific Research - FNRS through IISN Grant No. 4.4504.10, and the National Science Foundation through Grant No. PHY-106887.

  16. Mutual neutralization at low collision energies: the power of imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassantachart, April K.; Romano, Shalynn L.; Martin, Merl F.; Andrianarijaona, Vola M.; Urbain, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Mutual neutralization studies are generally limited to energies above a few eV, and do not specify the electronic state of the products, merely indicating a band of principal quantum numbers based on time-of-flight intervals (Terao et al., Europhys. Lett. 1 (1986) 123). We upgraded our merged beam set-up to reach meV collision energies, and incorporated three-dimensional product imaging. Besides providing clear coincidence signals, this technique gives unambiguous identification of the electronic states of the products. Knowing their angular distribution at the different collision energies allows absolute cross sections to be retrieved. Results for the H+/H-andHe+/H- systems will be presented, providing detailed branching ratios for non-degenerate channels. This research is supported by the Fund for Scientific Research - FNRS through IISN Grant No. 4.4504.10, and the National Science Foundation through Grant No. PHY-106887.

  17. Blasting and Zipping: Sequence Alignment and Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Orion; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2009-03-01

    Alignment of biological sequences such as DNA, RNA or proteins is one of the most widely used tools in computational bioscience. While the accomplishments of sequence alignment algorithms are undeniable the fact remains that these algorithms are based upon heuristic scoring schemes. Therefore, these algorithms do not provide model independent and objective measures for how similar two (or more) sequences actually are. Although information theory provides such a similarity measure - the mutual information (MI) - numerous previous attempts to connect sequence alignment and information have not produced realistic estimates for the MI from a given alignment. We report on a simple and flexible approach to get robust estimates of MI from global alignments. The presented results may help establish MI as a reliable tool for evaluating the quality of global alignments, judging the relative merits of different alignment algorithms, and estimating the significance of specific alignments.

  18. Mutualism exploitation: predatory drosophilid larvae sugar-trap ants and jeopardize facultative ant-plant mutualism.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Mayra C; Sendoya, Sebastian F; Oliveira, Paulo S

    2016-07-01

    An open question in the evolutionary ecology of ant-plant facultative mutualism is how other members of the associated community can affect the interaction to a point where reciprocal benefits are disrupted. While visiting Qualea grandiflora shrubs to collect sugary rewards at extrafloral nectaries, tropical savanna ants deter herbivores and reduce leaf damage. Here we show that larvae of the fly Rhinoleucophenga myrmecophaga, which develop on extrafloral nectaries, lure potentially mutualistic, nectar-feeding ants and prey on them. Foraging ants spend less time on fly-infested foliage. Field experiments showed that predation (or the threat of predation) on ants by fly larvae produces cascading effects through three trophic levels, resulting in fewer protective ants on leaves, increased numbers of chewing herbivores, and greater leaf damage. These results reveal an undocumented mode of mutualism exploitation by an opportunistic predator at a plant-provided food source, jeopardizing ant-derived protection services to the plant. Our study documents a rather unusual case of predation of adult ants by a dipteran species and demonstrates a top-down trophic cascade within a generalized ant-plant mutualism. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  19. The role of fire in UK peatland and moorland management: the need for informed, unbiased debate.

    PubMed

    Davies, G Matt; Kettridge, Nicholas; Stoof, Cathelijne R; Gray, Alan; Ascoli, Davide; Fernandes, Paulo M; Marrs, Rob; Allen, Katherine A; Doerr, Stefan H; Clay, Gareth D; McMorrow, Julia; Vandvik, Vigdis

    2016-06-05

    Fire has been used for centuries to generate and manage some of the UK's cultural landscapes. Despite its complex role in the ecology of UK peatlands and moorlands, there has been a trend of simplifying the narrative around burning to present it as an only ecologically damaging practice. That fire modifies peatland characteristics at a range of scales is clearly understood. Whether these changes are perceived as positive or negative depends upon how trade-offs are made between ecosystem services and the spatial and temporal scales of concern. Here we explore the complex interactions and trade-offs in peatland fire management, evaluating the benefits and costs of managed fire as they are currently understood. We highlight the need for (i) distinguishing between the impacts of fires occurring with differing severity and frequency, and (ii) improved characterization of ecosystem health that incorporates the response and recovery of peatlands to fire. We also explore how recent research has been contextualized within both scientific publications and the wider media and how this can influence non-specialist perceptions. We emphasize the need for an informed, unbiased debate on fire as an ecological management tool that is separated from other aspects of moorland management and from political and economic opinions.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'.

  20. Can hunting data be used to estimate unbiased population parameters? A case study on brown bears

    PubMed Central

    Van de Walle, Joanie; Zedrosser, Andreas; Swenson, Jon E.; Pelletier, Fanie

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying temporal changes in harvested populations is critical for applied and fundamental research. Unbiased data are required to detect true changes in phenotypic distribution or population size. Because of the difficulty of collecting detailed individual data from wild populations, data from hunting records are often used. Hunting records, however, may not represent a random sample of a population. We aimed to detect and quantify potential bias in hunting records. We compared data from a long-term monitoring project with hunting records of brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Sweden and investigated temporal trends (1996–2013) in the ratio of yearlings to adult females, yearling mass and adult female mass. Data from hunting records underestimated the decline in yearling and adult female mass over time, most likely owing to the legal protection of family groups from hunting, but reflected changes in the ratio of yearlings to adult females more reliably. Although hunting data can be reliable to approximate population abundance in some circumstances, hunting data can represent a biased sample of a population and should be used with caution in management and conservation decisions. PMID:27303052

  1. Orientation decoding in human visual cortex: new insights from an unbiased perspective.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Thomas A

    2014-06-11

    The development of multivariate pattern analysis or brain "decoding" methods has substantially altered the field of fMRI research. Although these methods are highly sensitive to whether or not decodable information exists, the information they discover and make use of for decoding is often concealed within complex patterns of activation. This opacity of interpretation is embodied in influential studies showing that the orientation of visual gratings can be decoded from brain activity in human visual cortex with fMRI. Although these studies provided a compelling demonstration of the power of these methods, their findings were somewhat mysterious as the scanning resolution was insufficient to resolve orientation columns, i.e., orientation information should not have been accessible. Two theories have been put forth to account for this result, the hyperacuity account and the biased map account, both of which assume that small biases in fMRI voxels are the source of decodable information. In the present study, we use Hubel and Wiesel's (1972) classic ice-cube model of visual cortex to show that the orientation of gratings can be decoded from an unbiased representation. In our analysis, we identify patterns of activity elicited by the edges of the stimulus as the source of the decodable information. Furthermore, these activation patterns masquerade as a radial bias, a key element of the biased map account. This classic model thus sheds new light on the mystery behind orientation decoding by unveiling a new source of decodable information.

  2. Asymptotically Unbiased Estimation of Exposure Odds Ratios in Complete Records Logistic Regression.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jonathan W; Harel, Ofer; Carpenter, James R

    2015-10-15

    Missing data are a commonly occurring threat to the validity and efficiency of epidemiologic studies. Perhaps the most common approach to handling missing data is to simply drop those records with 1 or more missing values, in so-called "complete records" or "complete case" analysis. In this paper, we bring together earlier-derived yet perhaps now somewhat neglected results which show that a logistic regression complete records analysis can provide asymptotically unbiased estimates of the association of an exposure of interest with an outcome, adjusted for a number of confounders, under a surprisingly wide range of missing-data assumptions. We give detailed guidance describing how the observed data can be used to judge the plausibility of these assumptions. The results mean that in large epidemiologic studies which are affected by missing data and analyzed by logistic regression, exposure associations may be estimated without bias in a number of settings where researchers might otherwise assume that bias would occur. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

  3. Unbiased Prediction and Feature Selection in High-Dimensional Survival Regression

    PubMed Central

    Laimighofer, Michael; Krumsiek, Jan; Theis, Fabian J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With widespread availability of omics profiling techniques, the analysis and interpretation of high-dimensional omics data, for example, for biomarkers, is becoming an increasingly important part of clinical medicine because such datasets constitute a promising resource for predicting survival outcomes. However, early experience has shown that biomarkers often generalize poorly. Thus, it is crucial that models are not overfitted and give accurate results with new data. In addition, reliable detection of multivariate biomarkers with high predictive power (feature selection) is of particular interest in clinical settings. We present an approach that addresses both aspects in high-dimensional survival models. Within a nested cross-validation (CV), we fit a survival model, evaluate a dataset in an unbiased fashion, and select features with the best predictive power by applying a weighted combination of CV runs. We evaluate our approach using simulated toy data, as well as three breast cancer datasets, to predict the survival of breast cancer patients after treatment. In all datasets, we achieve more reliable estimation of predictive power for unseen cases and better predictive performance compared to the standard CoxLasso model. Taken together, we present a comprehensive and flexible framework for survival models, including performance estimation, final feature selection, and final model construction. The proposed algorithm is implemented in an open source R package (SurvRank) available on CRAN. PMID:26894327

  4. Unbiased Metabolomic Investigation of Alzheimer's Disease Brain Points to Dysregulation of Mitochondrial Aspartate Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Paglia, Giuseppe; Stocchero, Matteo; Cacciatore, Stefano; Lai, Steven; Angel, Peggi; Alam, Mohammad Tauqeer; Keller, Markus; Ralser, Markus; Astarita, Giuseppe

    2016-02-05

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of adult dementia. Yet the complete set of molecular changes accompanying this inexorable, neurodegenerative disease remains elusive. Here we adopted an unbiased lipidomics and metabolomics approach to surveying frozen frontal cortex samples from clinically characterized AD patients (n = 21) and age-matched controls (n = 19), revealing marked molecular differences between them. Then, by means of metabolomic pathway analysis, we incorporated the novel molecular information into the known biochemical pathways and compared it with the results of a metabolomics meta-analysis of previously published AD research. We found six metabolic pathways of the central metabolism as well as glycerophospholipid metabolism predominantly altered in AD brains. Using targeted metabolomics approaches and MS imaging, we confirmed a marked dysregulation of mitochondrial aspartate metabolism. The altered metabolic pathways were further integrated with clinical data, showing various degrees of correlation with parameters of dementia and AD pathology. Our study highlights specific, altered biochemical pathways in the brains of individuals with AD compared with those of control subjects, emphasizing dysregulation of mitochondrial aspartate metabolism and supporting future venues of investigation.

  5. The role of fire in UK peatland and moorland management: the need for informed, unbiased debate

    PubMed Central

    Davies, G. Matt; Kettridge, Nicholas; Stoof, Cathelijne R.; Gray, Alan; Ascoli, Davide; Fernandes, Paulo M.; Marrs, Rob; Clay, Gareth D.; McMorrow, Julia; Vandvik, Vigdis

    2016-01-01

    Fire has been used for centuries to generate and manage some of the UK's cultural landscapes. Despite its complex role in the ecology of UK peatlands and moorlands, there has been a trend of simplifying the narrative around burning to present it as an only ecologically damaging practice. That fire modifies peatland characteristics at a range of scales is clearly understood. Whether these changes are perceived as positive or negative depends upon how trade-offs are made between ecosystem services and the spatial and temporal scales of concern. Here we explore the complex interactions and trade-offs in peatland fire management, evaluating the benefits and costs of managed fire as they are currently understood. We highlight the need for (i) distinguishing between the impacts of fires occurring with differing severity and frequency, and (ii) improved characterization of ecosystem health that incorporates the response and recovery of peatlands to fire. We also explore how recent research has been contextualized within both scientific publications and the wider media and how this can influence non-specialist perceptions. We emphasize the need for an informed, unbiased debate on fire as an ecological management tool that is separated from other aspects of moorland management and from political and economic opinions. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The interaction of fire and mankind’. PMID:27216512

  6. Rapid and unbiased extraction of chromatin associated RNAs from purified native chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhongwu; Yang, Yi; Konieczny, Stephen F.; Irudayaraj, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    An ultra fast and unbiased method that uses salicylic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles (SAMNPs) and magnetophoretic chromatography is developed to extract chromatin associated RNAs (CARs). The SAMNPs were first used for enriching cells from the cell culture media and further used for capturing chromatin after cells were lysed. The formed SAMNPs-chromatin complexes were transferred to a viscous polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution stored in a 200-μL pipette tip. Due to the difference in viscosities, a bi-layer liquid was formed inside the pipette tip. The SAMNPs-chromatin complexes were separated from the free SAMNPs and free RNA-SAMNPs complexes by applying an external magnetic field. The CARs were further extracted from the SAMNP-chromatin complexes directly. The extracted CARs were reverse transcribed as cDNA and further characterized by real-time qPCR. The total assay time taken for cell separation, chromatin purification and chromatin associated RNAs extraction can be accomplished in less than 2h. PMID:26643718

  7. Free energies from dynamic weighted histogram analysis using unbiased Markov state model.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2015-01-13

    The weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) is widely used to obtain accurate free energies from biased molecular simulations. However, WHAM free energies can exhibit significant errors if some of the biasing windows are not fully equilibrated. To account for the lack of full equilibration, we develop the dynamic histogram analysis method (DHAM). DHAM uses a global Markov state model to obtain the free energy along the reaction coordinate. A maximum likelihood estimate of the Markov transition matrix is constructed by joint unbiasing of the transition counts from multiple umbrella-sampling simulations along discretized reaction coordinates. The free energy profile is the stationary distribution of the resulting Markov matrix. For this matrix, we derive an explicit approximation that does not require the usual iterative solution of WHAM. We apply DHAM to model systems, a chemical reaction in water treated using quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) simulations, and the Na(+) ion passage through the membrane-embedded ion channel GLIC. We find that DHAM gives accurate free energies even in cases where WHAM fails. In addition, DHAM provides kinetic information, which we here use to assess the extent of convergence in each of the simulation windows. DHAM may also prove useful in the construction of Markov state models from biased simulations in phase-space regions with otherwise low population.

  8. Proteomics in Parkinson's disease: An unbiased approach towards peripheral biomarkers and new therapies.

    PubMed

    Alberio, Tiziana; Fasano, Mauro

    2011-12-20

    Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, affecting about 6 million people worldwide with a slow progression of the symptoms. Its prevalence is expected to double in the most populated areas within the next two decades, according to increasing aged population. Consequently, Parkinson's disease is a socio-economic trouble and a major challenge for the public health system. Parkinson's disease treatment is merely symptomatic, as clinical symptoms appear when about 70% of the involved neurons are lost and potential disease-modifying/neuroprotective therapies would have no effect. In turn, the availability of an objective measure that allows early diagnosis would strongly impact on the costs that biotech- and pharma-companies will sustain in order to develop disease-modifying therapies. The establishment of suitable models to investigate the mechanisms of Parkinson's disease progression and, on the other hand, the discovery and validation of selective and specific molecular biomarkers for early and differential diagnosis are indeed two important goals for a better management of the disease. In this review, we focus on cellular and animal models of Parkinson's disease by describing their advantages and limitations as useful tools to identify pathogenetic pathways that deserve further exploitation. In parallel, we discuss how proteomics may provide a potent tool to observe altered pathways in models or altered biomarkers in patients with an unbiased, hypothesis-free approach.

  9. Hetero-type dual photoanodes for unbiased solar water splitting with extended light harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Jang, Ji-Wook; Jo, Yim Hyun; Abdi, Fatwa F.; Lee, Young Hye; van de Krol, Roel; Lee, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxide semiconductors are promising photoelectrode materials for solar water splitting due to their robustness in aqueous solutions and low cost. Yet, their solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiencies are still not high enough for practical applications. Here we present a strategy to enhance the efficiency of metal oxides, hetero-type dual photoelectrodes, in which two photoanodes of different bandgaps are connected in parallel for extended light harvesting. Thus, a photoelectrochemical device made of modified BiVO4 and α-Fe2O3 as dual photoanodes utilizes visible light up to 610 nm for water splitting, and shows stable photocurrents of 7.0±0.2 mA cm−2 at 1.23 VRHE under 1 sun irradiation. A tandem cell composed with the dual photoanodes–silicon solar cell demonstrates unbiased water splitting efficiency of 7.7%. These results and concept represent a significant step forward en route to the goal of >10% efficiency required for practical solar hydrogen production. PMID:27966548

  10. Hetero-type dual photoanodes for unbiased solar water splitting with extended light harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Jang, Ji-Wook; Jo, Yim Hyun; Abdi, Fatwa F.; Lee, Young Hye; van de Krol, Roel; Lee, Jae Sung

    2016-12-01

    Metal oxide semiconductors are promising photoelectrode materials for solar water splitting due to their robustness in aqueous solutions and low cost. Yet, their solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiencies are still not high enough for practical applications. Here we present a strategy to enhance the efficiency of metal oxides, hetero-type dual photoelectrodes, in which two photoanodes of different bandgaps are connected in parallel for extended light harvesting. Thus, a photoelectrochemical device made of modified BiVO4 and α-Fe2O3 as dual photoanodes utilizes visible light up to 610 nm for water splitting, and shows stable photocurrents of 7.0+/-0.2 mA cm-2 at 1.23 VRHE under 1 sun irradiation. A tandem cell composed with the dual photoanodes-silicon solar cell demonstrates unbiased water splitting efficiency of 7.7%. These results and concept represent a significant step forward en route to the goal of >10% efficiency required for practical solar hydrogen production.

  11. Hetero-type dual photoanodes for unbiased solar water splitting with extended light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Jang, Ji-Wook; Jo, Yim Hyun; Abdi, Fatwa F; Lee, Young Hye; van de Krol, Roel; Lee, Jae Sung

    2016-12-14

    Metal oxide semiconductors are promising photoelectrode materials for solar water splitting due to their robustness in aqueous solutions and low cost. Yet, their solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiencies are still not high enough for practical applications. Here we present a strategy to enhance the efficiency of metal oxides, hetero-type dual photoelectrodes, in which two photoanodes of different bandgaps are connected in parallel for extended light harvesting. Thus, a photoelectrochemical device made of modified BiVO4 and α-Fe2O3 as dual photoanodes utilizes visible light up to 610 nm for water splitting, and shows stable photocurrents of 7.0±0.2 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 VRHE under 1 sun irradiation. A tandem cell composed with the dual photoanodes-silicon solar cell demonstrates unbiased water splitting efficiency of 7.7%. These results and concept represent a significant step forward en route to the goal of >10% efficiency required for practical solar hydrogen production.

  12. Asymptotically Unbiased Estimation of Exposure Odds Ratios in Complete Records Logistic Regression

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Harel, Ofer; Carpenter, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Missing data are a commonly occurring threat to the validity and efficiency of epidemiologic studies. Perhaps the most common approach to handling missing data is to simply drop those records with 1 or more missing values, in so-called “complete records” or “complete case” analysis. In this paper, we bring together earlier-derived yet perhaps now somewhat neglected results which show that a logistic regression complete records analysis can provide asymptotically unbiased estimates of the association of an exposure of interest with an outcome, adjusted for a number of confounders, under a surprisingly wide range of missing-data assumptions. We give detailed guidance describing how the observed data can be used to judge the plausibility of these assumptions. The results mean that in large epidemiologic studies which are affected by missing data and analyzed by logistic regression, exposure associations may be estimated without bias in a number of settings where researchers might otherwise assume that bias would occur. PMID:26429998

  13. Time-Dependent Tree-Structured Survival Analysis with Unbiased Variable Selection through Permutation Tests

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating time-dependent covariates into tree-structured survival analysis (TSSA) may result in more accurate prognostic models than if only baseline values are used. Available time-dependent TSSA methods exhaustively test every binary split on every covariate; however, this approach may result in selection bias towards covariates with more observed values. We present a method that uses unbiased significance levels from newly proposed permutation tests to select the time-dependent or baseline covariate with the strongest relationship with the survival outcome. The specific splitting value is identified using only the selected covariate. Simulation results show that the proposed time-dependent TSSA method produces tree models of equal or greater accuracy as compared to baseline TSSA models, even with high censoring rates and large within-subject variability in the time-dependent covariate. To illustrate, the proposed method is applied to data from a cohort of bipolar youth to identify subgroups at risk for self-injurious behavior. PMID:25043382

  14. Can hunting data be used to estimate unbiased population parameters? A case study on brown bears.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Martin; Van de Walle, Joanie; Zedrosser, Andreas; Swenson, Jon E; Pelletier, Fanie

    2016-06-01

    Quantifying temporal changes in harvested populations is critical for applied and fundamental research. Unbiased data are required to detect true changes in phenotypic distribution or population size. Because of the difficulty of collecting detailed individual data from wild populations, data from hunting records are often used. Hunting records, however, may not represent a random sample of a population. We aimed to detect and quantify potential bias in hunting records. We compared data from a long-term monitoring project with hunting records of brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Sweden and investigated temporal trends (1996-2013) in the ratio of yearlings to adult females, yearling mass and adult female mass. Data from hunting records underestimated the decline in yearling and adult female mass over time, most likely owing to the legal protection of family groups from hunting, but reflected changes in the ratio of yearlings to adult females more reliably. Although hunting data can be reliable to approximate population abundance in some circumstances, hunting data can represent a biased sample of a population and should be used with caution in management and conservation decisions. © 2016 The Authors.

  15. Unbiased simultaneous estimation of soil hydraulic properties and dynamic nonequilibrium parameters from transient outflow experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iden, S. C.; Diamantopoulos, E.; Durner, W.

    2012-04-01

    Simulation of variably saturated water flow in soils requires accurate knowledge of soil hydraulic properties. Transient flow experiments like the multistep outflow and evaporation methods are now routinely applied to determine soil hydraulic parameters by inverse modelling. Recent experimental evidence suggests that the water content dynamics during such flow experiments is subject to dynamic non-equilibrium. The extent to which this affects the accuracy of determining the equilibrium soil hydraulic properties is still unknown. Conversely, any bias in the equilibrium soil hydraulic properties caused by an inappropriate parameterization must be expected to lead to biased estimates of the parameters describing the hydraulic non-equilibrium. We coupled a dual porosity non-equilibrium model which combines the Richards equation and the Ross and Smettem approach for non-equilibrium with a free-form inversion algorithm. The free-form method has been shown before to guarantee an unbiased estimation of soil hydraulic properties. The freeform non-equilibrium estimation method was applied to data from various multistep outflow experiments. The results confirm that errors in the parameterization of the soil hydraulic properties cause biased estimates of non-equilibrium parameters. Such bias can be minimized or even eliminated with the free-form approach.

  16. An unbiased risk estimator for image denoising in the presence of mixed poisson-gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Le Montagner, Yoann; Angelini, Elsa D; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe

    2014-03-01

    The behavior and performance of denoising algorithms are governed by one or several parameters, whose optimal settings depend on the content of the processed image and the characteristics of the noise, and are generally designed to minimize the mean squared error (MSE) between the denoised image returned by the algorithm and a virtual ground truth. In this paper, we introduce a new Poisson-Gaussian unbiased risk estimator (PG-URE) of the MSE applicable to a mixed Poisson-Gaussian noise model that unifies the widely used Gaussian and Poisson noise models in fluorescence bioimaging applications. We propose a stochastic methodology to evaluate this estimator in the case when little is known about the internal machinery of the considered denoising algorithm, and we analyze both theoretically and empirically the characteristics of the PG-URE estimator. Finally, we evaluate the PG-URE-driven parametrization for three standard denoising algorithms, with and without variance stabilizing transforms, and different characteristics of the Poisson-Gaussian noise mixture.

  17. Towards an unbiased filter routine to determine precipitation and evapotranspiration from high precision lysimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Andre; Groh, Jannis; Schrader, Frederik; Durner, Wolfgang; Vereecken, Harry; Pütz, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Weighing lysimeters are considered to be the best means for a precise measurement of water fluxes at the interface between the soil-plant system and the atmosphere. Any decrease of the net mass of the lysimeter can be interpreted as evapotranspiration (ET), any increase as precipitation (P). However, the measured raw data need to be filtered to separate real mass changes from noise. Such filter routines typically apply two steps: (i) a low pass filter, like moving average, which smooths noisy data, and (ii) a threshold filter that separates significant from insignificant mass changes. Recent developments of these filters have identified and solved some problems regarding bias in the data processing. A remaining problem is that each change in flow direction is accompanied with a systematic flow underestimation due to the threshold scheme. In this contribution, we analyze this systematic effect and show that the absolute underestimation is independent of the magnitude of a flux event. Thus, for small events, like dew or rime formation, the relative error is high and can reach the same magnitude as the flux itself. We develop a heuristic solution to the problem by introducing a so-called ;snap routine;. The routine is calibrated and tested with synthetic flux data and applied to real measurements obtained with a precision lysimeter for a 10-month period. The heuristic snap routine effectively overcomes these problems and yields an almost unbiased representation of the real signal.

  18. Intramolecular Hydroamination of Unbiased and Functionalized Primary Aminoalkenes Catalyzed by a Rhodium Aminophosphine Complex

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Lisa D.; Hartwig, John F.

    2010-01-01

    We report a rhodium catalyst that exhibits high reactivity for the hydroamination of primary aminoalkenes that are unbiased toward cyclization and that possess functional groups that would not be tolerated in hydroaminations catalyzed by more electrophilic systems. This catalyst contains an unusual diaminophosphine ligand that binds to rhodium in a κ3-P,O,P mode. The reactions catalyzed by this complex typically proceed at mild temperatures (room temperature to 70 °C), occur with primary aminoalkenes lacking substituents on the alkyl chain that bias the system toward cyclization, occur with primary aminoalkenes containing chloride, ester, ether, enolizable ketone, nitrile, and unprotected alcohol functionality, and occur with primary aminoalkenes containing internal olefins. Mechanistic data imply that these reactions occur with a turnover-limiting step that is different from that of reactions catalyzed by late transition metal complexes of Pd, Pt, and Ir. This change in the turnover-limiting step and resulting high activity of the catalyst stem from favorable relative rates for protonolysis of the M-C bond to release the hydroamination product vs reversion of the aminoalkyl intermediate to regenerate the acyclic precursor. Probes for the origin of the reactivity of the rhodium complex of L1 imply that the aminophosphine groups lead to these favorable rates by effects beyond steric demands and simple electron donation to the metal center. PMID:20839807

  19. An unbiased expression screen for synaptogenic proteins identifies the LRRTM protein family as synaptic organizers.

    PubMed

    Linhoff, Michael W; Laurén, Juha; Cassidy, Robert M; Dobie, Frederick A; Takahashi, Hideto; Nygaard, Haakon B; Airaksinen, Matti S; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Craig, Ann Marie

    2009-03-12

    Delineating the molecular basis of synapse development is crucial for understanding brain function. Cocultures of neurons with transfected fibroblasts have demonstrated the synapse-promoting activity of candidate molecules. Here, we performed an unbiased expression screen for synaptogenic proteins in the coculture assay using custom-made cDNA libraries. Reisolation of NGL-3/LRRC4B and neuroligin-2 accounts for a minority of positive clones, indicating that current understanding of mammalian synaptogenic proteins is incomplete. We identify LRRTM1 as a transmembrane protein that induces presynaptic differentiation in contacting axons. All four LRRTM family members exhibit synaptogenic activity, LRRTMs localize to excitatory synapses, and artificially induced clustering of LRRTMs mediates postsynaptic differentiation. We generate LRRTM1(-/-) mice and reveal altered distribution of the vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT1, confirming an in vivo synaptic function. These results suggest a prevalence of LRR domain proteins in trans-synaptic signaling and provide a cellular basis for the reported linkage of LRRTM1 to handedness and schizophrenia.

  20. Unbiased identification of protein-bait interactions using biochemical enrichment and quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ong, Shao-En

    2010-03-01

    The use of recombinant proteins, antibodies, small molecules, or nucleic acids as affinity reagents is a simple yet powerful strategy to study the protein-bait interactions that drive biological processes. However, such experiments are often analyzed by Western blotting, limiting the ability to detect novel protein interactors. Unbiased protein identification by mass spectrometry (MS) extends these experiments beyond the study of pairwise interactions, allowing analyses of whole networks of protein-bait interactions. With the latest advances in MS, it is not uncommon to identify thousands of proteins from complex mixtures. Paradoxically, the improved sensitivity of proteomic analyses can make it more difficult to distinguish bait-specific interactions from the large background of identified proteins. In quantitative proteomics, MS signals from protein populations labeled with stable isotopes such as (13)C and (15)N can be identified and quantified relative to unlabeled counterparts. Using quantitative proteomics to compare biochemical enrichments with the bait of interest against those obtained with control baits allows sensitive detection and discrimination of specific protein-bait interactions among the large number of nonspecific interactions with beads. Ad hoc optimization of enrichment conditions is minimized, and mild purification conditions preserve secondary or high-order protein-protein interactions. The combination of biochemical enrichment and quantitative proteomics allows rapid characterization of molecular baits with their interacting proteins, providing tremendous insight into their biological mechanisms of action.