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Sample records for mv wedge photon

  1. Surface dose and build-up region measurements with wedge filters for 6 and 18 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Hatice; Ozbek, Nurdan; Okutan, Murat; Cakir, Aydin; Acar, Hilal

    2010-02-01

    High-energy photons are most commonly used in radiotherapy to treat cancer. Wedge filters are required to obtain homogeneous dose distribution in the patient. Different wedge filter types create different surface doses. In this study, the effect of the virtual and physical wedge filters on the surface and build-up region doses was examined for 6- and 18-MV high-energy photon beams. The measurements were made in a water equivalent phantom in the build-up region at a 100-cm source-to-surface distance for various field sizes using virtual and physical wedge filters having different angles. A parallel-plate ion chamber was used to measure the percent depth doses. The percentage dose at the surface increased as the field size increased for open, virtual, and physical wedged beams. For open, physical, and virtual wedged beams, the surface doses were found to be 15.4%, 9.9%, and 15.9% with 6-MV photons and 10.6%, 8.8%, 11.9% with 18-MV photons, respectively, at 10 x 10 cm(2) field size. Build-up doses of virtual wedged beams were similar to those of open beams. Surface and buildup doses of physical wedged beams were lower than those of open and virtual wedged beams.

  2. Assessment of computerized treatment planning system accuracy in calculating wedge factors of physical wedged fields for 6 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Wazir; Maqbool, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Hussain, Amjad; Tahir, Sajjad; Matiullah; Rooh, Gul; Ahmad, Tanveer; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2011-07-01

    Wedge filters are commonly used in external beam radiotherapy to achieve a uniform dose distribution within the target volume. The main objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the beam modifier algorithm of Theraplan plus (TPP version 3.8) treatment planning system and to confirm that either the beam hardening, beam softening and attenuation coefficients along with wedge geometry and measured wedge factor at single depth and multiple fields sizes can be the replacement of wedged profile and wedged cross-sectional data or not. In this regard the effect of beam hardening and beam softening was studied with physical wedges for 6 MV photons. The Normalized Wedge Factors (NWFs) were measured experimentally as well as calculated with the Theraplan plus, as a function of depth and field size in a water phantom for 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° wedge filters. The beam hardening and softening was determined experimentally by deriving the required coefficients for all wedge angles. The TPP version 3.8 requires wedge transmission factor at single depth and multiple field sizes. Without incorporating the hardening and softening coefficients the percent difference between measured and calculated NFWs was as high as 7%. After the introduction of these parameters into the algorithm, the agreement between measured and TPP (V 3.8) calculated NWFs were improved to within 2 percent for various depths. Similar improvement was observed in TPP version 3.8 while calculating NWFs for various field sizes when the required coefficients were adjusted. In conclusion, the dose calculation algorithm of TPP version 3.8 showed good accuracy for a 6 MV photon beam provided beam hardening and softening parameters are taken into account. From the results, it is also concluded that, the beam hardening, beam softening and attenuation coefficients along with wedge geometry and measured wedge factor at single depth and multiple fields sizes can be the replacement of wedged profile and

  3. SU-E-T-143: Effect of Physical and Virtual Wedges on the Surface Dose at Various SSD for 6 and 15 MV Photon Beam.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Girigesh; Sinha, S N; Ashokkumar, S; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, M; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Yadav, R S

    2012-06-01

    To study the effect of the virtual wedge and physical wedge filters on the surface and build-up region doses for 6 and 15MV high-energy photon beams for different field sizes and various source to surface distance(SSD). The measurements were made in water equivalent (PMMA) solid phantom in the build-up region at various SSD for various field sizes using virtual and physical wedge filters having different angles. A parallel-plate ion chamber (Markus) was used to measure the percent depth doses at surface and buildup region. Plane parallel ion chamber with fixed plate separation on the surface and buildup region would perturbate the dose measured, to get the proper dose over response correction factor was used. The percentage depth dose at surface (PDD0) increased as the field size increased for open, virtual, and physical wedged beams. For open, 30 degree physical, and virtual wedged beams, the surface doses were found to be 15.4%, 11.2%, and 15.2% with 6-MV photons and 11.2%, 9.4%, 11.2% with 15-MV photons, respectively, at 10 × 10 cm(2) field size at 100cm SSD.As SSD increases percentage depth dose at surface (PDD0) decreases for open,physical and virtual wedge field. Percentage depth dose at surface (PDD0) of virtual wedged beams were similar to those of open beams. PDD0 of physical wedged beams were lower than those of open and virtual wedged beams. Surface doses for both PW and VW increases with field size and small increase in surface dose for both PW and VW fields as wedge angle increases especially for large fields. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Linear array measurements of enhanced dynamic wedge and treatment planning system (TPS) calculation for 15 MV photon beam and comparison with electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Borislava; Grzadziel, Aleksandra; Rutonjski, Laza; Slosarek, Krzysztof

    2010-09-01

    Enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) are known to increase drastically the radiation therapy treatment efficiency. This paper has the aim to compare linear array measurements of EDW with the calculations of treatment planning system (TPS) and the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for 15 MV photon energy. The range of different field sizes and wedge angles (for 15 MV photon beam) were measured by the linear chamber array CA 24 in Blue water phantom. The measurement conditions were applied to the calculations of the commercial treatment planning system XIO CMS v.4.2.0 using convolution algorithm. EPID measurements were done on EPID-focus distance of 100 cm, and beam parameters being the same as for CA24 measurements. Both depth doses and profiles were measured. EDW linear array measurements of profiles to XIO CMS TPS calculation differ around 0.5%. Profiles in non-wedged direction and open field profiles practically do not differ. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) for all EDW measurements show the difference of not more than 0.2%, while the open field PDD is almost the same as EDW PDD. Wedge factors for 60 deg wedge angle were also examined, and the difference is up to 4%. EPID to linear array differs up to 5%. The implementation of EDW in radiation therapy treatments provides clinicians with an effective tool for the conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. If modelling of EDW beam in TPS is done correctly, a very good agreement between measurements and calculation is obtained, but EPID cannot be used for reference measurements.

  5. Dosimetric Characteristics of 6 MV Modified Beams by Physical Wedges of a Siemens Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Birgani, Mohammad Javad Tahmasebi; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Arvandi, Sholeh; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Mahbube

    2016-01-01

    Physical wedges still can be used as missing tissue compensators or filters to alter the shape of isodose curves in a target volume to reach an optimal radiotherapy plan without creating a hotspot. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of physical wedges filters such as off-axis photon fluence, photon spectrum, output factor and half value layer. The photon beam quality of a 6 MV Primus Siemens modified by 150 and 450 physical wedges was studied with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The calculated present depth dose and dose profile curves for open and wedged photon beam were in good agreement with the measurements. Increase of wedge angle increased the beam hardening and this effect was more pronounced at the heal region. Using such an accurate MC model to determine of wedge factors and implementation of it as a calculation algorithm in the future treatment planning systems is recommended.

  6. Comparison of surface dose delivered by 7 MV-unflattened and 6 MV-flattened photon beams.

    PubMed

    Sigamani, Ashokkumar; Nambiraj, Arunai

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the central-axis dose in the buildup region and the surface dose delivered by a 6 MV flattened photon beam (6 MV-FB) and a higher energy unflattened (7 MV-FFF) therapeutic photon beam for different-sized square fields with open fields and modifying filters. The beams are produced by a Siemens Artiste linear accelerator with a NACP-02 ionization chamber and the dose is measured by using GafChromic film and two different, commonly used, dosimeters: a p-type photon semiconductor dosimeter (PFD) and a cylindrical ionization chamber (CC13). The results indicate that the surface dose increases linearly with FS for both open and wedged fields for the 6 MV-FB and 7 MV-FFF beams. The surface dose delivered by the 7 MV-UFB beam is consistent with that delivered by the 6 MV-FB beam for field sizes up to 10 cm × 10 cm, after which the surface dose decreases. The buildup dose for the 7 MV-UFB beam is slightly less than that for the 6 MV-FB beam for field sizes ranging from 5 cm × 5 cm to 15 cm × 15 cm. For both the 6 MV-FB and 7 MV-FFF beams, the measured surface dose clearly increases with increasing field size, regardless of the detector used in the measurement. The surface dose measured with the PFD dosimeter and the NACP-02 and CC13 chambers differ significantly from the results obtained when using GafChromic film. The 7 MV-FFF beam results in a slightly smaller surface dose in the buildup region compared with the 6 MV-FB beam. The surface dose delivered by the higher energy 7 MV-FFF beam is less than that delivered by the energy-unmatched FFF beam in previously published works.

  7. Measurement and comparison of head scatter factor for 7 MV unflattened (FFF) and 6 MV flattened photon beam using indigenously designed columnar mini phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambiraj, Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Raman, Kothanda; Bhushan, Manindra; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Aim To measure and compare the head scatter factor for 7 MV unflattened and 6 MV flattened photon beam using a home-made designed mini phantom. Background The head scatter factor (Sc) is one of the important parameters for MU calculation. There are multiple factors that influence the Sc values, like accelerator head, flattening filter, primary and secondary collimators. Materials and methods A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with high and low atomic number material for measurement of head scatter factors at 10 cm and dmax dose water equivalent thickness. Results The Sc values measured with high-Z are higher than the low-Z mini phantoms observed for both 6MV-FB and 7MV-UFB photon energies. Sc values of 7MV-UFB photon beams were smaller than those of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.6–2.2% (Primus), 0.2–1.4% (Artiste) and 0.6–3.7% (Clinac iX (2300CD))) for field sizes ranging from 10 cm × 10 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams. The presence of wedge filters influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effects showed that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FF and FFF. Conclusions There were significant differences in Sc values measured for 6MV-FB and unflattened 7MV-UFB photon beams over the range of field sizes from 10 cm × 10 cm to 40 cm × 04 cm. Different results were obtained for measurements performed with low-Z and high-Z mini phantoms. PMID:25949220

  8. Photon spectral characteristics of dissimilar 6 MV linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hinson, William H; Kearns, William T; deGuzman, Allan F; Bourland, J Daniel

    2008-05-01

    This work measures and compares the energy spectra of four dosimetrically matched 6 MV beams, generated from four physically different linear accelerators. The goal of this work is twofold. First, this study determines whether the spectra of dosimetrically matched beams are measurably different. This study also demonstrates that the spectra of clinical photon beams can be measured as a part of the beam data collection process for input to a three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning system. The spectra of 6 MV beams that are dosimetrically matched for clinical use were studied to determine if the beam spectra are similarly matched. Each of the four accelerators examined had a standing waveguide, but with different physical designs. The four accelerators were two Varian 2100C/Ds (one 6 MV/18 MV waveguide and one 6 MV/10 MV waveguide), one Varian 600 C with a vertically mounted waveguide and no bending magnet, and one Siemens MD 6740 with a 6 MV/10 MV waveguide. All four accelerators had percent depth dose curves for the 6 MV beam that were matched within 1.3%. Beam spectra were determined from narrow beam transmission measurements through successive thicknesses of pure aluminum along the central axis of the accelerator, made with a graphite Farmer ion chamber with a Lucite buildup cap. An iterative nonlinear fit using a Marquardt algorithm was used to find each spectrum. Reconstructed spectra show that all four beams have similar energy distributions with only subtle differences, despite the differences in accelerator design. The measured spectra of different 6 MV beams are similar regardless of accelerator design. The measured spectra show excellent agreement with those found by the auto-modeling algorithm in a commercial 3D treatment planning system that uses a convolution dose calculation algorithm. Thus, beam spectra can be acquired in a clinical setting at the time of commissioning as a part of the routine beam data collection.

  9. Study of head scatter factor in 4MV photon beam used in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Appasamy, Murugan; Xavier, Sidonia Valas; Kuppusamy, Thayalan; Velayudham, Ramasubramanian

    2013-06-01

    The 4 MV photon beam offers equal build-up region behavior like Co-60 beam and it plays a major role in head and neck and pediatric radiotherapy. In this study an attempt is made to study the head scatter factor (SC) for 4 MV photon beam using locally designed PMMA and Brass miniphantoms. The SC is measured in combination of PMMA miniphantom with 0.6 cc chamber and Brass miniphantom with 0.6 cc and 0.13 cc chambers. The measured SC is compared with the literature data and it agrees within ± 1.98%. The study reveals that either 0.13 cc or 0.6 cc chamber with PMMA or Brass phantom materials can be used for SC measurements in a 4 MV photon beam. The variation of SSD does not alter the head scatter factor. The collimator exchange effect is found to be within 1, and it is less than that of other linear accelerators. It is also found that the presence of internal wedge has significant contribution to head scatter factor. The Phantom scatter factor is also calculated and it agrees within ±1% with published data.

  10. Canonical quantization of photons in a Rindler wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Valter

    1997-06-01

    Photons and thermal photons are studied in the Rindler wedge employing Feynman's gauge and canonical quantization. A Gupta-Bleuler-like formalism is explicitly implemented. Nonthermal Wightman functions and related (Euclidean and Lorentzian) Green functions are explicitly calculated and their complex time analytic structure is carefully analyzed using the Fulling-Ruijsenaars master function. The invariance of the advanced minus retarded fundamental solution is checked and a Ward identity discussed. It is suggested that the KMS condition can be implemented to define thermal states also dealing with unphysical photons. Following this way, thermal Wightman functions and related (Euclidean and Lorentzian) Green functions are built up. Their analytic structure is carefully examined employing a thermal master function as in the nonthermal case and other corresponding properties are discussed. Some subtleties arising dealing with unphysical photons in the presence of the Rindler conical singularity are pointed out. In particular, a one-parameter family of thermal Wightman and Schwinger functions with the same physical content is proved to exist due to a remaining (nontrivial) static gauge ambiguity. A photon version of the Bisognano-Wichmann theorem is investigated in the case of photons propagating in the Rindler Wedge employing Wightman functions. In spite of the found ambiguity in defining Rindler Green functions, the coincidence of (β=2π)-Rindler Wightman functions and Minkowski Wightman functions is proved dealing with test functions related to physical photons and Lorentz photons.

  11. Calculating dose distributions and wedge factors for photon treatment fields with dynamic wedges based on a convolution/superposition method.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; McCullough, E C; Mackie, T R

    1998-01-01

    A convolution/superposition based method was developed to calculate dose distributions and wedge factors in photon treatment fields generated by dynamic wedges. This algorithm used a dual source photon beam model that accounted for both primary photons from the target and secondary photons scattered from the machine head. The segmented treatment tables (STT) were used to calculate realistic photon fluence distributions in the wedged fields. The inclusion of the extra-focal photons resulted in more accurate dose calculation in high dose gradient regions, particularly in the beam penumbra. The wedge factors calculated using the convolution method were also compared to the measured data and showed good agreement within 0.5%. The wedge factor varied significantly with the field width along the moving jaw direction, but not along the static jaw or the depth direction. This variation was found to be determined by the ending position of the moving jaw, or the STT of the dynamic wedge. In conclusion, the convolution method proposed in this work can be used to accurately compute dose for a dynamic or an intensity modulated treatment based on the fluence modulation in the treatment field.

  12. Surface and buildup dose characteristics for 6, 10, and 18 MV photons from an Elekta Precise linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eric E; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Li, Zuofeng

    2003-01-01

    Understanding head scatter characteristics of photon beams is vital to properly commission treatment planning (TP) algorithms. Simultaneously, having definitive surface and buildup region dosimetry is important to optimize bolus. The Elekta Precise linacs have unique beam flattening filter configurations for each photon beam (6, 10, and 18 MV) in terms of material and location. We performed a comprehensive set of surface and buildup dose measurements with a thin window parallel-plate (PP) chamber to examine effects of field size (FS), source-to-skin distance (SSD), and attenuating media. Relative ionization data were converted to fractional depth dose (FDD) after correcting for bias effects and using the Gerbi method to account for chamber characteristics. Data were compared with a similar vintage Varian linac. At short SSDs the surface and buildup dose characteristics were similar to published data for Varian and Elekta accelerators. The FDD at surface (FDD(0)) for 6, 10, and 18 MV photons was 0.171, 0.159, and 0.199, respectively, for a 15x15 cm2, 100 cm SSD field. A blocking tray increased FDD(0) to 0.200, 0.200, and 0.256, while the universal wedge decreased FDD(0) to 0.107, 0.124, and 0.176. FDD(0) increased linearly with FS (approximately 1.16%/cm). FDD(0) decreased exponentially for 10 and 18 MV with increasing SSD. However, the 6 MV FDD(0) actually increased slightly with increasing SSD. This is likely due to the unique distal flattening filter for 6 MV. The measured buildup curves have been used to optimize TP calculations and guide bolus decisions. Overall the FDD(0) and buildup doses were very similar to published data. Of interest were the relatively low 10 MV surface doses, and the 6 MV FDD(0)'s dependence on SSD.

  13. Measuring linac photon beam energy through EPID image analysis of physically wedged fields.

    PubMed

    Dawoud, S M; Weston, S J; Bond, I; Ward, G C; Rixham, P A; Mason, J; Huckle, A; Sykes, J R

    2014-02-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful tools for measuring several parameters of interest in linac quality assurance (QA). However, a method for measuring linac photon beam energy using EPIDs has not previously been reported. In this report, such a method is devised and tested, based on fitting a second order polynomial to the profiles of physically wedged beams, where the metric of interest is the second order coefficient α. The relationship between α and the beam quality index [percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth (PDD10)] is examined to produce a suitable calibration curve between these two parameters. Measurements were taken in a water-tank for beams with a range of energies representative of the local QA tolerances about the nominal value 6 MV. In each case, the beam quality was found in terms of PDD10 for 100 × 100 mm(2) square fields. EPID images of 200 × 200 mm(2) wedged fields were then taken for each beam and the wedge profile was fitted in MATLAB 2010b (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). α was then plotted against PDD10 and fitted with a linear relation to produce the calibration curve. The uncertainty in α was evaluated by taking five repeat EPID images of the wedged field for a beam of 6 MV nominal energy. The consistency of measuring α was found by taking repeat measurements on a single linac over a three month period. The method was also tested at 10 MV by repeating the water-tank crosscalibration for a range of energies centered approximately about a 10 MV nominal value. Finally, the calibration curve from the test linac and that from a separate clinical machine were compared to test consistency of the method across machines in a matched fleet. The relationship between α and PDD10 was found to be strongly linear (R(2) = 0.979) while the uncertainty in α was found to be negligible compared to that associated with measuring PDD10 in the water-tank (± 0.3%). The repeat measurements over a three month period showed

  14. Measuring linac photon beam energy through EPID image analysis of physically wedged fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dawoud, S. M. Weston, S. J.; Bond, I.; Ward, G. C.; Rixham, P. A.; Mason, J.; Huckle, A.; Sykes, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful tools for measuring several parameters of interest in linac quality assurance (QA). However, a method for measuring linac photon beam energy using EPIDs has not previously been reported. In this report, such a method is devised and tested, based on fitting a second order polynomial to the profiles of physically wedged beams, where the metric of interest is the second order coefficientα. The relationship between α and the beam quality index [percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth (PDD{sub 10})] is examined to produce a suitable calibration curve between these two parameters. Methods: Measurements were taken in a water-tank for beams with a range of energies representative of the local QA tolerances about the nominal value 6 MV. In each case, the beam quality was found in terms of PDD{sub 10} for 100 × 100 mm{sup 2} square fields. EPID images of 200 × 200 mm{sup 2} wedged fields were then taken for each beam and the wedge profile was fitted in MATLAB 2010b (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). α was then plotted against PDD{sub 10} and fitted with a linear relation to produce the calibration curve. The uncertainty in α was evaluated by taking five repeat EPID images of the wedged field for a beam of 6 MV nominal energy. The consistency of measuring α was found by taking repeat measurements on a single linac over a three month period. The method was also tested at 10 MV by repeating the water-tank crosscalibration for a range of energies centered approximately about a 10 MV nominal value. Finally, the calibration curve from the test linac and that from a separate clinical machine were compared to test consistency of the method across machines in a matched fleet. Results: The relationship betweenα and PDD{sub 10} was found to be strongly linear (R{sup 2} = 0.979) while the uncertainty in α was found to be negligible compared to that associated with measuring PDD{sub 10} in the water-tank (

  15. Comparison of 4 MV photon surface dose among Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linear accelerators for tangential breast treatment: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Karasawa, Kumiko; Furuya, Tomohisa; Fujita, Takayuki; Tutumi, Yutaka; Miura, Kohei; Takada, Takahiro; Ito, Kana; Ozawa, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    We have compared the differences in a 4-MV photon surface dose among Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linear accelerators (linacs) with wedges for tangential breast treatment. The wedge factor and the surface dose were measured using a solid water phantom and an ion chamber for each linear accelerator with various field sizes and wedge angles. A tangential treatment plan was applied to an elliptical hollow cylinder water phantom with a radiochromic film placed thereon. A dose was delivered to a simulated target in the phantom, and the resulting dose distribution was analyzed using a film scanner. Varian's wedges resulted in the highest wedge factors, ranging from 0.37 to 0.75 depending on the wedge angles. Varian's wedges led to the highest normalized skin doses, ranging between 0.40 and 0.73 depending on the wedge angles and field sizes. In the cylinder phantom test with two tangential beams, the Varian linac provided a nearly 20% higher maximum dose than the Siemens and Elekta linacs. The Varian linac resulted in the highest surface doses, and the Elekta linac led to the lowest for nearly all the measurement conditions we employed, including open beams.

  16. Monte Carlo Simulation of a 6 MV X-Ray Beam for Open and Wedge Radiation Fields, Using GATE Code

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Taghi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Hasanabadi, Fatemeh; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a control software system, based on Monte Carlo simulation, and calculations of dosimetric parameters of standard and wedge radiation fields, using a Monte Carlo method. GATE version 6.1 (OpenGATE Collaboration), was used to simulate a compact 6 MV linear accelerator system. In order to accelerate the calculations, the phase-space technique and cluster computing (Condor version 7.2.4, Condor Team, University of Wisconsin–Madison) were used. Dosimetric parameters used in treatment planning systems for the standard and wedge radiation fields (10 cm × 10 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm and a 60° wedge), including the percentage depth dose and dose profiles, were measured by both computational and experimental methods. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results with 3%/3 mm criteria. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results. Almost all calculated data points have satisfied gamma index criteria of 3% to 3 mm. Based on the good agreement between calculated and measured results obtained for various radiation fields in this study, GATE may be used as a useful tool for quality control or pretreatment verification procedures in radiotherapy. PMID:25426430

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation of a 6 MV X-Ray Beam for Open and Wedge Radiation Fields, Using GATE Code.

    PubMed

    Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Taghi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Hasanabadi, Fatemeh; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a control software system, based on Monte Carlo simulation, and calculations of dosimetric parameters of standard and wedge radiation fields, using a Monte Carlo method. GATE version 6.1 (OpenGATE Collaboration), was used to simulate a compact 6 MV linear accelerator system. In order to accelerate the calculations, the phase-space technique and cluster computing (Condor version 7.2.4, Condor Team, University of Wisconsin-Madison) were used. Dosimetric parameters used in treatment planning systems for the standard and wedge radiation fields (10 cm × 10 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm and a 60° wedge), including the percentage depth dose and dose profiles, were measured by both computational and experimental methods. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results with 3%/3 mm criteria. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results. Almost all calculated data points have satisfied gamma index criteria of 3% to 3 mm. Based on the good agreement between calculated and measured results obtained for various radiation fields in this study, GATE may be used as a useful tool for quality control or pretreatment verification procedures in radiotherapy.

  18. SU-E-T-221: Investigation of Lower Energy (< 6 MV) Photon Beams for Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Ming, X; Feng, Y; Zhou, L; Ahmad, M; Deng, J; Nguyen, K; Griffin, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the potential applications of the lower energy (< 6MV) photon beams in the radiotherapeutic management of pediatric cancer and lung cancer patients. Methods: Photon beams of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6MV were first simulated with EGS4/BEAM and then used for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. For four pediatric patients with abdominal and brain lesions, six 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plans were generated using single photon energy (2 to 6MV) or mixed energies (3 and 6MV). Furthermore, a virtual machine of 3 and 6MV was commissioned in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on Monte-Carlo simulated data. Three IMRT plans of a lung cancer patient were generated on this virtual machine. All plans were normalized to D95% of target dose for 6MV plan and then compared in terms of integral dose and OAR sparing. Results: For the four pediatric patients, the integral dose for the 2, 3, 4 and 5MV plans increased by 9%, 5%, 3.5%, 1.7%, respectively as compared to 6MV. Almost all OARs in the 2MV plan received more than 10% more doses than 6MV. Mixed energy 3DCRT plans were of the same quality as 6MV plans. For the lung IMRT plans, both the 3MV plan and the mixed beam plan showed better OAR sparing in comparison to 6MV plan. Specifically, the maximum and mean doses to the spinal cord in the mixed energy plan were lower by 21% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Single lower energy photon beam was found to be inferior to 6MV in the radiotherapy of pediatric patients and lung cancer patients when the integral doses and the doses to the OARs were considered. However, mixed energy plans combining low with high energy beams showed significant OAR sparing while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Investigation with more patient data is ongoing for further confirmation.

  19. NOTE: Near surface photon energy spectra outside a 6 MV field edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. R.; Mountford, P. J.

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between a 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray energy spectrum outside the field edge near a phantom surface, and the corresponding spectrum on the central axis. The Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A was used to calculate the spectra on the central axis and at 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm from the edge of a 4 × 4 cm2, 10 × 10 cm2 and 15 × 15 cm2 field. Compared to the spectrum on the central axis, the spectra outside the field edge showed two distinct regions: a broad peak below about 0.5 MeV, and a lower amplitude, less rapidly changing region at higher energies from 0.5 to 6 MeV. The lower energy peak was due to scattered photons, and the higher energy component was due mainly to primary photons transmitted through the jaws of the secondary collimator. The potential impact of these spectral differences on critical organ photon dosimetry was determined by calculating the ratio of the sensitivity of a Scanditronix EDD-5 diode and of a LiF:Mg:Ti thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) outside the field edge to their respective sensitivity at the calibration position on the central axis. The lower energy peak combined with the non-uniform energy sensitivity of each detector produced up to a two-thirds overestimate of x-ray dose outside the field by the diode, whereas the response ratio of the TLD was about unity. These results indicated that a similar evaluation was required for profile measurements of a dynamic wedged field and measurements in an intensity modulated beam with either type of detector.

  20. Evaluation of dosimetric properties of 6 MV & 10 MV photon beams from a linear accelerator with no flattening filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, David

    A linear accelerator manufactured by Elekta, equipped with a multi leaf collimation (MLC) system has been modelled using Monte Carlo simulations with the photon flattening filter removed. The purpose of this investigation was to show that more efficient and more accurate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) treatments can be delivered from a standard linear accelerator with the flattening filter removed from the beam. A range of simulations of 6 MV and 10 MV photon were studied and compared to a model of a standard accelerator which included the flattening filter for those beams. Measurements using a scanning water phantom were also performed after the flattening filter had been removed. We show here that with the flattening filter removed, an increase to the dose on the central axis by a factor of 2.35 and 4.18 is achieved for 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams respectively using a standard 10x 10cm2 field size. A comparison of the dose at points at the field edges led to the result that, removal of the flattening filter reduced the dose at these points by approximately 10% for the 6 MV beam over the clinical range of field sizes. A further consequence of removing the flattening filter was the softening of the photon energy spectrum leading to a steeper reduction in dose at depths greater than dmax. Also studied was the electron contamination brought about by the removal of the filter. To reduce this electron contamination and thus reduce the skin dose to the patient we consider the use of an electron scattering foil in the beam path. The electron scattering foil had very little effect on dmax. From simulations of a standard 6MV beam, a filter-free beam and a filter-free beam with electron scattering foil, we deduce that the proportion of electrons in the photon beam is 0.35%, 0.28% and 0.27%, consecutively. In short, higher dose rates will result in decreased treatment times and the reduced dose outside of the field is indicative of reducing the dose to the

  1. Air cavity effects on the radition dose to the larynx using Co-60, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niroomand-Rad, A.; Harter, K.W.; Thobejane, S.; Bertrand, K.

    1994-07-30

    The purpose was to determine the perturbation effect in the surface layers of lesions located in the air-tumor tissues interface of larynx using {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were embedded at 16 measurement locations in slab no. 8 of a humanoid phantom and exposed to two lateral-opposed beams using standard 7 {times} 7 cm fields. Similarly, radiographic and radiochromic films were placed between slabs no. 7 and no. 8 of the humanoid phantom and exposed to two lateral-opposed radiation beams. The dosimeters were irradiated with {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. Computer tomography (CT) treatment planning without inhomogeneity correction was performed. At the tissue-air interface, the average measured percentage dose (% dose{sub m}) is about (108.7 {+-} 4.8%) with TLD data, (96.8 {+-} 2.5%) with radiographic film data, and (100.8 {+-} 4.9%) with radiochromic film data. Similarly, in the central part of the cavity, the % dose{sub m} is (98.4 {+-} 3.1)% with TLD data, (94.3 {+-} 3.3)% with radiographic film data, and (91.7 {+-} 5.0)% with radiochromic film data. Using the CT-based generated dose distribution (without inhomogeneity correction), the average calculated percentage dose (% dose{sub c}) is (98.7 {+-} 1.0%) at the tissue-air interface and 98% in the central part of the air cavity. For the beam energies studied, the variation from the % dose {sub m} at the tissue-air interface for a given dosimetry technique is relatively small and therefore should not be significant in clinical settings. The variation from the % dose{sub m} at the tissue-air interface is more significant for lower energies. This variation is about 4.3% for 10 MV photon beam, therefore, while institutional practice favors lower energy ({sup 60}Co to 6 MV) for node-negative glottic cancers, physical/dosimetric evidence offers no disadvantage to the use of higher energy photons. 10 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Surface dose measurements with GafChromic EBT film for 6 and 18MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Hatice; Cakir, Aydin; Okutan, Murat; Acar, Hilal

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the surface doses using GafChromic EBT films and compare them with plane-parallel ionization chamber measurements for 6 and 18 MV high energy photon beams. The measurements were made in a water equivalent solid phantom in the build-up region of the 6 and 18MV photon beams at 100 cm SSD for various field sizes. Markus type plane-parallel ion chamber with fixed-separation between collecting electrodes was used to measure the percent depth doses. GafChromic EBT film measurements were performed both on the phantom surface and maximum dose depth at the same geometry with ion chamber measurements. The surface doses found using GafChromic EBT film were 15%, 20%, 29%and 39%+/-2% (1SD) for 6 MV photons, 6%, 11%, 23% and 32%+/-2% (1SD) for 18 MV photons at 5, 10, 20 and 30 cm(2) field sizes, respectively. GafChromic EBT film provides precise measurements for surface dose in the high energy photons. Agreement between film and plane-parallel chamber measurements was found to be within +/-3% for 18 MV photon beams. There was 5% overestimate on the surface doses when compared with the plane-parallel chamber measurements for all field sizes in the 6 MV photon beams.

  3. Surface dose variations in 6 and 10 MV flattened and flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams.

    PubMed

    Cashmore, Jason

    2016-09-08

    As the use of linear accelerators operating in flattening filter-free (FFF) modes becomes more widespread, it is important to have an understanding of the surface doses delivered to patients with these beams. Flattening filter removal alters the beam quality and relative contributions of low-energy X-rays and contamination electrons in the beam. Having dosimetric data to describe the surface dose and buildup regions under a range of conditions for FFF beams is important if clinical decisions are to be made. An Elekta Synergy linac with standard MLCi head has been commissioned to run at 6 MV and 10 MV running with the flattening filter in or out. In this linac the 6 MV FFF beam has been energy-matched to the clinical beam on the central axis (D10). The 10 MV beam energy has not been adjusted. The flattening filter in both cases is replaced by a thin (2 mm) stainless steel plate. A thin window parallel plate chamber has been used to measure a comprehensive set of surface dose data in these beams for variations in field size and SSD, and for the presence of attenuators (wedge, shadow tray, and treatment couch). Surface doses are generally higher in FFF beams for small field sizes and lower for large field sizes with a crossover at 10 × 10 cm2 at 6 MV and 25 × 25 cm2 at 10 MV. This trend is also seen in the presence of the wedge, shadow tray, and treatment couch. Only small differences (< 0.5%) are seen between the beams on varying SSD. At both 6 and 10 MV the filter-free beams show far less variation with field size than conventional beams. By removing the flattening filter, a source of contamination electrons is exchanged for a source of low-energy photons (as these are no longer attenuated). In practice these two components almost balance out. No significant effects on surface dose are expected by the introduction of FFF delivery. © 2016 The Authors.

  4. SU-E-T-562: Scanned Percent Depth Dose Curve Discrepancy for Photon Beams with Physical Wedge in Place (Varian IX) Using Different Sensitive Volume Ion Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate and report the discrepancy of scanned percent depth dose (PDD) for photon beams with physical wedge in place when using ion chambers with different sensitive volumes. Methods/Materials: PDD curves of open fields and physical wedged fields (15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge) were scanned for photon beams (6MV and 10MV, Varian iX) with field size of 5x5 and 10x10 cm using three common scanning chambers with different sensitive volumes - PTW30013 (0.6cm3), PTW23323 (0.1cm3) and Exradin A16 (0.007cm3). The scanning system software used was OmniPro version 6.2, and the scanning water tank was the Scanditronix Wellhoffer RFA 300.The PDD curves from the three chambers were compared. Results: Scanned PDD curves of the same energy beams for open fields were almost identical between three chambers, but the wedged fields showed non-trivial differences. The largest differences were observed between chamber PTW30013 and Exradin A16. The differences increased as physical wedge angle increased. The differences also increased with depth, and were more pronounced for 6MV beam. Similar patterns were shown for both 5x5 and 10x10 cm field sizes. For open fields, all PDD values agreed with each other within 1% at 10cm depth and within 1.62% at 20 cm depth. For wedged fields, the difference of PDD values between PTW30013 and A16 reached 4.09% at 10cm depth, and 5.97% at 20 cm depth for 6MV with 60 degree physical wedge. Conclusion: We observed a significant difference in scanned PDD curves of photon beams with physical wedge in place obtained when using different sensitive volume ion chambers. The PDD curves scanned with the smallest sensitive volume ion chamber showed significant difference from larger chamber results, beyond 10cm depth. We believe this to be caused by varying response to beam hardening by the wedges.

  5. Beam data measurements for dynamic wedges on Varian 600C (6 MV) and 2100C (6 and 10 MV) linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Bidmead, A M; Garton, A J; Childs, P J

    1995-03-01

    The measurement of beam data for dynamic wedge dosimetry requires the integration of radiation dose at points across the radiation field during the dose delivery. The different measurement techniques required when using a linear diode array to measure beam profiles and when using ionization chambers to measure depth doses and effective wedge factors are described. The segmented treatment tables (STTS), which specify the delivered dose as a function of jaw position, are used by the control algorithm to deliver dynamic wedge fields. The reproducibility achieved using STTS is very consistent (and the stability of the accelerators is very good) so there is no significant variation in effective wedge factor or profile shape. There is a unique set of 132 STTS for each energy and design of treatment machine, which encompasses all the dynamic wedge data. There are significant discontinuities of up to 14% in wedge factors at certain field sizes. This means that wedge factors have to be measured at small increments (0.5 cm) in field size, as it is the width of the dynamic wedge field that determines the STT used. Considerable care must be taken when implementing these data on a current generation treatment planning computer.

  6. Neutron dose in and out of 18MV photon fields.

    PubMed

    Ezzati, A O; Studenski, M T

    2017-04-01

    In radiation therapy, neutron contamination is an undesirable side effect of using high energy photons to treat patients. Neutron contamination requires adjustments to the shielding requirements of the linear accelerator vault and contributes to the risk of secondary malignancies in patients by delivering dose outside of the primary treatment field. Using MCNPX, an established Monte Carlo code, manufacturer blueprints, and the most up to date ICRP neutron dose conversion factors, the neutron spectra, neutron/photon dose ratio, and the neutron capture gamma ray dose were calculated at different depths and off axis distances in a tissue equivalent phantom. Results demonstrated that the neutron spectra and dose are dependent on field size, depth in the phantom, and off-axis distance. Simulations showed that because of the low neutron absorption cross section of the linear accelerator head materials, the contribution to overall patient dose from neutrons can be up to 1000 times the photon dose out of the treatment field and is also dependent on field size and depth. Beyond 45cm off-axis, the dependence of the neutron dose on field size is minimal. Neutron capture gamma ray dose is also field size dependent and is at a maximum at a depth of about 7cm. It is important to remember that when treating with high energy photons, the dose from contamination neutrons must be considered as it is much greater than the photon dose.

  7. Comparison of Head Scatter Factor for 6MV and 10MV flattened (FB) and Unflattened (FFF) Photon Beam using indigenously Designed Columnar Mini Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambi Raj, N Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    To measure and compare the head scatter factor for flattened (FB) and unflattened (FFF) of 6MV and 10MV photon beam using indigenously designed mini phantom. A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with low and high atomic number materials at 10 cm (mini phantom) and at approximately twice the depth of maximum dose water equivalent thickness (brass build-up cap). Scatter in the accelerator (Sc) values of 6MV-FFF photon beams are lesser than that of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.66-2.8%; Clinac iX, 2300CD) and (0.47-1.74%; True beam) for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2. Sc values of 10MV-FFF photon beams are lesser (0.61-2.19%; True beam) than that of the 10MV-FB photons beams for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2. The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams and irrespective of head design of the different linear accelerators. The presence of field shaping device influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effect reveals that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FB or FFF photon beams and different linear accelerators, and it is less significant in FFF beams. Sc values of 6MV-FB square field were in good agreement with that of AAPM, TG-74 published data for Varian (Clinac iX, 2300CD) accelerator. Our results confirm that the removal of flattening filter decreases in the head scatter factor compared to flattened beam. This could reduce the out-of-field dose in advanced treatment delivery techniques. PMID:25190997

  8. Comparison of Head Scatter Factor for 6MV and 10MV flattened (FB) and Unflattened (FFF) Photon Beam using indigenously Designed Columnar Mini Phantom.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambi Raj, N Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2014-07-01

    To measure and compare the head scatter factor for flattened (FB) and unflattened (FFF) of 6MV and 10MV photon beam using indigenously designed mini phantom. A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with low and high atomic number materials at 10 cm (mini phantom) and at approximately twice the depth of maximum dose water equivalent thickness (brass build-up cap). Scatter in the accelerator (Sc) values of 6MV-FFF photon beams are lesser than that of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.66-2.8%; Clinac iX, 2300CD) and (0.47-1.74%; True beam) for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2). Sc values of 10MV-FFF photon beams are lesser (0.61-2.19%; True beam) than that of the 10MV-FB photons beams for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2). The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams and irrespective of head design of the different linear accelerators. The presence of field shaping device influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effect reveals that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FB or FFF photon beams and different linear accelerators, and it is less significant in FFF beams. Sc values of 6MV-FB square field were in good agreement with that of AAPM, TG-74 published data for Varian (Clinac iX, 2300CD) accelerator. Our results confirm that the removal of flattening filter decreases in the head scatter factor compared to flattened beam. This could reduce the out-of-field dose in advanced treatment delivery techniques.

  9. Sensitivity of alanine dosimeters with gadolinium exposed to 6 MV photons at clinical doses.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Longo, A; Spanò, M; Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Brai, M

    2011-12-01

    In this study we analyzed the ESR signal of alanine dosimeters with gadolinium exposed to 6 MV linear accelerator photons. We observed that the addition of gadolinium brings about an improvement in the sensitivity to photons because of its high atomic number. The experimental data indicated that the addition of gadolinium increases the sensitivity of the alanine to 6 MV photons. This enhancement was better observed at high gadolinium concentrations for which the tissue equivalence is heavily reduced. However, information about the irradiation setup and of the radiation beam features allows one to correct for this difference. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to obtain information on the expected effect of the addition of gadolinium on the dose absorbed by the alanine molecules inside the pellets. These results are compared with the experimental values, and the agreement is discussed.

  10. SU-E-T-611: Photon and Neutron Peripheral Dose Ratio for Low (6 MV) and High (15 MV) Energy for Treatment Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Irazola, L; Sanchez-Doblado, F; Terron, J; Ortiz-Seidel, M; Sanchez-Nieto, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Differences between radiotherapy techniques and energies, can offer improvements in tumor coverage and organs at risk preservation. However, a more complete decision should include peripheral doses delivered to the patient. The purpose of this work is the balance of photon and neutron peripheral doses for a prostate case solved with 6 different treatment modalities. Methods: Inverse and Forward IMRT and 3D-CRT in 6 and 15 MV for a Siemens Primus linac, using the same CT data set and contours. The methodology described in [1], was used with the TNRD thermal neutron detector [2] for neutron peripheral dose estimation at 7 relevant organs (colon, esophagus, stomach, liver, lung, thyroid and skin). Photon doses were estimated for these organs by terms of the algorithm proposed in [3]. Plans were optimized with the same restrictions and limited to 30 segments in the Inverse case. Results: A similar photon peripheral dose was found comparing 6 and 15 MV cases with slightly higher values of (1.9 ± 1.6) % in mean, for the 6 MV cases. Neutron presence when using 15 MV, represents an increase in peripheral dose of (18 ± 17) % in average. Due to the higher number of MU used in Inverse IMRT, an increasing of (22 ± 3) % in neutron dose is found related to Forward and 3D-CRT plans. This corresponds to photon doses within 44 and 255 mSv along the organs, for a dose prescription of 68 Gy at the isocenter. Conclusion: Neutron and photon peripheral doses for a prostate treatment planified in 6 different techniques have been analyzed. 6 MV plans are slightly more demanding in terms of photon peripheral doses. Inverse technique in 15 MV has Result to be the most demanding one in terms of total peripheral doses, including neutrons and photons.

  11. Definitive radiotherapy for early stage glottic cancer by 6 MV photons.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chi-Chung; Au, Kwok-Hung; Ngan, Roger Kai-Cheong; Cheung, Foon-Yiu; Chow, Sin-Ming; Fu, Yiu-Tung; Au, Joseph Siu-Kei; Law, Stephen Chun-Key

    2012-05-18

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of early glottic cancer (GC) treated by primary radiotherapy (RT) with 6 MV photons. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 695 consecutive patients with T1N0 and T2N0 GC treated between 1983 and 2005 by RT in our institution. Clinical outcome in terms of local control (LC), overall survival (OS) and cause- specific survival (CSS) rate were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 10.5 years. The 10-year actuarial LC rates were as follows: T1A, 91%; T1B, 87%; T2, 77%. The 10-year OS were as follows: T1, 74.2%; T2, 70.7%. The 10-year CSS were as follows: T1, 97.7%; T2, 97.1%.Poorly differentiated histology and tumor biologically effective dose<65 Gy15 were adverse factors in both LC of T1 and T2 disease. Involvement of anterior commissure was an adverse factor in both LC and CSS of T1 disease. Subglottic extension was associated with poor LC in T2 disease whereas hemoglobin <13.0 was associated with poor LC and CSS of T2 disease. Primary RT remains an option among the various standard treatments for early GC. Clinical treatment outcome by 6MV photons is similar and comparable to historic data of Cobalt-60 and 2 MV photons.

  12. Modelling 6 MV photon beams of a stereotactic radiosurgery system for Monte Carlo treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jun; Guerrero, Thomas; Ma, C.-M.; Nath, Ravinder

    2004-05-01

    The goal of this work is to build a multiple source model to represent the 6 MV photon beams from a Cyberknife stereotactic radiosurgery system for Monte Carlo treatment planning dose calculations. To achieve this goal, the 6 MV photon beams have been characterized and modelled using the EGS4/BEAM Monte Carlo system. A dual source model has been used to reconstruct the particle phase space at a plane immediately above the secondary collimator. The proposed model consists of two circular planar sources for the primary photons and the scattered photons, respectively. The dose contribution of the contaminant electrons was found to be in the order of 10-3 of the total maximum dose and therefore has been omitted in the source model. Various comparisons have been made to verify the dual source model against the full phase space simulated using the EGS4/BEAM system. The agreement in percent depth dose (PDD) curves and dose profiles between the phase space and the source model was generally within 2%/1 mm for various collimators (5 to 60 mm in diameter) at 80 to 100 cm source-to-surface distances (SSD). Excellent agreement (within 1%/1 mm) was also found between the dose distributions in heterogeneous lung and bone geometry calculated using the original phase space and those calculated using the source model. These results demonstrated the accuracy of the dual source model for Monte Carlo treatment planning dose calculations for the Cyberknife system.

  13. Characterization of Al2O3 optically stimulated luminescence films for 2D dosimetry using a 6 MV photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. F.; Shrestha, N.; Schnell, E.; Ahmad, S.; Akselrod, M. S.; Yukihara, E. G.

    2016-11-01

    This work evaluates the dosimetric properties of newly developed optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) films, fabricated with either Al2O3:C or Al2O3:C,Mg, using a prototype laser scanning reader, a developed image reconstruction algorithm, and a 6 MV therapeutic photon beam. Packages containing OSL films (Al2O3:C and Al2O3:C,Mg) and a radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT3) were irradiated using a 6 MV photon beam using different doses, field sizes, with and without wedge filter. Dependence on film orientation of the OSL system was also tested. Diode-array (MapCHECK) and ionization chamber measurements were performed for comparison. The OSLD film doses agreed with the MapCHECK and ionization chamber data within the experimental uncertainties (<2% at 1.5 Gy). The system background and minimum detectable dose (MDD) were  <0.5 mGy, and the dose response was approximately linear from the MDD up to a few grays (the linearity correction was  <10% up to ~2-4 Gy), with no saturation up to 30 Gy. The dose profiles agreed with those obtained using EBT3 films (analyzed using the triple channel method) in the high dose regions of the images. In the low dose regions, the dose profiles from the OSLD films were more reproducible than those from the EBT3 films. We also demonstrated that the OSL film data are independent on scan orientation and field size over the investigated range. The results demonstrate the potential of OSLD films for 2D dosimetry, particularly for the characterization of small fields, due to their wide dynamic range, linear response, resolution and dosimetric properties. The negligible background and potential simple calibration make these OSLD films suitable for remote audits. The characterization presented here may motivate further commercial development of a 2D dosimetry system based on the OSL from Al2O3:C or Al2O3:C,Mg.

  14. Wedge factor dependence with depth, field size, and nominal distance--a general computational rule.

    PubMed

    Popescu, A; Lai, K; Singer, K; Phillips, M

    1999-04-01

    We have investigated the dependence of the wedge factors with field size, depth, nominal, and extended distances for 4, 6, 18, and 24 MV photon beams. Analysis of the experimental data suggests a general linear dependence of the wedge factors with field size and depth. The study shows that changes in wedge factors are insignificant (< or = +/-1.0%) with respect to measurements at nominal SSD, SAD, or extended SSD. This independence of the wedge factors on source-to-surface distance was studied for different photon energies (4-24 MV) and for different attenuating wedges (external and internal wedges). For clinical applications, an algorithm is presented to calculate the wedge factor dependence with field size and depth. The new algorithm has been successfully implemented to replace wedge look-up tables for dose and MU calculations in PRISM 1.2 treatment planning system used in our department.

  15. Characteristics of the photon beam from a new 25-MV linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, J.E.; Andrew, J.W.; Michaels, H.B.; O'Brien, P.F.

    1985-09-01

    The Therac 25 is a relatively compact therapy machine, the heart of which is a double-pass electron linear accelerator. The electron beam is injected into the accelerator at the treatment head end of the machine and is accelerated back down the arm to an energy of 13 MeV. At this end of the machine a magnet system reflects the beam back into the structure where it gains up to an additional 12 MeV of energy. After leaving the linear accelerator the beam is bent by an achromatic head magnet through 270 degrees to the treatment head. The machine produces eight electron beams and a 25-MV photon beam. In this work only the parameters of the photon beam are addressed based on measurements at the first two clinical sites. Percentage depth doses, tissue phantom ratios, and beam symmetry and stability are presented and discussed.

  16. Characteristics of the photon beam from a new 25-MV linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, J E; Andrew, J W; Michaels, H B; O'Brien, P F

    1985-01-01

    The Therac 25 is a relatively compact therapy machine, the heart of which is a double-pass electron linear accelerator. The electron beam is injected into the accelerator at the treatment head end of the machine and is accelerated back down the arm to an energy of 13 MeV. At this end of the machine a magnet system reflects the beam back into the structure where it gains up to an additional 12 MeV of energy. After leaving the linear accelerator the beam is bent by an achromatic head magnet through 270 degrees to the treatment head. The machine produces eight electron beams and a 25-MV photon beam. In this work only the parameters of the photon beam are addressed based on measurements at the first two clinical sites. Percentage depth doses, tissue phantom ratios, and beam symmetry and stability are presented and discussed.

  17. Comparative /sup 60/Co total body irradiation and 25 MV total body irradiation dosimetry. [/sup 60/Co and 25 mv photons

    SciTech Connect

    Glasgow, G.P.; Mill, W.B.; Phillips, G.L. II.; Herzig, G.P.

    1980-09-01

    Adults with acute leukemia and malignant lymphoma in relapse after conventional therapy are treated with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI) followed by autologous bone marrow transplants. Phantom dosimetry and dosimetry on patients treated reveals that doses are delivered within 5% accuracy. Patient tolerance of treatment, and some biological considerations of low dose rate therapy are reviewed. Certain dosimetry features of an alternate treatment at 370 cm SAD, using 25 MV photons are also presented.

  18. Beam Characterization of 10-MV Photon Beam from Medical Linear Accelerator without Flattening Filter.

    PubMed

    Shimozato, Tomohiro; Aoyama, Yuichi; Matsunaga, Takuma; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    This work investigated the dosimetric properties of a 10-MV photon beam emitted from a medical linear accelerator (linac) with no flattening filter (FF). The aim of this study is to analyze the radiation fluence and energy emitted from the flattening filter free (FFF) linac using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The FFF linac was created by removing the FF from a linac in clinical use. Measurements of the depth dose (DD) and the off-axis profile were performed using a three-dimensional water phantom with an ionization chamber. A MC simulation for a 10-MV photon beam from this FFF linac was performed using the BEAMnrc code. The off-axis profiles for the FFF linac exhibited a chevron-like distribution, and the dose outside the irradiation field was found to be lower for the FFF linac than for a linac with an FF (FF linac). The DD curves for the FFF linac included many contaminant electrons in the build-up region. Therefore, for clinical use, a metal filter is additionally required to reduce the effects of the electron contamination. The mean energy of the FFF linac was found to be lower than that of the FF linac owing to the absence of beam hardening caused by the FF.

  19. Beam Characterization of 10-MV Photon Beam from Medical Linear Accelerator without Flattening Filter

    PubMed Central

    Shimozato, Tomohiro; Aoyama, Yuichi; Matsunaga, Takuma; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This work investigated the dosimetric properties of a 10-MV photon beam emitted from a medical linear accelerator (linac) with no flattening filter (FF). The aim of this study is to analyze the radiation fluence and energy emitted from the flattening filter free (FFF) linac using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Materials and Methods: The FFF linac was created by removing the FF from a linac in clinical use. Measurements of the depth dose (DD) and the off-axis profile were performed using a three-dimensional water phantom with an ionization chamber. A MC simulation for a 10-MV photon beam from this FFF linac was performed using the BEAMnrc code. Results: The off-axis profiles for the FFF linac exhibited a chevron-like distribution, and the dose outside the irradiation field was found to be lower for the FFF linac than for a linac with an FF (FF linac). The DD curves for the FFF linac included many contaminant electrons in the build-up region. Conclusion: Therefore, for clinical use, a metal filter is additionally required to reduce the effects of the electron contamination. The mean energy of the FFF linac was found to be lower than that of the FF linac owing to the absence of beam hardening caused by the FF. PMID:28706351

  20. Neutron contamination of Varian Clinac iX 10 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, S.; Tursinah, R.; Rhani, M. F.; Soh, R. C. X.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.

    2016-03-01

    High energy medical accelerators are commonly used in radiotherapy to increase the effectiveness of treatments. As we know neutrons can be emitted from a medical accelerator if there is an incident of X-ray that hits any of its materials. This issue becomes a point of view of many researchers. The neutron contamination has caused many problems such as image resolution and radiation protection for patients and radio oncologists. This study concerns the simulation of neutron contamination emitted from Varian Clinac iX 10 MV using Monte Carlo code system. As neutron production process is very complex, Monte Carlo simulation with MCNPX code system was carried out to study this contamination. The design of this medical accelerator was modelled based on the actual materials and geometry. The maximum energy of photons and neutron in the scoring plane was 10.5 and 2.239 MeV, respectively. The number and energy of the particles produced depend on the depth and distance from beam axis. From these results, it is pointed out that the neutron produced by linac 10 MV photon beam in a typical treatment is not negligible.

  1. Skin dose estimation for various beam modifiers and source-to-surface distances for 6MV photons

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Girigesh; Yadav, R. S.; Kumar, Alok

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn the skin dose estimation for various beam modifiers at various source-to-surface distances (SSDs) for a 6 MV photon. Surface and buildup region doses were measured with an acrylic slab phantom and Markus 0.055 cc parallel plate (PP) ionization chamber. Measurements were carried out for open fields, motorized wedge fields, acrylic block tray fields ranging from 3 × 3 cm2 to 30 × 30 cm2. Twenty-five percent of the field was blocked with a cerrobend block and a Multileaf collimator (MLC). The effect of the blocks on the skin dose was measured for a 20 × 20 cm2 field size, at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSD. During the use of isocentric treatments, whereby the tumor is positioned at 100 cm from the source, depending on the depth of the tumor and size of the patient, the SSD can vary from 80 cm to 100 cm. To achieve a larger field size, the SSD can also be extended up to 120 cm at times. The skin dose increased as field size increased. The skin dose for the open 10 ×10 cm2 field was 15.5%, 14.8% and 15.5% at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSDs, respectively. The skin dose due to a motorized 60° wedge for the 10 × 10 cm2 field was 9.9%, 9.5%, and 9.5% at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSDs. The skin dose due to acrylic block tray, of thickness 1.0 cm for a 10 × 10 cm2 field was 27.0%, 17.2% and 16.1% at 80, 100 and 120 cm SSD respectively. Due to the use of an acrylic block tray, the surface dose was increased for all field sizes at the above three SSDs and the percentage skin dose was more dominant at the lower SSD and larger field size. The skin dose for a 30 × 30 cm2 field size at 80 cm SSD was 38.3% and it was 70.4% for the open and acrylic block tray fields, respectively. The skin doses for motorized wedge fields were lower than for open fields. The effect of SSDs on the surface dose for motorized 60° wedge fields was not significant for a small field size (difference was less than 1% up to a 15 × 15 cm2 field size), but for a

  2. SU-E-T-308: Dosimetric Comparison of SBRT VMAT Treatment Plans Generated for 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, and 10 MV FFF Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D; Wang, B; Dunlap, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess differences in treatment plan quality between VMAT stereotactic body plans generated using the 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, and 10 MV FFF modalities available in our clinic. Plans for lung, spine, and other sites were compared to see if there is any advantage of one modality over the other. Methods: Treatment plans done for actual SBRT patients were selected. Groups of ten lung plans, five spine plans, and five plans from other sites were selected. New treatment plans were generated for each plan using the Varian Eclipse AAA algorithm. The constraints were kept the same as used in the actual plans, but the same version of software was used to generate plans for the three modalities. In addition, because there are natural variations in plans re-done with the same dose constraints, one of the lung plans was repeated ten times to assess those differences. Volumes of the 100%, 90%, 50%, 20% and 10% isodose surfaces were compared. Maximum dose two centimeters from the PTV were compared, as well as the volume of the 105% isodose surface outside of the PTV. In addition, the 20 Gray lung volume was compared for the lung plans. The values of these parameters were divided by the values for the 6 MV plans for comparison. Average and standard deviations were obtained for quantities in each group. The Student t test was done to determine if differences were seen at the 95% confidence level. Results: Comparison of the treatment plans showed no significant differences when assessing these volumes and doses. There were not any trends seen when comparing modalities as a function of PTV volume either. Conclusion: There is no obvious dosimetric advantage in selection of one modality over another for these types of SBRT plans.

  3. Study on the measurement of photo-neutron for15 MV photon beam from medical linear accelerator under different irradiation geometries using passive detectors.

    PubMed

    Thekkedath, Siji Cyriac; Raman, R Ganapathi; Musthafa, M M; Bakshi, A K; Pal, Rupali; Dawn, Sandipan; Kummali, Abdul Haneefa; Huilgol, Nagraj G; Selvam, T Palani; Datta, D

    2016-01-01

    The photo-neutron dose equivalents of 15 MV Elekta precise accelerators were measured for different depths in phantom, for various field sizes, at different distances from the isocenter in the patient plane and for various wedged fields. Fast and thermal neutrons are measured using passive detectors such as Columbia Resin-39 and pair of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) 600 and TLD 700 detector from Elekta medical linear accelerator. It is found that fast photo-neutron dose rate decreases as the depth increases, with a maximum of 0.57 ± 0.08 mSv/Gy photon dose at surface and minimum of 0.09 ± 0.02 mSv/Gy photon dose at 15 cm depth of water equivalent phantom with 10 cm backscatter. Photo neutrons decreases from 1.28 ± 0.03 mSv/Gy to 0.063 ± 0.032 when measured at isocenter and at 100 cm far from the field edge along the longitudinal direction in the patient plane. Fast and thermal neutron doses increases from 0.65 ± 0.05 mSv/Gy to 1.08 ± 0.07 mSv/Gy as the field size increases; from 5 cm × 5 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm for fast neutrons. With increase in wedge field angle from 0° to 60°, it is observed that the fast neutron dose increases from 0.42 ± 0.03 mSv/Gy to 0.95 ± 0.05 mSv/Gy.s Measurements indicate the photo-neutrons at few field sizes are slightly higher than the International Electrotechnical Commission standard specifications. Photo-neutrons from Omni wedged fields are studied in details. These studies of the photo-neutron energy response will enlighten the neutron dose to radiation therapy patients and are expected to further improve radiation protection guidelines.

  4. Absorbed dose beam quality correction factors kappaQ for the NE2571 chamber in a 5 MV and a 10 MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Palmans, H; Mondelaers, W; Thierens, H

    1999-03-01

    Dose to water (Dw) determination in clinical high-energy photon beams with ionization chambers calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water has been proposed as an alternative to ionization chamber dosimetry based on air kerma calibrations. Dw in the clinical beam is derived using a kappaQ factor that scales the absorbed dose calibration factor in the reference beam to the absorbed dose calibration factor in the user beam. In the present study kappaQ values were determined for the NE2571 chamber in a 5 MV and a 10 MV high-energy photon beam generated at the 15 MeV high-intensity electron linac of the University of Gent. A set of three NE2571 chambers was calibrated relative to the Gent sealed water calorimeter both in 60Co and in the linac beam at a depth of 5 cm and a source to detector distance of 100 cm. Two high-purity chemical water systems were used in the detection vessel of the calorimeter, H2-saturated and Ar-saturated pure water, which are both supposed to give a zero heat defect. TPR20(10) and %dd(10) have been evaluated as beam quality specifiers. Simulations using the BEAM/DOSXYZ Monte Carlo system were performed to evaluate potential corrections on the measured beam qualities. The average kappaQ values measured for the three NE2571 chambers in the 5 MV and 10 MV photon beams are 0.995 +/- 0.005 and 0.979 +/- 0.005 respectively. For the three chambers used, the maximum deviation of individual kappaQ values is 0.2%. The measured beam quality specifiers %dd(10) and TPR20(10) are 67.0 and 0.705 for the 5 MV beam and 75.0 and 0.759 for the 10 MV beam. Although our beam design is very different from those used by other investigators for the measurement of kappaQ values, the agreement with their results is satisfactory showing a slightly better agreement when %dd(10) is used as the beam quality specifier.

  5. Dosimetric properties of a flattening filter-free 6-MV photon beam: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Mesbahi, Asghar; Mehnati, Parinaz; Keshtkar, Ahmad; Farajollahi, Alireza

    2007-08-01

    The dosimetric features of an unflattened 6-MV photon beam of an Elekta SL-25 linac was calculated by the Monte Carlo (MC) method. The head of the Elekta SL-25 linac was simulated using the MCNP4C MC code. The accuracy of the model was evaluated using measured dosimetric features, including depth dose values and dose profiles in a water phantom. The flattening filter was then removed, and beam dosimetric properties were calculated by the MC method and compared with those of the flattened photon beam. Our results showed a significant (twofold) increase in the dose rate for all field sizes. Also, the photon beam spectra for an unflattened beam were softer, which led to a steeper reduction in depth doses. The decrease in the out-of-field dose and increase in the contamination electrons and a buildup region dose were the other consequences of removing the flattening filter. Our study revealed that, for recent radiotherapy techniques, the use of multileaf collimators for beam shaping removing the flattening filter could offer some advantages, including an increased dose rate and decreased out-of-field dose.

  6. Wedge and strip image readout systems for photon-counting detectors in space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Bixler, J.; Chakrabarti, S.; Vallerga, J.

    1986-01-01

    EUV and far UV applications of wedge and strip anodes in photon-counting microchannel plate detector systems are discussed in light of performance data obtained as a result of EUV Explorer spacecraft open face detector and FAUST-Spacelab far UV sealed tube sensor calibrations. CsI quantum detection efficiencies of about 80 percent at 114 A and about 40 percent at 600 and 1300 A have been achieved; a position sensitivity of less than 10 microns is demonstrated, and the position resolution, image linearity, background rate, and flat-field characteristics are discussed.

  7. Characteristics of an 18 MV photon beam from a Therac 20 Medical Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, M.S.; Shragge, P.C.

    1981-05-01

    The 18 MV photon beam characteristics of a Therac 20 Medical Linear Accelerator manufactured by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd, are presented. Tissue phantom ratios (TPR's) and percent depth dose data are given; for a 10 x 10 cm field, the percent depth dose at a depth of 10 cm is 78.5 (SSD 100 cm). The relative dose factors (RDF'S) are given and are analyzed to elucidate the relative contributions from phantom scatter, collimator scatter, and backscatter from the top of the collimators into the monitor chambers. The effect of field size and depth on the penumbra is described. Crossplots of the beam at a depth of 5 cm indicate that the flattening filter could be improved; there are hot spots of 108% near the corners of 40 x 40 fields.

  8. Characteristics of an 18 MV photon beam from a Therac 20 Medical Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M S; Shragge, P C

    1981-01-01

    The 18 MV photon beam characteristics of a Therac 20 Medical Linear Accelerator manufactured by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd, are presented. Tissue phantom ratios (TRP's) and percent depth dose data are given; for a 10 x 10 cm field, the percent depth dose at a depth of 10 cm is 78.5 (SSD 100 cm). The relative dose factors (RDF'S) are given and are analyzed to elucidate the relative contributions from phantom scatter, collimator scatter, and backscatter from the top of the collimators into the monitor chambers. The effect of field size and depth on the penumbra is described. Crossplots of the beam at a depth of 5 cm indicate that the flattening filter could be improved; there are hot spots of 108% near the corners of 40 x 40 fields.

  9. Variations in photon energy spectra of a 6 MV beam and their impact on TLD response

    PubMed Central

    Scarboro, Sarah B.; Followill, David S.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Measurement of the absorbed dose from radiotherapy beams is an essential component of providing safe and reproducible treatment. For an energy-dependent dosimeter such as thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), it is generally assumed that the energy spectrum is constant throughout the treatment field and is unperturbed by field size, depth, field modulation, or heterogeneities. However, this does not reflect reality and introduces error into clinical dose measurements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in the energy spectrum of a Varian 6 MV beam and to evaluate the impact of these variations in photon energy spectra on the response of a common energy-dependent dosimeter, TLD. Methods: Using Monte Carlo methods, we calculated variations in the photon energy spectra of a 6 MV beam as a result of variations of treatment parameters, including field size, measurement location, the presence of heterogeneities, and field modulation. The impact of these spectral variations on the response of the TLD is largely based on increased photoelectric effect in the dosimeter, and this impact was calculated using Burlin cavity theory. Measurements of the energy response were also made to determine the additional energy response due to all intrinsic and secondary effects. Results: For most in-field measurements, regardless of treatment parameter, the dosimeter response was not significantly affected by the spectral variations (<1% effect). For measurement points outside of the treatment field, where the spectrum is softer, the TLD over-responded by up to 12% due to an increased probability of photoelectric effect in the TLD material as well as inherent ionization density effects that play a role at low photon energies. Conclusions: It is generally acceptable to ignore the impact of variations in the photon spectrum on the measured dose for locations within the treatment field. However, outside the treatment field, the spectra are much softer, and a

  10. Portal dosimetry in wedged beams.

    PubMed

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Rozendaal, Roel; Camargo, Priscilla; Mans, Anton; Wendling, Markus; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Van Herk, Marcel; Mijnheer, Ben

    2015-05-08

    Portal dosimetry using electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is often applied to verify high-energy photon beam treatments. Due to the change in photon energy spectrum, the resulting dose values are, however, not very accurate in the case of wedged beams if the pixel-to-dose conversion for the situation without wedge is used. A possible solution would be to consider a wedged beam as another photon beam quality requiring separate beam modeling of the dose calculation algorithm. The aim of this study was to investigate a more practical solution: to make aSi EPID-based dosimetry models also applicable for wedged beams without an extra commissioning effort of the parameters of the model. For this purpose two energy-dependent wedge multiplication factors have been introduced to be applied for portal images taken with and without a patient/phantom in the beam. These wedge multiplication factors were derived from EPID and ionization chamber measurements at the EPID level for wedged and nonwedged beams, both with and without a polystyrene slab phantom in the beam. This method was verified for an EPID dosimetry model used for wedged beams at three photon beam energies (6, 10, and 18 MV) by comparing dose values reconstructed in a phantom with data provided by a treatment planning system (TPS), as a function of field size, depth, and off-axis distance. Generally good agreement, within 2%, was observed for depths between dose maximum and 15 cm. Applying the new model to EPID dose measurements performed during ten breast cancer patient treatments with wedged 6 MV photon beams showed that the average isocenter underdosage of 5.3% was reduced to 0.4%. Gamma-evaluation (global 3%/3 mm) of these in vivo data showed an increase in percentage of points with γ ≤ 1 from 60.2% to 87.4%, while γmean reduced from 1.01 to 0.55. It can be concluded that, for wedged beams, the multiplication of EPID pixel values with an energy-dependent correction factor provides good agreement

  11. Beam quality conversion factors for parallel-plate ionization chambers in MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the behavior of plane-parallel ion chambers in high-energy photon beams through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Ten plane-parallel ion chamber types were obtained from the major ion chamber manufacturers. Absorbed dose-to-water calibration coefficients are measured for these chambers and k{sub Q} factors are determined. In the process, the behaviors of the chambers are characterized through measurements of leakage currents, chamber settling in cobalt-60, polarity and ion recombination behavior, and long-term stability. Monte Carlo calculations of the absorbed dose to the air in the ion chamber and absorbed dose to water are obtained to calculate k{sub Q} factors. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors are investigated by varying material properties and chamber dimensions. Results: Chamber behavior was variable in MV photon beams, especially with regard to chamber leakage and ion recombination. The plane-parallel chambers did not perform as well as cylindrical chambers. Significant differences up to 1.5% were observed in calibration coefficients after a period of eight months although k{sub Q} factors were consistent on average within 0.17%. Chamber-to-chamber variations in k{sub Q} factors for chambers of the same type were at the 0.2% level. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors ranged between 0.34% and 0.50% depending on the chamber type. Average percent differences between measured and calculated k{sub Q} factors were - 0.02%, 0.18%, and - 0.16% for 6, 10, and 25 MV beams, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent agreement is observed on average at the 0.2% level between measured and Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors. Measurements indicate that the behavior of these chambers is not adequate for their use for reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams without a more extensive QA program than currently used for cylindrical reference-class ion chambers.

  12. Beam quality conversion factors for parallel-plate ionization chambers in MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R; Rogers, D W O

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the behavior of plane-parallel ion chambers in high-energy photon beams through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Ten plane-parallel ion chamber types were obtained from the major ion chamber manufacturers. Absorbed dose-to-water calibration coefficients are measured for these chambers and k(Q) factors are determined. In the process, the behaviors of the chambers are characterized through measurements of leakage currents, chamber settling in cobalt-60, polarity and ion recombination behavior, and long-term stability. Monte Carlo calculations of the absorbed dose to the air in the ion chamber and absorbed dose to water are obtained to calculate k(Q) factors. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k(Q) factors are investigated by varying material properties and chamber dimensions. Chamber behavior was variable in MV photon beams, especially with regard to chamber leakage and ion recombination. The plane-parallel chambers did not perform as well as cylindrical chambers. Significant differences up to 1.5% were observed in calibration coefficients after a period of eight months although k(Q) factors were consistent on average within 0.17%. Chamber-to-chamber variations in k(Q) factors for chambers of the same type were at the 0.2% level. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k(Q) factors ranged between 0.34% and 0.50% depending on the chamber type. Average percent differences between measured and calculated k(Q) factors were - 0.02%, 0.18%, and - 0.16% for 6, 10, and 25 MV beams, respectively. Excellent agreement is observed on average at the 0.2% level between measured and Monte Carlo calculated k(Q) factors. Measurements indicate that the behavior of these chambers is not adequate for their use for reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams without a more extensive QA program than currently used for cylindrical reference-class ion chambers.

  13. Radiation dosimetry of 12 MV photons from a CGR Therac 20 MeV Saturne linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Nair, R P

    1984-10-01

    Typically useful clinical radiation dosimetry characteristics of 12 MV photon beams from a CGR Therac 20 MeV Saturne linear accelerator are briefly outlined. Central axis percent depth dose data are compared with other published data. Beam profiles for small, medium and large fields are delineated to show the uniformity of beams at various depths.

  14. Simulation of a 6 MV Elekta Precise Linac photon beam using GATE/GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevillot, L.; Frisson, T.; Maneval, D.; Zahra, N.; Badel, J.-N.; Sarrut, D.

    2011-02-01

    The GEANT4-based GATE Monte Carlo (MC) platform was initially focused on PET and SPECT simulations. The new release v6.0 (February 2010) proposes new tools dedicated for radiation therapy simulations. In this work, we investigated some part of this extension and proposed a general methodology for Linac simulations. Details of the modeling of a 6 MV photon beam delivered by an Elekta Precise Linac, with radiation fields ranging from 5 × 5 to 30 × 30 cm2 at the isocenter are presented. Comparisons were performed with measurements in water. The simulations were performed in two stages: first, the patient-independent part was simulated and a phase space (PhS) was built above the secondary collimator. Then, a multiple source model (MSM) derived from the PhS was proposed to simulate the photon fluence interacting with the patient-dependent part. The selective bremsstrahlung splitting (SBS) variance reduction technique proposed in GATE was used in order to speed up the accelerator head simulation. Further investigations showed that the SBS can be safely used without biasing the simulations. Additional comparisons with full simulations performed on the EGEE grid, in a single stage from the electron source to the water phantom, allowed the evaluation of the MSM. The proposed MSM allowed for calculating depth dose and transverse profiles in 48 hours on a single 2.8 GHz CPU, with a statistical uncertainty of 0.8% for a 10 × 10 cm2 radiation field, using voxels of 5 × 5 × 5 mm3. Good agreement between simulations and measurements in water was observed, with dose differences of about 1% and 2% for depth doses and dose profiles, respectively. Additional gamma index comparisons were performed; more than 90% of the points for all simulations passed the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. To our knowledge, this feasibility study is the first one illustrating the potential of GATE for external radiotherapy applications.

  15. Simulation of a 6 MV Elekta Precise Linac photon beam using GATE/GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Grevillot, L; Frisson, T; Maneval, D; Zahra, N; Badel, J-N; Sarrut, D

    2011-02-21

    The GEANT4-based GATE Monte Carlo (MC) platform was initially focused on PET and SPECT simulations. The new release v6.0 (February 2010) proposes new tools dedicated for radiation therapy simulations. In this work, we investigated some part of this extension and proposed a general methodology for Linac simulations. Details of the modeling of a 6 MV photon beam delivered by an Elekta Precise Linac, with radiation fields ranging from 5 × 5 to 30 × 30 cm(2) at the isocenter are presented. Comparisons were performed with measurements in water. The simulations were performed in two stages: first, the patient-independent part was simulated and a phase space (PhS) was built above the secondary collimator. Then, a multiple source model (MSM) derived from the PhS was proposed to simulate the photon fluence interacting with the patient-dependent part. The selective bremsstrahlung splitting (SBS) variance reduction technique proposed in GATE was used in order to speed up the accelerator head simulation. Further investigations showed that the SBS can be safely used without biasing the simulations. Additional comparisons with full simulations performed on the EGEE grid, in a single stage from the electron source to the water phantom, allowed the evaluation of the MSM. The proposed MSM allowed for calculating depth dose and transverse profiles in 48 hours on a single 2.8 GHz CPU, with a statistical uncertainty of 0.8% for a 10 × 10 cm(2) radiation field, using voxels of 5 × 5 × 5 mm(3). Good agreement between simulations and measurements in water was observed, with dose differences of about 1% and 2% for depth doses and dose profiles, respectively. Additional gamma index comparisons were performed; more than 90% of the points for all simulations passed the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. To our knowledge, this feasibility study is the first one illustrating the potential of GATE for external radiotherapy applications.

  16. Monte Carlo study of conversion factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in solid slab phantoms for MV photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dong-wook; Lee, Jai-ki

    2016-08-01

    For high energy photon beams, solid phantom to water dose conversion factors were calculated by using a Monte Carlo method, and the result were compared with measurements and published data. Based on the absorbed dose to water dosimetry protocol, the conversion factor was theoretically divided into stopping powers ratios, perturbation factors and ratios of absorbed dose to water and that to solid phantom. Data for a Farmer-type chamber and a solid phantom based on polystyrene which is one of the most common material were applied to calculate the conversion factors for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. All measurements were conducted after 10 Gy pre-irradiation and thermal equilibrium had been established with solid slabs in a treatment room. The calculated and the measured conversion factors were in good agreement and could be used to confirm the feasibility of the solid phantom as a substitute for water for high energy photon beam.

  17. Analyzing the characteristics of 6 MV photon beam at low monitor unit settings

    PubMed Central

    Nithya, L.; Raj, N. Arunai Nambi; Rathinamuthu, Sasikumar

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the characteristics of a low monitor unit (MU) setting is essential, particularly for intensity-modulated techniques. Intensity modulation can be achieved through intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). There is possibility for low MUs in the segments of IMRT and VMAT plans. The minimum MU/segment must be set by the physicist in the treatment planning system at the time of commissioning. In this study, the characteristics such as dose linearity, stability, flatness, and symmetry of 6 MV photon beam of a Synergy linear accelerator at low MU settings were investigated for different dose rates. The measurements were performed for Synergy linear accelerator using a slab phantom with a FC65-G chamber and Profiler 2. The MU linearity was studied for 1–100 MU using a field size of 10 cm ×10 cm. The linearity error for 1 MU was 4.2%. Flatness of the beam was deteriorated in 1 MU condition. The beam stability and symmetry was well within the specification. Using this study, we conclude that the treatment delivered with <3 MU may result in uncertainty in dose delivery. To ensure the correct dose delivery with less uncertainty, it is recommended to use ≥3 MU as the minimum MU per segment in IMRT and VMAT plans. PMID:27051168

  18. Analyzing the characteristics of 6 MV photon beam at low monitor unit settings.

    PubMed

    Nithya, L; Raj, N Arunai Nambi; Rathinamuthu, Sasikumar

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the characteristics of a low monitor unit (MU) setting is essential, particularly for intensity-modulated techniques. Intensity modulation can be achieved through intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). There is possibility for low MUs in the segments of IMRT and VMAT plans. The minimum MU/segment must be set by the physicist in the treatment planning system at the time of commissioning. In this study, the characteristics such as dose linearity, stability, flatness, and symmetry of 6 MV photon beam of a Synergy linear accelerator at low MU settings were investigated for different dose rates. The measurements were performed for Synergy linear accelerator using a slab phantom with a FC65-G chamber and Profiler 2. The MU linearity was studied for 1-100 MU using a field size of 10 cm ×10 cm. The linearity error for 1 MU was 4.2%. Flatness of the beam was deteriorated in 1 MU condition. The beam stability and symmetry was well within the specification. Using this study, we conclude that the treatment delivered with <3 MU may result in uncertainty in dose delivery. To ensure the correct dose delivery with less uncertainty, it is recommended to use ≥3 MU as the minimum MU per segment in IMRT and VMAT plans.

  19. SU-E-T-362: Enhanced Dynamic Wedge Output Factors for Varian 2300CD and the Case for a Reference Database

    SciTech Connect

    Njeh, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose inhomogeneity in treatment planning can be compensated using physical wedges. Enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) were introduced by Varian to overcome some of the short comings of physical wedges. The objectives of this study were to measure EDW output factors for 6 MV and 20 MV photon energies for a Varian 2300CD. Secondly to review the literature in terms of published enhanced dynamic wedge output factors (EDWOF) for different Varian models and thereby adding credence to the case of the validity of reference databases. Methods: The enhanced dynamic wedge output factors were measured for the Varian 2300CD for both 6 MV and 20 MV photon energies. Twelve papers with published EDWOF for different Varian Linac models were found in the literature. Results: The EDWOF for 6 MV varied from 0.980 for a 5×5 cm 10 degree wedge to 0.424 for 20×20 cm 60 degree wedge. Similarly for 20 MV, the EDWOF varied from 0.986 for 5×5 cm 10 degree wedge to 0.529 for 20×20 cm 60 degree wedge. EDWOF are highly dependent on field size. Comparing our results with the published mean, we found an excellent agreement for 6 MV EDWOF with the percentage differences ranging from 0.01% to 0.57% with a mean of 0.03%. The coefficient of variation of published EDWOF ranged from 0.17% to 0.85% and 0.1% to 0.9% for the for 6 MV and 18MV photon energies respectively. This paper provides the first published EDWOF for 20 MV photon energy. In addition, we have provided the first compendium of EDWOFs for different Varian linac models. Conclusion: The consistency of EDWOF across models and institution provide further support that, a standard data set of basic photon and electron dosimetry could be established, as a guide for future commissioning, beam modeling and quality assurance purposes.

  20. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dirgayussa, I Gde Eka Yani, Sitti; Haryanto, Freddy; Rhani, M. Fahdillah

    2015-09-30

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good

  1. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirgayussa, I. Gde Eka; Yani, Sitti; Rhani, M. Fahdillah; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good criteria of dose

  2. Impact of tissue inhomogeneity on dose distribution in the canine carpal and tarsal regions for cobalt and 6 MV photons.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Monique N; Yoshikawa, Hiroto; Sidhu, Narinder

    2009-01-01

    We quantified the effect of tissue inhomogeneity on dose distribution in a canine distal extremity resulting from treatment with cobalt photons and photons from a 6MV accelerator. Monitor units for a typical distal extremity treatment were calculated by two methods, using equally weighted, parallel-opposed fields. The first method was a computed tomography (CT)-based, computerized treatment plan, calculated without inhomogeneity correction. The second method was a manual point dose calculation to the isocenter. A computerized planning system was then used to assess the dose distribution achieved by these two methods when tissue inhomogeneity was taken into account. For cobalt photons, the median percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) that received < 95% of the prescribed dose was 4.5% for the CT-based treatment plan, and 26.2% for the manually calculated plan. For 6 MV photons, the median percentage of the PTV that received < 95% of the prescribed dose was < 1% for both planning methods. The PTV dose achieved without using inhomogeneity correction for cobalt photons results in potentially significant under dosing of portions of the PTV.

  3. Relative biological damage in and out of field of 6, 10 and 18 MV clinical photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzati, A. O.

    2016-08-01

    The lower energy of scattered radiation in and out of a megavoltage (MV) photon beam suggests that relative biological damage (RBD) may change from in- to out-of-field regions for unit absorbed dose. Because of high linear energy transfer (LET) and potential of causing severe damage to the DNA, low-energy (10 eV-1 keV) slowing down electrons should be included in radiation biological damage calculations. In this study RBD was calculated in and out of field of 6, 10 and 18 MV clinical photon beams including low-energy slowing down electrons in the track length estimated method. Electron spectra at energies higher than 2 keV were collected in a water phantom at different depths and off-axis points by using the MCNP code. A new extrapolation method was used to estimate the electron spectra at energies lower than 2 keV. The obtained spectra at energies lower than 2 keV merged with spectra at energies higher than 2 keV by using continuity of the spectra. These spectra were used as an input to a validated microdosimetric Monte Carlo (MC) code, MC damage simulation (MCDS), to calculate the RBD of induced DSB in DNA at points in and out of the primary radiation field under fully aerobic (100% O2 and anoxic (0% O2 conditions. There was an observable difference in the energy spectra for electrons for points in the primary radiation field and those points out of field. RBD had maximum variation, 11% in 6 MV photons at field size of 20×20 cm2. This variation was less than 11% for 10 and 18 MV photons and field sizes smaller than 20×20 cm2. Our simulations also showed that under the anoxic condition, RBD increases up to 6% for 6 and 10 MV photons and the 20×20 cm2 field size. This work supports the hypothesis that in megavoltage treatments out-of-field radiation quality can vary enough to have an impact on RBD per unit dose and that this may play a role as the radiation therapy community explores biological optimization as a tool to assist treatment planning.

  4. The effect of energy spectrum change on DNA damage in and out of field in 10-MV clinical photon beams.

    PubMed

    Ezzati, A O; Xiao, Y; Sohrabpour, M; Studenski, M T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the DNA damage induced in a clinical megavoltage photon beam at various depths in and out of the field. MCNPX was used to simulate 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm(2) 10-MV photon beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Photon and electron spectra were collected in a water phantom at depths of 2.5, 12.5 and 22.5 cm on the central axis and at off-axis points out to 10 cm. These spectra were used as an input to a validated microdosimetric Monte Carlo code, MCDS, to calculate the RBE of induced DSB in DNA at points in and out of the primary radiation field at three depths. There was an observable difference in the energy spectra for photons and electrons for points in the primary radiation field and those points out of field. In the out-of-field region, the mean energy for the photon and electron spectra decreased by a factor of about six and three from the in-field mean energy, respectively. Despite the differences in spectra and mean energy, the change in RBE was <1 % from the in-field region to the out-of-field region at any depth. There was no significant change in RBE regardless of the location in the phantom. Although there are differences in both the photon and electron spectra, these changes do not correlate with a change in RBE in a clinical MV photon beam as the electron spectra are dominated by electrons with energies >20 keV.

  5. Study of the dosimetric properties of an unflattened 6-MV photon beam by using the BEAMnrc code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajaria, Ankit; Sharma, Neeraj; Sharma, Shiru; Pradhan, Satyajit; Mandal, Abhijit; Aggarwal, Lalit. M.

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the basic dosimetric properties of a Flattening-filter-free 6-MV photon beam based on the unique performance model of the Varian Clinic 600 linac operated with and without a flattening filter. Dosimetric features, including the central-axis absorbed dose, the beam profiles and the photon and electron fluences were calculated for the flattened and unflattened cases separately by using Monte Carlo simulations. We observe that the dosimetric field size and penumbra were slightly smaller for the unflattened beam, but the beam's non-flatness is unlikely to present a problem for treatments with small fields. Absolute depth dose calculations showed an increase in the dose rate by a factor of more than 2.4 for the unflattened 6-MV beam which depended on the depth. These results suggest that the removal of the filter could result in higher central-axis dose rates and hence, shorter beam delivery times for treatments. Surface doses were found to be higher for the unflattened beam due to more contamination electrons and low-energy photons being present in the beam. The total scatter factor, SCP, varies less with the field sizes, indicating that removing the filter from the beam line can reduce significantly the amount of head scatter photons and therefore, doses to normal tissues and organs.

  6. Surface dose for five telecobalt machines, 6MV photon beam from four linear accelerators and a Hi-Art Tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the surface dose for five telecobalt machines (four from Best Theratronics Limited, Canada, one from Panacea Medical Technologies, India), 6 MV photon beam (static) from four linear accelerators (three Varian linear accelerators and one Siemens) and Hi-Art Tomotherapy unit. The surface dose was measured with Thermoluminescent dosimeters in phantom slabs. For Tomotherapy 6 MV beam the surface dose was estimated as 32% while it was 35%, 33%, and 36% for Clinac 6EX, Clinac 2100CD, and Clinac 2100C linear accelerators, respectively. Similarly, the surface dose for 6 MV photon beam from Primus linear accelerator was estimated as 35%. Surface doses from telecobalt machines Equinox-80, Elite-80, Th-780C, Th-780, and Bhabhatron-II was found to be 30%, 29.1%, 27.8%, 29.3%, and 29.9% for 10 cm x 10 field size, respectively. Measured surface dose from all four linear accelerators were in good agreement with that of the Tomotherapy. The surface dose measurements were useful for Tomotherapy to predict the superficial dose during helical IMRT treatments.

  7. Synthesis and thermoluminescence properties of SrAl2O4 (EU) phosphor irradiated with cobalt-60, 6 MV and 16 MV photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Pushpraj Kumar; Kurchania, Rajnish

    2015-12-01

    Powder samples of SrAl2O4 (Eu) were synthesized by the combustion method using urea as a fuel. The combustion products were calcined at 700 °C for 1 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the prepared sample exhibit sharp diffraction peaks and absence of any amorphous phase. The average crystalline size was found to be ~33.04 nm, calculated by using Debye Scherer's formula. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images reveal that the crystallites have no uniform shape and the presence of several micro- and nano-particles within the grain. This may be due to the non-uniform distribution of temperature and mass flow in the combustion flame which results in the non-uniform shape of crystallites. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicates that the prepared sample is thermally stable up to 900 °C. Thermoluminescence (TL) behavior of prepared samples was studied after irradiation with Co-60gamma rays, 6 mega voltage (MV) and 16 MV photon beams at various doses. Glow curve of the prepared SrAl2O4 (Eu:1%) sample was similar in shape irrespective of incident energy and radiation type. The dominant peak in each glow curve appeared around at 312 °C. No shifts in peak positions have been observed. All the glow curves of sample doped with Eu(3%) have relatively higher intensity as compared to the sample doped with Eu(1%). Energy dependence has been observed in the present phosphor. This could be because of increase in the probability of Compton's interaction at this energy range due to transmission of primary as well as scattered radiation and decrease in mass attenuation coefficient with the increase in energy. The trapping parameters namely activation energy (E), order of kinetics (b) and frequency factor (s) have been determined using the glow curve shape (Chen's) method. These phosphors could be utilized for display applications, dating, temperature sensor, low as well as high energy radiation detection and dosimetry especially where tissue equivalency is not much

  8. A Measurement and Analysis of Buildup Region Dose for Open Field Photon Beams (Cobalt-60 through 24 MV)

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, Edwin C.

    2015-01-15

    The central axis depth dose in the build-up region (surface to d{sub max}) of single open field photon beams (cobalt-60 through 24 MV) has been measured utilizing parallel plate and extrapolation chamber methodology. These data were used to derive, for a prescription dose of 100 cGy, values of surface dose, the maximum value of dose along the central axis (D{sub max}) and the depth (nearest the surface) at which 90% of the prescription dose occurs (d{sub 90}). For both single and parallel opposed pair (POP) open field configurations, data are presented at field sizes of 5 × 5, 15 × 15 and 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} for prescription depths of 10, 15 and 20 cm (midplane for POP). For the treatment machines, field sizes, and prescription depths studied, it is possible to conclude that: for single open field irradiation, surface dose values (as a percentage of the prescription dose) can be either low (<10%) or comparable to the prescription dose itself; for POP open fields, surface dose values are relatively independent of photon energy and midplane depth, and range between 30% and 70% of prescription dose, being principally dependent on field size; the depth of the initial 90 cGy point for a prescription dose of 100 cGy, d{sub 90}, was larger for POP fields. For either single or POP open field treatments, d{sub 90} was always less than 22 mm, while for 6 MV or less, values of d{sub 90} were less than 4 mm; D{sub max} values can be very large (e.g., above 300 cGy) for certain treatment situations and are reduced significantly for POP treatments; for open field POP treatments, the percent reduction in D{sub max} with each increment in beam energy above 10 MV is reduced over that seen at 10 MV or less and, possibly, this further reduction may be clinically insignificant; for open field POP treatments, changes in surface dose, d{sub 90} and D{sub max} with beam energy above 10 MV do not suggest, with regard to these specific build-up curve parameters, any obvious advantage for

  9. Thermoluminescence responses of the Yb- and Yb-Tb-doped SiO2 optical fibers to 6-MV photons.

    PubMed

    Sahini, M H; Hossain, I; Wagiran, H; Saeed, M A; Ali, H

    2014-09-01

    Characteristics of the thermoluminescence (TL) responses of Yb- and Yb-Tb-doped optical fibers irradiated with 6MV photons are reported. The concentration of Yb in the Yb-doped optical fiber was 0.26mol%; the concentrations of Yb and Tb in the Yb-Tb-doped optical fiber were 0.62 and 0.2mol%, respectively. The TL dose responses are linear in the dose range 0.5-4Gy. The radiation sensitivity of the Yb-Tb material is almost two orders of magnitude higher than the sensitivity of the material doped with Yb alone.

  10. Equivalent square formula for determining the surface dose of rectangular field from 6 MV therapeutic photon beam.

    PubMed

    Apipunyasopon, Lukkana; Srisatit, Somyot; Phaisangittisakul, Nakorn

    2013-09-06

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the use of the equivalent square formula for determining the surface dose from a rectangular photon beam. A 6 MV therapeutic photon beam delivered from a Varian Clinac 23EX medical linear accelerator was modeled using the EGS4nrc Monte Carlo simulation package. It was then used to calculate the dose in the build-up region from both square and rectangular fields. The field patterns were defined by various settings of the X- and Y-collimator jaw ranging from 5 to 20 cm. Dose measurements were performed using a thermoluminescence dosimeter and a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber on the four square fields (5 × 5, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, and 20 × 20 cm2). The surface dose was acquired by extrapolating the build-up doses to the surface. An equivalent square for a rectangular field was determined using the area-to-perimeter formula, and the surface dose of the equivalent square was estimated using the square-field data. The surface dose of square field increased linearly from approximately 10% to 28% as the side of the square field increased from 5 to 20 cm. The influence of collimator exchange on the surface dose was found to be not significant. The difference in the percentage surface dose of the rectangular field compared to that of the relevant equivalent square was insignificant and can be clinically neglected. The use of the area-to-perimeter formula for an equivalent square field can provide a clinically acceptable surface dose estimation for a rectangular field from a 6 MV therapy photon beam.

  11. Microdosimetric study on influence of low energy photons on relative biological effectiveness under therapeutic conditions using 6 MV linac.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kase, Yuki; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Fujita, Yukio; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Itami, Jun

    2011-08-01

    Microdosimetry has been developed for the evaluation of radiation quality, and single-event dose-mean lineal energy y(D) is well-used to represent the radiation quality. In this study, the changes of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values under the therapeutic conditions using a 6 MV linac were investigated with a microdosimetric method. The y(D) values under the various irradiation conditions for x-rays from a 6 MV linac were measured with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) at an extremely low dose rate of a few tens of microGy/min by decreasing the gun grid voltage of the linac. According to the microdosimetric kinetic model (MK model), the RBE(MK) values for cell killing of the human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells can be derived if the y(D) values are obtained from TEPC measurements. The Monte Carlo code GEANT4 was also used to calculate the photon energy distributions and to investigate the changes of the y(D) values under the various conditions. The changes of the y(D) values were less than approximately 10% when the field size and the depth in a phantom varied. However, in the measurements perpendicular to a central beam axis, large changes were observed between the y(D) values inside the field and those outside the field. The maximum increase of approximately 50% in the y(D) value outside the field was obtained compared with those inside the field. The GEANT4 calculations showed that there existed a large relative number of low energy photons outside of the field as compared with inside of the field. The percentages of the photon fluences below 200 keV outside the field were approximately 40% against approximately 8% inside the field. By using the MK model, the field size and the depth dependence of the RBEMK values were less than approximately 2% inside the field. However, the RBEMK values outside the field were 6.6% higher than those inside the field. The increase of the RBE(MK) values by 6.6% outside the field was observed. This

  12. Microdosimetric study on influence of low energy photons on relative biological effectiveness under therapeutic conditions using 6 MV linac

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kase, Yuki; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Fujita, Yukio; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Itami, Jun

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Microdosimetry has been developed for the evaluation of radiation quality, and single-event dose-mean lineal energy y{sub D} is well-used to represent the radiation quality. In this study, the changes of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values under the therapeutic conditions using a 6 MV linac were investigated with a microdosimetric method. Methods: The y{sub D} values under the various irradiation conditions for x-rays from a 6 MV linac were measured with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) at an extremely low dose rate of a few tens of {mu}Gy/min by decreasing the gun grid voltage of the linac. According to the microdosimetric kinetic model (MK model), the RBE{sub MK} values for cell killing of the human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells can be derived if the y{sub D} values are obtained from TEPC measurements. The Monte Carlo code GEANT4 was also used to calculate the photon energy distributions and to investigate the changes of the y{sub D} values under the various conditions. Results: The changes of the y{sub D} values were less than approximately 10% when the field size and the depth in a phantom varied. However, in the measurements perpendicular to a central beam axis, large changes were observed between the y{sub D} values inside the field and those outside the field. The maximum increase of approximately 50% in the y{sub D} value outside the field was obtained compared with those inside the field. The GEANT4 calculations showed that there existed a large relative number of low energy photons outside of the field as compared with inside of the field. The percentages of the photon fluences below 200 keV outside the field were approximately 40% against approximately 8% inside the field. By using the MK model, the field size and the depth dependence of the RBE{sub MK} values were less than approximately 2% inside the field. However, the RBE{sub MK} values outside the field were 6.6% higher than those inside the field

  13. SU-E-T-432: Field Size Influence On the Electron and Photon Spectra Within Small MV Field Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Benmakhlouf, H; Andreo, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of photon field size on the electron and photon fluence spectra in the active volume of small field detectors. Methods: The PENELOPE MC system based usercode PenEasy was used to calculate the material influence on the spectra by scoring the differential fluence in inserts of silicon, carbon, phosphorus and aluminium having 3 mm diameter and height. The spectra were then calculated inside the active volume of eleven detectors (ion chambers and solid-state detectors) whose geometry was simulated with great detail. The inserts/detectors were placed at 10 cm depth in a 30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm water phantom and irradiated with 2.5 MeV photons and Varian Clinac 6 MV beams of small, medium and large size. Results: For all configurations, photon spectra in the scoring volume were similar to that in a small water volume except for additional characteristic x-ray peaks resulting from the material itself and from the materials surrounding the detectors (i.e. high-Z shielding the silicon). Electron fluence calculated in the inserts were up to 60% larger than in water; the difference increased with material density and decreasing field size. MC-calculated doses were compared to analytically determined collision kerma and restricted cema (cut-off=15keV). For the inserts, with large and medium fields K-col agreed with MC-dose, but K-col overestimated the dose for small fields due to lack of lateral CPE. For the detectors, up to 15% differences between K-col and the MC-dose were found. For all configurations the C-delta and MC-dose agreed within ±2%. Conclusion: The most relevant findings were that shielding affects substantially the photon spectra and material conditions the electron spectra, their field size dependence varying with the geometry configuration. These affect the values of factors entering into relative dosimetry.

  14. Comparison of the Effects of High-Energy Photon Beam Irradiation (10 and 18 MV) on 2 Types of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

    SciTech Connect

    Hashii, Haruko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Okawa, Ayako; Shida, Koichi; Isobe, Tomonori; Hanmura, Masahiro; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy for cancer may be required for patients with implantable cardiac devices. However, the influence of secondary neutrons or scattered irradiation from high-energy photons (≥10 MV) on implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) is unclear. This study was performed to examine this issue in 2 ICD models. Methods and Materials: ICDs were positioned around a water phantom under conditions simulating clinical radiation therapy. The ICDs were not irradiated directly. A control ICD was positioned 140 cm from the irradiation isocenter. Fractional irradiation was performed with 18-MV and 10-MV photon beams to give cumulative in-field doses of 600 Gy and 1600 Gy, respectively. Errors were checked after each fraction. Soft errors were defined as severe (change to safety back-up mode), moderate (memory interference, no changes in device parameters), and minor (slight memory change, undetectable by computer). Results: Hard errors were not observed. For the older ICD model, the incidences of severe, moderate, and minor soft errors at 18 MV were 0.75, 0.5, and 0.83/50 Gy at the isocenter. The corresponding data for 10 MV were 0.094, 0.063, and 0 /50 Gy. For the newer ICD model at 18 MV, these data were 0.083, 2.3, and 5.8 /50 Gy. Moderate and minor errors occurred at 18 MV in control ICDs placed 140 cm from the isocenter. The error incidences were 0, 1, and 0 /600 Gy at the isocenter for the newer model, and 0, 1, and 6 /600Gy for the older model. At 10 MV, no errors occurred in control ICDs. Conclusions: ICD errors occurred more frequently at 18 MV irradiation, which suggests that the errors were mainly caused by secondary neutrons. Soft errors of ICDs were observed with high energy photon beams, but most were not critical in the newer model. These errors may occur even when the device is far from the irradiation field.

  15. Determination of small field output factors in 6 and 10 MV flattening filter free photon beams using various detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masanga, W.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Khamfongkhruea, C.; Tannanonta, C.

    2016-03-01

    The study aimed to determine appropriate detectors for output factor measurement of small fields in 6 and 10 MV flattening filter free photon beams using five different detectors. Field sizes were varied between 0.6 × 0.6 and 4.0 × 4.0 cm2. An indirect method (daisy-chaining) was applied to normalize the output factors. For the smallest field size, the variations of output factors compared among the detectors were 13%. Exradin A16 had the lowest output factor and increasing in sequence with CC01, microDiamond, microLion and EDGE detectors, respectively, for both energies. The similarity between CC01 and microDiamond output factor values were within 1.6% and 1% for all field sizes of 6 and 10 MV FFF, respectively. EDGE and microLion presented the highest values while ExradinA16 gave lowest values. In conclusion, IBACC01, Exradin A16, microLion, microDiamond and EDGE detectors seem to be the detectors of choices for small field output factor measurement of FFF beams down to 1.6 × 1.6 cm2. However, we could not guarantee which detector is the most suitable for output factor measurement in small field less than 1.6 × 1.6 cm2 of FFF beams. Further studies are required to provide reference information for validation purposes.

  16. Correction to BrainSCAN central axis dose calculations for 6-MV photon beams to lung with lateral electron disequilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, Peter . E-mail: peter.geyer@mailbox.tu-dresden.de; Blank, Hilbert; Zips, Daniel; Alheit, Horst

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a correction method for lateral electron disequilibrium and tissue inhomogeneities in lung tissues applicable to the BrainSCAN treatment planning system. Methods and Materials: Four noncoplanar 6-MV photon beams with different beam diameters were applied to the right lung of a thorax phantom. The measured/calculated dose value ratio was evaluated as a function of a parameter that describes the degree of the lateral electron disequilibrium based on the primary dose. Results: The dose ratio showed a clearcut linear dependency on the disequilibrium parameter. Applying the proposed correction method, only minor differences between the measured and calculated doses were found for lesions >1 cm. However, for lesions <1 cm surrounded by lung tissue the difference was {<=}15%. Conclusion: The data have indicated a relevant magnitude of the correction factor only for lung lesions <1 cm.

  17. Magnetic field effects on the energy deposition spectra of MV photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, C; Stanescu, T; Fallone, B G

    2009-01-21

    Several groups worldwide have proposed various concepts for improving megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy that involve irradiating patients in the presence of a magnetic field-either for image guidance in the case of hybrid radiotherapy-MRI machines or for purposes of introducing tighter control over dose distributions. The presence of a magnetic field alters the trajectory of charged particles between interactions with the medium and thus has the potential to alter energy deposition patterns within a sub-cellular target volume. In this work, we use the MC radiation transport code PENELOPE with appropriate algorithms invoked to incorporate magnetic field deflections to investigate electron energy fluence in the presence of a uniform magnetic field and the energy deposition spectra within a 10 microm water sphere as a function of magnetic field strength. The simulations suggest only very minor changes to the electron fluence even for extremely strong magnetic fields. Further, calculations of the dose-averaged lineal energy indicate that a magnetic field strength of at least 70 T is required before beam quality will change by more than 2%.

  18. Comparison of Primary Doses Obtained in Three 6 MV Photon Beams Using a Small Attenuator.

    PubMed

    Trauernicht, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    It is a common technique in radiotherapy treatment planning systems to simplify the calculations by splitting the radiation beam into two components: namely the primary and scattered components. The contributions of the two components are evaluated separately and then summed to give the dose at the point of interest. Usually, the primary dose is obtained experimentally by extrapolating the ionization measured within the medium to zero-field size (Godden, Gamma radiation from cobalt 60 teletherapy units. Br. J. Radiol. Suppl. , 45(1983)). This approach offers the opportunity to obtain the primary component of dose without the need for an uncertain non-linear extrapolation. The primary dose can be obtained from two measurements of ionization in a large beam in a water phantom, as well as four measurements of ionization in a narrow beam geometry. The measurements were done over a range of different depths and thus the primary linear attenuation coefficient was also obtained. The calibrated output of a linear accelerator is usually 1.00 Gy per 100 monitor units (MU) at the depth of maximum dose ( d max ) in water for a 10 cm × 10 cm field. The values for the primary dose components at d max in a 10 cm × 10 cm field obtained in three different 6 MV beams using this method are D P ( d max , 10 cm × 10 cm) = 0.925-0.943 Gy/100 MU. The obtained values of the primary dose components compare well with measurements in the same beams extrapolated to zero-field size and also to literature. One can thus conclude that this method has the potential to provide an independent measurable verification of calculations of primary dose.

  19. Simulation of the 6 MV Elekta Synergy Platform linac photon beam using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission

    PubMed Central

    Didi, Samir; Moussa, Abdelilah; Yahya, Tayalati; Mustafa, Zerfaoui

    2015-01-01

    The present work validates the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission Monte Carlo software for the simulation of a 6 MV photon beam given by Elekta Synergy Platform medical linear accelerator treatment head. The simulation includes the major components of the linear accelerator (LINAC) with multi-leaf collimator and a homogeneous water phantom. Calculations were performed for the photon beam with several treatment field sizes ranging from 5 cm × 5 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm at 100 cm distance from the source. The simulation was successfully validated by comparison with experimental distributions. Good agreement between simulations and measurements was observed, with dose differences of about 0.02% and 2.5% for depth doses and lateral dose profiles, respectively. This agreement was also emphasized by the Kolmogorov–Smirnov goodness-of-fit test and by the gamma-index comparisons where more than 99% of the points for all simulations fulfill the quality assurance criteria of 2 mm/2%. PMID:26500399

  20. Simulation of the 6 MV Elekta Synergy Platform linac photon beam using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission.

    PubMed

    Didi, Samir; Moussa, Abdelilah; Yahya, Tayalati; Mustafa, Zerfaoui

    2015-01-01

    The present work validates the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission Monte Carlo software for the simulation of a 6 MV photon beam given by Elekta Synergy Platform medical linear accelerator treatment head. The simulation includes the major components of the linear accelerator (LINAC) with multi-leaf collimator and a homogeneous water phantom. Calculations were performed for the photon beam with several treatment field sizes ranging from 5 cm × 5 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm at 100 cm distance from the source. The simulation was successfully validated by comparison with experimental distributions. Good agreement between simulations and measurements was observed, with dose differences of about 0.02% and 2.5% for depth doses and lateral dose profiles, respectively. This agreement was also emphasized by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test and by the gamma-index comparisons where more than 99% of the points for all simulations fulfill the quality assurance criteria of 2 mm/2%.

  1. Inhomogeneity effect in Varian Trilogy Clinac iX 10 MV photon beam using EGSnrc and Geant4 code system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, S.; Rhani, M. F.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.

    2016-08-01

    Treatment fields consist of tissue other than water equivalent tissue (soft tissue, bones, lungs, etc.). The inhomogeneity effect can be investigated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. MC simulation of the radiation transport in an absorbing medium is the most accurate method for dose calculation in radiotherapy. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of inhomogeneity phantom on dose calculations in photon beam radiotherapy obtained by different MC codes. MC code system EGSnrc and Geant4 was used in this study. Inhomogeneity phantom dimension is 39.5 × 30.5 × 30 cm3 and made of 4 material slices (12.5 cm water, 10 cm aluminium, 5 cm lung and 12.5 cm water). Simulations were performed for field size 4 × 4 cm2 at SSD 100 cm. The spectrum distribution Varian Trilogy Clinac iX 10 MV was used. Percent depth dose (PDD) and dose profile was investigated in this research. The effects of inhomogeneities on radiation dose distributions depend on the amount, density and atomic number of the inhomogeneity, as well as on the quality of the photon beam. Good agreement between dose distribution from EGSnrc and Geant4 code system in inhomogeneity phantom was observed, with dose differences around 5% and 7% for depth doses and dose profiles.

  2. Reference photon dosimetry data and reference phase space data for the 6 MV photon beam from Varian Clinac 2100 series linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sang Hyun; Vassiliev, Oleg N.; Lee, Seungsoo; Liu, H. Helen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Mohan, Radhe

    2005-01-01

    The current study presents the reference photon dosimetry data (RPDD) and reference phase space data (RPSD) for the 6 MV photon beam from Varian 2100 series linear accelerators. The RPDD provide the basic photon dosimetry data, typically collected during the initial commissioning of a new linear accelerator, including output factors, depth dose data, and beam profile data in air and in water. The RPSD provide the full phase space information, such as position, direction, and energy for each particle generated inside the head of any particular linear accelerator in question. The dosimetric characteristics of the 6 MV photon beam from the majority of the aforementioned accelerators, which are unaltered from the manufacturer's original specifications, can be fully described with these two data sets within a clinically acceptable uncertainty ({approx}{+-}2%). The current study also presents a detailed procedure to establish the RPDD and RPSD using measured data and Monte Carlo calculations. The RPDD were constructed by compiling our own measured data and the average data based on the analysis of more than 50 sets of measured data from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) and 10 sets of clinical dosimetry data obtained from 10 different institutions participating in the RPC's quality assurance monitoring program. All the measured data from the RPC and the RPC-monitored institutions were found to be within a statistically tight range (i.e., 1{sigma}{approx_equal}1% or less) for each dosimetric quantity. The manufacturer's standard data, except for in-air off-axis factors that are available only from the current study, were compared with the RPDD, showing that the manufacturer's standard data could also be used as the RPDD for the photon beam studied in this study. The RPSD were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations using the BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc code system with 6.2 MeV (a spread of 3% full width at half maximum) and 1.0 mm full width at half maximum as the values of the

  3. Intracerebral delivery of carboplatin in combination with either 6 MV photons or monoenergetic synchrotron X-rays are equally efficacious for treatment of the F98 rat glioma.

    PubMed

    Bobyk, Laure; Edouard, Magali; Deman, Pierre; Rousseau, Julia; Adam, Jean-François; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Estève, François; Balosso, Jacques; Barth, Rolf F; Elleaume, Hélène

    2012-09-20

    The purpose of the present study was to compare side-by-side the therapeutic efficacy of a 6-day infusion of carboplatin, followed by X-irradiation with either 6 MV photons or synchrotron X-rays, tuned above the K-edge of Pt, for treatment of F98 glioma bearing rats. Carboplatin was administered intracerebrally (i.c.) to F98 glioma bearing rats over 6 days using AlzetTM osmotic pumps starting 7 days after tumor implantation. Radiotherapy was delivered in a single 15 Gy fraction on day 14 using a conventional 6 MV linear accelerator (LINAC) or 78.8 keV synchrotron X-rays. Untreated control animals had a median survival time (MeST) of 33 days. Animals that received either carboplatin alone or irradiation alone with either 78.8 keV or 6 MV had a MeSTs 38 and 33 days, respectively. Animals that received carboplatin in combination with X-irradiation had a MeST of > 180 days with a 55% cure rate, irrespective of whether they were irradiated with either 78.8 KeV synchrotron X-rays or 6MV photons. These studies have conclusively demonstrated the equivalency of i.c. delivery of carboplatin in combination with X-irradiation with either 6 MV photons or synchrotron X-rays.

  4. The thermoluminescence characteristics and the glow curves of Thulium doped silica fiber exposed to 10MV photon and 21MeV electron radiation.

    PubMed

    Alawiah, A; Alina, M S; Bauk, S; Abdul-Rashid, H A; Gieszczyk, W; Noramaliza, M N; Mahdiraji, G A; Tamchek, N; Zulkifli, M I; Bradley, D A; Marashdeh, M W

    2015-04-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves and kinetics parameters of Thulium (Tm) doped silica cylindrical fibers (CF) are presented. A linear accelerator (LINAC) was used to deliver high-energy radiation of 21MeV electrons and 10MV photons. The CFs were irradiated in the dose range of 0.2-10Gy. The experimental glow curve data was reconstructed by using WinREMS. The WinGCF software was used for the kinetic parameters evaluation. The TL sensitivity of Tm-doped silica CF is about 2 times higher as compared to pure silica CF. Tm-doped silica CF seems to be more sensitive to 21MeV electrons than to 10MV photons. Surprisingly, no supralinearity was displayed and a sub-linear response of Tm-doped silica CF was observed within the analyzed dose range for both 21MeV electrons and 10MV photons. The Tm-doped silica CF glow curve consists of 5 individual glow peaks. The Ea of peak 4 and peak 5 was highly dependent on dose when irradiated with photons. We also noticed that the electron radiation (21MeV) caused a shift of glow peak by 7-13°C to the higher temperature region compared with photons radiation (10MV). Our Tm-doped fibers seem to give high TL response after 21MeV electrons, which gives around 2 times higher peak integral as compared with 10MV photon radiation. We concluded that peak 4 is the first-order kinetic peak and can be used as the main dosimetric peak of Tm-doped silica CF.

  5. Optimization of a multiple-scattering Compton camera as a photon-tracking imager for 6-MV photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoong; Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho

    2014-06-01

    During radiation therapy, the irradiated position and the energy deposited in a patient must be monitored. In general, calculations before photon exposure or 2D measurements of the transmitted photons have been widely used for making dose estimates. In this paper, we propose a real-time 3D dose measurement using Compton imaging technology. On the basis of the Monte-Carlo method, we designed a multiple-scattering Compton camera system (MSCC) with semiconductor and scintillation detectors. The MSCC was constructed with two semiconductor detectors as scattering detectors and a cadmium-tungstate (CWO) scintillator detector as an absorber detector. The two planar semiconductor arrays, and the CWO array consisted of 40 × 40 pixels, each with a size of 1 × 1 × ɛ mm3, where ɛ is the variable thickness of the detectors. The design parameters, such as the types of semiconductors, detector thicknesses and distances between detectors, were optimized on the basis of the detection efficiency and angular resolution of reconstructed images for a point source. Under the optimized conditions, uncertainty factors in geometry and energy were estimated for various inter-detector distances. We used a source corresponding to photons scattered from a water phantom exposed to 6-MeV peak X-rays. According to our simulation results, the figure of merit, reached its maximum value when the inter-detector distance was 3 cm. In order to achieve a high FOM, we chose 1 cm as the optimum thickness for the scattering and absorbed detectors. A cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector showed the best performance among the simulated semiconductors. The position uncertainty caused by the pixelization effect was the major factor in degrading the angular resolution of the reconstructed images, and the degradation caused by energy broadening was less than expected. The angular uncertainties caused by Doppler broadening and incorrect sequencing were minimal compared with that of pixelization. Our

  6. Monte Carlo calculation based on hydrogen composition of the tissue for MV photon radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Demol, Benjamin; Viard, Romain; Reynaert, Nick

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that Monte Carlo treatment planning systems require tissue characterization (density and composition) as a function of CT number. A discrete set of tissue classes with a specific composition is introduced. In the current work we demonstrate that, for megavoltage photon radiotherapy, only the hydrogen content of the different tissues is of interest. This conclusion might have an impact on MRI-based dose calculations and on MVCT calibration using tissue substitutes. A stoichiometric calibration was performed, grouping tissues with similar atomic composition into 15 dosimetrically equivalent subsets. To demonstrate the importance of hydrogen, a new scheme was derived, with correct hydrogen content, complemented by oxygen (all elements differing from hydrogen are replaced by oxygen). Mass attenuation coefficients and mass stopping powers for this scheme were calculated and compared to the original scheme. Twenty-five CyberKnife treatment plans were recalculated by an in-house developed Monte Carlo system using tissue density and hydrogen content derived from the CT images. The results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations using the original stoichiometric calibration. Between 300 keV and 3 MeV, the relative difference of mass attenuation coefficients is under 1% within all subsets. Between 10 keV and 20 MeV, the relative difference of mass stopping powers goes up to 5% in hard bone and remains below 2% for all other tissue subsets. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the treatment plans present no visual difference between the two schemes. Relative differences of dose indexes D98, D95, D50, D05, D02, and Dmean were analyzed and a distribution centered around zero and of standard deviation below 2% (3σ) was established. On the other hand, once the hydrogen content is slightly modified, important dose differences are obtained. Monte Carlo dose planning in the field of megavoltage photon radiotherapy is fully achievable using

  7. Monte Carlo calculation based on hydrogen composition of the tissue for MV photon radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Demol, Benjamin; Viard, Romain; Reynaert, Nick

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that Monte Carlo treatment planning systems require tissue characterization (density and composition) as a function of CT number. A discrete set of tissue classes with a specific composition is introduced. In the current work we demonstrate that, for megavoltage photon radiotherapy, only the hydrogen content of the different tissues is of interest. This conclusion might have an impact on MRI-based dose calculations and on MVCT calibration using tissue substitutes. A stoichiometric calibration was performed, grouping tissues with similar atomic composition into 15 dosimetrically equivalent subsets. To demonstrate the importance of hydrogen, a new scheme was derived, with correct hydrogen content, complemented by oxygen (all elements differing from hydrogen are replaced by oxygen). Mass attenuation coefficients and mass stopping powers for this scheme were calculated and compared to the original scheme. Twenty-five CyberKnife treatment plans were recalculated by an in-house developed Monte Carlo system using tissue density and hydrogen content derived from the CT images. The results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations using the original stoichiometric calibration. Between 300 keV and 3 MeV, the relative difference of mass attenuation coefficients is under 1% within all subsets. Between 10 keV and 20 MeV, the relative difference of mass stopping powers goes up to 5% in hard bone and remains below 2% for all other tissue subsets. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the treatment plans present no visual difference between the two schemes. Relative differences of dose indexes D98, D95, D50, D05, D02, and Dmean were analyzed and a distribution centered around zero and of standard deviation below 2% (3 σ) was established. On the other hand, once the hydrogen content is slightly modified, important dose differences are obtained. Monte Carlo dose planning in the field of megavoltage photon radiotherapy is fully achievable using

  8. Carcinoma of the tonsillar region - results of external irradiation. [/sup 60/Co; 2MV photons

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, D.; Laramore, G.E.; Griffin, T.W.; Russel, A.H.; Tesh, D.W.; Taylor, W.J.; Martenson, J.A.

    1982-05-15

    A retrospective analysis is made of 104 patients treated with photon megavoltage radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar region during the period 1965-1976. Moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma was the most common histological grade. Fifty-three per cent of the cases presented with cervical lymphadenopathy with three cases of bilateral involvement. The three year local control rate was 100% for Stage I, 74% Stage II, 49% Stage III, and 33% Stage IV. Two Stage III cases and one Stage IV case developed subsequent contralateral neck disease. No patient with either T/sub 1/N/sub 0/ or T/sub 2/N/sub 0/ tumor failed in the ipsilateral or contralateral neck despite the fact that 42% of the T/sub 1/N/sub 0/ cases and 37% of the T/sub 2/N/sub 0/ cases were treated with unilateral portals. The prognostic significance of the T and N stages, treatment techniques, as well as dose response relationships are analyzed and the literature is reviewed.

  9. Planar scanning method for detecting refraction characteristics of two-dimensional photonic quasi-crystal wedge-shaped prisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianjun; Tan, Wei; Liu, Exian; Hu, Haili; Fan, Zhigang; Zhang, Tianhua; Zhang, Xiong

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a planar scanning method is proposed. This novel method adapts two monitors moving along double planar tracks that can be used to detect refraction characteristics of two-dimensional (2D) photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) wedge-shaped prisms. Refraction of a decagonal Penrose-type PQC prism is analyzed for a given incident beam and two polarization modes at different incident positions in the prism using this method. Refraction from the prism is irregular, indicating that nonuniformity in the arrangement of scatterers in the prism causes Bragg-like scattering irregularities. Numerical results show that this method can be used for guiding the design of a 2D PQC prism and for the analysis of its refraction characteristics.

  10. Accurate dosimetry with GafChromic EBT film of a 6 MV photon beam in water: What level is achievable?

    SciTech Connect

    Battum, L. J. van; Hoffmans, D.; Piersma, H.; Heukelom, S.

    2008-02-15

    This paper focuses on the accuracy, in absolute dose measurements, with GafChromic EBT film achievable in water for a 6 MV photon beam up to a dose of 2.3 Gy. Motivation is to get an absolute dose detection system to measure up dose distributions in a (water) phantom, to check dose calculations. An Epson 1680 color (red green blue) transmission flatbed scanner has been used as film scanning system, where the response in the red color channel has been extracted and used for the analyses. The influence of the flatbed film scanner on the film based dose detection process was investigated. The scan procedure has been optimized; i.e. for instance a lateral correction curve was derived to correct the scan value, up to 10%, as a function of optical density and lateral position. Sensitometric curves of different film batches were evaluated in portrait and landscape scan mode. Between various batches important variations in sensitometric curve were observed. Energy dependence of the film is negligible, while a slight variation in dose response is observed for very large angles between film surface and incident photon beam. Improved accuracy in absolute dose detection can be obtained by repetition of a film measurement to tackle at least the inherent presence of film inhomogeneous construction. We state that the overall uncertainty is random in absolute EBT film dose detection and of the order of 1.3% (1 SD) under the condition that the film is scanned in a limited centered area on the scanner and at least two films have been applied. At last we advise to check a new film batch on its characteristics compared to available information, before using that batch for absolute dose measurements.

  11. Accurate dosimetry with GafChromic EBT film of a 6 MV photon beam in water: what level is achievable?

    PubMed

    van Battum, L J; Hoffmans, D; Piersma, H; Heukelom, S

    2008-02-01

    This paper focuses on the accuracy, in absolute dose measurements, with GafChromicTM EBT film achievable in water for a 6 MV photon beam up to a dose of 2.3 Gy. Motivation is to get an absolute dose detection system to measure up dose distributions in a (water) phantom, to check dose calculations. An Epson 1680 color (red green blue) transmission flatbed scanner has been used as film scanning system, where the response in the red color channel has been extracted and used for the analyses. The influence of the flatbed film scanner on the film based dose detection process was investigated. The scan procedure has been optimized; i.e. for instance a lateral correction curve was derived to correct the scan value, up to 10%, as a function of optical density and lateral position. Sensitometric curves of different film batches were evaluated in portrait and landscape scan mode. Between various batches important variations in sensitometric curve were observed. Energy dependence of the film is negligible, while a slight variation in dose response is observed for very large angles between film surface and incident photon beam. Improved accuracy in absolute dose detection can be obtained by repetition of a film measurement to tackle at least the inherent presence of film inhomogeneous construction. We state that the overall uncertainty is random in absolute EBT film dose detection and of the order of 1.3% (1 SD) under the condition that the film is scanned in a limited centered area on the scanner and at least two films have been applied. At last we advise to check a new film batch on its characteristics compared to available information, before using that batch for absolute dose measurements.

  12. Neutron Damage Induced in Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices from a Clinical 18 MV Photon Beam: A Monte Carlo Study.

    PubMed

    Ezzati, Ahad Ollah; Studenski, Matthew T

    2017-09-14

    To quantify the relative neutron damage induced in CIEDs from clinical 18 MV photon beams for varying field sizes, depths and off axis distances. Damage was assessed using silicon damage response functions and ICRP neutron dose conversion factors in MCNPX. Particular attention was devoted to the modelling of the Varian 2100C/D linear accelerator to ensure accurate contamination neutron spectra. Neutron dose, fluence and relative damage to CIEDs was calculated. CIED damage from neutrons is related to the neutron dose rather than the neutron fluence. As field size increases, the region of high damage probability extends to a greater distance beyond the edge of the field than with smaller fields. At a distance greater than 50 cm or from the central axis or a depth deeper than 10 cm, the probability of damage is less than 10% of the central axis damage probability for all field sizes. Clinically, increasing the depth or the distance from the central axis to the CIED will reduce the probability of damage from neutrons. Care must be taken when treating large fields as the overall probability of damage increase as does the distance the higher probability of damage extends beyond the field edge. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Study of the response of plastic scintillation detectors in small-field 6 MV photon beams by Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lilie L. W.; Beddar, Sam

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the response of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in a 6 MV photon beam of various field sizes using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Three PSDs were simulated: A BC-400 and a BCF-12, each attached to a plastic-core optical fiber, and a BC-400 attached to an air-core optical fiber. PSD response was calculated as the detector dose per unit water dose for field sizes ranging from 10x10 down to 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2} for both perpendicular and parallel orientations of the detectors to an incident beam. Similar calculations were performed for a CC01 compact chamber. The off-axis dose profiles were calculated in the 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2} photon beam and were compared to the dose profile calculated for the CC01 chamber and that calculated in water without any detector. The angular dependence of the PSDs' responses in a small photon beam was studied. Results: In the perpendicular orientation, the response of the BCF-12 PSD varied by only 0.5% as the field size decreased from 10x10 to 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2}, while the response of BC-400 PSD attached to a plastic-core fiber varied by more than 3% at the smallest field size because of its longer sensitive region. In the parallel orientation, the response of both PSDs attached to a plastic-core fiber varied by less than 0.4% for the same range of field sizes. For the PSD attached to an air-core fiber, the response varied, at most, by 2% for both orientations. Conclusions: The responses of all the PSDs investigated in this work can have a variation of only 1%-2% irrespective of field size and orientation of the detector if the length of the sensitive region is not more than 2 mm long and the optical fiber stems are prevented from pointing directly to the incident source.

  14. Calculation of Nuclear Particles Production at High-Energy Photon Beams from a Linac Operating at 6, 10 and 15 MV.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, Renato; Bettega, Daniela; Calzolari, Paola; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2016-08-13

    Production of photonuclear particles in a tissue-equivalent medium has been calculated for linacs at 6, 10 and 15 MV from Varian TrueBeam. Based on the knowledge of bremsstrahlung fluence spectra and linac photon beam parameters, numerical integration was performed on the cross sections for photoparticle production of the constituent elements of tissue ((2)H,(12)C,(13)C,(16)O,(17)O,(18)O,(14)N,(15)N). At 15 MV, at the depth of photon maximum dose, the total absorbed dose due to neutrons, protons, alphas and residual nuclei from photon reactions in tissue (5.5E-05 Gy per Gy of photons) is comparable to that due to neutrons from accelerator head. Results reasonably agree with data reported in the literature using Monte Carlo models simulating linac head components. This work suggests a simple method to estimate the dose contributed by the photon-induced nuclear particles for high-energy photon beams produced by linacs in use, as it might be relevant for late stochastic effects.

  15. Differences in wedge factor determination in air using a PMMA mini-phantom or a brass build-up cap.

    PubMed

    Heukelom, S; Lanson, J H; Mijnheer, B J

    1997-12-01

    The head scatter dose contribution to the output of a treatment machine has been determined for an open and wedged 60Co gamma-ray beam and for open and wedged x-ray beams of 4, 8, and 16 MV. From those data wedge factor values "in air" have been deduced, expressed as the ratio of the dose to water, measured in air, for the situation with and without wedge, for the same number of monitor units (or treatment time for 60Co). The measurements have been performed using a polymethyl-metacrylate (PMMA) and a graphite-walled ionization chamber inserted in a brass build-up cap and in a PMMA mini-phantom, respectively. Absolute wedge factor values deduced with both detector systems and based on the ratio of ionization chamber readings, differ for the investigated photon beams, up to 3.5% for the 4 MV x-ray beam. The deviations results from the difference in composition between the detector materials and water and can be taken into account by conversion of the ionization chamber readings for both the open and wedged photon beams to the absorbed dose to water. For the brass build-up cap detector system the ratio of the conversion factors for the wedged and open beam changes the ratio of the ionization chamber readings up to about 3.6% for the 4 MV x-ray beam. For the mini-phantom the conversion factors for the wedged and open beam are almost equal for all photon beams. Consequently, for that system wedge factors based on ionization chamber readings or dose values are the same. With respect to the wedge factor variation with field size a somewhat larger increase has been determined for the 60Co and 4 MV photon beam using the brass build-up cap: about 1% for field sizes varying between 5 cm x 5 cm and 15 cm x 15 cm. This effect has to be related to an apparent more pronounced variation of the head scatter dose contribution with field size for the wedged photon beams if the brass build-up cap detection system is used. It can be concluded that determination of wedge factors "in

  16. Impact of 6MV photon beam attenuation by carbon fiber couch and immobilization devices in IMRT planning and dose delivery.

    PubMed

    Munjal, R K; Negi, P S; Babu, A G; Sinha, S N; Anand, A K; Kataria, T

    2006-04-01

    Multiple fields in IMRT and optimization allow conformal dose to the target and reduced dose to the surroundings and the regions of interest. Thus we can escalate the dose to the target to achieve better tumor control with low morbidity. Orientation of multiple beams can be achieved by i) different gantry angles, ii) rotating patient's couch isocentrically. In doing so, one or more beam may pass through different materials like the treatment couch, immobilization cast fixation plate, head and neck rest or any other supportive device. Our observations for 6MV photon beam on PRIMUS-KXE2 with MED-TEC carbon fiber tabletop and 10 × 10 cm(2) field size reveals that the maximum dose attenuation by the couch was of the order of 2.96% from gantry angle 120-160°. Attenuation due to cast fixation base plate of PMMA alone was of the order of 5.8-10.55% at gantry angle between 0 and 90°. Attenuation due to carbon fiber base plate alone was 3.8-7.98%. Attenuation coefficient of carbon fiber and PMMA was evaluated and was of the order of 0.082 cm(-1) and 0.064 cm(-1) respectively. Most of the TPS are configured for direct beam incidence attenuation correction factors only. Whereas when the beam is obliquely incident on the couch, base plate, headrest and any other immobilization device get attenuated more than the direct beam incidence. The correction factors for oblique incidence beam attenuation are not configured in most of the commercially available treatment planning systems. Therefore, such high variations in dose delivery could lead to under-dosage to the target volume for treatments requiring multiple fields in IMRT and 3D-CRT and need to be corrected for monitor unit calculations.

  17. A comparison of small-field tissue phantom ratio data generation methods for an Elekta Agility 6 MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Neil; Brackenridge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-phantom ratios (TPRs) are a common dosimetric quantity used to describe the change in dose with depth in tissue. These can be challenging and time consuming to measure. The conversion of percentage depth dose (PDD) data using standard formulae is widely employed as an alternative method in generating TPR. However, the applicability of these formulae for small fields has been questioned in the literature. Functional representation has also been proposed for small-field TPR production. This article compares measured TPR data for small 6 MV photon fields against that generated by conversion of PDD using standard formulae to assess the efficacy of the conversion data. By functionally fitting the measured TPR data for square fields greater than 4cm in length, the TPR curves for smaller fields are generated and compared with measurements. TPRs and PDDs were measured in a water tank for a range of square field sizes. The PDDs were converted to TPRs using standard formulae. TPRs for fields of 4 × 4cm(2) and larger were used to create functional fits. The parameterization coefficients were used to construct extrapolated TPR curves for 1 × 1 cm(2), 2 × 2-cm(2), and 3 × 3-cm(2) fields. The TPR data generated using standard formulae were in excellent agreement with direct TPR measurements. The TPR data for 1 × 1-cm(2), 2 × 2-cm(2), and 3 × 3-cm(2) fields created by extrapolation of the larger field functional fits gave inaccurate initial results. The corresponding mean differences for the 3 fields were 4.0%, 2.0%, and 0.9%. Generation of TPR data using a standard PDD-conversion methodology has been shown to give good agreement with our directly measured data for small fields. However, extrapolation of TPR data using the functional fit to fields of 4 × 4cm(2) or larger resulted in generation of TPR curves that did not compare well with the measured data.

  18. Dose evaluation of Grid Therapy using a 6 MV flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beam: A Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rovira, Immaculada; Puxeu-Vaqué, Josep; Prezado, Yolanda

    2017-07-24

    Spatially fractionated radiotherapy is a strategy to overcome the main limitation of radiotherapy, i.e., the restrained normal tissue tolerances. A well-known example is Grid Therapy, which is currently performed at some hospitals using megavoltage photon beams delivered by Linacs. Grid Therapy has been successfully used in the management of bulky abdominal tumors with low toxicity. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether an improvement in therapeutic index in Grid Therapy can be obtained by implementing it in a flattening filter-free (FFF) Linac. The rationale behind is that the removal of the flattening filter shifts the beam energy spectrum towards lower energies and increase the photon fluence. Lower energies result in a reduction of lateral scattering and thus, to higher peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR) in normal tissues. In addition, the gain in fluence might allow using smaller beams leading a more efficient exploitation of dose-volume effects, and consequently, a better normal tissue sparing. Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate realistic dose distributions considering a 6 MV FFF photon beam from a standard medical Linac and a cerrobend mechanical collimator in different configurations: grid sizes of 0.3 × 0.3 cm(2) , 0.5 × 0.5 cm(2) , and 1 × 1 cm(2) and a corresponding center-to-center (ctc) distance of 0.6, 1, and 2 cm, respectively (total field size of 10 × 10 cm(2) ). As figure of merit, peak doses in depth, PVDR, output factors (OF), and penumbra values were assessed. Dose at the entrance is slightly higher than in conventional Grid Therapy. However, it is compensated by the large PVDR obtained at the entrance, reaching a maximum of 35 for a grid size of 1 × 1 cm(2) . Indeed, this grid size leads to very high PVDR values at all depths (≥ 10), which are much higher than in standard Grid Therapy. This may be beneficial for normal tissues but detrimental for tumor control, where a lower PVDR might be requested. In

  19. A water calorimeter for on-site absorbed dose to water calibrations in 60Co and MV-photon beams including MRI incorporated treatment equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Prez, Leon; de Pooter, Jacco; Jansen, Bartel; Aalbers, Tony

    2016-07-01

    In reference dosimetry the aim is to establish the absorbed dose to water, D w, under reference conditions. However, existing dosimetry protocols are not always applicable for rapidly emerging new treatment modalities. For primary standard dosimetry laboratories it is generally not feasible to acquire such modalities. Therefore it is strongly desired that D w measurements with primary standards can be performed on-site in clinical beams for the new treatment modalities in order to characterize and calibrate detectors. To serve this need, VSL has developed a new transportable water calorimeter serving as a primary D w standard for 60Co and MV-photons including MRI incorporated treatment equipment. Special attention was paid to its operation in different beam geometries and beam modalities including the application in magnetic fields. The new calorimeter was validated in the VSL 60Co beam and on-site in clinical MV-photon beams. Excellent agreement of 0.1% was achieved with previous 60Co field calibrations, i.e. well within the uncertainty of the previous calorimeter, and with measurements performed in horizontal and vertical MV-photon beams. k Q factors, determined for two PTW 30013 ionization chambers, agreed very well with available literature data. The relative combined standard uncertainty (k  =  1) for D w measurements in 60Co and MV-photons is 0.37%. Calibrations are carried out with a standard uncertainty of 0.42% and k Q -factors are determined with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.40%.

  20. Intermediate energy photons (1 MV) to improve dose gradient, conformality, and homogeneity: potential benefits for small field intracranial radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Keller, Brian M; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Presutti, Joe; Beachey, David J

    2009-01-01

    A previously conceived and demonstrated principle of reducing penumbra for small radiosurgical dose fields is here now applied to a multiple beam arrangement in a stereotactic head phantom. In this work it is found that the fourfold reduction in radiological penumbra of small, single 1 MV x-ray fields translates to a more conformal, homogeneous dose distribution in the more complex beam arrangements. The film dosimetry is conducted with a high resolution digital microscope to quantify the sharp dose gradients. Further, the Gafchromic EBT film measurements in phantom are compared to calculations using the Xknife RT3 (Radionics, Burlington, MA) treatment planning software (TPS) with modeled 1 MV beam data. An orthogonal pair of coplanar beams and an 18-beam coplanar arc irradiation both yielded agreement between the modeling within the TPS and the film work. Conventional 6 MV modality is compared alongside 1 MV throughout. The 90%-50% and 90%-10% dose gradients at the intersection of the orthogonal beam pair were 1.7 and 4.7 mm for 6 MV versus 0.5 and 1.3 mm for 1 MV for an identical setup. The 18-beam coplanar arc plan yielded 90%-80% and 90%-50% dose gradients of 0.84 and 2.2 mm for 6 MV versus gradients of 0.29 and 1.36 mm for 1 MV for the midaxial slice coplanar with all beamlet axes. Uncertainties in gradient measurements were +/- 0.15 mm. The 18-beam coplanar beam arrangement represented a worst case scenario for penumbra overlap deteriorating the dose distribution. In brief, 1 MV x-rays provided superior homogeneity, conformality, and dose fall-off to 6 MV for the irradiations examined.

  1. Intermediate energy photons (1 MV) to improve dose gradient, conformality, and homogeneity: Potential benefits for small field intracranial radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Presutti, Joe; Beachey, David J.

    2009-01-15

    A previously conceived and demonstrated principle of reducing penumbra for small radiosurgical dose fields is here now applied to a multiple beam arrangement in a stereotactic head phantom. In this work it is found that the fourfold reduction in radiological penumbra of small, single 1 MV x-ray fields translates to a more conformal, homogeneous dose distribution in the more complex beam arrangements. The film dosimetry is conducted with a high resolution digital microscope to quantify the sharp dose gradients. Further, the Gafchromic EBT film measurements in phantom are compared to calculations using the Xknife RT3 (Radionics, Burlington, MA) treatment planning software (TPS) with modeled 1 MV beam data. An orthogonal pair of coplanar beams and an 18-beam coplanar arc irradiation both yielded agreement between the modeling within the TPS and the film work. Conventional 6 MV modality is compared alongside 1 MV throughout. The 90%-50% and 90%-10% dose gradients at the intersection of the orthogonal beam pair were 1.7 and 4.7 mm for 6 MV versus 0.5 and 1.3 mm for 1 MV for an identical setup. The 18-beam coplanar arc plan yielded 90%-80% and 90%-50% dose gradients of 0.84 and 2.2 mm for 6 MV versus gradients of 0.29 and 1.36 mm for 1 MV for the midaxial slice coplanar with all beamlet axes. Uncertainties in gradient measurements were {+-}0.15 mm. The 18-beam coplanar beam arrangement represented a worst case scenario for penumbra overlap deteriorating the dose distribution. In brief, 1 MV x-rays provided superior homogeneity, conformality, and dose fall-off to 6 MV for the irradiations examined.

  2. Three-photon fluorescence imaging of melanin with a dual-wedge confocal scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mega, Yair; Kerimo, Joseph; Robinson, Joseph; Vakili, Ali; Johnson, Nicolette; DiMarzio, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Confocal microscopy can be used as a practical tool in non-invasive applications in medical diagnostics and evaluation. In particular, it is being used for the early detection of skin cancer to identify pathological cellular components and, potentially, replace conventional biopsies. The detection of melanin and its spatial location and distribution plays a crucial role in the detection and evaluation of skin cancer. Our previous work has shown that the visible emission from melanin is strong and can be easily observed with a near-infrared CW laser using low power. This is due to a unique step-wise, (SW) three-photon excitation of melanin. This paper shows that the same SW, 3-photon fluorescence can also be achieved with an inexpensive, continuous-wave laser using a dual-prism scanning system. This demonstrates that the technology could be integrated into a portable confocal microscope for clinical applications. The results presented here are in agreement with images obtained with the larger and more expensive femtosecond laser system used earlier.

  3. A comparison of small-field tissue phantom ratio data generation methods for an Elekta Agility 6 MV photon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Neil Brackenridge, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Tissue-phantom ratios (TPRs) are a common dosimetric quantity used to describe the change in dose with depth in tissue. These can be challenging and time consuming to measure. The conversion of percentage depth dose (PDD) data using standard formulae is widely employed as an alternative method in generating TPR. However, the applicability of these formulae for small fields has been questioned in the literature. Functional representation has also been proposed for small-field TPR production. This article compares measured TPR data for small 6 MV photon fields against that generated by conversion of PDD using standard formulae to assess the efficacy of the conversion data. By functionally fitting the measured TPR data for square fields greater than 4 cm in length, the TPR curves for smaller fields are generated and compared with measurements. TPRs and PDDs were measured in a water tank for a range of square field sizes. The PDDs were converted to TPRs using standard formulae. TPRs for fields of 4 × 4 cm{sup 2} and larger were used to create functional fits. The parameterization coefficients were used to construct extrapolated TPR curves for 1 × 1 cm{sup 2}, 2 × 2-cm{sup 2}, and 3 × 3-cm{sup 2} fields. The TPR data generated using standard formulae were in excellent agreement with direct TPR measurements. The TPR data for 1 × 1-cm{sup 2}, 2 × 2-cm{sup 2}, and 3 × 3-cm{sup 2} fields created by extrapolation of the larger field functional fits gave inaccurate initial results. The corresponding mean differences for the 3 fields were 4.0%, 2.0%, and 0.9%. Generation of TPR data using a standard PDD-conversion methodology has been shown to give good agreement with our directly measured data for small fields. However, extrapolation of TPR data using the functional fit to fields of 4 × 4 cm{sup 2} or larger resulted in generation of TPR curves that did not compare well with the measured data.

  4. Energy spectra, angular spread, fluence profiles and dose distributions of 6 and 18 MV photon beams: results of monte carlo simulations for a varian 2100EX accelerator.

    PubMed

    Ding, George X

    2002-04-07

    The purpose of this study is to provide detailed characteristics of incident photon beams for different field sizes and beam energies. This information is critical to the future development of accurate treatment planning systems. It also enhances our knowledge of radiotherapy photon beams. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code, BEAM, has been used to simulate 6 and 18 MV photon beams from a Varian Clinac-2100EX accelerator. A simulated realistic beam is stored in a phase space data file, which contains details of each particle's complete history including where it has been and where it has interacted. The phase space files are analysed to obtain energy spectra, angular distribution, fluence profile and mean energy profiles at the phantom surface for particles separated according to their charge and history. The accuracy of a simulated beam is validated by the excellent agreement between the Monte Carlo calculated and measured dose distributions. Measured depth-dose curves are obtained from depth-ionization curves by accounting for newly introduced chamber fluence corrections and the stopping-power ratios for realistic beams. The study presents calculated depth-dose components from different particles as well as calculated surface dose and contribution from different particles to surface dose across the field. It is shown that the increase of surface dose with the increase of the field size is mainly due to the increase of incident contaminant charged particles. At 6 MV, the incident charged particles contribute 7% to 21% of maximum dose at the surface when the field size increases from 10 x 10 to 40 x 40 cm2. At 18 MV, their contributions are up to 11% and 29% of maximum dose at the surface for 10 x 10 cm2 and 40 x 40 cm2 fields respectively. However, the fluence of these incident charged particles is less than 1% of incident photon fluence in all cases.

  5. Energy responses of the LiF series TL pellets to high-energy photons in the energy range from 1.25 to 21 MV.

    PubMed

    Kim, J L; Lee, J I; Ji, Y H; Kim, B H; Kim, J S; Chang, S Y

    2006-01-01

    The energy responses for the KLT-300(LiF:Mg,Cu,Na,Si, Korea), GR-200(LiF:Mg,Cu,P, China) and MCP-N(LiF:Mg,Cu,P, Poland) thermoluminescence(TL) pellets were studied for a photon radiation with energies from 1.25 MeV(60Co) to 21 MV (Microtron) to verify the usefulness of the calibration for the radiotherapy beams. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have performed thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) audits to verify the calibration of the beams by TL powder, but TL pellets were used in this study because the element correction factor (ECF), defined as the factor to correct the variations that all TL dosemeters cannot be manufactured to have exactly the same TL efficiency, for each TL pellet could be accurately derived and be handled conveniently when compared with the powder. Also several works for the energy response of the TLDs were done for the low-energy photon beams up to 60Co, but they will be extended in this experiment to the high photon energies (up to 20 MV), which are widely used in the therapy level of a radiation. The PTW 30006 ionisation chamber was calibrated by the Korea primary standards to establish the air-kerma rates and the TL pellets were irradiated in a specially designed waterproof pellet holder in a water phantom (30 x 30 x 30 cm3) just like the IAEA postal audits programme. This result was compared with that of another type of phantom [10 (W) x 10 (L) x 10 (H) cm3 PMMA Perspex phantom for the 60Co and 6 MV photon, and 10 x 10 x 20 (H) cm3 for the 10 and 21 MV photon] for its convenient use and easy handling and installation in a hospital. The results show that the differences of the responses for the water phantom and PMMA Perspex phantom were negligible, which is contrary to the general conception that a big difference would be expected. For an application of these results to verify the therapy beams, an appropriate energy correction factor should be applied to the energies and phantom types

  6. Effects of immobilization beds on the dose in the entrance and exit dose region for Co-60, 4, 6 and 15 MV photons.

    PubMed

    Bilge, H; Yondem, S; Kucucuk, H; Cakir, A; Meral, R

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Styrofoam beds used for immobilization on build-up and exit dose regions for high energy photon beams. Build-up dose and exit dose measurements in central axis of Co-60 and 4, 6 and 15 MV photons at various field sizes and source to phantom distances were made in a water equivalent solid phantom with 2, 5 and 10 cm thick uniform Styrofoam beds at the surface. A Markus type plane-parallel ion chamber with fixed separation between collecting electrodes was used to measure the percent depth doses. The surface dose increased almost linearly with field size for Co-60, 4, 6 and 15 MV X-ray beams. The effect of immobilization (Styrofoam beds) on the surface dose increased with the thickness and this effect was lower with higher energies. When a 2 cm thick Styrofoam bed was used for immobilization, the surface dose in a 10x10 cm field was higher (43.9, 36.8, 28.8 and 14.9% for Co-60, 4, 6 and 15 MV, respectively). As the Styrofoam bed was thicker, the maximum dose point moved closer to the surface of the phantom for all energies. The exit surface dose was also enhanced with the presence of Styrofoam beds and similar to the effects on the surface dose. This enhancement was the maximum 5% for high energy photon beams and 6% for Co-60 beam. The introduction of Styrofoam beds in the radiation beam for the immobilization of the patient increases surface and exit doses to a considerable extent.

  7. SU-E-T-409: Evaluation of Tissue Composition Effect On Dose Distribution in Radiotherapy with 6 MV Photon Beam of a Medical Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbani, M; Tabatabaei, Z; Noghreiyan, A Vejdani; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate soft tissue composition effect on dose distribution for various soft tissues and various depths in radiotherapy with 6 MV photon beam of a medical linac. Methods: A phantom and Siemens Primus linear accelerator were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In a homogeneous cubic phantom, six types of soft tissue and three types of tissue-equivalent materials were defined separately. The soft tissues were muscle (skeletal), adipose tissue, blood (whole), breast tissue, soft tissue (9-component) and soft tissue (4-component). The tissue-equivalent materials included: water, A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic and perspex. Photon dose relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue at various depths on the beam’s central axis was determined for the 6 MV photon beam. The relative dose was also calculated and compared for various MCNPX tallies including,F8, F6 and,F4. Results: The results of the relative photon dose in various materials relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue and using different tallies are reported in the form of tabulated data. Minor differences between dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials were observed. The results from F6 and F4 were practically the same but different with,F8 tally. Conclusion: Based on the calculations performed, the differences in dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials are minor but they could be corrected in radiotherapy calculations to upgrade the accuracy of the dosimetric calculations.

  8. Spectra of photons and neutrons generated in a heterogeneous head of a 15 MV LINAC at differents field sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Benites-Rengifo, J. L.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Velazquez-Fernandez, J. B.

    2012-10-23

    Spectra of photons and neutrons were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5 using the e/p/n mode. A heterogeneous model was used to define the linac head where the collimators were modeled to produce five different treatment fields at the isocenter. Photon and neutron spectra were estimated in several points along two directions from the isocenter. The total photon fluence beyond 60 cm behaves according to 1/r{sup 2} rule, while total neutron fluence, beyond 80 cm, can be described by diffusion theory using an infinite plane as a neutron source.

  9. Spectra of photons and neutrons generated in a heterogeneous head of a 15 MV LINAC at differents field sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benites-Rengifo, J. L.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Velazquez-Fernandez, J. B.

    2012-10-01

    Spectra of photons and neutrons were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5 using the e/p/n mode. A heterogeneous model was used to define the linac head where the collimators were modeled to produce five different treatment fields at the isocenter. Photon and neutron spectra were estimated in several points along two directions from the isocenter. The total photon fluence beyond 60 cm behaves according to 1/r2 rule, while total neutron fluence, beyond 80 cm, can be described by diffusion theory using an infinite plane as a neutron source.

  10. Impact and relationship of anterior commissure and time-dose factor on the local control of T1N0 glottic cancer treated by 6 MV photons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To evaluate prognostic factors that may influence local control (LC) of T1N0 glottic cancer treated by primary radiotherapy (RT) with 6 MV photons. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 433 consecutive patients with T1N0 glottic cancer treated between 1983 and 2005 by RT in our institution. All patients were treated with 6 MV photons. One hundred and seventy seven (41%) patients received 52.5 Gy in 23 fractions with 2.5 Gy/fraction, and 256 (59%) patients received 66 Gy in 33 fractions with 2 Gy/fraction. Results The median follow-up time was 10.5 years. The 10-year LC rates were 91% and 87% for T1a and T1b respectively. Multivariate analysis showed LC rate was adversely affected by poorly differentiated histology (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 7.5, p = 0.035); involvement of anterior commissure (HR: 2.34, p = 0.011); fraction size of 2.0 Gy (HR: 2.17, p = 0.035) and tumor biologically effective dose (BED) < 65 Gy15 (HR: 3.38, p = 0.017). Conclusions The negative impact of anterior commissure involvement could be overcome by delivering a higher tumor BED through using fraction size of > 2.0 Gy. We recommend that fraction size > 2.0 Gy should be utilized, for radiation schedules with five daily fractions each week. PMID:21600025

  11. Effects of Siemens TT-D carbon fiber table top on beam attenuation, and build up region of 6 MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Sheykhoo, Asma; Abdollahi, Sara; Hadizadeh Yazdi, Mohammad Hadi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This study deals with Monte Carlo simulations of the effects which the 550 TXT carbon fiber couch can have on the relevant parameters of a 6 MV clinical photon beam in three field sizes. According to the reports issued by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), the calculated dose across a high gradient distribution should be within 2% of the relative dose, or within 0.2 cm of the isodose curve position in the target volume. Nowadays, the use of posterior oblique beam has become a common practice. It is clear that, in radiotherapy, the presence of the couch affects the beam intensity and, as a result, the skin dose. Firstly, Siemens linear accelerator validation for 6 MV photon beam was performed, and satisfactory agreement between Monte Carlo and experimental data for various field sizes was observed. Secondly, the couch transmission factor for the reference field size and depth was computed, and the skin dose enhancement by the couch was assessed. The largest impact of the carbon fiber couch effect was observed for the 5 × 5 cm(2) field size. Such evaluation has not been reported for this couch before. Despite providing minimal attenuation for the primary radiation, the assumption that carbon fiber couches are radiotranslucent is not valid, and the effects of couches of this type on the transmission factor, and on the skin dose should be carefully investigated for each field size and depth.

  12. SU-E-T-17: Comparison of MCNP5 Calculations in the Buildup Region with Plane Parallel Ionization Chamber Measurements for 6 and 18 MV Photon Beams.

    PubMed

    Abbas, H; Satti, J; MacDonald, C

    2012-06-01

    Cylindrical ion chambers are known to overestimate the dose in the buildup region, where gradients are high. The potential for MCNP5 to produce accurate calculations in this region, even when benchmarked with a large volume chamber, was tested. MCNP5 was used to model 6 and 18 MV photon beams for a Varian accelerator using vendor geometry with the collimator corrections of Chibani and Ma. Modeling was benchmarked by adjusting electron beam energy and diameter to match calculations with ionization chamber (with 0.125 cm(3) sensitive volume) measurements of percent depth doses (PDDs) beyond dmax and cross dose profiles for 5×5, 10×10 and 30×30 cm(2) field sizes. For comparison in the buildup region, the MCNP5 voxel was reduced to 1 mm, with extrapolation to find surface dose. In this region a plane parallel chamber (with 0.055 cm(3) sensitive volume) was used to measure PDDs at 0, 2 and 4 mm depths for the three field sizes, using the Khan over-response correction. Calculations and cylindrical chamber measurements for PDDs beyond dmax agree within 2% for all field sizes and energies. Dose profiles at dmax (1.5 cm and 3.3 cm for 6 and 18 MV) and at 10 cm agree within 2% in the flat region and within 10% in the penumbra. In the buildup region, the MCNP5 calculations agree with plane parallel PDD measurements within 3% at 2 and 4 mm depths. The extrapolation of the MCNP5 PDD overestimates the surface dose for the 18 MV beam for the 30×30 cm(2) field, and is within 4.2% for the smaller fields and for all field sizes at 6 MV. Improved extrapolation techniques may yield better surface dose agreement. Accurate dose in the buildup region can be calculated by MCNP5. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. SU-E-T-82: A Study On Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) Dosimetry Using 2D Seven29 Ion Chamber Array Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Syam; Aparna

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric properties of Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) using PTW Seven29 ion chamber array Methods: PTW Seven29 ion chamber array and Solid Water phantoms for different depths were used for the study. The study was carried out in Varian Clinac ix with photon energies, 6MV & 15MV. Primarily the solid water phantoms with the 2D array were scanned using a CT scanner (GE Optima 580) at different depths. These scanned images were used for EDW planning in an Eclipse treatment planning system (version 10). Planning was done for different wedge angles and for different depths for 6MV & 15MV. A dose of 100 CGy was delivered in each cases. For each delivery, calculated the Monitoring Unit (MU) required. Same set-up was created before delivering the plans in Varian Clinac-ix. For each clinically relevant depth and for different wedge angles, the same MU was delivered as calculated. Different wedged dose distributions where reconstructed from the measured 2D array data using the in-house developed excel program. Results: It is observed that the shoulder like region in the profile which reduces as depth increases. For the same depth and energy, the percentage difference between planned and measured dose is lesser than 3%. For smaller wedge angles, the percentage difference is found to be greater than 3% for the largest wedge angle. Standard deviation between measured doses at shoulder region for planned and measured profiles is 0.08 and 0.02 respectively. Standard deviations between planned and measured wedge factors for different depths (2.5cm, 5cm, 10cm, and 15cm) are (0.0021, 0.0007, 0.0050, 0.0001) for 6MV and (0.0024, 0.0191, 0.0013, 0.0005) for 15MV respectively. Conclusion: The 2D Seven29 ion chamber array is a good tool for the Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) dosimetry.

  14. Comparison of dosimetric characteristics of Siemens virtual and physical wedges for ONCOR linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Attalla, Ehab M; Abo-Elenein, H S; Ammar, H; El-Desoky, Ismail

    2010-07-01

    Dosimetric properties of virtual wedge (VW) and physical wedge (PW) in 6- and 10-MV photon beams from a Siemens ONCOR linear accelerator, including wedge factors, depth doses, dose profiles, peripheral doses, are compared. While there is a great difference in absolute values of wedge factors, VW factors (VWFs) and PW factors (PWFs) have a similar trend as a function of field size. PWFs have stronger depth dependence than VWF due to beam hardening in PW fields. VW dose profiles in the wedge direction, in general, match very well with those of PW, except in the toe area of large wedge angles with large field sizes. Dose profiles in the nonwedge direction show a significant reduction in PW fields due to off-axis beam softening and oblique filtration. PW fields have significantly higher peripheral doses than open and VW fields. VW fields have similar surface doses as the open fields, while PW fields have lower surface doses. Surface doses for both VW and PW increase with field size and slightly with wedge angle. For VW fields with wedge angles 45° and less, the initial gap up to 3 cm is dosimetrically acceptable when compared to dose profiles of PW. VW fields in general use less monitor units than PW fields.

  15. A descriptive and broadly applicable model of therapeutic and stray absorbed dose from 6 to 25 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Christopher W; Newhauser, Wayne D; Wilson, Lydia J; Schneider, Uwe; Kaderka, Robert; Miljanić, Saveta; Knežević, Željka; Stolarcyzk, Liliana; Durante, Marco; Harrison, Roger M

    2017-07-01

    To develop a simple model of therapeutic and stray absorbed dose for a variety of treatment machines and techniques without relying on proprietary machine-specific parameters. Dosimetry measurements conducted in this study and from the literature were used to develop an analytical model of absorbed dose from a variety of treatment machines and techniques in the 6 to 25 MV interval. A modified one-dimensional gamma-index analysis was performed to evaluate dosimetric accuracy of the model on an independent dataset consisting of measured dose profiles from seven treatment units spanning four manufacturers. The average difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose values was 9.9% for those datasets on which the model was trained. Additionally, these results indicate that the model can provide accurate calculations of both therapeutic and stray radiation dose from a wide variety of radiotherapy units and techniques. We have developed a simple analytical model of absorbed dose from external beam radiotherapy treatments in the 6 to 25 MV beam energy range. The model has been tested on measured data from multiple treatment machines and techniques, and is broadly applicable to contemporary external beam radiation therapy. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Validation of Monte Carlo simulation of 6 MV photon beam produced by Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator using BEAMnrc code and DOSXYZnrc code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheikh, Mohamed; Maghnouj, Abdelmajid; Tajmouati, Jaouad; Didi, Abdessamad; Ezzati, Ahad Olah

    2017-09-01

    The Monte Carlo model for the photon-beam output from the Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator was validated to compare the calculated to measured PDD and beam dose profiles The Monte Carlo calculation method is considered to be the most accurate method for dose calculation in radiotherapy. The objective of this study is to build a Monte Carlo geometry of Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator as realistically as possible. The Monte Carlo codes used in this work were the BEAMnrc code to simulate the photons beam and the DOSXYZnrc code to examinate the absorbed dose in the water phantom. We have calculated percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles of the 6 MV photon beam for the 6 × 6 cm2, 10 × 10 cm2 and 15 × 15 cm2 field sizes. We have used the gamma index technique for the quantitative evaluation to compare the measured and calculated distributions. Good agreement was found between calculated PDD and beam profile compared to measured data. The comparison was evaluated using the gamma index method and the criterions were 3% for dose difference and 3 mm for distance to agreement. The gamma index acceptance rate was more than 97% of both distribution comparisons PDDs and dose profiles and our results were more developed and accurate. The Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator was accurately modeled using Monte Carlo codes: BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes package.

  17. A Monte Carlo study on electron and neutron contamination caused by the presence of hip prosthesis in photon mode of a 15 MV Siemens PRIMUS linac.

    PubMed

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Behmadi, Marziyeh; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2013-09-06

    Several investigators have pointed out that electron and neutron contamination from high-energy photon beams are clinically important. The aim of this study is to assess electron and neutron contamination production by various prostheses in a high-energy photon beam of a medical linac. A 15 MV Siemens PRIMUS linac was simulated by MCNPX Monte Carlo (MC) code and the results of percentage depth dose (PDD) and dose profile values were compared with the measured data. Electron and neutron contaminations were calculated on the beam's central axis for Co-Cr-Mo, stainless steel, Ti-alloy, and Ti hip prostheses through MC simulations. Dose increase factor (DIF) was calculated as the ratio of electron (neutron) dose at a point for 10 × 10 cm² field size in presence of prosthesis to that at the same point in absence of prosthesis. DIF was estimated at different depths in a water phantom. Our MC-calculated PDD and dose profile data are in good agreement with the corresponding measured values. Maximum dose increase factor for electron contamination for Co-Cr-Mo, stainless steel, Ti-alloy, and Ti prostheses were equal to 1.18, 1.16, 1.16, and 1.14, respectively. The corresponding values for neutron contamination were respectively equal to: 184.55, 137.33, 40.66, and 43.17. Titanium-based prostheses are recommended for the orthopedic practice of hip junction replacement. When treatment planning for a patient with hip prosthesis is performed for a high-energy photon beam, attempt should be made to ensure that the prosthesis is not exposed to primary photons.

  18. Analysis of the EBT3 Gafchromic film irradiated with 6 MV photons and 6 MeV electrons using reflective mode scanners.

    PubMed

    Farah, Nicolas; Francis, Ziad; Abboud, Marie

    2014-09-01

    We explore in our study the effects of electrons and X-rays irradiations on the newest version of the Gafchromic EBT3 film. Experiments are performed using the Varian "TrueBeam 1.6" medical accelerator delivering 6 MV X-ray photons and 6 MeV electron beams as desired. The main interest is to compare the responses of EBT3 films exposed to two separate beams of electrons and photons, for radiation doses ranging up to 500 cGy. The analysis is done on a flatbed EPSON 10000 XL scanner and cross checked on a HP Scanjet 4850 scanner. Both scanners are used in reflection mode taking into account landscape and portrait scanning positions. After thorough verifications, the reflective scanning method can be used on EBT3 as an economic alternative to the transmission method which was also one of the goals of this study. A comparison is also done between single scan configuration including all samples in a single A4 (HP) or A3 (EPSON) format area and multiple scan procedure where each sample is scanned separately on its own. The images analyses are done using the ImageJ software. Results show significant influence of the scanning configuration but no significant differences between electron and photon irradiations for both single and multiple scan configurations. In conclusion, the film provides a reliable relative dose measurement method for electrons and photons irradiations in the medical field applications. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Varian 2100C/D Clinac 18 MV photon phase space file characterization and modeling by using MCNP Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzati, Ahad Ollah

    2015-07-01

    Multiple points and a spatial mesh based surface source model (MPSMBSS) was generated for 18MV Varian 2100 C/D Clinac phase space file (PSF) and implemented in MCNP code. The generated source model (SM) was benchmarked against PSF and measurements. PDDs and profiles were calculated using the SM and original PSF for different field sizes from 5 × 5 to 20 × 20 cm2. Agreement was within 2% of the maximum dose at 100cm SSD for beam profiles at the depths of 4cm and 15cm with respect to the original PSF. Differences between measured and calculated points were less than 2% of the maximum dose or 2mm distance to agreement (DTA) at 100 cm SSD. Thus it can be concluded that the modified MCNP code can be used for radiotherapy calculations including multiple source model (MSM) and using the source biasing capability of MPSMBSS can increase the simulation speed up to 3600 for field sizes smaller than 5 × 5 cm2.

  20. SU-E-J-38: Comparison of 6MV Photon Dose in a Perpendicular and Parallel Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Integrating a linac with an MRI system would allow for real time tumour tracking however the patient will be irradiated in the presence of a magnetic field. The present study experimentally investigates the magnetic field effects on entrance, exit, and interface dose for both transverse and parallel magnetic fields. Methods: Polystyrene was used to construct a set of phantoms for Gafchromic film measurements. One phantom had an adjustable air gap and four other phantoms had one surface at various angles. The linac-MR prototype consisting of a biplanar permanent magnet coupled to a linac was used for the transverse magnetic field measurements. A couple of solenoid electromagnets, stacked on top of each other and irradiated along their bore, were used for the parallel field measurements. Results: All doses are relative to no magnetic field. The transverse magnetic field reduced the entrance dose for all surface angles by strongly deflecting the contaminant electrons. The exit dose in a transverse magnetic field was found to be significantly higher. The entrance dose with a parallel magnetic field present is higher due to the contaminant electrons being concentrated within the beam area. The air gap phantom measurements, done in a transverse magnetic field, show a significant increase of the dose at the proximal side of the air gap and a decrease at the distal side. The measurements, done in the parallel magnetic field, show the concentration of secondary electrons in the air gap. Conclusion: The radiation dose measurements of a 6MV beam in a parallel and transverse magnetic field presented here are currently being replicated using Monte Carlo simulations. This verified Monte Carlo system could provide the dose calculation basis for future linac-MR systems.

  1. Experimental determination of beam quality factors, kQ, for two types of Farmer chamber in a 10 MV photon and a 175 MeV proton beam.

    PubMed

    Medin, Joakim; Ross, Carl K; Klassen, Norman V; Palmans, Hugo; Grusell, Erik; Grindborg, Jan-Erik

    2006-03-21

    Absorbed doses determined with a sealed water calorimeter operated at 4 degrees C are compared with the results obtained using ionization chambers and the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice in a 10 MV photon beam (TPR(20,10) = 0.734) and a 175 MeV proton beam (at a depth corresponding to the residual range, R(res) = 14.7 cm). Three NE 2571 and two FC65-G ionization chambers were calibrated in terms of absorbed-dose-to-water in (60)Co at the Swedish secondary standard dosimetry laboratory, directly traceable to the BIPM. In the photon beam quality, calorimetry was found to agree with ionometry within 0.3%, confirming the k(Q) values tabulated in TRS-398. In contrast, a 1.8% deviation was found in the proton beam at 6 g cm(-2) depth, suggesting that the TRS-398 tabulated k(Q) values for these two ionization chamber types are too high. Assuming no perturbation effect in the proton beam for the ionization chambers, a value for (w(air)/e)(Q) of 33.6 J C(-1) +/- 1.7% (k = 1) can be derived from these measurements. An analytical evaluation of the effect from non-elastic nuclear interactions in the ionization chamber wall indicates a perturbation effect of 0.6%. Including this estimated result in the proton beam would increase the determined (w(air)/e)(Q) value by the same amount.

  2. Analysis of latent variance reduction methods in phase space Monte Carlo calculations for 6, 10 and 18 MV photons by using MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzati, A. O.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2013-02-01

    In this study, azimuthal particle redistribution (APR), and azimuthal particle rotational splitting (APRS) methods are implemented in MCNPX2.4 source code. First of all, the efficiency of these methods was compared to two tallying methods. The APRS is more efficient than the APR method in track length estimator tallies. However in the energy deposition tally, both methods have nearly the same efficiency. Latent variance reduction factors were obtained for 6, 10 and 18 MV photons as well. The APRS relative efficiency contours were obtained. These obtained contours reveal that by increasing the photon energies, the contours depth and the surrounding areas were further increased. The relative efficiency contours indicated that the variance reduction factor is position and energy dependent. The out of field voxels relative efficiency contours showed that latent variance reduction methods increased the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation efficiency in the out of field voxels. The APR and APRS average variance reduction factors had differences less than 0.6% for splitting number of 1000.

  3. SU-E-T-175: Evaluation of the Relative Output Ratio for Collimator Jaw and MLC Defined Small Static 6MV Photon Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, G; Thwaites, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate relative output ratio of collimator jaw and MLC defined small photon fields. Methods: Relative output ratios were measured using Gafchromic EBT3 film for a 6 MV photon beam on a Novalis Tx with HD120 MLC. Beam collimation was achieved by the jaws for 1.0 cm and 3.0 cm and MLC defined square field sizes between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm with varying jaw settings between 2.0 and 4.0 cm. Film pieces were exposed to 4 Gy. Experiments were repeated with each session consisting of five consecutive exposures for the given MLC and/or jaw collimation and with the MLC and the jaws reset for each exposure. Films were scanned using EPSON 10000XL flatbed scanner approximately 24 hours after exposure in 48 bit RGB format at 150 dpi. Film calibration data were corrected for daily linac output variations. Doses were evaluated using the green channel with square ROI sizes of 0.1 – 0.6 cm. Converted doses were normalised for output ratio calculation using the 3.0 cm field as a machine specific reference field size. Mean output ratio and coefficient of variation (CV) were calculated for each experimental session. Results: For the Novalis 6 MV photon beam the output ratios between 0.719 and 0.872 have been measured for the jaw/MLC combinations tested. For a jaw setting of 4.0 cm field, the mean CV of the output ratios increased from 0.77% to 1.48% with decreasing MLC field size from 1.0 cm to 0.5 cm. For a nominal MLC 1.0 cm field, the CV increased to 1.00% from 0.77% with reducing jaw field size from 4.0 cm to 2.0 cm. Conclusion: The relative output ratio and the associated CV were dependent on the collimator jaw and MLC settings. The field size dependent CV showed similar trends to those reported in the literature.

  4. Portal scatter to primary dose ratio of 4 to 18 MV photon spectra incident on heterogeneous phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozard, Siobhan R.

    Electronic portal imagers designed and used to verify the positioning of a cancer patient undergoing radiation treatment can also be employed to measure the in vivo dose received by the patient. This thesis investigates the ratio of the dose from patient-scattered particles to the dose from primary (unscattered) photons at the imaging plane, called the scatter to primary dose ratio (SPR). The composition of the SPR according to the origin of scatter is analyzed more thoroughly than in previous studies. A new analytical method for calculating the SPR is developed and experimentally verified for heterogeneous phantoms. A novel technique that applies the analytical SPR method for in vivo dosimetry with a portal imager is evaluated. Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine the imager dose from patient-generated electrons and photons that scatter one or more times within the object. The database of SPRs reported from this investigation is new since the contribution from patient-generated electrons was neglected by previous Monte Carlo studies. The SPR from patient-generated electrons was found here to be as large as 0.03. The analytical SPR method relies on the established result that the scatter dose is uniform for an air gap between the patient and the imager that is greater than 50 cm. This method also applies the hypothesis that first-order Compton scatter only, is sufficient for scatter estimation. A comparison of analytical and measured SPRs for neck, thorax, and pelvis phantoms showed that the maximum difference was within +/-0.03, and the mean difference was less than +/-0.01 for most cases. This accuracy was comparable to similar analytical approaches that are limited to homogeneous phantoms. The analytical SPR method could replace lookup tables of measured scatter doses that can require significant time to measure. In vivo doses were calculated by combining our analytical SPR method and the convolution/superposition algorithm. Our calculated in vivo doses

  5. Comparison of Flattening Filter (FF) and Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) 6 MV photon beam characteristics for small field dosimetry using EGSnrc Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeetha, S.; Sureka, C. S.

    2017-06-01

    The present study is focused to compare the characteristics of Varian Clinac 600 C/D flattened and unflattened 6 MV photon beams for small field dosimetry using EGSnrc Monte Carlo Simulation since the small field dosimetry is considered to be the most crucial and provoking task in the field of radiation dosimetry. A 6 MV photon beam of a Varian Clinac 600 C/D medical linear accelerator operates with Flattening Filter (FF) and Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) mode for small field dosimetry were performed using EGSnrc Monte Carlo user codes (BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc) in order to calculate the beam characteristics using Educated-trial and error method. These includes: Percentage depth dose, lateral beam profile, dose rate delivery, photon energy spectra, photon beam uniformity, out-of-field dose, surface dose, penumbral dose and output factor for small field dosimetry (0.5×0.5 cm2 to 4×4 cm2) and are compared with magna-field sizes (5×5 cm2 to 40×40 cm2) at various depths. The results obtained showed that the optimized beam energy and Full-width-half maximum value for small field dosimetry and magna-field dosimetry was found to be 5.7 MeV and 0.13 cm for both FF and FFF beams. The depth of dose maxima for small field size deviates minimally for both FF and FFF beams similar to magna-fields. The depths greater than dmax depicts a steeper dose fall off in the exponential region for FFF beams comparing FF beams where its deviations gets increased with the increase in field size. The shape of the lateral beam profiles of FF and FFF beams varies remains similar for the small field sizes less than 4×4 cm2 whereas it varies in the case of magna-fields. Dose rate delivery for FFF beams shows an eminent increase with a two-fold factor for both small field dosimetry and magna-field sizes. The surface dose measurements of FFF beams for small field size were found to be higher whereas it gets lower for magna-fields than FF beam. The amount of out-of-field dose reduction gets

  6. SU-E-T-454: Impact of Air Gap On PDDs of 6 MV Photon Beam for Various Field Sizes in Inhomogeneous Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Oyewale, S; Pokharel; Singh, H; Islam, M; Rana, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate how the shape of air gap and its size will impact the percent depth doses (PDDs) of a 6MV photon beam for various field sizes. Methods: Two in-house phantoms were manufactured containing rectangular (phantom A) and circular (phantom B) air gaps. Both phantoms A and B were composed of same top layer (solid-water; 30×30cm{sup 2},5cm thickness) and bottom layer (solid-water; 30×30cm {sup 2},8cm thickness), but middle layer was varied to observe air gap effects and scatter contribution to the measurement point. In phantom A, a rectangular shaped air gap (30×30cm{sup 2},7cm thickness) was created by placing Styrofoam blocks between top and bottom layers of the phantom. In phantom B, middle layer was replaced by “inhomogenous block”, composed of acrylic plate (30×30cm{sup 2}, 4cm thickness) followed by PVC(30×30cm{sup 2},3cm thickness). Additionally, circular air gap was created by drilling a hole (diameter=2.8cm, length=7cm) at the center of “inhomogenous block”. In both phantoms, measurement readings were obtained at 13cm depth (i.e., 1cm after air gap) and depth of maximum dose(6MV energy; 100 MUs; field sizes ranged from 3×3cm{sup 2} to 10×10cm{sup 2}). The PDDs at 13cm depth were compared in both phantoms. Results: The measurements in both phantoms A and B showed an almost linear increase in PDDs with increasing field size, especially for smaller field sizes (from 3×3 to 7×7cm{sup 2}). For each field size, the PDD in phantom A was smaller compared to the one in phantom B. The difference in PDDs between two phantoms decreased with an increase in field size as the PDD difference decreased from 9.0% to 6.4%. Conclusion: The shape and size of air gap affect the PDD measurements in secondary build-up region as 6 MV primary beam traverses through the center of air gap. The scatter contribution due to increase in field size was more noticeable for field sizes ≤7×7cm{sup 2}.

  7. Validation of GEANT4 simulations for percentage depth dose calculations in heterogeneous media by using small photon beams from the 6-MV Cyberknife: Comparison with photon beam dosimetry with EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung Il; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Shin, Jae Won; Hong, Seung-Woo; Suh, Tae Suk; Min, Kyung Joo; Lee, Sang Deok; Chung, Su Mi; Jung, Jae-Yong

    2015-04-01

    Percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions in heterogeneous phantoms with lung and soft bone equivalent media are studied by using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. For lung equivalent media, Balsa wood is used, and for soft bone equivalent media, a compound material with epoxy resin, hardener and calcium carbonate is used. Polystyrene slabs put together with these materials are used as a heterogeneous phantom. Dose measurements are performed with Gafchromic EBT2 film by using photon beams from the 6-MV CyberKnife at the Seoul Uridul Hospital. The cone sizes of the photon beams are varied from 5 to 10 to 30 mm. When the Balsa wood is inserted in the phantom, the dose measured with EBT2 film is found to be significantly different from the dose without the EBT2 film in and the dose beyond the Balsa wood region, particularly for small field sizes. On the other hand, when the soft bone equivalent material is inserted in the phantom, the discrepancy between the dose measured with EBT2 film and the dose without EBT2 film can be seen only in the region of the soft bone equivalent material. GEANT4 simulations are done with and without the EBT2 film to compare the simulation results with measurements. The GEANT4 simulations including EBT2 film are found to agree well with the measurements for all the cases within an error of 2.2%. The results of the present study show that GEANT4 gives reasonable results for the PDD calculations in heterogeneous media when using photon beams produced by the 6-MV CyberKnife

  8. Comparison of out-of-field photon doses in 6 MV IMRT and neutron doses in proton therapy for adult and pediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, Basit S.; Bednarz, Bryan; Seco, Joao; Hancox, Cindy; Paganetti, Harald

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess lateral out-of-field doses in 6 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) and compare them with secondary neutron equivalent dose contributions in proton therapy. We simulated out-of-field photon doses to various organs as a function of distance, patient's age, gender and treatment volumes based on 3, 6, 9 cm field diameters in the head and neck and spine region. The out-of-field photon doses to organs near the field edge were found to be in the range of 2, 5 and 10 mSv Gy-1 for 3 cm, 6 cm and 9 cm diameter IMRT fields, respectively, within 5 cm of the field edge. Statistical uncertainties calculated in organ doses vary from 0.2% to 40% depending on the organ location and the organ volume. Next, a comparison was made with previously calculated neutron equivalent doses from proton therapy using identical field arrangements. For example, out-of-field doses for IMRT to lung and uterus (organs close to the 3 cm diameter spinal field) were computed to be 0.63 and 0.62 mSv Gy-1, respectively. These numbers are found to be a factor of 2 smaller than the corresponding out-of-field doses for proton therapy, which were estimated to be 1.6 and 1.7 mSv Gy-1 (RBE), respectively. However, as the distance to the field edge increases beyond approximately 25 cm the neutron equivalent dose from proton therapy was found to be a factor of 2-3 smaller than the out-of-field photon dose from IMRT. We have also analyzed the neutron equivalent doses from an ideal scanned proton therapy (assuming not significant amount of absorbers in the treatment head). Out-of-field doses were found to be an order of magnitude smaller compared to out-of-field doses in IMRT or passive scattered proton therapy. In conclusion, there seem to be three geometrical areas when comparing the out-of-target dose from IMRT and (passive scattered) proton treatments. Close to the target (in-field, not analyzed here) protons offer a distinct advantage due to the lower

  9. Comparison of build-up region doses in oblique tangential 6 MV photon beams calculated by AAA and CCC algorithms in breast Rando phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunun, P.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Dumrongkijudom, N.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the build-up region doses on breast Rando phantom surface with the bolus covered, the doses in breast Rando phantom and also the doses in a lung that is the heterogeneous region by two algorithms. The AAA in Eclipse TPS and the collapsed cone convolution algorithm in Pinnacle treatment planning system were used to plan in tangential field technique with 6 MV photon beam at 200 cGy total doses in Breast Rando phantom with bolus covered (5 mm and 10 mm). TLDs were calibrated with Cobalt-60 and used to measure the doses in irradiation process. The results in treatment planning show that the doses in build-up region and the doses in breast phantom were closely matched in both algorithms which are less than 2% differences. However, overestimate of doses in a lung (L2) were found in AAA with 13.78% and 6.06% differences at 5 mm and 10 mm bolus thickness, respectively when compared with CCC algorithm. The TLD measurements show the underestimate in buildup region and in breast phantom but the doses in a lung (L2) were overestimated when compared with the doses in the two plannings at both thicknesses of the bolus.

  10. Measurement of photoneutron dose produced by wedge filters of a high energy linac using polycarbonate films.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Hashemi-Malayeri, Bijan; Raisali, Gholamreza; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Sharafi, Ali Akbar; Torkzadeh, Falamarz

    2008-05-01

    Radiotherapy represents the most widely spread technique to control and treat cancer. To increase the treatment efficiency, high energy linacs are used. However, applying high energy photon beams leads to a non-negligible dose of neutrons contaminating therapeutic beams. In addition, using conventional linacs necessitates applying wedge filters in some clinical conditions. However, there is not enough information on the effect of these filters on the photoneutrons produced. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of photoneutron dose equivalent due to the use of linac wedge filters. A high energy (18 MV) linear accelerator (Elekta SL 75/25) was studied. Polycarbonate films were used to measure the dose equivalent of photoneutrons. After electrochemical etching of the films, the neutron dose equivalent was calculated using Hp(10) factor, and its variation on the patient plane at 0, 5, 10, 50 and 100 cm from the center of the X-ray beam was determined. By increasing the distance from the center of the X-ray beam towards the periphery, the photoneutron dose equivalent decreased rapidly for the open and wedged fields. Increasing of the field size increased the photoneutron dose equivalent. The use of wedge filter increased the proportion of the neutron dose equivalent. The increase can be accounted for by the selective absorption of the high energy photons by the wedge filter.

  11. SU-E-T-525: Dosimetric Validation of the Algorithm Based on Linear Boltzmann Transport Equations for Photon 4MV Dose Calculation.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Miyabe, Y; Nakata, M; Tsuruta, Y; Nakamura, M; Mizowaki, T; Hiraoka, M

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate a dosimetric accuracy of AcurosXB dose calculation algorithm for 4 MV photon beam. Four MV beam (Clinac-6EX) and AAA and AcurosXB algorithms (pre-release version 11.0.03.) were used in this study. The differences of the calculation with AAA (EAAA) and AcurosXB (EAXB) to the measurement were evaluated in the depth doses to 25 cm depth and dose profiles within the water and slab phantoms (water, lung and bone equivalent). In addition, the clinical cases, including three whole breast plans and three head and neck IMRT plans, were evaluated. First the AAA plans were calculated, then AcurosXB plans were recalculated with dose-to-medium with identical beam setup and monitor units as in the AAA plan. In the water phantom study, the EAAA and EAXB were up to 2.2% and 1.5% in the depth doses for the open field (field size = 4 - 40cm square), respectively. Under the heterogeneity conditions, the EAAA and EAXB were less than 4.4% and 2.2% in lung region, and less than 12.5% and 6.3% in bone region, respectively. In the re-buildup region after passing through the lung phantom, the AAA overestimated the doses about 10%; however AcurosXB had good agreement with measurement within 3%. Dose profiles with AcurosXB were better agreement with measurement than AAA. In the clinical cases, the dose of the skin surface region with AcurosXB were higher than AAA by at least 10%, and the dose differences over 5% appeared in heterogeneous region. However, DVH shapes of each organ were similar between AAA and AcurosXB within 2%. In phantom study, AcurosXB had better agreement to measurement than AAA, especially in heterogeneous region and re-buildup region. In the clinical cases, there were large differences between AcurosXB and AAA in the surface region. Evaluation Agreement of non-clinical versions of Acuros XB with Varian Medical Systems. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. An investigation of the depth dose in the build-up region, and surface dose for a 6-MV therapeutic photon beam: Monte Carlo simulation and measurements

    PubMed Central

    Apipunyasopon, Lukkana; Srisatit, Somyot; Phaisangittisakul, Nakorn

    2013-01-01

    The percentage depth dose in the build-up region and the surface dose for the 6-MV photon beam from a Varian Clinac 23EX medical linear accelerator was investigated for square field sizes of 5 × 5, 10 × 10, 15 × 15 and 20 × 20 cm2using the EGS4nrc Monte Carlo (MC) simulation package. The depth dose was found to change rapidly in the build-up region, and the percentage surface dose increased proportionally with the field size from approximately 10% to 30%. The measurements were also taken using four common detectors: TLD chips, PFD dosimeter, parallel-plate and cylindrical ionization chamber, and compared with MC simulated data, which served as the gold standard in our study. The surface doses obtained from each detector were derived from the extrapolation of the measured depth doses near the surface and were all found to be higher than that of the MC simulation. The lowest and highest over-responses in the surface dose measurement were found with the TLD chip and the CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber, respectively. Increasing the field size increased the percentage surface dose almost linearly in the various dosimeters and also in the MC simulation. Interestingly, the use of the CC13 ionization chamber eliminates the high gradient feature of the depth dose near the surface. The correction factors for the measured surface dose from each dosimeter for square field sizes of between 5 × 5 and 20 × 20 cm2are introduced. PMID:23104898

  13. A feasibility study to calculate unshielded fetal doses to pregnant patients in 6-MV photon treatments using Monte Carlo methods and anatomically realistic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X. George

    2008-07-15

    A Monte Carlo-based procedure to assess fetal doses from 6-MV external photon beam radiation treatments has been developed to improve upon existing techniques that are based on AAPM Task Group Report 36 published in 1995 [M. Stovall et al., Med. Phys. 22, 63-82 (1995)]. Anatomically realistic models of the pregnant patient representing 3-, 6-, and 9-month gestational stages were implemented into the MCNPX code together with a detailed accelerator model that is capable of simulating scattered and leakage radiation from the accelerator head. Absorbed doses to the fetus were calculated for six different treatment plans for sites above the fetus and one treatment plan for fibrosarcoma in the knee. For treatment plans above the fetus, the fetal doses tended to increase with increasing stage of gestation. This was due to the decrease in distance between the fetal body and field edge with increasing stage of gestation. For the treatment field below the fetus, the absorbed doses tended to decrease with increasing gestational stage of the pregnant patient, due to the increasing size of the fetus and relative constant distance between the field edge and fetal body for each stage. The absorbed doses to the fetus for all treatment plans ranged from a maximum of 30.9 cGy to the 9-month fetus to 1.53 cGy to the 3-month fetus. The study demonstrates the feasibility to accurately determine the absorbed organ doses in the mother and fetus as part of the treatment planning and eventually in risk management.

  14. A 4 MV flattening filter-free beam: commissioning and application to conformal therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, S. W.; Rosser, K. E.; Bedford, J. L.

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that radiotherapy treatments undertaken on a flattening filter-free (FFF) linear accelerator have a number of advantages over treatments undertaken on a conventional linear accelerator. In addition, 4 MV photon beams may give improved isodose coverage for some treatment volumes at air/tissue interfaces, compared to when utilizing the clinical standard of 6 MV photons. In order to investigate these benefits, FFF beams were established on an Elekta Beam Modulator linear accelerator for 4 MV photons. Commissioning beam data were obtained for open and wedged fields. The measured data were then imported into a treatment planning system and a beam model was commissioned. The beam model was optimized to improve dose calculations at shallow, clinically relevant depths. Following verification, the beam model was utilized in a treatment planning study, including volumetric modulated arc therapy, for a selection of lung, breast/chest wall and larynx patients. Increased dose rates of around 800 MU min-1 were recorded for open fields (relative to 320 MU min-1 for filtered open fields) and reduced head scatter was inferred from output factor measurements. Good agreement between planned and delivered dose was observed in verification of treatment plans. The planning study indicated that with a FFF beam, equivalent (and in some cases improved) isodose profiles could be achieved for small lung and larynx treatment volumes relative to 4 MV filtered treatments. Furthermore, FFF treatments with wedges could be replicated using open fields together with an 'effective wedge' technique and isocentre shift. Clinical feasibility of a FFF beam was therefore demonstrated, with beam modelling, treatment planning and verification being successfully accomplished.

  15. SU-E-T-313: Dosimetric Deviation of Misaligned Beams for a 6 MV Photon Linear Accelerator Using Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric variations of misaligned beams for a linear accelerator by using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Method and Materials: Misaligned beams of a Varian 21EX Clinac were simulated to estimate the dosimetric effects. All the linac head components for a 6 MV photon beam were implemented in BEAMnrc/EGSnrc system. For incident electron beam parameters, 6 MeV with 0.1 cm full-width-half-max Gaussian beam was used. A phase space file was obtained below the jaw per each misalignment condition of the incident electron beam: (1) The incident electron beams were tilted by 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 degrees on the x-axis from the central axis. (2) The center of the incident electron beam was off-axially moved toward +x-axis by 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 cm away from the central axis. Lateral profiles for each misaligned beam condition were acquired at dmax = 1.5 cm and 10 cm depth in a rectangular water phantom. Beam flatness and symmetry were calculated by using the lateral profile data. Results: The lateral profiles were found to be skewed opposite to the angle of the incident beam for the tilted beams. For the displaced beams, similar skewed lateral profiles were obtained with small shifts of penumbra on the +x-axis. The variations of beam flatness were 3.89–11.18% and 4.12–42.57% for the tilted beam and the translated beam, respectively. The beam symmetry was separately found to be 2.95 −9.93% and 2.55–38.06% separately. It was found that the percent increase of the flatness and the symmetry values are approximated 2 to 3% per 0.5 degree tilt or per 1 mm displacement. Conclusion: This study quantified the dosimetric effects of misaligned beams using MC simulations. The results would be useful to understand the magnitude of the dosimetric deviations for the misaligned beams.

  16. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yani, Sitti; Dirgayussa, I Gde E.; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam; Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah

    2015-09-30

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm{sup 3}, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3}. The 1 × 10{sup 9} histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in d{sub max} from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3} about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3} about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  17. Accuracy of dose measurements and calculations within and beyond heterogeneous tissues for 6 MV photon fields smaller than 4 cm produced by Cyberknife

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Ellen E.; Daskalov, George M.

    2008-06-15

    For the small radiation field sizes used in stereotactic radiosurgery, lateral electronic disequilibrium and steep dose gradients exist in a large portion of these fields, requiring the use of high-resolution measurement techniques. These relatively large areas of electronic disequilibrium make accurate dosimetry as well as dose calculation more difficult, and this is exacerbated in regions of tissue heterogeneity. Tissue heterogeneity was considered insignificant in the brain where stereotactic radiosurgery was first used. However, as this technique is expanded to the head and neck and other body sites, dose calculations need to account for dose perturbations in and beyond air cavities, lung, and bone. In a previous study we have evaluated EBT Gafchromic film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ) for dosimetry and characterization of the Cyberknife radiation beams and found that it was comparable to other common detectors used for small photon beams in solid water equivalent phantoms. In the present work EBT film is used to measure dose in heterogeneous slab phantoms containing lung and bone equivalent materials for the 6 MV radiation beams of diameter 7.5 to 40 mm produced by the Cyberknife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). These measurements are compared to calculations done with both the clinically utilized Raytrace algorithm as well as the newly developed Monte Carlo based algorithm available on the Cyberknife treatment planning system. Within the low density material both the measurements and Monte Carlo calculations correctly model the decrease in dose produced by a loss of electronic equilibrium, whereas the Raytrace algorithm incorrectly predicts an enhancement of dose in this region. Beyond the low density material an enhancement of dose is correctly calculated by both algorithms. Within the high density bone heterogeneity the EBT film measurements represent dose to unit density tissue in bone and agree with the Monte Carlo results when corrected to dose

  18. Rethinking wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I.

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Stabilizing CO2 emissions at current levels for fifty years is not consistent with either an atmospheric CO2 concentration below 500 ppm or global temperature increases below 2 °C. Accepting these targets, solving the climate problem requires that emissions peak and decline in the next few decades, and ultimately fall to near zero. Phasing out emissions over 50 years could be achieved by deploying on the order of 19 'wedges', each of which ramps up linearly over a period of 50 years to ultimately avoid 1 GtC y-1 of CO2 emissions. But this level of mitigation will require affordable carbon-free energy systems to be deployed at the scale of tens of terawatts. Any hope for such fundamental and disruptive transformation of the global energy system depends upon coordinated efforts to innovate, plan, and deploy new transportation and energy systems that can provide affordable energy at this scale without emitting CO2 to the atmosphere. 1. Introduction In 2004, Pacala and Socolow published a study in Science arguing that '[h]umanity can solve the carbon and climate problem in the first half of this century simply by scaling up what we already know how to do' [1]. Specifically, they presented 15 options for 'stabilization wedges' that would grow linearly from zero to 1 Gt of carbon emissions avoided per year (GtC y-1 1 Gt = 1012 kg) over 50 years. The solution to the carbon and climate problem, they asserted, was 'to deploy the technologies and/or lifestyle changes necessary to fill all seven wedges of the stabilization triangle'. They claimed this would offset the growth of emissions and put us on a trajectory to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration at 500 ppm if emissions decreased sharply in the second half of the 21st century. The wedge concept has proven popular as an analytical tool for considering the potential of different technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. In the years since the paper was published, it has been cited more than 400 times, and

  19. Water equivalence study of some phantoms based on effective photon energy, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for clinical MV X-ray and Co-60 γ-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2013-02-01

    A previously proposed procedure has been applied to some water equivalent phantoms namely PMMA, Polystyrene, Solid Water (WT1), RW3 and ABS for the first time to compute effective photon energy (Eeff), effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (neeff) for different MV X-ray beams and Co-60 gamma beam which are heterogeneous in energy. For the purpose of the present investigation, effective atomic cross-sections of the given materials have been determined first to obtain effective photon energies which were further used for calculation of Zeff and neeff. Similar procedure was adopted for Co-60 γ-rays to check the validity of the present method. Results were found to be quite satisfactory. When it comes to the water equivalence, the Eeff results showed that the RW3 and ABS phantoms are more effective for 6 MV beam whereas RW3 and Polystyrene are more effective for 15 MV and Co-60 beams, respectively. The ABS and WT1 phantoms have better water equivalences than the others according to the Zeff and neeff results, respectively.

  20. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  1. Dose to 'water-like' media or dose to tissue in MV photons radiotherapy treatment planning: still a matter of debate.

    PubMed

    Andreo, Pedro

    2015-01-07

    The difference between Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP) based on the assumption of 'water-like' tissues with densities obtained from CT procedures, or on tissue compositions derived from CT-determined densities, have been investigated. Stopping powers and electron fluences have been calculated for a range of media and body tissues for 6 MV photon beams, including changes in their physical data (density and stopping powers). These quantities have been used to determine absorbed doses using cavity theory. It is emphasized that tissue compositions given in ICRU or ICRP reports should not be given the standing of physical constants as they correspond to average values obtained for a limited number of human-body samples. It has been shown that mass stopping-power ratios to water are more dependent on patient-to-patient composition differences, and therefore on their mean excitation energies (I-values), than on mass density. Electron fluence in different media are also more dependent on media composition (and their I-values) than on density. However, as a consequence of the balance between fluence and stopping powers, doses calculated from their product are more constant than what the independent stopping powers and fluence variations suggest. Additionally, cancelations in dose ratios minimize the differences between the 'water-like' and 'tissue' approaches, yielding practically identical results except for bone, and to a lesser extent for adipose tissue. A priori, changing from one approach to another does not seem to be justified considering the large number of approximations and uncertainties involved throughout the treatment planning tissue segmentation and dose calculation procedures. The key issue continues to be the composition of tissues and their I-values, and as these cannot be obtained for individual patients, whatever approach is selected does not lead to significant differences from a water reference dose, the maximum of these being of the order of 5

  2. Dose to ‘water-like’ media or dose to tissue in MV photons radiotherapy treatment planning: still a matter of debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreo, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The difference between Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP) based on the assumption of ‘water-like’ tissues with densities obtained from CT procedures, or on tissue compositions derived from CT-determined densities, have been investigated. Stopping powers and electron fluences have been calculated for a range of media and body tissues for 6 MV photon beams, including changes in their physical data (density and stopping powers). These quantities have been used to determine absorbed doses using cavity theory. It is emphasized that tissue compositions given in ICRU or ICRP reports should not be given the standing of physical constants as they correspond to average values obtained for a limited number of human-body samples. It has been shown that mass stopping-power ratios to water are more dependent on patient-to-patient composition differences, and therefore on their mean excitation energies (I-values), than on mass density. Electron fluence in different media are also more dependent on media composition (and their I-values) than on density. However, as a consequence of the balance between fluence and stopping powers, doses calculated from their product are more constant than what the independent stopping powers and fluence variations suggest. Additionally, cancelations in dose ratios minimize the differences between the ‘water-like’ and ‘tissue’ approaches, yielding practically identical results except for bone, and to a lesser extent for adipose tissue. A priori, changing from one approach to another does not seem to be justified considering the large number of approximations and uncertainties involved throughout the treatment planning tissue segmentation and dose calculation procedures. The key issue continues to be the composition of tissues and their I-values, and as these cannot be obtained for individual patients, whatever approach is selected does not lead to significant differences from a water reference dose, the maximum of these being of the

  3. SU-E-T-46: A Monte Carlo Investigation of Radiation Interactions with Gold Nanoparticles in Water for 6 MV, 85 KeV and 40 KeV Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, D B; O’Brien, D J; McFadden, C H; Wolfe, T; Krishnan, S; Sawakuchi, G O; Hallacy, T M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of gold-nanoparticles (AuNPs) on energy deposition in water for different irradiation conditions. Methods: TOPAS version B12 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate energy deposition in water from monoenergetic 40 keV and 85 keV photon beams and a 6 MV Varian Clinac photon beam (IAEA phase space file, 10x10 cm{sup 2}, SSD 100 cm). For the 40 and 85 keV beams, monoenergetic 2x2 mm{sup 2} parallel beams were used to irradiate a 30x30x10 µm {sup 3} water mini-phantom located at 1.5 cm depth in a 30x30x50 cm{sup 3} water phantom. 5000 AuNPs of 50 nm diameter were randomly distributed inside the mini-phantom. Energy deposition was scored in the mini-phantom with the AuNPs’ material set to gold and then water. For the 6 MV beam, we created another phase space (PHSP) file on the surface of a 2 mm diameter sphere located at 1.5 cm depth in the water phantom. The PHSP file consisted of all particles entering the sphere including backscattered particles. Simulations were then performed using the new PHSP as the source with the mini-phantom centered in a 2 mm diameter water sphere in vacuum. The g4em-livermore reference list was used with “EMRangeMin/EMRangeMax = 100 eV/7 MeV” and “SetProductionCutLowerEdge = 990 eV” to create the new PHSP, and “SetProductionCutLowerEdge = 100 eV” for the mini-phantom simulations. All other parameters were set as defaults (“finalRange = 100 µm”). Results: The addition of AuNPs resulted in an increase in the mini-phantom energy deposition of (7.5 ± 8.7)%, (1.6 ± 8.2)%, and (−0.6 ± 1.1)% for 40 keV, 85 keV and 6 MV beams respectively. Conclusion: Enhanced energy deposition was seen at low photon energies, but decreased with increasing energy. No enhancement was observed for the 6 MV beam. Future work is required to decrease the statistical uncertainties in the simulations. This research is partially supported from institutional funds from the Center for Radiation Oncology Research, The

  4. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  5. Comparison of pencil-beam, collapsed-cone and Monte-Carlo algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning for 6-MV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Dong Ho

    2015-07-01

    Treatment planning system calculations in inhomogeneous regions may present significant inaccuracies due to loss of electronic equilibrium. In this study, three different dose calculation algorithms, pencil beam (PB), collapsed cone (CC), and Monte-Carlo (MC), provided by our planning system were compared to assess their impact on the three-dimensional planning of lung and breast cases. A total of five breast and five lung cases were calculated by using the PB, CC, and MC algorithms. Planning treatment volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) delineations were performed according to our institution's protocols on the Oncentra MasterPlan image registration module, on 0.3-0.5 cm computed tomography (CT) slices taken under normal respiration conditions. Intensitymodulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were calculated for the three algorithm for each patient. The plans were conducted on the Oncentra MasterPlan (PB and CC) and CMS Monaco (MC) treatment planning systems for 6 MV. The plans were compared in terms of the dose distribution in target, the OAR volumes, and the monitor units (MUs). Furthermore, absolute dosimetry was measured using a three-dimensional diode array detector (ArcCHECK) to evaluate the dose differences in a homogeneous phantom. Comparing the dose distributions planned by using the PB, CC, and MC algorithms, the PB algorithm provided adequate coverage of the PTV. The MUs calculated using the PB algorithm were less than those calculated by using. The MC algorithm showed the highest accuracy in terms of the absolute dosimetry. Differences were found when comparing the calculation algorithms. The PB algorithm estimated higher doses for the target than the CC and the MC algorithms. The PB algorithm actually overestimated the dose compared with those calculated by using the CC and the MC algorithms. The MC algorithm showed better accuracy than the other algorithms.

  6. Monte Carlo modelling of diode detectors for small field MV photon dosimetry: detector model simplification and the sensitivity of correction factors to source parameterization.

    PubMed

    Cranmer-Sargison, G; Weston, S; Evans, J A; Sidhu, N P; Thwaites, D I

    2012-08-21

    The goal of this work was to examine the use of simplified diode detector models within a recently proposed Monte Carlo (MC) based small field dosimetry formalism and to investigate the influence of electron source parameterization has on MC calculated correction factors. BEAMnrc was used to model Varian 6 MV jaw-collimated square field sizes down to 0.5 cm. The IBA stereotactic field diode (SFD), PTW T60016 (shielded) and PTW T60017 (un-shielded) diodes were modelled in DOSRZnrc and isocentric output ratios (OR(fclin)(detMC)) calculated at depths of d = 1.5, 5.0 and 10.0 cm. Simplified detector models were then tested by evaluating the percent difference in (OR(fclin)(detMC)) between the simplified and complete detector models. The influence of active volume dimension on simulated output ratio and response factor was also investigated. The sensitivity of each MC calculated replacement correction factor (k(fclin,fmsr)(Qclin,Qmsr)), as a function of electron FWHM between 0.100 and 0.150 cm and energy between 5.5 and 6.5 MeV, was investigated for the same set of small field sizes using the simplified detector models. The SFD diode can be approximated simply as a silicon chip in water, the T60016 shielded diode can be modelled as a chip in water plus the entire shielding geometry and the T60017 unshielded diode as a chip in water plus the filter plate located upstream. The detector-specific (k(fclin,fmsr)(Qclin,Qmsr)), required to correct measured output ratios using the SFD, T60016 and T60017 diode detectors are insensitive to incident electron energy between 5.5 and 6.5 MeV and spot size variation between FWHM = 0.100 and 0.150 cm. Three general conclusions come out of this work: (1) detector models can be simplified to produce OR(fclin)(detMC) to within 1.0% of those calculated using the complete geometry, where typically not only the silicon chip, but also any high density components close to the chip, such as scattering plates or shielding material is necessary

  7. [Correction of enhanced dynamic wedge factor and analysis of monitor unit calculation].

    PubMed

    Huang, Sijuan; Chen, Lixin; Cao, Wufei; Sun, Wenzhao; Chen, Along; Liu, Bojio; Wang, Bin

    2015-02-01

    To study the correction of algorithm for Varian enhanced dynamic wedge(EDW) factors and compare the dose/monitor unit (MU) deviation measured at the central axis of EDW field with that obtained by manual calculation or using the treatment planning system. EDW factors and dose were measured with Thimble ion chamber at 10 cm depth under the water for 6 MV and 10 MV photon on Varian linear accelerator. The corresponding calculations were done with the radiation treatment planning system. An analytic formula, namely the MU Fraction model, was used to calculate the EDW factor, which was corrected with a constant factor. The MU of conventional 2-D planning derived from manual calculating, treatment planning system, and actual measurements were compared. With the measured results as the standard, the corrected manual calculation deviation of EDW factors was significantly reduced. For photon 6 MV, the maximum deviation reduced from 4.2% to 1.3% for 60° symmetry fields was, and from -4.7% to -1.8% for asymmetric fields. For photon 10 MV, the maximum deviation for all EDW fields was reduced from -3.0% to 1.1%. Comparison of the manual calculations with the measured results showed a MU deviation for symmetric fields within 2%, and more than 5% for some asymmetric fields. The deviation between the calculations of the treatment planning and the measured results was less than 1.5%. Constant factor correction can effectively reduce the deviation of manual calculation. For MU calculation of EDW field in conventional 2-D dimensional treatment planning, the corrected results of symmetric fields meet clinical requirements. While the minimum distance between the field edge and the central axis was less than 4 cm in asymmetric fields, the corresponding special method, measurement or the treatment planning system should be used to calculate the dose/MU.

  8. 2D mapping of the MV photon fluence and 3D dose reconstruction in real time for quality assurance during radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrowaili, Z. A.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Carolan, M.; Fuduli, I.; Porumb, C.; Petasecca, M.; Metcalfe, P.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2015-09-01

    Summary: the photon irradiation response of a 2D solid state transmission detector array mounted in a linac block tray is used to reconstruct the projected 2D dose map in a homogenous phantom along rays that diverge from the X-ray source and pass through each of the 121 detector elements. A unique diode response-to-dose scaling factor, applied to all detectors, is utilised in the reconstruction to demonstrate that real time QA during radiotherapy treatment is feasible. Purpose: to quantitatively demonstrate reconstruction of the real time radiation dose from the irradiation response of the 11×11 silicon Magic Plate (MP) detector array operated in Transmission Mode (MPTM). Methods and Materials: in transmission mode the MP is positioned in the block tray of a linac so that the central detector of the array lies on the central axis of the radiation beam. This central detector is used to determine the conversion factor from measured irradiation response to reconstructed dose at any point on the central axis within a homogenous solid water phantom. The same unique conversion factor is used for all MP detector elements lying within the irradiation field. Using the two sets of data, the 2D or 3D dose map is able to be reconstructed in the homogenous phantom. The technique we have developed is illustrated here for different depths and irradiation field sizes, (5 × 5 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2) as well as a highly non uniform irradiation field. Results: we find that the MPTM response is proportional to the projected 2D dose map measured at a specific phantom depth, the "sweet depth". A single factor, for several irradiation field sizes and depths, is derived to reconstruct the dose in the phantom along rays projected from the photon source through each MPTM detector element. We demonstrate that for all field sizes using the above method, the 2D reconstructed and measured doses agree to within ± 2.48% (2 standard deviation) for all in-field MP detector elements. Conclusions: a

  9. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement and the displacement correction factor for cylindrical ionization chambers in a 6 MV photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, C.; Hartmann, G. H.; Karger, C. P.

    2012-11-01

    The displacement effect of cylindrical ionization chambers is taken into account either by an effective point of measurement (EPOM) or, alternatively, by using a displacement correction factor. The dependence of these effects on water was examined as a function of the cavity radius for 60Co gamma radiation in a previous paper. This paper describes results for high-energy photon beams using the same measurement technique. Additionally, the displacement correction factor was directly measured. Absorbed doses measured under reference conditions following the international protocol IAEA TRS-398 and the German protocol DIN 6800-2 agreed well between the chambers with different cavity radii within a standard uncertainty of 0.2%. However, there was a constant difference of 0.2% between both protocols. Similar to our observations made in 60Co, absorbed doses measured with the different chambers at depths beyond the maximum showed deviations of up to 0.6% and 0.5% for IAEA TRS-398 and DIN 6800-2, respectively, and deviations of more than 1% were found for both protocols in the build-up and maximum region. We therefore propose modified formulas for the determination of the EPOM and the displacement correction factor.

  10. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement and the displacement correction factor for cylindrical ionization chambers in a 6 MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Legrand, C; Hartmann, G H; Karger, C P

    2012-11-07

    The displacement effect of cylindrical ionization chambers is taken into account either by an effective point of measurement (EPOM) or, alternatively, by using a displacement correction factor. The dependence of these effects on water was examined as a function of the cavity radius for (60)Co gamma radiation in a previous paper. This paper describes results for high-energy photon beams using the same measurement technique. Additionally, the displacement correction factor was directly measured. Absorbed doses measured under reference conditions following the international protocol IAEA TRS-398 and the German protocol DIN 6800-2 agreed well between the chambers with different cavity radii within a standard uncertainty of 0.2%. However, there was a constant difference of 0.2% between both protocols. Similar to our observations made in (60)Co, absorbed doses measured with the different chambers at depths beyond the maximum showed deviations of up to 0.6% and 0.5% for IAEA TRS-398 and DIN 6800-2, respectively, and deviations of more than 1% were found for both protocols in the build-up and maximum region. We therefore propose modified formulas for the determination of the EPOM and the displacement correction factor.

  11. Determination of output factor for 6 MV small photon beam: comparison between Monte Carlo simulation technique and microDiamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krongkietlearts, K.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Paisangittisakul, N.

    2016-03-01

    In order to improve the life's quality for a cancer patient, the radiation techniques are constantly evolving. Especially, the two modern techniques which are intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are quite promising. They comprise of many small beam sizes (beamlets) with various intensities to achieve the intended radiation dose to the tumor and minimal dose to the nearby normal tissue. The study investigates whether the microDiamond detector (PTW manufacturer), a synthetic single crystal diamond detector, is suitable for small field output factor measurement. The results were compared with those measured by the stereotactic field detector (SFD) and the Monte Carlo simulation (EGSnrc/BEAMnrc/DOSXYZ). The calibration of Monte Carlo simulation was done using the percentage depth dose and dose profile measured by the photon field detector (PFD) of the 10×10 cm2 field size with 100 cm SSD. Comparison of the values obtained from the calculations and measurements are consistent, no more than 1% difference. The output factors obtained from the microDiamond detector have been compared with those of SFD and Monte Carlo simulation, the results demonstrate the percentage difference of less than 2%.

  12. SU-E-J-239: Influence of RF Coil Materials On Surface and Buildup Dose From a 6MV Photon Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to perform real time tumour tracking using an integrated Linac-MR, images have to be acquired during irradiation. MRI uses RF coils in close proximity to the imaged volume. Given current RF coil designs this means that the high energy photons will be passing through the coil before reaching the patient. This study experimentally investigates the dose modifications that occur due to the presence of various RF coil materials in the treatment beam. Methods: Polycarbonate, copper or aluminum tape, and Teflon were used to emulate the base, conductor and cover respectively of a surface RF coil. These materials were placed at various distances from the surface of polystyrene or solid water phantoms which were irradiated in the presence of no magnetic field, a transverse 0.2T magnetic field, and a parallel 0.2T magnetic field. Percent depth doses were measured using ion chambers. Results: A significant increase in surface and buildup dose is observed. The surface dose is seen to decrease with an increasing separation between the emulated coil and the phantom surface, when no magnetic field is present. When a transverse magnetic field is applied the surface dose decreases faster with increasing separation, as some of the electrons created in the coil are curved away from the phantom’s surface. When a parallel field is present the surface dose stays approximately constant for small separations, only slightly decreasing for separations greater than 5cm, since the magnetic field focuses the electrons produced in the coil materials not allowing them to scatter. Conclusion: Irradiating a patient through an RF coil leads to an increase in the surface and buildup doses. Mitigating this increase is important for the successful clinical use of either a transverse or a parallel configuration Linac-MR unit. This project is partially supported by an operating grant from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR MOP 93752)

  13. Optimization of combined electron and photon beams for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, W.; Li, J.; Chen, L.; Price, R. A.; Freedman, G.; Ding, M.; Qin, L.; Yang, J.; Ma, C.-M.

    2004-05-01

    Recently, intensity-modulated radiation therapy and modulated electron radiotherapy have gathered a growing interest for the treatment of breast and head and neck tumours. In this work, we carried out a study to combine electron and photon beams to achieve differential dose distributions for multiple target volumes simultaneously. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown optimization and dose calculation software for different treatment techniques. Five different planning techniques have been developed for this study based on a standard photon beam whole breast treatment and an electron beam tumour bed cone down. Technique 1 includes two 6 MV tangential wedged photon beams followed by an anterior boost electron field. Technique 2 includes two 6 MV tangential intensity-modulated photon beams and the same boost electron field. Technique 3 optimizes two intensity-modulated photon beams based on a boost electron field. Technique 4 optimizes two intensity-modulated photon beams and the weight of the boost electron field. Technique 5 combines two intensity-modulated photon beams with an intensity-modulated electron field. Our results show that technique 2 can reduce hot spots both in the breast and the tumour bed compared to technique 1 (dose inhomogeneity is reduced from 34% to 28% for the target). Techniques 3, 4 and 5 can deliver a more homogeneous dose distribution to the target (with dose inhomogeneities for the target of 22%, 20% and 9%, respectively). In many cases techniques 3, 4 and 5 can reduce the dose to the lung and heart. It is concluded that combined photon and electron beam therapy may be advantageous for treating breast cancer compared to conventional treatment techniques using tangential wedged photon beams followed by a boost

  14. Poster - Thur Eve - 60: Physical and dynamic wedges in radiotherapy for rectal cancer: A dosimetric comparison.

    PubMed

    Isa, M; Iqbal, K; Afzal, M; Buzdar, S; Chow, J

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the dosimetry of the physical wedge (PW) and enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) in radiotherapy of rectal cancer. Two wedge angles of 45° and 60° were used in the comparison due to the size of the pelvis contour. 6 and 15 MV photon beams produced from a Varian 21 CD linear accelerator were used. Thirty rectum patients were investigated using the three-field technique. Treatment plans using the PWs and EDWs were created using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Monitor units, plan normalization value, maximum and minimum doses in the planning target volume (PTV), dose conformity index, dose homogeneity index and uniformity index were determined for each treatment plan. The average dose coverage for the PTV with EDW and PW plans were compared. The PTV received prescription doses of 100.9±0.74%, 101.01±1.63% for the EDW (45°, 60°) compared to 101.2±1.65%, 101.3±1.33% for the PW (45°, 60°). Homogeneity indices were (0.11±0.02%, 0.11±0.05%) for the EDW (45°, 60°), and (0.15±0.1%, 0.16±0.11%) for the PW (45°, 60°), respectively. The EDW at 45° had better target coverage with higher conformity index value of 0.98 ± 0.01 compared to the other wedges. A statistically significant (p < 0.01) change in plan normalization values and fewer monitor units were found using the EDW at 45°. We conclude that the EDW at 45° results in an improvement to the plan evaluation parameters presented and thus increases dose efficacy for radiotherapy of rectal cancer. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Radiosurgery with unflattened 6-MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P F; Gillies, B A; Schwartz, M; Young, C; Davey, P

    1991-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks to doing stereotactic radiosurgery with a linear accelerator is the long time required to deliver the target dose. Single fractions of 25 Gy delivered at the isocenter and at depth in the skull may require beam times in excess of 15 min for a typical linear accelerator with a maximum dose rate of 250 cGy/min in tissue. In an effort to decrease the treatment time for this technique, the flattening filter has been removed from an AECL Therac-6 linear accelerator and the characteristics of the resulting beam have been measured. Flatness is acceptable for the field sizes used with this technique and the dose rate is increased by a factor of 2.75.

  16. Poster — Thur Eve — 21: Off-axis dose perturbation effects in water in a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} 18 MV photon beam for the PTW microLion and Exradin A1SL ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady, K; Davis, S D; Papaconstadopoulos, P; Seuntjens, J

    2014-08-15

    A PTW microLion liquid ionization chamber and an Exradin A1SL air-filled ionization chamber have been modeled using the egs-chamber user code of the EGSnrc system to determine their perturbation effects in water in a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} 18 MV photon beam. A model of the Varian CL21EX linear accelerator was constructed using the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code, and was validated by comparing measured PDDs and profiles from the microLion and A1SL chambers to calculated results that included chamber models. Measured PDDs for a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} field for the microLion chamber agreed with calculations to within 1.5% beyond a depth of 0.5 cm, and the A1SL PDDs agreed within 1.0% beyond 1.0 cm. Measured and calculated profiles at 10 cm depth agreed within 1.0% for both chambers inside the field, and within 4.0% near the field edge. Local percent differences increased up to 15% at 4 cm outside the field. The ratio of dose to water in the absence of the chamber relative to dose in the chamber's active volume as a function of off-axis distance was calculated using the egs-chamber correlated sampling technique. The dose ratio was nearly constant inside the field and consistent with the stopping power ratios of water to detector material, but varied up to 3.3% near the field edge and 5.2% at 4 cm outside the field. Once these perturbation effects are fully characterized for more field sizes and detectors, they could be applied to clinical water tank measurements for improved dosimetric accuracy.

  17. Sojourner APXS & Wedge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-08-27

    This image of the rock "Wedge" was taken from the Sojourner rover's rear color camera on Sol 37. The position of the rover relative to Wedge is seen in MRPS 83349. The segmented rod visible in the middle of the frame is the deployment arm for the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). The APXS, the bright, cylindrical object at the end of the arm, is positioned against Wedge and is designed to measure the rock's chemical composition. This was done successfully on the night of Sol 37. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00906

  18. Micromachine Wedge Stepping Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Schriner, H.K.

    1998-11-04

    A wedge stepping motor, which will index a mechanism, has been designed and fabricated in the surface rnicromachine SUMMiT process. This device has demonstrated the ability to index one gear tooth at a time with speeds up to 205 teeth/see. The wedge stepper motor has the following features, whi:h will be useful in a number of applications. o The ability to precisely position mechanical components. . Simple pulse signals can be used for operation. o Only 2 drive signals are requixed for operation. o Torque and precision capabilities increase with device size . The device to be indexed is restrained at all times by the wedge shaped tooth that is used for actuation. This paper will discuss the theory of operation and desi=m of the wedge stepping motor. The fabrication and testing of I he device will also be presented.

  19. Wedges for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Donald A.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer device is provided which is used in ultrasonic inspection of the material surrounding a threaded hole and which comprises a wedge of plastic or the like including a curved threaded surface adapted to be screwed into the threaded hole and a generally planar surface on which a conventional ultrasonic transducer is mounted. The plastic wedge can be rotated within the threaded hole to inspect for flaws in the material surrounding the threaded hole.

  20. The Cosmonaut Sea Wedge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solli, K.; Kuvaas, B.; Kristoffersen, Y.; Leitchenkov, G.; Guseva, J.; Gandyukhin, V.

    2007-01-01

    A set of multi-channel seismic profiles (~15000 km) acquired by Russia, Norway and Australia has been used to investigate the depositional evolution of the Cosmonaut Sea margin of East Antarctica. We recognize a regional sediment wedge below the upper part of the continental rise. The wedge, herein termed the Cosmonaut Sea Wedge, is positioned stratigraphically underneath the inferred glaciomarine section and extends for at least 1200 km along the continental margin and from 80 to about 250 km seaward or to the north. Lateral variations in the growth pattern of the wedge indicate several overlapping depocentres, which at their distal northern end are flanked by elongated mounded drifts and contourite sheets. The internal stratification of the mounded drift deposits suggests that westward flowing bottom currents reworked the marginal deposits. The action of these currents together with sea-level changes is considered to have controlled the growth of the wedge. We interpret the Cosmonaut Sea Wedge as a composite feature comprising several bottom current reworked fan systems.

  1. Implementation of enhanced dynamic wedge in the focus rtp system.

    PubMed

    Miften, M; Wiesmeyer, M; Beavis, A; Takahashi, K; Broad, S

    2000-01-01

    The FOCUS RTP system implementation of Varian's enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) is presented. Calculations of both dose distributions and wedge factors (WFs) are based on segmented treatment tables (STTs). Calculating dose requires a "transmission matrix" derived from an STT to model the modified fluence from the source. The dose calculation is then performed using either the Clarkson or convolution/superposition algorithms. An initial "primary dose/monitor unit (MU) fraction" WF estimate at the weight point of symmetric and asymmetric fields is calculated from the STT as the ratio of MU delivered on the axis of the weight point divided by total MU delivered for the treatment field. In our approach, we go beyond this initial estimate with a "scatter dose" correction. This requires measured 60 degrees WFs for 5 fields. Scatter corrections derived from measured WFs are interpolated for other wedge angles and field sizes in much the same way as arbitrary wedge angle STTs are derived from a "golden STT" using the "ratio of tangents" formalism. Dose comparisons with measured distributions show good agreement to within 3% or 3 mm for 6-MV beams and all EDW angles. Agreement with measurements to within 1% is obtained for WFs in all symmetric and asymmetric fields for 6- and 10-MV beams. For large wedge angles and field sizes, this represents a significant improvement over the 3% to 4% errors often observed using the MU fraction model alone.

  2. Wedged multilayer Laue Lens.

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, R.; Liu, C.; Qian, J.; Kewish, C. M.; Macrander, A. T.; Yan, H.; Kang, H. C.; Maser, J.; Stephenson, G. B.

    2008-05-01

    A multilayer Laue lens (MLL) is an x-ray focusing optic fabricated from a multilayer structure consisting of thousands of layers of two different materials produced by thin-film deposition. The sequence of layer thicknesses is controlled to satisfy the Fresnel zone plate law and the multilayer is sectioned to form the optic. An improved MLL geometry can be created by growing each layer with an in-plane thickness gradient to form a wedge, so that every interface makes the correct angle with the incident beam for symmetric Bragg diffraction. The ultimate hard x-ray focusing performance of a wedged MLL has been predicted to be significantly better than that of a nonwedged MLL, giving subnanometer resolution with high efficiency. Here, we describe a method to deposit the multilayer structure needed for an ideal wedged MLL and report our initial deposition results to produce these structures.

  3. Dose distribution analysis of physical and dynamic wedges by using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy MatriXX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Dae-chul

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated differences between the physical wedge and the dynamic wedge distributions of radiation by using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ImRT) MatriXX. The linear accelerator used X-rays with energy levels of 6 MV and 10 MV to adjust the collimator by motoring the independent jaws (X1, X2, Y1, Y2) for setting wedge angles of 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees. The collimator field size was set as 10 × 10 cm2 or 20 × 20 cm2 at the maximum dose point. The dose distribution for each wedge had ±5% and ±11% errors for field sizes of 10 × 10 cm2 and 20 × 20 cm2, respectively. The error was greatest at a wedge angle of 45 degrees and was pronounced at the end of the dynamic wedge where Y1 and Y2 met. Consequently, concluded that the dose distributions were similar for both wedges for the field size of a small beam profile. The beam dose was greatly increased at the end of the dynamic wedge. A more precise estimate of the therapeutic dose of radiation for a dynamic wedge that nearly matches that of the physical wedge can be achieved by correcting of the increasing part of the beam dose. The findings imply that a heavy wedge filter should not be used when calculating the isodose distribution and the therapeutic dose.

  4. Breast Radiotherapy with Mixed Energy Photons; a Model for Optimal Beam Weighting.

    PubMed

    Birgani, Mohammadjavad Tahmasebi; Fatahiasl, Jafar; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Bagheri, Ali; Behrooz, Mohammad Ali; Zabiehzadeh, Mansour; Meskani, Reza; Gomari, Maryam Talaei

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of high energy photons (>10 MV) with an optimal weight using a mixed energy technique is a practical way to generate a homogenous dose distribution while maintaining adequate target coverage in intact breast radiotherapy. This study represents a model for estimation of this optimal weight for day to day clinical usage. For this purpose, treatment planning computed tomography scans of thirty-three consecutive early stage breast cancer patients following breast conservation surgery were analyzed. After delineation of the breast clinical target volume (CTV) and placing opposed wedge paired isocenteric tangential portals, dosimeteric calculations were conducted and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were generated, first with pure 6 MV photons and then these calculations were repeated ten times with incorporating 18 MV photons (ten percent increase in weight per step) in each individual patient. For each calculation two indexes including maximum dose in the breast CTV (Dmax) and the volume of CTV which covered with 95% Isodose line (VCTV, 95%IDL) were measured according to the DVH data and then normalized values were plotted in a graph. The optimal weight of 18 MV photons was defined as the intersection point of Dmax and VCTV, 95%IDL graphs. For creating a model to predict this optimal weight multiple linear regression analysis was used based on some of the breast and tangential field parameters. The best fitting model for prediction of 18 MV photons optimal weight in breast radiotherapy using mixed energy technique, incorporated chest wall separation plus central lung distance (Adjusted R2=0.776). In conclusion, this study represents a model for the estimation of optimal beam weighting in breast radiotherapy using mixed photon energy technique for routine day to day clinical usage.

  5. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light–matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (∼90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ∼0.004λvac3 in an exposed single-mode waveguide–resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light–matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon–matter coupling. PMID:26284499

  6. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Kress, Stephan J P; Antolinez, Felipe V; Richner, Patrizia; Jayanti, Sriharsha V; Kim, David K; Prins, Ferry; Riedinger, Andreas; Fischer, Maximilian P C; Meyer, Stefan; McPeak, Kevin M; Poulikakos, Dimos; Norris, David J

    2015-09-09

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light-matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (~90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ~0.004λvac(3) in an exposed single-mode waveguide-resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light-matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon-matter coupling.

  7. Effect of various physical parameters on surface and build-up dose for 15-MV X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Girigesh; Yadav, R. S.; Kumar, Alok

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the effect of various physical parameters on the skin and build-up doses of 15-MV photon beams. The effects of field dimensions, acrylic shadow tray, focus to-skin distance (FSD) on surface and buildup dose were determined for open, motorized 60° wedge (MW) and blocked fields. A ‘Markus’ plane parallel plate chamber was used for these measurements in an Elekta (6–15MV) linear accelerator. The surface dose for MW fields was lower than the dose for an open field, but the trend reversed for large fields and higher degree wedges. With the use of an acrylic shadow tray, the surface dose increased for all field sizes, but the increase was dominant for large fields. The surface dose for blocked fields was lower than the dose for open fields. The percentage depth dose of 10 × 10 cm2 field at surface (PDD0) for open beam were 13.89%, 11.71%, and 10.74% at 80 cm, 100 cm, and 120 cm FSD, respectively. The blocking tray increased PDD0 of 10 × 10 cm2 field to 26.29%, 14.01%, and 11.53%, while the motorized 60° wedge decreased PDD0 to 11.32%, 9.7%, and 8.9 % at these FSDs. The maximum PDD difference seen at surface (i.e., skin) for 5 × 5 cm2, 15 × 15 cm2, and 30 × 30 cm2 are 0.5%, 4.6%, and 5.6% for open field and 0.9%, 4.7%, and 7.2% for motorized 60° wedge field, when FSDs varied from 80 cm to 120 cm. The maximum PDD difference seen at surface for 5 × 5 cm2, 15 × 15 cm2, and 30 × 30 cm2 fields are 5.6%, 22.8%, and 29.6%, respectively, for a 1.0-cm perspex-blocking tray as the FSD is changed. The maximum PDD difference was seen at the surface (i.e., skin) and this decreased with increasing depth. PMID:21170184

  8. Substorm Current Wedge Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; McPherron, R. L.; Amm, O.; Apatenkov, S.; Baumjohann, W.; Birn, J.; Lester, M.; Nakamura, R.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Sergeev, V.

    2015-07-01

    Almost 40 years ago the concept of the substorm current wedge was developed to explain the magnetic signatures observed on the ground and in geosynchronous orbit during substorm expansion. In the ensuing decades new observations, including radar and low-altitude spacecraft, MHD simulations, and theoretical considerations have tremendously advanced our understanding of this system. The AMPTE/IRM, THEMIS and Cluster missions have added considerable observational knowledge, especially on the important role of fast flows in producing the stresses that generate the substorm current wedge. Recent detailed, multi-spacecraft, multi-instrument observations both in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere have brought a wealth of new information about the details of the temporal evolution and structure of the current system. While the large-scale picture remains valid, the new details call for revision and an update of the original view. In this paper we briefly review the historical development of the substorm current wedge, review recent in situ and ground-based observations and theoretical work, and discuss the current active research areas. We conclude with a revised, time-dependent picture of the substorm current wedge that follows its evolution from the initial substorm flows through substorm expansion and recovery.

  9. Europa Wedge Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image shows an area of crustal separation on Jupiter's moon, Europa. Lower resolution pictures taken earlier in the tour of NASA's Galileo spacecraft revealed that dark wedge-shaped bands in this region are areas where the icy crust has completely pulled apart. Dark material has filled up from below and filled the void created by this separation.

    In the lower left corner of this image, taken by Galileo's onboard camera on December 16, 1997, a portion of one dark wedge area is visible, revealing a linear texture along the trend of the wedge. The lines of the texture change orientation slightly and reflect the fact that we are looking at a bend in the wedge. The older, bright background, visible on the right half of the image, is criss-crossed with ridges. A large, bright ridge runs east-west through the upper part of the image, cutting across both the older background plains and the wedge. This ridge is rough in texture, with numerous small terraces and troughs containing dark material.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the northwest. This image, centered at approximately 16.5 degrees south latitude and 196.5 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 10 kilometers square (about 6.5 miles square). The resolution of this image is about 26 meters per picture element. This image was taken by the solid state imaging system from a distance of 1250 kilometers (750 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  10. Europa Wedge Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image shows an area of crustal separation on Jupiter's moon, Europa. Lower resolution pictures taken earlier in the tour of NASA's Galileo spacecraft revealed that dark wedge-shaped bands in this region are areas where the icy crust has completely pulled apart. Dark material has filled up from below and filled the void created by this separation.

    In the lower left corner of this image, taken by Galileo's onboard camera on December 16, 1997, a portion of one dark wedge area is visible, revealing a linear texture along the trend of the wedge. The lines of the texture change orientation slightly and reflect the fact that we are looking at a bend in the wedge. The older, bright background, visible on the right half of the image, is criss-crossed with ridges. A large, bright ridge runs east-west through the upper part of the image, cutting across both the older background plains and the wedge. This ridge is rough in texture, with numerous small terraces and troughs containing dark material.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the northwest. This image, centered at approximately 16.5 degrees south latitude and 196.5 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 10 kilometers square (about 6.5 miles square). The resolution of this image is about 26 meters per picture element. This image was taken by the solid state imaging system from a distance of 1250 kilometers (750 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  11. The effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the sensitivity of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) exposed to 6 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Omotayo, Azeez A.; Cygler, Joanna E.; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) exposed to accumulated doses of 6 MV photon beams. Methods: In this study the authors used nanoDot OSLDs readout with a MicroStar reader. The authors first characterized the dose-response, fading, and OSL signal loss of OSLDs exposed to doses from 0.5 to 10 Gy. To determine the effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the OSLDs' response, the authors optically treated the OSLDs with 26 W fluorescent lamps in two modes: (i) directly under the lamps for 10, 120, and 600 min and (ii) with a long-pass filter for 55, 600, and 2000 min. Changes in the OSLDs' sensitivity were determined for an irradiation-readout-bleaching-readout cycle after irradiations with 1 and 10 Gy dose fractions. Results: The OSLDs presented supralinearity for doses of 2 Gy and above. The signal loss rates for sequential readouts were (0.287 {+-} 0.007)% per readout in the reader's strong-stimulation mode, and (0.019 {+-} 0.002)% and (0.035 {+-} 0.007)% per readout for doses of 0.2 and 10 Gy, respectively, in the reader's weak-stimulation mode. Fading half-life values ranged from (0.98 {+-} 0.14) min to (1.77 {+-} 0.24) min and fading showed dose dependence for the first 10-min interval. For 10 and 55 min bleaching using modes (i) and (ii), the OSL signal increased 14% for an accumulated dose of 7 Gy (1 Gy fractions). For OSLDs exposed to 10 Gy fractions, the OSL signal increased 30% and 25% for bleaching modes (i) and (ii) and accumulated dose of 70 Gy, respectively. For 120 and 600 min bleaching using modes (i) and (ii), the OSL signal increased 2.7% and 1.5% for an accumulated dose of 7 Gy (1 Gy fractions), respectively. For 10 Gy fractions, the signal increased 14% for bleaching mode (i) (120 min bleaching) and decreased 1.3% for bleaching mode (ii) (600 min bleaching) for an accumulated dose of 70 Gy. For 600 and 2000 min bleaching

  12. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  13. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  14. Clinical implementation of enhanced dynamic wedges into the Pinnacle treatment planning system: Monte Carlo validation and patient-specific QA.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Munir; Deng, Jun; Lund, Molly W; Chen, Zhe; Kimmett, James; Moran, Meena S; Nath, Ravinder

    2009-01-21

    The goal of this work is to present a systematic Monte Carlo validation study on the clinical implementation of the enhanced dynamic wedges (EDWs) into the Pinnacle(3) (Philips Medical Systems, Fitchburg, WI) treatment planning system (TPS) and QA procedures for patient plan verification treated with EDWs. Modeling of EDW beams in the Pinnacle(3) TPS, which employs a collapsed-cone convolution superposition (CCCS) dose model, was based on a combination of measured open-beam data and the 'Golden Segmented Treatment Table' (GSTT) provided by Varian for each photon beam energy. To validate EDW models, dose profiles of 6 and 10 MV photon beams from a Clinac 2100 C/D were measured in virtual water at depths from near-surface to 30 cm for a wide range of field sizes and wedge angles using the Profiler 2 (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) diode array system. The EDW output factors (EDWOFs) for square fields from 4 to 20 cm wide were measured in virtual water using a small-volume Farmer-type ionization chamber placed at a depth of 10 cm on the central axis. Furthermore, the 6 and 10 MV photon beams emerging from the treatment head of Clinac 2100 C/D were fully modeled and the central-axis depth doses, the off-axis dose profiles and the output factors in water for open and dynamically wedged fields were calculated using the Monte Carlo (MC) package EGS4. Our results have shown that (1) both the central-axis depth doses and the off-axis dose profiles of various EDWs computed with the CCCS dose model and MC simulations showed good agreement with the measurements to within 2%/2 mm; (2) measured EDWOFs used for monitor-unit calculation in Pinnacle(3) TPS agreed well with the CCCS and MC predictions within 2%; (3) all the EDW fields satisfied our validation criteria of 1% relative dose difference and 2 mm distance-to-agreement (DTA) with 99-100% passing rate in routine patient treatment plan verification using MapCheck 2D diode array.

  15. Clinical implementation of enhanced dynamic wedges into the Pinnacle treatment planning system: Monte Carlo validation and patient-specific QA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Munir; Deng, Jun; Lund, Molly W.; Chen, Zhe; Kimmett, James; Moran, Meena S.; Nath, Ravinder

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this work is to present a systematic Monte Carlo validation study on the clinical implementation of the enhanced dynamic wedges (EDWs) into the Pinnacle3 (Philips Medical Systems, Fitchburg, WI) treatment planning system (TPS) and QA procedures for patient plan verification treated with EDWs. Modeling of EDW beams in the Pinnacle3 TPS, which employs a collapsed-cone convolution superposition (CCCS) dose model, was based on a combination of measured open-beam data and the 'Golden Segmented Treatment Table' (GSTT) provided by Varian for each photon beam energy. To validate EDW models, dose profiles of 6 and 10 MV photon beams from a Clinac 2100 C/D were measured in virtual water at depths from near-surface to 30 cm for a wide range of field sizes and wedge angles using the Profiler 2 (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) diode array system. The EDW output factors (EDWOFs) for square fields from 4 to 20 cm wide were measured in virtual water using a small-volume Farmer-type ionization chamber placed at a depth of 10 cm on the central axis. Furthermore, the 6 and 10 MV photon beams emerging from the treatment head of Clinac 2100 C/D were fully modeled and the central-axis depth doses, the off-axis dose profiles and the output factors in water for open and dynamically wedged fields were calculated using the Monte Carlo (MC) package EGS4. Our results have shown that (1) both the central-axis depth doses and the off-axis dose profiles of various EDWs computed with the CCCS dose model and MC simulations showed good agreement with the measurements to within 2%/2 mm; (2) measured EDWOFs used for monitor-unit calculation in Pinnacle3 TPS agreed well with the CCCS and MC predictions within 2%; (3) all the EDW fields satisfied our validation criteria of 1% relative dose difference and 2 mm distance-to-agreement (DTA) with 99-100% passing rate in routine patient treatment plan verification using MapCheck 2D diode array.

  16. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Ding, M.; Li, J. S.; Lee, M. C.; Pawlicki, T.; Deng, J.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer.

  17. Quality assurance of electron and photon beam energy using the BQ-CHECK phantom.

    PubMed

    Speight, Richard J; Esmail, Ashraf; Weston, Steve J

    2011-02-01

    The BQ-CHECK phantom (PTW Freiburg, Germany) has been designed to be used with a 2D ion chamber array to facilitate the quality assurance (QA) of electron and photon beam qualities (BQ). The BQ-CHECK phantom has three wedges covering the diagonal axes of the beam: two opposed aluminum wedges used to measure electron energy and a single copper wedge used to measure photon energy. The purpose of this work was to assess the suitability of the BQ-CHECK phantom for use in a routine QA program. A range of percentage depth dose (PDD) curves for two photon beams and four electron beams were measured using a MP3 plotting tank (PTW Freiburg). These beams were used to irradiate a STARCHECK array (PTW Freiburg) with and without the BQ-CHECK phantom on top of the array. For photons, the ratio of the signals from two chambers underneath the copper wedge was used as an effective TPR measurement (TPR(eff)) and, for electrons, the full width at half maximum of the profile (E(FWHM)) underneath the aluminum wedges was used as an electron energy constancy measurement. PDD measurements were compared with TPR(eff) and E(FWHM) to assess the sensitivity of the BQ-CHECK phantom. The clinical tolerances of TPReff were determined for 6 MV (0.634-0.649), and 10MV (0.683-0.692). For electrons, the clinical tolerances of EFWHM were determined for 6 MeV (94.8-103.4 mm), 8 MeV (105.5-114.0 mm), 10 MeV (125.4-133.9 mm) and 12 MeV (138.8-147.3 mm).Electron and photon energy metrics are presented which demonstrate that the BQ-CHECK phantom could be used to form part of an efficient routine monthly QA program. Acceptable beam quality limits for various nominal beam energies were established and at these limits, modified profiles were acquired using the STARCHECK array. From the modified profiles, E(FWHM) and TPR(eff) were determined for the electron and photon beams, respectively. It was demonstrated that both E(FWHM) and the TPR(eff) have a linear relationship with conventional beam quality metrics.

  18. Penetrable Wedge Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-03

    F -A276 232 GE F Formpproved P-W-=nQb,3;t- OBM No. 0704 -0188 foI rll it 1 Ilthisl buridllenli 1i to :iudrrg th ftirnu reviwing Wwtru"t.Of S.aching...geometries. (2) Numerical " solutions" are still proliferating, but are too messy and remoxed from the physics to offer any important insight into the wave...mathematical solution of the impedance boundary wedge. III. PHYSICAL IMPEDANCE BOUNDARY CONDITION The coupled difference equations (14), (17), and (18) on page

  19. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  20. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  1. Sojourner, Wedge, & Shark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image taken near the end of daytime operations on Sol 50 shows the Sojourner rover between the rocks 'Wedge' (foreground) and 'Shark' (behind rover). The rover successfully deployed its Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer on Shark on Sol 52.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  2. Dose measurements in the build-up region for the photon beams from Clinac-1800 dual energy medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, M; Ravichandran, R

    2000-05-01

    Since the skin dose becomes the limiting factor while deciding the tumorcidal dose, the detailed analysis of dose distribution in the build-up region is necessary for high-energy photon beams. In this study the beam characteristics affecting the build-up and skin dose for 6- and 18-MV photons are analyzed. Measurements were made with 6- and 18-MV photons using a PTW parallel-plate ionization chamber (B 23344-036) and a RDM-1F electrometer. Build-up ionization measurements were made with the chamber fitted into a 25 x 25 x 25 cm polystyrene phantom with a fixed SSD of 100 cm. The entrance and build-up dose measurements were made with a polycarbonate and a mesh type metallic shielding tray and a 45 degrees wedge. Exit dose measurements were carried out for the graphite patient supporting assembly table top, 1.0 cm thick piece of wood and the 1.0 cm thick patient supporting perspex base frame for head and neck treatments. It was observed that the dmax decreased slightly with field size as with other accelerators. For both photon energies the surface dose was observed to increase with increase in field size. It was also noticed that the dose in the build-up region increases slightly when the polycarbonate secondary blocking tray is introduced with the increase in surface dose. The data show that the tray perturbation factor (TPF) at surface decreases steadily with tray-surface distance for both photon beams for all field sizes. It was noted that the TPF was more when the polycarbonate tray was introduced at shorter tray-surface distances for both energies. At tray-surface distances above 60 cm the TPF almost remained close to unity for 6-MV photons for all field sizes, whereas the continuous decrease in TPF could be noted for 18-MV photon beams even after the TPF reached unity. The increase in surface dose with field size for both photon energies is due to the electron scattering from the intervening materials. The use of wedge filters absorbs low-energy scattered

  3. Aligning Optical Fibers by Means of Actuated MEMS Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Brian; Ghodssi, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) of a proposed type would be designed and fabricated to effect lateral and vertical alignment of optical fibers with respect to optical, electro-optical, optoelectronic, and/or photonic devices on integrated circuit chips and similar monolithic device structures. A MEMS device of this type would consist of a pair of oppositely sloped alignment wedges attached to linear actuators that would translate the wedges in the plane of a substrate, causing an optical fiber in contact with the sloping wedge surfaces to undergo various displacements parallel and perpendicular to the plane. In making it possible to accurately align optical fibers individually during the packaging stages of fabrication of the affected devices, this MEMS device would also make it possible to relax tolerances in other stages of fabrication, thereby potentially reducing costs and increasing yields. In a typical system according to the proposal (see Figure 1), one or more pair(s) of alignment wedges would be positioned to create a V groove in which an optical fiber would rest. The fiber would be clamped at a suitable distance from the wedges to create a cantilever with a slight bend to push the free end of the fiber gently to the bottom of the V groove. The wedges would be translated in the substrate plane by amounts Dx1 and Dx2, respectively, which would be chosen to move the fiber parallel to the plane by a desired amount Dx and perpendicular to the plane by a desired amount Dy. The actuators used to translate the wedges could be variants of electrostatic or thermal actuators that are common in MEMS.

  4. Inelastic wedge billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Martin; Olafsen, Jeffrey S.

    2017-06-01

    Billiards are simple systems used to investigate Hamiltonian dynamics in physics. When real billiards are examined experimentally, the energy dissipated in each collision must be replaced by an external stimulus to maintain the dynamics. We focus on a specific system of a driven billiard using a wedge shaped boundary to examine nonlinear and chaotic behavior. Mathematical models such as the logistic map are simple low dimensional systems that exhibit nonlinear and chaotic behavior as a single parameter is varied. This logistic map can then be used to identify a very specific mathematical parameter known as the Lyapunov exponent, which helps in identifying chaos more clearly. In the current experiment, the dynamics of a particle free to move near a horizontally shaken vertical boundary will be examined for the presence of chaos. The goal of the research is to extract a Lyapunov exponent between any two trajectories in the system. In addition, the manner in which the dynamics evolve freely through dissipative collisions provides a testbed for measurements of the velocity dependent coefficients of restitution for the billiard. A better description of hard sphere coefficients of restitution would be beneficial to a host of experiments and numerical simulations in granular physics.

  5. 6 MV Vacuum Voltmeter Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    reversed). The draw rod compresses o-ring seals between the insulators and rings to allow operation in vacuum. The insulator outer surfaces are coated...small-diameter ends, and have toroidal conductors attached at their large-diameter ends. The field shaper surfaces are treated to increase the...the direction to emit electrons toward the VVM insulator stack. The field magnitude is about 0.5 MV/cm, and would probably emit without the surface

  6. Optimized dynamic rotation with wedges.

    PubMed

    Rosen, I I; Morrill, S M; Lane, R G

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic rotation is a computer-controlled therapy technique utilizing an automated multileaf collimator in which the radiation beam shape changes dynamically as the treatment machine rotates about the patient so that at each instant the beam shape matches the projected shape of the target volume. In simple dynamic rotation, the dose rate remains constant during rotation. For optimized dynamic rotation, the dose rate is varied as a function of gantry angle. Optimum dose rate at each gantry angle is computed by linear programming. Wedges can be included in the optimized dynamic rotation therapy by using additional rotations. Simple and optimized dynamic rotation treatment plans, with and without wedges, for a pancreatic tumor have been compared using optimization cost function values, normal tissue complication probabilities, and positive difference statistic values. For planning purposes, a continuous rotation is approximated by static beams at a number of gantry angles equally spaced about the patient. In theory, the quality of optimized treatment planning solutions should improve as the number of static beams increases. The addition of wedges should further improve dose distributions. For the case studied, no significant improvements were seen for more than 36 beam angles. Open and wedged optimized dynamic rotations were better than simple dynamic rotation, but wedged optimized dynamic rotation showed no definitive improvement over open beam optimized dynamic rotation.

  7. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer having liquid/wedge and gas/wedge interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic liquid densitometer that uses a material wedge having two sections, one with a liquid/wedge interface and another with a gas/wedge interface. It is preferred that the wedge have an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the liquid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the liquid. Ultrasonic signals are internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a liquid is determined by immersing the wedge into the liquid and measuring reflections of ultrasound at the liquid/wedge interface and at the gas/wedge interface.

  8. Verification of the accuracy of a photon dose-calculation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Kent A; Followill, David S; Liu, H Helen; Starkschall, George

    2002-01-01

    An extensive set of measured data was developed for the purpose of verifying the accuracy of a photon dose-calculation algorithm. Dose distributions from a linear accelerator were measured using an ion chamber in a water phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters in a heterogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. Test cases included square fields, rectangular fields, fields having different source-to-surface distances, wedged fields, irregular fields, obliquely incident fields, asymmetrically collimated fields with wedges, multileaf collimator-shaped fields, and two heterogeneous density cases. The data set was used to validate the photon dose-calculation algorithm in a commercial radiation treatment planning system. The treatment planning system calculated photon doses to within the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 53 (TG-53) criteria for 99% of points in the buildup region, 90% of points in the inner region, 88% of points in the outer region, and 93% of points in the penumbra. For the heterogeneous phantoms, calculations agreed with actual measurements to within +/-3%. The monitor unit tests revealed that the 18-MV open square fields, oblique incidence, oblique incidence with wedge, and mantle field test cases did not meet the TG-53 criteria but were within +/-2.5% of measurements. It was concluded that (i) the photon dose calculation algorithm used by the treatment planning system did not meet the TG-53 criteria 100% of the time; (ii) some of the TG-53 criteria may need to be modified, and (iii) the generally stated goal of accuracy in dose delivery of within 5% cannot be met in all situations using this beam model in the treatment planning system.

  9. Extension of the Operating Point of the Mercury IVA from 6 to 8 MV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    6-MV peak output voltage. Also, the cross section for fission rises sharply above the threshold energy. It was therefore decided to increase the...pulse, very few x rays above threshold could be generated by Mercury with a 6-MV peak output voltage. Also, the cross section for fission rises sharply...bremsstrahlung source for inducing photofission” these Proceedings. [3] D.M. Mosher, et al., "A computation-based analysis of photon- induced fission

  10. Tectonic wedges: geometry and kinematic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Torres, L. M.; Ramon-Lluch, R.; Eguiluz, L.

    1994-10-01

    The geometry of several tectonic wedge combinations was studied in an outcrop in the Basque Basin, Western Pyrenees. Three types of tectonic wedges were distinguished: simple, double and triple wedge. On the surface the geometry of the observed tectonic wedges is always highly elemental: emergent thrust, horse or klippe. The final stage in the evolution of a tectonic wedge is its delamination. This can occur by the spreading of the thrusts which conform the wedge, or by the development of back thrusts associated to them. The relative age of the back thrust with respect to the thrust indicates whether the original structure was a simple thrust or a tectonic wedge. If this criterion is applied to the Pyrenean Orogen, this range corresponds to a tectonic wedge.

  11. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  12. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  13. Wedge wetting by electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mußotter, Maximilian; Bier, Markus

    2017-09-01

    The wetting of a charged wedgelike wall by an electrolyte solution is investigated by means of classical density functional theory. As in other studies on wedge wetting, this geometry is considered as the most simple deviation from a planar substrate, and it serves as a first step toward more complex confinements of fluids. By focusing on fluids containing ions and surface charges, features of real systems are covered that are not accessible within the vast majority of previous theoretical studies concentrating on simple fluids in contact with uncharged wedges. In particular, the filling transition of charged wedges is necessarily of first order, because wetting transitions of charged substrates are of first order and the barrier in the effective interface potential persists below the wetting transition of a planar wall; hence, critical filling transitions are not expected to occur for ionic systems. The dependence of the critical opening angle on the surface charge, as well as the dependence of the filling height, of the wedge adsorption, and of the line tension on the opening angle and on the surface charge are analyzed in detail.

  14. Calibration of the Wedge Prism

    Treesearch

    Charles B. Briscoe

    1957-01-01

    Since the introduction of plotless cruising in this country by Grosenbaugh and the later suggestion of using a wedge prism as an angle gauge by Bruce this method of determining basal area has been widely adopted in the South. One of the factors contributing to the occasionally unsatisfactory results obtained is failure to calibrate the prism used. As noted by Bruce the...

  15. A 2D ion chamber array audit of wedged and asymmetric fields in an inhomogeneous lung phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, Jessica; Dunn, Leon Alves, Andrew; Kenny, John; Lehmann, Joerg; Williams, Ivan; Kron, Tomas; Cole, Andrew

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) has implemented a new method of a nonreference condition Level II type dosimetric audit of radiotherapy services to increase measurement accuracy and patient safety within Australia. The aim of this work is to describe the methodology, tolerances, and outcomes from the new audit. Methods: The ACDS Level II audit measures the dose delivered in 2D planes using an ionization chamber based array positioned at multiple depths. Measurements are made in rectilinear homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms composed of slabs of solid water and lung. Computer generated computed tomography data sets of the rectilinear phantoms are supplied to the facility prior to audit for planning of a range of cases including reference fields, asymmetric fields, and wedged fields. The audit assesses 3D planning with 6 MV photons with a static (zero degree) gantry. Scoring is performed using local dose differences between the planned and measured dose within 80% of the field width. The overall audit result is determined by the maximum dose difference over all scoring points, cases, and planes. Pass (Optimal Level) is defined as maximum dose difference ≤3.3%, Pass (Action Level) is ≤5.0%, and Fail (Out of Tolerance) is >5.0%. Results: At close of 2013, the ACDS had performed 24 Level II audits. 63% of the audits passed, 33% failed, and the remaining audit was not assessable. Of the 15 audits that passed, 3 were at Pass (Action Level). The high fail rate is largely due to a systemic issue with modeling asymmetric 60° wedges which caused a delivered overdose of 5%–8%. Conclusions: The ACDS has implemented a nonreference condition Level II type audit, based on ion chamber 2D array measurements in an inhomogeneous slab phantom. The powerful diagnostic ability of this audit has allowed the ACDS to rigorously test the treatment planning systems implemented in Australian radiotherapy facilities. Recommendations from audits have led to

  16. A 2D ion chamber array audit of wedged and asymmetric fields in an inhomogeneous lung phantom.

    PubMed

    Lye, Jessica; Kenny, John; Lehmann, Joerg; Dunn, Leon; Kron, Tomas; Alves, Andrew; Cole, Andrew; Williams, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) has implemented a new method of a nonreference condition Level II type dosimetric audit of radiotherapy services to increase measurement accuracy and patient safety within Australia. The aim of this work is to describe the methodology, tolerances, and outcomes from the new audit. The ACDS Level II audit measures the dose delivered in 2D planes using an ionization chamber based array positioned at multiple depths. Measurements are made in rectilinear homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms composed of slabs of solid water and lung. Computer generated computed tomography data sets of the rectilinear phantoms are supplied to the facility prior to audit for planning of a range of cases including reference fields, asymmetric fields, and wedged fields. The audit assesses 3D planning with 6 MV photons with a static (zero degree) gantry. Scoring is performed using local dose differences between the planned and measured dose within 80% of the field width. The overall audit result is determined by the maximum dose difference over all scoring points, cases, and planes. Pass (Optimal Level) is defined as maximum dose difference ≤3.3%, Pass (Action Level) is ≤5.0%, and Fail (Out of Tolerance) is >5.0%. At close of 2013, the ACDS had performed 24 Level II audits. 63% of the audits passed, 33% failed, and the remaining audit was not assessable. Of the 15 audits that passed, 3 were at Pass (Action Level). The high fail rate is largely due to a systemic issue with modeling asymmetric 60° wedges which caused a delivered overdose of 5%-8%. The ACDS has implemented a nonreference condition Level II type audit, based on ion chamber 2D array measurements in an inhomogeneous slab phantom. The powerful diagnostic ability of this audit has allowed the ACDS to rigorously test the treatment planning systems implemented in Australian radiotherapy facilities. Recommendations from audits have led to facilities modifying clinical practice and

  17. Wedge immersed thermistor bolometer measures infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyfus, M. G.

    1965-01-01

    Wedge immersed-thermistor bolometer measures infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The thermistor flakes are immersed by optical contact on a wedge-shaped germanium lens whose narrow dimension is clamped between two complementary wedge-shaped germanium blocks bonded with a suitable adhesive.

  18. The effect of a dynamic wedge in the medial tangential field upon the contralateral breast dose

    SciTech Connect

    McParland, B.J. )

    1990-12-01

    The elevated incidence of breast cancer following irradiation of breast tissue has led to concern over the magnitude of the scattered radiation received by the uninvolved contralateral breast during radiation therapy for a primary breast lesion and the risk of an induced contralateral breast cancer. Some linear accelerators use a single dynamic (or universal) wedge that is mounted within the treatment head at an extended distance from the patient. Because of the combined effects of distance and shielding, the contralateral breast dose due to a medial tangent containing a dynamic wedge is expected to be less than that containing a conventional wedge. This paper presents contralateral breast dose (CBD) measurements performed on an anthropomorphic phantom with breast prostheses irradiated with 6 MV X rays from a linear accelerator equipped with a dynamic wedge. Doses were measured at 15 points within the contralateral breast prosthesis with thermoluminescent dosimeters. It was found that the contralateral breast dose per unit target breast dose decreases with the perpendicular distance from the posterior edge of the medial tangent to the dose measurement point and increases with effective wedge angle by factors ranging up to 2.8, in agreement with data presented earlier for a water phantom geometry. This dose elevation showed no statistically significant dependence (p less than 0.05) upon the perpendicular distance from the beam edge. Comparisons with data in the literature show that the contralateral breast dose increase by a dynamic wedge is typically only about half of that reported for a conventional wedge for the same wedge angle and distance from the beam.

  19. The Substorm Current Wedge Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, Larry; McPherron, Robert; Apatenkov, Sergey; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Birn, Joachim; Lester, Mark; Nakamura, Rumi; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Sergeev, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Almost 40 years ago the concept of the substorm current wedge was developed to explain the magnetic signatures observed on the ground and in geosynchronous orbit during substorm expansion. In the ensuing decades new observations, including radar and low-altitude spacecraft, MHD simulations, and theoretical considerations have tremendously advanced our understanding of this system. The AMPTE/IRM, THEMIS and Cluster missions have added considerable observational knowledge, especially on the important role of fast flows in producing the stresses that generate the substorm current wedge. Recent detailed, multi-spacecraft, multi-instrument observations both in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere have brought a wealth of new information about the details of the temporal evolution and structure of the current system. In this paper, we briefly review recent in situ and ground-based observations and theoretical work that have demonstrated a need for an update of the original picture. We present a revised, time-dependent picture of the substorm current wedge that follows its evolution from the initial substorm flows through substorm expansion and recovery, and conclude by identifying open questions.

  20. Constituent Components of Out-of-Field Scatter Dose for 18-MV Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy: A Comparison With 6-MV and Implications for Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, Jeremy D.; Smith, Ryan; Lancaster, Craig M.; Haynes, Matthew; Jones, Phillip; Panettieri, Vanessa

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Methods and Materials: Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Results: Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite

  1. Constituent components of out-of-field scatter dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy: a comparison with 6-MV and implications for carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Jeremy D; Smith, Ryan; Lancaster, Craig M; Haynes, Matthew; Jones, Phillip; Panettieri, Vanessa

    2014-11-01

    To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite reducing internal/patient scatter. Out

  2. The development and experimental evaluation of a simple analytical model for the TPR in the build-up region of megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Godin, Marcelo; Galiano, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a simple analytical model for the tissue phantom ratio (TPR) in the build-up region of megavoltage photon beams and to experimentally evaluate the model under a variety of clinically relevant field configurations. Considering electron contamination and primary photons as the main components of the absorbed dose in the build-up region, an analytic expression for the TPR was derived. The electron contamination component was addressed with a biexponential function; the primary photon component was treated as nonlocal energy transport, i.e., assuming the energy deposited by secondary electrons can be described by a biexponential mode similar to that of contaminating electrons. The model contains five independent constants, which were fitted experimentally. The accuracy of the model was evaluated by comparing its results with in-phantom measurements taken on square, rectangular, irregular, and wedged fields, for 6 and 15 MV photon beams on a GE-Saturne 41 accelerator. More specifically, the accuracy of the model was quantified using the gamma index with 2% dose and 2 mm spatial tolerances as described by Low et al. [Med. Phys. 25, 656-661 (1998)]. For square cerrobende blocked fields, the maximum recorded gamma indices were 0.42 and 0.54 for 6 and 15 MV beams, respectively. For "I" shaped fields, the corresponding maxima were 0.64 and 0.52, respectively, while for "cross" shaped fields they were 0.42 and 0.76. For rectangular 10 × 30 cm fields, the corresponding maxima were 0.32 and 0.42, and for 7 × 20 cm fields, they were 0.70 and 0.35, respectively. For square 10 × 10 cm and 15 × 15 cm fields with an acrylic tray, the maxima were 0.57 and 0.45 for 6 MV and 0.32 and 0.77 for 15 MV beams, respectively. For a 10 × 10 cm 60° wedged field, the maxima were 0.53 and 0.33 for 6 and 15 MV beams, respectively. In all examined cases of irregular, rectangular, square (with and without tray), and wedged fields, the

  3. Operational characteristics of Wedge and Strip image readout systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.; Malina, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Application of the Wedge and Strip readout system in microchannel plate detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer and FAUST space astronomy programs is discussed. Anode designs with high resolution (greater than 600 x 600 pixels) in imaging and spectroscopy applications have been developed. Extension of these designs to larger formats (100 mm) with higher resolution (3000 x 3000 pixels) are considered. It is shown that the resolution and imaging are highly stable, and that the flat field performance is essentially limited by photon statistics. Very high speed event response has also been achieved with output pulses having durations of less than 10 nanoseconds.

  4. Reliability assessment of a 1 MV LTD.

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Salvador; Chavez, Raymond; Molina, Isidro; Kim, Alexandre A.; Johnson, David L.; Maenchen, John Eric; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Ziska, Derek Raymond

    2005-07-01

    A 1 MV linear transformer driver (LTD) is being tested with a large area e-beam diode load at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The experiments will be utilized to determine the repeatability of the output pulse and the reliability of the components. The 1 MV accelerator is being used to determine the feasibility of designing a 6 MV LTD for radiography experiments. The peak voltage, risetime, and pulse width as well as the cavity timing jitter are analyzed to determine the repeatability of the output pulse.

  5. SU-E-T-178: Clinical Feasibility of Multi-Leaf Collimator Based Dynamic Wedge

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, C; Kwak, J; Ahn, S; Kim, J; Park, J; Yoon, S; Cho, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A multi-leaf collimator (MLC) based dynamic wedge (MDW), which provide similar dose profile of physical wedge (PW) along x-jaw direction while significant monitor unit (MU) reduction, was developed and investigated for clinical use. Methods: A novel technique was used to create the wedge profile using MLC. A modification was applied to the DICOM-RT format file of the plan made with the PW to replace PW with MDW. The Varian enhanced dynamic wedge profile was used to produce MLC sequence, while the MU of the wedged field was recalculated using PW factor and fluence map. The profiles for all possible MDWs to substitute PWs were verified in 6/15 MV x-ray irradiations. New plans with MDWs were compared with the original plans in 5 rectal, 5 RT breast and 5 liver cases. Results: The wedge profile of the MDW fields were well matched with those of PWs inside the fields while less scatter than PW out of the fields. For plan comparisons of the clinical cases no significant dose discrepancy was observed between MDW plan and PW’s with the dose volume histograms. The maximum and mean doses in PTVs are agreed within 1.0%. The Result of OARs of MDW plans are slightly improved in the maximum doses (3.22 ∼ 150.4 cGy) and the mean doses (17.18 ∼ 85.52 cGy) on average for all cases while the prescribed doses are 45 Gy for rectal cases, 40 or 45 Gy for liver cases and 50 Gy for breast cases. The MUs of the fields which replace PW with MDW are reduced to 68% of those of PW. Conclusion: We developed a novel dynamic wedge technique with MLC that shows clinical advantage compared to PW.

  6. Wedge scattering by the method of iteration

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, D.; DeRaad, L.L. Jr.; St-Cyr, G.J.

    1993-07-01

    We have investigated scattering from the classic wedge and have shown that the method of iteration of the surface current integral equation predicts currents and backscattered fields that are good approximations to the Sommerfeld solution. The method of iteration has also been applied to truncated wedges on flat surfaces with the result that the scattering from this wedge is been to be very much different from the Sommerfeld solution. These results and their implications for ocean backscatter are reported herein.

  7. Wedge locality and asymptotic commutativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we study twist deformed quantum field theories obtained by combining the Wightman axiomatic approach with the idea of spacetime noncommutativity. We prove that the deformed fields with deformation parameters of opposite sign satisfy the condition of mutual asymptotic commutativity, which was used earlier in nonlocal quantum field theory as a substitute for relative locality. We also present an improved proof of the wedge localization property discovered for the deformed fields by Grosse and Lechner, and we show that the deformation leaves the asymptotic behavior of the vacuum expectation values in spacelike directions substantially unchanged.

  8. Geometry and kinematics of extensional structural wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Baoling; He, Dengfa; Zhang, Yongsheng; Sun, Yanpeng; Huang, Jingyi; Zhang, Wenjun

    2017-03-01

    Structural wedges in the compressive environment have been recognized and studied in different locations. However, extension structural wedges are less well-understood. Based on the normal fault-bend folding theory and inclined shear model, this paper quantitatively analyses deformations related to extensional structural wedges and builds a series of geometric models for them. An extensional structural wedge is a fault-block held by two or more normal faults, the action of which would fold its overlying strata. Extensional structural wedges of different shapes will lead to different deformation results for the overlying strata, and this paper illustrates both the triangular and quadrangular wedges and their related deformations. This paper also discusses differences between the extensional structural wedges and the normal fault-bend-folding. By analysing two seismic sections from Langfang-Gu'an Sag, East China, this paper provides two natural examples of the triangular and quadrangular extensional structural wedges, where the models can reasonably explain the overlying distinct highs and lows without obvious faults. The establishment of a geometric model of extensional structural wedges can provide reference and theoretical bases for future quantitative analysis of deformations in the extensional environment.

  9. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-05-08

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kfclin,fmsrQclin,Qmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations.

  10. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-05-01

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations. PACS number(s): 87.55.k, 87.55.Qr.

  11. Oak Ridge 25-MV tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    A brief description is presented of the scope and status of the heavy ion accelerator facility, and status of the project is discussed. Initial operation of the 25 MV tandem accelerator from National Electrostatics Corporation is covered. (GHT)

  12. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Iyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  13. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Lyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0, 30, 45, and 60. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  14. Rapid acceptance testing of modern linac using on-board MV and kV imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Cai, Bin; Harry, Taylor; Dolly, Steven; Sun, Baozhou; Li, Hua; Stinson, Keith; Noel, Camille; Santanam, Lakshmi; Pawlicki, Todd; Mutic, Sasa; Goddu, S Murty

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel process for using on-board MV and kV Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) to perform linac acceptance testing (AT) for two reasons: (a) to standardize the assessment of new equipment performance, and (b) to reduce the time to clinical use while reducing physicist workload. In this study, Varian TrueBeam linacs equipped with amorphous silicon-based EPID (aS1000) were used. The conventional set of AT tests and tolerances were used as a baseline guide. A novel methodology was developed or adopted from published literature to perform as many tests as possible using the MV and kV EPIDs. The developer mode on Varian TrueBeam linacs was used to automate the process. In the EPID-based approach, most of mechanical tests were conducted by acquiring images through a custom phantom and software tools were developed for quantitative analysis to extract different performance parameters. The embedded steel-spheres in a custom phantom provided both visual and radiographic guidance for beam geometry testing. For photon beams, open field EPID images were used to extract inline/crossline profiles to verify the beam energy, flatness and symmetry. EPID images through a double wedge phantom were used for evaluating electron beam properties via diagonal profile. Testing was augmented with a commercial automated application (Machine Performance Check) which was used to perform several geometric accuracy tests such as gantry, collimator rotations, and couch rotations/translations. The developed process demonstrated that the tests, which required customer demonstration, were efficiently performed using EPIDs. The AT tests that were performed using EPIDs were fully automated using the developer mode on the Varian TrueBeam system, while some tests, such as the light field versus radiation field congruence, and collision interlock checks required user interaction. On-board imagers are quite suitable for both geometric and dosimetric testing

  15. Generation of virtual monochromatic CBCT from dual kV/MV beam projections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hao; Liu, Bo; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel on-board imaging technique which allows generation of virtual monochromatic (VM) cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a selected energy from combined kilovoltage (kV)/megavoltage (MV) beam projections. Methods: With the current orthogonal kV/MV imaging hardware equipped in modern linear accelerators, both MV projections (from gantry angle of 0°–100°) and kV projections (90°–200°) were acquired as gantry rotated a total of 110°. A selected range of overlap projections between 90° to 100° were then decomposed into two material projections using experimentally determined parameters from orthogonally stacked aluminum and acrylic step-wedges. Given attenuation coefficients of aluminum and acrylic at a predetermined energy, one set of VM projections could be synthesized from two corresponding sets of decomposed projections. Two linear functions were generated using projection information at overlap angles to convert kV and MV projections at nonoverlap angles to approximate VM projections for CBCT reconstruction. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for different inserts in VM CBCTs of a CatPhan phantom with various selected energies and compared with those in kV and MV CBCTs. The effect of overlap projection number on CNR was evaluated. Additionally, the effect of beam orientation was studied by scanning the CatPhan sandwiched with two 5 cm solid-water phantoms on both lateral sides and an electronic density phantom with two metal bolt inserts. Results: Proper selection of VM energy [30 and 40 keV for low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polymethylpentene, 2 MeV for Delrin] provided comparable or even better CNR results as compared with kV or MV CBCT. An increased number of overlap kV and MV projection demonstrated only marginal improvements of CNR for different inserts (with the exception of LDPE) and therefore one projection overlap was found to be sufficient for the CatPhan study. It was also evident that the optimal CBCT image

  16. Tumor Targeting, Trifunctional Dendritic Wedge

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a newly designed trifunctional theranostic agent for targeting solid tumors. This agent combines a dendritic wedge with high boron content for boron neutron capture therapy or boron MRI, a monomethine cyanine dye for visible-light fluorescent imaging, and an integrin ligand for efficient tumor targeting. We report photophysical properties of the new agent, its cellular uptake and in vitro targeting properties. Using live animal imaging and intravital microscopy (IVM) techniques, we observed a rapid accumulation of the agent and its retention for a prolonged period of time (up to 7 days) in fully established animal models of human melanoma and murine mammary adenocarcinoma. This macromolecular theranostic agent can be used for targeted delivery of high boron load into solid tumors for future applications in boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:25350602

  17. Two critical tapers in a single wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, J.; Burg, J.-P.; Brun, J.-P.

    2009-04-01

    Thrust involving a ductile décollement (e.g. salt, over-pressured shales) like Zagros, Jura, Pakistan Salt Ranges, Cascades and Makran have in common a small cross-sectional taper, attributed to large thrust spacing and fast frontward propagation above the ductile décollement. Such a low cross-sectional taper has been analytically explained by approximating the ductile layer as a horizon with negligible shear strength. We tested the development of thrust wedges involving a ductile basal décollement of uniform shear strength by means of laboratory experiments. The model consists of a sand layer with initial wedge geometry and a basal ductile décollement of constant thickness and shear strength made of silicone putty. 30% of bulk shortening is applied to the wedge at constant velocity. Thrusting starts in the middle of the wedge, followed by in-sequence frontward propagation. The back part of the wedge, between backstop and the closest thrust, remains undeformed; it passively advances over the base without internal deformation. It appears that both domains have different critical tapers. The inner domain is in a critical state from the onset of shortening (i.e. the initial wedge is already critical), while the frontal domain steadily acquires a state of critical taper by thrusting. This result is at variance with the classical assumption that shortening of a wedge made of homogeneous layers creates a single critical taper. The experimental thrust wedges do show other features characteristic for weak décollement wedges like narrow cross-sectional taper, large thrust spacing and variety in thrust geometries. Application of the results to natural thrust wedges like the Jura Mountains could shed new light on their development and geometry at depth.

  18. Capillarity driven motion of solid film wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.; Miksis, M.J.; Voorhees, P.W.; Davis, S.H.

    1997-06-01

    A solid film freshly deposited on a substrate may form a non-equilibrium contact angle with the substrate, and will evolve. This morphological evolution near the contact line is investigated by studying the motion of a solid wedge on a substrate. The contact angle of the wedge changes at time t = 0 from the wedge angle {alpha} to the equilibrium contact angle {beta}, and its effects spread into the wedge via capillarity-driven surface diffusion. The film profiles at different times are found to be self-similar, with the length scale increasing as t{sup 1 4}. The self-similar film profile is determined numerically by a shooting method for {alpha} and {beta} between 0 and 180. In general, the authors find that the film remains a wedge when {alpha} = {beta}. For {alpha} < {beta}, the film retracts, whereas for {alpha} > {beta}, the film extends. For {alpha} = 90{degree}, the results describe the growth of grain-boundary grooves for arbitrary dihedral angles. For {beta} = 90{degree}, the solution also applies to a free-standing wedge, and the thin-wedge profiles agree qualitatively with those observed in transmission electron microscope specimens.

  19. Pressure Distributions About Finite Wedges in Bounded and Unbounded Subsonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, Patrick L; Prasse, Ernst I

    1953-01-01

    An analytical investigation of incompressible flow about wedges was made to determine effects of tunnel-wedge ratio and wedge angle on the wedge pressure distributions. The region of applicability of infinite wedge-type velocity distribution was examined for finite wedges. Theoretical and experimental pressure coefficients for various tunnel-wedge ratios, wedge angles, and subsonic Mach numbers were compared.

  20. Hydrologic Data and Evaluation for Model Validation Wells, MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3 near the Project Shoal Area

    SciTech Connect

    B. Lyles; P. Oberlander; D. Gillespie; D. Donithan; J. Chapman; J. Healey

    2007-02-14

    In 2006, a drilling campaign was conducted at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) to provide information for model validation, emplace long-term monitoring wells, and develop baseline geochemistry for long term hydrologic monitoring. Water levels were monitored in the vicinity of the drilling, in the existing wells HC-1 and HC-6, as well as in the newly drilled wells, MV-1, MV-2 and MV-3 and their associated piezometers. Periodic water level measurements were also made in existing wells HC-2, HC-3, HC-4, HC-5 and HC-7. A lithium bromide chemical tracer was added to drilling fluids during the installation of the monitoring and validation (MV) wells and piezometers. The zones of interest were the fractured, jointed and faulted horizons within a granitic body. These horizons generally have moderate hydraulic conductivities. As a result, the wells and their shallower piezometers required strenuous purging and development to remove introduced drilling fluids as evidenced by bromide concentrations. After airlift and surging well development procedures, the wells were pumped continuously until the bromide concentration was less then 1 milligram per liter (mg/L). Water quality samples were collected after the well development was completed. Tritium scans were preformed before other analyses to ensure the absence of high levels of radioactivity. Tritium levels were less than 2,000 pico-curies per liter. Samples were also analyzed for carbon-14 and iodine-129, stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, as well as major cations and anions. Aquifer tests were performed in each MV well after the bromide concentration fell below acceptable levels. Water level data from the aquifer tests were used to compute aquifer hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity

  1. Ultrasonic transducer with laminated coupling wedge

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1976-08-03

    An ultrasonic transducer capable of use in a high-temperature environment incorporates a laminated metal coupling wedge including a reflecting edge shaped as a double sloping roof and a transducer crystal backed by a laminated metal sound absorber disposed so as to direct sound waves through the coupling wedge and into a work piece, reflections from the interface between the coupling wedge and the work piece passing to the reflecting edge. Preferably the angle of inclination of the two halves of the reflecting edge are different.

  2. Penetrating eye injury from a metal wedge.

    PubMed

    Kozielec, G F; To, K

    1999-01-01

    The authors describe a patient with a penetrating ocular injury from a metal wedge, a common hand tool used by road service technicians for the purpose of opening a locked car door. The patient had a penetrating eye injury from a metal wedge when its sharp end released from a car door lock and retracted upward, striking the right eye. No report exists of ocular injury using a metal wedge for its intended purpose of opening a car door lock. The use of polycarbonate lenses might afford some protection.

  3. Seismic rupture propagation beneath potential landslide wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, A.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-12-01

    During 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0), much larger slip and tsunami occurred than expectation at outer-wedge (toe of the trench landward slope) of Japan trench (eg. Ide et al., 2011). Similarly, outer-wedge deformation was pointed out in northern segment of 1986 Meiji-Sanriku earthquake (Ms 7.2), and it was discussed that earthquake-related landslide induced large tsunami (eg. Kanamori, 1972; Tanioka and Satake, 1996). Many landslides and normal faults, potential tsunami genesis, are developed at outer-wedge of Japan trench (Henry et al., 1989). Some steep normal-faults turn to horizon at deep portion, and land sliding may be prevented by basal friction. If seismic rupture propagates to basal fault of the outer-wedge, triggered gravity collapse will enlarge deformation of the outer-wedge to cause large tsunamis. It was considered that seismogenic fault locks at deep portion under inner-wedge of the plate subduction zone, and outer-wedge was classified into aseismic zone classically. Seismic rupture propagation to outer-wedge is still uncertain. Seismic slip at the outer-wedge was found from the drilled core during IODP Nankai trough seismogenic zone drilling project (NanTroSEIZE) in Nankai trough, southwest Japan. Samples were obtained from the frontal thrust (438 mbsf), which connects the deep plate boundary to the seafloor at the toe of the accretionary wedge, and from a megasplay fault (271 mbsf) that branches from the plate boundary décollement. Higher vitrinite reflectance of 0.57 % and 0.37 % than the host rock of 0.24 % were found at splay and plate boundary faults zones respectively. These correspond with 300-400 °C and > 20°C of host rock. Local high temperature zone less than several cm thick may be caused by frictional shear heat at fault zone (Sakaguchi, et al., 2011). Shear velocity and durations can be estimated from thermal property of the sediment and distribution of the vitrinite anomaly (Hamada et al., 2011). This result shows that seismic

  4. The novel HVEE 5 MV Tandetron™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottdang, A.; Mous, D. J. W.; Haitsma, R. G.

    2002-05-01

    Recently, HVEE has extended the voltage range for its Tandetron™ accelerators from 3 MV terminal voltage to 5 MV terminal voltage with the development of an entirely new coaxial Tandetron™. The new 5 MV system is presently in the final test phase and will shortly be installed at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain) as part of their new IBA facility. The all-solid-state power supply (parallel-fed Cockroft-Walton type) is constructed around the high-energy accelerator tubes, thereby avoiding the T-shaped tank that was so far characteristic for the HVEE Tandetrons™. During the design of the system special emphasis has been put to minimize the electrical field strength in the complete structure. Using three-dimensional electrostatic field simulations, we were able to identify possible hot spots and to reduce the maximum field strength to 80% compared to that of older designs. This reduction in field strength guarantees more reliable operation at or even above the guaranteed terminal voltage of 5 MV. The electrical power for beam transport is generated by a 10 kW version of a recently in-house developed range of all-solid-state drivers with output powers of up to 25 kW. Apart from IBA applications like heavy element ERDA and NRA, the system is very well suited for other applications like positron emission tomography, deep implants in semiconductors as well as accelerator mass spectrometry of various elements, including 36Cl and 41Ca.

  5. 25 MV tandem accelerator at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1980-01-01

    A new heavy-ion accelerator facility is under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A brief description of the scope and status of this project is presented with emphasis on the first operational experience with the 25 MV tandem accelerator.

  6. A specially curved wedge for eliminating wedge angle effect in unsteady shock reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun

    2017-08-01

    A curved wedge with a specific shape is designed and manufactured to guarantee the wedge angle unvaried during the cylindrically converging shock moving along the wedge. Thus the variation of the wedge angle caused by the wedge will be eliminated in unsteady shock reflection. Different initial wedge angles are considered to observe regular reflection and Mach reflection. When Mach reflection occurs, it is found that direct Mach reflection is persisted over the wedge without wave pattern transitions, which differs from our previous work with varied wedge angles [Zhang et al. "Reflection of cylindrical converging shock wave over a plane wedge," Phys. Fluids 28, 086101 (2016)]. Moreover, the Mach stem is nearly straight when the wedge angle is relatively large, and the trajectory of triple point can be well predicted by three-shock theory. It is believed that the straight Mach stem results from the coupling effect of the converging shock and the convexly curved wedge, which exert opposite effects on the Mach stem curvature. As the wedge angle reduces, the three-shock theory prediction deviates from the present results owing to the curved Mach stem. Stronger vortices are produced near the wall, which are caused by the interaction of two shear layers, and whether the stronger vortices will be generated near the wall depends on the reflection number of the shock wave over the tube wall and wedge. The length of disturbed shock front in the Mach reflection is found to increase nonlinearly due to the unsteady feature of the flow. The growth rate of length reduces as the shock converges because of the geometrical contraction effect. Further the lengths of the Mach stem and the disturbed shock front are compared, and the results show that although the difference exists between them, both of them show a similar variation tendency. Compared with our previous work with varied wedge angles, the variation of the wedge angle has great effects on the Mach stem length and wave

  7. Metal artifact correction for x-ray computed tomography using kV and selective MV imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meng; Keil, Andreas; Constantin, Dragos; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The overall goal of this work is to improve the computed tomography (CT) image quality for patients with metal implants or fillings by completing the missing kilovoltage (kV) projection data with selectively acquired megavoltage (MV) data that do not suffer from photon starvation. When both of these imaging systems, which are available on current radiotherapy devices, are used, metal streak artifacts are avoided, and the soft-tissue contrast is restored, even for regions in which the kV data cannot contribute any information. Methods: Three image-reconstruction methods, including two filtered back-projection (FBP)-based analytic methods and one iterative method, for combining kV and MV projection data from the two on-board imaging systems of a radiotherapy device are presented in this work. The analytic reconstruction methods modify the MV data based on the information in the projection or image domains and then patch the data onto the kV projections for a FBP reconstruction. In the iterative reconstruction, the authors used dual-energy (DE) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) methods to simultaneously combine the kV/MV data and perform the reconstruction. Results: The authors compared kV/MV reconstructions to kV-only reconstructions using a dental phantom with fillings and a hip-implant numerical phantom. Simulation results indicated that dual-energy sinogram patch FBP and the modified dual-energy PWLS method can successfully suppress metal streak artifacts and restore information lost due to photon starvation in the kV projections. The root-mean-square errors of soft-tissue patterns obtained using combined kV/MV data are 10–15 Hounsfield units smaller than those of the kV-only images, and the structural similarity index measure also indicates a 5%–10% improvement in the image quality. The added dose from the MV scan is much less than the dose from the kV scan if a high efficiency MV detector is assumed. Conclusions: The authors have shown that it

  8. Design and simulation of a short, variable-energy 4 to 10 MV S-band linear accelerator waveguide.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Devin; Fallone, B Gino; Steciw, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    To modify a previously designed, short, 10 MV linac waveguide, so that it can produce any energy from 4 to 10 MV. The modified waveguide is designed to be a drop-in replacement for the 6 MV waveguide used in the author's current linear accelerator-magnetic resonance imager (Linac-MR). Using our group's previously designed short 10 MV linac as a starting point, the port was moved to the fourth cavity, the shift to the first coupling cavity was removed and a tuning cylinder added to the first coupling cavity. Each cavity was retuned using finite element method (FEM) simulations to resonate at the desired frequency. FEM simulations were used to determine the RF field distributions for various tuning cylinder depths, and electron trajectories were computed using a particle-in-cell model to determine the required RF power level and tuning cylinder depth to produce electron energy distributions for 4, 6, 8, and 10 MV photon beams. Monte Carlo simulations were then used to compare the depth dose profiles with those produced by published electron beam characteristics for Varian linacs. For each desired photon energy, the electron beam energy was within 0.5% of the target mean energy, the depth of maximum dose was within 1.5 mm of that produced by the Varian linac, and the ratio of dose at 10 cm depth to 20 cm depth was within 1%. A new 27.5 cm linear accelerator waveguide design capable of producing any photon energy between 4 and 10 MV has been simulated, however coupling port design and the implications of increased electron beam current at 10 MV remain to be investigated. For the specific cases of 4, 6, and 10 MV, this linac produces depth dose profiles similar to those produced by published spectra for Varian linacs. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Numerical simulation of vortex-wedge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Ho; Lee, Duck-Joo

    1994-06-01

    Interactions between vortical flows and a solid surface cause one of the primary sources of noise and unsteady loading. The mechanism of the interaction is studied numerically for a single Rankine vortex impinging upon a wedge. An Euler-Lagrangian method is employed to calculate the unsteady, viscous, incompressible flows in two dimensions. A random vortex method is used to describe the vorticity dominant field. A fast vortex method is used to reduce the computational time in the calculation of the convection velocity of each vortex particle. A Schwarz-Christoffel transformation is used to map the numerical domain onto the physical domain. Vortex partical plots, velocity vectors, and streamlines are presented at selected times for both inviscid and viscous interactions. It is observed that the incident rankine vortex distorts and is split by the wedge as it nears and passes the wedge, and the vortices generated from the leading edge toward the underside of the wedge form into a single vortex. The vorticity orientation of the shed vortex is opposite to that of the incident vortex. It is found that the convection velocity of the shed vortex is changed wheen it comes off the leading edge of the wedge, and the strength of the shed vortex varies with the time during the vortex-wedge interaction. This strength variation is presumed to influence the shed vortex convection velocity. The overall features for the interaction agree well with the experimental results of Ziada and Rockwell.

  10. Aerodynamic Analysis Over Double Wedge Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, U. S.; Ajay, V. S.; Rajat, R. H.; Samanyu, S.

    2017-05-01

    Aeronautical studies are being focused more towards supersonic flights and methods to attain a better and safer flight with highest possible performance. Aerodynamic analysis is part of the whole procedure, which includes focusing on airfoil shapes which will permit sustained flight of aircraft at these speeds. Airfoil shapes differ based on the applications, hence the airfoil shapes considered for supersonic speeds are different from the ones considered for Subsonic. The present work is based on the effects of change in physical parameter for the Double wedge airfoil. Mach number range taken is for transonic and supersonic. Physical parameters considered for the Double wedge case with wedge angle (ranging from 5 degree to 15 degree. Available Computational tools are utilized for analysis. Double wedge airfoil is analysed at different Angles of attack (AOA) based on the wedge angle. Analysis is carried out using fluent at standard conditions with specific heat ratio taken as 1.4. Manual calculations for oblique shock properties are calculated with the help of Microsoft excel. MATLAB is used to form a code for obtaining shock angle with Mach number and wedge angle at the given parameters. Results obtained from manual calculations and fluent analysis are cross checked.

  11. Taper Angle Evolution in Taiwan Accretionary Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Chi, W.; Liu, C.

    2011-12-01

    Liwen Chena,b, Wu-Cheng Chia, Char-Shine Liuc aInstitute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan bInstitute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan cInstitute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan The critical taper model, originally developed using onland Taiwan as an example, is governed by force balance of a horizontal compressional wedge. This model has been successfully applied to many mountainous regions around the world. Among them, Taiwan is located in an oblique collision between the Luzon Arc and the Chinese Passive margin. Previous critical taper angle studies of Taiwan are mainly focusing on utilizing land data. In this study we want to extend these studies to offshore region from the subduction zone to collision zone. Here we study the varying taper angles of the double-vergent wedge derived from 1,000 km of reflection seismic profiles in both the pro-wedge and retro-wedge locations. These profiles were collected in the last two decades. For the retro-wedge, the topography slope angle changes from 2 to 8.8 degrees; some of the steep slope suggests that some part of the retrowedge is currently in a super-critical angle state. Such dramatic changes in taper angle probably strongly affect regional sedimentary processes, including slumping, in addition to structural deformation. These complex processes might even help develop a mélange or re-open a closed basin. We are currently working on studying the taper angle evolution of the pro-wedge from subduction to arc-continent collision zone in the offshore region. Though further works are needed, our preliminary results show that the evolution of wedge angles and the geometry of the wedge are closely linked and inseparable. The structures of the subducting plate might have strong influence on the deformation style of the over-riding plate. It would be interesting to combine the angle variation with the structure interpretation of the accretionary wedge

  12. Dosimetric comparison between 10MV-FFF and 6MV-FFF for lung SBRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmus, I. F.; Atalay, E. D.

    2017-02-01

    Plans were prepared by using same non-coplanar fields and physical parameters in 6MV-FFF and 10MV-FFF energies for fourteen lung Stereotactic Body Radio Therapy (SBRT) patients. In two plans which have different energies, critic organ doses, PTV doses, quality of plans (Gradient Index (GI), Homogeneity Index (HI), Conformity Index (CI)) and Monitor Unit (MU) values were compared. Quality controls were performed with 2D-Array Iba MatriXX Evolution® dosimetry system for each plans. As a results, plan with 6MV-FFF energy give better results in terms of CI and GI values. In this way, when more conformal dose distributions were provided, there was a rapid dose decrease at out of target volume. Lower MU values were obtained in plans which was prepared with 10MV-FFF energy. In plan with 10MV-FFF energy lower MU values are obtained. Lower values in heart and spinal cord doses are founded and better results are obtained in Body and Ipsa-Lung V5, V10, V20 values with 6MV-FFF energies. When differences were very small in volume which were taken low dose (V5), these differences increased in volume which were taken high dose (V20). High dose rates can be reached by both two unfiltered energies and can be used in lung SBRT.

  13. Heavy ion fusion 2 MV injector

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.

    1995-04-01

    A heavy-ion-fusion driver-scale injector has been constructed and operated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The injector has produced 2.3 MV and 950 mA of K{sup +}, 15% above original design goals in energy and current. Normalized edge emittance of less than 1 {pi} mm-mr was measured over a broad range of parameters. The head-to-tail energy flatness is less than {+-} 0.2% over the 1 {micro}s pulse.

  14. Oak Ridge 25-MV tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, N.F.; Richardson, E.G.; Mann, J.E.; Juras, R.C.; Jones, C.M.; Biggerstaff, J.A.; Benjamin, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    A new heavy-ion accelerator facility is nearing completion at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper presents a brief description of the scope and status of this project and a discussion of some aspects of the first operational experience with the 25 MV tandem accelerator which is being provided by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) as a major component of the first phase of the facility.

  15. Evaluating the dose to the contralateral breast when using a dynamic wedge versus a regular wedge.

    PubMed

    Weides, C D; Mok, E C; Chang, W C; Findley, D O; Shostak, C A

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of secondary cancers in the contralateral breast after primary breast irradiation is several times higher than the incidence of first time breast cancer. Studies have shown that the scatter radiation to the contralateral breast may play a large part in the induction of secondary breast cancers. Factors that may contribute to the contralateral breast dose may include the use of blocks, the orientation of the field, and wedges. Reports have shown that the use of regular wedges, particularly for the medial tangential field, gives a significantly higher dose to the contralateral breast compared to an open field. This paper compares the peripheral dose outside the field using a regular wedge, a dynamic wedge, and an open field technique. The data collected consisted of measurements taken with patients, solid water and a Rando phantom using a Varian 2300CD linear accelerator. Ion chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), diodes, and films were the primary means for collecting the data. The measurements show that the peripheral dose outside the field using a dynamic wedge is close to that of open fields, and significantly lower than that of regular wedges. This information indicates that when using a medial wedge, a dynamic wedge should be used.

  16. The formation of grounding zone wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowal, Katarzyna; Worster, Grae

    2016-11-01

    Ice sheets are generally lubricated by a layer of sub-glacial sediment, or till, which plays a central role in determining their large-scale dynamics. Sub-glacial till has been found to accumulate into distinctive sedimentary wedges at ice-sheet grounding zones, separating floating ice shelves from grounded ice sheets. These grounding-zone wedges have important implications for stabilizing ice sheets against grounding-zone retreat in response to rising sea levels. We develop a theoretical model of wedge formation in which we treat both ice and till as viscous fluids spreading under gravity into an inviscid ocean and present a fluid-mechanical explanation of the formation of these wedges in terms of the jump in hydrostatic loading and unloading of till across the grounding zone. We also conduct a series of fluid-mechanical experiments in a confined setting in which we find that the underlying layer of less viscous fluid accumulates spontaneously in a similar wedge-shaped region at the experimental grounding line. We also extend our theory to more natural, unconfined settings in two dynamical regimes in which the overlying ice is resisted dominantly either by vertical shear or by extensional stresses and compare our findings with available geophysical data. Currently at Northwestern University.

  17. Mechanics of injection wedges in collision orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. B.; Schulmann, K.

    2003-04-01

    Instantaneously juxtaposed lithospheric sections, marked by different geothermal gradient and lithological make-up, are examined to identify zones of highly contrasting strength in adjacent transposed crust and lithospheric mantle. Three types of geotherms and four reference lithospheric segments: thin crust/hot geotherm (rift), thin crust/mean geotherm (relaxed rift), standard crust/hot geotherm (arc), standard crust/mean geotherm (normal crust), are compared with variable permutations of cratonic, standard and rifted lithosphere thicknesses. This permits identification of strong brittle-elastic or plastic mantle, lower and upper crust juxtaposed against plastic rocks of a weak adjacent lithosphere. Vertical positions of shallow dipping detachment zones thus delineate possible areas of hot or cold injection wedges which include: (i) Single shallow wedge (or Flake), (ii) Double shallow and deep wedge, (iii) Deep lithospheric crocodile, (iv) Crustal thickening due to shallow strength differences, (v) Mantle Lithosphere thickening, or wedging, due to deep mantle strength differences and (vii) Exchange tectonics as an extreme wedging process, in which horizontal mass exchange is approximately equal. Rheological calculations are compared to a database of seismic profiles in which the geometry of detachment zones and proposed thermal conditions and lithological make-ups have been presented.

  18. Long polymers near wedges and cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2015-12-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo study of N -step self-avoiding walks, attached to the corner of an impenetrable wedge in two dimensions (d =2 ), or the tip of an impenetrable cone in d =3 , of sizes ranging up to N =106 steps. We find that the critical exponent γα, which determines the dependence of the number of available conformations on N for a cone or wedge with opening angle α , is in good agreement with the theory for d =2 . We study the end-point distribution of the walks in the allowed space and find similarities to the known behavior of random walks (ideal polymers) in the same geometry. For example, the ratio between the mean square end-to-end distances of a polymer near the cone or wedge and a polymer in free space depends linearly on γα, as is known for ideal polymers. We show that the end-point distribution of polymers attached to a wedge does not separate into a product of angular and radial functions, as it does for ideal polymers in the same geometry. The angular dependence of the end position of polymers near the wedge differs from theoretical predictions.

  19. Quench propagation delay due to copper wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; McInturff, A.D.; Hanft, R.W.; Mazur, P.O.

    1986-01-01

    The superconducting magnet design style selected for the SSC dipoles is 16.6 m long and incorporates copper wedges in the windings in order to achieve the required magnetic field uniformity. Recent studies of quench propagation in a 4 m model, SLN-012 at BNL, have been carried out in order to prove the feasibility of self-protection for these magnets in the event of a quench. This feature would dispense with an active protection system like the one used in the Fermilab Energy Saver. These studies, however, require the knowledge of how the copper wedges affect the transverse spreading of normal zones needed in the self-protecting scheme. It is not clear that such information can be obtained with the short (1 m long) prototypes about to be tested since the time for the normal zone to cross over a wedge might be of the order of or longer than the time it takes for it to reach the other side of the wedge by propagation along the cable. Well instrumented long prototype magnets are months away from availability. Calculations that take into account the effect of the Kapton insulation, helium in the interstices and other significant details do not exist or have not been tested. Therefore we have measured the delay that the copper wedges introduce in the transverse (azimuthal) propagation of the normal zone in an experimental simulation of these magnets.

  20. Dose-volume histogram comparison between static 5-field IMRT with 18-MV X-rays and helical tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akihiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hattori, Yukiko; Tamura, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Michio; Otsuka, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Yanagi, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We treated prostate cancer patients with static 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using linac 18-MV X-rays or tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays. As X-ray energies differ, we hypothesized that 18-MV photon IMRT may be better for large patients and tomotherapy may be more suitable for small patients. Thus, we compared dose-volume parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) in 59 patients with T1-3 N0M0 prostate cancer who had been treated using 5-field IMRT. For these same patients, tomotherapy plans were also prepared for comparison. In addition, plans of 18 patients who were actually treated with tomotherapy were analyzed. The evaluated parameters were homogeneity indicies and a conformity index for the PTVs, and D2 (dose received by 2% of the PTV in Gy), D98, Dmean and V10-70 Gy (%) for OARs. To evaluate differences by body size, patients with a known body mass index were grouped by that index ( <21; 21-25; and >25 kg/m(2)). For the PTV, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans compared with the 5-field IMRT plans. For the rectum, V10 Gy and V60 Gy were higher, whereas V20 Gy and V30 Gy were lower in the tomotherapy plans. For the bladder, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans. However, both plans were considered clinically acceptable. Similar trends were observed in 18 patients treated with tomotherapy. Obvious trends were not observed for body size. Tomotherapy provides equivalent dose distributions for PTVs and OARs compared with 18-MV 5-field IMRT. Tomotherapy could be used as a substitute for high-energy photon IMRT for prostate cancer regardless of body size.

  1. FEM design and simulation of a short, 10 MV, S-band Linac with Monte Carlo dose simulations.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Devin; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B G; Steciw, S

    2015-04-01

    Current commercial 10 MV Linac waveguides are 1.5 m. The authors' current 6 MV linear accelerator-magnetic resonance imager (Linac-MR) system fits in typical radiotherapy vaults. To allow 10 MV treatments with the Linac-MR and still fit within typical vaults, the authors design a 10 MV Linac with an accelerator waveguide of the same length (27.5 cm) as current 6 MV Linacs. The first design stage is to design a cavity such that a specific experimental measurement for breakdown is applicable to the cavity. This is accomplished through the use of finite element method (FEM) simulations to match published shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength from an electric breakdown study. A full waveguide is then designed and tuned in FEM simulations based on this cavity design. Electron trajectories are computed through the resulting radio frequency fields, and the waveguide geometry is modified by shifting the first coupling cavity in order to optimize the electron beam properties until the energy spread and mean energy closely match values published for an emulated 10 MV Linac. Finally, Monte Carlo dose simulations are used to compare the resulting photon beam depth dose profile and penumbra with that produced by the emulated 10 MV Linac. The shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength are all matched to within 0.1%. A first coupling cavity shift of 1.45 mm produces an energy spectrum width of 0.347 MeV, very close to the published value for the emulated 10 MV of 0.315 MeV, and a mean energy of 10.53 MeV, nearly identical to the published 10.5 MeV for the emulated 10 MV Linac. The depth dose profile produced by their new Linac is within 1% of that produced by the emulated 10 MV spectrum for all depths greater than 1.5 cm. The penumbra produced is 11% narrower, as measured from 80% to 20% of the central axis dose. The authors have successfully designed and simulated an S-band waveguide of length

  2. FEM design and simulation of a short, 10 MV, S-band Linac with Monte Carlo dose simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, Devin; Aubin, J. St.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Current commercial 10 MV Linac waveguides are 1.5 m. The authors’ current 6 MV linear accelerator–magnetic resonance imager (Linac–MR) system fits in typical radiotherapy vaults. To allow 10 MV treatments with the Linac–MR and still fit within typical vaults, the authors design a 10 MV Linac with an accelerator waveguide of the same length (27.5 cm) as current 6 MV Linacs. Methods: The first design stage is to design a cavity such that a specific experimental measurement for breakdown is applicable to the cavity. This is accomplished through the use of finite element method (FEM) simulations to match published shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength from an electric breakdown study. A full waveguide is then designed and tuned in FEM simulations based on this cavity design. Electron trajectories are computed through the resulting radio frequency fields, and the waveguide geometry is modified by shifting the first coupling cavity in order to optimize the electron beam properties until the energy spread and mean energy closely match values published for an emulated 10 MV Linac. Finally, Monte Carlo dose simulations are used to compare the resulting photon beam depth dose profile and penumbra with that produced by the emulated 10 MV Linac. Results: The shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength are all matched to within 0.1%. A first coupling cavity shift of 1.45 mm produces an energy spectrum width of 0.347 MeV, very close to the published value for the emulated 10 MV of 0.315 MeV, and a mean energy of 10.53 MeV, nearly identical to the published 10.5 MeV for the emulated 10 MV Linac. The depth dose profile produced by their new Linac is within 1% of that produced by the emulated 10 MV spectrum for all depths greater than 1.5 cm. The penumbra produced is 11% narrower, as measured from 80% to 20% of the central axis dose. Conclusions: The authors have successfully

  3. A review of dynamics modelling of friction wedge suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Cole, Colin; Spiryagin, Maksym; Sun, Yan Quan

    2014-11-01

    Three-piece bogies with friction wedge suspensions are the most widely used bogies in heavy haul trains. Fiction wedge suspensions play a key role in these wagon systems. This article reviews current techniques in dynamic modelling of friction wedge suspension with various motivations: to improve dynamic models of friction wedge suspensions so as to improve general wagon dynamics simulations; to seek better friction wedge suspension models for wagon stability assessments in complex train systems; to improve the modelling of other friction devices, such as friction draft gear. Relevant theories and friction wedge suspension models developed by using commercial simulation packages and in-house simulation packages are reviewed.

  4. The Naples University 3 MV tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Campajola, L.; Brondi, A.

    2013-07-18

    The 3 MV tandem accelerator of the Naples University is used for research activities and applications in many fields. At the beginning of operation (1977) the main utilization was in the field of nuclear physics. Later, the realization of new beam lines allowed the development of applied activities as radiocarbon dating, ion beam analysis, biophysics, ion implantation etc. At present, the availability of different ion sources and many improvements on the accelerator allow to run experiments in a wide range of subjects. An overview of the characteristics and major activities of the laboratory is presented.

  5. Two-dimensional meniscus in a wedge

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M.; Pinczewski, W.V.; Oren, P.E.

    1995-03-15

    This paper presents a closed-form analytical solution of the augmented Young-Laplace equation for the meniscus profile in a two-dimensional wedge-shaped capillary. The solution is valid for monotonic forms of disjoining pressure which are repulsive in nature. In the limit of negligible disjoining pressure, it is shown to reduce to the classical solution of constant curvature. The character of the solution is examined and examples of practical interest which demonstrate the application of the solution to the computation of the meniscus profile in a wedge-shaped capillary are discussed.

  6. Build-up modification of commercial diodes for entrance dose measurements in 'higher energy' photon beams.

    PubMed

    Georg, D; De Ost, B; Hoornaert, M T; Pilette, P; Van Dam, J; Van Dycke, M; Huyskens, D

    1999-06-01

    Several commercially available p-type diodes do not provide sufficient build-up for in-vivo dosimetry in 'higher' energy photon beams, and only limited information could be found in the literature describing the correction factor variation and/or the achievable accuracy for in-vivo dosimetry methods in this energy range. The first aim of this study is to assess and analyze the variation of diode correction factors for entrance dose measurements at higher photon energies. In a second step the total build up thickness of the diode has been modified in order to minimize the correction factor variation. Diode correction factors accounting for non-reference conditions (field size, source surface distance, tray, wedge, and block) are determined in 18-25 MV photon beams provided by different treatment units for Scanditronix p-type diodes recommended for higher energy photon beams: old type and new type EDP-20, and EDP-30 diodes. Hemispherical build-up caps of different materials (copper, iron, lead) are used to increase the total build-up thickness. Perturbation effects with and without additional build-up caps are assessed for the three diode types. For unmodified diodes field size correction factors (C(FS)) vary between 1.7% and 6%, dependent on diode type and treatment unit. For example, for an old type EDP-20 the C(FS) variation at 18 MV is much higher on a GE linac (5%) as compared to the Philips machine (1.7%). Depending on diode type, this variation can be reduced to 1-2% when adding additional build-up. The variation of source to surface distance correction factors is almost independent of build-up thickness. By adding additional build-up the influence of trays and blocks can be almost eliminated. The correction factor variation of unmodified diodes reflects the variation of the electron contamination with treatment geometry. A total build-up thickness of 30 mm is found to be the 'best compromise' for the three types of diodes investigated when measuring entrance

  7. 38. INTERIOR VIEW, DENISON MULTIPRESS FOR INSERTION OF WEDGES ONTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. INTERIOR VIEW, DENISON MULTI-PRESS FOR INSERTION OF WEDGES ONTO HANDLES AND CUTTING OFF SCRAP END OF HANDLE FOLLOWING WEDGE INSERTION, BRIAN KIMBLE, OPERATOR - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  8. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and wedges...

  9. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and wedges...

  10. Johnstone's "Wedge" and Theory of Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Carroll C.

    1987-01-01

    Presents the views of a scholar in speech communication on Henry Johnstone's ideas about rhetoric. Concludes that rhetoric that "appeals" wedges apart percipient and objects of perception, or that it forces a person to examine what he or she knows or is, as well as examining the proffered rhetoric. (NKA)

  11. Sharp Thermal Transition in the Forearc Mantle Wedge as a Consequence of Nonlinear Mantle Wedge Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, I.; Wang, K.; Jiangheng, H.

    2009-12-01

    A sharp landward increase in seismic attenuation over a few tens of kilometres distance in the forearc mantle wedge has been reported for a number of subduction zones, including Alaska, Costa Rica, central Andes, Hikurangi, and NE Japan. The low attenuation in the wedge nose is commonly interpreted as to indicate a cold state, and the high attenuation further landward to indicate high temperature and/or partial melting. Beneath the arc, the high temperature at shallow depths may be caused by transient melt migration, but at larger depths the mantle wedge must be hot enough to generate melt. Thus, the landward change in the thermal state of the forearc mantle wedge is large and sharp. We use a two-dimensional steady-state thermal model and the subduction-interface weakening approach of Wada et al. (2008) to investigate how slab-driven mantle wedge flow controls the thermal transition. We observe that the sharpness of the transition increases with the increasing nonlinearity of the flow system. In an isoviscous mantle wedge with a uniform interface strength, there is no spontaneous transition in the flow and thermal fields. In a diffusion-creep mantle wedge, even with a uniform interface strength, the strong temperature dependence of the mantle rheology always results in full slab-mantle decoupling along the weakened part of the interface and hence complete stagnation of the overlying mantle, giving rise to a cold wedge nose that does not participate in the wedge flow. On the other hand, the interface immediately downdip of the zone of decoupling is fully coupled, and the overlying mantle is driven to flow at a rate compatible with the subduction rate. The flow system thus shows a bimodal behaviour. In a dislocation-creep mantle wedge, its stress-dependence results in an additional feedback effect, making the bimodal behaviour more pronounced than in the diffusion-creep mantle wedge, with an abrupt change from decoupling to coupling along the subduction interface

  12. Radiotherapy treatment planning with dynamic wedges--an algorithm for generating wedge factors and beam data.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S J; Foster, K R

    1995-09-01

    If the jaws of a linear accelerator are moved under computer control during irradiation, dose distributions similar to those with wedge filters can be produced. Varian linear accelerators utilize this effect to give a 'dynamic wedge', using segmented treatment tables (STTs). An algorithm is described to generate the dose per monitor unit at any point in a beam, using the STT values. Dynamically wedged beams are modelled as the superposition of static asymmetric beams, using an algorithm based on beam data measured for symmetric beams. Predictions of wedge factors, depth doses and profiles generated using the algorithm are compared with measurements. Good agreement is found between predictions and measurements. The calculation time is typically 5 ms/dose point on a PC with a 486DX processor.

  13. Backscatter correction factor for megavoltage photon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yida; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: For routine clinical dosimetry of photon beams, it is often necessary to know the minimum thickness of backscatter phantom material to ensure that full backscatter condition exists. Methods: In case of insufficient backscatter thickness, one can determine the backscatter correction factor, BCF(s,d,t), defined as the ratio of absorbed dose measured on the central-axis of a phantom with backscatter thickness of t to that with full backscatter for square field size s and forward depth d. Measurements were performed in SAD geometry for 6 and 15 MV photon beams using a 0.125 cc thimble chamber for field sizes between 10 x 10 and 30 x 30 cm at depths between d{sub max} (1.5 cm for 6 MV and 3 cm for 15 MV) and 20 cm. Results: A convolution method was used to calculate BCF using Monte-Carlo simulated point-spread kernels generated for clinical photon beams for energies between Co-60 and 24 MV. The convolution calculation agrees with the experimental measurements to within 0.8% with the same physical trend. The value of BCF deviates more from 1 for lower energies and larger field sizes. According to our convolution calculation, the minimum BCF occurs at forward depth d{sub max} and 40 x 40 cm field size, 0.970 for 6 MV and 0.983 for 15 MV. Conclusions: The authors concluded that backscatter thickness is 6.0 cm for 6 MV and 4.0 cm for 15 MV for field size up to 10 x 10 cm when BCF = 0.998. If 4 cm backscatter thickness is used, BCF is 0.997 and 0.983 for field size of 10 x 10 and 40 x 40 cm for 6 MV, and is 0.998 and 0.990 for 10 x 10 and 40 x 40 cm for 15 MV, respectively.

  14. Benchmarking numerical models of brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Schreurs, Guido; Albertz, Markus; Gerya, Taras V.; Kaus, Boris; Landry, Walter; le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Mishin, Yury; Egholm, David L.; Cooke, Michele; Maillot, Bertrand; Thieulot, Cedric; Crook, Tony; May, Dave; Souloumiac, Pauline; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    We report quantitative results from three brittle thrust wedge experiments, comparing numerical results directly with each other and with corresponding analogue results. We first test whether the participating codes reproduce predictions from analytical critical taper theory. Eleven codes pass the stable wedge test, showing negligible internal deformation and maintaining the initial surface slope upon horizontal translation over a frictional interface. Eight codes participated in the unstable wedge test that examines the evolution of a wedge by thrust formation from a subcritical state to the critical taper geometry. The critical taper is recovered, but the models show two deformation modes characterised by either mainly forward dipping thrusts or a series of thrust pop-ups. We speculate that the two modes are caused by differences in effective basal boundary friction related to different algorithms for modelling boundary friction. The third experiment examines stacking of forward thrusts that are translated upward along a backward thrust. The results of the seven codes that run this experiment show variability in deformation style, number of thrusts, thrust dip angles and surface slope. Overall, our experiments show that numerical models run with different numerical techniques can successfully simulate laboratory brittle thrust wedge models at the cm-scale. In more detail, however, we find that it is challenging to reproduce sandbox-type setups numerically, because of frictional boundary conditions and velocity discontinuities. We recommend that future numerical-analogue comparisons use simple boundary conditions and that the numerical Earth Science community defines a plasticity test to resolve the variability in model shear zones.

  15. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge provides mechanical support to the perianal region during the labor and delivery...

  16. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not located...

  17. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  18. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  19. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  20. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  1. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  2. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-01

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  3. MV-Algebra for Cultural Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballonoff, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results on a new area of application of quantum structures, motivated by a reading of the 2004 monograph Reasoning in Quantum Theory. Ethnographers often describe a particular culture by describing rules of social relations that they assert characterize that culture. Viable cultures exist over periods of time, that is, over sequences of “generations”. To embody this, we define a suitable set of objects and relations, and a structure on which cultural rules act as “operators” on a set of “configurations” on generations. This yields an MV-algebra of those operators. This implies that culture theory might be studied as an example of the theory of quantum structures.

  4. A 100 MV cryomodule for CW operation

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece

    2005-07-10

    A cryomodule designed for high-gradient CW operation has been built at Jefferson Lab. The Renascence cryomodule is the final prototype of a design for use in the 12 GeV CEBAF upgrade. The module uses eight 7-cell 1497 MHz cavities to be individually powered by 13 kW klystrons. Specifications call for providing >109 MV CW with < 250 W of dynamic heat at 2.07 K. The module incorporates a new generation of tuners and higher power input waveguides. A mixture of the new HG and LL cavity shapes are used. A new high thermal conductivity RF feedthrough has been developed and used on the 32 HOM coupler probes of Renascence. The cryomodule assembly is complete. Testing is to begin late June. Design features and initial test data will be presented.

  5. MvDAT: Multivariate Dependence Analysis Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadegh, M.; Ragno, E.; AghaKouchak, A.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrologic and climatic variables are interdependent, and it is often necessary to analyze association among variables using multivariate methods. Univariate marginal distributions may not be sufficient to describe hydrologic variables (or events) that bear intrinsic multivariate characteristics. The concept of copula is widely used to model the dependence structure of two (or more) random variables. Multivariate methods and copulas have been used in drought monitoring, frequency analysis, and extreme value analysis, among others. Here, we present a newly developed MultiVariate Dependence Analysis Toolbox (MvDAT) for assessing the dependence structure of target variables using 26 copulas. Copulas included in MvDAT differ in complexity with one to three tunable parameters. The Graphical User Interface (GUI) of this program enables users to conveniently browse the input data, select the desired copula family (one, multiple, or all), and finally choose the optimization approach (local/global) for dependence analysis. The program will automatically plot posterior parameter distributions of selected copula(s), if global optimization is selected, as well as fitted versus empirical probability isolines. Moreover, a summary report is automatically generated that rank the performance of selected copulas based on Maximum Likelihood, Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). Summary report also details on the best and 95% uncertainty ranges of parameters of each copula, and its best performance in terms of root mean square error (RMSE) and Nash-Sutcliff efficiency (NSE) criteria. This package is developed in MATLAB and enables the community to perform dependence analysis using a more rigorous and comprehensive approach.

  6. Wedge factor dependence with depth and field size for fast neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Alina; Risler, Ruedi

    2003-07-21

    The dependence of the wedge factors (WFs) on field size (FS) and depth for a fast neutron beam has been investigated. In a previous study (Popescu et al 1999 Med. Phys. 26 541), a method was presented that allows a simple and accurate way of calculating the wedge-factor dependence on FS and depth in the case of a photon beam. The validity of a similar approach is tested in the present study for neutron beam dosimetry. The clinical neutron therapy system at the University of Washington (UW) has a flattening filter assembly consisting of two filters: a small field filter and a large field filter. Despite this complication, the approach presented in Popescu et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 541) can be used to describe the WF dependence on FS and depth (d).

  7. Life at the wedge: the activity and diversity of arctic ice wedge microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Roland C; Radtke, Kristin J; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of polygonal terrain on Mars underlain by ice heightens interest in the possibility that this water-bearing habitat may be, or may have been, a suitable habitat for extant life. The possibility is supported by the recurring detection of terrestrial microorganisms in subsurface ice environments, such as ice wedges found beneath tundra polygon features. A characterization of the microbial community of ice wedges from the high Arctic was performed to determine whether this ice environment can sustain actively respiring microorganisms and to assess the ecology of this extreme niche. We found that ice wedge samples contained a relatively abundant number of culturable cells compared to other ice habitats (∼10(5) CFU·mL(-1)). Respiration assays in which radio-labeled acetate and in situ measurement of CO(2) flux were used suggested low levels of microbial activity, though more sensitive techniques are required to confirm these findings. Based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, bacterial and archaeal ice wedge communities appeared to reflect surrounding soil communities. Two Pseudomonas sp. were the most abundant taxa in the ice wedge bacterial library (∼50%), while taxa related to ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota occupied 90% of the archaeal library. The tolerance of a variety of isolates to salinity and temperature revealed characteristics of a psychrotolerant, halotolerant community. Our findings support the hypothesis that ice wedges are capable of sustaining a diverse, plausibly active microbial community. As such, ice wedges, compared to other forms of less habitable ground ice, could serve as a reservoir for life on permanently cold, water-scarce, ice-rich extraterrestrial bodies and are therefore of interest to astrobiologists and ecologists alike. .

  8. Starting of generic inlet with blunted wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovoy, V.; Mosharov, V.; Radchenko, V.; Skuratov, A.; Struminskaya, I.

    2017-06-01

    Bluntness e¨ect of gas-compressing wedges on starting and §ow structure in an air inlet was investigated experimentally. The inlet was of internal compression type with §at walls and rectangular cross section. The experiments were carried out in the wind tunnel UT-1M at Mach numbers M = 5 and 8 and Reynolds numbers Re∞L from 2.8 · 106 to 23 · 106. The §ow characteristics were measured by panoramic optical methods. Data demonstrating in§uence of wedge bluntness radius on the inlet starting were obtained at di¨erent Mach and Reynolds numbers as well as at di¨erent contraction ratios. Ambiguity of the §ow regime in the inlet under certain conditions was found.

  9. Electromagnetic scattering by pyramidal and wedge absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, Brian T.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1988-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering from pyramidal and wedge absorbers used to line the walls of modern anechoic chambers is measured and compared with theoretically predicted values. The theoretical performance for various angles of incidence is studied. It is shown that a pyramidal absorber scatters electromagnetic energy more as a random rough surface does. The apparent reflection coefficient from an absorber wall illuminated by a plane wave can be much less than the normal absorber specifications quoted by the manufacturer. For angles near grazing incidence, pyramidal absorbers give a large backscattered field from the pyramid side-faces or edges. The wedge absorber was found to give small backscattered fields for near-grazing incidence. Based on this study, some new guidelines for the design of anechoic chambers are advocated because the specular scattering models used at present do not appear valid for pyramids that are large compared to the wavelength.

  10. Bouncing and bursting in a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, Etienne; Cohen, Caroline; Quere, David

    2015-11-01

    Placed into an inhomogeneous confined medium, non-wetting drops tend to be expelled from the tightest regions, where their contact with the walls would be maximized. They preferentially explore more open areas which are favorable from the point of view of capillary energy. Following this principle, one may thus use the geometry of confined environments to control fluid droplets in various ways : displacing, filtering, fragmenting... In this communication, we present experimental results on the dynamics of Leidenfrost drops launched into a wedge formed by two quasi-horizontal glass plates. Influenced by the gradient of confinement, these non-wetting liquid pucks approach the apex of the wedge to a minimal distance where they bounce back. At higher impact velocity, we observe that drops tend to penetrate deeper into the wedge but often burst into a large number of small fragments. We also discuss ways to control the deviation of droplets from their initial trajectory. We propose scaling law analyses to explain the characteristics of the observed bouncing and bursting phenomena.

  11. Wedge assembly for electrical transformer component spacing

    DOEpatents

    Baggett, Franklin E.; Cage, W. Franklin

    1991-01-01

    A wedge assembly that is easily inserted between two surfaces to be supported thereby, and thereafter expanded to produce a selected spacing between those surfaces. This wedge assembly has two outer members that are substantially identical except that they are mirror images of each other. Oppositely directed faces of these of these outer members are substantially parallel for the purpose of contacting the surfaces to be separated. The outer faces of these outer members that are directed toward each other are tapered so as to contact a center member having complementary tapers on both faces. A washer member is provided to contact a common end of the outer members, and a bolt member penetrates this washer and is threadably received in a receptor of the center member. As the bolt member is threaded into the center member, the center member is drawn further into the gap between the outer members and thereby separates these outer members to contact the surfaces to be separated. In the preferred embodiment, the contacting surfaces of the outer member and the center member are provided with guide elements. The wedge assembly is described for use in separating the secondary windings from the laminations of an electrical power transformer.

  12. Interior impedance wedge diffraction with surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy

    1988-01-01

    The exact impedance wedge solution is evaluated asymptotically using the method of steepest descents for plane wave illumination at normal incidence. Uniform but different impedances on each face are considered for both soft and hard polarizations. The asymptotic solution isolates the incident, singly reflected, multiply reflected, diffracted, and surface wave fields. Multiply reflected fields of any order are permitted. The multiply reflected fields from the exact solution are written as ratios of auxiliary Maliuzhinets functions, whereas a geometrical analysis gives the reflected fields as products of reflection coefficients. These two representations are shown to be identical in magnitude, phase and the angular range over which they exist. The diffracted field includes four Fresnel transition functions as in the perfect conductor case, and the expressions for the appropriate discontinuities at the shadow boundaries are presented. The surface wave exists over a finite angular range and only for certain surface impedances. A surface wave transition field is included to retain continuity. Computations are presented for interior wedge diffractions although the formulation is valid for both exterior and interior wedges.

  13. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  14. Impulse Response of a Density Contrast Wedge Using Normal Coordinates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Dezhang

    The exact impulse solutions of a point source for a penetrable wedge (rhonerho ', upsilon = upsilon ') and a shallow water wedge using normal coordinates are presented. This is the extension of Biot and Tolstoy's exact solution in normal coordinates for a rigid wedge. Our solutions reduce to known solutions for rigid (rho'toinfty ), free (rho'to 0), and homogeneous (rho' = rho) wedges. The direct, reflected, transmitted and diffracted waves are well separated in time domain. The reflected (transmitted) part can be described by the direct waves traveling from the images around the image circle to the receiver, the amplitude depends on the number of times that the actual wave is reflected from the wedge walls. The diffracted part of the solution is not the solution for an ideal wedge (rigid or free) multiplied by an impedance factor. Transmission of acoustic wave in a wedge shaped waveguide (shallow water wedge) can also be solved in a normal mode formulation. An array of sources can excite single mode transmission in the waveguide. Alternatively, a combination of the wedge solution for a set of source positions can also be chosen to excite a single mode. The normal mode technique and wedge solution using normal coordinates give the same signal amplitudes. We compare our wedge solutions with the laboratory experimental measurements given by Tindle et al. The good agreements of the theoretical predictions with their experimental data suggests that the exact solution of an isovelocity wedge can be applied for a more general penetrable wedge by incorporating the total reflections if the velocity contrast is as close enough to 1.0.

  15. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Transcuneiform and opening wedge medial cuneiform osteotomy with closing wedge cuboid osteotomy in relapsed clubfoot.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Margaret; Nicol, Richard O

    2003-01-01

    Ten patients (13 feet) aged 4 to 11 years with idiopathic clubfeet underwent bony correction for resistant supination and adduction deformities. A closing wedge cuboid osteotomy and medial cuneiform opening wedge and transcuneiform osteotomy were performed in all cases. The average improvement in anteroposterior talo-first metatarsal angle of 22 degrees, calcaneo-fifth metatarsal angle of 13 degrees, and lateral calcaneo-first metatarsal of 9 degrees confirmed the clinically satisfactory correction in all feet. However, one foot required repeat surgery 2 years after the index procedure.

  17. The hot white dwarf in the cataclysmic variable MV Lyrae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoard, D. W.; Linnell, A. P.; Szkody, Paula; Fried, Robert E.; Sion, Edward M.; Hubeny, Ivan; Wolfe, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    We have obtained the first far-ultraviolet spectrum of the novalike cataclysmic variable MV Lyrae using the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. We also obtained contemporaneous optical light curves and spectra. All data are from a deep faint accretion state of MV Lyr.

  18. Dosimetric Comparison in Breast Radiotherapy of 4 MV and 6 MV on Physical Chest Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio; Batista Nogueira, Luciana; Lima Souza Castro, Andre; Alves de oliveira, Marcio; Galvao Dias, Humberto

    2015-07-01

    According to the World Health Organization (2014) breast cancer is the main cause of death by cancer in women worldwide. The biggest challenge of radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer is to deposit the entire prescribed dose homogeneously in the breast, sparing the surrounding tissue. In this context, this paper aimed at evaluating and comparing internal dose distribution in the mammary gland based on experimental procedures submitted to two distinct energy spectra produced in breast cancer radiotherapy. The methodology consisted of reproducing opposite parallel fields used in the treatment of breast tumors in a chest phantom. This simulator with synthetic breast, composed of equivalent tissue material (TE), was previously developed by the NRI Research Group (UFMG). The computer tomography (CT) scan of the simulator was obtained antecedently. The radiotherapy planning systems (TPS) in the chest phantom were performed in the ECLIPSE system from Varian Medical Systems and CAT 3D system from MEVIS. The irradiations were reproduced in the Varian linear accelerator, model SL- 20 Precise, 6 MV energy and Varian linear accelerator, 4 MV Clinac 6x SN11 model. Calibrations of the absorbed dose versus optical density from radiochromic films were generated in order to obtain experimental dosimetric distribution at the films positioned within the glandular and skin equivalent tissues of the chest phantom. The spatial dose distribution showed equivalence with the TPS on measurement data performed in the 6 MV spectrum. The average dose found in radiochromic films placed on the skin ranged from 49 to 79%, and from 39 to 49% in the mammary areola, for the prescribed dose. Dosimetric comparisons between the spectra of 4 and 6 MV, keeping the constant geometry of the fields applied in the same phantom, will be presented showing their equivalence in breast radiotherapy, as well as the variations will be discussed. To sum up, the dose distribution has reached the value expected in

  19. Dose enhancement close to platinum implants for the 4, 6, and 10 MV stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Joel Y.C.; Ng, Ben K.P.; Yu, K.N.

    2004-10-01

    Three photon interaction processes, namely, the photoelectric effect, Compton effect, and pair production, can occur when materials with high atomic numbers are irradiated by the high- and low-energy bremsstrahlung photons from a linear accelerator. A dose enhancement, due to the photoelectric effect and pair production, near targets with platinum implants (with a high atomic number) in radiosurgery cannot be predicted by the XKnife{sup reg} radiosurgery treatment planning system. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations using PRESTA EGS4 were employed to investigate the resulting dose enhancements from 4, 6, and 10 MV energies commonly used in the stereotactic radiosurgery system. Dose enhancements from 32% to 68% were observed close to the platinum implant for the above energies when using a 12.5 mm collimator. Comparatively higher dose enhancements were observed when using smaller collimators. It was found that this dose enhancement increased with beam energy but decreased as beam size increased.

  20. Optimal clinical implementation of the Siemens virtual wedge.

    PubMed

    Walker, C P; Richmond, N D; Lambert, G D

    2003-01-01

    Installation of a modern high-energy Siemens Primus linear accelerator at the Northern Centre for Cancer Treatment (NCCT) provided the opportunity to investigate the optimal clinical implementation of the Siemens virtual wedge filter. Previously published work has concentrated on the production of virtual wedge angles at 15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees as replacements for the Siemens hard wedges of the same nominal angles. However, treatment plan optimization of the dose distribution can be achieved with the Primus, as its control software permits the selection of any virtual wedge angle from 15 degrees to 60 degrees in increments of 1 degrees. The same result can also be produced from a combination of open and 60 degrees wedged fields. Helax-TMS models both of these modes of virtual wedge delivery by the wedge angle and the wedge fraction methods respectively. This paper describes results of timing studies in the planning of optimized patient dose distributions by both methods and in the subsequent treatment delivery procedures. Employment of the wedge fraction method results in the delivery of small numbers of monitor units to the beam's central axis; therefore, wedge profile stability and delivered dose with low numbers of monitor units were also investigated. The wedge fraction was proven to be the most efficient method when the time taken for both planning and treatment delivery were taken into consideration, and is now used exclusively for virtual wedge treatment delivery in Newcastle. It has also been shown that there are no unfavorable dosimetric consequences from its practical implementation.

  1. Knee abduction angular impulses during prolonged running with wedged insoles.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Worobets, Jay T; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2013-07-01

    Wedged insoles may produce immediate effects on knee abduction angular impulses during running; however, it is currently not known whether these knee abduction angular impulse magnitudes are maintained throughout a run when fatigue sets in. If changes occur, this could affect the clinical utility of wedged insoles in treating conditions such as patellofemoral pain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether knee abduction angular impulses are altered during a prolonged run with wedged insoles. It was hypothesized that knee abduction angular impulses would be reduced following a prolonged run with wedged insoles. Nine healthy runners participated. Runners were randomly assigned to either a 6-mm medial wedge condition or a 6-mm lateral wedge condition and then ran continuously overground for 30 min. Knee abduction angular impulses were quantified at 0 and 30 min using a gait analysis procedure. After 2 days, participants returned to perform the same test but with the other wedge type. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate main effects of wedge condition and time and interactions between wedge condition and time (α = 0.05). Paired t-tests were used for post hoc analysis (α = 0.01). No interaction effects (p = 0.958) were found, and knee abduction angular impulses were not significantly different over time (p = 0.384). Lateral wedge conditions produced lesser knee abduction angular impulses than medial conditions at 0 min (difference of 2.79 N m s, p = 0.006) and at 30 min (difference of 2.76 N m s, p < 0.001). It is concluded that significant knee abduction angular impulse changes within wedge conditions do not occur during a 30-min run. Additionally, knee abduction angular impulse differences between wedge conditions are maintained during a 30-min run.

  2. Plastic deformation of a wedge by a sliding punch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepershin, R. I.

    2016-11-01

    We present a self-similar solution of the problem of deformation of an ideally plastic wedge by a sliding punch with regard to contact friction; such a solution generalizes the well-known solutions of the problem of wedge penetration into a plastic half-space and of compression of an ideally plastic wedge by a plane punch. The problem is of interest for modeling the processes of plastic deformation of rough surfaces of metal pieces by a rigid tool.

  3. Physical parameters of very small diameter 10 MV X-ray beams for linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Edwin

    Physical aspects of very small diameter X-ray beams used for a linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery are presented in this thesis. A 10 MV linac was used as the radiation source. Very small 10 MV photon fields with diameters of 1.5 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm are produced by special collimators attached to the treatment head of the linac. The radiation beam data were measured with a small field diode detector as well as radiographic and radiochromic films. Measured beam parameters were compared with the same parameters calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For very small photon fields with diameters on the order of the focal spot size, MC calculations show that both the percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions and dose profiles are sensitive to the focal spot size. A simple sliding slit technique was developed to measure the focal spot size and shape for accurate MC simulations of very small diameter beams. The measured focal spot of the 10 MV linac is elliptical in shape and fitted by a Gaussian distribution with full-widths-at-half-maximum (FWHMs) of 2.05 mm and 1.34 mm in the principal axes of the ellipse. A Gaussian circle equivalent in area to the experimentally determined focal spot ellipse was used in MC simulations. The resulting PDD and beam profile calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. Dynamic radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams was carried out using the 10 MV linac. Radiosurgical isodose distributions were measured with radiographic films in a spherical head phantom and calculated with the MC technique. A good agreement between the measured and MC-calculated isodose distributions for very small diameter fields is achieved. The displacement of the center of the measured isodose distributions relative to the laser-defined isocenter was on the order of 0.7 mm. All these results show the potential of linac-based radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams for clinical use.

  4. Vibration frequencies of a constrained cantilever wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, W. Lionel, Jr.; Lu, Yangshan

    1989-05-01

    This paper presents the solution for the natural frequencies of a beam tapered in one direction, or a wedge, with both a rotational and a translational constraint at a position along the length of the beam. The eigenfrequencies were determined using an incremental search and bisection method, accurate to the fourth decimal place. The taper ratio was varied from 1.4 to 5.0 and the dimensionless spring constants were varied from 0 to 1000. Graphs are provided to illustrate some results.

  5. Spectral differences in 6 MV beams with matched PDDs and the effect on chamber response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, J. E.; Butler, D. J.; Ramanathan, G.; Franich, R. D.

    2012-11-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has installed an Elekta Synergy platform linac to establish a direct megavoltage primary standard calibration service, instead of relying on calibrations derived from 60Co. One of the 6 MV beams of the ARPANSA linac has been approximately matched to the Varian high energy platform 6 MV photon beam. The electron beam energy was adjusted to match the percentage depth dose (PDD) curve and TPR20,10. This work calculates the error introduced when using a calibration factor from this Elekta Synergy Platform linac on a Varian high-energy platform beam at 6 MV. Monte Carlo models of the Varian and matched Elekta accelerator accurately predict the measured PDDs and profiles, but show significantly different energy spectra, resulting mainly from differences in target thickness between the two accelerators. Monte Carlo modelling of the energy correction factor kQ of a secondary standard NE2561 chamber shows a difference of 0.4% between the Varian and the Varian-matched Elekta beams. Although small, this is a significant discrepancy for primary standard calibrations. Similar variations are expected for chambers of similar construction, and additional variations may occur with other linac manufacturers. The work has also investigated the design of a custom flattening filter to precisely match the energy spectrum of the Varian beam on the Elekta platform.

  6. Metal artifact correction for x-ray computed tomography using kV and selective MV imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng; Keil, Andreas; Constantin, Dragos; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The overall goal of this work is to improve the computed tomography (CT) image quality for patients with metal implants or fillings by completing the missing kilovoltage (kV) projection data with selectively acquired megavoltage (MV) data that do not suffer from photon starvation. When both of these imaging systems, which are available on current radiotherapy devices, are used, metal streak artifacts are avoided, and the soft-tissue contrast is restored, even for regions in which the kV data cannot contribute any information. Methods: Three image-reconstruction methods, including two filtered back-projection (FBP)-based analytic methods and one iterative method, for combining kV and MV projection data from the two on-board imaging systems of a radiotherapy device are presented in this work. The analytic reconstruction methods modify the MV data based on the information in the projection or image domains and then patch the data onto the kV projections for a FBP reconstruction. In the iterative reconstruction, the authors used dual-energy (DE) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) methods to simultaneously combine the kV/MV data and perform the reconstruction. Results: The authors compared kV/MV reconstructions to kV-only reconstructions using a dental phantom with fillings and a hip-implant numerical phantom. Simulation results indicated that dual-energy sinogram patch FBP and the modified dual-energy PWLS method can successfully suppress metal streak artifacts and restore information lost due to photon starvation in the kV projections. The root-mean-square errors of soft-tissue patterns obtained using combined kV/MV data are 10–15 Hounsfield units smaller than those of the kV-only images, and the structural similarity index measure also indicates a 5%–10% improvement in the image quality. The added dose from the MV scan is much less than the dose from the kV scan if a high efficiency MV detector is assumed. Conclusions: The authors have shown that it

  7. Spot size effects in miniaturized moving-optical-wedge interferometer.

    PubMed

    Al-Saeed, Tarek A; Khalil, Diaa A

    2011-06-10

    In this paper we study the effect of diffraction on the performance of a miniaturized moving-optical-wedge interferometer. By using the Gaussian model, we calculate the degradation of the interferometer visibility due to diffraction effects. We use this model to optimize the detector size required to obtain maximum visibility and study its effect on resolution of Fourier transform spectrometers based on a moving-optical-wedge interferometer. A comparison between these effects in Michelson and wedge interferometers is also presented showing the advantage of the moving-optical-wedge interferometer in suppressing the diffraction effects with respect to the Michelson interferometer.

  8. Impingement of water droplets on wedges and double-wedge airfoils at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, John S

    1954-01-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the equations of motion of water droplets impinging on a wedge in a two-dimensional supersonic flow field with a shock wave attached to the wedge. The closed-form solution yields analytical expressions for the equation of the droplet trajectory, the local rate of impingement and the impingement velocity at any point on the wedge surface, and the total rate of impingement. The analytical expressions are utilized to determine the impingement on the forward surfaces of diamond airfoils in supersonic flow fields with attached shock waves. The results presented include the following conditions: droplet diameters from 2 to 100 microns, pressure altitudes from sea level to 30,000 feet, free-stream static temperatures from 420 degrees r, free stream Mach numbers from 1.1 to 2.0, semiapex angles for the wedge from 1.14 degrees to 7.97 degrees, thickness-to-chord ratios for the diamond airfoil from 0.02 to 0.14, chord lengths from 1 to 20 feet, and angles of attack from zero to the inverse tangent of the airfoil thickness-to-chord ratio.

  9. Effect of Wedge Insertion Angle on Posterior Tibial Slope in Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Kazu; Ogawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Kentaro; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a well-established surgery for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) wherein the lower extremity is realigned to shift the load distribution from the medial compartment of the knee to the lateral compartment. However, this surgery is known to affect the posterior tibial slope angle (PTSA), which could lead to abnormal knee kinematics and instability, and eventually to knee OA. Although PTSA control is as important as coronal realignment, few appropriate measurements for this parameter have been reported. The placement of a wedge spacer might have an effect on PTSA. Purpose: To elucidate the relationship between the PTSA and the direction of insertion of a wedge spacer. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study assessed 43 knees from 34 patients who underwent medial opening wedge HTO for knee OA. Pre- and postoperative lateral radiographs of the knee as well as postoperative computed tomography scans were performed to evaluate the relationship among PTSA, wedge insertion angle (WIA), and opening gap ratio (distance of the anterior opening gap/distance of the posterior opening gap at the osteotomy site). Results: The PTSA significantly increased from 9.0° ± 2.8° preoperatively to 13.2° ± 4.1° postoperatively (P < .001), resulting in a mean ΔPTSA of 4.7° ± 4.5°. The mean opening gap ratio was 0.86 ± 0.11, and the mean WIA was 25.9° ± 8.4°. The WIA and opening gap ratio were both highly correlated with ΔPTSA (r = 0.71 and 0.72, respectively), implying that a smaller WIA or smaller gap ratio leads to less increase in posterior slope. Conclusion: The direction of wedge insertion is highly correlated with PTSA increase, which suggests that the PTSA can be controlled for by adjusting the direction of wedge insertion during surgery. Clinical Relevance: Study results suggest that it is possible to adjust the PTSA by controlling the WIA during surgery. Proper

  10. Application of a test package in an intercomparison of the photon dose calculation performance of treatment planning systems used in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Venselaar, J; Welleweerd, H

    2001-08-01

    Testing the performance of treatment planning systems by using the AAPM Task Group 23 test package is a useful approach, but has its limitations. To be able to include technical developments, such as the asymmetric collimator, it was decided to remeasure the AAPM data set on more modern radiotherapy equipment, to extend the test geometries, and to evaluate the use of the new package. A coherent set of beam data of 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beams was measured on two modern linear accelerators. These data served as input data in seven commercially available treatment planning systems, which were clinically in use in different radiotherapy departments. Next, a test package was measured which included a missing tissue geometry and fields with asymmetrical collimator setting, with and without a wedge. The absolute dose prediction from the different treatment planning systems in which the measured beam data were entered, was compared for all test points with the results of direct measurements. The criteria of acceptability were exceeded by some systems in cases of irregular field geometry and missing tissue geometry. The majority of the systems had difficulties with accurate dose calculation for asymmetrically wedged fields. The application of the new test package did not introduce insuperable difficulties and was highly appreciated by the participating centres. Most systems performed reasonably well for the majority of the beam geometries, with the exception of asymmetrically wedged beams. The extended test package is available for other users or user groups for the purpose of commissioning new treatment planning systems, or new releases of existing systems.

  11. Experimental and numerical investigations on melamine wedges.

    PubMed

    Schneider, S

    2008-09-01

    Melamine wedges are often used as acoustic lining material for anechoic chambers. It was proposed here to study the effects of the mounting conditions on the acoustic properties of the melamine wedges used in the large anechoic chamber at the LMA. The results of the impedance tube measurements carried out show that the mounting conditions must be taken into account when assessing the quality of an acoustic lining. As it can be difficult to simulate these mounting conditions in impedance tube experiments, a numerical method was developed, which can be used to complete the experiments or for parametric studies. By combining the finite and the boundary element method, it is possible to investigate acoustic linings with almost no restrictions as to the geometry, material behavior, or mounting conditions. The numerical method presented here was used to study the acoustic properties of the acoustic lining installed in the anechoic chamber at the LMA. Further experiments showed that the behavior of the melamine foam is anisotropic. Numerical simulations showed that this anisotropy can be used to advantage when designing an acoustic lining.

  12. Molecular Depth Profiling by Wedged Crater Beveling

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dan; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas; Wucher, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy are employed to characterize a wedge-shaped crater eroded by a 40keV C60+ cluster ion beam on an organic film of Irganox 1010 doped with Irganox 3114 delta layers. From an examination of the resulting surface, the information about depth resolution, topography and erosion rate can be obtained as a function of crater depth for every depth in a single experiment. It is shown that when measurements are performed at liquid nitrogen temperature, a constant erosion rate and reduced bombardment induced surface roughness is observed. At room temperature, however, the erosion rate drops by ~1/3 during the removal of the 400 nm Irganox film and the roughness gradually increased to from 1 nm ~4 nm. From SIMS lateral images of the beveled crater and AFM topography results, depth resolution was further improved by employing glancing angles of incidence and lower primary ion beam energy. Sub-10 nm depth resolution was observed under the optimized conditions on a routine basis. In general, we show that the wedge-crater beveling is an important tool for elucidating the factors that are important for molecular depth profiling experiments. PMID:21744861

  13. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention.... External mechanical support of the perianal region is intended to help prevent the occurrence of external...

  14. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  15. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  16. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  17. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention... hemorrhoids associated with vaginal childbirth. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  18. 28. REPRESENTATIVE CENTER WEDGE. BALANCE WHEELS ON TRACK, WITH RACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. REPRESENTATIVE CENTER WEDGE. BALANCE WHEELS ON TRACK, WITH RACK TO OUTSIDE, SHOWN TO RIGHT OF THE WEDGE. PHOTO TAKEN AT SOUTH SWING SPAN. - George P. Coleman Memorial Bridge, Spanning York River at U.S. Route 17, Yorktown, York County, VA

  19. Assessment of Automated Measurement and Verification (M&V) Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Granderson, Jessica; Touzani, Samir; Custodio, Claudine; Sohn, Michael; Fernandes, Samuel; Jump, David

    2015-07-01

    This report documents the application of a general statistical methodology to assess the accuracy of baseline energy models, focusing on its application to Measurement and Verification (M&V) of whole-building energy savings.

  20. Ground penetrating radar estimates of permafrost ice wedge depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsekian, A.; Slater, L. D.; Nolan, J. T.; Grosse, G.; Walter Anthony, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical ground ice wedges associated with polygonal patterning in permafrost environments form due to frost cracking of soils under harsh winter conditions and subsequent infilling of cracks with snow melt water. Ice wedge polygon patterns have implications for lowland geomorphology, hydrology, and vulnerability of permafrost to thaw. Ice wedge dimensions may exceed two meters width at the surface and several meters depth, however few studies have addressed the question of ice wedge depth due to challenges related to measuring the vertical dimension below the ground. Vertical exposures where ice wedges maybe observed are limited to rapidly retreating lake, river, and coastal bluffs. Coring though the ice wedges to determine vertical extent is possible, however that approach is time consuming and labor intensive. Many geophysical investigations have noted signal anomalies related to the presence of ice wedges, but no reliable method for extracting wedge dimensions from geophysical data has been yet proposed. Here we present new evidence that ground penetrating radar (GPR) may be a viable method for estimating ice wedge depth. We present three new perspectives on processing GPR data collected over ice wedges that show considerable promise for use as a fast, cost effective method for evaluating ice wedge depth. Our novel approaches include 1) a simple frequency-domain analysis, 2) an S-transform frequency domain analysis and 3) an analysis of the returned signal power as a radar cross section (RCS) treating subsurface ice wedges as dihedral corner retro-reflectors. Our methods are demonstrated and validated using finite-difference time domain FDTD) GPR forward models of synthetic idealized ice wedges and field data from permafrost sites in Alaska. Our results indicate that frequency domain and signal power data provide information that is easier to extract from raw GPR data than similar information in the time domain. We also show that we can simplify the problem by

  1. Drumhead model of 2D wetting, filling and wedge covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, D. B.; Parry, A. O.; Wood, A. J.

    2002-10-01

    Recent work has demonstrated novel fluid interfacial behaviour occurring at filling or wedge-wetting transitions in two- and three-dimensional systems. In particular, in two dimensions (2D) studies of filling in shallow wedges, for both pure and impure systems, reveal simple covariance relations which relate criticality at filling to strong-fluctuation regime wetting and restrict the allowed critical singularities. Here we introduce a drumhead interfacial model of filling in acute wedges which can be adapted to include an orientation-dependent surface tension. We calculate the excess wedge free energy and scaling form of the mid-point height probability distribution function (PDF) and demonstrate that the covariance relations are the same as found in the shallow wedge approximation. Connections with exact Ising model results and a bubble model interpretation of the interfacial height PDF at wetting are made.

  2. MV-22 Squadron Organization: A Different Way to Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    MV-22 SQUADRON ORGANIZATION : A DIFFERENT WAY TO SUPPORT A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and...JUN 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MV-22 Squadron Organization : A Different Way to Support 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Command and General Staff College ATTN: ATZL-SWD-GD Fort Leavenworth, KS 66027-2301 8. PERFORMING ORG REPORT

  3. Configuration and Generation of Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiangning

    The substorm current wedge (SCW), a core element of substorm dynamics coupling the magnetotail to the ionosphere, is crucial in understanding substorms. It has been suggested that the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the SCW are caused by either pressure gradients or flow vortices, or both. Our understanding of FAC generations is based predominately on numerical simulations, because it has not been possible to organize spacecraft observations in a coordinate system determined by the SCW. This dissertation develops an empirical inversion model of the current wedge and inverts midlatitude magnetometer data to obtain the parameters of the current wedge for three solar cycles. This database enables statistical data analysis of spacecraft plasma and magnetic field observations relative to the SCW coordinate. In chapter 2, a new midlatitude positive bay (MPB) index is developed and calculated for three solar cycles of data. The MPB index is processed to determine the substorm onset time, which is shown to correspond to the auroral breakup onset with at most 1-2 minutes difference. Substorm occurrence rate is found to depend on solar wind speed while substorm duration is rather constant, suggesting that substorm process has an intrinsic pattern independent of external driving. In chapter 3, an SCW inversion technique is developed to determine the strength and locations of the FACs in an SCW. The inversion parameters for FAC strength and location, and ring current strength are validated by comparison with other measurements. In chapter 4, the connection between earthward flows and auroral poleward expansion is examined using improved mapping, obtained from a newly-developed dynamic magnetospheric model by superimposing a standard magnetospheric field model with substorm current wedge obtained from the inversion technique. It is shown that the ionospheric projection of flows observed at a fixed point in the equatorial plane map to the bright aurora as it expands poleward

  4. Characterization of CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A fringe detection and measurement system was constructed for use with the CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner, consisting of three circuit boards. The first board is a standard Reticon RC-100 B motherboard which is used to provide the timing, video processing, and housekeeping functions required by the Reticon RL-512 G photodiode array used in the system. The sampled and held video signal from the motherboard is processed by a second, custom fabricated circuit board which contains a high speed fringe detection and locating circuit. This board includes a dc level discriminator type fringe detector, a counter circuit to determine fringe center, a pulsed laser triggering circuit, and a control circuit to operate the shutter for the He-Ne reference laser beam. The fringe center information is supplied to the third board, a commercial single board computer, which governs the data collection process and interprets the results.

  5. Characterization of CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A fringe detection and measurement system was constructed for use with the CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner, consisting of three circuit boards. The first board is a standard Reticon RC-100 B motherboard which is used to provide the timing, video processing, and housekeeping functions required by the Reticon RL-512 G photodiode array used in the system. The sampled and held video signal from the motherboard is processed by a second, custom fabricated circuit board which contains a high speed fringe detection and locating circuit. This board includes a dc level discriminator type fringe detector, a counter circuit to determine fringe center, a pulsed laser triggering circuit, and a control circuit to operate the shutter for the He-Ne reference laser beam. The fringe center information is supplied to the third board, a commercial single board computer, which governs the data collection process and interprets the results.

  6. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    DOE PAGES

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; ...

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack.more » This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.« less

  7. Substorm Current Wedge at Earth and Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Slavin, J. A.; Sundberg, T.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews magnetospheric substorms and dipolarizations observed at both Earth and Mercury. It briefly discusses new insights into the physics of the substorm current wedge (SCW) that have been revealed the past few years. The formation and evolution of the SCW are closely tied to the braking of flows convecting flux away from the reconnection site and the resultant near-planet flux pileup that creates the dipolarization. At Earth, the SCW plays a critical role in substorms, coupling magnetospheric to ionospheric motions, deflecting incoming plasma flows, and regulating the dissipation of pressure built up in the near-Earth magnetosphere during dipolarization. The lack of a conducting boundary at Mercury provides a natural experiment to examine the role of an ionosphere on regulating magnetospheric convection. Energetic particles may play a much greater role within substorms at Mercury than at Earth, providing another opportunity for comparative studies.

  8. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack. This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.

  9. Covariance for Cone and Wedge Complete Filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascón, C.; Parry, A. O.

    2005-03-01

    Interfacial phenomena associated with fluid adsorption in two dimensional systems have recently been shown to exhibit hidden symmetries, or covariances, which precisely relate local adsorption properties in different confining geometries. We show that covariance also occurs in three-dimensional systems and is likely to be verifiable experimentally and in Ising model simulations studies. Specifically, we study complete wetting in wedge (W) and cone (C) geometries as bulk coexistence is approached and show that the equilibrium midpoint heights satisfy lc(h,α)=lw(h/2,α), where h measures the partial pressure and α is the tilt angle. This covariance is valid for both short-ranged and long-ranged intermolecular forces and identifies both leading and next-to-leading-order critical exponents and amplitudes in the confining geometries.

  10. Seamount subduction underneath an accretionary wedge: modelling mass wasting and wedge collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannu, Utsav; Ueda, Kosuke; Willett, Sean; Gerya, Taras; Strasser, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Seamounts (h >1 km) and knolls (h = 500 m-1000 m) cover about one-fifth of the total ocean floor area. These topographical highs of the ocean floor eventually get subducted. Subduction of these topographical features leads to severe deformation of the overriding plate and can cause extensive tectonic erosion and mass wasting of the frontal prism, which can ultimately cause a forearc wedge collapse. Large submarine landslides and the corresponding wedge collapse have previously been reported, for instance, in the northern part of the Hikurangi margin where the landslide is known as the giant Ruatoria debris avalanche, and have also been frequently reported in several seismic sections along the Costa Rica margin. Size and frequency relation of landslides suggest that the average size of submarine landslides in margins with rough subducting plates tends to be larger. However, this observation has not yet been tested or explained by physical models. In numerical subduction models, landslides take place, if at all, on a much larger timescale (in the order of 104-105 years, depending on the time steps of the model) than in natural cases. On the other hand, numerical models simulating mass wasting events such as avalanches and submarine landslides, typically model single events at a much smaller spatio-temporal domain, and do not consider long-term occurrence patterns of freely forming landslides. In this contribution, we present a multi-scale nested numerical approach to emulate short-term landslides within long-term progressive subduction. The numerical approach dynamically produces instantaneous submarine landslides and the resulting debris flow in the spatially and temporally refined inner model. Then we apply these convoluted changes in topography (e.g. due to the submarine landslide etc.) back to an outer larger-scale model instance that addresses wedge evolution. We use this approach to study the evolution of the accretionary wedge during seamount subduction.

  11. [Biphasic ceramic wedge and plate fixation with locked adjustable screws for open wedge tibial osteotomy].

    PubMed

    Lavallé, F; Pascal-Mousselard, H; Rouvillain, J L; Ribeyre, D; Delattre, O; Catonné, Y

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this radiological study was to evaluate the use of a biphasic ceramic wedge combined with plate fixation with locked adjustable screws for open wedge tibial osteotomy. Twenty-six consecutive patients (27 knees) underwent surgery between December 1999 and March 2002 to establish a normal lower-limb axis. The series included 6 women and 20 men, mean age 50 years (16 right knees and 11 left knees). Partial weight-bearing with crutches was allowed on day 1. A standard radiological assessment was performed on day 1, 90, and 360 (plain AP and lateral stance films of the knee). A pangonogram was performed before surgery and at day 360. Presence of a lateral metaphyseal space, development of peripheral cortical bridges, and osteointegration of the bone substitute-bone interface were evaluated used to assess bone healing. The medial tibial angle between the line tangent to the tibial plateau and the anatomic axis of the tibia (beta) was evaluated to assess preservation of postoperative correction. The HKA angle was determined. Three patients were lost to follow-up and 23 patients (24 knees) were retained for analysis. At last follow-up, presence of peripheral cortical bridges and complete filling of the lateral metaphyseal space demonstrated bone healing in all patients. Good quality osteointegration was achieved since 21 knees did not present an interface between the bone substitute and native bone (homogeneous transition zone). The beta angle was unchanged for 23 knees. A normal axis was observed in patients (16 knees) postoperatively. Use of a biphasic ceramic wedge in combination with plate fixation with locked adjustable screws is a reliable option for open wedge tibial osteotomy. The bone substitute fills the gap well. Tolerance and integration are optimal. Bone healing is achieved. Plate fixation with protected weight bearing appears to be a solid assembly, maintaining these corrections.

  12. ERDA at the 9 MV Tandem and at the 3 MV Tandetron of IFIN-HH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrascu, H.; Petrascu, M.; Pantelica, D.; Negoita, F.; Ionescu, P.; Mihai, M. D.; Acsente, T.; Statescu, M.; Scafes, A. C.

    2017-09-01

    Recoil spectrometry using heavy ions proposed in 1976 by L'Ecuyer has evolved into a universal IBA technique. Few years later an experimental setup for simultaneous light and medium heavy element detection including a compact ΔE(gas)-Er(solid) telescope, was developed at the Tandem accelerator of IFIN-HH. To increase the resolution, an integrated preamplifier was mounted close to the ionization chamber. The calibration procedure for the telescope and the software for the quantitative evaluation of the data are briefly presented. Recently, a 3 MV Tandetron accelerator has been installed and commissioned at the IFIN-HH. Among several ion-beam techniques for detection and depth profiling of hydrogen isotopes, Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) technique using a low energy 4He beam, proposed by Doyle and Peercy, is particularly advantageous. By measuring simultaneously both the H or D recoiling at a forward angle and backscattered 4He ions, a rather complete characterization of the sample can be achieved. Selected results from our investigations, obtained using these facilities, are presented.

  13. Wedge Dynamics, Forearc Basins, and Seismogenic Zone of Cascadia Megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Hu, Y.

    2005-12-01

    A dynamic critical wedge theory has been developed to describe stress changes in submarine wedges in great earthquake cycles. For most subduction zones, the theory postulates that the actively deforming outer wedge overlies the updip velocity-strengthening part of the subduction fault, and the less deformed inner wedge overlies the megathrust seismogenic zone. Coseismic shear-stress increase in the velocity-strengthening zone drives the outer wedge into the critical state, causing episodic fold-and-thrust deformation, but the inner wedge stays in the stable regime throughout earthquake cycles, maintaining a stable environment for the development of forearc sedimentary basins. This is consistent with the globally observed correlation of the location of forearc basins with rupture zones of subduction earthquakes [Wells et al., JGR, 2003]. However, northern/central Cascadia is complicated by recent, exceedingly rapid growth of the accretionary prism. Until mid-Pleistocene, the megathrust seismogenic zone was probably mostly beneath the forearc basins, in agreement with the modern global observations. Rapid wedge growth and consequent megathrust warming over the past Ma have caused the seismogenic zone to move seaward by tens of km, to a position consistent with inferences based on contemporary geodetic observations. With much of the seismogenic zone located seaward of the forearc basins and beneath the upper continental slope, the dynamic taper theory predicts that coseismic deformation should cause extensional structures on the upper slope but accretion and thrusting on the lower slope, consistent with structural observations [McNeill et al., JGR, 1998].

  14. On the production of neutrons in laminated barriers for 10 MV medical accelerator rooms.

    PubMed

    Facure, A; da Silva, A X; da Rosa, L A R; Cardoso, S C; Rezende, G F S

    2008-07-01

    When space limitations are primary constraints, laminated barriers with metals can be an option to provide sufficient shielding for a radiotherapy treatment room. However, if a photon clinical beam with end point energy of 10 MeV or higher interacts with the metal inside the barriers neutrons are ejected and can result in an exposure problem inside and outside the vault. The empirical formulae existing in the literature to estimate neutron dose equivalents beyond laminated barriers do not take into account neutron production for spectra below 15 MV. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to simulate the production and transport of photoneutrons across primary barriers of 10 MV accelerator treatment rooms containing lead or steel, in order to obtain the ambient dose equivalents produced by these particles outside the room and in the patient plane. It was found that the neutron doses produced are insignificant when steel is present in the primary barriers of 10 MV medical accelerators. On the other hand, the results show that, in all cases where lead sheets are positioned in the primary barriers, the neutron ambient dose equivalents outside the room generally exceed the shielding design goal of 20 μSv/week for uncontrolled areas, even when the lead sheets are positioned inside the treatment room. Moreover, for laminated barriers, the photoneutrons produced in the metals are summed with the particles generated in the accelerator head shielding and can represent a significant component of additional dose to the patients. In this work, it was found that once lead sheets are positioned inside the room, the neutron ambient dose equivalents can reach the value of 75 μSv per Gray of photon absorbed dose at the isocenter. However, for all simulated cases, a tendency in the reduction of neutron doses with increasing lead thickness can be observed. This trend can imply in higher neutron ambient dose equivalents outside the room for thinner lead sheets

  15. On the production of neutrons in laminated barriers for 10 MV medical accelerator rooms.

    PubMed

    Facure, A; da Silva, A X; da Rosa, L A R; Cardoso, S C; Rezende, G F S

    2008-07-01

    When space limitations are primary constraints, laminated barriers with metals can be an option to provide sufficient shielding for a radiotherapy treatment room. However, if a photon clinical beam with end point energy of 10 MeV or higher interacts with the metal inside the barriers neutrons are ejected and can result in an exposure problem inside and outside the vault. The empirical formulae existing in the literature to estimate neutron dose equivalents beyond laminated barriers do not take into account neutron production for spectra below 15 MV. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to simulate the production and transport of photoneutrons across primary barriers of 10 MV accelerator treatment rooms containing lead or steel, in order to obtain the ambient dose equivalents produced by these particles outside the room and in the patient plane. It was found that the neutron doses produced are insignificant when steel is present in the primary barriers of 10 MV medical accelerators. On the other hand, the results show that, in all cases where lead sheets are positioned in the primary barriers, the neutron ambient dose equivalents outside the room generally exceed the shielding design goal of 20 microSv/week for uncontrolled areas, even when the lead sheets are positioned inside the treatment room. Moreover, for laminated barriers, the photoneutrons produced in the metals are summed with the particles generated in the accelerator head shielding and can represent a significant component of additional dose to the patients. In this work, it was found that once lead sheets are positioned inside the room, the neutron ambient dose equivalents can reach the value of 75 microSv per Gray of photon absorbed dose at the isocenter. However, for all simulated cases, a tendency in the reduction of neutron doses with increasing lead thickness can be observed. This trend can imply in higher neutron ambient dose equivalents outside the room for thinner lead sheets

  16. On the production of neutrons in laminated barriers for 10 MV medical accelerator rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Facure, A.; Silva, A. X. da; Rosa, L. A. R. da; Cardoso, S. C.; Rezende, G. F. S.

    2008-07-15

    When space limitations are primary constraints, laminated barriers with metals can be an option to provide sufficient shielding for a radiotherapy treatment room. However, if a photon clinical beam with end point energy of 10 MeV or higher interacts with the metal inside the barriers neutrons are ejected and can result in an exposure problem inside and outside the vault. The empirical formulae existing in the literature to estimate neutron dose equivalents beyond laminated barriers do not take into account neutron production for spectra below 15 MV. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to simulate the production and transport of photoneutrons across primary barriers of 10 MV accelerator treatment rooms containing lead or steel, in order to obtain the ambient dose equivalents produced by these particles outside the room and in the patient plane. It was found that the neutron doses produced are insignificant when steel is present in the primary barriers of 10 MV medical accelerators. On the other hand, the results show that, in all cases where lead sheets are positioned in the primary barriers, the neutron ambient dose equivalents outside the room generally exceed the shielding design goal of 20 {mu}Sv/week for uncontrolled areas, even when the lead sheets are positioned inside the treatment room. Moreover, for laminated barriers, the photoneutrons produced in the metals are summed with the particles generated in the accelerator head shielding and can represent a significant component of additional dose to the patients. In this work, it was found that once lead sheets are positioned inside the room, the neutron ambient dose equivalents can reach the value of 75 {mu}Sv per Gray of photon absorbed dose at the isocenter. However, for all simulated cases, a tendency in the reduction of neutron doses with increasing lead thickness can be observed. This trend can imply in higher neutron ambient dose equivalents outside the room for thinner lead sheets

  17. Change in Posterior Tibial Slope After Open-Wedge and Closed-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nha, Kyung-Wook; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Ahn, Hyeong-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-11-01

    It is unclear whether open- or closed-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) results in significant changes in posterior tibial slope, with no consensus on the magnitude of such changes. Furthermore, methods of measuring posterior tibial slope differ among studies. This meta-analysis was therefore designed to evaluate whether posterior tibial slope increases after open-wedge HTO and decreases after closed-wedge HTO and to quantify the magnitudes of the slope changes after open- and closed-wedge HTO using various methods of measuring posterior tibial slope. Posterior tibial slope increases after open-wedge and decreases after closed-wedge HTO. The magnitude of change is similar for the 2 methods, and the value obtained for posterior tibial slope change is affected by the method of measurement. Meta-analysis. Multiple comprehensive databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and KoreaMed, were searched for studies that evaluated the posterior slope of the proximal tibia in patients who had undergone open- and/or closed-wedge HTO. Studies were included that compared pre- and postoperative posterior tibial slopes, regardless of measurement method, including anterior and posterior tibial cortex or tibial shaft axis as a reference line, in patients who underwent open- or closed-wedge HTO. The quality of each included study was appraised with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Twenty-seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled data, which included subgroups of 3 methods, showed that posterior tibial slope increased 2.02° (95% CI, 2.66° to 1.38°; P = .005) after open-wedge HTO and decreased 2.35° (95% CI, 1.38° to 3.32°; P < .001) after closed-wedge HTO. This meta-analysis confirmed that posterior tibial slope increased after open-wedge HTO and decreased after closed-wedge HTO when the results of a variety of measurement methods were pooled. The magnitude of change after open- and closed-wedge HTO was similar and small (approximately 2°), suggesting

  18. Stable and Critical Noncohesive Coulomb Wedges: Exact Elastic Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Hu, Y.

    2004-12-01

    The theory of critically tapered Coulomb wedge has been successfully applied to model active fold-and-thrust belts or submarine accretionary prisms. Brittle mountain building is episodic in nature, controlled by changes in basal friction, erosion and sedimentation, and hydrogeology. Sediment accretion may be modulated by great subduction earthquakes. Between deformation episodes and/or during transition between compressional and extensional tectonics, the Coulomb wedges are stable (i.e., supercritical), to which the critical taper theory does not apply. In this work, we provide an exact elastic solution for stable wedges based on Airy stress functions. The stress equilibrium equation and definition of basal friction and basal and internal pore fluid pressure ratios are exactly the same as those used for Dahlen's [1984] exact solution for critical noncohesive Coulomb wedges, but internal friction μ becomes irrelevant. Given elastic - perfectly Coulomb-plastic rheology, for stresses in a wedge on the verge of Coulomb failure there must co-exist a critical taper solution involving μ and a unique equivalent elastic solution not involving μ . Our elastic solution precisely reduces to Dahlen's critical taper solution for critical conditions. For stable conditions, normal stress perpendicular to the surface slope σ z and shear stress τ xz are identical with those in a critical taper, but the slope-parallel normal stress is different. The elastic solution is also generally applicable to purely elastic wedges and useful for modeling geodetic observations. A stable noncohesive Coulomb wedge differs from a general elastic wedge in that its upper and lower surfaces stay at zero curvature during loading. Dahlen, F.A. (1984), Noncohesive critical Coulomb wedges: An exact solution, JGR, 89, 10,125-10,133.

  19. Group sequential designs for stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials.

    PubMed

    Grayling, Michael J; Wason, James Ms; Mander, Adrian P

    2017-06-01

    The stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial design has received substantial attention in recent years. Although various extensions to the original design have been proposed, no guidance is available on the design of stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with interim analyses. In an individually randomised trial setting, group sequential methods can provide notable efficiency gains and ethical benefits. We address this by discussing how established group sequential methodology can be adapted for stepped-wedge designs. Utilising the error spending approach to group sequential trial design, we detail the assumptions required for the determination of stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with interim analyses. We consider early stopping for efficacy, futility, or efficacy and futility. We describe first how this can be done for any specified linear mixed model for data analysis. We then focus on one particular commonly utilised model and, using a recently completed stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial, compare the performance of several designs with interim analyses to the classical stepped-wedge design. Finally, the performance of a quantile substitution procedure for dealing with the case of unknown variance is explored. We demonstrate that the incorporation of early stopping in stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial designs could reduce the expected sample size under the null and alternative hypotheses by up to 31% and 22%, respectively, with no cost to the trial's type-I and type-II error rates. The use of restricted error maximum likelihood estimation was found to be more important than quantile substitution for controlling the type-I error rate. The addition of interim analyses into stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials could help guard against time-consuming trials conducted on poor performing treatments and also help expedite the implementation of efficacious treatments. In future, trialists should consider incorporating early stopping of some kind into

  20. Fracture and contact problems for an elastic wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Arin, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with the plane elastostatic contact problem for an infinite elastic wedge of arbitrary angle. The medium is loaded through a frictionless rigid wedge of a given symmetric profile. Using the Mellin transform formulation the mixed boundary value problem is reduced to a singular integral equation with the contact stress as the unknown function. With the application of the results to the fracture of the medium in mind, the main emphasis in the study has been on the investigation of the singular nature of the stress state around the apex of the wedge and on the determination of the contact pressure.

  1. Fracture and contact problems for an elastic wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Arin, K.

    1974-01-01

    The plane elastostatic contact problem for an infinite elastic wedge of arbitrary angle is discussed. The medium is loaded through a frictionless rigid wedge of a given symmetric profile. Using the Mellin transform formulation the mixed boundary value problem is reduced to a singular integral equation with the contact stress as the unknown function. With the application of the results to the fracture of the medium in mind, the main emphasis in the study has been on the investigation of the singular nature of the stress state around the apex of the wedge and on the determination of the contact pressure.

  2. Refined numerical solution of the transonic flow past a wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, S.-M.; Fung, K.-Y.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical procedure combining the ideas of solving a modified difference equation and of adaptive mesh refinement is introduced. The numerical solution on a fixed grid is improved by using better approximations of the truncation error computed from local subdomain grid refinements. This technique is used to obtain refined solutions of steady, inviscid, transonic flow past a wedge. The effects of truncation error on the pressure distribution, wave drag, sonic line, and shock position are investigated. By comparing the pressure drag on the wedge and wave drag due to the shocks, a supersonic-to-supersonic shock originating from the wedge shoulder is confirmed.

  3. Ancient Yedoma carbon loss: primed by ice wedge thaw?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, K. L.; Vonk, J. E.; Mann, P. J.; Zimov, N.; Bulygina, E. B.; Davydova, A.; Spencer, R. G.; Holmes, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Northeast Siberian permafrost is dominated by frozen Yedoma deposits containing ca. 500 Gt of carbon, nearly a quarter of northern permafrost organic carbon (OC). Yedoma deposits are Pleistocene-age alluvial and/or aeolian accumulations characterized by high ice wedge content (~50%), making them particularly vulnerable to a warming climate and to surface collapse upon thaw. Dissolved OC in streams originating primarily from Yedoma has been shown to be highly biolabile, relative to waters containing more modern OC. The cause of this biolability, however, remains speculative. Here we investigate the influence of ice wedge input upon the bioavailability of Yedoma within streams from as a potential cause of Yedoma carbon biolability upon release into the Kolyma River from the thaw-eroding river exposures of Duvannyi Yar, NE Siberia. We measured biolability on (1) ice wedge, Kolyma, and Yedoma leachate controls; (2) ice wedge and Kolyma plus Yedoma OC (8 g/L); and (3) varying ratios of ice wedge water to Kolyma river water. Biolability assays were conducted using both 5-day BOD (biological oxygen demand) and 11-day BDOC (biodegradable dissolved organic carbon) incubations. We found that ancient DOC in Yedoma soil leachate alone was highly biolabile with losses of 52±0.1% C over a 5-day BOD incubation. Similarly, DOC contained in pure ice wedge water was found to be biolabile, losing 21±0% C during a 5-day BOD incubation. Increased ice wedge contributions led to higher overall C losses in identical Yedoma soil leachates, with 8.9±0.6% losses of Yedoma C with 100% ice wedge water, 7.1±1% (50% ice wedge/ 50% Kolyma) and 5±0.3% with 100% Kolyma River water. We discuss potential mechanisms for the increased loss of ancient C using associated measurements of nutrient availability, carbon quality (CDOM/FDOM) and extracellular enzyme activity rates. Our initial results indicate that ice wedge meltwater forming Yedoma streams makes Yedoma OC more bioavailable than it would

  4. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jerome P.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Draggoo, Vaughn G.

    1994-01-01

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  5. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  6. The challenges of numerically simulating analogue brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne; Ellis, Susan

    2017-04-01

    Fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges form when sedimentary and crustal rocks are compressed into thrusts and folds in the foreland of an orogen or at a subduction trench. For over a century, analogue models have been used to investigate the deformation characteristics of such brittle wedges. These models predict wedge shapes that agree with analytical critical taper theory and internal deformation structures that well resemble natural observations. In a series of comparison experiments for thrust wedges, called the GeoMod2004 (1,2) and GeoMod2008 (3,4) experiments, it was shown that different numerical solution methods successfully reproduce sandbox thrust wedges. However, the GeoMod2008 benchmark also pointed to the difficulties of representing frictional boundary conditions and sharp velocity discontinuities with continuum numerical methods, in addition to the well-known challenges of numerical plasticity. Here we show how details in the numerical implementation of boundary conditions can substantially impact numerical wedge deformation. We consider experiment 1 of the GeoMod2008 brittle thrust wedge benchmarks. This experiment examines a triangular thrust wedge in the stable field of critical taper theory that should remain stable, that is, without internal deformation, when sliding over a basal frictional surface. The thrust wedge is translated by lateral displacement of a rigid mobile wall. The corner between the mobile wall and the subsurface is a velocity discontinuity. Using our finite-element code SULEC, we show how different approaches to implementing boundary friction (boundary layer or contact elements) and the velocity discontinuity (various smoothing schemes) can cause the wedge to indeed translate in a stable manner or to undergo internal deformation (which is a fail). We recommend that numerical studies of sandbox setups not only report the details of their implementation of boundary conditions, but also document the modelling attempts that

  7. Technical Report: Reference photon dosimetry data for Varian accelerators based on IROC-Houston site visit data

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, James R.; Followill, David S.; Lowenstein, Jessica; Molineu, Andrea; Alvarez, Paola; Taylor, Paige A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate data regarding linear accelerator (Linac) radiation characteristics are important for treatment planning system modeling as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) has measured the dosimetric characteristics of numerous machines through their on-site dosimetry review protocols. Photon data are presented and can be used as a secondary check of acquired values, as a means to verify commissioning a new machine, or in preparation for an IROC-H site visit. Methods: Photon data from IROC-H on-site reviews from 2000 to 2014 were compiled and analyzed. Specifically, data from approximately 500 Varian machines were analyzed. Each dataset consisted of point measurements of several dosimetric parameters at various locations in a water phantom to assess the percentage depth dose, jaw output factors, multileaf collimator small field output factors, off-axis factors, and wedge factors. The data were analyzed by energy and parameter, with similarly performing machine models being assimilated into classes. Common statistical metrics are presented for each machine class. Measurement data were compared against other reference data where applicable. Results: Distributions of the parameter data were shown to be robust and derive from a student’s t distribution. Based on statistical and clinical criteria, all machine models were able to be classified into two or three classes for each energy, except for 6 MV for which there were eight classes. Quantitative analysis of the measurements for 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photon beams is presented for each parameter; supplementary material has also been made available which contains further statistical information. Conclusions: IROC-H has collected numerous data on Varian Linacs and the results of photon measurements from the past 15 years are presented. The data can be used as a comparison check of a physicist’s acquired values. Acquired values that are well

  8. Technical Report: Reference photon dosimetry data for Varian accelerators based on IROC-Houston site visit data.

    PubMed

    Kerns, James R; Followill, David S; Lowenstein, Jessica; Molineu, Andrea; Alvarez, Paola; Taylor, Paige A; Stingo, Francesco C; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-05-01

    Accurate data regarding linear accelerator (Linac) radiation characteristics are important for treatment planning system modeling as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) has measured the dosimetric characteristics of numerous machines through their on-site dosimetry review protocols. Photon data are presented and can be used as a secondary check of acquired values, as a means to verify commissioning a new machine, or in preparation for an IROC-H site visit. Photon data from IROC-H on-site reviews from 2000 to 2014 were compiled and analyzed. Specifically, data from approximately 500 Varian machines were analyzed. Each dataset consisted of point measurements of several dosimetric parameters at various locations in a water phantom to assess the percentage depth dose, jaw output factors, multileaf collimator small field output factors, off-axis factors, and wedge factors. The data were analyzed by energy and parameter, with similarly performing machine models being assimilated into classes. Common statistical metrics are presented for each machine class. Measurement data were compared against other reference data where applicable. Distributions of the parameter data were shown to be robust and derive from a student's t distribution. Based on statistical and clinical criteria, all machine models were able to be classified into two or three classes for each energy, except for 6 MV for which there were eight classes. Quantitative analysis of the measurements for 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photon beams is presented for each parameter; supplementary material has also been made available which contains further statistical information. IROC-H has collected numerous data on Varian Linacs and the results of photon measurements from the past 15 years are presented. The data can be used as a comparison check of a physicist's acquired values. Acquired values that are well outside the expected distribution should be

  9. Technical Report: Reference photon dosimetry data for Varian accelerators based on IROC-Houston site visit data

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, James R.; Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F.; Lowenstein, Jessica; Molineu, Andrea; Alvarez, Paola; Taylor, Paige A.; Stingo, Francesco C.

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate data regarding linear accelerator (Linac) radiation characteristics are important for treatment planning system modeling as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) has measured the dosimetric characteristics of numerous machines through their on-site dosimetry review protocols. Photon data are presented and can be used as a secondary check of acquired values, as a means to verify commissioning a new machine, or in preparation for an IROC-H site visit. Methods: Photon data from IROC-H on-site reviews from 2000 to 2014 were compiled and analyzed. Specifically, data from approximately 500 Varian machines were analyzed. Each dataset consisted of point measurements of several dosimetric parameters at various locations in a water phantom to assess the percentage depth dose, jaw output factors, multileaf collimator small field output factors, off-axis factors, and wedge factors. The data were analyzed by energy and parameter, with similarly performing machine models being assimilated into classes. Common statistical metrics are presented for each machine class. Measurement data were compared against other reference data where applicable. Results: Distributions of the parameter data were shown to be robust and derive from a student’s t distribution. Based on statistical and clinical criteria, all machine models were able to be classified into two or three classes for each energy, except for 6 MV for which there were eight classes. Quantitative analysis of the measurements for 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photon beams is presented for each parameter; supplementary material has also been made available which contains further statistical information. Conclusions: IROC-H has collected numerous data on Varian Linacs and the results of photon measurements from the past 15 years are presented. The data can be used as a comparison check of a physicist’s acquired values. Acquired values that are well

  10. Towards a 700 mV silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.; Blakers, A. W.; Gauja, E.; Willison, M. R.; Szpitalak, T.

    1982-01-01

    The key to improved silicon solar cell performance lies in increasing cell open circuit voltage. Not only does improved voltage direclty increase cell efficiency, but it also increases the limiting value of fill factor and decreases the temperature sensitivity of the cell. Limits on attainable open circuit voltage are not well defined. A thermodynamic limit of 850 mV exists for black body silicon cells, with 700 mV long regarded as a practical limit. This paper describes experimental work which has resulted in experimental devices with open circuit voltages approaching 700 mV. Values up to 694 (AM0, 25 C) have been demonstrated. The cells are similar in structure to conventional p-n junction cells, but particular attention is paid to passivating the entire top surface of the cell, including regions under the top contact.

  11. Ghost story. I. Wedge states in the oscillator formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Loriano; Maccaferri, Carlo; Scherer Santos, Ricardo J.; Tolla, Driba D.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is primarily devoted to the ghost wedge states in string field theory formulated with the oscillator formalism. Our aim is to prove, using such formalism, that the wedge states can be expressed as |nrangle = exp{[(2-n)/2](Script L0+Script L0†)}|0rangle, separately in the matter and ghost sector. This relation is crucial for instance in the proof of Schnabl's solution. We start from the exponentials in the rhs and wish to prove that they take precisely the form of wedge states. As a guideline we first re-demonstrate this relation for the matter part. Then we turn to the ghosts. On the way we face the problem of `diagonalizing' infinite rectangular matrices. We manage to give a meaning to such an operation and to prove that the eigenvalues we obtain satisfy the recursion relations of the wedge states.

  12. Wedge Heat-Flux Indicators for Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2003-01-01

    Wedge indicators have been proposed for measuring thermal radiation that impinges on specimens illuminated by flash lamps for thermographic inspection. Heat fluxes measured by use of these indicators would be used, along with known thermal, radiative, and geometric properties of the specimens, to estimate peak flash temperatures on the specimen surfaces. These indicators would be inexpensive alternatives to high-speed infrared pyrometers, which would otherwise be needed for measuring peak flash surface temperatures. The wedge is made from any suitable homogenous material such as plastic. The choice of material is governed by the equation given. One side of the wedge is covered by a temperature sensitive compound that decomposes irreversibly when its temperature exceeds a rated temperature (T-rated). The uncoated side would be positioned alongside or in place of the specimen and exposed to the flash, then the wedge thickness at the boundary between the white and blackened portions measured.

  13. DETAIL VIEW OF THREEPART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE-PART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF QUARRY WALL, FACING EAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  14. DETAIL VIEW OF THREEPART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE-PART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF QUARRY WALL, FACING NORTHWEST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  15. VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING SOUTHEAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  16. VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING NORTH - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  17. Direct air activation measurements at a 15-MV medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Saeed, M K; Poppe, B; Fischer, H W

    2015-02-01

    Direct radiometric determination of (14)N (γ, n) (13)N air activation was achieved at a 15-MV medical linear accelerator operating in a high-energy photon mode. (13)N was identified by irradiating a gas-tight Marinelli beaker filled with nitrogen gas and later observing the 10-min half-life of the 511-keV positron-electron annihilation line using high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. Quantitative evaluation of the spectral signal yielded a (13)N production rate of 836.8 ± 32 Bq Gy(-1) in air per 40 × 40 cm(2) field cross section at 100 cm source-surface distance. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Low-versus high-energy photon beams in radiotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Foote, R L; Robinow, J S; Shaw, E G; Kline, R W; Suman, V J; Ilstrup, D M; Lee, R E

    1993-01-01

    This retrospective study analyzed the outcome of lung cancer patients who were treated with either 4-MV or 10-MV photons. From October 1979 through December 1982, 126 patients with locally advanced, unresectable or medically inoperable, nonmetastatic non-small cell lung cancer were treated in a prospective trial in which they were randomly assigned to one of three chemotherapy combinations and thoracic radiotherapy. The patients were stratified by cell type, extent of operation, age, sex, and status of supraclavicular lymph nodes. All patients were followed until death or for a minimum of 4.8 years. Of the 102 evaluable patients, 98 were treated with either 4-MV or 10-MV photons (49 patients in each group). Outcomes examined included best primary tumor response, time to first local (in-field) recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. No significant differences were detected between the patients treated with 4-MV or 10-MV photons for several important prognostic and treatment factors or for any of the study outcomes, including first local (in-field) recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. For the group of 98 patients treated with either 4-MV or 10-MV photons, the estimated 2-year freedom from first local (in-field) recurrence was 47.7%. The estimated 2-year disease-free and overall survivals were 21.6% and 28.6%, respectively.

  19. Modeling Structural and Mechanical Responses to Localized Erosional Processes on a Bivergent Orogenic Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzen, R.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    Critical Coulomb wedge theory established that orogenic and accretionary wedges should develop self-similarly and maintain a critical taper that reflects the balance of strength of the wedge material and a basal décollement. However, a variety of geological processes can perturb that balance, forcing readjustment of the wedge. For example, glacial erosion and landsliding can concentrate erosion on a localized portion of the wedge slope, leaving that portion of the wedge with an out-of-equilibrium slope that would need to re-develop for the wedge to resume self-similar growth. We use the discrete element method to analyze how growing bivergent wedges with different cohesive strengths respond structurally and mechanically to erosional events localized along upper, middle, and lower segments of the pro-wedge. Mechanically, pro-wedge erosion results in a sudden decrease followed by a quick recovery of the mean stress and maximum shear stress throughout the pro-wedge. However, when erosion is localized in the mid- to lower portions of the pro-wedge, a zone of increased mean stress develops where the wedge is concentrating deformation to recover its taper. In contrast, when erosion is localized in the upper axial zone, there is almost no recovery of the wedge taper, reflecting the fact that the material at the top of the wedge is being carried passively in a transition zone between the pro-wedge and retro-wedge. Structurally, wedges composed of lower cohesion material recover their critical taper almost immediately through distributed deformation, while wedges of higher-cohesion material recover more slowly, and incompletely, by concentrating deformation along existing fault surfaces. As a result, localized erosional episodes can have a lasting effect on the wedge morphology when the wedge is composed of higher cohesion material.

  20. Geophysical Surveys for Detecting Distribution and Shape of Ice Wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Matsuoka, N.; Ikeda, A.

    2006-12-01

    Recent development of applied geophysical methods has shown detailed structure in various periglacial features. However, these methods have been rarely applied to studies in ice wedges. Thus, we attempted to display distribution and shape of ice wedges using a ground penetrating radar (GPR) and a direct current (DC) resistivity meter. The surveys were performed at a comprehensive monitoring site of ice-wedging in Adventdalen, Svalbard, where troughs and small cracks form polygonal patterns on the ground. Unknown structure below such new cracks is also focused in this study. We obtained 37 GPR profiles using 250 MHz signal. 2-D resistivity surveys were also performed along 14 GPR profiles. The electrodes were placed at 1 m intervals and their combination followed the Wenner array. In addition, shallow boreholes were dug across 5 troughs/cracks to estimate the width of ice wedge. The analyzed results show parabolic patterns formed by the multiple radar waveforms and largely increasing gradients of DC resistivity below the troughs and small cracks. The strong reflections of the radar signals and the starting zones of the increasing resistivity lay about 1 m deep, which corresponded to the top of ice wedges (0.7-0.9 m deep) revealed by the drilling. In the GPR profiles, a relatively flat pattern of the reflection was sandwiched by a pair of parabolic patterns below each well-developed trough, whereas a sharp parabolic pattern was detected below each small crack. These results mean that the presence of narrow ice wedges is detectable by the GPR method and the top of a parabolic pattern roughly corresponds to one edge of an ice wedge table. In the DC resistivity profiles, a high resistivity core exists below each trough and crack. The high resistivity probably resulted from ice having lower unfrozen water content than the surrounding silt materials. The heights of the cores indicate that the ice wedges were formed at least between 1 m and 3 m deep. The cores are, however

  1. Orientation of optic axis in wedged photorefractive crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Konstantine; Siahmakoun, Azad Z.

    1996-02-01

    A holographic method for finding the orientation of the optic axis of uniaxial photorefractive crystals is proposed. A theoretical procedure for determining the wedge angle of such crystals has also been developed. Two BaTiO 3 crystals grown by the same vender are examined and the resulting measurements lead to the values of wedge angle with an accuracy of about ±0.1°.

  2. Stereoscopic Display on Computer Monitor Using a Single Wedge Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Tae-Soo; Park, Chan-Young; Lee, Han-Bae; Park, Seung-Han

    2002-02-01

    We propose a novel stereoscopic display technique which uses only a single wedge prism. It can provide good depth perception from a stereoscopic pair image displayed on a computer monitor. One element of the stereoscopic pair image is inversely distorted to correct the deformation induced by the wedge prism. The computer simulation and experimental demonstration show that this technique can be successfully applied to the Internet environment.

  3. Finite Element Analysis of Cross-Wedge Rolling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Dinh Van; Ngung, Dao Minh; Giang, Nguyen Trong

    2010-06-01

    In this study, a non-isothermal simulation model for flat-wedged cross-wedge rolling (CWR) to fabricate a bullet was presented by using three-dimensional thermo-rigid-plastic finite element method (FEM). Both deformation behavior and heat transfer of the process were taken into account. Based on the simulation results, the distributions of temperature, stress, strain areas were analyzed. These results could provide theoretical guidance for net shape and reasonable design of tools.

  4. Three Dimensional FEM Simulation of Wedge — Rolls Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pater, Zbigniew

    2004-06-01

    In this work the new method of cross — wedge rolling is shown. It is based on the rolling of the axisymmetrical products using one flat wedge and two rolls ( profile or smooth). In this article, the results of the numerical simulation of the described method are also provided. On the basis of the calculations, the possibility of producing stepped shafts with cylindrical, spherical and conical surfaces was assumed.

  5. Curvature of purple membranes comprising permanently wedge-shaped bacteriorhodopsin molecules is regulated by lipid content.

    PubMed

    Rhinow, Daniel; Hampp, Norbert

    2010-01-14

    Purple membrane (PM) from Halobacterium salinarum has been studied by many groups and is commonly described as a flat 2-D crystalline membrane microdomain which contains a hexagonal crystalline lattice of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) trimers in a stoichiometric ratio of 10:1 between lipids and BR. BR is the key protein in the halobacterial photosynthetic system and acts as a light-driven proton pump. Upon absorption of a photon, BR undergoes a cyclic series of intramolecular changes, among them a transient "wedge-like" geometrical change of the protein due to a tilt in helix F, one of the seven alpha-helical domains of BR. Due to the strong coupling between the BRs in the crystalline lattice, this may affect membrane topography. In nature, only low light levels occur and the total number of BRs in the "wedge-shaped" state is negligible. For mutated PMs like PM-D85T and PM-D85N (PM-D85X, X = neutral residue), the change of the membrane topography can be triggered in a pH-dependent manner. PMs containing BR-D85X look like "cups" at certain pH values. How does nature deal with a mutated PM like PM-D96G/F171C/F219L (PM-Tri) which comprises permanently "wedge-shaped" BRs and how does this influence membrane assembly? Astonishingly, we observed that PM-Tri is flat. Obviously, the morphology of Halobacterium salinarum is highly conserved and requires flat PMs to be assembled. We found that the lipid content of PM-Tri is specifically altered to assemble a hexagonal crystalline PM-Tri lattice of flat topography.

  6. Optical refractometry based on Fresnel diffraction from a phase wedge.

    PubMed

    Tavassoly, M Taghi; Saber, Ahad

    2010-11-01

    A method that utilizes the Fresnel diffraction of light from the phase step formed by a transparent wedge is introduced for measuring the refractive indices of transparent solids, liquids, and solutions. It is shown that, as a transparent wedge of small apex angle is illuminated perpendicular to its surface by a monochromatic parallel beam of light, the Fresnel fringes, caused by abrupt change in refractive index at the wedge lateral boundary, are formed on a screen held perpendicular to the beam propagation direction. The visibility of the fringes varies periodically between zero and 1 in the direction normal to the wedge apex. For a known or measured apex angle, the wedge refractive index is obtained by measuring the period length by a CCD. To measure the refractive index of a transparent liquid or solution, the wedge is installed in a transparent rectangle cell containing the sample. Then, the cell is illuminated perpendicularly and the visibility period is measured. By using modest optics, one can measure the refractive index at a relative uncertainty level of 10(-5). There is no limitation on the refractive index range. The method can be applied easily with no mechanical manipulation. The measuring apparatus can be very compact with low mechanical and optical noises.

  7. Resorbability of rigid beta-tricalcium phosphate wedges in open-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a retrospective radiological study.

    PubMed

    Kraal, T; Mullender, M; de Bruine, J H D; Reinhard, R; de Gast, A; Kuik, D J; van Royen, B J

    2008-06-01

    The open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is a well accepted treatment modality for patients with osteoarthritis of the medial compartment associated with genu varum. To fill in the osteotomy gap 30% macroporosity rigid beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) is frequently used as a stable resorbable bone substitute. However, the resorbability of these beta-TCP wedges is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate this. Twenty-one OWHTO procedures in seventeen patients were performed with the use of 30% macroporosity rigid beta-TCP wedges. The osteotomies were fixed using an angle-stable locking plate. Conventional AP and lateral radiographs were examined in order to assess the resorbability of the 30% macroporosity rigid beta-TCP wedges as a function of time. A radiological classification system consisting of five phases was used to monitor the resorption of the 30% macroporosity rigid beta-TCP wedges. The mean duration of follow-up was 62 months (+/-23 range of 28-99). In all 21 cases, remnants of the 30% macroporosity rigid beta-TCP wedges were still present at maximum follow-up. Although the boundaries between 30% macroporosity rigid beta-TCP wedges and bone remained slightly visible, all osteotomies were completely consolidated and full osseointegration took place. In 16 out of 21 knees the fixation system was removed after a mean duration of 32 months (+/-19 range of 6-62). In six out of 21 knees a conversion to a knee arthroplasty was performed after a mean duration of 56 months (+/-18 range of 37-82). The OWHTO did not interfere with the placement of knee prostheses. Complete resorption of 30% macroporosity rigid beta-TCP wedges did not take place up to 8 years after operation.

  8. Benchmarking analogue models of brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreurs, Guido; Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Boutelier, Jennifer; Burberry, Caroline; Callot, Jean-Paul; Cavozzi, Cristian; Cerca, Mariano; Chen, Jian-Hong; Cristallini, Ernesto; Cruden, Alexander R.; Cruz, Leonardo; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Da Poian, Gabriela; Garcia, Victor H.; Gomes, Caroline J. S.; Grall, Céline; Guillot, Yannick; Guzmán, Cecilia; Hidayah, Triyani Nur; Hilley, George; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Koyi, Hemin A.; Lu, Chia-Yu; Maillot, Bertrand; Meriaux, Catherine; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Pan, Chang-Chih; Pillot, Daniel; Portillo, Rodrigo; Rosenau, Matthias; Schellart, Wouter P.; Schlische, Roy W.; Take, Andy; Vendeville, Bruno; Vergnaud, Marine; Vettori, Matteo; Wang, Shih-Hsien; Withjack, Martha O.; Yagupsky, Daniel; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    We performed a quantitative comparison of brittle thrust wedge experiments to evaluate the variability among analogue models and to appraise the reproducibility and limits of model interpretation. Fifteen analogue modeling laboratories participated in this benchmark initiative. Each laboratory received a shipment of the same type of quartz and corundum sand and all laboratories adhered to a stringent model building protocol and used the same type of foil to cover base and sidewalls of the sandbox. Sieve structure, sifting height, filling rate, and details on off-scraping of excess sand followed prescribed procedures. Our analogue benchmark shows that even for simple plane-strain experiments with prescribed stringent model construction techniques, quantitative model results show variability, most notably for surface slope, thrust spacing and number of forward and backthrusts. One of the sources of the variability in model results is related to slight variations in how sand is deposited in the sandbox. Small changes in sifting height, sifting rate, and scraping will result in slightly heterogeneous material bulk densities, which will affect the mechanical properties of the sand, and will result in lateral and vertical differences in peak and boundary friction angles, as well as cohesion values once the model is constructed. Initial variations in basal friction are inferred to play the most important role in causing model variability. Our comparison shows that the human factor plays a decisive role, and even when one modeler repeats the same experiment, quantitative model results still show variability. Our observations highlight the limits of up-scaling quantitative analogue model results to nature or for making comparisons with numerical models. The frictional behavior of sand is highly sensitive to small variations in material state or experimental set-up, and hence, it will remain difficult to scale quantitative results such as number of thrusts, thrust spacing

  9. Intermediate Megavoltage Photon Beams for Improved Lung Cancer Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuanming; Ahmad, Munir; Ming, Xin; Zhou, Li; Deng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of intermediate megavoltage (3-MV) photon beams on SBRT lung cancer treatments. To start with, a 3-MV virtual beam was commissioned on a commercial treatment planning system based on Monte Carlo simulations. Three optimized plans (6-MV, 3-MV and dual energy of 3- and 6-MV) were generated for 31 lung cancer patients with identical beam configuration and optimization constraints for each patient. Dosimetric metrics were evaluated and compared among the three plans. Overall, planned dose conformity was comparable among three plans for all 31 patients. For 21 thin patients with average short effective path length (< 10 cm), the 3-MV plans showed better target coverage and homogeneity with dose spillage index R50% = 4.68±0.83 and homogeneity index = 1.26±0.06, as compared to 4.95±1.01 and 1.31±0.08 in the 6-MV plans (p < 0.001). Correspondingly, the average/maximum reductions of lung volumes receiving 20 Gy (V20Gy), 5 Gy (V5Gy), and mean lung dose (MLD) were 7%/20%, 9%/30% and 5%/10%, respectively in the 3-MV plans (p < 0.05). The doses to 5% volumes of the cord, esophagus, trachea and heart were reduced by 9.0%, 10.6%, 11.4% and 7.4%, respectively (p < 0.05). For 10 thick patients, dual energy plans can bring dosimetric benefits with comparable target coverage, integral dose and reduced dose to the critical structures, as compared to the 6-MV plans. In conclusion, our study indicated that 3-MV photon beams have potential dosimetric benefits in treating lung tumors in terms of improved tumor coverage and reduced doses to the adjacent critical structures, in comparison to 6-MV photon beams. Intermediate megavoltage photon beams (< 6-MV) may be considered and added into current treatment approaches to reduce the adjacent normal tissue doses while maintaining sufficient tumor dose coverage in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26672752

  10. Ice wedges as climate archives - opportunities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Dereviagin, Alexander; Wetterich, Sebastian; Schirrmeister, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Permafrost regions are assumed to play a major role for Global Climate Change as they are susceptible to recent warming in particular with regard to the potential release of stored fossil carbon. Permafrost serves as archive of past environmental and climate conditions (such as sedimentation processes, temperature and precipitation regimes as well as landscape and ecosystem development) over tens of thousands of years that can be traced by the study of the frozen deposits, paleontological content and ground ice. Ground ice comprises all types of ice contained in frozen ground, including pore ice, segregation ice and ice wedges. Here, we focus on ice wedges as the most promising climate archive that can be studied by stable water isotope methods analogously to glacier ice. They may be identified by their vertically oriented foliations. Ice wedges form by the repeated filling of wintertime thermal contraction cracks by snow melt water in spring. As the melt water quickly refreezes at negative ground temperature no isotopic fractionation takes place. Hence, the isotopic composition (δ18O, δD, d excess) of wedge ice is assumed to be representative of annual cold period climate conditions, i.e. winter and spring. Ice wedges are widely distributed in non-glaciated high northern latitudes, are diagnostic of permafrost and, in general, indicative of cold and stable climate conditions. They are found in continuous and discontinuous permafrost zones and may also have formed during and survived interglacials. They may provide unique paleo information that is not captured by other climate archives. Usually, ice wedges are dated by radiocarbon dating of organic material incorporated in the ice, but also 36Cl/Cl ratios have been successfully used to date ice wedges. Nevertheless reliable age determination is challenging when studying ice wedges. Here we tackle the potential of ice wedges from the Siberian and American Arctic to trace past climate changes from stable isotope

  11. Relative biological damage and electron fluence in and out of a 6 MV photon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syme, A.; Kirkby, C.; Mirzayans, R.; Mac Kenzie, M.; Field, C.; Fallone, B. G.

    2009-11-01

    Scattered radiation in the penumbra of a megavoltage radiation therapy beam can deposit a non-negligible dose in the healthy tissue around a target volume. The lower energy of the radiation in this region suggests that its biological effectiveness might not be the same as that of the open beam. In this work, we determined the relative biological damage in normal human fibroblasts after megavoltage irradiation in two geometries. The first was an open-beam irradiation and the second was a blocked configuration in which only scattered radiation could reach the target cells. The biological damage was evaluated by the γ-H2AX immunofluorescence assay, which is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks in individual cells. We report that the scattered radiation is more effective at producing biological damage than the open beam radiation. We found a 27% enhancement in the net mean nuclear γ-H2AX fluorescence intensity at 2 Gy and a 48% enhancement at 4 Gy. These findings are of interest due to the increased doses of penumbral radiation close to target volumes both in dose escalation studies and in IMRT treatment deliveries where high dose gradients exist for the purpose of conformal avoidance of healthy tissues.

  12. Seismic reflection images of the accretionary wedge of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, T.H.; Stoffa, P.L. ); McIntosh, K.; Silver, E.A. )

    1990-05-01

    The large-scale structure of modern accretionary wedges is known almost entirely from seismic reflection investigations using single or grids of two-dimensional profiles. The authors will report on the first three-dimensional seismic reflection data volume collected of a wedge. This data set covers a 9-km-wide {times} 22-km-long {times} 6-km-thick volume of the accretionary wedge just arcward of the Middle America Trench off Costa Rica. The three-dimensional processing has improved the imaging ability of the multichannel data, and the data volume allows mapping of structures from a few hundred meters to kilometers in size. These data illustrate the relationships between the basement, the wedge shape, and overlying slope sedimentary deposits. Reflections from within the wedge define the gross structural features and tectonic processes active along this particular convergent margin. So far, the analysis shows that the subdued basement relief (horst and graben structures seldom have relief of more than a few hundred meters off Costa Rica) does affect the larger scale through going structural features within the wedge. The distribution of mud volcanoes and amplitude anomalies associated with the large-scale wedge structures suggests that efficient fluid migration paths may extend from the top of the downgoing slab at the shelf edge out into the lower and middle slope region at a distance of 50-100 km. Offscraping of the uppermost (about 45 m) sediment occurs within 4 km of the trench, creating a small pile of sediments near the trench lower slope. Underplating of parts of the 400-m-thick subducted sedimentary section begins at a very shallow structural level, 4-10 km arcward of the trench. Volumetrically, the most important accretionary process is underplating.

  13. The evolving energy budget of accretionary wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeck, Jessica; Cooke, Michele; Maillot, Bertrand; Souloumiac, Pauline

    2017-04-01

    The energy budget of evolving accretionary systems reveals how deformational processes partition energy as faults slip, topography uplifts, and layer-parallel shortening produces distributed off-fault deformation. The energy budget provides a quantitative framework for evaluating the energetic contribution or consumption of diverse deformation mechanisms. We investigate energy partitioning in evolving accretionary prisms by synthesizing data from physical sand accretion experiments and numerical accretion simulations. We incorporate incremental strain fields and cumulative force measurements from two suites of experiments to design numerical simulations that represent accretionary wedges with stronger and weaker detachment faults. One suite of the physical experiments includes a basal glass bead layer and the other does not. Two physical experiments within each suite implement different boundary conditions (stable base versus moving base configuration). Synthesizing observations from the differing base configurations reduces the influence of sidewall friction because the force vector produced by sidewall friction points in opposite directions depending on whether the base is fixed or moving. With the numerical simulations, we calculate the energy budget at two stages of accretion: at the maximum force preceding the development of the first thrust pair, and at the minimum force following the development of the pair. To identify the appropriate combination of material and fault properties to apply in the simulations, we systematically vary the Young's modulus and the fault static and dynamic friction coefficients in numerical accretion simulations, and identify the set of parameters that minimizes the misfit between the normal force measured on the physical backwall and the numerically simulated force. Following this derivation of the appropriate material and fault properties, we calculate the components of the work budget in the numerical simulations and in the

  14. Glass Microbeads in Analog Models of Thrust Wedges.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Taynara; Gomes, Caroline J S

    2017-01-01

    Glass microbeads are frequently used in analog physical modeling to simulate weak detachment zones but have been neglected in models of thrust wedges. Microbeads differ from quartz sand in grain shape and in low angle of internal friction. In this study, we compared the structural characteristics of microbeads and sand wedges. To obtain a better picture of their mechanical behavior, we determined the physical and frictional properties of microbeads using polarizing and scanning electron microscopy and ring-shear tests, respectively. We built shortening experiments with different basal frictions and measured the thickness, slope and length of the wedges and also the fault spacings. All the microbeads experiments revealed wedge geometries that were consistent with previous studies that have been performed with sand. However, the deformation features in the microbeads shortened over low to intermediate basal frictions were slightly different. Microbeads produced different fault geometries than sand as well as a different grain flow. In addition, they produced slip on minor faults, which was associated with distributed deformation and gave the microbeads wedges the appearance of disharmonic folds. We concluded that the glass microbeads may be used to simulate relatively competent rocks, like carbonates, which may be characterized by small-scale deformation features.

  15. Diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagumennyi, Ia V.; Dimitrieva, N. F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the problem of evolution of diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle is analyzed numerically. The governing set of fundamental equations is solved using original solvers from the open source OpenFOAM package on supercomputer facilities. Due to breaking of naturally existing diffusion flux of a stratifying agent by the impermeable surface of the wedge a complex multi-level vortex system of compensatory fluid motions is formed around the obstacle. Sharp edges of the obstacle generate extended high-gradient horizontal interfaces which are clearly observed in laboratory experiments by high-resolution Schlieren visualization. Formation of an intensive pressure depression zone in front of the leading vertex of the wedge is responsible for generation of propulsive force resulting in a self-displacement of the obstacle along the neutral buoyancy horizon in a stably stratified environment. The size of the pressure deficiency area near the sharp vertex of a concave wedge is about twice that for a convex one. This demonstrates a more intensive propulsion mechanism in case of the concave wedge and, accordingly, a higher velocity of its self-movement in a continuously stratified medium.

  16. Casimir effect for a semitransparent wedge and an annular piston

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, Kimball A.; Wagner, Jef; Kirsten, Klaus

    2009-12-15

    We consider the Casimir energy due to a massless scalar field in a geometry of an infinite wedge closed by a Dirichlet circular cylinder, where the wedge is formed by {delta}-function potentials, so-called semitransparent boundaries. A finite expression for the Casimir energy corresponding to the arc and the presence of both semitransparent potentials is obtained, from which the torque on the sidewalls can be derived. The most interesting part of the calculation is the nontrivial nature of the angular mode functions. Numerical results are obtained which are closely analogous to those recently found for a magnetodielectric wedge, with the same speed of light on both sides of the wedge boundaries. Alternative methods are developed for annular regions with radial semitransparent potentials, based on reduced Green's functions for the angular dependence, which allows calculations using the multiple-scattering formalism. Numerical results corresponding to the torque on the radial plates are likewise computed, which generalize those for the wedge geometry. Generally useful formulas for calculating Casimir energies in separable geometries are derived.

  17. Empirical evidence for two nightside current wedges during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from a comprehensive statistical study of the ionospheric current system and its coupling to the magnetosphere during classical bulge type substorms. We identified 116 substorms and determined the global ionospheric current system before and during the substorm using the SuperMAG initiative and global auroral images obtained by the Polar VIS Earth camera. The westward electrojet (WEJ) display a distinct latitudinal shift between the pre- and post-midnight region and we find evidence that the two WEJ regions are disconnected. This, and other observational facts, led us to propose a new 3D current system configuration that consists of 2 wedge type systems: a current wedge in the pre-midnight region (substorm current wedge), and another current wedge system in the post-midnight region (oval current wedge). There is some local time overlap between the two systems. The former maps to the region inside the near Earth neutral line and is associated with structured BPS type electron precipitation. The latter maps to the inner magnetosphere and is associated with diffuse electron precipitation. We present results of the statistical study, show typical events, results from Biot-Savart simulations, and discuss the implications for our understanding of the 3D current system associated with substorms.

  18. Prostatic thermoluminescent dosimeter analysis in a patient treated with 18 MV X rays through a prosthetic hip

    SciTech Connect

    Hazuka, M.B.; Stroud, D.N.; Adams, J.; Ibbott, G.S.; Kinzie, J.J. )

    1993-01-15

    External beam radiation therapy with high energy photon beams through hip protheses has been shown to cause dose inhomogeneities for target volumes in the pelvis. In this work, measurements of dose using thermoluminescent dosimetry were compared with dose calculations from a computerized treatment planning system in a patient with prostatic carcinoma and a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum hip prosthesis. A 39% decrement in dose at isocenter was demonstrated for an 18 MV photon beam passing through the prosthesis. A discrepancy of only 3.1% was shown between measured and calculated dose when the tissue-maximum ratio (TMR) method of heterogeneity correction was used. However, it is recognized that several sources of error are possible when heterogeneity corrections are performed for high density prostheses and these are discussed below. The results of this work stress the importance of accurate data for use with the ratio of TMR's' algorithm in order that accurate treatment planning can be performed.

  19. COMMISSIONING AND OPERATION OF THE CEBAF 100 MV CRYOMODULES

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Trent; Davis, G; Drury, Michael; Harwood, Leigh; Hogan, John; Kimber, Andrew; Lahti, George; Merz, William; Nelson, Richard; Plawski, Tomasz; Seidman, David; Spata, Michael; Wilson, Michael; Hovater, J

    2012-07-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of ten new 100 MV cryomodules and RF systems. The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at a maximum accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m. To support the higher gradients and higher Q{sub L} ({approx} 3 x 10{sup 7}), a new RF system has been developed and is being installed to power and control the cavities. The RF system employs digital control and 13 kW klystrons. Recently, two of these cryomodules and associated RF hardware and software have been installed and commissioned in the CEBAF accelerator. Electrons at linac currents up to 540 {micro}A have been successfully accelerated and used for nuclear physics experiments. This paper reports on the commissioning and operation of the RF system and cryomodules.

  20. Citrus alongside the sinking wreckage of MV Pacific Star in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Citrus alongside the sinking wreckage of MV Pacific Star in the Pacific Ocean. Pacific Star's captain used his vessel to ram the cutter after he was ordered to stop and submit to inspection by a boarding team. Citrus was not seriously damaged in the collision. U.S. Coast Guard personnel recovered a large amount of marijuana from the wreckage - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter CITRUS, Coos Bay, Coos County, OR

  1. Surface dose measurements in and out of field: Implications for breast radiotherapy with megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Lonski, Peta; Ramachandran, Prabhakar; Franich, Rick; Kron, Tomas

    2017-06-05

    This study examines the difference in surface dose between flat and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in the context of breast radiotherapy. The surface dose was measured for 6MV, 6MV FFF, 10MV, 10MV FFF and 18MV photon beams using a thin window ionisation chamber for various field sizes. Profiles were acquired to ascertain the change in surface dose off-axis. Out-of-field measurements were included in a clinically representative half beam block tangential breast field. In the field centres of FFF beams the surface dose was found to be increased for small fields and decreased for large fields compared to flat beams. For FFF beams, surface dose was found to decrease off-axis and resulted in lower surface dose out-of-field compared to flat beams. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. TH-C-12A-08: New Compact 10 MV S-Band Linear Accelerator: 3D Finite-Element Design and Monte Carlo Dose Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, D; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B; Steciw, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a new compact S-band linac waveguide capable of producing a 10 MV x-ray beam, while maintaining the length (27.5 cm) of current 6 MV waveguides. This will allow higher x-ray energies to be used in our linac-MRI systems with the same footprint. Methods: Finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics was used to design an accelerator cavity matching one published in an experiment breakdown study, to ensure that our modeled cavities do not exceed the threshold electric fields published. This cavity was used as the basis for designing an accelerator waveguide, where each cavity of the full waveguide was tuned to resonate at 2.997 GHz by adjusting the cavity diameter. The RF field solution within the waveguide was calculated, and together with an electron-gun phase space generated using Opera3D/SCALA, were input into electron tracking software PARMELA to compute the electron phase space striking the x-ray target. This target phase space was then used in BEAM Monte Carlo simulations to generate percent depth doses curves for this new linac, which were then used to re-optimize the waveguide geometry. Results: The shunt impedance, Q-factor, and peak-to-mean electric field ratio were matched to those published for the breakdown study to within 0.1% error. After tuning the full waveguide, the peak surface fields are calculated to be 207 MV/m, 13% below the breakdown threshold, and a d-max depth of 2.42 cm, a D10/20 value of 1.59, compared to 2.45 cm and 1.59, respectively, for the simulated Varian 10 MV linac and brehmsstrahlung production efficiency 20% lower than a simulated Varian 10 MV linac. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the design of a functional 27.5 cm waveguide producing 10 MV photons with characteristics similar to a Varian 10 MV linac.

  3. 5 MV 30 mA industrial electron processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Y.; Mizusawa, K.

    1991-05-01

    Industrial electron beam processing systems have been in use in various application fields such as: improving heat resistivity of wire insulation; controlling quality of automobile rubber tires and melt index characteristics of PE foams; and curing paintings or printing inks. Recently, there has come up a need for electron beam with an energy higher than 3 MV in order to disinfect salmonella in chicken meat, to kill bugs in fruits, and to sterilize medical disposables. To meet this need we developed a 5 MV 30 mA electron processing system with an X-ray conversion target. The machine was tested in NHV's plant in Kyoto at continuous operation of full voltage and full current. It proved to be very steady in operation with a high efficiency (as much as 72%). Also, the X-ray target was tested in a continuous run of 5 MV 30 mA (150 kW). It proved to be viable in industrial utilization. This paper introduces the process and the results of the development.

  4. Gold nanoparticle induced vasculature damage in radiotherapy: Comparing protons, megavoltage photons, and kilovoltage photons.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuting; Paganetti, Harald; McMahon, Stephen J; Schuemann, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticle (GNP) induced vasculature damage for proton, megavoltage (MV) photon, and kilovoltage (kV) photon irradiation. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using tool for particle simulation (TOPAS) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in close proximity up to 20 μm from the GNPs. The spatial dose distribution from GNPs was used as an input to calculate the dose deposited to the blood vessels. GNP induced vasculature damage was evaluated for three particle sources (a clinical spread out Bragg peak proton beam, a 6 MV photon beam, and two kV photon beams). For each particle source, various depths in tissue, GNP sizes (2, 10, and 20 nm diameter), and vessel diameters (8, 14, and 20 μm) were investigated. Two GNP distributions in lumen were considered, either homogeneously distributed in the vessel or attached to the inner wall of the vessel. Doses of 30 Gy and 2 Gy were considered, representing typical in vivo enhancement studies and conventional clinical fractionation, respectively. These simulations showed that for 20 Au-mg/g GNP blood concentration homogeneously distributed in the vessel, the additional dose at the inner vascular wall encircling the lumen was 43% of the prescribed dose at the depth of treatment for the 250 kVp photon source, 1% for the 6 MV photon source, and 0.1% for the proton beam. For kV photons, GNPs caused 15% more dose in the vascular wall for 150 kVp source than for 250 kVp. For 6 MV photons, GNPs caused 0.2% more dose in the vascular wall at 20 cm depth in water as compared to at depth of maximum dose (Dmax). For proton therapy, GNPs caused the same dose in the vascular wall for all depths across the spread out Bragg peak with 12.7 cm range and 7 cm modulation. For the same weight of GNPs in the vessel, 2 nm diameter GNPs caused three times more damage to the vessel than 20 nm diameter GNPs. When the GNPs were attached to the inner vascular wall

  5. Gold nanoparticle induced vasculature damage in radiotherapy: Comparing protons, megavoltage photons, and kilovoltage photons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuting; Paganetti, Harald; McMahon, Stephen J.; Schuemann, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to investigate the radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticle (GNP) induced vasculature damage for proton, megavoltage (MV) photon, and kilovoltage (kV) photon irradiation. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using tool for particle simulation (TOPAS) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in close proximity up to 20 μm from the GNPs. The spatial dose distribution from GNPs was used as an input to calculate the dose deposited to the blood vessels. GNP induced vasculature damage was evaluated for three particle sources (a clinical spread out Bragg peak proton beam, a 6 MV photon beam, and two kV photon beams). For each particle source, various depths in tissue, GNP sizes (2, 10, and 20 nm diameter), and vessel diameters (8, 14, and 20 μm) were investigated. Two GNP distributions in lumen were considered, either homogeneously distributed in the vessel or attached to the inner wall of the vessel. Doses of 30 Gy and 2 Gy were considered, representing typical in vivo enhancement studies and conventional clinical fractionation, respectively. Results: These simulations showed that for 20 Au-mg/g GNP blood concentration homogeneously distributed in the vessel, the additional dose at the inner vascular wall encircling the lumen was 43% of the prescribed dose at the depth of treatment for the 250 kVp photon source, 1% for the 6 MV photon source, and 0.1% for the proton beam. For kV photons, GNPs caused 15% more dose in the vascular wall for 150 kVp source than for 250 kVp. For 6 MV photons, GNPs caused 0.2% more dose in the vascular wall at 20 cm depth in water as compared to at depth of maximum dose (Dmax). For proton therapy, GNPs caused the same dose in the vascular wall for all depths across the spread out Bragg peak with 12.7 cm range and 7 cm modulation. For the same weight of GNPs in the vessel, 2 nm diameter GNPs caused three times more damage to the vessel than 20 nm diameter GNPs. When the GNPs were attached

  6. Gold nanoparticle induced vasculature damage in radiotherapy: Comparing protons, megavoltage photons, and kilovoltage photons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuting Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan; McMahon, Stephen J.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to investigate the radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticle (GNP) induced vasculature damage for proton, megavoltage (MV) photon, and kilovoltage (kV) photon irradiation. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using tool for particle simulation (TOPAS) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in close proximity up to 20 μm from the GNPs. The spatial dose distribution from GNPs was used as an input to calculate the dose deposited to the blood vessels. GNP induced vasculature damage was evaluated for three particle sources (a clinical spread out Bragg peak proton beam, a 6 MV photon beam, and two kV photon beams). For each particle source, various depths in tissue, GNP sizes (2, 10, and 20 nm diameter), and vessel diameters (8, 14, and 20 μm) were investigated. Two GNP distributions in lumen were considered, either homogeneously distributed in the vessel or attached to the inner wall of the vessel. Doses of 30 Gy and 2 Gy were considered, representing typical in vivo enhancement studies and conventional clinical fractionation, respectively. Results: These simulations showed that for 20 Au-mg/g GNP blood concentration homogeneously distributed in the vessel, the additional dose at the inner vascular wall encircling the lumen was 43% of the prescribed dose at the depth of treatment for the 250 kVp photon source, 1% for the 6 MV photon source, and 0.1% for the proton beam. For kV photons, GNPs caused 15% more dose in the vascular wall for 150 kVp source than for 250 kVp. For 6 MV photons, GNPs caused 0.2% more dose in the vascular wall at 20 cm depth in water as compared to at depth of maximum dose (Dmax). For proton therapy, GNPs caused the same dose in the vascular wall for all depths across the spread out Bragg peak with 12.7 cm range and 7 cm modulation. For the same weight of GNPs in the vessel, 2 nm diameter GNPs caused three times more damage to the vessel than 20 nm diameter GNPs. When the GNPs were attached

  7. Photonic Hypercrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new "universality class" of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  8. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  9. Alignment of multiradiation isocenters for megavoltage photon beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Ding, Kai; Cowan, Garth; Tryggestad, Erik; Armour, Elwood; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin

    2015-11-08

    The accurate measurement of the linear accelerator (linac) radiation isocenter is critical, especially for stereotactic treatment. Traditional quality assurance (QA) procedure focuses on the measurement of single radiation isocenter, usually of 6 megavoltage (MV) photon beams. Single radiation isocenter is also commonly assumed in treatment planning systems (TPS). Due to different flattening filters and bending magnet and steering parameters, the radiation isocenter of one energy mode can deviate from another if no special effort was devoted. We present the first experience of the multiradiation isocenters alignment on an Elekta linac, as well as its corresponding QA procedure and clinical impact. An 8 mm ball-bearing (BB) phantom was placed at the 6 MV radiation isocenter using an Elekta isocenter search algorithm, based on portal images. The 3D radiation isocenter shifts of other photon energy modes relative to the 6 MV were determined. Beam profile scanning for different field sizes was used as an independent method to determine the 2D multiradiation isocenters alignment. To quantify the impact of radiation isocenter offset on targeting accuracy, the 10 MV radiation isocenter was manually offset from that for 6 MV by adjusting the bending magnet current. Because our table isocenter was mechanically aligned to the 6 MV radiation isocenter, the deviation of the table isocentric rotation from the "shifted" 10 MV radiation isocenter after bending magnet adjustment was assessed. Winston-Lutz test was also performed to confirm the overall radiation isocenter positioning accuracy for all photon energies. The portal image method showed the radiation isocenter of the 10 MV flattening filter-free mode deviated from others before beam parameter adjustment. After the adjustment, the deviation was greatly improved from 0.96 to 0.35 mm relative to the 6 MV radiation isocenter. The same finding was confirmed by the profile-scanning method. The maximum deviation of the table

  10. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Edward S.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  11. Laparoscopic caecal wedge resection with intraoperative endoscopic assistance.

    PubMed

    Giavarini, Luisa; Boni, Luigi; Cortellezzi, Camillo Claudio; Segato, Sergio; Cassinotti, Elisa; Rausei, Stefano; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Rovera, Francesca; Marzorati, Alessandro; Spampatti, Sebastiano; Sambucci, Daniele; Dionigi, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a potential evolution of adenomatous polyps, that is why nowadays screening programs for colorectal cancer are widely diffused. Colonoscopy is the gold standard procedure for identifying and resecting polyps; however, for some polyps resection during colonoscopy is not possible. The aim of the present study is to identify a fast and safe procedure for endoscopically resecting unresectable polyps. Patients with endoscopically unresectable polyps were scheduled for laparoscopic wedge resection under colonoscopic assistance. From November 2010 to November 2012 we treated 15 patients with endoscopically unresectable adenomatous polyps. All patients underwent a laparoscopic caecal wedge resection with intraoperative endoscopic assistance. All procedures were completed without complications and in all cases complete resection of the polyps was achieved. Laparoscopic wedge caecal resection with intraoperative colonoscopy is a fast and safe procedure that can be performed for large polyps that could not be treated endoscopically. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Surgical Associates Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, E.S.

    1980-05-09

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  13. Topological photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2008-03-01

    We associate intrinsic energy equal to hν /2 with the spin angular momentum of photon, and propose a topological model based on orbifold in space and tifold in time as topological obstructions. The model is substantiated using vector wavefield disclinations. The physical photon is suggested to be a particlelike topological photon and a propagating wave such that the energy hν of photon is equally divided between spin energy and translational energy, corresponding to linear momentum of hν /c. The enigma of wave-particle duality finds natural resolution, and the proposed model gives new insights into the phenomena of interference and emission of radiation.

  14. In vivo dosimetry: intercomparison between p-type based and n-type based diodes for the 16-25 MV energy range.

    PubMed

    Jornet, N; Ribas, M; Eudaldo, T

    2000-06-01

    This paper compares two different types of diodes designed to cover the energy range from 16 to 25 MV, one n-type (diode-A) and the other p-type (diode-B). A 18 MV x-ray beam has been used for all tests. Signal stability postirradiation, intrinsic precision and linearity of response with dose, front-back symmetry, and dose decrease under the diode were studied. Also, the water equivalent thickness of the build up caps was determined. Both types of diodes were calibrated to give entrance dose. Entrance correction factors for field size, tray, source skin distance, angle, and wedge were determined. Finally, the effect of dose rate, temperature and accumulated dose on the diode's response were studied. Only diode-A had full build-up for 18 MV x rays and standard irradiation conditions. Field size correction factor was about 2%-4% for field sizes bigger than 20 x 20 cm2 for both diodes. Tray correction factor was negligible for diode-A while diode-B would overestimate the dose by a 2% for a 40 x 40 cm2 field size if the correction factor was not applied. Wedge correction factors are only relevant for the 60 degrees wedge, being the correction factor for diode-A significantly higher than for diode-B. Diode-A showed less temperature dependence than diode-B. Sensitivity dependence on dose per pulse was a 1.5% higher for diode-A than for diode-B and therefore a higher SSD dependence was found for diode-A. The loss of sensitivity with accumulated radiation dose was only about 0.3% for diode-A, after 300 Gy, while it amounted to 8% for diode-B. Weighing the different correction factors for both types of diodes no conclusions about which type is better can be driven. From these results it can be also seen that the dependence of the diode response on dose rate in a pulsed beam does not seem to be associated with the fact of being n-type or p-type but could be related to the doping level of the diodes.

  15. Noise attenuation by a hard wedge-shaped barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouis, D.

    2003-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of sound screening by a wedge-like barrier. The sound source is assumed to be point like, and the receiver is located in the shadow of the source sound field, so that according to geometrical optics only the field diffracted by the edge of the barrier is considered. First, for the hard wedge in space, three models are used for calculating the amplitude of the edge-diffracted field. These are the uniform theory of diffraction (UTD), the Hadden-Pierce model, both in the frequency domain, and the Biot-Tolstoy theory of diffraction which is a time domain formulation. It is first shown that even at relatively low frequencies, the frequency domain models perform quite satisfactorily as compared to the exact time domain theory. Hence, and due to its relative simplicity the UTD is proposed as an accurate calculation scheme for solving problems with edge diffraction by hard wedges. It is also proved from theoretical calculations that the amplitude of the edge-diffracted field increases for an increasing angle of the wedge, and consequently the hard half-plane gives the lowest field amplitude in the shadow zone. Some applications are then considered for evaluating the performance of a barrier on a flat ground, either completely hard or with mixed homogeneous boundary conditions. An improvement of the scheme for calculating the sound field in the all-hard case is achieved through considering the multiple diffraction, in this case only to the second order, between the top of the wedge barrier and its base. The results show that for usually occurring situations, increasing the angle of the hard wedge barrier affects negatively its efficiency through diminishing its insertion loss. These conclusions are also supported by the results of some experimental measurements conducted at a scale-model level.

  16. Wedge covariance for two-dimensional filling and wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, A. O.; Greenall, M. J.; Wood, A. J.

    2002-02-01

    A comprehensive theory of interfacial fluctuation effects occurring at two-dimensional wedge (corner) filling transitions in pure (thermal disorder) and impure (random bond disorder) systems is presented. Scaling theory and the explicit results of transfer matrix and replica trick studies of interfacial Hamiltonian models reveal that, for almost all examples of intermolecular forces, the critical behaviour at filling is fluctuation dominated, characterized by universal critical exponents and scaling functions that depend only on the wandering exponent ζ. Within this filling-fluctuation (FFL) regime, the critical behaviour of the midpoint interfacial height, probability distribution function, local compressibility and wedge free energy are identical to corresponding quantities predicted for the strong-fluctuation (SFL) regime for critical wetting transitions at planar walls. In particular the wedge free energy is related to the SFL regime point tension, which is calculated for systems with random bond disorder using the replica trick. The connection with the SFL regime for all these quantities can be expressed precisely in terms of special wedge covariance relations, which complement standard scaling theory and restrict the allowed values of the critical exponents for both FFL filling and SFL critical wetting. The predictions for the values of the exponents in the SFL regime recover earlier results based on random walk arguments. The covariance of the wedge free energy leads to a new, general relation for the SFL regime point tension, which derives the conjectured Indekeu-Robledo critical exponent relation and also explains the origin of the logarithmic singularity for pure systems known from exact Ising studies due to Abraham and co-workers. Wedge covariance is also used to predict the numerical values of critical exponents and position dependence of universal one-point functions for pure systems.

  17. Capillary surfaces in a wedge: Differing contact angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert

    1994-01-01

    The possible zero-gravity equilibrium configurations of capillary surfaces u(x, y) in cylindrical containers whose sections are (wedge) domains with corners are investigated mathematically, for the case in which the contact angles on the two sides of the wedge may differ. In such a situation the behavior can depart in significant qualitative ways from that for which the contact angles on the two sides are the same. Conditions are described under which such qualitative changes must occur. Numerically computed surfaces are depicted to indicate the behavior.

  18. Regularization for Inverting the Radon Transform with Wedge Consideration (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    medical imaging , and industrial testing, the object of interest is scanned over a limited angular range, which is less than the full 180 deg mathematically required for density reconstruction. The use of standard full-range reconstruction algorithms produces results with notorious "butter-fly" or "wedge" artifacts. In this work we propose a reconstruction technique with a regularization term that takes into account the orientation of the missing angular range, also denoted as missing wedge. We show that a regularization that penalizes non-uniformly in the

  19. Analysis of a free-running synchronization artifact correction for MV-imaging with aSi:H flat panels

    SciTech Connect

    Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Sedlmayer, Felix; Deutschmann, Heinz; Huber, Stefan

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Solid state flat panel electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are widely used for megavolt (MV) photon imaging applications in radiotherapy. In addition to their original purpose in patient position verification, they are convenient to use in quality assurance and dosimetry to verify beam geometry and dose deposition or to perform linear accelerator (linac) calibration procedures. However, native image frames from amorphous silicon (aSi:H) detectors show a range of artifacts which have to be eliminated by proper correction algorithms. When a panel is operated in free-running frame acquisition mode, moving vertical stripes (periodic synchronization artifacts) are a disturbing feature in image frames. Especially for applications in volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or motion tracking, the synchronization (sync) artifacts are the limiting factor for potential and accuracy since they become even worse at higher frame rates and at lower dose rates, i.e., linac pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs). Methods: The authors introduced a synchronization correction method which is based on a theoretical model describing the interferences of the panel's readout clocking with the linac's dose pulsing. Depending on the applied PRF, a certain number of dose pulses is captured per frame which is readout columnwise, sequentially. The interference of the PRF with the panel readout is responsible for the period and the different gray value levels of the sync stripes, which can be calculated analytically. Sync artifacts can then be eliminated multiplicatively in precorrected frames without additional information about radiation pulse timing. Results: For the analysis, three aSi:H EPIDs of various types were investigated with 6 and 15 MV photon beams at varying PRFs of 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 pulses per second. Applying the sync correction at panels with gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators improved single frame flood field image quality drastically

  20. Analysis of a free-running synchronization artifact correction for MV-imaging with aSi:H flat panels.

    PubMed

    Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Huber, Stefan; Sedlmayer, Felix; Deutschmann, Heinz

    2013-03-01

    Solid state flat panel electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are widely used for megavolt (MV) photon imaging applications in radiotherapy. In addition to their original purpose in patient position verification, they are convenient to use in quality assurance and dosimetry to verify beam geometry and dose deposition or to perform linear accelerator (linac) calibration procedures. However, native image frames from amorphous silicon (aSi:H) detectors show a range of artifacts which have to be eliminated by proper correction algorithms. When a panel is operated in free-running frame acquisition mode, moving vertical stripes (periodic synchronization artifacts) are a disturbing feature in image frames. Especially for applications in volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or motion tracking, the synchronization (sync) artifacts are the limiting factor for potential and accuracy since they become even worse at higher frame rates and at lower dose rates, i.e., linac pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs). The authors introduced a synchronization correction method which is based on a theoretical model describing the interferences of the panel's readout clocking with the linac's dose pulsing. Depending on the applied PRF, a certain number of dose pulses is captured per frame which is readout columnwise, sequentially. The interference of the PRF with the panel readout is responsible for the period and the different gray value levels of the sync stripes, which can be calculated analytically. Sync artifacts can then be eliminated multiplicatively in precorrected frames without additional information about radiation pulse timing. For the analysis, three aSi:H EPIDs of various types were investigated with 6 and 15 MV photon beams at varying PRFs of 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 pulses per second. Applying the sync correction at panels with gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators improved single frame flood field image quality drastically [improvement of the signal

  1. Shielding for neutron scattered dose to the fetus in patients treated with 18 MV x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Roy, S C; Sandison, G A

    2000-08-01

    Neutrons are associated with therapeutic high energy x-ray beams as a contaminant that contributes significant unwanted dose to the patient. Measurement of both photon and neutron scattered dose at the position of a fetus from chest irradiation by a large field 18 MV x-ray beam was performed using an ionization chamber and superheated drop detector, respectively. Shielding construction to reduce this scattered dose was investigated using both lead sheet and borated polyethylene slabs. A 7.35 cm lead shield reduced the scattered photon dose by 50% and the scattered neutron dose by 40%. Adding 10 cm of 5% borated polyethylene to this lead shield reduced the scattered neutron dose by a factor of 7.5 from the unshielded value. When the 5% borated polyethylene was replaced by the same thickness of 30% borated polyethylene there was no significant change in the reduction of neutron scatter dose. The most efficient shield studied reduced the neutron scatter dose by a factor of 10. The results indicate that most of the scattered neutrons present at the position of the fetus produced by an 18 MV x-ray beam are of low energy and in the thermal to 0.57 MeV range since lead is almost transparent to neutrons with energies lower than 0.57 MeV. This article constitutes the first report of an effective shield to reduce neutron dose at the fetus when treating a pregnant woman with a high energy x-ray beam.

  2. Measles Virus (MV) Hemagglutinin: Evidence that Attachment Sites for MV Receptors SLAM and CD46 Overlap on the Globular Head

    PubMed Central

    Massé, Nicolas; Ainouze, Michelle; Néel, Benjamin; Wild, T. Fabian; Buckland, Robin; Langedijk, Johannes P. M.

    2004-01-01

    Measles virus hemagglutinin (MVH) residues potentially responsible for attachment to the wild-type (wt) MV receptor SLAM (CD150) have been identified and localized on the MVH globular head by reference to a revised hypothetical structural model for MVH (www.pepscan.nl/downloads/measlesH.pdb). We show that the mutation of five charged MVH residues which are conserved among morbillivirus H proteins has major effects on both SLAM downregulation and SLAM-dependent fusion. In the three-dimensional surface representation of the structural model, three of these residues (D505, D507, and R533) align the rim on one side of the cavity on the top surface of the MVH globular head and form the basis of a single continuous site that overlaps with the 546-548-549 CD46 binding site. We show that the overlapping sites fall within the footprint of an anti-MVH monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both wt and laboratory-vaccine MV strains and whose epitope contains R533. Our study does not exclude the possibility that Y481 binds CD46 directly but suggests that the N481Y mutation of wt MVH could influence, at a distance, the conformation of the overlapping sites so that affinity to CD46 increases. The relevance of these results to present concepts of MV receptor usage is discussed, and an explanation is proposed as to why morbillivirus attachment proteins are H, whereas those from the other paramyxoviruses are HN (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase). PMID:15308701

  3. Effect of a trade between boattail angle and wedge size on the performance of a nonaxisymmetric wedge nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, George T., Jr.; Bare, E. Ann; Burley, James R., II

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effect of a boattail angle and wedge-size trade on the performance of nonaxisymmetric wedge nozzles installed on a generic twin-engine fighter aircraft model. Test data were obtained at static conditions and at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.25. Angle of attack was held constant at 0 deg. High-pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust, and the nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to slightly over 15.0. For the configurations studied, the results indicate that wedge size can be reduced without affecting aeropropulsive performance.

  4. The photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Russell L.

    2009-10-01

    There are no TEM waves, only photons. Lets build a photon, using a radio antenna. A short antenna (2L<< λ) simplifies the calculation, letting B fall off everywhere as 1/r^2. The Biot-Savart law finds B = (μ0/4π)(LI0/r^2)θφt. The magnetic flux thru a semi-circle of radius λ/2 is set equal to the flux quantum h/e, determining the needed source strength, LI0. From this, one can integrate the magnetic energy density over a sphere of radius λ/2 and finds it to be 1.0121 hc/λ. Pretty close. A B field collapses when the current ceases, but the photon evades this by creating a ɛ0E / t displacement current at center that fully supports the toroidal B assembly as it moves at c. This E=vxB arises because the photon moves at c. Stopped, a photon decays. At every point along the photon's path, an observer will note a transient oscillation of an E field. This sources the EM ``guiding wave'', carrying little or no energy and expanding at c. At the head of the photon, all these spherical guiding waves gather ``in-phase'' as a planar wavefront. This model speaks to all the many things we know about light. The photon is tiny, but its guiding wave is huge.

  5. Microdosimetry of Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellmar, Darwin Llewelyn

    Experimental techniques were developed for obtaining microdosimetric spectra on hospital-based linear accelerators. Microdosimetry spectra were measured for Cobalt-60 photons, 10 and 15 MV bremsstrahlung x-rays and 12 to 20 MeV electrons. The x-ray and electrons were produced at ultra-low dose rates (50-200 micro-gray/hour), which enabled direct measurements of lineal energy distributions with a conventional Rossi -type gas proportional counter. Extensive measurements were made to insure that the dosimetric properties of the low dose rate beams are nearly identical to those produced under high dose rate clinical conditions. Analytical procedures were developed to correct measured lineal energy spectra for pulse pileup. The lineal energy spectra for 10 MV X-rays and electrons differ significantly from Cobalt-60 photons with the dose average lineal energy (y(,D)) being lower than Cobalt-60 photons by 15 to 20% and 20 to 30%, respectively. The values of y(,D) for Cobalt gamma rays and 15 MV X-rays are comparable. The calculated spectrum assuming CSDA predicted the peak and the shoulder of the experimental spectra, but was unable to predict the exact shape.

  6. Experimental measurement of radiological penumbra associated with intermediate energy x-rays (1MV) and small radiosurgery field sizes.

    PubMed

    Keller, Brian M; Beachey, David J; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is used to treat intracranial lesions with a high degree of accuracy. At the present time, x-ray energies at or above Co-60 gamma rays are used. Previous Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that intermediate energy x-ray photons or IEPs (defined to be photons in the energy range of 0.2-1.2MeV), combined with small field sizes, produce a reduced radiological penumbra leading to a sharper dose gradient, improved dose homogeneity and sparing of critical anatomy adjacent to the target volume. This hypothesis is based on the fact that, for small x-ray fields, a dose outside the treatment volume is dictated mainly by the range of electrons set into motion by x-ray photons. The purpose of this work is: (1) to produce intermediate energy x rays using a detuned medical linear accelerator, (2) to characterize the energy of this beam, (3) to measure the radiological penumbra for IEPs and small fields to compare with that produced by 6MV x rays or Co-60, and (4) to compare these experimental measurements with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The maximum photon energy of our IEP x-ray spectrum was measured to be 1.2MeV. Gafchromic EBT films (ISP Technologies, Wayne, NJ) were irradiated and read using a novel digital microscopy imaging system with high spatial resolution. Under identical irradiation conditions the measured radiological penumbra widths (80%-20% distance), for field sizes ranging from 0.3×0.3to4.0×4.0cm2, varied from 0.3-0.77mm (1.2MV) and from 1.1-2.1mm (6MV). Even more dramatic were the differences found when comparing the 90%-10% or the 95%-5% widths, which are in fact more significant in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations agreed well with the experimental findings. The reduction in radiological penumbra could be substantial for specific clinical situations such as in the treatment of an ocular melanoma abutting the macula or for the treatment of functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia (a nonlethal neurological

  7. Experimental measurement of radiological penumbra associated with intermediate energy x-rays (1 MV) and small radiosurgery field sizes.

    PubMed

    Keller, Brian M; Beachey, David J; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is used to treat intracranial lesions with a high degree of accuracy. At the present time, x-ray energies at or above Co-60 gamma rays are used. Previous Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that intermediate energy x-ray photons or IEPs (defined to be photons in the energy range of 0.2-1.2 MeV), combined with small field sizes, produce a reduced radiological penumbra leading to a sharper dose gradient, improved dose homogeneity and sparing of critical anatomy adjacent to the target volume. This hypothesis is based on the fact that, for small x-ray fields, a dose outside the treatment volume is dictated mainly by the range of electrons set into motion by x-ray photons. The purpose of this work is: (1) to produce intermediate energy x rays using a detuned medical linear accelerator, (2) to characterize the energy of this beam, (3) to measure the radiological penumbra for IEPs and small fields to compare with that produced by 6 MV x rays or Co-60, and (4) to compare these experimental measurements with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The maximum photon energy of our IEP x-ray spectrum was measured to be 1.2 MeV. Gafchromic EBT films (ISP Technologies, Wayne, NJ) were irradiated and read using a novel digital microscopy imaging system with high spatial resolution. Under identical irradiation conditions the measured radiological penumbra widths (80%-20% distance), for field sizes ranging from 0.3 x 0.3 to 4.0 x 4.0 cm2, varied from 0.3-0.77 mm (1.2 MV) and from 1.1-2.1 mm (6 MV). Even more dramatic were the differences found when comparing the 90%-10% or the 95%-5% widths, which are in fact more significant in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations agreed well with the experimental findings. The reduction in radiological penumbra could be substantial for specific clinical situations such as in the treatment of an ocular melanoma abutting the macula or for the treatment of functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia (a nonlethal

  8. Experimental measurement of radiological penumbra associated with intermediate energy x-rays (1 MV) and small radiosurgery field sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M.; Beachey, David J.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-10-15

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is used to treat intracranial lesions with a high degree of accuracy. At the present time, x-ray energies at or above Co-60 gamma rays are used. Previous Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that intermediate energy x-ray photons or IEPs (defined to be photons in the energy range of 0.2-1.2 MeV), combined with small field sizes, produce a reduced radiological penumbra leading to a sharper dose gradient, improved dose homogeneity and sparing of critical anatomy adjacent to the target volume. This hypothesis is based on the fact that, for small x-ray fields, a dose outside the treatment volume is dictated mainly by the range of electrons set into motion by x-ray photons. The purpose of this work is: (1) to produce intermediate energy x rays using a detuned medical linear accelerator (2) to characterize the energy of this beam (3) to measure the radiological penumbra for IEPs and small fields to compare with that produced by 6 MV x rays or Co-60, and (4) to compare these experimental measurements with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The maximum photon energy of our IEP x-ray spectrum was measured to be 1.2 MeV. Gafchromic EBT films (ISP Technologies, Wayne, NJ) were irradiated and read using a novel digital microscopy imaging system with high spatial resolution. Under identical irradiation conditions the measured radiological penumbra widths (80%-20% distance), for field sizes ranging from 0.3x0.3 to 4.0x4.0 cm{sup 2}, varied from 0.3-0.77 mm (1.2 MV) and from 1.1-2.1 mm (6 MV). Even more dramatic were the differences found when comparing the 90%-10% or the 95%-5% widths, which are in fact more significant in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations agreed well with the experimental findings. The reduction in radiological penumbra could be substantial for specific clinical situations such as in the treatment of an ocular melanoma abutting the macula or for the treatment of functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia (a nonlethal

  9. Benchmark solutions for sound propagation in an ideal wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wen-Yu; Yang, Chun-Mei; Qin, Ji-Xing; Zhang, Ren-He

    2013-05-01

    Sound propagation in a wedge-shaped waveguide with perfectly reflecting boundaries is one of the few range-dependent problems with an analytical solution, and hence provides an ideal benchmark for a full two-way solution to the wave equation. An analytical solution for the sound propagation in an ideal wedge with a pressure-release bottom was presented by Buckingham and Tolstoy [Buckingham and Tolstoy 1990 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 87 1511]. The ideal wedge problem with a rigid bottom is also of great importance in underwater acoustics. We present an analytical solution to the ideal wedge problem with a perfectly reflecting bottom, either rigid or pressure-release, which may be used to provide a means for investigating the sound field in depth-varying channels, and to establish the accuracy of numerical propagation models. Closed-form expressions for coupling matrices are also provided for the ideal waveguides characterized by a homogeneous water column bounded by perfectly reflecting boundaries. A comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical solution recently proposed by Luo et al. [Luo W Y, Yang C M and Zhang R H 2012 Chin. Phys. Lett. 29 014302] is also presented, through which the accuracy of this numerical model is illustrated.

  10. Experimental investigation of hypersonic flow induced separation over double wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Tokitada

    2009-09-01

    Flow separation occurs over the compression corners generated by deflected control surfaces on hypersonic re-entry vehicles and in the inlet of scram jet engines. Configurations like a double wedge and double cone model are useful for studying the separated flow features. Flow fields around concave corners are relatively complicated and produce several classical viscous flow features depending on the combination of the first and second wedge or cone half apex angles. Particularly characteristic phenomena are mainly shock/boundary layer, shock/shock interaction, unsteady shear layers and non-linear shock oscillations. Although most of these basic gas dynamics characteristics are well known, it is not clear what happens at high enthalpy conditions. This paper reports a result of flow fields over a double wedge at a stagnation enthalpy of 4.8 MJ/kg. The experiment was carried out in a free piston shock tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 6.99. Schlieren and double exposure holographic interferometry were applied to visualize the flow field over the double wedge.

  11. Acoustic or Electromagnetic Scattering from the Penetrable Wedge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-28

    difference equation to be solved in the transform variable. A special inhomogeneous surface impedance yields purely algebraic equations for the... lineal density is located at the source coordinates (r’, 0’) of Fig. 1. The permittivity of the wedge of angle 2a is f 2 , which is surrounded by a

  12. The Gibbons-Hawking ansatz over a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Borbon, Martin

    2017-10-01

    We discuss the Ricci-flat 'model metrics' on C2 with cone singularities along the conic { zw = 1 } constructed by Donaldson (2012), Section 5-using the Gibbons-Hawking ansatz over wedges in R3. In particular we describe their asymptotic behavior at infinity and compute their energies.

  13. Magnetic and structural instabilities of ultrathin Fe(100) wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S.D.; Li, Dongqi; Qiu, Z.Q.

    1994-05-01

    An overview is provided of recent efforts to explore magnetic and related structural issues for ultrathin Fe films grown epitaxially as wedge structures onto Ag(100) and Cu(100). Experiments were carried out utilizing the surface magneto-optic Kerr effect (SMOKE). Ordinary bcc Fe is lattice-matched to the primitive unit cell of the Ag(100) surface. Fe wedges on Ag(100) can be fabricated whose thick end has in-plane magnetic easy axes due to the shape anisotropy, and whose thin end has perpendicular easy axes due to the surface magnetic anisotrophy. A spin-reorientation transition can thus be studied in the center of the wedge where the competing anisotropies cancel. The goal is to test the Mermin-Wagner theorem which states that long-range order is lost at finite temperatures in an isotropic two-dimensional Heisenberg system. Fe wedges on Cu(100) can be studied in like manner, but the lattice matching permits fcc and tetragonally-distorted fcc phases to provide structural complexity in addition to the interplay of competing magnetic anisotropies. The results of these studies are new phase identifications that help both to put previous work into perspective and to define issues to pursue in the future.

  14. Electrodynamic Casimir effect in a medium-filled wedge.

    PubMed

    Brevik, Iver; Ellingsen, Simen A; Milton, Kimball A

    2009-04-01

    We re-examine the electrodynamic Casimir effect in a wedge defined by two perfect conductors making dihedral angle alpha=pi/p. This system is analogous to the system defined by a cosmic string. We consider the wedge region as filled with an azimuthally symmetric material, with permittivity and permeability epsilon1, micro1 for distance from the axis ra. The results are closely related to those for a circular-cylindrical geometry, but with noninteger azimuthal quantum number mp. Apart from a zero-mode divergence, which may be removed by choosing periodic boundary conditions on the wedge, and may be made finite if dispersion is included, we obtain finite results for the free energy corresponding to changes in a for the case when the speed of light is the same inside and outside the radius a , and for weak coupling, |epsilon1-epsilon2|<1, for purely dielectric media. We also consider the radiation produced by the sudden appearance of an infinite cosmic string, situated along the cusp line of the pre-existing wedge.

  15. 2-MV electrostatic quadrupole injector for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Prost, L.; Seidl, P.A.

    2004-11-10

    High current and low emittance are principal requirements for heavy-ion injection into a linac driver for inertial fusion energy. An electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) injector is capable of providing these high charge density and low emittance beams. We have modified the existing 2-MV Injector to reduce beam emittance and to double the pulse length. We characterize the beam delivered by the modified injector to the High Current Transport Experiment (HCX) and the effects of finite rise time of the extraction voltage pulse in the diode on the beam head. We demonstrate techniques for mitigating aberrations and reducing beam emittance growth in the injector.

  16. Applications of 1 MV field-emission transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Akira

    2003-01-01

    A newly developed 1 MV field-emission transmission electron microscope has recently been applied to the field of superconductivity by utilizing its bright and monochromatic field-emission electron beam. This microscope allows individual magnetic vortices inside high-Tc superconductors to be observed, thus, opening the way to investigate the unusual behaviour of vortices, which reflects the anisotropic layered structure of these superconducting materials. One example is the observation of the arrangements of chain vortex lines that are formed when a magnetic field is applied obliquely to the layer plane of the materials.

  17. Spectral reconstruction for a 6 MV linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Bojórquez, M.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Lárraga, J. M.

    2004-09-01

    In this work we present the first results of an x-ray spectral reconstruction for a 6 MV Varian LINAC. The shape of the spectrum will be used in Monte Carlo treatment planning in order to improve the quality and accuracy of the calculated dose distributions. We based our simulation method on the formalism proposed by Francois et al. (1). In this method the spectrum is reconstructed from transmission measurements under narrow beam geometry for multiple attenuator thicknesses. These data allowed us to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum through direct solution of matrix systems using spectral algebra formalism.

  18. Wedges, cones, cosmic strings and their vacuum energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulling, S. A.; Trendafilova, C. S.; Truong, P. N.; Wagner, J.

    2012-09-01

    One of J Stuart Dowker’s most significant achievements has been to observe that the theory of diffraction by wedges developed a century ago by Sommerfeld and others provided the key to solving two problems of great interest in general-relativistic quantum field theory during the last quarter of the 20th century: the vacuum energy associated with an infinitely thin, straight cosmic string, and (after an interchange of time with a space coordinate) the apparent vacuum energy of empty space as viewed by an accelerating observer. In a sense the string problem is more elementary than the wedge, since Sommerfeld’s technique was to relate the wedge problem to that of a conical manifold by the method of images. Indeed, Minkowski space, as well as all cone and wedge problems, are related by images to an infinitely sheeted master manifold, which we call Dowker space. We review the research in this area and exhibit in detail the vacuum expectation values of the energy density and pressure of a scalar field in Dowker space and the cone and wedge spaces that result from it. We point out that the (vanishing) vacuum energy of Minkowski space results, from the point of view of Dowker space, from the quantization of angular modes, in precisely the way that the Casimir energy of a toroidal closed universe results from the quantization of Fourier modes; we hope that this understanding dispels any lingering doubts about the reality of cosmological vacuum energy. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker’s 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  19. P-Wave to Rayleigh-wave conversion coefficients for wedge corners; model experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gangi, A.F.; Wesson, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    An analytic solution is not available for the diffraction of elastic waves by wedges; however, numerical solutions of finite-difference type are available for selected wedge angles. The P- to Rayleigh-wave conversion coefficients at wedge tips have been measured on two-dimensional seismic models for stress-free wedges with wedge angles, ??0, of 10, 30, 60, 90 and 120??. The conversion coefficients show two broad peaks and a minimum as a function of the angle between the wedge face and the direction of the incident P-wave. The minimum occurs for the P wave incident parallel to the wedge face and one maximum is near an incidence angle of 90?? to the wedge face. The amplitude of this maximum, relative to the other, decreases as the wedge angle increases. The asymmetry of the conversion coefficients, CPR(??; ??0), relative to parallel incidence (?? = 0) increases as the wedge angle increases. The locations of the maxima and the minimum as well as the asymmetry can be explained qualitatively. The conversion coefficients are measured with an accuracy of ??5% in those regions where there are no interfering waves. A comparison of the data for the 10?? wedge with the theoretical results for a half plane (0?? wedge) shows good correlation. ?? 1978.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of bacteria preserved in a permafrost ice wedge for 25,000 years.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Taiki; Tanaka, Michiko; Moriizumi, Jun; Nakamura, Toshio; Brouchkov, Anatoli; Douglas, Thomas A; Fukuda, Masami; Tomita, Fusao; Asano, Kozo

    2007-04-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of bacteria preserved within an ice wedge from the Fox permafrost tunnel was undertaken by cultivation and molecular techniques. The radiocarbon age of the ice wedge was determined. Our results suggest that the bacteria in the ice wedge adapted to the frozen conditions have survived for 25,000 years.

  1. Biomechanical Analysis of a Novel Wedge Locking Plate in a Porcine Tibial Model

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jeong-Ku; Yeom, Chul Hyun; Jang, Ho Su; Song, Han Eui; Lee, Sung Jae; Kim, Kang Hee; Chung, Kyu Sung; Bhat, Mahendar Gururaj

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to analyze biomechanical properties of a novel wedge locking plate in medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) in a porcine tibial model. Methods A uniform 8-mm OWHTO was performed in 12 porcine tibiae. Six of them were subsequently fixed with the plate without a wedge, whereas the other 6 were additionally reinforced with a metal wedge of 8 mm. Biomechanical properties (stiffness, displacement of the osteotomy gap, and failure load) were evaluated under axial load. The different modes of failure were also investigated. Results The plate showed an axial stiffness of 2,457 ± 450 N/mm with a wedge and 1,969 ± 874 N/mm without a wedge. The maximum failure load was 5,380 ± 952 N with a wedge and 4,354 ± 607 N without a wedge. The plate with a wedge had a significantly greater failure load and significantly less displacement of medial gap at failure than that without a wedge (p = 0.041 and p = 0.002, respectively). The axial stiffness was not different between the two types of fixation. Most failures were caused by lateral cortex breakage and there was no implant failure. Conclusions The novel wedge locking plate showed excellent biomechanical properties and an additional wedge provided significant improvement. This plate can be a good fixation method for OWHTO. PMID:27904718

  2. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC.

    PubMed

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-11-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed (28)Al, (24)Na, (54)Mn and (60)Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is (28)Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several (28)Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received.

  3. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC

    PubMed Central

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-01-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed 28Al, 24Na, 54Mn and 60Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is 28Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several 28Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  4. Optical linear polarimetry of Solar System bodies using a Wedged Double Wollaston.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorosabel, J.; García Muñoz, A.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Hueso, R.; Pérez Hoyos, S.

    2015-05-01

    The gases and aerosols contained in a planetary atmosphere leave characteristic signatures on the reflected radiation. Hence we could use the polarization state of emergent radiation to investigate the atmospheric optical properties of the planet. We report on the first polarimetric tests of Jupiter and Saturn recently carried out with a Wedged Double Wollaston (WeDoWo) prism attached to the ALFOSC instrument mounted at NOT. A WeDoWo is composed of a suitable combination of two glass wedges and two Wollaston prisms in the parallel beam ALFOSC. The edges split the beam and feed the Wollaston prims with axes rotated by 45 deg. Thus, the relative intensities of the output light provides the angle and degree of the input photons. The four images are taken simultaneously and hence at identical planet rotation and atmospheric conditions. In order avoid overlap of the 4 images in the CCD, a 10" wide slit is placed on the telescope focal plane. Polarimetry complements the extended technique of photometry by probing different atmospheric altitudes, characterizing the particles in suspension in the atmosphere. In observations with spatial resolution of the planet disk, polarimetry may be sensitive to the phenomenon of limb polarization and to the occurrence of polar hazes (as for Jupiter). We plan to complement the observational work with modelling. For that purpose, we are using a novel Pre-conditioned Backward Monte Carlo (PBMC) algorithm that computes the full Stokes vector for multiple scattering. We are also developing a new calibration code in order to systematize the data reduction. Despite the potentialities of the technique, there has been no systematic survey of the Solar System planets in polarimetric mode. In the medium term we plan to extend the WeDoWo use to other objects of the Solar System.

  5. Comparison of clinical and radiological outcomes between opening-wedge and closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy: A comprehensive meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingfeng; Lin, Jun; Jin, Zhicheng; Cai, Xiaobin; Gao, Weiyang

    2017-01-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) has been widely used for clinical treatment of osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee, and both opening-wedge and closing-wedge HTO are the most commonly used methods. However, it remains unclear which technique has better clinical and radiological outcomes in practice. To systematically evaluate this issue, we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis by pooling all available data for the opening-wedge HTO and closing-wedge HTO techniques from the electronic databases including PubMed, Embase, Wed of Science and Cochrane Library. A total of 22 studies encompassing 2582 cases were finally enrolled in the meta-analysis. There was no significant difference regarding surgery time, duration of hospitalization, knee pain VAS, Lysholm score and HSS knee score (clinical outcomes) between the opening-wedge and closing-wedge HTO groups (P > 0.05). However, the opening-wedge HTO group showed wider range of motion than the closing-wedge HTO group (P = 0.003). Moreover, as for Hip-Knee-Ankle angle and mean angle of correction, no significant difference was observed between the opening-wedge and closing-wedge HTO groups (P > 0.05), while the opening-wedge HTO group showed greater posterior tibial slope angle (P < 0.001) and lesser patellar height than the closing-wedge HTO group (P < 0.001). On light of the above analysis, we believe that individualized surgical approach should be introduced based on the clinical characteristics of each patient. PMID:28182736

  6. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  7. A patient-specific Monte Carlo dose-calculation method for photon beams.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Chui, C S; Lovelock, M

    1998-06-01

    A patient-specific, CT-based, Monte Carlo dose-calculation method for photon beams has been developed to correctly account for inhomogeneity in the patient. The method employs the EGS4 system to sample the interaction of radiation in the medium. CT images are used to describe the patient geometry and to determine the density and atomic number in each voxel. The user code (MCPAT) provides the data describing the incident beams, and performs geometry checking and energy scoring in patient CT images. Several variance reduction techniques have been implemented to improve the computation efficiency. The method was verified with measured data and other calculations, both in homogeneous and inhomogeneous media. The method was also applied to a lung treatment, where significant differences in dose distributions, especially in the low-density region, were observed when compared with the results using an equivalent pathlength method. Comparison of the DVHs showed that the Monte Carlo calculated plan predicted an underdose of nearly 20% to the target, while the maximum doses to the cord and the heart were increased by 25% and 33%, respectively. These results suggested that the Monte Carlo method may have an impact on treatment designs, and also that it can be used as a benchmark to assess the accuracy of other dose calculation algorithms. The computation time for the lung case employing five 15-MV wedged beams, with an approximate field size of 13 X 13 cm and the dose grid size of 0.375 cm, was less than 14 h on a 175-MHz computer with a standard deviation of 1.5% in the high-dose region.

  8. The effect of 6 and 15 MV on intensity-modulated radiation therapy prostate cancer treatment: plan evaluation, tumour control probability and normal tissue complication probability analysis, and the theoretical risk of secondary induced malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, M; Aldridge, S; Guerrero Urbano, T; Nisbet, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 and 15-MV photon energies on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) prostate cancer treatment plan outcome and to compare the theoretical risks of secondary induced malignancies. Methods Separate prostate cancer IMRT plans were prepared for 6 and 15-MV beams. Organ-equivalent doses were obtained through thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements in an anthropomorphic Aldersen radiation therapy human phantom. The neutron dose contribution at 15 MV was measured using polyallyl-diglycol-carbonate neutron track etch detectors. Risk coefficients from the International Commission on Radiological Protection Report 103 were used to compare the risk of fatal secondary induced malignancies in out-of-field organs and tissues for 6 and 15 MV. For the bladder and the rectum, a comparative evaluation of the risk using three separate models was carried out. Dose–volume parameters for the rectum, bladder and prostate planning target volume were evaluated, as well as normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumour control probability calculations. Results There is a small increased theoretical risk of developing a fatal cancer from 6 MV compared with 15 MV, taking into account all the organs. Dose–volume parameters for the rectum and bladder show that 15 MV results in better volume sparing in the regions below 70 Gy, but the volume exposed increases slightly beyond this in comparison with 6 MV, resulting in a higher NTCP for the rectum of 3.6% vs 3.0% (p=0.166). Conclusion The choice to treat using IMRT at 15 MV should not be excluded, but should be based on risk vs benefit while considering the age and life expectancy of the patient together with the relative risk of radiation-induced cancer and NTCPs. PMID:22010028

  9. Photon diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2009-11-01

    In current light models, a particle-like model of light is inconsistent with diffraction observations. A model of light is proposed wherein photon inferences are combined with the cosmological scalar potential model (SPM). That the photon is a surface with zero surface area in the travel direction is inferred from the Michelson-Morley experiment. That the photons in slits are mathematically treated as a linear antenna array (LAA) is inferred from the comparison of the transmission grating interference pattern and the single slit diffraction pattern. That photons induce a LAA wave into the plenum is inferred from the fractal model. Similarly, the component of the photon (the hod) is treated as a single antenna radiating a potential wave into the plenum. That photons are guided by action on the surface of the hod is inferred from the SPM. The plenum potential waves are a real field (not complex) that forms valleys, consistent with the pilot waves of the Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics. Therefore, the Afshar experiment result is explained, supports Bohm, and falsifies Copenhagen. The papers may be viewed at http://web.citcom.net/˜scjh/.

  10. Photonic lanterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Argyros, Alexander; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-12-01

    Multimode optical fibers have been primarily (and almost solely) used as "light pipes" in short distance telecommunications and in remote and astronomical spectroscopy. The modal properties of the multimode waveguides are rarely exploited and mostly discussed in the context of guiding light. Until recently, most photonic applications in the applied sciences have arisen from developments in telecommunications. However, the photonic lantern is one of several devices that arose to solve problems in astrophotonics and space photonics. Interestingly, these devices are now being explored for use in telecommunications and are likely to find commercial use in the next few years, particularly in the development of compact spectrographs. Photonic lanterns allow for a low-loss transformation of a multimode waveguide into a discrete number of single-mode waveguides and vice versa, thus enabling the use of single-mode photonic technologies in multimode systems. In this review, we will discuss the theory and function of the photonic lantern, along with several different variants of the technology. We will also discuss some of its applications in more detail. Furthermore, we foreshadow future applications of this technology to the field of nanophotonics.

  11. Photon counting detectors for Fabry-Perot interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, E. H.; Haviland, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Sealed channel plate photomultipliers with multiple discrete anodes for use as photon counting detectors in the image plane of Fabry-Perot interferometers are described. The influence of design and construction on performance of completed devices is discussed. Effects on spatial resolution, lifetime, and counting efficiency are described. It is shown that devices can be optimized for particular applications. The results should be generally applicable to resistive anode and wedge and strip anode types of sealed detectors.

  12. Characteristics of mobile MOSFET dosimetry system for megavoltage photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. Sathish; Sharma, S. D.; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of a mobile metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (mobile MOSFET) detector for standard bias were investigated for megavoltage photon beams. This study was performed with a brass alloy build-up cap for three energies namely Co-60, 6 and 15 MV photon beams. The MOSFETs were calibrated and the performance characteristics were analyzed with respect to dose rate dependence, energy dependence, field size dependence, linearity, build-up factor, and angular dependence for all the three energies. A linear dose-response curve was noted for Co-60, 6 MV, and 15 MV photons. The calibration factors were found to be 1.03, 1, and 0.79 cGy/mV for Co-60, 6 MV, and 15 MV photon energies, respectively. The calibration graph has been obtained to the dose up to 600 cGy, and the dose-response curve was found to be linear. The MOSFETs were found to be energy independent both for measurements performed at depth as well as on the surface with build-up. However, field size dependence was also analyzed for variable field sizes and found to be field size independent. Angular dependence was analyzed by keeping the MOSFET dosimeter in parallel and perpendicular orientation to the angle of incidence of the radiation with and without build-up on the surface of the phantom. The maximum variation for the three energies was found to be within ± 2% for the gantry angles 90° and 270°, the deviations without the build-up for the same gantry angles were found to be 6%, 25%, and 60%, respectively. The MOSFET response was found to be independent of dose rate for all three energies. The dosimetric characteristics of the MOSFET detector make it a suitable in vivo dosimeter for megavoltage photon beams. PMID:25190992

  13. Characteristics of mobile MOSFET dosimetry system for megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A Sathish; Sharma, S D; Ravindran, B Paul

    2014-07-01

    The characteristics of a mobile metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (mobile MOSFET) detector for standard bias were investigated for megavoltage photon beams. This study was performed with a brass alloy build-up cap for three energies namely Co-60, 6 and 15 MV photon beams. The MOSFETs were calibrated and the performance characteristics were analyzed with respect to dose rate dependence, energy dependence, field size dependence, linearity, build-up factor, and angular dependence for all the three energies. A linear dose-response curve was noted for Co-60, 6 MV, and 15 MV photons. The calibration factors were found to be 1.03, 1, and 0.79 cGy/mV for Co-60, 6 MV, and 15 MV photon energies, respectively. The calibration graph has been obtained to the dose up to 600 cGy, and the dose-response curve was found to be linear. The MOSFETs were found to be energy independent both for measurements performed at depth as well as on the surface with build-up. However, field size dependence was also analyzed for variable field sizes and found to be field size independent. Angular dependence was analyzed by keeping the MOSFET dosimeter in parallel and perpendicular orientation to the angle of incidence of the radiation with and without build-up on the surface of the phantom. The maximum variation for the three energies was found to be within ± 2% for the gantry angles 90° and 270°, the deviations without the build-up for the same gantry angles were found to be 6%, 25%, and 60%, respectively. The MOSFET response was found to be independent of dose rate for all three energies. The dosimetric characteristics of the MOSFET detector make it a suitable in vivo dosimeter for megavoltage photon beams.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations for 20 MV X-ray spectrum reconstruction of a linear induction accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Li, Qin; Jiang, Xiao-Guo

    2012-09-01

    To study the spectrum reconstruction of the 20 MV X-ray generated by the Dragon-I linear induction accelerator, the Monte Carlo method is applied to simulate the attenuations of the X-ray in the attenuators of different thicknesses and thus provide the transmission data. As is known, the spectrum estimation from transmission data is an ill-conditioned problem. The method based on iterative perturbations is employed to derive the X-ray spectra, where initial guesses are used to start the process. This algorithm takes into account not only the minimization of the differences between the measured and the calculated transmissions but also the smoothness feature of the spectrum function. In this work, various filter materials are put to use as the attenuator, and the condition for an accurate and robust solution of the X-ray spectrum calculation is demonstrated. The influences of the scattering photons within different intervals of emergence angle on the X-ray spectrum reconstruction are also analyzed.

  15. Analytical calculation of central-axis dosimetric data for a dedicated 6-MV radiosurgery linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Yang, James N; Pino, Ramiro

    2008-10-01

    Narrow beams are extensively used in stereotactic radiosurgery. The accuracy of treatment planning dose calculation depends largely on how well the dosimetric data are measured during the machine commissioning. Narrow beams are characterized by the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. The lateral electronic disequilibrium in the radiation field and detector's finite size are likely to compromise the accuracy in dose measurements in these beams. This may have a profound impact on outcome in patients who undergo stereotactic radiosurgery. To confirm the measured commissioning data for a dedicated 6-MV linear accelerator-based radiosurgery system, we developed an analytical model to calculate the narrow photon beam central-axis dose. This model is an extension of a previously reported method of Nizin and Mooij for the calculation of the absorbed dose under lateral electronic disequilibrium conditions at depth of dmax or greater. The scatter factor and tissue-maximum ratio were calculated for narrow beams using the parametrized model and compared to carefully measured results for the same beams. For narrow beam radii ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 cm, the differences between the analytical and measured scatter factors were no greater than 1.4%. In addition, the differences between the analytical and measured tissue-maximum ratios were within 3.3% for regions greater than the maximum dose depth. The estimated error of this analytical calculation was less than 2%, which is sufficient to validate measurement results.

  16. 1D pixelated MV portal imager with structured privacy film: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo; Shedlock, Daniel; Myronakis, Marios; Berbeco, Ross; Star-Lack, Josh

    2017-03-01

    Modern amorphous silicon flat panel-based electronic portal imaging devices that utilize thin gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators suffer from low quantum efficiencies (QEs). Thick two dimensionally (2D) pixelated scintillator arrays offer an effective but expensive option for increasing QE. To reduce costs, we have investigated the possibility of combining a thick one dimensional (1D) pixelated scintillator (PS) with an orthogonally placed 1D structured optical filter to provide for overall good 2D spatial resolution. In this work, we studied the potential for using a 1D video screen privacy film (PF) to serve as a directional optical attenuator and filter. A Geant4 model of the PF was built based on reflection and transmission measurements taken with a laser-based optical reflectometer. This information was incorporated into a Geant4-based x-ray detector simulator to generate modulation transfer functions (MTFs), noise power spectra (NPS), and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) for various 1D and 2D configurations. It was found that the 1D array with PF can provide the MTFs and DQEs of 2D arrays. Although the PF significantly reduced the amount of optical photons detected by the flat panel, we anticipate using a scintillator with an inherently high optical yield (e.g. cesium iodide) for MV imaging, where fluence rates are inherently high, will still provide adequate signal intensities for the imaging tasks associated with radiotherapy.

  17. Nonlinearity in MCF7 Cell Survival Following Exposure to Modulated 6 MV Radiation Fields

    PubMed Central

    Castiella, Marion; Franceries, Xavier; Cassol, Emmanuelle; Vieillevigne, Laure; Pereda, Veronica; Bardies, Manuel; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The study of cell survival following exposure to nonuniform radiation fields is taking on particular interest because of the increasing evidence of a nonlinear relationship at low doses. We conducted in vitro experiments using the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. A 2.4 × 2.4 cm2 square area of a T25 flask was irradiated by a Varian Novalis accelerator delivering 6 MV photons. Cell survival inside the irradiation field, in the dose gradient zone and in the peripheral zone, was determined using a clonogenic assay for different radiation doses at the isocenter. Increased cell survival was observed inside the irradiation area for doses of 2, 10, and 20 Gy when nonirradiated cells were present at the periphery, while the cells at the periphery showed decreased survival compared to controls. Increased survival was also observed at the edge of the dose gradient zone for cells receiving 0.02 to 0.01 Gy when compared with cells at the periphery of the same flask, whatever the isocenter dose. These data are the first to report cell survival in the dose gradient zone. Radiotherapists must be aware of this nonlinearity in dose response. PMID:26740805

  18. Analytical calculation of central-axis dosimetric data for a dedicated 6-MV radiosurgery linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, James N.; Pino, Ramiro

    2008-10-15

    Narrow beams are extensively used in stereotactic radiosurgery. The accuracy of treatment planning dose calculation depends largely on how well the dosimetric data are measured during the machine commissioning. Narrow beams are characterized by the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. The lateral electronic disequilibrium in the radiation field and detector's finite size are likely to compromise the accuracy in dose measurements in these beams. This may have a profound impact on outcome in patients who undergo stereotactic radiosurgery. To confirm the measured commissioning data for a dedicated 6-MV linear accelerator-based radiosurgery system, we developed an analytical model to calculate the narrow photon beam central-axis dose. This model is an extension of a previously reported method of Nizin and Mooij for the calculation of the absorbed dose under lateral electronic disequilibrium conditions at depth of d{sub max} or greater. The scatter factor and tissue-maximum ratio were calculated for narrow beams using the parametrized model and compared to carefully measured results for the same beams. For narrow beam radii ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 cm, the differences between the analytical and measured scatter factors were no greater than 1.4%. In addition, the differences between the analytical and measured tissue-maximum ratios were within 3.3% for regions greater than the maximum dose depth. The estimated error of this analytical calculation was less than 2%, which is sufficient to validate measurement results.

  19. X-Ray CT of Highly-Attenuating Objects: 9- or 15- MV Spectra?

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G; Trebes, J; Perry, R; Schneberk, D; Logan, C

    2005-08-29

    We imaged-highly attenuating test objects in three dimensions with 9-MV (at LLNL) and 15-MV (at Hill Air Force Base) x-ray spectra. While we used the same detector and motion control, there were differences that we could not control in the two radiography bays and in the sources. The results show better spatial resolution for the 9-MV spectrum and better contrast for the 15-MV spectrum. The 15-MV data contains a noise pattern that obfuscates the data. It is our judgment that if sufficient attention were given to design of the bay, beam dump, collimation, filtration and linac spot size; a 15-MV imaging system using a flat panel could be developed with spatial resolution of 5 lp/mm and contrastive performance better than we have demonstrated using a 9-MV spectrum.

  20. SU-E-T-560: Monte Carlo Simulation of the Neutron Radiation Field Around a Medical 18 MV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, F; Czarnecki, D; Zink, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Today the majority of radiation therapy treatments are performed at medical electron linear accelerators (linacs). The accelerated electrons are used for the generation of bremsstrahlung photons. The use of higher electron respectively photon energies has some advantages over lower energies such as the longer dose build-up. However photons with energies higher than ∼7 MeV can additionally to the interaction with bound electrons undergo inelastic reactions with nuclei. These photonuclear reactions lead to the emission of fast neutrons which contaminate the primary photon field. The neutrons might penetrate through the collimators and deliver out-of-field dose to the patient. Furthermore the materials inside the linac head as well as the air inside the treatment room get activated which might deliver dose to the medical employees even when the linac is not in operation. A detailed knowledge of these effects is essential for adequate radiation protection of the employees and an optimal patient treatment. Methods: It is a common method to study the radiation fields of such linacs by means of Monte Carlo simulations. For the investigation of the effects caused by photonuclear reactions a typical linac in high energy mode (Varian Clinac 18 MV-X) as well as the surrounding bunker were modelled and simulated using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA which includes extensive nuclear reaction and neutron transport models additional to electron-photon transport as well as capabilities for a detailed study of effective dose distributions and activation yields. Results: Neutron spectra as well as neutron effective dose distributions within the bunker were obtained, reaching up to some mSv/Gy in the patient’s plane. The results are normalized per Gy in the depth dose maximum at 10×10 cm{sup 2} field size. Therefore an absolute interpretation is possible. Conclusion: The obtained data gives a better understanding of the photonuclear reaction caused effects.

  1. The effect of wedge position and inlet geometry on shock wave reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. E.; da Silva, N. P.; Skews, B. W.; Paton, R. T.

    2017-02-01

    Experiments were conducted in a shock tube to determine the effect of planar wedge inlet geometry on the shock wave reflection pattern that occurred on a wedge. High-speed schlieren imaging was used to visualize the experiments conducted in air with a nominal incident shock strength of Mach 1.31. The experimental test pieces consisted of a wedge mounted above the floor of the shock tube where the underside wedge angle was varied. The upper wedge angle was fixed at 30°, resulting in a Mach reflection. The underside wedge angle was either 30° or 90°, corresponding to a conventional and blunt wedge respectively. For the cases presented here, the reflected shock from the initial interaction reflects off of the shock tube floor and diffracts around the wedge apex. A density gradient is formed at the wedge apex due to this process and results in a vortex being shed for the 90° wedge. It was shown by simple measurements that the diffracted wave could reach the triple point of the upper Mach reflection if the wedge were of sufficient length.

  2. New machining and testing method of large angle infrared wedge mirror parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ying; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Fumei; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Xuanmin; Zengqi, Xu; Li, Wenting; Zhang, Feng

    2016-10-01

    Large angle wedge parts were widely used in the optical system that was used for achieving a wide range of scanning. Due to the parts having the characteristic of large difference in the thickness of both ends and high density, the accuracy of the wedge angle was hard to ensure to reach second level in optical processing. Generally, wedge mirror angle was measured by contact comparison method which was easy to damage the surface. In view of the existence of two practical problems, in this paper, based on theoretical analysis, by taking three key measures that were the accurate positioning for the central position of the large angle wedge part, the accuracy control of angle precision machined of wedge mirror and fast and non destructive laser assisted absolute measurement of large angle wedge, the qualified rate of parts were increased to 100%, a feasible, controllable and efficient process route for large angle infrared wedge parts was found out.

  3. A piecewise-focused high DQE detector for MV imaging.

    PubMed

    Star-Lack, Josh; Shedlock, Daniel; Swahn, Dennis; Humber, Dave; Wang, Adam; Hirsh, Hayley; Zentai, George; Sawkey, Daren; Kruger, Isaac; Sun, Mingshan; Abel, Eric; Virshup, Gary; Shin, Mihye; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Electronic portal imagers (EPIDs) with high detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) are sought to facilitate the use of the megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy treatment beam for image guidance. Potential advantages include high quality (treatment) beam's eye view imaging, and improved cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) generating images with more accurate electron density maps with immunity to metal artifacts. One approach to increasing detector sensitivity is to couple a thick pixelated scintillator array to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) incorporating amorphous silicon thin film electronics. Cadmium tungstate (CWO) has many desirable scintillation properties including good light output, a high index of refraction, high optical transparency, and reasonable cost. However, due to the 0 1 0 cleave plane inherent in its crystalline structure, the difficulty of cutting and polishing CWO has, in part, limited its study relative to other scintillators such as cesium iodide and bismuth germanate (BGO). The goal of this work was to build and test a focused large-area pixelated "strip" CWO detector. A 361 × 52 mm scintillator assembly that contained a total of 28 072 pixels was constructed. The assembly comprised seven subarrays, each 15 mm thick. Six of the subarrays were fabricated from CWO with a pixel pitch of 0.784 mm, while one array was constructed from BGO for comparison. Focusing was achieved by coupling the arrays to the Varian AS1000 AMFPI through a piecewise linear arc-shaped fiber optic plate. Simulation and experimental studies of modulation transfer function (MTF) and DQE were undertaken using a 6 MV beam, and comparisons were made between the performance of the pixelated strip assembly and the most common EPID configuration comprising a 1 mm-thick copper build-up plate attached to a 133 mg/cm(2) gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screen (Cu-GOS). Projection radiographs and CBCT images of phantoms were acquired. The work also introduces the use of a

  4. Neutron H*(10) estimation and measurements around 18MV linac.

    PubMed

    Cerón Ramírez, Pablo Víctor; Díaz Góngora, José Antonio Irán; Paredes Gutiérrez, Lydia Concepción; Rivera Montalvo, Teodoro; Vega Carrillo, Héctor René

    2016-11-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry, analytical techniques and Monte Carlo calculations were used to estimate the dose of neutron radiation in a treatment room with a linear electron accelerator of 18MV. Measurements were carried out through neutron ambient dose monitors which include pairs of thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD 600 ((6)LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD 700 ((7)LiF: Mg, Ti), which were placed inside a paraffin spheres. The measurements has allowed to use NCRP 151 equations, these expressions are useful to find relevant dosimetric quantities. In addition, photoneutrons produced by linac head were calculated through MCNPX code taking into account the geometry and composition of the linac head principal parts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A piecewise-focused high DQE detector for MV imaging

    PubMed Central

    Star-Lack, Josh; Shedlock, Daniel; Swahn, Dennis; Humber, Dave; Wang, Adam; Hirsh, Hayley; Zentai, George; Sawkey, Daren; Kruger, Isaac; Sun, Mingshan; Abel, Eric; Virshup, Gary; Shin, Mihye; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Electronic portal imagers (EPIDs) with high detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) are sought to facilitate the use of the megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy treatment beam for image guidance. Potential advantages include high quality (treatment) beam’s eye view imaging, and improved cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) generating images with more accurate electron density maps with immunity to metal artifacts. One approach to increasing detector sensitivity is to couple a thick pixelated scintillator array to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) incorporating amorphous silicon thin film electronics. Cadmium tungstate (CWO) has many desirable scintillation properties including good light output, a high index of refraction, high optical transparency, and reasonable cost. However, due to the 0 1 0 cleave plane inherent in its crystalline structure, the difficulty of cutting and polishing CWO has, in part, limited its study relative to other scintillators such as cesium iodide and bismuth germanate (BGO). The goal of this work was to build and test a focused large-area pixelated “strip” CWO detector. Methods: A 361  ×  52 mm scintillator assembly that contained a total of 28 072 pixels was constructed. The assembly comprised seven subarrays, each 15 mm thick. Six of the subarrays were fabricated from CWO with a pixel pitch of 0.784 mm, while one array was constructed from BGO for comparison. Focusing was achieved by coupling the arrays to the Varian AS1000 AMFPI through a piecewise linear arc-shaped fiber optic plate. Simulation and experimental studies of modulation transfer function (MTF) and DQE were undertaken using a 6 MV beam, and comparisons were made between the performance of the pixelated strip assembly and the most common EPID configuration comprising a 1 mm-thick copper build-up plate attached to a 133 mg/cm2 gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screen (Cu-GOS). Projection radiographs and CBCT images of phantoms were acquired. The work

  6. Development status of M-V rocket structures and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoda, Junjiro; Minesugi, Kenji; Watanabe, Naoyuki

    M-V is the next generation satellite launcher of the Mu rocket series of Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). This paper describes the plan and the status of the development of its structure and mechanisms. The performance of the motor casings for the solid propellant rockets, which are the largest structural members in each stage, will be much improved by the introduction of new materials and new fabrication methods. For the nose-faring made of honeycomb sandwich shells with carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) face sheet, a new separation joint is being developed, which is composed of an expanding shielded mild detonating cord. A unique inter-stage joint between the 1st and 2nd stages is being developed in order to accommodate to the fire-in-the-hole (FITH) ignition of the 2nd stage rocket motor.

  7. Circuit Simulations of a 1 MV LTD for radiography.

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Salvador; Johnson, David L.; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Rose, David Vincent; Kim, Alexandre A.; Ziska, Derek Raymond; Chavez, Raymond; Molina, Isidro; Maenchen, John Eric

    2005-07-01

    A 1 MV linear transformer driver (LTD), capable of driving a radiographic diode load, has been built and tested. A circuit model of this accelerator has been developed using the BERTHA circuit simulation code. Simulations are compared to data from power-flow experiments utilizing a large area electron-beam diode load. Results show that the simulation model performs well in modeling the baseline operation of the accelerator. In addition, the circuit model has been used to predict several possible fault modes. Simulations of switch prefires, main capacitor failure, vacuum insulator flashover, and core saturation have been used to estimate the probability of inducing further failures and the impact on the load voltage and current.

  8. A compact 1 MV multi-element AMS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M. G.; Mous, D. J. W.; Gottdang, A.

    2006-08-01

    HVE has designed and built a compact 1 MV multi-element AMS system with a footprint of 3.8 m × 6.3 m. The system is primarily designed for the analysis of light elements like beryllium, carbon and aluminium, but it also supports the measurement of heavy ions like iodine and plutonium. The analysis of 14C is done using the charge state 1. For this, the accelerator terminal is designed for high stripper gas thickness to efficiently destroy the interfering molecules like 13CH and 12CH2. For the analysis of 10Be, suppression of the isobaric 10B is achieved using an absorber foil that can be inserted in front of the electrostatic analyser. The analysis of 26Al can be done using charge-state 1 or 3. The rare isotopes are identified in a dual-anode high-resolution detector and a two-dimensional data acquisition system.

  9. Comparing gold nano-particle enhanced radiotherapy with protons, megavoltage photons and kilovoltage photons: a Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuting; McMahon, Stephen J; Scarpelli, Matthew; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2014-12-21

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown potential to be used as a radiosensitizer for radiation therapy. Despite extensive research activity to study GNP radiosensitization using photon beams, only a few studies have been carried out using proton beams. In this work Monte Carlo simulations were used to assess the dose enhancement of GNPs for proton therapy. The enhancement effect was compared between a clinical proton spectrum, a clinical 6 MV photon spectrum, and a kilovoltage photon source similar to those used in many radiobiology lab settings. We showed that the mechanism by which GNPs can lead to dose enhancements in radiation therapy differs when comparing photon and proton radiation. The GNP dose enhancement using protons can be up to 14 and is independent of proton energy, while the dose enhancement is highly dependent on the photon energy used. For the same amount of energy absorbed in the GNP, interactions with protons, kVp photons and MV photons produce similar doses within several nanometers of the GNP surface, and differences are below 15% for the first 10 nm. However, secondary electrons produced by kilovoltage photons have the longest range in water as compared to protons and MV photons, e.g. they cause a dose enhancement 20 times higher than the one caused by protons 10 μm away from the GNP surface. We conclude that GNPs have the potential to enhance radiation therapy depending on the type of radiation source. Proton therapy can be enhanced significantly only if the GNPs are in close proximity to the biological target.

  10. Comparing gold nano-particle enhanced radiotherapy with protons, megavoltage photons and kilovoltage photons: a Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; McMahon, Stephen J.; Scarpelli, Matthew; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown potential to be used as a radiosensitizer for radiation therapy. Despite extensive research activity to study GNP radiosensitization using photon beams, only a few studies have been carried out using proton beams. In this work Monte Carlo simulations were used to assess the dose enhancement of GNPs for proton therapy. The enhancement effect was compared between a clinical proton spectrum, a clinical 6 MV photon spectrum, and a kilovoltage photon source similar to those used in many radiobiology lab settings. We showed that the mechanism by which GNPs can lead to dose enhancements in radiation therapy differs when comparing photon and proton radiation. The GNP dose enhancement using protons can be up to 14 and is independent of proton energy, while the dose enhancement is highly dependent on the photon energy used. For the same amount of energy absorbed in the GNP, interactions with protons, kVp photons and MV photons produce similar doses within several nanometers of the GNP surface, and differences are below 15% for the first 10 nm. However, secondary electrons produced by kilovoltage photons have the longest range in water as compared to protons and MV photons, e.g. they cause a dose enhancement 20 times higher than the one caused by protons 10 μm away from the GNP surface. We conclude that GNPs have the potential to enhance radiation therapy depending on the type of radiation source. Proton therapy can be enhanced significantly only if the GNPs are in close proximity to the biological target.

  11. Impulse Representation of Sound Field due to a Rigid Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawu, Tjundewo; Ueda, Mitsuhiro

    2004-05-01

    An impulse representation for calculating a diffraction wave due to a rigid wedge is described. The method is an approximation of the Biot-Tolstoy rigorous closed-form solution for the diffraction of point source radiation by an infinite rigid wedge. The band-limited time-domain function can be reconstructed to the original waveform if it satisfies the sampling theorem, which assumes that sampling takes place at the lowest permissible sampling rate. Therefore, if the energy is concentrated between the first sampling intervals immediately after the rise time of the time-domain function, the rigorous solution can be approximated as a delta function. This paper shows the description methods of the diffraction field near the ridge in three-dimensional space. Using the proposed impulse representation, numerical simulation was performed and the calculation accuracy was examined.

  12. Shock wave reflection over convex and concave wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitade, M.; Kosugi, T.; Yada, K.; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2001-04-01

    It is well known that the transition criterion nearly agrees with the detachment criterion in the case of strong shocks, two-dimensional, and pseudosteady flow. However, when the shock wave diffracts over a wedge whose angle is below the detachment criterion, that is, in the domain of Mach reflection, precursory regular reflection (PRR) appears near the leading edge and as the shock wave propagates, the PRR is swept away by the overtaking corner signal (cs) that forces the transition to Mach reflection. It is clear that viscosity and thermal conductivity influences transition and the triple point trajectory. On the other hand, the reflection over concave and convex wedges is truly unsteady flow, and the effect of viscosity and thermal conductivity on transition and triple point trajectory has not been reported. This paper describes that influence of viscosity over convex and concave corners investigated both experiments and numerical simulations.

  13. MHD Casson nanofluid flow past a wedge with Newtonian heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Kartini; Hanouf, Zahir; Ishak, Anuar

    2017-02-01

    The problem of steady Casson nanofluid flow past a wedge is studied in this paper. The presence of magnetic field along with Newtonian heating at the surface is considered. The governing partial differential equations are first transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by similarity transformations, before being solved numerically using the Keller-box method. The effects of the wedge angle Ω from 0° (horizontal plate) to 180° (vertical plate) as well as of as the magnetic parameter M on the non-Newtonian fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics are investigated. It is found that the surface temperature is slightly higher for the flow over a horizontal plate compared to that over a vertical plate. It is also found that the magnetic field decreases the surface temperature but increases the skin friction. The flow of a Newtonian fluid is found to give higher skin friction as compared to that of Casson fluid.

  14. Large scale test of wedge shaped micro strip gas counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Atz, S.; Aulchenko, V.; Bachmann, S.; Baiboussinov, B.; Barthe, S.; Beaumont, W.; Beckers, T.; Beißel, F.; Benhammou, Y.; Bergdolt, A. M.; Bernier, K.; Blüm, P.; Bondar, A.; Bouhali, O.; Boulogne, I.; Bozzo, M.; Brom, J. M.; Camps, C.; Chorowicz, V.; Coffin, J.; Commichau, V.; Contardo, D.; Croix, J.; De Troy, J.; Drouhin, F.; Eberlé, H.; Flügge, G.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Geist, W.; Goerlach, U.; Gundlfinger, K.; Hangarter, K.; Haroutunian, R.; Helleboid, J. M.; Henkes, Th.; Hoffer, M.; Hoffman, C.; Huss, D.; Ischebeck, R.; Jeanneau, F.; Juillot, P.; Junghans, S.; Kapp, M. R.; Kärcher, K.; Knoblauch, D.; Kräber, M.; Krauth, M.; Kremp, J.; Lounis, A.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Maazouzi, C.; Macke, D.; Metri, R.; Mirabito, L.; Müller, Th.; Nagaslaev, V.; Neuberger, D.; Nowack, A.; Pallares, A.; Pandoulas, D.; Petertill, M.; Pooth, O.; Racca, C.; Ripp, I.; Ruoff, E.; Sauer, A.; Schmitz, P.; Schulte, R.; von Dratzig, A. Schultz; Schunk, J. P.; Schuster, G.; Schwaller, B.; Shektman, L.; Siedling, R.; Sigward, M. H.; Simonis, H. J.; Smadja, G.; Stefanescu, J.; Szczesny, H.; Tatarinov, A.; Thümmel, W. H.; Tissot, S.; Titov, V.; Todorov, T.; Tonutti, M.; Udo, F.; Vander Velde, C.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Dyck, Ch.; Vanlaer, P.; Van Lancker, L.; Verdini, P. G.; Weseler, S.; Wittmer, B.; Wortmann, R.; Zghiche, A.; Zhukov, V.

    1999-11-01

    In order to check the system aspects of the forward-backward MSGC tracker designed for the future CMS experiment at LHC, 38 trapezoidal MSGC counters assembled in six multi-substrates detector modules were built and exposed to a muon beam at the CERN SPS. Results on the gain uniformity along the wedge-shaped strip pattern and across the detector modules are shown together with measurements of the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution.

  15. Wedge-local quantum fields on a nonconstant noncommutative spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Much, A.

    2012-08-15

    Within the framework of warped convolutions we deform the massless free scalar field. The deformation is performed by using the generators of the special conformal transformations. The investigation shows that the deformed field turns out to be wedge-local. Furthermore, it is shown that the spacetime induced by the deformation with the special conformal operators is nonconstant noncommutative. The noncommutativity is obtained by calculating the deformed commutator of the coordinates.

  16. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    Numerical and laboratory models are often used to investigate the evolution of deformation processes at various scales in crust and lithosphere. In both approaches, the freedom in choice of simulation method, materials and their properties, and deformation laws could affect model outcomes. To assess the role of modelling method and to quantify the variability among models, we have performed a comparison of laboratory and numerical experiments. Here, we present results of 11 numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference and distinct element techniques. We present three experiments that describe shortening of a sand-like, brittle wedge. The material properties of the numerical ‘sand', the model set-up and the boundary conditions are strictly prescribed and follow the analogue setup as closely as possible. Our first experiment translates a non-accreting wedge with a stable surface slope of 20 degrees. In agreement with critical wedge theory, all models maintain the same surface slope and do not deform. This experiment serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions for taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work. The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup, which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. The models accommodate shortening by formation of forward and backward shear zones. We compare surface slope, rate of dissipation of energy, root-mean-square velocity, and the location, dip angle and spacing of shear zones. We show that we successfully simulate sandbox-style brittle behaviour using different numerical modelling techniques and that we obtain the same styles of deformation behaviour in numerical and laboratory experiments at similar levels of variability. The GeoMod2008 Numerical Team: Markus Albertz, Michelle Cooke, Tony Crook, David Egholm, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Yury Mishin

  17. Silurian Extrusion Wedge Tectonics in the Central Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmer, J. C.; Glodny, J.; Drüppel, K.; Greiling, R. O.

    2015-12-01

    The Scandian fold-thrust belt of the central Scandinavian Caledonides host the high-grade metamorphic Seve Nappe Complex bounded on top by a normal sense shear zone and at the base by a reverse sense shear zone. Rb-Sr multimineral geochronology in synkinematic assemblages indicates simultaneous movements at the normal-sense roof shear zone and at the reverse-sense floor shear zone between 434 Ma and 429 Ma. Pressure temperature pseudosection calculations provide evidence for eclogite facies metamorphic conditions and nearly isothermal decompression at ~670 ± 50 °C from 17.5 to 14.5 kbar in garnet-kyanite mica schists during reverse-sense shearing, and from 15 to 11 kbar in garnet mica schists during normal-sense shearing. These and other published data and the presence of decompression-related pegmatites dated at 434 Ma and 429 Ma indicate that the Seve nappes form a 1-2 km thin extrusion wedge that extends along strike for at least 150 km. Devonian ductile extensional to transtensional deformation of the more internal parts of the orogen did not affect the early to mid-Silurian extrusion wedge that was preserved in the more external parts of the orogen due to foreland-directed nappe displacements in the order of >400 km. This wedge marks an early stage of exhumation of (ultra-)high-pressure metamorphic rocks and orogenic wedge formation in this part of the Scandinavian Caledonides predating the ≥10 km thick, post-415 Ma exhumation processes of ultrahigh-pressure rocks in southwestern Norway.

  18. Wedge Prism for Direction Resolved Speckle Correlation Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pechersky, M.J.

    1999-01-20

    The role of a wedge prism for strain sign determination and enhancing the sensitivity for sub-fringe changes is emphasized. The design and incorporation aspects for in-plane sensitive interferometers have been described in detail. Some experimental results dealing with stress determination by laser annealing and speckle corelation interferometry are presented. The prism can also be applied to produce standardized carrier fringes in spatial phase shifting interferometry.

  19. SU-E-T-322: The Evaluation of the Gafchromic EBT3 Film in Low Dose 6 MV X-Ray Beams with Different Scanning Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H; Sung, J; Yoon, M; Kim, D; Chung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the response of the Gafchromic EBT3 film in low dose for 6 MV x-ray beams with two scanning modes, the reflection scanning mode and the transmission scanning mode. Methods: We irradiated the Gafcromic EBT3 film using a 60 degree enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) with 6 MV x-ray beams from Clinac iX Linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The irradiated Gafchromic EBT3 film was scanned with different scanning modes, the reflection scanning mode and the transmission scanning mode. The scanned Gafchromic EBT3 film was analyzed with MATLAB. Results: When 7.2 cGy was irradiated to the Gafchromic EBT3 film, the uncertainty was 0.54 cGy with reflection scanning mode and was 0.88 cGy with transmission scanning mode. When 24 cGy was irradiated to the Gafchromic EBT3 film, the uncertainty was similar to the case of 7.2 cGy irradiation showing 0.51 cGy of uncertainty with reflection scanning mode and 0.87 cGy of uncertainty with transmission scanning mode. The result suggests that the reflection mode should be used in Gafchromic EBT3 film for low irradiation. Conclusion: The result suggests that the reflection mode should be used in Gafchromic EBT3 film for low irradiation.

  20. Missing wedge computed tomography by iterative algorithm DIRECTT.

    PubMed

    Kupsch, Andreas; Lange, Axel; Hentschel, Manfred P; Lück, Sebastian; Schmidt, Volker; Grothausmann, Roman; Hilger, André; Manke, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    A strategy to mitigate typical reconstruction artefacts in missing wedge computed tomography is presented. These artefacts appear as elongations of reconstructed details along the mean direction (i.e. the symmetry centre of the projections). Although absent in standard computed tomography applications, they are most prominent in advanced electron tomography and also in special topics of X-ray and neutron tomography under restricted geometric boundary conditions. We investigate the performance of the DIRECTT (Direct Iterative Reconstruction of Computed Tomography Trajectories) algorithm to reduce the directional artefacts in standard procedures. In order to be sensitive to the anisotropic nature of missing wedge artefacts, we investigate isotropic substructures of metal foam as well as circular disc models. Comparison is drawn to filtered backprojection and algebraic techniques. Reference is made to reconstructions of complete data sets. For the purpose of assessing the reconstruction quality, Fourier transforms are employed to visualize the missing wedge directly. Deficient reconstructions of disc models are evaluated by a length-weighted kernel density estimation, which yields the probabilities of boundary orientations. The DIRECTT results are assessed at different signal-to-noise ratios by means of local and integral evaluation parameters. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Integrated waste management as a climate change stabilization wedge.

    PubMed

    Bahor, Brian; Van Brunt, Michael; Stovall, Jeff; Blue, Katherine

    2009-11-01

    Anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas emissions are known to contribute to global increases in greenhouse gas concentrations and are widely believed to contribute to climate change. A reference carbon dioxide concentration of 383 ppm for 2007 is projected to increase to a nominal 500 ppm in less than 50 years according to business as usual models. This concentration change is equivalent to an increase of 7 billion tonnes of carbon per year (7 Gt C year(-1)). The concept of a stabilization wedge was introduced by Pacala and Socolow (Science, 305, 968-972, 2004) to break the 7 Gt C year(- 1) into more manageable 1 Gt C year(- 1) reductions that would be achievable with current technology. A total of fifteen possible 'wedges' were identified; however, an integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management system based on the European Union's waste management hierarchy was not evaluated as a wedge. This analysis demonstrates that if the tonnage of MSW is allocated to recycling, waste to energy and landfilling in descending order in lieu of existing 'business-as-usual' practices with each option using modern technology and best practices, the system would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 1 Gt C year( -1). This integrated waste management system reduces CO(2) by displacing fossil electrical generation and avoiding manufacturing energy consumption and methane emissions from landfills.

  2. The wedge hot-film anemometer in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A commercial wedge hot-film probe is studied to determine its heat transfer response in transonic to low supersonic flows of high unit Reynolds number. The results of this study show that its response in this flow regime differs from the response of cylindrical type sensors. Whereas the cylindrical sensor has the same sensitivity to velocity as to density for free-stream Mach numbers exceeding 1.3, the wedge probe sensitivity to velocity is always greater than its sensitivity to density over the entire flow regime. This property requires determination of three fluctuation components due to density, velocity, and temperature, in a transonic or supersonic turbulent flow. Sensitivity equations are derived based on the observed behavior of the wedge probe. Both the durability and the frequency response of the probe are excellent, the square wave insertion test indicating frequency response near 130 kHz. The directional response of the probe at sonic speed is poor and requires further examination before Reynolds stress measurements are attempted with dual sensor probes.

  3. RADIOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF THE OPENING WEDGE PROXIMAL TIBIAL OSTEOTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos Francisco Bittencourt; Camara, Eduardo Kastrup Bittencourt; Vieira, Luiz Antonio; Adolphsson, Fernando; Rodarte, Rodrigo Ribeiro Pinho

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To radiographically evaluate individuals who underwent opening wedge proximal tibial osteotomy, with the aim of analyzing the proximal tibial slope in the frontal and sagittal planes, and the patellar height. Method: The study included 22 individuals who were operated at the National Traumatology and Orthopedics Institute (INTO) for correction of varus angular tibial deviation using the opening wedge osteotomy (OWO) technique with the Orthofix monolateral external fixator. Patients with OWO whose treatment was completed between January 2000 and December 2006 were analyzed. The measurement technique consisted of using anteroposterior radiographs with loading and lateral views with the operated knees flexed at 30°. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the pre and postoperative tibial slope and patellar height values in the patients evaluated. Conclusion: Opening wedge proximal tibial osteotomy is a technique that avoids the problems presented by high proximal tibial osteotomy, since it is done without causing changes to the extensor mechanism, ligament imbalance or distortions in the proximal tibia. PMID:27022577

  4. Stability of Supersonic Boundary Layers Over Blunt Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2006-01-01

    Receptivity and stability of supersonic boundary layers over blunt flat plates and wedges are numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 3.5 and at a high Reynolds number of 10(exp 6)/inch. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. Computations are performed for a flat plate with leading edge thicknesses of 0.0001, 0.001, 0.005 and 0.01 inches that give Reynolds numbers based on the leading edge thickness ranging from 1000 to 10000. Calculations are also performed for a wedge of 10 degrees half angle with different leading edge radii 0.001 and 0.01 inches. The linear stability results showed that the bluntness has a strong stabilizing effect on the stability of two-dimensional boundary layers. The transition Reynolds number for a flat plate with a leading edge thickness of 0.01 inches is about 3.5 times larger than it is for the Blasius boundary layer. It was also revealed that boundary layers on blunt wedges are far more stable than on blunt flat plates.

  5. Geomorphological-thermo-mechanical modeling: Application to orogenic wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, K.; Willett, S. D.; Gerya, T.; Ruh, J.

    2015-09-01

    Coupled geomorphological-thermo-mechanical modeling is presented in a new implementation that combines two established thermo-mechanical and landscape evolution models. A finite-difference marker-in-cell technique is used to solve for the thermo-mechanical problem including complex visco-plastic rheologies in high resolution. Each timestep is synchronously solved with a fluvial landscape evolution model that includes numerical solution of fluvial incision and analytical hillslope processes for both diffusive and slope-limited processes on an adaptive grid. The implementation is successful in modeling large deformation at different scales. We demonstrate high degrees of coupling through processes such as exhumation of rocks with different erodibilities. Sensitivity of the coupled system evolution to surface parameters, and mechanical parameters, is explored for the established case of development of compressive wedges. The evolution of wedge models proves to be primarily sensitive to erodibility and the degree of river network integration. Relief follows deformation in propagating forward with wedge growth. We apply the method to a large-scale model of continental collision, in which a close relationship between deep tectonics, fluvial network evolution, and uplift and erosion can be demonstrated.

  6. On the acoustic wedge design and simulation of anechoic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Changyong; Zhang, Shangyu; Huang, Lixi

    2016-10-01

    This study proposes an alternative to the classic wedge design for anechoic chambers, which is the uniform-then-gradient, flat-wall (UGFW) structure. The working mechanisms of the proposed structure and the traditional wedge are analyzed. It is found that their absorption patterns are different. The parameters of both structures are optimized for achieving minimum absorber depth, under the condition of absorbing 99% of normal incident sound energy. It is found that, the UGFW structure achieves a smaller total depth for the cut-off frequencies ranging from 100 Hz to 250 Hz. This paper also proposes a modification for the complex source image (CSI) model for the empirical simulation of anechoic chambers, originally proposed by Bonfiglio et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134 (1), 285-291 (2013)]. The modified CSI model considers the non-locally reactive effect of absorbers at oblique incidence, and the improvement is verified by a full, finite-element simulation of a small chamber. With the modified CSI model, the performance of both decorations with the optimized parameters in a large chamber is simulated. The simulation results are analyzed and checked against the tolerance of 1.5 dB deviation from the inverse square law, stipulated in the ISO standard 3745(2003). In terms of the total decoration depth and anechoic chamber performance, the UGFW structure is better than the classic wedge design.

  7. Washing wedges: a capillary instability in a gradient of confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Ludovic; Herbaut, Remy; Bico, Jose; Reyssat, Etienne

    2015-11-01

    When a drop of oil is introduced into a gradient of confinement (two glass plates forming a sharp wedge) capillary forces drive it toward the most confined regions, where the solid-fluid contact area is maximal. A surfactant solution subsequently introduced into the wedge undergoes the same movement until it reaches the oil previously added. If the aqueous phase wets the solid better than the oil, a complex exchange process between both phases occurs. The water-oil interface destabilizes, oil fingers grow in the water phase, pinch-off and lead to the formation of droplets that migrate away from the tip of the wedge. The whole oil phase is eventually extracted. A linear stability analysis of the interface is presented and captures the size of the oil droplets. The dynamics of the system is however not perfectly explained by a simple Poiseuille flow. Indeed, more refined models should account for the dissipation in meniscii and lubrication films. Finally, we suggest that our model experiment may constitute a useful tool to select optimal systems for oil recovery processes.

  8. Wedge-Filtering of Geomorphologic Terrestrial Laser Scan Data

    PubMed Central

    Panholzer, Helmut; Prokop, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning is of increasing importance for surveying and hazard assessments. Digital terrain models are generated using the resultant data to analyze surface processes. In order to determine the terrain surface as precisely as possible, it is often necessary to filter out points that do not represent the terrain surface. Examples are vegetation, vehicles, and animals. Filtering in mountainous terrain is more difficult than in other topography types. Here, existing automatic filtering solutions are not acceptable, because they are usually designed for airborne scan data. The present article describes a method specifically suitable for filtering terrestrial laser scanning data. This method is based on the direct line of sight between the scanner and the measured point and the assumption that no other surface point can be located in the area above this connection line. This assumption is only true for terrestrial laser data, but not for airborne data. We present a comparison of the wedge filtering to a modified inverse distance filtering method (IDWMO) filtered point cloud data. Both methods use manually filtered surfaces as reference. The comparison shows that the mean error and root–mean-square-error (RSME) between the results and the manually filtered surface of the two methods are similar. A significantly higher number of points of the terrain surface could be preserved, however, using the wedge-filtering approach. Therefore, we suggest that wedge-filtering should be integrated as a further parameter into already existing filtering processes, but is not suited as a standalone solution so far. PMID:23429548

  9. Hypersingularity, electromagnetic edge condition, and an analytic hyperbolic wedge model.

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng

    2014-04-01

    It is insufficient to consider that hypersingularity is unphysical solely based on energy considerations. With a proper combination of the two degenerate hypersingular modes, the energy-flux edge condition is satisfied. A hyperbolic wedge model is presented that is much simpler than the previous model for the purpose of studying singular characteristics of the edge fields. This model not only reproduces the sharp edge model as the wedge becomes infinitely sharp but also naturally shows how the two degenerate hypersingular modes of the sharp edge model should be combined. In an incidental study of the effect of rounding edges on numerical computation, I show that the converged results for rounded edges do not converge to a fixed value when the radius of curvature tends to zero, if the corresponding sharp edge supports hypersingularity. I also prove that introducing a small amount of absorption loss for the purpose of improving numerical convergence is effective only when the ratio of the real parts of the permittivities of the two media forming the wedge is close to -1. Finally I remark on the possible illposedness of the hypersingularity problem without imposition of the edge condition.

  10. Shock interaction mechanisms on a double wedge at Mach 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durna, Ahmet Selim; El Hajj Ali Barada, Mohamad; Celik, Bayram

    2016-09-01

    Present computational study investigates formation and interaction mechanisms of shocks and boundary layer for low enthalpy Mach 7 flows of nitrogen over double wedges, which have fixed fore and various aft angles of 30° and 45°-60°, respectively. We use a density based finite-volume Navier-Stokes solver to simulate low enthalpy Mach 7 flows of nitrogen over double wedges. The solver is first and second order accurate in time and space, respectively. The meshes used in simulations of two-dimensional laminar flows consist of multiple blocks of structured mesh. Depending on the intensity, impingement angle, and impingement location of transmitted shock wave, the resulting adverse pressure gradient related disturbances on the wedge surface can trigger complex flow physics both in subsonic and supersonic regions. We observe a strong interaction between the deformation of the boundary layer and the bow shock as well as the transmitted shock for high aft angles. Comparison of the obtained results in terms of general flow physics shows that there exists an aft angle threshold value for such interaction which is in the range of 45°-50°.

  11. Dual Double-Wedge Pseudo-Depolarizer with Anamorphic PSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter; Thompson, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A polarized scene, which may occur at oblique illumination angles, creates a radiometric signal that varies as a function of viewing angle. One common optical component that is used to minimize such an effect is a polarization scrambler or depolarizer. As part of the CLARREO mission, the SOLARIS instrument project at Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a new class of polarization scramblers using a dual double-wedge pseudo-depolarizer that produces an anamorphic point spread function (PSF). The SOLARIS instrument uses two Wollaston type scramblers in series, each with a distinct wedge angle, to image a pseudo-depolarized scene that is free of eigenstates. Since each wedge is distinct, the scrambler is able to produce an anamorphic PSF that maintains high spatial resolution in one dimension by sacrificing the spatial resolution in the other dimension. This scrambler geometry is ideal for 1-D imagers, such as pushbroom slit spectrometers, which require high spectral resolution, high spatial resolution, and low sensitivity to polarized light. Moreover, the geometry is applicable to a wide range of scientific instruments that require both high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) and low sensitivity to polarized scenes

  12. The dosimetric effects of photon energy on the quality of prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Tai, Cyril; Lee, Alvin; Ashamalla, Hani; Ikoro, N C

    2014-01-01

    Studies comparing the dosimetric effects of high- and low-energy photons to treat prostate cancer using 3-dimensional conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy have yielded mixed results. With the advent of newer radiation delivery systems like volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), the impact of changing photon energy is readdressed. Sixty-five patients treated for prostate cancer at our institution from 2011 to 2012 underwent CT simulation. A target volume encompassing the prostate and entire seminal vesicles was treated to 50.4 Gy, followed by a boost to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles to a total dose of 81 Gy. The VMAT plans were generated for 6-MV and 10-MV photons under identical optimization conditions using the Eclipse system version 8.6 (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The analytical anisotropic algorithm was used for all dose calculations. Plans were normalized such that 98% of the planning target volume (PTV) received 100% of the prescribed dose. Dose-volumetric data from the treatment planning system was recorded for both 6-MV and 10-MV plans, which were compared for both the entire cohort and subsets of patients stratified according to the anterior-posterior separation. Plans using 10-MV photons had statistically significantly lower relative integral dose (4.1%), gradient measure (4.1%), skin Dmax (16.9%), monitor units (13.0%), and bladder V(30) (3.1%) than plans using 6-MV photons (P < .05). There was no difference in rectal dose, high-dose-region bladder dose, PTV coverage, or conformity index. The benefit of 10-MV photons was more pronounced for thicker patients (anterior-posterior separation >21 cm) for most parameters, with statistically significant differences in bladder V(30), bladder V(65), integral dose, conformity index, and monitor units. The main dosimetric benefits of 10-MV as compared with 6-MV photons are seen in thicker patients, though for the entire cohort 10-MV plans resulted in a lower integral dose

  13. Beam modeling and verification of a photon beam multisource model

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnesjoe, Anders; Weber, Lars; Murman, Anders; Saxner, Mikael; Thorslund, Ingvar; Traneus, Erik

    2005-06-15

    Dose calculations for treatment planning of photon beam radiotherapy require a model of the beam to drive the dose calculation models. The beam shaping process involves scattering and filtering that yield radiation components which vary with collimator settings. The necessity to model these components has motivated the development of multisource beam models. We describe and evaluate clinical photon beam modeling based on multisource models, including lateral beam quality variations. The evaluation is based on user data for a pencil kernel algorithm and a point kernel algorithm (collapsed cone) used in the clinical treatment planning systems Helax-TMS and Nucletron-Oncentra. The pencil kernel implementations treat the beam spectrum as lateral invariant while the collapsed cone involves off axis softening of the spectrum. Both algorithms include modeling of head scatter components. The parameters of the beam model are derived from measured beam data in a semiautomatic process called RDH (radiation data handling) that, in sequential steps, minimizes the deviations in calculated dose versus the measured data. The RDH procedure is reviewed and the results of processing data from a large number of treatment units are analyzed for the two dose calculation algorithms. The results for both algorithms are similar, with slightly better results for the collapsed cone implementations. For open beams, 87% of the machines have maximum errors less than 2.5%. For wedged beams the errors were found to increase with increasing wedge angle. Internal, motorized wedges did yield slightly larger errors than external wedges. These results reflect the increased complexity, both experimentally and computationally, when wedges are used compared to open beams.

  14. Quantitative testing critical-taper wedge theory with distinct-element modeling and the role of dynamics in controlling wedge tapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Luther; Suppe, John

    2014-05-01

    Critical-taper wedge mechanics (e.g. Davis, et al. 1983, Dahlen 1990) provides fundamental relationships between the observed tapered geometries of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges and their detachment and wedge strengths. This theory has given diverse insight into kinematics, roles of erosion and sedimentation, and the morphology of compressive mountain belts, much of which has been aided by extensive analog and numerical modeling. The field has grown large, with several thousand papers addressing real-world, analog, and numerical wedges (cf. Buiter 2012). The majority of the insight has been qualitative, but nevertheless quite influential in our current understanding of mountain belts and submarine wedges. In contrast, quantitative applications of wedge theory, either to nature or models, has been rather limited because of the complexity of most wedge equations. It it is easy to become "lost in parameter space" with many strength parameters that are difficult to constrain or have ambiguous meaning, given real-world data and observations. Recently wedge theory has been recast into a very simple form (Suppe 2007; Yeh and Suppe 2014) that provides an unambiguous relationship between the observed covariation of surface slope α with detachment dip β and the wedge W and fault F strengths with few assumptions. In the real world we have limited knowledge of strengths, forces, fluid pressures and earthquake history, or the relationship between strength heterogeneity and structural style, or to what extent the strength of a wedge is an evolving macroscopic property (e.g. folding, imbrications and strain localization) or a material property. The well-defined relationship between wedge taper and global strength makes numerical wedges an ideal tool for the study of compressive mountain belts. In this work: [1] We successfully test this simpler quantitative wedge theory over a very wide range of wedge strengths and structural styles using distinct

  15. SU-E-T-536: Is BJR Supplement #25 Recommendation for Megavoltage Energy Independent Scatter Factor Still Valid for Flattening Filter Free Photon Beams?

    PubMed

    Chung, H; Yi, B; Prado, K

    2012-06-01

    In the process of measuring and validating fundamental dosimetry data prior to the clinical use of a treatment unit, it is prudent to compare measurements with previously published equivalent data. During the commissioning of an accelerator with flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams (Varian True Beam 6 MV FFF and 10 MV FFF) we compared measured Phantom Scatter Factors (Sp) with the Normalized Peak Scatter Factors (NPSFs) from the British Journal of Radiology Supplement 25 (BJR #25). The purpose of this work was to determine whether the energy independent NPSFs BJR#25 are valid for comparison with FFF photon beams. All measurements were performed using a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator with photon energies of 6-MV, 6-MV FFF and 10-MV FFF modes. For all measurements, a Scanditronix CC04 ionization chamber was used. Both water and in-air measurements were made to obtain NPSFs normalized to the 10 × 10 cm(2) field size. For measurements in water, the chamber was positioned at 100 cm source-to-axis distance at the depth of dose maximum. For in-air measurements, the chamber was positioned at 100 cm source-to-axis distance with appropriate build-up cap. From BJR #25, NPSFs were obtained for comparison with the measurements. The NPSF agreement between the 6-MV and 6-MV FFF with the BJR#25 were all within ±0.5%. The agreement ranged from 0.996 to 1.004 and 0.995 to 1.002 for 6-MV and 6-MV FFF, respectively. We also found that 10-MV FFF showed very similar trend. The scatter factors reported in BJR #25 are valid for comparison for 6-MV, 6-MV FFF, and 10-MV. Additional investigation is needed to further understand the dosimetric characteristics of FFF mode. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Low dose megavoltage cone beam computed tomography with an unflattened 4 MV beam from a carbon target.

    PubMed

    Faddegon, Bruce A; Wu, Vincent; Pouliot, Jean; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bani-Hashemi, Ali

    2008-12-01

    Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) is routinely used for visualizing anatomical structures and implanted fiducials for patient positioning in radiotherapy. MVCBCT using a 6 MV treatment beam with high atomic number (Z) target and flattening filter in the beamline, as done conventionally, has lower image quality than can be achieved with a MV beam due to heavy filtration of the low-energy bremsstrahlung. The unflattened beam of a low Z target has an abundance of diagnostic energy photons, detected with modern flat panel detectors with much higher efficiency given the same dose to the patient. This principle guided the development of a new megavoltage imaging beamline (IBL) for a commercial radiotherapy linear accelerator. A carbon target was placed in one of the electron primary scattering foil slots on the target-foil slide. A PROM on a function controller board was programed to put the carbon target in place for MVCBCT. A low accelerating potential of 4.2 MV was used for the IBL to restrict leakage of primary electrons through the target such that dose from x rays dominated the signal in the monitor chamber and the patient surface dose. Results from phantom and cadaver images demonstrated that the IBL had much improved image quality over the treatment beam. For similar imaging dose, the IBL improved the contrast-to-noise ratio by as much as a factor of 3 in soft tissue over that of the treatment beam. The IBL increased the spatial resolution by about a factor of 2, allowing the visualization of finer anatomical details. Images of the cadaver contained useful information with doses as low as 1 cGy. The IBL may be installed on certain models of linear accelerators without mechanical modification and results in significant improvement in the image quality with the same dose, or images of the same quality with less than one-third of the dose.

  17. Low dose megavoltage cone beam computed tomography with an unflattened 4 MV beam from a carbon target

    SciTech Connect

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Wu, Vincent; Pouliot, Jean; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bani-Hashemi, Ali

    2008-12-15

    Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) is routinely used for visualizing anatomical structures and implanted fiducials for patient positioning in radiotherapy. MVCBCT using a 6 MV treatment beam with high atomic number (Z) target and flattening filter in the beamline, as done conventionally, has lower image quality than can be achieved with a MV beam due to heavy filtration of the low-energy bremsstrahlung. The unflattened beam of a low Z target has an abundance of diagnostic energy photons, detected with modern flat panel detectors with much higher efficiency given the same dose to the patient. This principle guided the development of a new megavoltage imaging beamline (IBL) for a commercial radiotherapy linear accelerator. A carbon target was placed in one of the electron primary scattering foil slots on the target-foil slide. A PROM on a function controller board was programed to put the carbon target in place for MVCBCT. A low accelerating potential of 4.2 MV was used for the IBL to restrict leakage of primary electrons through the target such that dose from x rays dominated the signal in the monitor chamber and the patient surface dose. Results from phantom and cadaver images demonstrated that the IBL had much improved image quality over the treatment beam. For similar imaging dose, the IBL improved the contrast-to-noise ratio by as much as a factor of 3 in soft tissue over that of the treatment beam. The IBL increased the spatial resolution by about a factor of 2, allowing the visualization of finer anatomical details. Images of the cadaver contained useful information with doses as low as 1 cGy. The IBL may be installed on certain models of linear accelerators without mechanical modification and results in significant improvement in the image quality with the same dose, or images of the same quality with less than one-third of the dose.

  18. Green photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-02-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas.

  19. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  20. Thermal Evolution of Diapirs with Complex Mantle Wedge Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, R. T.; Kincaid, C.

    2016-12-01

    Subduction of oceanic lithosphere drives heat and mass exchange between Earth's interior and surface. One proposed transport mechanism for thermally and chemically distinct material through the wedge is the diapir model. The dominant driver of flow in the upper mantle is a mode of forced convection responding to motion of a tabular slab. A set of 4D laboratory experiments was conducted exploring the relationship between buoyancy flux and subduction parameters and subsequent effects on diapir transport. Variable subduction styles tested include downdip and rollback motion, slab gaps, slab steepening and backarc extension. The mantle is modeled using viscous glucose syrup with an Arrhenius type temperature dependent viscosity. Diapirs representing homogeneous mechanically mixed melange layer are introduced as buoyant fluid injected at multiple point sources situated along the surface of the sinking slab. Laboratory data is collected using high definition time-lapse photography and quantified using image velocimetry techniques. Here we present results from numerical simulation of the thermal evolution of spherical mantle wedge diapirs using 2D axisymmetric advection-diffusion model with internal diapir flow described by an analytic potential flow solution. A suite of wedge temperature profiles are used as thermal forcing on diapirs traversing the wedge along experimentally observed 4D ascent pathways. Scaling arguments suggest that for systems with Péclet number on the order of 15 advective heat transport is expected to dominate over diffusive heat transport, but the range of observed P-T-t paths and vigorous internal flow complicate this assumption. Interactions between modes of free (diapiric) and forced (wedge) convection lead to complex spatio-temporal variability in slab-to-arc connectivity patterns. Rollback induced toroidal flow, along trench changes in dip, convergence rate and backarc extension all produce a significant ( 500 km) trench-parallel transport

  1. Subduction zone evolution and low viscosity wedges and channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Vlad; Gurnis, Michael

    2007-12-01

    Dehydration of subducting lithosphere likely transports fluid into the mantle wedge where the viscosity is decreased. Such a decrease in viscosity could form a low viscosity wedge (LVW) or a low viscosity channel (LVC) on top of the subducting slab. Using numerical models, we investigate the influence of low viscosity wedges and channels on subduction zone structure. Slab dip changes substantially with the viscosity reduction within the LVWs and LVCs. For models with or without trench rollback, overthickening of slabs is greatly reduced by LVWs or LVCs. Two divergent evolutionary pathways have been found depending on the maximum depth extent of the LVW and wedge viscosity. Assuming a viscosity contrast of 0.1 with background asthenosphere, models with a LVW that extends down to 400 km depth show a steeply dipping slab, while models with an LVW that extends to much shallower depth, such as 200 km, can produce slabs that are flat lying beneath the overriding plate. There is a narrow range of mantle viscosities that produces flat slabs (5 to10 × 10 19 Pa s) and the slab flattening process is enhanced by trench rollback. Slab can be decoupled from the overriding plate with a LVC if the thickness is at least a few 10 s of km, the viscosity reduction is at least a factor of two and the depth extent of the LVC is several hundred km. These models have important implications for the geochemical and spatial evolution of volcanic arcs and the state of stress within the overriding plate. The models explain the poor correlation between traditional geodynamic controls, subducting plate age and convergence rates, on slab dip. We predict that when volcanic arcs change their distance from the trench, they could be preceded by changes in arc chemistry. We predict that there could be a larger volatile input into the wedge when arcs migrate toward the trench and visa-versa. The transition of a subduction zone into the flat-lying regime could be preceded by changes in the volatile

  2. Photonic Bandgaps in Photonic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Gates, Amanda L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will focus on photonic bandgaps that arise due to nearly free photon and tight-binding effects in coupled microparticle and ring-resonator systems. The Mie formulation for homogeneous spheres is generalized to handle core/shell systems and multiple concentric layers in a manner that exploits an analogy with stratified planar systems, thereby allowing concentric multi-layered structures to be treated as photonic bandgap (PBG) materials. Representative results from a Mie code employing this analogy demonstrate that photonic bands arising from nearly free photon effects are easily observed in the backscattering, asymmetry parameter, and albedo for periodic quarter-wave concentric layers, though are not readily apparent in extinction spectra. Rather, the periodicity simply alters the scattering profile, enhancing the ratio of backscattering to forward scattering inside the bandgap, in direct analogy with planar quarter-wave multilayers. PBGs arising from tight-binding may also be observed when the layers (or rings) are designed such that the coupling between them is weak. We demonstrate that for a structure consisting of N coupled micro-resonators, the morphology dependent resonances split into N higher-Q modes, in direct analogy with other types of oscillators, and that this splitting ultimately results in PBGs which can lead to enhanced nonlinear optical effects.

  3. Impact of sedimentation on evolution of accretionary wedges: Insights from high-resolution thermomechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannu, Utsav; Ueda, Kosuke; Willett, Sean D.; Gerya, Taras V.; Strasser, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Syntectonic sedimentation history is a potential cause of differentiated accretionary wedge structures along the subduction margin. Recent efforts to model the role of sedimentation on wedge evolution have highlighted the importance of spatiotemporal history of sedimentation on the evolution of the wedge. Moreover, reconstruction of deformation history of the accretionary wedges using reflection seismic and borehole data has further substantiated the impact of sedimentation on wedge evolution. We conduct several numerical experiments using a high-resolution dynamic 2-D thermomechanical plate subduction model to systematically investigate and quantify different effects of sedimentation on accretionary wedge evolution. Models with sedimentation suggest migration of deformation to parts of the wedge lying outside the sedimentation zone leading to emergence/reactivation of out-of-sequence thrusts (OOSTs). Frequency and length of new thrust sheets are correlated with sedimentation in the trench. Models undergo a transition period of 1.5 Myr following the onset of sedimentation, after which they continue to grow under a new steady state. Stabilization of the wedge and increased load on the oceanic plate due to sedimentation create conditions in which smaller wedge-top basins combine to form a large and flat forearc basin. Last but not the least, emergence of OOST in models of accretionary wedges undergoing sedimentation provides important insights in to evolution of potentially tsunamigenic OOSTs like the Megasplay Fault seaward of the Kumano forearc basin.

  4. SU-E-T-100: Designing a QA Tool for Enhance Dynamic Wedges Based On Dynalog Files

    SciTech Connect

    Yousuf, A; Hussain, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A robust quality assurance (QA) program for computer controlled enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) has been designed and tested. Calculations to perform such QA test is based upon the EDW dynamic log files generated during dose delivery. Methods: Varian record and verify system generates dynamic log (dynalog) files during dynamic dose delivery. The system generated dynalog files contain information such as date and time of treatment, energy, monitor units, wedge orientation, and type of treatment. It also contains the expected calculated segmented treatment tables (STT) and the actual delivered STT for the treatment delivery as a verification record. These files can be used to assess the integrity and precision of the treatment plan delivery. The plans were delivered with a 6 MV beam from a Varian linear accelerator. For available EDW angles (10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°, 45°, and 60°) Varian STT values were used to manually calculate monitor units for each segment. It can also be used to calculate the EDW factors. Independent verification of fractional MUs per segment was performed against those generated from dynalog files. The EDW factors used to calculate MUs in TPS were dosimetrically verified in solid water phantom with semiflex chamber on central axis. Results: EDW factors were generated from the STT provided by Varian and verified against practical measurements. The measurements were in agreement of the order of 1 % to the calculated EDW data. Variation between the MUs per segment obtained from dynalog files and those manually calculated was found to be less than 2%. Conclusion: An efficient and easy tool to perform routine QA procedure of EDW is suggested. The method can be easily implemented in any institution without a need for expensive QA equipment. An error of the order of ≥2% can be easily detected.

  5. A regional-scale estimation of ice wedge ice volumes in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, M.; Pollard, W. H.; Grand'Maison, C. B.

    2016-12-01

    Ice wedges are both prominent and environmentally vulnerable features in continuous permafrost environments. As the world's Arctic regions begin to warm, concern over the potential effects of ice wedge melt out has become an immediate issue, receiving much attention in the permafrost literature. In this study we estimate the volume of ice wedge ice for large areas in the Canadian High Arctic through the use of high resolution satellite imagery and the improved capabilities of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The methodology used for this study is similar to that of one performed in Siberia and Alaska by Ulrich et al, in 2014. Utilizing Ulrich's technique, this study detected ice wedge polygons from satellite imagery using ArcGIS. The average width and depth of these ice wedges were obtained from a combination of field data and long-term field studies for the same location. The assumptions used in the analysis of ice wedge volume have been tested, including trough width being representative of ice wedge width, and ice wedge ice content (Pollard and French 1980). This study used specific field sites located near Eureka on Ellesmere Island (N80°01', W85°43') and at Expedition Fiord on Axel Heiberg Island (N79°23', W90°59'). The preliminary results indicate that the methodology used by Ulrich et al, 2014 is transferrable to the Canadian High Arctic, and that ice wedge volumes range between 3-10% of the upper part of permafrost. These findings are similar to previous studies and their importance is made all the more evident by the dynamic nature of ice wedges where it could be argued that they are a key driver of thermokarst terrain. The ubiquitous nature of ice wedges across arctic terrain highlights the importance and the need to improve our understanding of ice wedge dynamics, as subsidence from ice wedge melt-out could lead to large scale landscape change.

  6. Calibration of Film for Accurate Megavoltage Photon Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, J.I.; Kerr, A.T.; Shragge, P.C.

    2015-01-15

    An accurate method of converting film density to dose is presented. For films oriented parallel to the beam’s central axis, calibration curves were produced at several depths using Kodak XV-2 film for cobalt-60, 4 MV, and 18 MV beams. Then the appropriate curve was employed to convert the film density to dose at a specific depth. It is hypothesized that the change in film response with depth is due to changes in the photon spectra at depth in a phantom.

  7. 78 FR 48180 - Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the M/V IRON STAN, 1246342

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ...-0696] Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the M/V IRON STAN, 1246342 AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... issued for the Uninspected Towing Vessel M/V IRON STAN as required by 33 U.S.C. 1605(c) and 33 CF. 81.18... 81.18, has been issued for the M/V IRON STAN. The vessel's primary purpose is to push a passenger...

  8. Modeling silicon diode energy response factors for use in therapeutic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2009-10-21

    Silicon diodes have good spatial resolution, which makes them advantageous over ionization chambers for dosimetry in fields with high dose gradients. However, silicon diodes overrespond to low-energy photons, that are more abundant in scatter which increase with large fields and larger depths. We present a cavity-theory-based model for a general response function for silicon detectors at arbitrary positions within photon fields. The model uses photon and electron spectra calculated from fluence pencil kernels. The incident photons are treated according to their energy through a bipartition of the primary beam photon spectrum into low- and high-energy components. Primary electrons from the high-energy component are treated according to Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Low-energy primary photons together with all scattered photons are treated according to large cavity theory supplemented with an energy-dependent factor K(E) to compensate for energy variations in the electron equilibrium. The depth variation of the response for an unshielded silicon detector has been calculated for 5 x 5 cm(2), 10 x 10 cm(2) and 20 x 20 cm(2) fields in 6 and 15 MV beams and compared with measurements showing that our model calculates response factors with deviations less than 0.6%. An alternative method is also proposed, where we show that one can use a correlation with the scatter factor to determine the detector response of silicon diodes with an error of less than 3% in 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams.

  9. Energy constancy checking for electron beams using a wedge-shaped solid phantom combined with a beam profile scanner.

    PubMed

    Rosenow, U F; Islam, M K; Gaballa, H; Rashid, H

    1991-01-01

    An energy constancy checking method is presented which involves a specially designed wedge-shaped solid phantom in combination with a multiple channel ionization chamber array known as the Thebes device. Once the phantom/beam scanner combination is set up, measurements for all electron energies can be made and evaluated without re-entering the treatment room. This is also valid for the readjustment of beam energies which are found to deviate from required settings. The immediate presentation of the measurements is in the form of crossplots which resemble depth dose profiles. The evaluation of the measured data can be performed using a hand-held calculator, but processing of the measured signals through a PC-type computer is advisable. The method is insensitive to usual fluctuations in beam flatness. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the method are more than adequate. The method may also be used in modified form for photon beams.

  10. Erosional Growth of Critical Coulomb Wedges Applied to the Aconcagua Fold and Thrust Belt, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilley, G. E.; Strecker, M. R.; Ramos, V. A.

    2002-12-01

    The development of topography within and erosional removal of material from an orogen apparently exerts a primary control on its structure. We develop a semi-analytic model that investigates the temporal development of a frontally-accreting, critically growing Coulomb wedge that is subject to erosional removal of material. The wedge 1) is required to be in its critical state during growth, 2) grows by addition of material to the wedge from the foreland, and 3) is eroded primarily by bedrock fluvial incision. Our coupled models allow exploration of different bedrock power-law exponents when investigating the relationship between the development of topography and deformation. We present general results for arbitrary initial critical wedge geometries, and investigate the temporal development of a critical wedge with no initial topography. Increasing rock erodibility and/or precipitation, decreasing mass flux accreting to the wedge front, increasing wedge sole-out depth, decreasing wedge and basal decollement overpressure, and increasing basal decollement friction lead to narrow wedges. As bedrock power-law exponent values increase, wedge geometry quickly reaches a condition in which all material accreted to the front of the wedge is removed by erosion and the wedge geometry is relatively independent of all erosional and wedge properties except the fault basal friction. We apply our model to the Aconcagua fold and thrust belt in the central Andes where wedge development over time is well-constrained. The model predicts the measured propagation rate history and current wedge width when bedrock power-law exponents of m=1/3,n=2/3 are used. Power-law exponents of m=0.46, n=1 greatly underestimate the propagation rate during the final increment of wedge growth; however, adjusting the poorly known rock erodibility may provide satisfactory agreement between field-measured values and model predictions. Power-law exponents greater than m=0.46, n=1 produce poor correspondence

  11. The 2 MV tandem pelletron accelerator of the Louvre Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsel, G.; Menu, M.; Moulin, J.; Salomon, J.

    1990-01-01

    The IBA facility of the Louvre Museum, code AGLAE, is based on the 6SDH-2 2 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator of NEC. A number of details of this machine have been specially designed with NEC to match the specific needs required for museum studies, i.e.: p, d, 3He, 4He, 15N beams from a single rf source, purely electrostatic focusing, halo-free submillimeter beam impacts, high-energy as well as low-energy operation at relatively high currents for resonance depth profiling of light nuclei including 1H, the possibility to automatize the machine operation as far as possible, development towards 14C AMS, and a microbeam extension. Special features of this machine include electrostatic steerers at the injection and electrostatic dog-leg steerers at the high-energy side, double slits at both sides of the accelerator, triplets instead of doublets for beam symmetry, turbomolecular recirculation of the stripper gas at the terminal, a new design of the stripper system itself, and a double feedback system with two capacitive pickoff plates for optimum energy spread and stability. The reasons of these special features will be explained and the characteristics of the machine as observed until now will be presented.

  12. Radiocarbon measurement with 1 MV AMS at charge state 1+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, K. H.; Hong, W.; Park, G.; Lee, J. G.

    2015-10-01

    A 1 MV AMS was installed at KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources) in 2007. We usually measure 14C at charge state 2+ because beam transmission yield reaches maximum value at a terminal voltage of 950 kV. However, this condition always has the possibility of interference by Li22+ molecules. To avoid the interference, samples with high Li contents need to be measured with charge states 1+ or 3+ because lithium ions only form the even charge states. Therefore, it was necessary to investigate the operating conditions of our AMS machine with charge state 1+ or 3+. The optimized condition for 1+ measurement was found to be 500 kV for terminal voltage and 2.5 × 10-2 mbar for stripper gas pressure. After setting up operating conditions for measurement with C1+, standard (IAEA C1, C7 and C8), blank, unknown wood and charcoal samples were measured and the results were compared with those obtained with a C2+ beam. The background level was determined to be as low as 2-5 × 10-15 for 14C1+.

  13. Preliminary design of a 10 MV ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Henderson, T.; Judd, D.L.; Keefe, D.; Laslett, L.J.; Meneghetti, J.; Pixe, C.; Vanecek, D.

    1986-06-01

    At the low energy end of an induction linac HIF driver the beam current is limited by our ability to control space charge by a focusing system. As a consequence, HIF induction accelerator designs feature simultaneous acceleration of many beams in parallel within a single accelerator structure. As the speed of the beams increase, the focusing system changes from electrostatic to magnetic quadrupoles with a corresponding increase in the maximum allowable current. At that point the beams are merged thereby decreasing the cost of the subsequent accelerator structure. The LBL group is developing an experiment to study the physics of merging and of focusing ion beams. In the design, parallel beams of ions (C/sup +/, Al/sup +/, or Al/sup + +/) are accelerated to several MV and merged transversely. The merged beams are then further accelerated and the growth in transverse and longitudinal emittance is determined for comparison with theory. The apparatus will then be used to study the problems associated with focusing ion beams to a small spot. Details of the accelerator design and considerations of the physics of combining beams are presented.

  14. The SPECT/CT Evaluation of Compartmental Changes after Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Byung Kag; Kim, Dong Whan; Sim, Jae Ang; Lee, Beom Koo; Lee, Yong Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate compartmental changes using combined single-photon emission computerized tomography and conventional computerized tomography (SPECT/CT) after open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) for providing clinical guidance for proper correction. Materials and Methods Analysis was performed using SPECT/CT from around 1 year after surgery on 22 patients who underwent OWHTO. Postoperative mechanical axis was measured and classified into 3 groups: group I (varus), group II (0°–3° valgus), and group III (>3° valgus). Patella location was evaluated using Blackburne-Peel (BP) ratio. On SPECT/CT, the knee joint was divided into medial, lateral, and patellofemoral compartments and the brighter signal was marked as a positive signal. Results Increased signal activity in the medial compartment was observed in 12 cases. No correlation was observed between postoperative mechanical axis and medial signal increase. Lateral increased signal activity was observed in 3 cases, and as valgus degree increased, lateral compartment’s signal activity increased. Increased signal activity of the patellofemoral joint was observed in 7 cases, and significant correlation was observed between changes in BP ratio and increased signal activity. Conclusions For the treatment of medial osteoarthritis, OWHTO requires overcorrection that does not exceed 3 valgus. In addition, the possibility of a patellofemoral joint problem after OWHTO should be kept in mind. PMID:27894172