Science.gov

Sample records for mv wedge photon

  1. A depth dependence determination of the wedge transmission factor for 4-10 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    McCullough, E C; Gortney, J; Blackwell, C R

    1988-01-01

    The depth dependence (up to 25 cm) of the in-phantom wedge transmission factor (WTF) has been determined for three medical linear accelerator x-ray beams with energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV containing 15 degrees-60 degrees (nominal) brass wedges. All measurements were made with a cylindrical ionization chamber in water, for a field size of 10 X 10 cm2 with a source-skin distance of 80 or 100 cm. We conclude that, for the accelerators studied, the WTF factor at depth is less than 2% different from that determined at dmax (for the nominal wedge angles and photon energies studied) unless the depth of interest is greater than 10 cm. Up to the maximum depth studied (25 cm) the relative wedge factor--that is, wedge factor at depth compared to that determined at dmax--was about equal to or less than 1.02 for the 15 degrees and 30 degrees wedges and any of the photon beam energies studied. For the seldom utilized combination of a nominal wedge angle in excess of 45 degrees with a depth greater than 10 cm, the WTF at depth can differ from the WTF determined at dmax, by up to 5%. Since the wedge transmission factor is reflective of relative percent dose data, our results also indicate that it is in error to use open field percent depth doses for certain combinations of wedge angle, photon energy, and depth. PMID:3211057

  2. Depth dependence determination of the wedge transmission factor for 4--10 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, E.C.; Gortney, J.; Blackwell, C.R.

    1988-07-01

    The depth dependence (up to 25 cm) of the in-phantom wedge transmission factor (WTF) has been determined for three medical linear accelerator x-ray beams with energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV containing 15/sup 0/--60/sup 0/ (nominal) brass wedges. All measurements were made with a cylindrical ionization chamber in water, for a field size of 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ with a source--skin distance of 80 or 100 cm. We conclude that, for the accelerators studied, the WTF factor at depth is less than 2% different from that determined at d/sub max/ (for the nominal wedge angles and photon energies studied) unless the depth of interest is greater than 10 cm. Up to the maximum depth studied (25 cm) the relative wedge factor: that is, wedge factor at depth compared to that determined at d/sub max/ : was about equal to or less than 1.02 for the 15/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/ wedges and any of the photon beam energies studied. For the seldom utilized combination of a nominal wedge angle in excess of 45/sup 0/ with a depth greater than 10 cm, the WTF at depth can differ from the WTF determined at d/sub max/, by up to 5%. Since the wedge transmission factor is reflective of relative percent dose data, our results also indicate that it is in error to use open field percent depth doses for certain combinations of wedge angle, photon energy, and depth.

  3. Linear array measurements of enhanced dynamic wedge and treatment planning system (TPS) calculation for 15 MV photon beam and comparison with electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements

    PubMed Central

    Petrovic, Borislava; Grzadziel, Aleksandra; Rutonjski, Laza; Slosarek, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) are known to increase drastically the radiation therapy treatment efficiency. This paper has the aim to compare linear array measurements of EDW with the calculations of treatment planning system (TPS) and the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for 15 MV photon energy. Materials and methods. The range of different field sizes and wedge angles (for 15 MV photon beam) were measured by the linear chamber array CA 24 in Blue water phantom. The measurement conditions were applied to the calculations of the commercial treatment planning system XIO CMS v.4.2.0 using convolution algorithm. EPID measurements were done on EPID-focus distance of 100 cm, and beam parameters being the same as for CA24 measurements. Results Both depth doses and profiles were measured. EDW linear array measurements of profiles to XIO CMS TPS calculation differ around 0.5%. Profiles in non-wedged direction and open field profiles practically do not differ. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) for all EDW measurements show the difference of not more than 0.2%, while the open field PDD is almost the same as EDW PDD. Wedge factors for 60 deg wedge angle were also examined, and the difference is up to 4%. EPID to linear array differs up to 5%. Conclusions The implementation of EDW in radiation therapy treatments provides clinicians with an effective tool for the conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. If modelling of EDW beam in TPS is done correctly, a very good agreement between measurements and calculation is obtained, but EPID cannot be used for reference measurements. PMID:22933916

  4. Dosimetric Characteristics of 6 MV Modified Beams by Physical Wedges of a Siemens Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Birgani, Mohammad Javad Tahmasebi; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Arvandi, Sholeh; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Mahbube

    2016-01-01

    Physical wedges still can be used as missing tissue compensators or filters to alter the shape of isodose curves in a target volume to reach an optimal radiotherapy plan without creating a hotspot. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of physical wedges filters such as off-axis photon fluence, photon spectrum, output factor and half value layer. The photon beam quality of a 6 MV Primus Siemens modified by 150 and 450 physical wedges was studied with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The calculated present depth dose and dose profile curves for open and wedged photon beam were in good agreement with the measurements. Increase of wedge angle increased the beam hardening and this effect was more pronounced at the heal region. Using such an accurate MC model to determine of wedge factors and implementation of it as a calculation algorithm in the future treatment planning systems is recommended. PMID:27221838

  5. Measurement and comparison of head scatter factor for 7 MV unflattened (FFF) and 6 MV flattened photon beam using indigenously designed columnar mini phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambiraj, Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Raman, Kothanda; Bhushan, Manindra; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Aim To measure and compare the head scatter factor for 7 MV unflattened and 6 MV flattened photon beam using a home-made designed mini phantom. Background The head scatter factor (Sc) is one of the important parameters for MU calculation. There are multiple factors that influence the Sc values, like accelerator head, flattening filter, primary and secondary collimators. Materials and methods A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with high and low atomic number material for measurement of head scatter factors at 10 cm and dmax dose water equivalent thickness. Results The Sc values measured with high-Z are higher than the low-Z mini phantoms observed for both 6MV-FB and 7MV-UFB photon energies. Sc values of 7MV-UFB photon beams were smaller than those of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.6–2.2% (Primus), 0.2–1.4% (Artiste) and 0.6–3.7% (Clinac iX (2300CD))) for field sizes ranging from 10 cm × 10 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams. The presence of wedge filters influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effects showed that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FF and FFF. Conclusions There were significant differences in Sc values measured for 6MV-FB and unflattened 7MV-UFB photon beams over the range of field sizes from 10 cm × 10 cm to 40 cm × 04 cm. Different results were obtained for measurements performed with low-Z and high-Z mini phantoms. PMID:25949220

  6. Matching the 6-MV photon beam characteristics of two dissimilar linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Marshall, M G

    1993-01-01

    A new prototype 6-MV flattening filter was designed by the manufacturer for use in a popular dual energy linear accelerator. To satisfy the contract demands, this filter was designed to produce a beam whose characteristics matched precisely with those of the 6-MV beam produced from a single photon peak energy unit from the same manufacturer and already in operation in the department. A single set of 6-MV dosimetric files for both units can now be maintained. The new filter has forced percent depth values over a wide clinical range of field sizes and depths to agree within 1.3%. Beam profiles now agree to within 1% over the useful area. For wedges with similar wedge angles, transmission factors now agree to within 1%. Standard acceptance testing performance specifications provided by the manufacturer were not adequate for clinical beam matching. The purchase contract for these units included our own specifications, which were more rigid and pertinent to our goal. Details of the effort are discussed. PMID:8309448

  7. Single-photon cooling in a wedge billiard

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S.; Sundaram, B.; Raizen, M. G.

    2010-09-15

    Single-photon cooling (SPC), noted for its potential as a versatile method for cooling a variety of atomic species, has recently been demonstrated experimentally. In this paper, we study possible ways to improve the performance of SPC by applying it to atoms trapped inside a wedge billiard. The main feature of the wedge billiard for atoms, also experimentally realized recently, is that the nature of atomic trajectories within it changes from stable periodic orbit to random chaotic motion with the change in wedge angle. We find that a high cooling efficiency is possible in this system with a relatively weak dependence on the wedge angle and that chaotic dynamics, rather than a regular orbit, is more desirable for enhancing the performance of SPC.

  8. Calculation of effective dose from measurements of secondary neutron spectra and scattered photon dose from dynamic MLC IMRT for 6 MV, 15 MV, and 18 MV beam energies.

    PubMed

    Howell, Rebecca M; Hertel, Nolan E; Wang, Zhonglu; Hutchinson, Jesson; Fullerton, Gary D

    2006-02-01

    Effective doses were calculated from the delivery of 6 MV, 15 MV, and 18 MV conventional and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) prostate treatment plans. ICRP-60 tissue weighting factors were used for the calculations. Photon doses were measured in phantom for all beam energies. Neutron spectra were measured for 15 MV and 18 MV and ICRP-74 quality conversion factors used to calculate ambient dose equivalents. The ambient dose equivalents were corrected for each tissue using neutron depth dose data from the literature. The depth corrected neutron doses were then used as a measure of the neutron component of the ICRP protection quantity, organ equivalent dose. IMRT resulted in an increased photon dose to many organs. However, the IMRT treatments resulted in an overall decrease in effective dose compared to conventional radiotherapy. This decrease correlates to the ability of an intensity-modulated field to minimize dose to critical normal structures in close proximity to the treatment volume. In a comparison of the three beam energies used for the IMRT treatments, 6 MV resulted in the lowest effective dose, while 18 MV resulted in the highest effective dose. This is attributed to the large neutron contribution for 18 MV compared to no neutron contribution for 6 MV. PMID:16532941

  9. Dosimetric evaluation of 120-leaf multileaf collimator in a Varian linear accelerator with 6-MV and 18-MV photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, R.; Jayesh, K.; Joshi, R. C.; Al-idrisi, Maha; Narayanamurthy, P.; Majumdar, Saroj Kumar Das

    2008-01-01

    In this study the dosimetric characteristics of 120-leaf multileaf collimators (MLCs) were evaluated for 6-MV and 18-MV photon beams. The dose rate, percentage depth dose, surface dose, dose in the build-up region, beam profile, flatness, symmetry, and penumbra width were measured using three field-defining methods: (i) ‘Jaw only’, (ii) ‘MLC only’, and (iii) ‘MLC+Jaw’. Analysis of dose rate shows that the dose rate for ‘MLC only’ field was higher than that for ‘Jaw only” and ‘MLC+Jaw’ fields in both the energies. The ‘percentage of difference’ of dose rates between ‘MLC only’ and ‘MLC+Jaw’ was (0.9% to 4.4%) and (1.14% to 7%) for 6 MV and 18 MV respectively. The surface dose and dose in the build-up region were more pronounced for ‘MLC only’ fields for both energies, and no significant difference was found in percentage depth dose beyond dmax for both energies. Beam profiles show that flatness and symmetry for both the energies were less than the 3%. The penumbra width for ‘MLC only’ field was more than that for the other two field-defining methods by (1 to 2 mm) and (0.8 to 1.3 mm) for 6-MV and 18-MV photon beams respectively. Analysis of ‘width of 50% dose level’ of the beam profiles at dmax to reflect the field size shows 1 to 2 mm more for 6-MV photons and 2.2 to 2.4 mm morefor 18-MV photons for ‘MLC only’ fields. The results of this study suggest that the characteristics of 120-leaf MLC system with 6 MV and 18 MV are same in all aspects except the surface dose, penumbra, dose in the build-up region, and width of 50% dose levels. PMID:19893701

  10. Measuring linac photon beam energy through EPID image analysis of physically wedged fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dawoud, S. M. Weston, S. J.; Bond, I.; Ward, G. C.; Rixham, P. A.; Mason, J.; Huckle, A.; Sykes, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful tools for measuring several parameters of interest in linac quality assurance (QA). However, a method for measuring linac photon beam energy using EPIDs has not previously been reported. In this report, such a method is devised and tested, based on fitting a second order polynomial to the profiles of physically wedged beams, where the metric of interest is the second order coefficientα. The relationship between α and the beam quality index [percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth (PDD{sub 10})] is examined to produce a suitable calibration curve between these two parameters. Methods: Measurements were taken in a water-tank for beams with a range of energies representative of the local QA tolerances about the nominal value 6 MV. In each case, the beam quality was found in terms of PDD{sub 10} for 100 × 100 mm{sup 2} square fields. EPID images of 200 × 200 mm{sup 2} wedged fields were then taken for each beam and the wedge profile was fitted in MATLAB 2010b (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). α was then plotted against PDD{sub 10} and fitted with a linear relation to produce the calibration curve. The uncertainty in α was evaluated by taking five repeat EPID images of the wedged field for a beam of 6 MV nominal energy. The consistency of measuring α was found by taking repeat measurements on a single linac over a three month period. The method was also tested at 10 MV by repeating the water-tank crosscalibration for a range of energies centered approximately about a 10 MV nominal value. Finally, the calibration curve from the test linac and that from a separate clinical machine were compared to test consistency of the method across machines in a matched fleet. Results: The relationship betweenα and PDD{sub 10} was found to be strongly linear (R{sup 2} = 0.979) while the uncertainty in α was found to be negligible compared to that associated with measuring PDD{sub 10} in the water-tank (

  11. Monte Carlo Simulation of a 6 MV X-Ray Beam for Open and Wedge Radiation Fields, Using GATE Code.

    PubMed

    Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Taghi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Hasanabadi, Fatemeh; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a control software system, based on Monte Carlo simulation, and calculations of dosimetric parameters of standard and wedge radiation fields, using a Monte Carlo method. GATE version 6.1 (OpenGATE Collaboration), was used to simulate a compact 6 MV linear accelerator system. In order to accelerate the calculations, the phase-space technique and cluster computing (Condor version 7.2.4, Condor Team, University of Wisconsin-Madison) were used. Dosimetric parameters used in treatment planning systems for the standard and wedge radiation fields (10 cm × 10 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm and a 60° wedge), including the percentage depth dose and dose profiles, were measured by both computational and experimental methods. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results with 3%/3 mm criteria. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results. Almost all calculated data points have satisfied gamma index criteria of 3% to 3 mm. Based on the good agreement between calculated and measured results obtained for various radiation fields in this study, GATE may be used as a useful tool for quality control or pretreatment verification procedures in radiotherapy.

  12. Monte Carlo Simulation of a 6 MV X-Ray Beam for Open and Wedge Radiation Fields, Using GATE Code

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Taghi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Hasanabadi, Fatemeh; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a control software system, based on Monte Carlo simulation, and calculations of dosimetric parameters of standard and wedge radiation fields, using a Monte Carlo method. GATE version 6.1 (OpenGATE Collaboration), was used to simulate a compact 6 MV linear accelerator system. In order to accelerate the calculations, the phase-space technique and cluster computing (Condor version 7.2.4, Condor Team, University of Wisconsin–Madison) were used. Dosimetric parameters used in treatment planning systems for the standard and wedge radiation fields (10 cm × 10 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm and a 60° wedge), including the percentage depth dose and dose profiles, were measured by both computational and experimental methods. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results with 3%/3 mm criteria. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results. Almost all calculated data points have satisfied gamma index criteria of 3% to 3 mm. Based on the good agreement between calculated and measured results obtained for various radiation fields in this study, GATE may be used as a useful tool for quality control or pretreatment verification procedures in radiotherapy. PMID:25426430

  13. Monte Carlo Simulation of a 6 MV X-Ray Beam for Open and Wedge Radiation Fields, Using GATE Code.

    PubMed

    Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Taghi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Hasanabadi, Fatemeh; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a control software system, based on Monte Carlo simulation, and calculations of dosimetric parameters of standard and wedge radiation fields, using a Monte Carlo method. GATE version 6.1 (OpenGATE Collaboration), was used to simulate a compact 6 MV linear accelerator system. In order to accelerate the calculations, the phase-space technique and cluster computing (Condor version 7.2.4, Condor Team, University of Wisconsin-Madison) were used. Dosimetric parameters used in treatment planning systems for the standard and wedge radiation fields (10 cm × 10 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm and a 60° wedge), including the percentage depth dose and dose profiles, were measured by both computational and experimental methods. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results with 3%/3 mm criteria. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results. Almost all calculated data points have satisfied gamma index criteria of 3% to 3 mm. Based on the good agreement between calculated and measured results obtained for various radiation fields in this study, GATE may be used as a useful tool for quality control or pretreatment verification procedures in radiotherapy. PMID:25426430

  14. SU-E-T-221: Investigation of Lower Energy (< 6 MV) Photon Beams for Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Ming, X; Feng, Y; Zhou, L; Ahmad, M; Deng, J; Nguyen, K; Griffin, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the potential applications of the lower energy (< 6MV) photon beams in the radiotherapeutic management of pediatric cancer and lung cancer patients. Methods: Photon beams of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6MV were first simulated with EGS4/BEAM and then used for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. For four pediatric patients with abdominal and brain lesions, six 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plans were generated using single photon energy (2 to 6MV) or mixed energies (3 and 6MV). Furthermore, a virtual machine of 3 and 6MV was commissioned in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on Monte-Carlo simulated data. Three IMRT plans of a lung cancer patient were generated on this virtual machine. All plans were normalized to D95% of target dose for 6MV plan and then compared in terms of integral dose and OAR sparing. Results: For the four pediatric patients, the integral dose for the 2, 3, 4 and 5MV plans increased by 9%, 5%, 3.5%, 1.7%, respectively as compared to 6MV. Almost all OARs in the 2MV plan received more than 10% more doses than 6MV. Mixed energy 3DCRT plans were of the same quality as 6MV plans. For the lung IMRT plans, both the 3MV plan and the mixed beam plan showed better OAR sparing in comparison to 6MV plan. Specifically, the maximum and mean doses to the spinal cord in the mixed energy plan were lower by 21% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Single lower energy photon beam was found to be inferior to 6MV in the radiotherapy of pediatric patients and lung cancer patients when the integral doses and the doses to the OARs were considered. However, mixed energy plans combining low with high energy beams showed significant OAR sparing while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Investigation with more patient data is ongoing for further confirmation.

  15. Air cavity effects on the radition dose to the larynx using Co-60, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niroomand-Rad, A.; Harter, K.W.; Thobejane, S.; Bertrand, K.

    1994-07-30

    The purpose was to determine the perturbation effect in the surface layers of lesions located in the air-tumor tissues interface of larynx using {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were embedded at 16 measurement locations in slab no. 8 of a humanoid phantom and exposed to two lateral-opposed beams using standard 7 {times} 7 cm fields. Similarly, radiographic and radiochromic films were placed between slabs no. 7 and no. 8 of the humanoid phantom and exposed to two lateral-opposed radiation beams. The dosimeters were irradiated with {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. Computer tomography (CT) treatment planning without inhomogeneity correction was performed. At the tissue-air interface, the average measured percentage dose (% dose{sub m}) is about (108.7 {+-} 4.8%) with TLD data, (96.8 {+-} 2.5%) with radiographic film data, and (100.8 {+-} 4.9%) with radiochromic film data. Similarly, in the central part of the cavity, the % dose{sub m} is (98.4 {+-} 3.1)% with TLD data, (94.3 {+-} 3.3)% with radiographic film data, and (91.7 {+-} 5.0)% with radiochromic film data. Using the CT-based generated dose distribution (without inhomogeneity correction), the average calculated percentage dose (% dose{sub c}) is (98.7 {+-} 1.0%) at the tissue-air interface and 98% in the central part of the air cavity. For the beam energies studied, the variation from the % dose {sub m} at the tissue-air interface for a given dosimetry technique is relatively small and therefore should not be significant in clinical settings. The variation from the % dose{sub m} at the tissue-air interface is more significant for lower energies. This variation is about 4.3% for 10 MV photon beam, therefore, while institutional practice favors lower energy ({sup 60}Co to 6 MV) for node-negative glottic cancers, physical/dosimetric evidence offers no disadvantage to the use of higher energy photons. 10 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Surface dose variations in 6 and 10 MV flattened and flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams.

    PubMed

    Cashmore, Jason

    2016-01-01

    As the use of linear accelerators operating in flattening filter-free (FFF) modes becomes more widespread, it is important to have an understanding of the surface doses delivered to patients with these beams. Flattening filter removal alters the beam quality and relative contributions of low-energy X-rays and contamination electrons in the beam. Having dosimetric data to describe the surface dose and buildup regions under a range of conditions for FFF beams is important if clinical decisions are to be made. An Elekta Synergy linac with standard MLCi head has been commissioned to run at 6 MV and 10 MV running with the flattening filter in or out. In this linac the 6 MV FFF beam has been energy-matched to the clinical beam on the central axis (D10). The 10 MV beam energy has not been adjusted. The flattening filter in both cases is replaced by a thin (2 mm) stainless steel plate. A thin window parallel plate chamber has been used to measure a comprehensive set of surface dose data in these beams for variations in field size and SSD, and for the presence of attenuators (wedge, shadow tray, and treatment couch). Surface doses are generally higher in FFF beams for small field sizes and lower for large field sizes with a crossover at 10 × 10 cm2 at 6 MV and 25 × 25 cm2 at 10 MV. This trend is also seen in the presence of the wedge, shadow tray, and treatment couch. Only small differences (< 0.5%) are seen between the beams on varying SSD. At both 6 and 10 MV the filter-free beams show far less variation with field size than conventional beams. By removing the flattening filter, a source of contamination electrons is exchanged for a source of low-energy photons (as these are no longer attenuated). In practice these two components almost balance out. No significant effects on surface dose are expected by the introduction of FFF delivery.

  17. Surface dose variations in 6 and 10 MV flattened and flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams.

    PubMed

    Cashmore, Jason

    2016-01-01

    As the use of linear accelerators operating in flattening filter-free (FFF) modes becomes more widespread, it is important to have an understanding of the surface doses delivered to patients with these beams. Flattening filter removal alters the beam quality and relative contributions of low-energy X-rays and contamination electrons in the beam. Having dosimetric data to describe the surface dose and buildup regions under a range of conditions for FFF beams is important if clinical decisions are to be made. An Elekta Synergy linac with standard MLCi head has been commissioned to run at 6 MV and 10 MV running with the flattening filter in or out. In this linac the 6 MV FFF beam has been energy-matched to the clinical beam on the central axis (D10). The 10 MV beam energy has not been adjusted. The flattening filter in both cases is replaced by a thin (2 mm) stainless steel plate. A thin window parallel plate chamber has been used to measure a comprehensive set of surface dose data in these beams for variations in field size and SSD, and for the presence of attenuators (wedge, shadow tray, and treatment couch). Surface doses are generally higher in FFF beams for small field sizes and lower for large field sizes with a crossover at 10 × 10 cm2 at 6 MV and 25 × 25 cm2 at 10 MV. This trend is also seen in the presence of the wedge, shadow tray, and treatment couch. Only small differences (< 0.5%) are seen between the beams on varying SSD. At both 6 and 10 MV the filter-free beams show far less variation with field size than conventional beams. By removing the flattening filter, a source of contamination electrons is exchanged for a source of low-energy photons (as these are no longer attenuated). In practice these two components almost balance out. No significant effects on surface dose are expected by the introduction of FFF delivery. PMID:27685127

  18. SU-E-T-562: Scanned Percent Depth Dose Curve Discrepancy for Photon Beams with Physical Wedge in Place (Varian IX) Using Different Sensitive Volume Ion Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate and report the discrepancy of scanned percent depth dose (PDD) for photon beams with physical wedge in place when using ion chambers with different sensitive volumes. Methods/Materials: PDD curves of open fields and physical wedged fields (15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge) were scanned for photon beams (6MV and 10MV, Varian iX) with field size of 5x5 and 10x10 cm using three common scanning chambers with different sensitive volumes - PTW30013 (0.6cm3), PTW23323 (0.1cm3) and Exradin A16 (0.007cm3). The scanning system software used was OmniPro version 6.2, and the scanning water tank was the Scanditronix Wellhoffer RFA 300.The PDD curves from the three chambers were compared. Results: Scanned PDD curves of the same energy beams for open fields were almost identical between three chambers, but the wedged fields showed non-trivial differences. The largest differences were observed between chamber PTW30013 and Exradin A16. The differences increased as physical wedge angle increased. The differences also increased with depth, and were more pronounced for 6MV beam. Similar patterns were shown for both 5x5 and 10x10 cm field sizes. For open fields, all PDD values agreed with each other within 1% at 10cm depth and within 1.62% at 20 cm depth. For wedged fields, the difference of PDD values between PTW30013 and A16 reached 4.09% at 10cm depth, and 5.97% at 20 cm depth for 6MV with 60 degree physical wedge. Conclusion: We observed a significant difference in scanned PDD curves of photon beams with physical wedge in place obtained when using different sensitive volume ion chambers. The PDD curves scanned with the smallest sensitive volume ion chamber showed significant difference from larger chamber results, beyond 10cm depth. We believe this to be caused by varying response to beam hardening by the wedges.

  19. Comparison of Head Scatter Factor for 6MV and 10MV flattened (FB) and Unflattened (FFF) Photon Beam using indigenously Designed Columnar Mini Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambi Raj, N Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    To measure and compare the head scatter factor for flattened (FB) and unflattened (FFF) of 6MV and 10MV photon beam using indigenously designed mini phantom. A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with low and high atomic number materials at 10 cm (mini phantom) and at approximately twice the depth of maximum dose water equivalent thickness (brass build-up cap). Scatter in the accelerator (Sc) values of 6MV-FFF photon beams are lesser than that of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.66-2.8%; Clinac iX, 2300CD) and (0.47-1.74%; True beam) for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2. Sc values of 10MV-FFF photon beams are lesser (0.61-2.19%; True beam) than that of the 10MV-FB photons beams for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2. The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams and irrespective of head design of the different linear accelerators. The presence of field shaping device influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effect reveals that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FB or FFF photon beams and different linear accelerators, and it is less significant in FFF beams. Sc values of 6MV-FB square field were in good agreement with that of AAPM, TG-74 published data for Varian (Clinac iX, 2300CD) accelerator. Our results confirm that the removal of flattening filter decreases in the head scatter factor compared to flattened beam. This could reduce the out-of-field dose in advanced treatment delivery techniques. PMID:25190997

  20. Comparison of Head Scatter Factor for 6MV and 10MV flattened (FB) and Unflattened (FFF) Photon Beam using indigenously Designed Columnar Mini Phantom.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambi Raj, N Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2014-07-01

    To measure and compare the head scatter factor for flattened (FB) and unflattened (FFF) of 6MV and 10MV photon beam using indigenously designed mini phantom. A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with low and high atomic number materials at 10 cm (mini phantom) and at approximately twice the depth of maximum dose water equivalent thickness (brass build-up cap). Scatter in the accelerator (Sc) values of 6MV-FFF photon beams are lesser than that of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.66-2.8%; Clinac iX, 2300CD) and (0.47-1.74%; True beam) for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2). Sc values of 10MV-FFF photon beams are lesser (0.61-2.19%; True beam) than that of the 10MV-FB photons beams for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2). The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams and irrespective of head design of the different linear accelerators. The presence of field shaping device influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effect reveals that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FB or FFF photon beams and different linear accelerators, and it is less significant in FFF beams. Sc values of 6MV-FB square field were in good agreement with that of AAPM, TG-74 published data for Varian (Clinac iX, 2300CD) accelerator. Our results confirm that the removal of flattening filter decreases in the head scatter factor compared to flattened beam. This could reduce the out-of-field dose in advanced treatment delivery techniques.

  1. Estimation of photoneutron intensities around radiotherapy linear accelerator 23-MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Shweikani, R; Anjak, O

    2015-05-01

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) were used to study the variations of fast neutron relative intensities around a high-energy (23MV) linear accelerator (Varian 21EX) photon beam. The variations were determined on the patient plane at 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200cm from the isocenter of the photon beam. In addition, photoneutron intensities and distributions at isocenter level with field size of 40×40cm(2) at Source Axis Distance (SAD)=100cm around 23MV photon beam were also determined. The results showed that the photoneutron intensities decreased rapidly by increasing the distance from the center of the x-ray beam towards the periphery, for the open fields.

  2. Characterization of Al2O3 optically stimulated luminescence films for 2D dosimetry using a 6 MV photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. F.; Shrestha, N.; Schnell, E.; Ahmad, S.; Akselrod, M. S.; Yukihara, E. G.

    2016-11-01

    This work evaluates the dosimetric properties of newly developed optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) films, fabricated with either Al2O3:C or Al2O3:C,Mg, using a prototype laser scanning reader, a developed image reconstruction algorithm, and a 6 MV therapeutic photon beam. Packages containing OSL films (Al2O3:C and Al2O3:C,Mg) and a radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT3) were irradiated using a 6 MV photon beam using different doses, field sizes, with and without wedge filter. Dependence on film orientation of the OSL system was also tested. Diode-array (MapCHECK) and ionization chamber measurements were performed for comparison. The OSLD film doses agreed with the MapCHECK and ionization chamber data within the experimental uncertainties (<2% at 1.5 Gy). The system background and minimum detectable dose (MDD) were  <0.5 mGy, and the dose response was approximately linear from the MDD up to a few grays (the linearity correction was  <10% up to ~2–4 Gy), with no saturation up to 30 Gy. The dose profiles agreed with those obtained using EBT3 films (analyzed using the triple channel method) in the high dose regions of the images. In the low dose regions, the dose profiles from the OSLD films were more reproducible than those from the EBT3 films. We also demonstrated that the OSL film data are independent on scan orientation and field size over the investigated range. The results demonstrate the potential of OSLD films for 2D dosimetry, particularly for the characterization of small fields, due to their wide dynamic range, linear response, resolution and dosimetric properties. The negligible background and potential simple calibration make these OSLD films suitable for remote audits. The characterization presented here may motivate further commercial development of a 2D dosimetry system based on the OSL from Al2O3:C or Al2O3:C,Mg.

  3. Skyshine photon doses from 6 and 10 MV medical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    de Paiva, Eduardo; da Rosa, Luiz A R

    2012-01-01

    The skyshine radiation phenomenon consists of the scattering of primary photon beams in the atmosphere above the roof of a medical linear accelerator facility, generating an additional dose at ground level in the vicinity of the treatment room. Thus, with respect to radioprotection, this situation plays an important role when the roof is designed with little shielding and there are buildings next to the radiotherapy treatment room. In literature, there are few reported skyshine-measured doses and these contain poor agreement with empirical calculations. In this work, we carried out measurements of skyshine photon dose rates produced from eight different 6 and 10 MV medical accelerators. Each measurement was performed outside the room facility, with the beam positioned in the upward direction, at a horizontal distance from the target and for a 40 cm × 40 cm maximum photon field size at the accelerator isocenter. Measured dose-equivalent rates results were compared with calculations obtained by an empirical expression, and differences between them deviated in one or more order of magnitude.

  4. Monte Carlo study of conversion factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in solid slab phantoms for MV photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dong-wook; Lee, Jai-ki

    2016-08-01

    For high energy photon beams, solid phantom to water dose conversion factors were calculated by using a Monte Carlo method, and the result were compared with measurements and published data. Based on the absorbed dose to water dosimetry protocol, the conversion factor was theoretically divided into stopping powers ratios, perturbation factors and ratios of absorbed dose to water and that to solid phantom. Data for a Farmer-type chamber and a solid phantom based on polystyrene which is one of the most common material were applied to calculate the conversion factors for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. All measurements were conducted after 10 Gy pre-irradiation and thermal equilibrium had been established with solid slabs in a treatment room. The calculated and the measured conversion factors were in good agreement and could be used to confirm the feasibility of the solid phantom as a substitute for water for high energy photon beam.

  5. Wedge-and-strip anodes for centroid-finding position-sensitive photon and particle detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C.; Jelinsky, P.; Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    The paper examines geometries employing position-dependent charge partitioning to obtain a two-dimensional position signal from each detected photon or particle. Requiring three or four anode electrodes and signal paths, images have little distortion and resolution is not limited by thermal noise. An analysis of the geometrical image nonlinearity between event centroid location and the charge partition ratios is presented. In addition, fabrication and testing of two wedge-and-strip anode systems are discussed. Images obtained with EUV radiation and microchannel plates verify the predicted performance, with further resolution improvements achieved by adopting low noise signal circuitry. Also discussed are the designs of practical X-ray, EUV, and charged particle image systems.

  6. Analyzing the characteristics of 6 MV photon beam at low monitor unit settings.

    PubMed

    Nithya, L; Raj, N Arunai Nambi; Rathinamuthu, Sasikumar

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the characteristics of a low monitor unit (MU) setting is essential, particularly for intensity-modulated techniques. Intensity modulation can be achieved through intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). There is possibility for low MUs in the segments of IMRT and VMAT plans. The minimum MU/segment must be set by the physicist in the treatment planning system at the time of commissioning. In this study, the characteristics such as dose linearity, stability, flatness, and symmetry of 6 MV photon beam of a Synergy linear accelerator at low MU settings were investigated for different dose rates. The measurements were performed for Synergy linear accelerator using a slab phantom with a FC65-G chamber and Profiler 2. The MU linearity was studied for 1-100 MU using a field size of 10 cm ×10 cm. The linearity error for 1 MU was 4.2%. Flatness of the beam was deteriorated in 1 MU condition. The beam stability and symmetry was well within the specification. Using this study, we conclude that the treatment delivered with <3 MU may result in uncertainty in dose delivery. To ensure the correct dose delivery with less uncertainty, it is recommended to use ≥3 MU as the minimum MU per segment in IMRT and VMAT plans. PMID:27051168

  7. In vivo and phantom measurements of the secondary photon and neutron doses for prostate patients undergoing 18 MV IMRT.

    PubMed

    Reft, Chester S; Runkel-Muller, Renate; Myrianthopoulos, Leon

    2006-10-01

    For intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments 6 MV photons are typically used, however, for deep seated tumors in the pelvic region, higher photon energies are increasingly being employed. IMRT treatments require more monitor units (MU) to deliver the same dose as conformal treatments, causing increased secondary radiation to tissues outside the treated area from leakage and scatter, as well as a possible increase in the neutron dose from photon interactions in the machine head. Here we provide in vivo patient and phantom measurements of the secondary out-of-field photon radiation and the neutron dose equivalent for 18 MV IMRT treatments. The patients were treated for prostate cancer with 18 MV IMRT at institutions using different therapy machines and treatment planning systems. Phantom exposures at the different facilities were used to compare the secondary photon and neutron dose equivalent between typical IMRT delivered treatment plans with a six field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plan. For the in vivo measurements LiF thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and Al2O3 detectors using optically stimulated radiation were used to obtain the photon dose and CR-39 track etch detectors were used to obtain the neutron dose equivalent. For the phantom measurements a Bonner sphere (25.4 cm diameter) containing two types of TLDs (TLD-600 and TLD-700) having different thermal neutron sensitivities were used to obtain the out-of-field neutron dose equivalent. Our results showed that for patients treated with 18 MV IMRT the photon dose equivalent is greater than the neutron dose equivalent measured outside the treatment field and the neutron dose equivalent normalized to the prescription dose varied from 2 to 6 mSv/Gy among the therapy machines. The Bonner sphere results showed that the ratio of neutron equivalent doses for the 18 MV IMRT and 3DCRT prostate treatments scaled as the ratio of delivered MUs. We also observed differences in the

  8. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirgayussa, I. Gde Eka; Yani, Sitti; Rhani, M. Fahdillah; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good criteria of dose

  9. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dirgayussa, I Gde Eka Yani, Sitti; Haryanto, Freddy; Rhani, M. Fahdillah

    2015-09-30

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good

  10. Relative biological damage in and out of field of 6, 10 and 18 MV clinical photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzati, A. O.

    2016-08-01

    The lower energy of scattered radiation in and out of a megavoltage (MV) photon beam suggests that relative biological damage (RBD) may change from in- to out-of-field regions for unit absorbed dose. Because of high linear energy transfer (LET) and potential of causing severe damage to the DNA, low-energy (10 eV-1 keV) slowing down electrons should be included in radiation biological damage calculations. In this study RBD was calculated in and out of field of 6, 10 and 18 MV clinical photon beams including low-energy slowing down electrons in the track length estimated method. Electron spectra at energies higher than 2 keV were collected in a water phantom at different depths and off-axis points by using the MCNP code. A new extrapolation method was used to estimate the electron spectra at energies lower than 2 keV. The obtained spectra at energies lower than 2 keV merged with spectra at energies higher than 2 keV by using continuity of the spectra. These spectra were used as an input to a validated microdosimetric Monte Carlo (MC) code, MC damage simulation (MCDS), to calculate the RBD of induced DSB in DNA at points in and out of the primary radiation field under fully aerobic (100% O2 and anoxic (0% O2 conditions. There was an observable difference in the energy spectra for electrons for points in the primary radiation field and those points out of field. RBD had maximum variation, 11% in 6 MV photons at field size of 20×20 cm2. This variation was less than 11% for 10 and 18 MV photons and field sizes smaller than 20×20 cm2. Our simulations also showed that under the anoxic condition, RBD increases up to 6% for 6 and 10 MV photons and the 20×20 cm2 field size. This work supports the hypothesis that in megavoltage treatments out-of-field radiation quality can vary enough to have an impact on RBD per unit dose and that this may play a role as the radiation therapy community explores biological optimization as a tool to assist treatment planning.

  11. The effect of energy spectrum change on DNA damage in and out of field in 10-MV clinical photon beams.

    PubMed

    Ezzati, A O; Xiao, Y; Sohrabpour, M; Studenski, M T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the DNA damage induced in a clinical megavoltage photon beam at various depths in and out of the field. MCNPX was used to simulate 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm(2) 10-MV photon beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Photon and electron spectra were collected in a water phantom at depths of 2.5, 12.5 and 22.5 cm on the central axis and at off-axis points out to 10 cm. These spectra were used as an input to a validated microdosimetric Monte Carlo code, MCDS, to calculate the RBE of induced DSB in DNA at points in and out of the primary radiation field at three depths. There was an observable difference in the energy spectra for photons and electrons for points in the primary radiation field and those points out of field. In the out-of-field region, the mean energy for the photon and electron spectra decreased by a factor of about six and three from the in-field mean energy, respectively. Despite the differences in spectra and mean energy, the change in RBE was <1 % from the in-field region to the out-of-field region at any depth. There was no significant change in RBE regardless of the location in the phantom. Although there are differences in both the photon and electron spectra, these changes do not correlate with a change in RBE in a clinical MV photon beam as the electron spectra are dominated by electrons with energies >20 keV.

  12. Study of the dosimetric properties of an unflattened 6-MV photon beam by using the BEAMnrc code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajaria, Ankit; Sharma, Neeraj; Sharma, Shiru; Pradhan, Satyajit; Mandal, Abhijit; Aggarwal, Lalit. M.

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the basic dosimetric properties of a Flattening-filter-free 6-MV photon beam based on the unique performance model of the Varian Clinic 600 linac operated with and without a flattening filter. Dosimetric features, including the central-axis absorbed dose, the beam profiles and the photon and electron fluences were calculated for the flattened and unflattened cases separately by using Monte Carlo simulations. We observe that the dosimetric field size and penumbra were slightly smaller for the unflattened beam, but the beam's non-flatness is unlikely to present a problem for treatments with small fields. Absolute depth dose calculations showed an increase in the dose rate by a factor of more than 2.4 for the unflattened 6-MV beam which depended on the depth. These results suggest that the removal of the filter could result in higher central-axis dose rates and hence, shorter beam delivery times for treatments. Surface doses were found to be higher for the unflattened beam due to more contamination electrons and low-energy photons being present in the beam. The total scatter factor, SCP, varies less with the field sizes, indicating that removing the filter from the beam line can reduce significantly the amount of head scatter photons and therefore, doses to normal tissues and organs.

  13. Surface dose for five telecobalt machines, 6MV photon beam from four linear accelerators and a Hi-Art Tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the surface dose for five telecobalt machines (four from Best Theratronics Limited, Canada, one from Panacea Medical Technologies, India), 6 MV photon beam (static) from four linear accelerators (three Varian linear accelerators and one Siemens) and Hi-Art Tomotherapy unit. The surface dose was measured with Thermoluminescent dosimeters in phantom slabs. For Tomotherapy 6 MV beam the surface dose was estimated as 32% while it was 35%, 33%, and 36% for Clinac 6EX, Clinac 2100CD, and Clinac 2100C linear accelerators, respectively. Similarly, the surface dose for 6 MV photon beam from Primus linear accelerator was estimated as 35%. Surface doses from telecobalt machines Equinox-80, Elite-80, Th-780C, Th-780, and Bhabhatron-II was found to be 30%, 29.1%, 27.8%, 29.3%, and 29.9% for 10 cm x 10 field size, respectively. Measured surface dose from all four linear accelerators were in good agreement with that of the Tomotherapy. The surface dose measurements were useful for Tomotherapy to predict the superficial dose during helical IMRT treatments. PMID:18783288

  14. Synthesis and thermoluminescence properties of SrAl2O4 (EU) phosphor irradiated with cobalt-60, 6 MV and 16 MV photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Pushpraj Kumar; Kurchania, Rajnish

    2015-12-01

    Powder samples of SrAl2O4 (Eu) were synthesized by the combustion method using urea as a fuel. The combustion products were calcined at 700 °C for 1 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the prepared sample exhibit sharp diffraction peaks and absence of any amorphous phase. The average crystalline size was found to be ~33.04 nm, calculated by using Debye Scherer's formula. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images reveal that the crystallites have no uniform shape and the presence of several micro- and nano-particles within the grain. This may be due to the non-uniform distribution of temperature and mass flow in the combustion flame which results in the non-uniform shape of crystallites. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicates that the prepared sample is thermally stable up to 900 °C. Thermoluminescence (TL) behavior of prepared samples was studied after irradiation with Co-60gamma rays, 6 mega voltage (MV) and 16 MV photon beams at various doses. Glow curve of the prepared SrAl2O4 (Eu:1%) sample was similar in shape irrespective of incident energy and radiation type. The dominant peak in each glow curve appeared around at 312 °C. No shifts in peak positions have been observed. All the glow curves of sample doped with Eu(3%) have relatively higher intensity as compared to the sample doped with Eu(1%). Energy dependence has been observed in the present phosphor. This could be because of increase in the probability of Compton's interaction at this energy range due to transmission of primary as well as scattered radiation and decrease in mass attenuation coefficient with the increase in energy. The trapping parameters namely activation energy (E), order of kinetics (b) and frequency factor (s) have been determined using the glow curve shape (Chen's) method. These phosphors could be utilized for display applications, dating, temperature sensor, low as well as high energy radiation detection and dosimetry especially where tissue equivalency is not much

  15. Peripheral dose measurements for 6 and 18 MV photon beams on a linear accelerator with multileaf collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Zacharopoulou, Fotini; Varveris, Haralambos; Damilakis, John

    2008-10-15

    Peripheral dose (PD) to critical structures outside treatment volume is of clinical importance. The aim of the current study was to estimate PD on a linear accelerator equipped with multileaf collimator (MLC). Dose measurements were carried out using an ionization chamber embedded in a water phantom for 6 and 18 MV photon beams. PD values were acquired for field sizes from 5x5 to 20x20 cm{sup 2} in increments of 5 cm at distances up to 24 cm from the field edge. Dose data were obtained at two collimator orientations where the measurement points are shielded by MLC and jaws. The variation of PD with the source to skin distance (SSD), depth, and lateral displacement of the measurement point was evaluated. To examine the dependence of PD upon the tissue thickness at the entrance point of the beam, scattered dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosemeters placed on three anthropomorphic phantoms simulating 5- and 10-year-old children and an average adult patient. PD from 6 MV photons varied from 0.13% to 6.75% of the central-axis maximum dose depending upon the collimator orientation, extent of irradiated area, and distance from the treatment field. The corresponding dose range from 18 MV x rays was 0.09% to 5.61%. The variation of PD with depth and with lateral displacements up to 80% of the field dimension was very small. The scattered dose from both photon beams increased with the increase of SSD or tissue thickness along beam axis. The presented dosimetric data set allows the estimation of scattered dose outside the primary beam.

  16. Thermoluminescence responses of the Yb- and Yb-Tb-doped SiO2 optical fibers to 6-MV photons.

    PubMed

    Sahini, M H; Hossain, I; Wagiran, H; Saeed, M A; Ali, H

    2014-09-01

    Characteristics of the thermoluminescence (TL) responses of Yb- and Yb-Tb-doped optical fibers irradiated with 6MV photons are reported. The concentration of Yb in the Yb-doped optical fiber was 0.26mol%; the concentrations of Yb and Tb in the Yb-Tb-doped optical fiber were 0.62 and 0.2mol%, respectively. The TL dose responses are linear in the dose range 0.5-4Gy. The radiation sensitivity of the Yb-Tb material is almost two orders of magnitude higher than the sensitivity of the material doped with Yb alone.

  17. Enhanced dynamic wedge output factors for Varian 2300CD and the case for a reference database.

    PubMed

    Njeh, Christopher F

    2015-01-01

    Dose inhomogeneity in treatment planning can be compensated using physical wedges. Enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) were introduced by Varian to overcome some of the shortcomings of physical wedges. The objectives of this study were to measure EDW output factors for 6 MV and 20 MV photon energies for a Varian 2300CD. Secondly, to review the literature in terms of published enhanced dynamic wedge output factors (EDWOF) for different Varian models and thereby add credence to the case of the validity of reference databases. The enhanced dynamic wedge output factors were measured for the Varian 2300CD for both 6MV and 20 MV photon energies. Twelve papers with published EDWOF for different Varian linac models were found in the literature. Comparing our results with the published mean, we found an excellent agreement for 6 MV EDWOF, with the percentage differences ranging from 0.01% to 0.57%, with a mean of 0.03%. The coefficient of variation of published EDWOF ranged from 0.17% to 0.85% and 0.1% to 0.9% for the for 6 MV and 18 MV photon energies, respectively. This paper provides the first published EDWOF for 20 MV photon energy. In addition, we have provided the first compendium of EDWOFs for different Varian linac models. The consistency of value across models and institution provide further support that a standard dataset of basic photon and electron dosimetry could be established as a guide for future commissioning, beam modeling, and quality assurance purposes. PMID:26699307

  18. Comparison of the Effects of High-Energy Photon Beam Irradiation (10 and 18 MV) on 2 Types of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

    SciTech Connect

    Hashii, Haruko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Okawa, Ayako; Shida, Koichi; Isobe, Tomonori; Hanmura, Masahiro; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy for cancer may be required for patients with implantable cardiac devices. However, the influence of secondary neutrons or scattered irradiation from high-energy photons (≥10 MV) on implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) is unclear. This study was performed to examine this issue in 2 ICD models. Methods and Materials: ICDs were positioned around a water phantom under conditions simulating clinical radiation therapy. The ICDs were not irradiated directly. A control ICD was positioned 140 cm from the irradiation isocenter. Fractional irradiation was performed with 18-MV and 10-MV photon beams to give cumulative in-field doses of 600 Gy and 1600 Gy, respectively. Errors were checked after each fraction. Soft errors were defined as severe (change to safety back-up mode), moderate (memory interference, no changes in device parameters), and minor (slight memory change, undetectable by computer). Results: Hard errors were not observed. For the older ICD model, the incidences of severe, moderate, and minor soft errors at 18 MV were 0.75, 0.5, and 0.83/50 Gy at the isocenter. The corresponding data for 10 MV were 0.094, 0.063, and 0 /50 Gy. For the newer ICD model at 18 MV, these data were 0.083, 2.3, and 5.8 /50 Gy. Moderate and minor errors occurred at 18 MV in control ICDs placed 140 cm from the isocenter. The error incidences were 0, 1, and 0 /600 Gy at the isocenter for the newer model, and 0, 1, and 6 /600Gy for the older model. At 10 MV, no errors occurred in control ICDs. Conclusions: ICD errors occurred more frequently at 18 MV irradiation, which suggests that the errors were mainly caused by secondary neutrons. Soft errors of ICDs were observed with high energy photon beams, but most were not critical in the newer model. These errors may occur even when the device is far from the irradiation field.

  19. Determination of small field output factors in 6 and 10 MV flattening filter free photon beams using various detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masanga, W.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Khamfongkhruea, C.; Tannanonta, C.

    2016-03-01

    The study aimed to determine appropriate detectors for output factor measurement of small fields in 6 and 10 MV flattening filter free photon beams using five different detectors. Field sizes were varied between 0.6 × 0.6 and 4.0 × 4.0 cm2. An indirect method (daisy-chaining) was applied to normalize the output factors. For the smallest field size, the variations of output factors compared among the detectors were 13%. Exradin A16 had the lowest output factor and increasing in sequence with CC01, microDiamond, microLion and EDGE detectors, respectively, for both energies. The similarity between CC01 and microDiamond output factor values were within 1.6% and 1% for all field sizes of 6 and 10 MV FFF, respectively. EDGE and microLion presented the highest values while ExradinA16 gave lowest values. In conclusion, IBACC01, Exradin A16, microLion, microDiamond and EDGE detectors seem to be the detectors of choices for small field output factor measurement of FFF beams down to 1.6 × 1.6 cm2. However, we could not guarantee which detector is the most suitable for output factor measurement in small field less than 1.6 × 1.6 cm2 of FFF beams. Further studies are required to provide reference information for validation purposes.

  20. Magnetic field effects on the energy deposition spectra of MV photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, C; Stanescu, T; Fallone, B G

    2009-01-21

    Several groups worldwide have proposed various concepts for improving megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy that involve irradiating patients in the presence of a magnetic field-either for image guidance in the case of hybrid radiotherapy-MRI machines or for purposes of introducing tighter control over dose distributions. The presence of a magnetic field alters the trajectory of charged particles between interactions with the medium and thus has the potential to alter energy deposition patterns within a sub-cellular target volume. In this work, we use the MC radiation transport code PENELOPE with appropriate algorithms invoked to incorporate magnetic field deflections to investigate electron energy fluence in the presence of a uniform magnetic field and the energy deposition spectra within a 10 microm water sphere as a function of magnetic field strength. The simulations suggest only very minor changes to the electron fluence even for extremely strong magnetic fields. Further, calculations of the dose-averaged lineal energy indicate that a magnetic field strength of at least 70 T is required before beam quality will change by more than 2%.

  1. Simulation of the 6 MV Elekta Synergy Platform linac photon beam using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission

    PubMed Central

    Didi, Samir; Moussa, Abdelilah; Yahya, Tayalati; Mustafa, Zerfaoui

    2015-01-01

    The present work validates the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission Monte Carlo software for the simulation of a 6 MV photon beam given by Elekta Synergy Platform medical linear accelerator treatment head. The simulation includes the major components of the linear accelerator (LINAC) with multi-leaf collimator and a homogeneous water phantom. Calculations were performed for the photon beam with several treatment field sizes ranging from 5 cm × 5 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm at 100 cm distance from the source. The simulation was successfully validated by comparison with experimental distributions. Good agreement between simulations and measurements was observed, with dose differences of about 0.02% and 2.5% for depth doses and lateral dose profiles, respectively. This agreement was also emphasized by the Kolmogorov–Smirnov goodness-of-fit test and by the gamma-index comparisons where more than 99% of the points for all simulations fulfill the quality assurance criteria of 2 mm/2%. PMID:26500399

  2. Inhomogeneity effect in Varian Trilogy Clinac iX 10 MV photon beam using EGSnrc and Geant4 code system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, S.; Rhani, M. F.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.

    2016-08-01

    Treatment fields consist of tissue other than water equivalent tissue (soft tissue, bones, lungs, etc.). The inhomogeneity effect can be investigated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. MC simulation of the radiation transport in an absorbing medium is the most accurate method for dose calculation in radiotherapy. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of inhomogeneity phantom on dose calculations in photon beam radiotherapy obtained by different MC codes. MC code system EGSnrc and Geant4 was used in this study. Inhomogeneity phantom dimension is 39.5 × 30.5 × 30 cm3 and made of 4 material slices (12.5 cm water, 10 cm aluminium, 5 cm lung and 12.5 cm water). Simulations were performed for field size 4 × 4 cm2 at SSD 100 cm. The spectrum distribution Varian Trilogy Clinac iX 10 MV was used. Percent depth dose (PDD) and dose profile was investigated in this research. The effects of inhomogeneities on radiation dose distributions depend on the amount, density and atomic number of the inhomogeneity, as well as on the quality of the photon beam. Good agreement between dose distribution from EGSnrc and Geant4 code system in inhomogeneity phantom was observed, with dose differences around 5% and 7% for depth doses and dose profiles.

  3. Monte Carlo calculation based on hydrogen composition of the tissue for MV photon radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Demol, Benjamin; Viard, Romain; Reynaert, Nick

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that Monte Carlo treatment planning systems require tissue characterization (density and composition) as a function of CT number. A discrete set of tissue classes with a specific composition is introduced. In the current work we demonstrate that, for megavoltage photon radiotherapy, only the hydrogen content of the different tissues is of interest. This conclusion might have an impact on MRI-based dose calculations and on MVCT calibration using tissue substitutes. A stoichiometric calibration was performed, grouping tissues with similar atomic composition into 15 dosimetrically equivalent subsets. To demonstrate the importance of hydrogen, a new scheme was derived, with correct hydrogen content, complemented by oxygen (all elements differing from hydrogen are replaced by oxygen). Mass attenuation coefficients and mass stopping powers for this scheme were calculated and compared to the original scheme. Twenty-five CyberKnife treatment plans were recalculated by an in-house developed Monte Carlo system using tissue density and hydrogen content derived from the CT images. The results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations using the original stoichiometric calibration. Between 300 keV and 3 MeV, the relative difference of mass attenuation coefficients is under 1% within all subsets. Between 10 keV and 20 MeV, the relative difference of mass stopping powers goes up to 5% in hard bone and remains below 2% for all other tissue subsets. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the treatment plans present no visual difference between the two schemes. Relative differences of dose indexes D98, D95, D50, D05, D02, and Dmean were analyzed and a distribution centered around zero and of standard deviation below 2% (3 σ) was established. On the other hand, once the hydrogen content is slightly modified, important dose differences are obtained. Monte Carlo dose planning in the field of megavoltage photon radiotherapy is fully achievable using

  4. The thermoluminescence characteristics and the glow curves of Thulium doped silica fiber exposed to 10MV photon and 21MeV electron radiation.

    PubMed

    Alawiah, A; Alina, M S; Bauk, S; Abdul-Rashid, H A; Gieszczyk, W; Noramaliza, M N; Mahdiraji, G A; Tamchek, N; Zulkifli, M I; Bradley, D A; Marashdeh, M W

    2015-04-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves and kinetics parameters of Thulium (Tm) doped silica cylindrical fibers (CF) are presented. A linear accelerator (LINAC) was used to deliver high-energy radiation of 21MeV electrons and 10MV photons. The CFs were irradiated in the dose range of 0.2-10Gy. The experimental glow curve data was reconstructed by using WinREMS. The WinGCF software was used for the kinetic parameters evaluation. The TL sensitivity of Tm-doped silica CF is about 2 times higher as compared to pure silica CF. Tm-doped silica CF seems to be more sensitive to 21MeV electrons than to 10MV photons. Surprisingly, no supralinearity was displayed and a sub-linear response of Tm-doped silica CF was observed within the analyzed dose range for both 21MeV electrons and 10MV photons. The Tm-doped silica CF glow curve consists of 5 individual glow peaks. The Ea of peak 4 and peak 5 was highly dependent on dose when irradiated with photons. We also noticed that the electron radiation (21MeV) caused a shift of glow peak by 7-13°C to the higher temperature region compared with photons radiation (10MV). Our Tm-doped fibers seem to give high TL response after 21MeV electrons, which gives around 2 times higher peak integral as compared with 10MV photon radiation. We concluded that peak 4 is the first-order kinetic peak and can be used as the main dosimetric peak of Tm-doped silica CF.

  5. Optimization of a multiple-scattering Compton camera as a photon-tracking imager for 6-MV photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoong; Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho

    2014-06-01

    During radiation therapy, the irradiated position and the energy deposited in a patient must be monitored. In general, calculations before photon exposure or 2D measurements of the transmitted photons have been widely used for making dose estimates. In this paper, we propose a real-time 3D dose measurement using Compton imaging technology. On the basis of the Monte-Carlo method, we designed a multiple-scattering Compton camera system (MSCC) with semiconductor and scintillation detectors. The MSCC was constructed with two semiconductor detectors as scattering detectors and a cadmium-tungstate (CWO) scintillator detector as an absorber detector. The two planar semiconductor arrays, and the CWO array consisted of 40 × 40 pixels, each with a size of 1 × 1 × ɛ mm3, where ɛ is the variable thickness of the detectors. The design parameters, such as the types of semiconductors, detector thicknesses and distances between detectors, were optimized on the basis of the detection efficiency and angular resolution of reconstructed images for a point source. Under the optimized conditions, uncertainty factors in geometry and energy were estimated for various inter-detector distances. We used a source corresponding to photons scattered from a water phantom exposed to 6-MeV peak X-rays. According to our simulation results, the figure of merit, reached its maximum value when the inter-detector distance was 3 cm. In order to achieve a high FOM, we chose 1 cm as the optimum thickness for the scattering and absorbed detectors. A cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector showed the best performance among the simulated semiconductors. The position uncertainty caused by the pixelization effect was the major factor in degrading the angular resolution of the reconstructed images, and the degradation caused by energy broadening was less than expected. The angular uncertainties caused by Doppler broadening and incorrect sequencing were minimal compared with that of pixelization. Our

  6. Planar scanning method for detecting refraction characteristics of two-dimensional photonic quasi-crystal wedge-shaped prisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianjun; Tan, Wei; Liu, Exian; Hu, Haili; Fan, Zhigang; Zhang, Tianhua; Zhang, Xiong

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a planar scanning method is proposed. This novel method adapts two monitors moving along double planar tracks that can be used to detect refraction characteristics of two-dimensional (2D) photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) wedge-shaped prisms. Refraction of a decagonal Penrose-type PQC prism is analyzed for a given incident beam and two polarization modes at different incident positions in the prism using this method. Refraction from the prism is irregular, indicating that nonuniformity in the arrangement of scatterers in the prism causes Bragg-like scattering irregularities. Numerical results show that this method can be used for guiding the design of a 2D PQC prism and for the analysis of its refraction characteristics. PMID:27140896

  7. Planar scanning method for detecting refraction characteristics of two-dimensional photonic quasi-crystal wedge-shaped prisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianjun; Tan, Wei; Liu, Exian; Hu, Haili; Fan, Zhigang; Zhang, Tianhua; Zhang, Xiong

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a planar scanning method is proposed. This novel method adapts two monitors moving along double planar tracks that can be used to detect refraction characteristics of two-dimensional (2D) photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) wedge-shaped prisms. Refraction of a decagonal Penrose-type PQC prism is analyzed for a given incident beam and two polarization modes at different incident positions in the prism using this method. Refraction from the prism is irregular, indicating that nonuniformity in the arrangement of scatterers in the prism causes Bragg-like scattering irregularities. Numerical results show that this method can be used for guiding the design of a 2D PQC prism and for the analysis of its refraction characteristics.

  8. Study of the response of plastic scintillation detectors in small-field 6 MV photon beams by Monte Carlo simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lilie L. W.; Beddar, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the response of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in a 6 MV photon beam of various field sizes using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Three PSDs were simulated: A BC-400 and a BCF-12, each attached to a plastic-core optical fiber, and a BC-400 attached to an air-core optical fiber. PSD response was calculated as the detector dose per unit water dose for field sizes ranging from 10×10 down to 0.5×0.5 cm2 for both perpendicular and parallel orientations of the detectors to an incident beam. Similar calculations were performed for a CC01 compact chamber. The off-axis dose profiles were calculated in the 0.5×0.5 cm2 photon beam and were compared to the dose profile calculated for the CC01 chamber and that calculated in water without any detector. The angular dependence of the PSDs’ responses in a small photon beam was studied. Results: In the perpendicular orientation, the response of the BCF-12 PSD varied by only 0.5% as the field size decreased from 10×10 to 0.5×0.5 cm2, while the response of BC-400 PSD attached to a plastic-core fiber varied by more than 3% at the smallest field size because of its longer sensitive region. In the parallel orientation, the response of both PSDs attached to a plastic-core fiber varied by less than 0.4% for the same range of field sizes. For the PSD attached to an air-core fiber, the response varied, at most, by 2% for both orientations. Conclusions: The responses of all the PSDs investigated in this work can have a variation of only 1%–2% irrespective of field size and orientation of the detector if the length of the sensitive region is not more than 2 mm long and the optical fiber stems are prevented from pointing directly to the incident source. PMID:21520871

  9. Verification measurements and clinical evaluation of the iPlan RT Monte Carlo dose algorithm for 6 MV photon energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petoukhova, A. L.; van Wingerden, K.; Wiggenraad, R. G. J.; van de Vaart, P. J. M.; van Egmond, J.; Franken, E. M.; van Santvoort, J. P. C.

    2010-08-01

    This study presents data for verification of the iPlan RT Monte Carlo (MC) dose algorithm (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany). MC calculations were compared with pencil beam (PB) calculations and verification measurements in phantoms with lung-equivalent material, air cavities or bone-equivalent material to mimic head and neck and thorax and in an Alderson anthropomorphic phantom. Dosimetric accuracy of MC for the micro-multileaf collimator (MLC) simulation was tested in a homogeneous phantom. All measurements were performed using an ionization chamber and Kodak EDR2 films with Novalis 6 MV photon beams. Dose distributions measured with film and calculated with MC in the homogeneous phantom are in excellent agreement for oval, C and squiggle-shaped fields and for a clinical IMRT plan. For a field with completely closed MLC, MC is much closer to the experimental result than the PB calculations. For fields larger than the dimensions of the inhomogeneities the MC calculations show excellent agreement (within 3%/1 mm) with the experimental data. MC calculations in the anthropomorphic phantom show good agreement with measurements for conformal beam plans and reasonable agreement for dynamic conformal arc and IMRT plans. For 6 head and neck and 15 lung patients a comparison of the MC plan with the PB plan was performed. Our results demonstrate that MC is able to accurately predict the dose in the presence of inhomogeneities typical for head and neck and thorax regions with reasonable calculation times (5-20 min). Lateral electron transport was well reproduced in MC calculations. We are planning to implement MC calculations for head and neck and lung cancer patients.

  10. A comparison of small-field tissue phantom ratio data generation methods for an Elekta Agility 6 MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Neil; Brackenridge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-phantom ratios (TPRs) are a common dosimetric quantity used to describe the change in dose with depth in tissue. These can be challenging and time consuming to measure. The conversion of percentage depth dose (PDD) data using standard formulae is widely employed as an alternative method in generating TPR. However, the applicability of these formulae for small fields has been questioned in the literature. Functional representation has also been proposed for small-field TPR production. This article compares measured TPR data for small 6 MV photon fields against that generated by conversion of PDD using standard formulae to assess the efficacy of the conversion data. By functionally fitting the measured TPR data for square fields greater than 4cm in length, the TPR curves for smaller fields are generated and compared with measurements. TPRs and PDDs were measured in a water tank for a range of square field sizes. The PDDs were converted to TPRs using standard formulae. TPRs for fields of 4 × 4cm(2) and larger were used to create functional fits. The parameterization coefficients were used to construct extrapolated TPR curves for 1 × 1 cm(2), 2 × 2-cm(2), and 3 × 3-cm(2) fields. The TPR data generated using standard formulae were in excellent agreement with direct TPR measurements. The TPR data for 1 × 1-cm(2), 2 × 2-cm(2), and 3 × 3-cm(2) fields created by extrapolation of the larger field functional fits gave inaccurate initial results. The corresponding mean differences for the 3 fields were 4.0%, 2.0%, and 0.9%. Generation of TPR data using a standard PDD-conversion methodology has been shown to give good agreement with our directly measured data for small fields. However, extrapolation of TPR data using the functional fit to fields of 4 × 4cm(2) or larger resulted in generation of TPR curves that did not compare well with the measured data.

  11. A water calorimeter for on-site absorbed dose to water calibrations in (60)Co and MV-photon beams including MRI incorporated treatment equipment.

    PubMed

    de Prez, Leon; de Pooter, Jacco; Jansen, Bartel; Aalbers, Tony

    2016-07-01

    In reference dosimetry the aim is to establish the absorbed dose to water, D w, under reference conditions. However, existing dosimetry protocols are not always applicable for rapidly emerging new treatment modalities. For primary standard dosimetry laboratories it is generally not feasible to acquire such modalities. Therefore it is strongly desired that D w measurements with primary standards can be performed on-site in clinical beams for the new treatment modalities in order to characterize and calibrate detectors. To serve this need, VSL has developed a new transportable water calorimeter serving as a primary D w standard for (60)Co and MV-photons including MRI incorporated treatment equipment. Special attention was paid to its operation in different beam geometries and beam modalities including the application in magnetic fields. The new calorimeter was validated in the VSL (60)Co beam and on-site in clinical MV-photon beams. Excellent agreement of 0.1% was achieved with previous (60)Co field calibrations, i.e. well within the uncertainty of the previous calorimeter, and with measurements performed in horizontal and vertical MV-photon beams. k Q factors, determined for two PTW 30013 ionization chambers, agreed very well with available literature data. The relative combined standard uncertainty (k  =  1) for D w measurements in (60)Co and MV-photons is 0.37%. Calibrations are carried out with a standard uncertainty of 0.42% and k Q -factors are determined with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.40%. PMID:27300589

  12. A water calorimeter for on-site absorbed dose to water calibrations in 60Co and MV-photon beams including MRI incorporated treatment equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Prez, Leon; de Pooter, Jacco; Jansen, Bartel; Aalbers, Tony

    2016-07-01

    In reference dosimetry the aim is to establish the absorbed dose to water, D w, under reference conditions. However, existing dosimetry protocols are not always applicable for rapidly emerging new treatment modalities. For primary standard dosimetry laboratories it is generally not feasible to acquire such modalities. Therefore it is strongly desired that D w measurements with primary standards can be performed on-site in clinical beams for the new treatment modalities in order to characterize and calibrate detectors. To serve this need, VSL has developed a new transportable water calorimeter serving as a primary D w standard for 60Co and MV-photons including MRI incorporated treatment equipment. Special attention was paid to its operation in different beam geometries and beam modalities including the application in magnetic fields. The new calorimeter was validated in the VSL 60Co beam and on-site in clinical MV-photon beams. Excellent agreement of 0.1% was achieved with previous 60Co field calibrations, i.e. well within the uncertainty of the previous calorimeter, and with measurements performed in horizontal and vertical MV-photon beams. k Q factors, determined for two PTW 30013 ionization chambers, agreed very well with available literature data. The relative combined standard uncertainty (k  =  1) for D w measurements in 60Co and MV-photons is 0.37%. Calibrations are carried out with a standard uncertainty of 0.42% and k Q -factors are determined with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.40%.

  13. Three-photon fluorescence imaging of melanin with a dual-wedge confocal scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mega, Yair; Kerimo, Joseph; Robinson, Joseph; Vakili, Ali; Johnson, Nicolette; DiMarzio, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Confocal microscopy can be used as a practical tool in non-invasive applications in medical diagnostics and evaluation. In particular, it is being used for the early detection of skin cancer to identify pathological cellular components and, potentially, replace conventional biopsies. The detection of melanin and its spatial location and distribution plays a crucial role in the detection and evaluation of skin cancer. Our previous work has shown that the visible emission from melanin is strong and can be easily observed with a near-infrared CW laser using low power. This is due to a unique step-wise, (SW) three-photon excitation of melanin. This paper shows that the same SW, 3-photon fluorescence can also be achieved with an inexpensive, continuous-wave laser using a dual-prism scanning system. This demonstrates that the technology could be integrated into a portable confocal microscope for clinical applications. The results presented here are in agreement with images obtained with the larger and more expensive femtosecond laser system used earlier.

  14. Calorimetric determination of kQ factors for NE 2561 and NE 2571 ionization chambers in 5 cm × 5 cm and 10 cm × 10 cm radiotherapy beams of 8 MV and 16 MV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Achim; Kapsch, Ralf-Peter

    2007-10-01

    The relative uncertainty of the ionometric determination of the absorbed dose to water, Dw, in the reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams is in the order of 1.5% and is dominated by the uncertainty of the calculated chamber- and energy-dependent correction factors kQ. In the present investigation, kQ values were determined experimentally in 5 cm × 5 cm and 10 cm × 10 cm radiotherapy beams of 8 MV and 16 MV bremsstrahlung by means of a water calorimeter operated at 4 °C. Ionization chambers of the types NE 2561 and NE 2571 were calibrated directly in the water phantom of the calorimeter. The measurements were carried out at the linear accelerator of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. It is shown that the kQ factor of a single ionization chamber can be measured with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.3%. No significant variations of kQ were found for the different lateral sizes of the radiation fields used in this investigation.

  15. Spectra of photons and neutrons generated in a heterogeneous head of a 15 MV LINAC at differents field sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Benites-Rengifo, J. L.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Velazquez-Fernandez, J. B.

    2012-10-23

    Spectra of photons and neutrons were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5 using the e/p/n mode. A heterogeneous model was used to define the linac head where the collimators were modeled to produce five different treatment fields at the isocenter. Photon and neutron spectra were estimated in several points along two directions from the isocenter. The total photon fluence beyond 60 cm behaves according to 1/r{sup 2} rule, while total neutron fluence, beyond 80 cm, can be described by diffusion theory using an infinite plane as a neutron source.

  16. Analysis of the EBT3 Gafchromic film irradiated with 6 MV photons and 6 MeV electrons using reflective mode scanners.

    PubMed

    Farah, Nicolas; Francis, Ziad; Abboud, Marie

    2014-09-01

    We explore in our study the effects of electrons and X-rays irradiations on the newest version of the Gafchromic EBT3 film. Experiments are performed using the Varian "TrueBeam 1.6" medical accelerator delivering 6 MV X-ray photons and 6 MeV electron beams as desired. The main interest is to compare the responses of EBT3 films exposed to two separate beams of electrons and photons, for radiation doses ranging up to 500 cGy. The analysis is done on a flatbed EPSON 10000 XL scanner and cross checked on a HP Scanjet 4850 scanner. Both scanners are used in reflection mode taking into account landscape and portrait scanning positions. After thorough verifications, the reflective scanning method can be used on EBT3 as an economic alternative to the transmission method which was also one of the goals of this study. A comparison is also done between single scan configuration including all samples in a single A4 (HP) or A3 (EPSON) format area and multiple scan procedure where each sample is scanned separately on its own. The images analyses are done using the ImageJ software. Results show significant influence of the scanning configuration but no significant differences between electron and photon irradiations for both single and multiple scan configurations. In conclusion, the film provides a reliable relative dose measurement method for electrons and photons irradiations in the medical field applications.

  17. Varian 2100C/D Clinac 18 MV photon phase space file characterization and modeling by using MCNP Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzati, Ahad Ollah

    2015-07-01

    Multiple points and a spatial mesh based surface source model (MPSMBSS) was generated for 18MV Varian 2100 C/D Clinac phase space file (PSF) and implemented in MCNP code. The generated source model (SM) was benchmarked against PSF and measurements. PDDs and profiles were calculated using the SM and original PSF for different field sizes from 5 × 5 to 20 × 20 cm2. Agreement was within 2% of the maximum dose at 100cm SSD for beam profiles at the depths of 4cm and 15cm with respect to the original PSF. Differences between measured and calculated points were less than 2% of the maximum dose or 2mm distance to agreement (DTA) at 100 cm SSD. Thus it can be concluded that the modified MCNP code can be used for radiotherapy calculations including multiple source model (MSM) and using the source biasing capability of MPSMBSS can increase the simulation speed up to 3600 for field sizes smaller than 5 × 5 cm2.

  18. SU-E-J-38: Comparison of 6MV Photon Dose in a Perpendicular and Parallel Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Integrating a linac with an MRI system would allow for real time tumour tracking however the patient will be irradiated in the presence of a magnetic field. The present study experimentally investigates the magnetic field effects on entrance, exit, and interface dose for both transverse and parallel magnetic fields. Methods: Polystyrene was used to construct a set of phantoms for Gafchromic film measurements. One phantom had an adjustable air gap and four other phantoms had one surface at various angles. The linac-MR prototype consisting of a biplanar permanent magnet coupled to a linac was used for the transverse magnetic field measurements. A couple of solenoid electromagnets, stacked on top of each other and irradiated along their bore, were used for the parallel field measurements. Results: All doses are relative to no magnetic field. The transverse magnetic field reduced the entrance dose for all surface angles by strongly deflecting the contaminant electrons. The exit dose in a transverse magnetic field was found to be significantly higher. The entrance dose with a parallel magnetic field present is higher due to the contaminant electrons being concentrated within the beam area. The air gap phantom measurements, done in a transverse magnetic field, show a significant increase of the dose at the proximal side of the air gap and a decrease at the distal side. The measurements, done in the parallel magnetic field, show the concentration of secondary electrons in the air gap. Conclusion: The radiation dose measurements of a 6MV beam in a parallel and transverse magnetic field presented here are currently being replicated using Monte Carlo simulations. This verified Monte Carlo system could provide the dose calculation basis for future linac-MR systems.

  19. Experimental determination of beam quality factors, kQ, for two types of Farmer chamber in a 10 MV photon and a 175 MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medin, Joakim; Ross, Carl K.; Klassen, Norman V.; Palmans, Hugo; Grusell, Erik; Grindborg, Jan-Erik

    2006-03-01

    Absorbed doses determined with a sealed water calorimeter operated at 4 °C are compared with the results obtained using ionization chambers and the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice in a 10 MV photon beam (TPR20,10 = 0.734) and a 175 MeV proton beam (at a depth corresponding to the residual range, Rres = 14.7 cm). Three NE 2571 and two FC65-G ionization chambers were calibrated in terms of absorbed-dose-to-water in 60Co at the Swedish secondary standard dosimetry laboratory, directly traceable to the BIPM. In the photon beam quality, calorimetry was found to agree with ionometry within 0.3%, confirming the kQ values tabulated in TRS-398. In contrast, a 1.8% deviation was found in the proton beam at 6 g cm-2 depth, suggesting that the TRS-398 tabulated kQ values for these two ionization chamber types are too high. Assuming no perturbation effect in the proton beam for the ionization chambers, a value for (wair/e)Q of 33.6 J C-1 ± 1.7% (k = 1) can be derived from these measurements. An analytical evaluation of the effect from non-elastic nuclear interactions in the ionization chamber wall indicates a perturbation effect of 0.6%. Including this estimated result in the proton beam would increase the determined (wair/e)Q value by the same amount.

  20. Comparison of out-of-field photon doses in 6 MV IMRT and neutron doses in proton therapy for adult and pediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, Basit S.; Bednarz, Bryan; Seco, Joao; Hancox, Cindy; Paganetti, Harald

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess lateral out-of-field doses in 6 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) and compare them with secondary neutron equivalent dose contributions in proton therapy. We simulated out-of-field photon doses to various organs as a function of distance, patient's age, gender and treatment volumes based on 3, 6, 9 cm field diameters in the head and neck and spine region. The out-of-field photon doses to organs near the field edge were found to be in the range of 2, 5 and 10 mSv Gy-1 for 3 cm, 6 cm and 9 cm diameter IMRT fields, respectively, within 5 cm of the field edge. Statistical uncertainties calculated in organ doses vary from 0.2% to 40% depending on the organ location and the organ volume. Next, a comparison was made with previously calculated neutron equivalent doses from proton therapy using identical field arrangements. For example, out-of-field doses for IMRT to lung and uterus (organs close to the 3 cm diameter spinal field) were computed to be 0.63 and 0.62 mSv Gy-1, respectively. These numbers are found to be a factor of 2 smaller than the corresponding out-of-field doses for proton therapy, which were estimated to be 1.6 and 1.7 mSv Gy-1 (RBE), respectively. However, as the distance to the field edge increases beyond approximately 25 cm the neutron equivalent dose from proton therapy was found to be a factor of 2-3 smaller than the out-of-field photon dose from IMRT. We have also analyzed the neutron equivalent doses from an ideal scanned proton therapy (assuming not significant amount of absorbers in the treatment head). Out-of-field doses were found to be an order of magnitude smaller compared to out-of-field doses in IMRT or passive scattered proton therapy. In conclusion, there seem to be three geometrical areas when comparing the out-of-target dose from IMRT and (passive scattered) proton treatments. Close to the target (in-field, not analyzed here) protons offer a distinct advantage due to the lower

  1. Comparison of out-of-field photon doses in 6 MV IMRT and neutron doses in proton therapy for adult and pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Athar, Basit S; Bednarz, Bryan; Seco, Joao; Hancox, Cindy; Paganetti, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess lateral out-of-field doses in 6 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) and compare them with secondary neutron equivalent dose contributions in proton therapy. We simulated outof-field photon doses to various organs as a function of distance, patient's age, gender and treatment volumes based on 3, 6, 9 cm field diameters in the head and neck and spine region. The out-of-field photon doses to organs near the field edge were found to be in the range of 2, 5 and 10 mSv Gy−1 for 3 cm, 6 cm and 9 cm diameter IMRT fields, respectively, within 5 cm of the field edge. Statistical uncertainties calculated in organ doses vary from 0.2% to 40% depending on the organ location and the organ volume. Next, a comparison was made with previously calculated neutron equivalent doses from proton therapy using identical field arrangements. For example, out-of-field doses for IMRT to lung and uterus (organs close to the 3 cm diameter spinal field) were computed to be 0.63 and 0.62 mSv Gy−1, respectively. These numbers are found to be a factor of 2 smaller than the corresponding out-of-field doses for proton therapy, which were estimated to be 1.6 and 1.7 mSv Gy−1 (RBE), respectively. However, as the distance to the field edge increases beyond approximately 25 cm the neutron equivalent dose from proton therapy was found to be a factor of 2–3 smaller than the out-of-field photon dose from IMRT. We have also analyzed the neutron equivalent doses from an ideal scanned proton therapy (assuming not significant amount of absorbers in the treatment head). Outof-field doses were found to be an order of magnitude smaller compared to out-of-field doses in IMRT or passive scattered proton therapy. In conclusion, there seem to be three geometrical areas when comparing the out-of-target dose from IMRT and (passive scattered) proton treatments. Close to the target (in-field, not analyzed here) protons offer a distinct advantage due to the lower

  2. Comparison of build-up region doses in oblique tangential 6 MV photon beams calculated by AAA and CCC algorithms in breast Rando phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunun, P.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Dumrongkijudom, N.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the build-up region doses on breast Rando phantom surface with the bolus covered, the doses in breast Rando phantom and also the doses in a lung that is the heterogeneous region by two algorithms. The AAA in Eclipse TPS and the collapsed cone convolution algorithm in Pinnacle treatment planning system were used to plan in tangential field technique with 6 MV photon beam at 200 cGy total doses in Breast Rando phantom with bolus covered (5 mm and 10 mm). TLDs were calibrated with Cobalt-60 and used to measure the doses in irradiation process. The results in treatment planning show that the doses in build-up region and the doses in breast phantom were closely matched in both algorithms which are less than 2% differences. However, overestimate of doses in a lung (L2) were found in AAA with 13.78% and 6.06% differences at 5 mm and 10 mm bolus thickness, respectively when compared with CCC algorithm. The TLD measurements show the underestimate in buildup region and in breast phantom but the doses in a lung (L2) were overestimated when compared with the doses in the two plannings at both thicknesses of the bolus.

  3. Quantitative Verification of Dynamic Wedge Dose Distribution Using a 2D Ionization Chamber Array.

    PubMed

    Sahnoun, Tarek; Farhat, Leila; Mtibaa, Anis; Besbes, Mounir; Daoud, Jamel

    2015-10-01

    The accuracy of two calculation algorithms of the Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system (TPS)--the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and pencil-beam convolution (PBC)--in modeling the enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) was investigated. Measurements were carried out for 6 and 18 MV photon beams using a 2D ionization chamber array. Accuracy of the TPS was evaluated using a gamma index analysis with the following acceptance criteria for dose differences (DD) and distance to agreement (DTA): 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm. The TPS models the dose distribution accurately except for 20×20 cm(2) field size, 60 (°) and 45 (°) wedge angles using PBC at 6 MV photon energy. For these latter fields, the pass rate and the mean value of gamma were less than 90% and more than 0.5, respectively at the (3%/3 mm) acceptance criteria. In addition, an accuracy level of (2%/2 mm) was achieved using AAA with better agreement for 18 MV photon energy.

  4. Experimental determination of kQ factors for cylindrical ionization chambers in 10 cm × 10 cm and 3 cm × 3 cm photon beams from 4 MV to 25 MV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, A.; Kapsch, R. P.

    2014-08-01

    For the ionometric determination of absorbed dose to water, Dw, in megavoltage photon beams from a linear accelerator, beam-quality-dependent correction factors, kQ, are used for the ionization chambers. By using a water calorimeter, these factors can be determined experimentally and with substantially lower standard uncertainties compared to calculated values of the kQ, which are published in various dosimetry protocols. In this investigation, kQ for different types of cylindrical ionization chambers (NE 2561, NE 2571, FC 65 G) were determined experimentally in 10 cm × 10 cm photon beams from 4 MV to 25 MV (corresponding beam quality index TPR20,10 from 0.64 to 0.80). The measurements were carried out at the linear accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. It is shown that the kQ factors for a single ionization chamber in 10 cm × 10 cm photon beams can be measured with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.31%. In addition to these measurements in 10 cm × 10 cm fields, kQ factors for the NE 2561 chamber were also determined in smaller 3 cm × 3 cm photon beams between 6 MV and 25 MV. In this case, relative standard uncertainties between 0.35 % and 0.38 % are achieved for the kQ factors. It is found for this ionization chamber, that the ratio of the kQ factors in 3 cm × 3 cm and in 10 cm × 10 cm beams increases with increasing TPR20,10 to reach a value of 1.0095 at TPR20,10 = 0.8 with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.4 %.

  5. A feasibility study to calculate unshielded fetal doses to pregnant patients in 6-MV photon treatments using Monte Carlo methods and anatomically realistic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X. George

    2008-07-15

    A Monte Carlo-based procedure to assess fetal doses from 6-MV external photon beam radiation treatments has been developed to improve upon existing techniques that are based on AAPM Task Group Report 36 published in 1995 [M. Stovall et al., Med. Phys. 22, 63-82 (1995)]. Anatomically realistic models of the pregnant patient representing 3-, 6-, and 9-month gestational stages were implemented into the MCNPX code together with a detailed accelerator model that is capable of simulating scattered and leakage radiation from the accelerator head. Absorbed doses to the fetus were calculated for six different treatment plans for sites above the fetus and one treatment plan for fibrosarcoma in the knee. For treatment plans above the fetus, the fetal doses tended to increase with increasing stage of gestation. This was due to the decrease in distance between the fetal body and field edge with increasing stage of gestation. For the treatment field below the fetus, the absorbed doses tended to decrease with increasing gestational stage of the pregnant patient, due to the increasing size of the fetus and relative constant distance between the field edge and fetal body for each stage. The absorbed doses to the fetus for all treatment plans ranged from a maximum of 30.9 cGy to the 9-month fetus to 1.53 cGy to the 3-month fetus. The study demonstrates the feasibility to accurately determine the absorbed organ doses in the mother and fetus as part of the treatment planning and eventually in risk management.

  6. A 4 MV flattening filter-free beam: commissioning and application to conformal therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Stevens, S W; Rosser, K E; Bedford, J L

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that radiotherapy treatments undertaken on a flattening filter-free (FFF) linear accelerator have a number of advantages over treatments undertaken on a conventional linear accelerator. In addition, 4 MV photon beams may give improved isodose coverage for some treatment volumes at air/tissue interfaces, compared to when utilizing the clinical standard of 6 MV photons. In order to investigate these benefits, FFF beams were established on an Elekta Beam Modulator linear accelerator for 4 MV photons. Commissioning beam data were obtained for open and wedged fields. The measured data were then imported into a treatment planning system and a beam model was commissioned. The beam model was optimized to improve dose calculations at shallow, clinically relevant depths. Following verification, the beam model was utilized in a treatment planning study, including volumetric modulated arc therapy, for a selection of lung, breast/chest wall and larynx patients. Increased dose rates of around 800 MU min(-1) were recorded for open fields (relative to 320 MU min(-1) for filtered open fields) and reduced head scatter was inferred from output factor measurements. Good agreement between planned and delivered dose was observed in verification of treatment plans. The planning study indicated that with a FFF beam, equivalent (and in some cases improved) isodose profiles could be achieved for small lung and larynx treatment volumes relative to 4 MV filtered treatments. Furthermore, FFF treatments with wedges could be replicated using open fields together with an 'effective wedge' technique and isocentre shift. Clinical feasibility of a FFF beam was therefore demonstrated, with beam modelling, treatment planning and verification being successfully accomplished.

  7. A 4 MV flattening filter-free beam: commissioning and application to conformal therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, S. W.; Rosser, K. E.; Bedford, J. L.

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that radiotherapy treatments undertaken on a flattening filter-free (FFF) linear accelerator have a number of advantages over treatments undertaken on a conventional linear accelerator. In addition, 4 MV photon beams may give improved isodose coverage for some treatment volumes at air/tissue interfaces, compared to when utilizing the clinical standard of 6 MV photons. In order to investigate these benefits, FFF beams were established on an Elekta Beam Modulator linear accelerator for 4 MV photons. Commissioning beam data were obtained for open and wedged fields. The measured data were then imported into a treatment planning system and a beam model was commissioned. The beam model was optimized to improve dose calculations at shallow, clinically relevant depths. Following verification, the beam model was utilized in a treatment planning study, including volumetric modulated arc therapy, for a selection of lung, breast/chest wall and larynx patients. Increased dose rates of around 800 MU min-1 were recorded for open fields (relative to 320 MU min-1 for filtered open fields) and reduced head scatter was inferred from output factor measurements. Good agreement between planned and delivered dose was observed in verification of treatment plans. The planning study indicated that with a FFF beam, equivalent (and in some cases improved) isodose profiles could be achieved for small lung and larynx treatment volumes relative to 4 MV filtered treatments. Furthermore, FFF treatments with wedges could be replicated using open fields together with an 'effective wedge' technique and isocentre shift. Clinical feasibility of a FFF beam was therefore demonstrated, with beam modelling, treatment planning and verification being successfully accomplished.

  8. The dosimetric significance of using 10 MV photons for volumetric modulated arc therapy for post-prostatectomy irradiation of the prostate bed

    PubMed Central

    Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of the study was to analyse the dosimetric differences when using 10 MV instead of 6 MV for VMAT treatment plans for post-prostatectomy irradiation of the prostate bed. Methods and materials Ten post-prostatectomy prostate bed irradiation cases previously treated using 6 MV with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were re-planned using 10 MV with VMAT. Prescription dose was 66.6 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction for 37 daily fractions. The same structure set, number of arcs, field sizes, and minimum dose to the Planning Target Volume (PTV) were used for both 6 MV and 10 MV plans. Results were collected for dose to Organs at Risk (OAR) constraints, dose to the target structures, number of monitor units for each arc, Body V5, Conformity Index, and Integral Dose. The mean values were used to compare the 6 MV and 10 MV results. To determine the statistical significance of the results, a paired Student t test and power analysis was performed. Results Statistically significant lower mean values were observed for the OAR dose constraints for the rectum, bladder-Clinical Target Volume (bladder-CTV), left femoral head, and right femoral head. Also, statistically significant lower mean values were observed for the Body V5, Conformity Index, and Integral Dose. Conclusions Several dosimetric benefits were observed when using 10 MV instead of 6 MV for VMAT based treatment plans. Benefits include sparing more dose from the OAR while still maintaining the same dose coverage to the PTV. Other benefits include lower Body V 5,Conformity Index, and Integral Dose. PMID:27247557

  9. Rethinking wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I.

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Stabilizing CO2 emissions at current levels for fifty years is not consistent with either an atmospheric CO2 concentration below 500 ppm or global temperature increases below 2 °C. Accepting these targets, solving the climate problem requires that emissions peak and decline in the next few decades, and ultimately fall to near zero. Phasing out emissions over 50 years could be achieved by deploying on the order of 19 'wedges', each of which ramps up linearly over a period of 50 years to ultimately avoid 1 GtC y-1 of CO2 emissions. But this level of mitigation will require affordable carbon-free energy systems to be deployed at the scale of tens of terawatts. Any hope for such fundamental and disruptive transformation of the global energy system depends upon coordinated efforts to innovate, plan, and deploy new transportation and energy systems that can provide affordable energy at this scale without emitting CO2 to the atmosphere. 1. Introduction In 2004, Pacala and Socolow published a study in Science arguing that '[h]umanity can solve the carbon and climate problem in the first half of this century simply by scaling up what we already know how to do' [1]. Specifically, they presented 15 options for 'stabilization wedges' that would grow linearly from zero to 1 Gt of carbon emissions avoided per year (GtC y-1 1 Gt = 1012 kg) over 50 years. The solution to the carbon and climate problem, they asserted, was 'to deploy the technologies and/or lifestyle changes necessary to fill all seven wedges of the stabilization triangle'. They claimed this would offset the growth of emissions and put us on a trajectory to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration at 500 ppm if emissions decreased sharply in the second half of the 21st century. The wedge concept has proven popular as an analytical tool for considering the potential of different technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. In the years since the paper was published, it has been cited more than 400 times, and

  10. The matching of wedge transmission factors across six multi-energy linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Weston, S J; Thompson, R C A; Morgan, A M

    2007-01-01

    Elekta Precise linear accelerators create a wedged isodose distribution using a single, fixed, motorized wedge with a nominal wedge angle of 60 degrees. Wedge angles of less than 60 degrees can be produced by varying the proportion of open and wedge monitor units for a given exposure. The fixed wedge can be replaced with a mobile wedge, the position of which can be moved in order to adjust the wedge transmission factor (WTF). Using the original fixed wedges installed in our fleet of six Elekta accelerators, we found a range of 4% in measured wedge transmission factor for 6 MV beams. Results are presented which demonstrate that by using the mobile wedge it is possible to match the wedge transmission factors to within 1% for the six linear accelerators over three energies. PMID:17267473

  11. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yani, Sitti; Dirgayussa, I Gde E.; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam; Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah

    2015-09-30

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm{sup 3}, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3}. The 1 × 10{sup 9} histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in d{sub max} from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3} about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3} about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  12. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, Sitti; Dirgayussa, I. Gde E.; Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam

    2015-09-01

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm3, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3. The 1 × 109 histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in dmax from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3 about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3 about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  13. Rethinking wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I.

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Stabilizing CO2 emissions at current levels for fifty years is not consistent with either an atmospheric CO2 concentration below 500 ppm or global temperature increases below 2 °C. Accepting these targets, solving the climate problem requires that emissions peak and decline in the next few decades, and ultimately fall to near zero. Phasing out emissions over 50 years could be achieved by deploying on the order of 19 'wedges', each of which ramps up linearly over a period of 50 years to ultimately avoid 1 GtC y-1 of CO2 emissions. But this level of mitigation will require affordable carbon-free energy systems to be deployed at the scale of tens of terawatts. Any hope for such fundamental and disruptive transformation of the global energy system depends upon coordinated efforts to innovate, plan, and deploy new transportation and energy systems that can provide affordable energy at this scale without emitting CO2 to the atmosphere. 1. Introduction In 2004, Pacala and Socolow published a study in Science arguing that '[h]umanity can solve the carbon and climate problem in the first half of this century simply by scaling up what we already know how to do' [1]. Specifically, they presented 15 options for 'stabilization wedges' that would grow linearly from zero to 1 Gt of carbon emissions avoided per year (GtC y-1 1 Gt = 1012 kg) over 50 years. The solution to the carbon and climate problem, they asserted, was 'to deploy the technologies and/or lifestyle changes necessary to fill all seven wedges of the stabilization triangle'. They claimed this would offset the growth of emissions and put us on a trajectory to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration at 500 ppm if emissions decreased sharply in the second half of the 21st century. The wedge concept has proven popular as an analytical tool for considering the potential of different technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. In the years since the paper was published, it has been cited more than 400 times, and

  14. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  15. Dose to ‘water-like’ media or dose to tissue in MV photons radiotherapy treatment planning: still a matter of debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreo, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The difference between Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP) based on the assumption of ‘water-like’ tissues with densities obtained from CT procedures, or on tissue compositions derived from CT-determined densities, have been investigated. Stopping powers and electron fluences have been calculated for a range of media and body tissues for 6 MV photon beams, including changes in their physical data (density and stopping powers). These quantities have been used to determine absorbed doses using cavity theory. It is emphasized that tissue compositions given in ICRU or ICRP reports should not be given the standing of physical constants as they correspond to average values obtained for a limited number of human-body samples. It has been shown that mass stopping-power ratios to water are more dependent on patient-to-patient composition differences, and therefore on their mean excitation energies (I-values), than on mass density. Electron fluence in different media are also more dependent on media composition (and their I-values) than on density. However, as a consequence of the balance between fluence and stopping powers, doses calculated from their product are more constant than what the independent stopping powers and fluence variations suggest. Additionally, cancelations in dose ratios minimize the differences between the ‘water-like’ and ‘tissue’ approaches, yielding practically identical results except for bone, and to a lesser extent for adipose tissue. A priori, changing from one approach to another does not seem to be justified considering the large number of approximations and uncertainties involved throughout the treatment planning tissue segmentation and dose calculation procedures. The key issue continues to be the composition of tissues and their I-values, and as these cannot be obtained for individual patients, whatever approach is selected does not lead to significant differences from a water reference dose, the maximum of these being of the

  16. Dose to 'water-like' media or dose to tissue in MV photons radiotherapy treatment planning: still a matter of debate.

    PubMed

    Andreo, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The difference between Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP) based on the assumption of 'water-like' tissues with densities obtained from CT procedures, or on tissue compositions derived from CT-determined densities, have been investigated. Stopping powers and electron fluences have been calculated for a range of media and body tissues for 6 MV photon beams, including changes in their physical data (density and stopping powers). These quantities have been used to determine absorbed doses using cavity theory. It is emphasized that tissue compositions given in ICRU or ICRP reports should not be given the standing of physical constants as they correspond to average values obtained for a limited number of human-body samples. It has been shown that mass stopping-power ratios to water are more dependent on patient-to-patient composition differences, and therefore on their mean excitation energies (I-values), than on mass density. Electron fluence in different media are also more dependent on media composition (and their I-values) than on density. However, as a consequence of the balance between fluence and stopping powers, doses calculated from their product are more constant than what the independent stopping powers and fluence variations suggest. Additionally, cancelations in dose ratios minimize the differences between the 'water-like' and 'tissue' approaches, yielding practically identical results except for bone, and to a lesser extent for adipose tissue. A priori, changing from one approach to another does not seem to be justified considering the large number of approximations and uncertainties involved throughout the treatment planning tissue segmentation and dose calculation procedures. The key issue continues to be the composition of tissues and their I-values, and as these cannot be obtained for individual patients, whatever approach is selected does not lead to significant differences from a water reference dose, the maximum of these being of the order of 5

  17. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  18. Wedge Joints for Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Kenneth E.

    1987-01-01

    Structure assembled rapidly with simple hand tools. Proposed locking wedge joints enable rapid assembly of lightweight beams, towers, scaffolds, and other truss-type structures. Lightweight structure assembled from tubular struts joined at nodes by wedge pins fitting into mating slots. Joint assembled rapidly by seating wedge pin in V-shaped slots and deforming end of strut until primary pawl engages it.

  19. Comparison of pencil-beam, collapsed-cone and Monte-Carlo algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning for 6-MV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Dong Ho

    2015-07-01

    Treatment planning system calculations in inhomogeneous regions may present significant inaccuracies due to loss of electronic equilibrium. In this study, three different dose calculation algorithms, pencil beam (PB), collapsed cone (CC), and Monte-Carlo (MC), provided by our planning system were compared to assess their impact on the three-dimensional planning of lung and breast cases. A total of five breast and five lung cases were calculated by using the PB, CC, and MC algorithms. Planning treatment volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) delineations were performed according to our institution's protocols on the Oncentra MasterPlan image registration module, on 0.3-0.5 cm computed tomography (CT) slices taken under normal respiration conditions. Intensitymodulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were calculated for the three algorithm for each patient. The plans were conducted on the Oncentra MasterPlan (PB and CC) and CMS Monaco (MC) treatment planning systems for 6 MV. The plans were compared in terms of the dose distribution in target, the OAR volumes, and the monitor units (MUs). Furthermore, absolute dosimetry was measured using a three-dimensional diode array detector (ArcCHECK) to evaluate the dose differences in a homogeneous phantom. Comparing the dose distributions planned by using the PB, CC, and MC algorithms, the PB algorithm provided adequate coverage of the PTV. The MUs calculated using the PB algorithm were less than those calculated by using. The MC algorithm showed the highest accuracy in terms of the absolute dosimetry. Differences were found when comparing the calculation algorithms. The PB algorithm estimated higher doses for the target than the CC and the MC algorithms. The PB algorithm actually overestimated the dose compared with those calculated by using the CC and the MC algorithms. The MC algorithm showed better accuracy than the other algorithms.

  20. Monte Carlo modelling of diode detectors for small field MV photon dosimetry: detector model simplification and the sensitivity of correction factors to source parameterization.

    PubMed

    Cranmer-Sargison, G; Weston, S; Evans, J A; Sidhu, N P; Thwaites, D I

    2012-08-21

    The goal of this work was to examine the use of simplified diode detector models within a recently proposed Monte Carlo (MC) based small field dosimetry formalism and to investigate the influence of electron source parameterization has on MC calculated correction factors. BEAMnrc was used to model Varian 6 MV jaw-collimated square field sizes down to 0.5 cm. The IBA stereotactic field diode (SFD), PTW T60016 (shielded) and PTW T60017 (un-shielded) diodes were modelled in DOSRZnrc and isocentric output ratios (OR(fclin)(detMC)) calculated at depths of d = 1.5, 5.0 and 10.0 cm. Simplified detector models were then tested by evaluating the percent difference in (OR(fclin)(detMC)) between the simplified and complete detector models. The influence of active volume dimension on simulated output ratio and response factor was also investigated. The sensitivity of each MC calculated replacement correction factor (k(fclin,fmsr)(Qclin,Qmsr)), as a function of electron FWHM between 0.100 and 0.150 cm and energy between 5.5 and 6.5 MeV, was investigated for the same set of small field sizes using the simplified detector models. The SFD diode can be approximated simply as a silicon chip in water, the T60016 shielded diode can be modelled as a chip in water plus the entire shielding geometry and the T60017 unshielded diode as a chip in water plus the filter plate located upstream. The detector-specific (k(fclin,fmsr)(Qclin,Qmsr)), required to correct measured output ratios using the SFD, T60016 and T60017 diode detectors are insensitive to incident electron energy between 5.5 and 6.5 MeV and spot size variation between FWHM = 0.100 and 0.150 cm. Three general conclusions come out of this work: (1) detector models can be simplified to produce OR(fclin)(detMC) to within 1.0% of those calculated using the complete geometry, where typically not only the silicon chip, but also any high density components close to the chip, such as scattering plates or shielding material is necessary

  1. 2D mapping of the MV photon fluence and 3D dose reconstruction in real time for quality assurance during radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrowaili, Z. A.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Carolan, M.; Fuduli, I.; Porumb, C.; Petasecca, M.; Metcalfe, P.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2015-09-01

    Summary: the photon irradiation response of a 2D solid state transmission detector array mounted in a linac block tray is used to reconstruct the projected 2D dose map in a homogenous phantom along rays that diverge from the X-ray source and pass through each of the 121 detector elements. A unique diode response-to-dose scaling factor, applied to all detectors, is utilised in the reconstruction to demonstrate that real time QA during radiotherapy treatment is feasible. Purpose: to quantitatively demonstrate reconstruction of the real time radiation dose from the irradiation response of the 11×11 silicon Magic Plate (MP) detector array operated in Transmission Mode (MPTM). Methods and Materials: in transmission mode the MP is positioned in the block tray of a linac so that the central detector of the array lies on the central axis of the radiation beam. This central detector is used to determine the conversion factor from measured irradiation response to reconstructed dose at any point on the central axis within a homogenous solid water phantom. The same unique conversion factor is used for all MP detector elements lying within the irradiation field. Using the two sets of data, the 2D or 3D dose map is able to be reconstructed in the homogenous phantom. The technique we have developed is illustrated here for different depths and irradiation field sizes, (5 × 5 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2) as well as a highly non uniform irradiation field. Results: we find that the MPTM response is proportional to the projected 2D dose map measured at a specific phantom depth, the "sweet depth". A single factor, for several irradiation field sizes and depths, is derived to reconstruct the dose in the phantom along rays projected from the photon source through each MPTM detector element. We demonstrate that for all field sizes using the above method, the 2D reconstructed and measured doses agree to within ± 2.48% (2 standard deviation) for all in-field MP detector elements. Conclusions: a

  2. Coupled wedge waves.

    PubMed

    Abell, Bradley C; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J

    2013-11-01

    The interface between two wedges can be treated as a displacement discontinuity characterized by elastic stiffnesses. By representing the boundary between the two quarter-spaces as a displacement discontinuity, coupled wedge waves were determined theoretically to be dispersive and to depend on the specific stiffness of the non-welded contact between the two wedges. Laboratory experiments on isotropic and anisotropic aluminum confirmed the theoretical prediction that the velocity of coupled wedge waves, for a non-welded interface, ranged continuously from the single wedge wave velocity at low stress to the Rayleigh velocity as the load applied normal to the interface was increased. Elastic waves propagating along the coupled wedges of two quarter-spaces in non-welded contact are found to exist theoretically even when the material properties of the two quarter-spaces are the same.

  3. Determination of output factor for 6 MV small photon beam: comparison between Monte Carlo simulation technique and microDiamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krongkietlearts, K.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Paisangittisakul, N.

    2016-03-01

    In order to improve the life's quality for a cancer patient, the radiation techniques are constantly evolving. Especially, the two modern techniques which are intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are quite promising. They comprise of many small beam sizes (beamlets) with various intensities to achieve the intended radiation dose to the tumor and minimal dose to the nearby normal tissue. The study investigates whether the microDiamond detector (PTW manufacturer), a synthetic single crystal diamond detector, is suitable for small field output factor measurement. The results were compared with those measured by the stereotactic field detector (SFD) and the Monte Carlo simulation (EGSnrc/BEAMnrc/DOSXYZ). The calibration of Monte Carlo simulation was done using the percentage depth dose and dose profile measured by the photon field detector (PFD) of the 10×10 cm2 field size with 100 cm SSD. Comparison of the values obtained from the calculations and measurements are consistent, no more than 1% difference. The output factors obtained from the microDiamond detector have been compared with those of SFD and Monte Carlo simulation, the results demonstrate the percentage difference of less than 2%.

  4. SU-E-J-239: Influence of RF Coil Materials On Surface and Buildup Dose From a 6MV Photon Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to perform real time tumour tracking using an integrated Linac-MR, images have to be acquired during irradiation. MRI uses RF coils in close proximity to the imaged volume. Given current RF coil designs this means that the high energy photons will be passing through the coil before reaching the patient. This study experimentally investigates the dose modifications that occur due to the presence of various RF coil materials in the treatment beam. Methods: Polycarbonate, copper or aluminum tape, and Teflon were used to emulate the base, conductor and cover respectively of a surface RF coil. These materials were placed at various distances from the surface of polystyrene or solid water phantoms which were irradiated in the presence of no magnetic field, a transverse 0.2T magnetic field, and a parallel 0.2T magnetic field. Percent depth doses were measured using ion chambers. Results: A significant increase in surface and buildup dose is observed. The surface dose is seen to decrease with an increasing separation between the emulated coil and the phantom surface, when no magnetic field is present. When a transverse magnetic field is applied the surface dose decreases faster with increasing separation, as some of the electrons created in the coil are curved away from the phantom’s surface. When a parallel field is present the surface dose stays approximately constant for small separations, only slightly decreasing for separations greater than 5cm, since the magnetic field focuses the electrons produced in the coil materials not allowing them to scatter. Conclusion: Irradiating a patient through an RF coil leads to an increase in the surface and buildup doses. Mitigating this increase is important for the successful clinical use of either a transverse or a parallel configuration Linac-MR unit. This project is partially supported by an operating grant from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR MOP 93752)

  5. Micromachine Wedge Stepping Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Schriner, H.K.

    1998-11-04

    A wedge stepping motor, which will index a mechanism, has been designed and fabricated in the surface rnicromachine SUMMiT process. This device has demonstrated the ability to index one gear tooth at a time with speeds up to 205 teeth/see. The wedge stepper motor has the following features, whi:h will be useful in a number of applications. o The ability to precisely position mechanical components. . Simple pulse signals can be used for operation. o Only 2 drive signals are requixed for operation. o Torque and precision capabilities increase with device size . The device to be indexed is restrained at all times by the wedge shaped tooth that is used for actuation. This paper will discuss the theory of operation and desi=m of the wedge stepping motor. The fabrication and testing of I he device will also be presented.

  6. Wedges for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Donald A.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer device is provided which is used in ultrasonic inspection of the material surrounding a threaded hole and which comprises a wedge of plastic or the like including a curved threaded surface adapted to be screwed into the threaded hole and a generally planar surface on which a conventional ultrasonic transducer is mounted. The plastic wedge can be rotated within the threaded hole to inspect for flaws in the material surrounding the threaded hole.

  7. The Cosmonaut Sea Wedge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solli, K.; Kuvaas, B.; Kristoffersen, Y.; Leitchenkov, G.; Guseva, J.; Gandyukhin, V.

    2007-01-01

    A set of multi-channel seismic profiles (~15000 km) acquired by Russia, Norway and Australia has been used to investigate the depositional evolution of the Cosmonaut Sea margin of East Antarctica. We recognize a regional sediment wedge below the upper part of the continental rise. The wedge, herein termed the Cosmonaut Sea Wedge, is positioned stratigraphically underneath the inferred glaciomarine section and extends for at least 1200 km along the continental margin and from 80 to about 250 km seaward or to the north. Lateral variations in the growth pattern of the wedge indicate several overlapping depocentres, which at their distal northern end are flanked by elongated mounded drifts and contourite sheets. The internal stratification of the mounded drift deposits suggests that westward flowing bottom currents reworked the marginal deposits. The action of these currents together with sea-level changes is considered to have controlled the growth of the wedge. We interpret the Cosmonaut Sea Wedge as a composite feature comprising several bottom current reworked fan systems.

  8. Dose distribution analysis of physical and dynamic wedges by using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy MatriXX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Dae-chul

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated differences between the physical wedge and the dynamic wedge distributions of radiation by using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ImRT) MatriXX. The linear accelerator used X-rays with energy levels of 6 MV and 10 MV to adjust the collimator by motoring the independent jaws (X1, X2, Y1, Y2) for setting wedge angles of 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees. The collimator field size was set as 10 × 10 cm2 or 20 × 20 cm2 at the maximum dose point. The dose distribution for each wedge had ±5% and ±11% errors for field sizes of 10 × 10 cm2 and 20 × 20 cm2, respectively. The error was greatest at a wedge angle of 45 degrees and was pronounced at the end of the dynamic wedge where Y1 and Y2 met. Consequently, concluded that the dose distributions were similar for both wedges for the field size of a small beam profile. The beam dose was greatly increased at the end of the dynamic wedge. A more precise estimate of the therapeutic dose of radiation for a dynamic wedge that nearly matches that of the physical wedge can be achieved by correcting of the increasing part of the beam dose. The findings imply that a heavy wedge filter should not be used when calculating the isodose distribution and the therapeutic dose.

  9. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light–matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (∼90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ∼0.004λvac3 in an exposed single-mode waveguide–resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light–matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon–matter coupling. PMID:26284499

  10. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Kress, Stephan J P; Antolinez, Felipe V; Richner, Patrizia; Jayanti, Sriharsha V; Kim, David K; Prins, Ferry; Riedinger, Andreas; Fischer, Maximilian P C; Meyer, Stefan; McPeak, Kevin M; Poulikakos, Dimos; Norris, David J

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light-matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (~90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ~0.004λvac(3) in an exposed single-mode waveguide-resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light-matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon-matter coupling.

  11. Europa Wedge Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image shows an area of crustal separation on Jupiter's moon, Europa. Lower resolution pictures taken earlier in the tour of NASA's Galileo spacecraft revealed that dark wedge-shaped bands in this region are areas where the icy crust has completely pulled apart. Dark material has filled up from below and filled the void created by this separation.

    In the lower left corner of this image, taken by Galileo's onboard camera on December 16, 1997, a portion of one dark wedge area is visible, revealing a linear texture along the trend of the wedge. The lines of the texture change orientation slightly and reflect the fact that we are looking at a bend in the wedge. The older, bright background, visible on the right half of the image, is criss-crossed with ridges. A large, bright ridge runs east-west through the upper part of the image, cutting across both the older background plains and the wedge. This ridge is rough in texture, with numerous small terraces and troughs containing dark material.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the northwest. This image, centered at approximately 16.5 degrees south latitude and 196.5 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 10 kilometers square (about 6.5 miles square). The resolution of this image is about 26 meters per picture element. This image was taken by the solid state imaging system from a distance of 1250 kilometers (750 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  12. The effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the sensitivity of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) exposed to 6 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Omotayo, Azeez A.; Cygler, Joanna E.; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) exposed to accumulated doses of 6 MV photon beams. Methods: In this study the authors used nanoDot OSLDs readout with a MicroStar reader. The authors first characterized the dose-response, fading, and OSL signal loss of OSLDs exposed to doses from 0.5 to 10 Gy. To determine the effect of different bleaching wavelengths on the OSLDs' response, the authors optically treated the OSLDs with 26 W fluorescent lamps in two modes: (i) directly under the lamps for 10, 120, and 600 min and (ii) with a long-pass filter for 55, 600, and 2000 min. Changes in the OSLDs' sensitivity were determined for an irradiation-readout-bleaching-readout cycle after irradiations with 1 and 10 Gy dose fractions. Results: The OSLDs presented supralinearity for doses of 2 Gy and above. The signal loss rates for sequential readouts were (0.287 {+-} 0.007)% per readout in the reader's strong-stimulation mode, and (0.019 {+-} 0.002)% and (0.035 {+-} 0.007)% per readout for doses of 0.2 and 10 Gy, respectively, in the reader's weak-stimulation mode. Fading half-life values ranged from (0.98 {+-} 0.14) min to (1.77 {+-} 0.24) min and fading showed dose dependence for the first 10-min interval. For 10 and 55 min bleaching using modes (i) and (ii), the OSL signal increased 14% for an accumulated dose of 7 Gy (1 Gy fractions). For OSLDs exposed to 10 Gy fractions, the OSL signal increased 30% and 25% for bleaching modes (i) and (ii) and accumulated dose of 70 Gy, respectively. For 120 and 600 min bleaching using modes (i) and (ii), the OSL signal increased 2.7% and 1.5% for an accumulated dose of 7 Gy (1 Gy fractions), respectively. For 10 Gy fractions, the signal increased 14% for bleaching mode (i) (120 min bleaching) and decreased 1.3% for bleaching mode (ii) (600 min bleaching) for an accumulated dose of 70 Gy. For 600 and 2000 min bleaching

  13. Breast Radiotherapy with Mixed Energy Photons; a Model for Optimal Beam Weighting.

    PubMed

    Birgani, Mohammadjavad Tahmasebi; Fatahiasl, Jafar; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Bagheri, Ali; Behrooz, Mohammad Ali; Zabiehzadeh, Mansour; Meskani, Reza; Gomari, Maryam Talaei

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of high energy photons (>10 MV) with an optimal weight using a mixed energy technique is a practical way to generate a homogenous dose distribution while maintaining adequate target coverage in intact breast radiotherapy. This study represents a model for estimation of this optimal weight for day to day clinical usage. For this purpose, treatment planning computed tomography scans of thirty-three consecutive early stage breast cancer patients following breast conservation surgery were analyzed. After delineation of the breast clinical target volume (CTV) and placing opposed wedge paired isocenteric tangential portals, dosimeteric calculations were conducted and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were generated, first with pure 6 MV photons and then these calculations were repeated ten times with incorporating 18 MV photons (ten percent increase in weight per step) in each individual patient. For each calculation two indexes including maximum dose in the breast CTV (Dmax) and the volume of CTV which covered with 95% Isodose line (VCTV, 95%IDL) were measured according to the DVH data and then normalized values were plotted in a graph. The optimal weight of 18 MV photons was defined as the intersection point of Dmax and VCTV, 95%IDL graphs. For creating a model to predict this optimal weight multiple linear regression analysis was used based on some of the breast and tangential field parameters. The best fitting model for prediction of 18 MV photons optimal weight in breast radiotherapy using mixed energy technique, incorporated chest wall separation plus central lung distance (Adjusted R2=0.776). In conclusion, this study represents a model for the estimation of optimal beam weighting in breast radiotherapy using mixed photon energy technique for routine day to day clinical usage.

  14. Clinical implementation of enhanced dynamic wedges into the Pinnacle treatment planning system: Monte Carlo validation and patient-specific QA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Munir; Deng, Jun; Lund, Molly W.; Chen, Zhe; Kimmett, James; Moran, Meena S.; Nath, Ravinder

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this work is to present a systematic Monte Carlo validation study on the clinical implementation of the enhanced dynamic wedges (EDWs) into the Pinnacle3 (Philips Medical Systems, Fitchburg, WI) treatment planning system (TPS) and QA procedures for patient plan verification treated with EDWs. Modeling of EDW beams in the Pinnacle3 TPS, which employs a collapsed-cone convolution superposition (CCCS) dose model, was based on a combination of measured open-beam data and the 'Golden Segmented Treatment Table' (GSTT) provided by Varian for each photon beam energy. To validate EDW models, dose profiles of 6 and 10 MV photon beams from a Clinac 2100 C/D were measured in virtual water at depths from near-surface to 30 cm for a wide range of field sizes and wedge angles using the Profiler 2 (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) diode array system. The EDW output factors (EDWOFs) for square fields from 4 to 20 cm wide were measured in virtual water using a small-volume Farmer-type ionization chamber placed at a depth of 10 cm on the central axis. Furthermore, the 6 and 10 MV photon beams emerging from the treatment head of Clinac 2100 C/D were fully modeled and the central-axis depth doses, the off-axis dose profiles and the output factors in water for open and dynamically wedged fields were calculated using the Monte Carlo (MC) package EGS4. Our results have shown that (1) both the central-axis depth doses and the off-axis dose profiles of various EDWs computed with the CCCS dose model and MC simulations showed good agreement with the measurements to within 2%/2 mm; (2) measured EDWOFs used for monitor-unit calculation in Pinnacle3 TPS agreed well with the CCCS and MC predictions within 2%; (3) all the EDW fields satisfied our validation criteria of 1% relative dose difference and 2 mm distance-to-agreement (DTA) with 99-100% passing rate in routine patient treatment plan verification using MapCheck 2D diode array.

  15. Quality assurance of electron and photon beam energy using the BQ-CHECK phantom.

    PubMed

    Speight, Richard J; Esmail, Ashraf; Weston, Steve J

    2011-02-01

    The BQ-CHECK phantom (PTW Freiburg, Germany) has been designed to be used with a 2D ion chamber array to facilitate the quality assurance (QA) of electron and photon beam qualities (BQ). The BQ-CHECK phantom has three wedges covering the diagonal axes of the beam: two opposed aluminum wedges used to measure electron energy and a single copper wedge used to measure photon energy. The purpose of this work was to assess the suitability of the BQ-CHECK phantom for use in a routine QA program. A range of percentage depth dose (PDD) curves for two photon beams and four electron beams were measured using a MP3 plotting tank (PTW Freiburg). These beams were used to irradiate a STARCHECK array (PTW Freiburg) with and without the BQ-CHECK phantom on top of the array. For photons, the ratio of the signals from two chambers underneath the copper wedge was used as an effective TPR measurement (TPR(eff)) and, for electrons, the full width at half maximum of the profile (E(FWHM)) underneath the aluminum wedges was used as an electron energy constancy measurement. PDD measurements were compared with TPR(eff) and E(FWHM) to assess the sensitivity of the BQ-CHECK phantom. The clinical tolerances of TPReff were determined for 6 MV (0.634-0.649), and 10MV (0.683-0.692). For electrons, the clinical tolerances of EFWHM were determined for 6 MeV (94.8-103.4 mm), 8 MeV (105.5-114.0 mm), 10 MeV (125.4-133.9 mm) and 12 MeV (138.8-147.3 mm).Electron and photon energy metrics are presented which demonstrate that the BQ-CHECK phantom could be used to form part of an efficient routine monthly QA program. Acceptable beam quality limits for various nominal beam energies were established and at these limits, modified profiles were acquired using the STARCHECK array. From the modified profiles, E(FWHM) and TPR(eff) were determined for the electron and photon beams, respectively. It was demonstrated that both E(FWHM) and the TPR(eff) have a linear relationship with conventional beam quality metrics.

  16. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  17. Sojourner, Wedge, & Shark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image taken near the end of daytime operations on Sol 50 shows the Sojourner rover between the rocks 'Wedge' (foreground) and 'Shark' (behind rover). The rover successfully deployed its Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer on Shark on Sol 52.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  18. Wedge and Flat Top

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Flat Top, the rectangular rock at right, is part of a stretch of rocky terrain in this image, taken by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. Dust has accumulated on the top of Flat Top, but is not present on the sides due to the steep angles of the rock. This dust may have been placed by dust storms moving across the Martian surface. The rock dubbed 'Wedge' is at left. The objects have been studied using several different color filters on the IMP camera.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  19. Aligning Optical Fibers by Means of Actuated MEMS Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Brian; Ghodssi, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) of a proposed type would be designed and fabricated to effect lateral and vertical alignment of optical fibers with respect to optical, electro-optical, optoelectronic, and/or photonic devices on integrated circuit chips and similar monolithic device structures. A MEMS device of this type would consist of a pair of oppositely sloped alignment wedges attached to linear actuators that would translate the wedges in the plane of a substrate, causing an optical fiber in contact with the sloping wedge surfaces to undergo various displacements parallel and perpendicular to the plane. In making it possible to accurately align optical fibers individually during the packaging stages of fabrication of the affected devices, this MEMS device would also make it possible to relax tolerances in other stages of fabrication, thereby potentially reducing costs and increasing yields. In a typical system according to the proposal (see Figure 1), one or more pair(s) of alignment wedges would be positioned to create a V groove in which an optical fiber would rest. The fiber would be clamped at a suitable distance from the wedges to create a cantilever with a slight bend to push the free end of the fiber gently to the bottom of the V groove. The wedges would be translated in the substrate plane by amounts Dx1 and Dx2, respectively, which would be chosen to move the fiber parallel to the plane by a desired amount Dx and perpendicular to the plane by a desired amount Dy. The actuators used to translate the wedges could be variants of electrostatic or thermal actuators that are common in MEMS.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of the Head Scatter and Jaw Transmission Correction Factor for Commissioning of Enhanced Dynamic Wedge Fields Using a MapCHECK 2 Diode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Edward C.

    Quality assurance in radiation oncology treatment planning requires independent verification of dose to be delivered to a patient through "second check" calculations for simple plans as well as planar dose fluence measurements for more complex treatments, such as intensity modulated radiation treatments (IMRT). Discrepancies between treatment planning system (TPS) and second check calculations created a need for treatment plan verification using a two dimensional diode array for Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) fields. While these measurements met clinical standards for treatment, they revealed room for improvement in the EDW model. The purpose of this study is to analyze the head scatter and jaw transmission effects of the moving jaw in EDW fields by measuring dose profiles with a two dimensional diode array in order to minimize differences between the manufacturer provided fluence table (Golden Segmented Treatment Table) and actual machine output. The jaw transmission effect reduces the dose gradient in the wedge direction due to transmission photons adding dose to the heel region of the field. The head scatter effect also reduces the gradient in the dose profile due to decreased accelerator output at increasingly smaller field sizes caused by the moving jaw. The field size continuously decreases with jaw motion, and thus the toe region of the wedge receives less dose than anticipated due to less head scatter contribution for small field sizes. The Golden Segmented Treatment Table (GSTT) does not take these factors into account since they are specific to each individual machine. Thus, these factors need to be accounted for in the TPS to accurately model the gradient of the wedge. The TPS used in this clinic uses one correction factor (transmission factor) to account for both effects since both factors reduce the dose gradient of the wedge. Dose profile measurements were made for 5x5 cm2, 10x10 cm2, and 20x20 cm2 field sizes with open fields and 10°, 15°, 20°, 25

  1. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer having liquid/wedge and gas/wedge interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic liquid densitometer that uses a material wedge having two sections, one with a liquid/wedge interface and another with a gas/wedge interface. It is preferred that the wedge have an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the liquid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the liquid. Ultrasonic signals are internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a liquid is determined by immersing the wedge into the liquid and measuring reflections of ultrasound at the liquid/wedge interface and at the gas/wedge interface.

  2. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  3. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  4. Wedge immersed thermistor bolometer measures infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyfus, M. G.

    1965-01-01

    Wedge immersed-thermistor bolometer measures infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The thermistor flakes are immersed by optical contact on a wedge-shaped germanium lens whose narrow dimension is clamped between two complementary wedge-shaped germanium blocks bonded with a suitable adhesive.

  5. A 2D ion chamber array audit of wedged and asymmetric fields in an inhomogeneous lung phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, Jessica; Dunn, Leon Alves, Andrew; Kenny, John; Lehmann, Joerg; Williams, Ivan; Kron, Tomas; Cole, Andrew

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) has implemented a new method of a nonreference condition Level II type dosimetric audit of radiotherapy services to increase measurement accuracy and patient safety within Australia. The aim of this work is to describe the methodology, tolerances, and outcomes from the new audit. Methods: The ACDS Level II audit measures the dose delivered in 2D planes using an ionization chamber based array positioned at multiple depths. Measurements are made in rectilinear homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms composed of slabs of solid water and lung. Computer generated computed tomography data sets of the rectilinear phantoms are supplied to the facility prior to audit for planning of a range of cases including reference fields, asymmetric fields, and wedged fields. The audit assesses 3D planning with 6 MV photons with a static (zero degree) gantry. Scoring is performed using local dose differences between the planned and measured dose within 80% of the field width. The overall audit result is determined by the maximum dose difference over all scoring points, cases, and planes. Pass (Optimal Level) is defined as maximum dose difference ≤3.3%, Pass (Action Level) is ≤5.0%, and Fail (Out of Tolerance) is >5.0%. Results: At close of 2013, the ACDS had performed 24 Level II audits. 63% of the audits passed, 33% failed, and the remaining audit was not assessable. Of the 15 audits that passed, 3 were at Pass (Action Level). The high fail rate is largely due to a systemic issue with modeling asymmetric 60° wedges which caused a delivered overdose of 5%–8%. Conclusions: The ACDS has implemented a nonreference condition Level II type audit, based on ion chamber 2D array measurements in an inhomogeneous slab phantom. The powerful diagnostic ability of this audit has allowed the ACDS to rigorously test the treatment planning systems implemented in Australian radiotherapy facilities. Recommendations from audits have led to

  6. The effect of a dynamic wedge in the medial tangential field upon the contralateral breast dose

    SciTech Connect

    McParland, B.J. )

    1990-12-01

    The elevated incidence of breast cancer following irradiation of breast tissue has led to concern over the magnitude of the scattered radiation received by the uninvolved contralateral breast during radiation therapy for a primary breast lesion and the risk of an induced contralateral breast cancer. Some linear accelerators use a single dynamic (or universal) wedge that is mounted within the treatment head at an extended distance from the patient. Because of the combined effects of distance and shielding, the contralateral breast dose due to a medial tangent containing a dynamic wedge is expected to be less than that containing a conventional wedge. This paper presents contralateral breast dose (CBD) measurements performed on an anthropomorphic phantom with breast prostheses irradiated with 6 MV X rays from a linear accelerator equipped with a dynamic wedge. Doses were measured at 15 points within the contralateral breast prosthesis with thermoluminescent dosimeters. It was found that the contralateral breast dose per unit target breast dose decreases with the perpendicular distance from the posterior edge of the medial tangent to the dose measurement point and increases with effective wedge angle by factors ranging up to 2.8, in agreement with data presented earlier for a water phantom geometry. This dose elevation showed no statistically significant dependence (p less than 0.05) upon the perpendicular distance from the beam edge. Comparisons with data in the literature show that the contralateral breast dose increase by a dynamic wedge is typically only about half of that reported for a conventional wedge for the same wedge angle and distance from the beam.

  7. Constituent Components of Out-of-Field Scatter Dose for 18-MV Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy: A Comparison With 6-MV and Implications for Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, Jeremy D.; Smith, Ryan; Lancaster, Craig M.; Haynes, Matthew; Jones, Phillip; Panettieri, Vanessa

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Methods and Materials: Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Results: Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite

  8. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Iyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  9. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Lyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0, 30, 45, and 60. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  10. Wedged Fibers Suppress Feedback of Laser Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.

    1986-01-01

    When injected laser is coupled into optical fiber, emission instabilities arise because of optical feedback losses from fiber into laser. Coupling efficiencies as high as 80 percent, however, obtained by shaping end of multimode fiber into obtuse-angled wedge. Because slanted sides eliminate back reflection, such wedged fiber achieves high coupling efficiency.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of the Pokeweed Mosaic Virus (PkMV)-New Jersey Isolate and Its Comparison to PkMV-MD and PkMV-PA.

    PubMed

    Di, Rong

    2016-09-08

    Pokeweed mosaic virus (PkMV) causes systemically mosaic symptoms on pokeweed (Phytolacca americana L.) plants. The genome of the PkMV-NJ (New Jersey) isolate was cloned by PCR and sequenced by the Sanger sequencing method. The sequence comparison indicates that PkMV-NJ is more divergent from the other two sequenced isolates, PkMV-MD and PkMV-PA.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Pokeweed Mosaic Virus (PkMV)-New Jersey Isolate and Its Comparison to PkMV-MD and PkMV-PA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pokeweed mosaic virus (PkMV) causes systemically mosaic symptoms on pokeweed (Phytolacca americana L.) plants. The genome of the PkMV-NJ (New Jersey) isolate was cloned by PCR and sequenced by the Sanger sequencing method. The sequence comparison indicates that PkMV-NJ is more divergent from the other two sequenced isolates, PkMV-MD and PkMV-PA. PMID:27609914

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the Pokeweed Mosaic Virus (PkMV)-New Jersey Isolate and Its Comparison to PkMV-MD and PkMV-PA.

    PubMed

    Di, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Pokeweed mosaic virus (PkMV) causes systemically mosaic symptoms on pokeweed (Phytolacca americana L.) plants. The genome of the PkMV-NJ (New Jersey) isolate was cloned by PCR and sequenced by the Sanger sequencing method. The sequence comparison indicates that PkMV-NJ is more divergent from the other two sequenced isolates, PkMV-MD and PkMV-PA. PMID:27609914

  14. Generation of virtual monochromatic CBCT from dual kV/MV beam projections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hao; Liu, Bo; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel on-board imaging technique which allows generation of virtual monochromatic (VM) cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a selected energy from combined kilovoltage (kV)/megavoltage (MV) beam projections. Methods: With the current orthogonal kV/MV imaging hardware equipped in modern linear accelerators, both MV projections (from gantry angle of 0°–100°) and kV projections (90°–200°) were acquired as gantry rotated a total of 110°. A selected range of overlap projections between 90° to 100° were then decomposed into two material projections using experimentally determined parameters from orthogonally stacked aluminum and acrylic step-wedges. Given attenuation coefficients of aluminum and acrylic at a predetermined energy, one set of VM projections could be synthesized from two corresponding sets of decomposed projections. Two linear functions were generated using projection information at overlap angles to convert kV and MV projections at nonoverlap angles to approximate VM projections for CBCT reconstruction. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for different inserts in VM CBCTs of a CatPhan phantom with various selected energies and compared with those in kV and MV CBCTs. The effect of overlap projection number on CNR was evaluated. Additionally, the effect of beam orientation was studied by scanning the CatPhan sandwiched with two 5 cm solid-water phantoms on both lateral sides and an electronic density phantom with two metal bolt inserts. Results: Proper selection of VM energy [30 and 40 keV for low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polymethylpentene, 2 MeV for Delrin] provided comparable or even better CNR results as compared with kV or MV CBCT. An increased number of overlap kV and MV projection demonstrated only marginal improvements of CNR for different inserts (with the exception of LDPE) and therefore one projection overlap was found to be sufficient for the CatPhan study. It was also evident that the optimal CBCT image

  15. Capillarity driven motion of solid film wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.; Miksis, M.J.; Voorhees, P.W.; Davis, S.H.

    1997-06-01

    A solid film freshly deposited on a substrate may form a non-equilibrium contact angle with the substrate, and will evolve. This morphological evolution near the contact line is investigated by studying the motion of a solid wedge on a substrate. The contact angle of the wedge changes at time t = 0 from the wedge angle {alpha} to the equilibrium contact angle {beta}, and its effects spread into the wedge via capillarity-driven surface diffusion. The film profiles at different times are found to be self-similar, with the length scale increasing as t{sup 1 4}. The self-similar film profile is determined numerically by a shooting method for {alpha} and {beta} between 0 and 180. In general, the authors find that the film remains a wedge when {alpha} = {beta}. For {alpha} < {beta}, the film retracts, whereas for {alpha} > {beta}, the film extends. For {alpha} = 90{degree}, the results describe the growth of grain-boundary grooves for arbitrary dihedral angles. For {beta} = 90{degree}, the solution also applies to a free-standing wedge, and the thin-wedge profiles agree qualitatively with those observed in transmission electron microscope specimens.

  16. Ultrasonic transducer with laminated coupling wedge

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1976-08-03

    An ultrasonic transducer capable of use in a high-temperature environment incorporates a laminated metal coupling wedge including a reflecting edge shaped as a double sloping roof and a transducer crystal backed by a laminated metal sound absorber disposed so as to direct sound waves through the coupling wedge and into a work piece, reflections from the interface between the coupling wedge and the work piece passing to the reflecting edge. Preferably the angle of inclination of the two halves of the reflecting edge are different.

  17. Pressure Distributions About Finite Wedges in Bounded and Unbounded Subsonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, Patrick L; Prasse, Ernst I

    1953-01-01

    An analytical investigation of incompressible flow about wedges was made to determine effects of tunnel-wedge ratio and wedge angle on the wedge pressure distributions. The region of applicability of infinite wedge-type velocity distribution was examined for finite wedges. Theoretical and experimental pressure coefficients for various tunnel-wedge ratios, wedge angles, and subsonic Mach numbers were compared.

  18. Hydrologic Data and Evaluation for Model Validation Wells, MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3 near the Project Shoal Area

    SciTech Connect

    B. Lyles; P. Oberlander; D. Gillespie; D. Donithan; J. Chapman; J. Healey

    2007-02-14

    In 2006, a drilling campaign was conducted at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) to provide information for model validation, emplace long-term monitoring wells, and develop baseline geochemistry for long term hydrologic monitoring. Water levels were monitored in the vicinity of the drilling, in the existing wells HC-1 and HC-6, as well as in the newly drilled wells, MV-1, MV-2 and MV-3 and their associated piezometers. Periodic water level measurements were also made in existing wells HC-2, HC-3, HC-4, HC-5 and HC-7. A lithium bromide chemical tracer was added to drilling fluids during the installation of the monitoring and validation (MV) wells and piezometers. The zones of interest were the fractured, jointed and faulted horizons within a granitic body. These horizons generally have moderate hydraulic conductivities. As a result, the wells and their shallower piezometers required strenuous purging and development to remove introduced drilling fluids as evidenced by bromide concentrations. After airlift and surging well development procedures, the wells were pumped continuously until the bromide concentration was less then 1 milligram per liter (mg/L). Water quality samples were collected after the well development was completed. Tritium scans were preformed before other analyses to ensure the absence of high levels of radioactivity. Tritium levels were less than 2,000 pico-curies per liter. Samples were also analyzed for carbon-14 and iodine-129, stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, as well as major cations and anions. Aquifer tests were performed in each MV well after the bromide concentration fell below acceptable levels. Water level data from the aquifer tests were used to compute aquifer hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity

  19. The Effect of Large-Field Wedge Filters on Stopping Power Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Ronald Jay

    Over the past few decades, linear accelerators have been used for the treatment of cancer. These accelerators produce a spectrum of x-ray energies, with the maximum energy determined by the accelerating potential in the accelerator waveguide. Traditionally, the beams produced by these accelerators have been modified for certain treatment schemes to improve the overall dose distribution in the tumor volume. One of the beam modifiers has been the use of wedge filters. Although it has been accepted for some years that the introduction of a wedge filter hardens the x-ray beam from a linear accelerator, little or no correction for this effect has been routinely performed in the typical clinic. The results of this research will demonstrate that (1) a detectable change in the x-ray fluence energy distribution results with the introduction of a large field wedge, and (2) the change in the photon fluence results in a change in the average stopping power ratio for water to air used in the conversion of ionization chamber reading to absorbed dose. These effects are demonstrated for a variety of configurations including central axis and off axis points, with and without the wedge. To demonstrate the change in the x-ray fluence energy distribution, a reconstruction of bremsstrahlung spectra from measured transmission data technique was used, utilizing a Laplace Transform Pair Model. Following determination of Phi(E) for various beam configurations, with and without a wedge filter, average stopping power ratios of water to air were determined for each spectra. The results presented indicate that although a significant change in the photon fluence energy distribution results with the introduction of the wedge filter into the beam, the change in stopping power is <=q 0.5 %. This small change, however, is on the order of the chamber perturbation factors normally incorporated when using national or international dosimetry protocols. Thus this small change should be considered in

  20. The novel HVEE 5 MV Tandetron™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottdang, A.; Mous, D. J. W.; Haitsma, R. G.

    2002-05-01

    Recently, HVEE has extended the voltage range for its Tandetron™ accelerators from 3 MV terminal voltage to 5 MV terminal voltage with the development of an entirely new coaxial Tandetron™. The new 5 MV system is presently in the final test phase and will shortly be installed at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain) as part of their new IBA facility. The all-solid-state power supply (parallel-fed Cockroft-Walton type) is constructed around the high-energy accelerator tubes, thereby avoiding the T-shaped tank that was so far characteristic for the HVEE Tandetrons™. During the design of the system special emphasis has been put to minimize the electrical field strength in the complete structure. Using three-dimensional electrostatic field simulations, we were able to identify possible hot spots and to reduce the maximum field strength to 80% compared to that of older designs. This reduction in field strength guarantees more reliable operation at or even above the guaranteed terminal voltage of 5 MV. The electrical power for beam transport is generated by a 10 kW version of a recently in-house developed range of all-solid-state drivers with output powers of up to 25 kW. Apart from IBA applications like heavy element ERDA and NRA, the system is very well suited for other applications like positron emission tomography, deep implants in semiconductors as well as accelerator mass spectrometry of various elements, including 36Cl and 41Ca.

  1. Long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonglai; Wang, Jian

    2014-11-03

    We design a novel long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic (LRHWP) waveguide composed of two identical dielectric nanowires symmetrically placed on two opposed wedges of a diamond shaped metal wire. With strong coupling between the dielectric nanowire mode and long-range surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode, both deep subwavelength mode confinement and low propagation loss are achieved. On one hand, when compared to the previous long-range hybrid SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can achieve smaller mode size with similar propagation length; on the other hand, when compared to the previous hybrid wedge SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can provide an order of magnitude longer propagation length with similar level of mode confinement. The designed LRHWP waveguide also features an overall advantage of one-order improvement of Figure of Merit. We further evaluate in detail the impacts of possible practical fabrication imperfections on the mode properties. The obtained results of mode properties show that the proposed LRHWP waveguide with an optimized wedge tip angle of 140 degree is fairly tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, asymmetry in the vertical direction, variation of wedge tip angle, tilt or rotation of metal wire, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius.

  2. Long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonglai; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    We design a novel long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic (LRHWP) waveguide composed of two identical dielectric nanowires symmetrically placed on two opposed wedges of a diamond shaped metal wire. With strong coupling between the dielectric nanowire mode and long-range surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode, both deep subwavelength mode confinement and low propagation loss are achieved. On one hand, when compared to the previous long-range hybrid SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can achieve smaller mode size with similar propagation length; on the other hand, when compared to the previous hybrid wedge SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can provide an order of magnitude longer propagation length with similar level of mode confinement. The designed LRHWP waveguide also features an overall advantage of one-order improvement of Figure of Merit. We further evaluate in detail the impacts of possible practical fabrication imperfections on the mode properties. The obtained results of mode properties show that the proposed LRHWP waveguide with an optimized wedge tip angle of 140 degree is fairly tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, asymmetry in the vertical direction, variation of wedge tip angle, tilt or rotation of metal wire, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:25362900

  3. Metal artifact correction for x-ray computed tomography using kV and selective MV imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meng; Keil, Andreas; Constantin, Dragos; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The overall goal of this work is to improve the computed tomography (CT) image quality for patients with metal implants or fillings by completing the missing kilovoltage (kV) projection data with selectively acquired megavoltage (MV) data that do not suffer from photon starvation. When both of these imaging systems, which are available on current radiotherapy devices, are used, metal streak artifacts are avoided, and the soft-tissue contrast is restored, even for regions in which the kV data cannot contribute any information. Methods: Three image-reconstruction methods, including two filtered back-projection (FBP)-based analytic methods and one iterative method, for combining kV and MV projection data from the two on-board imaging systems of a radiotherapy device are presented in this work. The analytic reconstruction methods modify the MV data based on the information in the projection or image domains and then patch the data onto the kV projections for a FBP reconstruction. In the iterative reconstruction, the authors used dual-energy (DE) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) methods to simultaneously combine the kV/MV data and perform the reconstruction. Results: The authors compared kV/MV reconstructions to kV-only reconstructions using a dental phantom with fillings and a hip-implant numerical phantom. Simulation results indicated that dual-energy sinogram patch FBP and the modified dual-energy PWLS method can successfully suppress metal streak artifacts and restore information lost due to photon starvation in the kV projections. The root-mean-square errors of soft-tissue patterns obtained using combined kV/MV data are 10–15 Hounsfield units smaller than those of the kV-only images, and the structural similarity index measure also indicates a 5%–10% improvement in the image quality. The added dose from the MV scan is much less than the dose from the kV scan if a high efficiency MV detector is assumed. Conclusions: The authors have shown that it

  4. Analytical scatter kernels for portal imaging at 6 MV.

    PubMed

    Spies, L; Bortfeld, T

    2001-04-01

    X-ray photon scatter kernels for 6 MV electronic portal imaging are investigated using an analytical and a semi-analytical model. The models are tested on homogeneous phantoms for a range of uniform circular fields and scatterer-to-detector air gaps relevant for clinical use. It is found that a fully analytical model based on an exact treatment of photons undergoing a single Compton scatter event and an approximate treatment of second and higher order scatter events, assuming a multiple-scatter source at the center of the scatter volume, is accurate within 1% (i.e., the residual scatter signal is less than 1% of the primary signal) for field sizes up to 100 cm2 and air gaps over 30 cm, but shows significant discrepancies for larger field sizes. Monte Carlo results are presented showing that the effective multiple-scatter source is located toward the exit surface of the scatterer, rather than at its center. A second model is therefore investigated where second and higher-order scattering is instead modeled by fitting an analytical function describing a nonstationary isotropic point-scatter source to Monte Carlo generated data. This second model is shown to be accurate to within 1% for air gaps down to 20 cm, for field sizes up to 900 cm2 and phantom thicknesses up to 50 cm. PMID:11339752

  5. Heavy ion fusion 2 MV injector

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.

    1995-04-01

    A heavy-ion-fusion driver-scale injector has been constructed and operated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The injector has produced 2.3 MV and 950 mA of K{sup +}, 15% above original design goals in energy and current. Normalized edge emittance of less than 1 {pi} mm-mr was measured over a broad range of parameters. The head-to-tail energy flatness is less than {+-} 0.2% over the 1 {micro}s pulse.

  6. Mechanics of injection wedges in collision orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. B.; Schulmann, K.

    2003-04-01

    Instantaneously juxtaposed lithospheric sections, marked by different geothermal gradient and lithological make-up, are examined to identify zones of highly contrasting strength in adjacent transposed crust and lithospheric mantle. Three types of geotherms and four reference lithospheric segments: thin crust/hot geotherm (rift), thin crust/mean geotherm (relaxed rift), standard crust/hot geotherm (arc), standard crust/mean geotherm (normal crust), are compared with variable permutations of cratonic, standard and rifted lithosphere thicknesses. This permits identification of strong brittle-elastic or plastic mantle, lower and upper crust juxtaposed against plastic rocks of a weak adjacent lithosphere. Vertical positions of shallow dipping detachment zones thus delineate possible areas of hot or cold injection wedges which include: (i) Single shallow wedge (or Flake), (ii) Double shallow and deep wedge, (iii) Deep lithospheric crocodile, (iv) Crustal thickening due to shallow strength differences, (v) Mantle Lithosphere thickening, or wedging, due to deep mantle strength differences and (vii) Exchange tectonics as an extreme wedging process, in which horizontal mass exchange is approximately equal. Rheological calculations are compared to a database of seismic profiles in which the geometry of detachment zones and proposed thermal conditions and lithological make-ups have been presented.

  7. Long polymers near wedges and cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2015-12-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo study of N -step self-avoiding walks, attached to the corner of an impenetrable wedge in two dimensions (d =2 ), or the tip of an impenetrable cone in d =3 , of sizes ranging up to N =106 steps. We find that the critical exponent γα, which determines the dependence of the number of available conformations on N for a cone or wedge with opening angle α , is in good agreement with the theory for d =2 . We study the end-point distribution of the walks in the allowed space and find similarities to the known behavior of random walks (ideal polymers) in the same geometry. For example, the ratio between the mean square end-to-end distances of a polymer near the cone or wedge and a polymer in free space depends linearly on γα, as is known for ideal polymers. We show that the end-point distribution of polymers attached to a wedge does not separate into a product of angular and radial functions, as it does for ideal polymers in the same geometry. The angular dependence of the end position of polymers near the wedge differs from theoretical predictions.

  8. Long polymers near wedges and cones.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2015-12-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo study of N-step self-avoiding walks, attached to the corner of an impenetrable wedge in two dimensions (d=2), or the tip of an impenetrable cone in d=3, of sizes ranging up to N=10(6) steps. We find that the critical exponent γ(α), which determines the dependence of the number of available conformations on N for a cone or wedge with opening angle α, is in good agreement with the theory for d=2. We study the end-point distribution of the walks in the allowed space and find similarities to the known behavior of random walks (ideal polymers) in the same geometry. For example, the ratio between the mean square end-to-end distances of a polymer near the cone or wedge and a polymer in free space depends linearly on γ(α), as is known for ideal polymers. We show that the end-point distribution of polymers attached to a wedge does not separate into a product of angular and radial functions, as it does for ideal polymers in the same geometry. The angular dependence of the end position of polymers near the wedge differs from theoretical predictions. PMID:26764719

  9. Structure of turbulent wedges created by isolated surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuester, Matthew S.; White, Edward B.

    2016-04-01

    Isolated surface roughness in a laminar boundary layer can create a wedge of turbulence that spreads laterally into the surrounding laminar flow. Some recent studies have identified high- and low-speed streaks along the exterior of turbulent wedges. In this experiment, developing turbulent wedges are measured to observe the creation of these streaks. Naphthalene shear stress surface visualization and hotwire measurements are utilized to investigate the details of turbulent wedges created by cylinders in a laminar flat-plate boundary layer. Both the surface visualization and the hotwire measurements show high- and low-speed streaks in the wake of the cylinder that devolve into a turbulent wedge. The turbulent wedge spreading is associated with the emergence of these high- and low-speed streaks along the outside of the wedge. As the wedge evolves in the streamwise direction, these streaks persist inside of the core of the wedge, while new, lower amplitude streaks form along the outside of the wedge. Adding asymmetry to the cylinder moved the virtual origin closer to the roughness and increased the vortex shedding frequency, while adding small-scale roughness features did not strongly affect turbulent wedge development. Intermittency calculations additionally show the origin of the turbulent core inside of the wedge. The structure and spacing of the high-speed streaks along the extremities of the turbulent wedge give insight into the spreading angle of the turbulent wedge.

  10. Wedge indentation of an elastoviscoplastic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhihong; Lucas, Margaret; Adams, Michael J.

    2002-05-01

    This paper describes the modeling of the indentation of an elasto-viscoplastic material. The finite element code ABAQUS was used to study the bulk mechanical, thermal and interface frictional characteristics for rigid wedge indenters. A series of simulations has been performed at a constant velocity to prescribed depths of penetration for a range of wedge surface temperatures and semi-included angles. Selected experimental data are provided as a basis for validating the numerical simulation. In the simulations, the constitutive behavior of the model material Plasticine is treated as non-linear elasto-viscoplastic, in which the stress scales linearly with the elastic strain and non-linearly with the plastic strain rate. The result demonstrate that the FE simulations agree well with the experimental dat of displacement, strain and stress for all the range of wedge angles and temperatures examined.

  11. A review of dynamics modelling of friction wedge suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Cole, Colin; Spiryagin, Maksym; Sun, Yan Quan

    2014-11-01

    Three-piece bogies with friction wedge suspensions are the most widely used bogies in heavy haul trains. Fiction wedge suspensions play a key role in these wagon systems. This article reviews current techniques in dynamic modelling of friction wedge suspension with various motivations: to improve dynamic models of friction wedge suspensions so as to improve general wagon dynamics simulations; to seek better friction wedge suspension models for wagon stability assessments in complex train systems; to improve the modelling of other friction devices, such as friction draft gear. Relevant theories and friction wedge suspension models developed by using commercial simulation packages and in-house simulation packages are reviewed.

  12. Dose-volume histogram comparison between static 5-field IMRT with 18-MV X-rays and helical tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akihiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hattori, Yukiko; Tamura, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Michio; Otsuka, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Yanagi, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We treated prostate cancer patients with static 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using linac 18-MV X-rays or tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays. As X-ray energies differ, we hypothesized that 18-MV photon IMRT may be better for large patients and tomotherapy may be more suitable for small patients. Thus, we compared dose-volume parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) in 59 patients with T1-3 N0M0 prostate cancer who had been treated using 5-field IMRT. For these same patients, tomotherapy plans were also prepared for comparison. In addition, plans of 18 patients who were actually treated with tomotherapy were analyzed. The evaluated parameters were homogeneity indicies and a conformity index for the PTVs, and D2 (dose received by 2% of the PTV in Gy), D98, Dmean and V10-70 Gy (%) for OARs. To evaluate differences by body size, patients with a known body mass index were grouped by that index ( <21; 21-25; and >25 kg/m(2)). For the PTV, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans compared with the 5-field IMRT plans. For the rectum, V10 Gy and V60 Gy were higher, whereas V20 Gy and V30 Gy were lower in the tomotherapy plans. For the bladder, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans. However, both plans were considered clinically acceptable. Similar trends were observed in 18 patients treated with tomotherapy. Obvious trends were not observed for body size. Tomotherapy provides equivalent dose distributions for PTVs and OARs compared with 18-MV 5-field IMRT. Tomotherapy could be used as a substitute for high-energy photon IMRT for prostate cancer regardless of body size.

  13. The Naples University 3 MV tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Campajola, L.; Brondi, A.

    2013-07-18

    The 3 MV tandem accelerator of the Naples University is used for research activities and applications in many fields. At the beginning of operation (1977) the main utilization was in the field of nuclear physics. Later, the realization of new beam lines allowed the development of applied activities as radiocarbon dating, ion beam analysis, biophysics, ion implantation etc. At present, the availability of different ion sources and many improvements on the accelerator allow to run experiments in a wide range of subjects. An overview of the characteristics and major activities of the laboratory is presented.

  14. FEM design and simulation of a short, 10 MV, S-band Linac with Monte Carlo dose simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, Devin; Aubin, J. St.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Current commercial 10 MV Linac waveguides are 1.5 m. The authors’ current 6 MV linear accelerator–magnetic resonance imager (Linac–MR) system fits in typical radiotherapy vaults. To allow 10 MV treatments with the Linac–MR and still fit within typical vaults, the authors design a 10 MV Linac with an accelerator waveguide of the same length (27.5 cm) as current 6 MV Linacs. Methods: The first design stage is to design a cavity such that a specific experimental measurement for breakdown is applicable to the cavity. This is accomplished through the use of finite element method (FEM) simulations to match published shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength from an electric breakdown study. A full waveguide is then designed and tuned in FEM simulations based on this cavity design. Electron trajectories are computed through the resulting radio frequency fields, and the waveguide geometry is modified by shifting the first coupling cavity in order to optimize the electron beam properties until the energy spread and mean energy closely match values published for an emulated 10 MV Linac. Finally, Monte Carlo dose simulations are used to compare the resulting photon beam depth dose profile and penumbra with that produced by the emulated 10 MV Linac. Results: The shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength are all matched to within 0.1%. A first coupling cavity shift of 1.45 mm produces an energy spectrum width of 0.347 MeV, very close to the published value for the emulated 10 MV of 0.315 MeV, and a mean energy of 10.53 MeV, nearly identical to the published 10.5 MeV for the emulated 10 MV Linac. The depth dose profile produced by their new Linac is within 1% of that produced by the emulated 10 MV spectrum for all depths greater than 1.5 cm. The penumbra produced is 11% narrower, as measured from 80% to 20% of the central axis dose. Conclusions: The authors have successfully

  15. Modes in Lined Wedge-Shaped Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechel, F. P.

    1998-10-01

    The computation of sound fields in wedge-shaped spaces with an absorbing boundary (the seabed) is a classical problem of underwater acoustics, covered by a large number of publications. All known solutions are approximations which are restricted to very small wedge angles θ0, typically less than 3°. In underwater acoustics it is further assumed thatk0r≫1. The background of the present paper is the performance of lined conical duct sections in silencers. There the wedge angle can attain values around 45°, and the assumptionk0r≫1 cannot be made. The absorber of the lined boundary here is supposed to be locally reacting (for reasons of simplicity); it can be characterized by a normalized surface admittanceG0. The problems of the analysis arise from the fact, that the fundamental field solutions (modes) can no longer be separated in the cylindrical co-ordinatesr, θ if a boundary is absorbing. This paper describes analytical solutions for the construction of modes in lined wedge-shaped ducts; they can be applied for wedge angles up to about 15° (a subsequent paper will describe a method for angles up to about 45° but only moderatek0rvalues). In the solutions, use is made of “fictitious modes”, which satisfy the boundary conditions and solve a part of the wave equation. They must be completed by a “modal rest” to satisfy approximately the full wave equation. In the first solution, the rest is synthesized by fictitious modes; in the second solution, a separate function is introduced for the rest. Modes for typical underwater acoustics conditions will arise as side products.

  16. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge provides mechanical support to the perianal region during the labor and delivery...

  17. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge provides mechanical support to the perianal region during the labor and delivery...

  18. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  19. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  20. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  1. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  2. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  3. A 100 MV cryomodule for CW operation

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece

    2005-07-10

    A cryomodule designed for high-gradient CW operation has been built at Jefferson Lab. The Renascence cryomodule is the final prototype of a design for use in the 12 GeV CEBAF upgrade. The module uses eight 7-cell 1497 MHz cavities to be individually powered by 13 kW klystrons. Specifications call for providing >109 MV CW with < 250 W of dynamic heat at 2.07 K. The module incorporates a new generation of tuners and higher power input waveguides. A mixture of the new HG and LL cavity shapes are used. A new high thermal conductivity RF feedthrough has been developed and used on the 32 HOM coupler probes of Renascence. The cryomodule assembly is complete. Testing is to begin late June. Design features and initial test data will be presented.

  4. MV-Algebra for Cultural Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballonoff, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results on a new area of application of quantum structures, motivated by a reading of the 2004 monograph Reasoning in Quantum Theory. Ethnographers often describe a particular culture by describing rules of social relations that they assert characterize that culture. Viable cultures exist over periods of time, that is, over sequences of “generations”. To embody this, we define a suitable set of objects and relations, and a structure on which cultural rules act as “operators” on a set of “configurations” on generations. This yields an MV-algebra of those operators. This implies that culture theory might be studied as an example of the theory of quantum structures.

  5. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  6. Experimental study on the water impact of a symmetrical wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yettou, El-Mahdi; Desrochers, Alain; Champoux, Yvan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our experimental investigation of the pressure distribution on a free-falling wedge upon entering water. Parameters such as the drop height, the deadrise angle and the mass of the wedge are related to the water pressure on the wedge and its dynamic behavior. Existing models that assumed a constant water-entry velocity of the wedge are compared with experimental data. In order to take into account the inherent variation in the velocity of a free-falling wedge, a combination of two models are proposed. This method gives an adequate approximation of the maximum pressures measured.

  7. Characterization of Ge-doped optical fibres for MV radiotherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, Noramaliza M.; Hussein, M.; Kadni, T.; Bradley, D. A.; Nisbet, A.

    2014-05-01

    Ge-doped optical fibres offer promising thermoluminescence (TL) properties together with small physical size and modest cost. Their use as dosimeters for postal radiotherapy dose audits of megavoltage photon beams has been investigated. Key dosimetric characteristics including reproducibility, linearity, dose rate, temperature and angular dependence have been established. A methodology of measuring absorbed dose under reference conditions was developed. The Ge-doped optical fibres offer linearity between TL yield and dose, with a reproducibility of better than 5%, following repeated measurements (n=5) for doses from 5 cGy to 1000 cGy. The fibres also offer dose rate, angular and temperature independence, while an energy-dependent response of 7% was found over the energy range 6 MV to 15 MV (TPR20,10 of 0.660, 0.723 and 0.774 for 6, 10 and 15 MV respectively). The audit methodology has been developed with an expanded uncertainty of 4.22% at 95% confidence interval for the photon beams studied.

  8. Life at the wedge: the activity and diversity of arctic ice wedge microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Roland C; Radtke, Kristin J; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of polygonal terrain on Mars underlain by ice heightens interest in the possibility that this water-bearing habitat may be, or may have been, a suitable habitat for extant life. The possibility is supported by the recurring detection of terrestrial microorganisms in subsurface ice environments, such as ice wedges found beneath tundra polygon features. A characterization of the microbial community of ice wedges from the high Arctic was performed to determine whether this ice environment can sustain actively respiring microorganisms and to assess the ecology of this extreme niche. We found that ice wedge samples contained a relatively abundant number of culturable cells compared to other ice habitats (∼10(5) CFU·mL(-1)). Respiration assays in which radio-labeled acetate and in situ measurement of CO(2) flux were used suggested low levels of microbial activity, though more sensitive techniques are required to confirm these findings. Based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, bacterial and archaeal ice wedge communities appeared to reflect surrounding soil communities. Two Pseudomonas sp. were the most abundant taxa in the ice wedge bacterial library (∼50%), while taxa related to ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota occupied 90% of the archaeal library. The tolerance of a variety of isolates to salinity and temperature revealed characteristics of a psychrotolerant, halotolerant community. Our findings support the hypothesis that ice wedges are capable of sustaining a diverse, plausibly active microbial community. As such, ice wedges, compared to other forms of less habitable ground ice, could serve as a reservoir for life on permanently cold, water-scarce, ice-rich extraterrestrial bodies and are therefore of interest to astrobiologists and ecologists alike. .

  9. Life at the wedge: the activity and diversity of arctic ice wedge microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Roland C; Radtke, Kristin J; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of polygonal terrain on Mars underlain by ice heightens interest in the possibility that this water-bearing habitat may be, or may have been, a suitable habitat for extant life. The possibility is supported by the recurring detection of terrestrial microorganisms in subsurface ice environments, such as ice wedges found beneath tundra polygon features. A characterization of the microbial community of ice wedges from the high Arctic was performed to determine whether this ice environment can sustain actively respiring microorganisms and to assess the ecology of this extreme niche. We found that ice wedge samples contained a relatively abundant number of culturable cells compared to other ice habitats (∼10(5) CFU·mL(-1)). Respiration assays in which radio-labeled acetate and in situ measurement of CO(2) flux were used suggested low levels of microbial activity, though more sensitive techniques are required to confirm these findings. Based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, bacterial and archaeal ice wedge communities appeared to reflect surrounding soil communities. Two Pseudomonas sp. were the most abundant taxa in the ice wedge bacterial library (∼50%), while taxa related to ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota occupied 90% of the archaeal library. The tolerance of a variety of isolates to salinity and temperature revealed characteristics of a psychrotolerant, halotolerant community. Our findings support the hypothesis that ice wedges are capable of sustaining a diverse, plausibly active microbial community. As such, ice wedges, compared to other forms of less habitable ground ice, could serve as a reservoir for life on permanently cold, water-scarce, ice-rich extraterrestrial bodies and are therefore of interest to astrobiologists and ecologists alike. . PMID:22519974

  10. Radiation pressure on a dielectric wedge.

    PubMed

    Mansuripur, Masud; Zakharian, Armis; Moloney, Jerome

    2005-03-21

    The force of electromagnetic radiation on a dielectric medium may be derived by a direct application of the Lorentz law of classical electrodynamics. While the light's electric field acts upon the (induced) bound charges in the medium, its magnetic field exerts a force on the bound currents. We use the example of a wedge-shaped solid dielectric, immersed in a transparent liquid and illuminated at Brewster's angle, to demonstrate that the linear momentum of the electromagnetic field within dielectrics has neither the Minkowski nor the Abraham form; rather, the correct expression for momentum density has equal contributions from both. The time rate of change of the incident momentum thus expressed is equal to the force exerted on the wedge plus that experienced by the surrounding liquid.

  11. High-energy rate forgings of wedges :

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Thomas Bither; Everhart, Wesley; Switzner, Nathan T; Balch, Dorian K.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2014-05-01

    The wedge geometry is a simple geometry for establishing a relatively constant gradient of strain in a forged part. The geometry is used to establish gradients in microstructure and strength as a function of strain, forging temperature, and quenching time after forging. This geometry has previously been used to benchmark predictions of strength and recrystallization using Sandias materials model for type 304L austenitic stainless steel. In this report, the processing conditions, in particular the times to forge and quench the forged parts, are summarized based on information recorded during forging on June 18, 2013 of the so-called wedge geometry from type 316L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn austenitic stainless steels.

  12. Two dimensional wedge/translating shroud nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A jet propulsion exhaust nozzle is reported for multi-engine installations which produces high internal/external, thrust-minus-drag, performance for transonic cruise or transonic acceleration as well as improved performance at subsonic and supersonic speeds. A two dimensional wedge/translating shroud provides the variable nozzle exit geometry needed to achieve high engine performance over a wide range of throttle power settings.

  13. Wedge assembly for electrical transformer component spacing

    DOEpatents

    Baggett, Franklin E.; Cage, W. Franklin

    1991-01-01

    A wedge assembly that is easily inserted between two surfaces to be supported thereby, and thereafter expanded to produce a selected spacing between those surfaces. This wedge assembly has two outer members that are substantially identical except that they are mirror images of each other. Oppositely directed faces of these of these outer members are substantially parallel for the purpose of contacting the surfaces to be separated. The outer faces of these outer members that are directed toward each other are tapered so as to contact a center member having complementary tapers on both faces. A washer member is provided to contact a common end of the outer members, and a bolt member penetrates this washer and is threadably received in a receptor of the center member. As the bolt member is threaded into the center member, the center member is drawn further into the gap between the outer members and thereby separates these outer members to contact the surfaces to be separated. In the preferred embodiment, the contacting surfaces of the outer member and the center member are provided with guide elements. The wedge assembly is described for use in separating the secondary windings from the laminations of an electrical power transformer.

  14. Interior impedance wedge diffraction with surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy

    1988-01-01

    The exact impedance wedge solution is evaluated asymptotically using the method of steepest descents for plane wave illumination at normal incidence. Uniform but different impedances on each face are considered for both soft and hard polarizations. The asymptotic solution isolates the incident, singly reflected, multiply reflected, diffracted, and surface wave fields. Multiply reflected fields of any order are permitted. The multiply reflected fields from the exact solution are written as ratios of auxiliary Maliuzhinets functions, whereas a geometrical analysis gives the reflected fields as products of reflection coefficients. These two representations are shown to be identical in magnitude, phase and the angular range over which they exist. The diffracted field includes four Fresnel transition functions as in the perfect conductor case, and the expressions for the appropriate discontinuities at the shadow boundaries are presented. The surface wave exists over a finite angular range and only for certain surface impedances. A surface wave transition field is included to retain continuity. Computations are presented for interior wedge diffractions although the formulation is valid for both exterior and interior wedges.

  15. Fast and thermal neutron profiles for a 25-MV x-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Price, K W; Nath, R; Holeman, G R

    1978-01-01

    High-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines generate neutrons by photonuclear reactions in the target and the treatment head and expose the patient to a neutron flux. In order to evaluate the neutron exposure quantitatively, fast and thermal neutron profiles for 25-MV x-ray beams of the Sagittaire accelerator have been measured. An activation technique, using the reactions 31P(n, gamma)32P (thermal neutrons) and 31P(n, p)31Si (fast neutrons, E greater than 0.7 MeV), has been developed to measure fast- and thermal-neutron fluxes in an intense high-energy photon flux. The sensitivity of this activation detector to high-energy photons, which has plagued many previous neutron measurements, was carefully measured and found to be less than 4%. Neutron fluxes for various photon field sizes ranging from 5 X 5 cm to 30 X 30 cm have been measured. The fast-neutron profiles were observed to have rounded edges and the thermal fluxes were found to be relatively uniform. In the central part of the x-ray beam, the ratio of neutron dose equivalent to photon absorbed dose was found to be between 0.2% and 0.5%. Outside of the photon field, the ratio of neutron dose equivalent to the central-axis photon absorbed dose was 0.12%.

  16. Area scalable optically induced photorefractive photonic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wentao; Xue, Yan Ling; Jiang, Dongdong

    2016-07-01

    A convenient approach to fabricate area scalable two-dimensional photonic microstructures was experimentally demonstrated by multi-face optical wedges. The approach is quite compact and stable without complex optical alignment equipment. Large-area square lattice microstructures are optically induced inside an iron-doped lithium niobate photorefractive crystal. The induced large-area microstructures are analyzed and verified by plane wave guiding, Brillouin-zone spectroscopy, angle-dependent transmission spectrum, and lateral Bragg reflection patterns. The method can be easily extended to generate other more complex area scalable photonic microstructures, such as quasicrystal lattices, by designing the multi-face optical wedge appropriately. The induced area scalable photonic microstructures can be fixed or erased even re-recorded in the photorefractive crystal, which suggests potential applications in micro-nano photonic devices.

  17. Direct air activation measurements at a 15-MV medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Saeed, M K; Poppe, B; Fischer, H W

    2015-02-01

    Direct radiometric determination of (14)N (γ, n) (13)N air activation was achieved at a 15-MV medical linear accelerator operating in a high-energy photon mode. (13)N was identified by irradiating a gas-tight Marinelli beaker filled with nitrogen gas and later observing the 10-min half-life of the 511-keV positron-electron annihilation line using high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. Quantitative evaluation of the spectral signal yielded a (13)N production rate of 836.8 ± 32 Bq Gy(-1) in air per 40 × 40 cm(2) field cross section at 100 cm source-surface distance.

  18. Knee abduction angular impulses during prolonged running with wedged insoles.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Worobets, Jay T; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2013-07-01

    Wedged insoles may produce immediate effects on knee abduction angular impulses during running; however, it is currently not known whether these knee abduction angular impulse magnitudes are maintained throughout a run when fatigue sets in. If changes occur, this could affect the clinical utility of wedged insoles in treating conditions such as patellofemoral pain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether knee abduction angular impulses are altered during a prolonged run with wedged insoles. It was hypothesized that knee abduction angular impulses would be reduced following a prolonged run with wedged insoles. Nine healthy runners participated. Runners were randomly assigned to either a 6-mm medial wedge condition or a 6-mm lateral wedge condition and then ran continuously overground for 30 min. Knee abduction angular impulses were quantified at 0 and 30 min using a gait analysis procedure. After 2 days, participants returned to perform the same test but with the other wedge type. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate main effects of wedge condition and time and interactions between wedge condition and time (α = 0.05). Paired t-tests were used for post hoc analysis (α = 0.01). No interaction effects (p = 0.958) were found, and knee abduction angular impulses were not significantly different over time (p = 0.384). Lateral wedge conditions produced lesser knee abduction angular impulses than medial conditions at 0 min (difference of 2.79 N m s, p = 0.006) and at 30 min (difference of 2.76 N m s, p < 0.001). It is concluded that significant knee abduction angular impulse changes within wedge conditions do not occur during a 30-min run. Additionally, knee abduction angular impulse differences between wedge conditions are maintained during a 30-min run.

  19. The hot white dwarf in the cataclysmic variable MV Lyrae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoard, D. W.; Linnell, A. P.; Szkody, Paula; Fried, Robert E.; Sion, Edward M.; Hubeny, Ivan; Wolfe, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    We have obtained the first far-ultraviolet spectrum of the novalike cataclysmic variable MV Lyrae using the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. We also obtained contemporaneous optical light curves and spectra. All data are from a deep faint accretion state of MV Lyr.

  20. Opening wedge osteotomies for correction of hallux valgus: a review of wedge plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Smith, W Bret; Hyer, Christopher F; DeCarbo, William T; Berlet, Gregory C; Lee, Thomas H

    2009-12-01

    Osteotomy of the proximal metatarsal for the correction of moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity is commonly performed. The purpose of this study is to review the early results of a technique for the correction of hallux valgus, an opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal first metatarsal with opening wedge plate fixation. A review was performed of the results of 47 patients (49 feet) who underwent correction of hallux valgus with proximal metatarsal opening wedge osteotomy. All osteotomies were secured with plate fixation on the medial side. Evaluation consisted of preoperative and postoperative radiographic as well as clinical evaluations. Mean corrections of 7 degrees were achieved for the 1-2 intermetatarsal angles. Fourteen complications occurred, 6 of which involved mild hardware irritation and did not affect outcome. Four nonunions or delayed unions were identified. The authors find the opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal first metatarsal to be a technically straightforward procedure for correcting moderate to severe hallux valgus. The correction obtained is comparable to other described techniques. PMID:20400425

  1. Impingement of water droplets on wedges and double-wedge airfoils at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, John S

    1954-01-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the equations of motion of water droplets impinging on a wedge in a two-dimensional supersonic flow field with a shock wave attached to the wedge. The closed-form solution yields analytical expressions for the equation of the droplet trajectory, the local rate of impingement and the impingement velocity at any point on the wedge surface, and the total rate of impingement. The analytical expressions are utilized to determine the impingement on the forward surfaces of diamond airfoils in supersonic flow fields with attached shock waves. The results presented include the following conditions: droplet diameters from 2 to 100 microns, pressure altitudes from sea level to 30,000 feet, free-stream static temperatures from 420 degrees r, free stream Mach numbers from 1.1 to 2.0, semiapex angles for the wedge from 1.14 degrees to 7.97 degrees, thickness-to-chord ratios for the diamond airfoil from 0.02 to 0.14, chord lengths from 1 to 20 feet, and angles of attack from zero to the inverse tangent of the airfoil thickness-to-chord ratio.

  2. Molecular depth profiling by wedged crater beveling.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dan; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas; Wucher, Andreas

    2011-08-15

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy are employed to characterize a wedge-shaped crater eroded by a 40-keV C(60)(+) cluster ion beam on an organic film of Irganox 1010 doped with Irganox 3114 delta layers. From an examination of the resulting surface, the information about depth resolution, topography, and erosion rate can be obtained as a function of crater depth for every depth in a single experiment. It is shown that when measurements are performed at liquid nitrogen temperature, a constant erosion rate and reduced bombardment induced surface roughness is observed. At room temperature, however, the erosion rate drops by ∼(1)/(3) during the removal of the 400 nm Irganox film and the roughness gradually increased to from 1 nm to ∼4 nm. From SIMS lateral images of the beveled crater and AFM topography results, depth resolution was further improved by employing glancing angles of incidence and lower primary ion beam energy. Sub-10 nm depth resolution was observed under the optimized conditions on a routine basis. In general, we show that the wedge-crater beveling is an important tool for elucidating the factors that are important for molecular depth profiling experiments.

  3. Experimental and numerical investigations on melamine wedges.

    PubMed

    Schneider, S

    2008-09-01

    Melamine wedges are often used as acoustic lining material for anechoic chambers. It was proposed here to study the effects of the mounting conditions on the acoustic properties of the melamine wedges used in the large anechoic chamber at the LMA. The results of the impedance tube measurements carried out show that the mounting conditions must be taken into account when assessing the quality of an acoustic lining. As it can be difficult to simulate these mounting conditions in impedance tube experiments, a numerical method was developed, which can be used to complete the experiments or for parametric studies. By combining the finite and the boundary element method, it is possible to investigate acoustic linings with almost no restrictions as to the geometry, material behavior, or mounting conditions. The numerical method presented here was used to study the acoustic properties of the acoustic lining installed in the anechoic chamber at the LMA. Further experiments showed that the behavior of the melamine foam is anisotropic. Numerical simulations showed that this anisotropy can be used to advantage when designing an acoustic lining.

  4. Mid-Calcaneal Length After Evans Calcaneal Osteotomy: A Retrospective Comparison of Wedge Locking Plates and Tricortical Allograft Wedges.

    PubMed

    Protzman, Nicole M; Wobst, Garrett M; Storts, Eric C; Mulhern, Jennifer L; McCarroll, Raymond E; Brigido, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Evans calcaneal osteotomy remains a cornerstone in the correction of the flexible flatfoot. Although multiple techniques have been used to maintain the length of the lateral column, a low profile wedge locking plate was recently introduced as an alternative to the traditional tricortical allograft wedge. We hypothesized that the wedge locking plate would better maintain the mid-calcaneal length compared with the tricortical allograft wedge. To test this hypothesis, after Evans osteotomy, the mid-calcaneal length was measured in the immediate postoperative period and again at 3 and 6 months. A total of 24 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 48.1 years (range 11 to 66). Of the 24 patients, 9 (37.5%) were treated with a tricortical allograft wedge and 15 (62.5%) with a wedge locking plate. At 3 months postoperatively, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was similar for the tricortical allograft wedge group (1.3 ± 1.9 mm) and the wedge locking plate group (0.5 ± 0.9 mm, p = .275). At 6 months postoperatively, however, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was greater for the tricortical allograft wedge group (2.8 ± 1.7 mm) than for the wedge locking plate group (0.6 ± 0.7 mm, p = .004). The 2 groups demonstrated a similar incidence of dorsally displaced distal calcaneal fragments throughout the study endpoint (p ≥ .052). These results suggest that the wedge locking plate better maintains the mid-calcaneal length over time compared with the tricortical allograft wedge.

  5. Dose enhancement close to platinum implants for the 4, 6, and 10 MV stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Joel Y.C.; Ng, Ben K.P.; Yu, K.N.

    2004-10-01

    Three photon interaction processes, namely, the photoelectric effect, Compton effect, and pair production, can occur when materials with high atomic numbers are irradiated by the high- and low-energy bremsstrahlung photons from a linear accelerator. A dose enhancement, due to the photoelectric effect and pair production, near targets with platinum implants (with a high atomic number) in radiosurgery cannot be predicted by the XKnife{sup reg} radiosurgery treatment planning system. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations using PRESTA EGS4 were employed to investigate the resulting dose enhancements from 4, 6, and 10 MV energies commonly used in the stereotactic radiosurgery system. Dose enhancements from 32% to 68% were observed close to the platinum implant for the above energies when using a 12.5 mm collimator. Comparatively higher dose enhancements were observed when using smaller collimators. It was found that this dose enhancement increased with beam energy but decreased as beam size increased.

  6. An intercomparison of neutron measurments for a 25 MV x-ray radiotherapy accelerator.

    PubMed

    Nath, R; Price, K W; Holeman, G R

    1980-01-01

    High-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines produce neutrons by photonuclear reactions which present a potential radiation hazard to the personnel and patient. A series of measurements of the neutron flux from a 25 MV x-ray linear accelerator, inside and outside the treatment room, have been performed using a multisphere spectrometer, Nemo dosimeter, and activation detectors. These results are compared with other mixed photon-neutron field measurements for the same machine performed using an argon/propane ionization chamber, silicon diode, track-etching detectors, and Monte Carlo calculations. It is found that these measurements agree with each other within a factor of two except for silicon diode measurements in the photon beam. Measured neutron spectra at various locations in the treatment room are also compared with the results of Monte Carlo transport calculations.

  7. Metal artifact correction for x-ray computed tomography using kV and selective MV imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng; Keil, Andreas; Constantin, Dragos; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The overall goal of this work is to improve the computed tomography (CT) image quality for patients with metal implants or fillings by completing the missing kilovoltage (kV) projection data with selectively acquired megavoltage (MV) data that do not suffer from photon starvation. When both of these imaging systems, which are available on current radiotherapy devices, are used, metal streak artifacts are avoided, and the soft-tissue contrast is restored, even for regions in which the kV data cannot contribute any information. Methods: Three image-reconstruction methods, including two filtered back-projection (FBP)-based analytic methods and one iterative method, for combining kV and MV projection data from the two on-board imaging systems of a radiotherapy device are presented in this work. The analytic reconstruction methods modify the MV data based on the information in the projection or image domains and then patch the data onto the kV projections for a FBP reconstruction. In the iterative reconstruction, the authors used dual-energy (DE) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) methods to simultaneously combine the kV/MV data and perform the reconstruction. Results: The authors compared kV/MV reconstructions to kV-only reconstructions using a dental phantom with fillings and a hip-implant numerical phantom. Simulation results indicated that dual-energy sinogram patch FBP and the modified dual-energy PWLS method can successfully suppress metal streak artifacts and restore information lost due to photon starvation in the kV projections. The root-mean-square errors of soft-tissue patterns obtained using combined kV/MV data are 10–15 Hounsfield units smaller than those of the kV-only images, and the structural similarity index measure also indicates a 5%–10% improvement in the image quality. The added dose from the MV scan is much less than the dose from the kV scan if a high efficiency MV detector is assumed. Conclusions: The authors have shown that it

  8. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  9. Photon-photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  10. The new photoactivation facility at the 4.3 MV Stuttgart DYNAMITRON: setup, performance, and first applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belic, D.; Besserer, J.; Arlandini, C.; de Boer, J.; Carroll, J. J.; Enders, J.; Hartmann, T.; Käppeler, F.; Kaiser, H.; Kneissl, U.; Loewe, M.; Maser, H.; Mohr, P.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Nord, A.; Pitz, H. H.; Richter, A.; Schumann, M.; Volz, S.; Zilges, A.

    2001-05-01

    At the Stuttgart 4.3 MV D YNAMITRON accelerator a new bremsstrahlung irradiation facility was installed for photoactivation experiments to complement the well-established arrangement for systematic photon-scattering studies taking advantage of the high photon fluxes achievable at this high-current accelerator. The population or depopulation of isomeric states in low-energy photon-induced reactions ( Eγ=0.5- 4.0 MeV) can be studied with sensitivities far beyond previous limits. The setup of this facility, its performance, and the absolute calibrations are described in detail. First exemplary results for a test case, the reaction 115In ( γ, γ') 115 m In, are presented and analyzed in combination with data from low-energy photon-scattering experiments ( 115In ( γ, γ') 115 In). The quality of the results demonstrates the powerful capability of this new installation.

  11. Correction factors for low perturbation in vivo diodes used in the determination of entrance doses in high energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Ralph; Philp, Amanda

    2008-01-15

    Purpose--Low perturbation diodes, with thin buildup caps, can be used to reduce perturbations to the delivered dose. The literature states that additional correction factors are required for low perturbation diodes, however, there are few reported studies into their use. This report measured the dose perturbations and correction factors for diodes with varying buildup cap thicknesses. Methods and materials--Scanditronix EDP15, EDD5, and EDD2 diodes were investigated. Dose perturbations and correction factors for field size, source-surface distance (SSD), obliquity, and wedge were measured in megavoltage photon beams. Results--EDP15 produces a 6% dose perturbation. EDD5 produces a perturbation between 1% and 2%. EDD2 perturbation is negligible. The variation of correction factors for the full buildup EDP15 diode is small and consistent with the literature. The low perturbation diode EDD2 has large correction factors. The field size correction factor varies from 1.38 to 0.87 for 10 MV. The SSD correction factor varies from 0.92 to 1.09 for 10 MV. At the maximum angle measured, the obliquity correction factor is 0.73 for 10 MV. Intermediate results were observed for the EDD5 diode. Conclusions--It is expected that it will be very difficult to achieve accurate in vivo dosimetry using the EDD2 diode. The EDD5 diode may represent a reasonable compromise between EDD2 and the full buildup EDP15. The EDD5 dose perturbation is small and the correction factors are not as large as for EDD2, so accurate in vivo dosimetry may be possible as long as the obliquity is below 45 degrees.

  12. 28. REPRESENTATIVE CENTER WEDGE. BALANCE WHEELS ON TRACK, WITH RACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. REPRESENTATIVE CENTER WEDGE. BALANCE WHEELS ON TRACK, WITH RACK TO OUTSIDE, SHOWN TO RIGHT OF THE WEDGE. PHOTO TAKEN AT SOUTH SWING SPAN. - George P. Coleman Memorial Bridge, Spanning York River at U.S. Route 17, Yorktown, York County, VA

  13. Computing pressure distributions in wedges and pinch-outs

    SciTech Connect

    Chih-Cheng Chen; Raghaven, R.

    1995-12-31

    A solution for wedge-type systems in terms of the Laplace transformation is derived. Characteristics of responses are discussed and computational issues are addressed. The algorithm given here is a practical tool for analyzing flows in wedge-type systems and may be incorporated immediately into existing software packages. Existing solutions are a subset of the solution given here.

  14. Magneto-optical and photoemission studies of ultrathin wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S.D.; Li, Dongqi

    1995-12-01

    Magnetic phase transitions of Fe wedges grown epitaxially on Cu(100) are detected via the surface magneto-optical Kerr effect and used to construct a phase diagram for face centered Fe. Also, the confinement of Cu sp- and d-quantum-well states is studied for Cu/Co(wedge)/Cu(100) utilizing undulator-based photoemission experiments.

  15. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention... hemorrhoids associated with vaginal childbirth. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The...

  16. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  17. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  18. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  19. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  20. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  1. Transmission of a Gaussian beam by a Fizeau interferential wedge.

    PubMed

    Stoykova, Elena

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of transmission of a finite-diameter Gaussian beam by a Fizeau interferential wedge is presented. The fringe calculation is based on angular spectrum expansion of the complex amplitude of the incident wave field. The developed approach is applicable to any beam diameter and wedge thickness at any distance from the wedge and yields as a boundary case the fringes at plane-wave illumination. The spatial region of resonant transmission on the wedge surface is given by the width of the transmitted peak for plane-wave illumination. At higher coating reflectivity, the direction of the transmitted beam is deviated with respect to that of the incident beam. Evaluation of the spectral response based on the spectral width of the transmitted power curve is introduced as more realistic for a correct description of the application of a Fizeau wedge as an interferential selector in laser resonators. PMID:16396037

  2. Effect of friction in wedging of elastic solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Arin, K.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper the contact problem for an elastic wedge of arbitrary angle is considered. It is assumed that the external load is applied to the medium through a rigid wedge and the coefficient of friction between the loading wedge and the elastic solid is constant. The problem is reduced to a singular integral equation of the second kind with the contact pressure as the unknown function. An effective numerical solution of the integral equation is described and the results of three examples are presented. The comparison of these results with those obtained from the frictionless wedge problem indicates that generally friction has the tendency of reducing the peak values of the stress intensity factors calculated at the wedge apex and at the end points of the contact area.

  3. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    DOE PAGES

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack.more » This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.« less

  4. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack. This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.

  5. Characterization of CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A fringe detection and measurement system was constructed for use with the CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner, consisting of three circuit boards. The first board is a standard Reticon RC-100 B motherboard which is used to provide the timing, video processing, and housekeeping functions required by the Reticon RL-512 G photodiode array used in the system. The sampled and held video signal from the motherboard is processed by a second, custom fabricated circuit board which contains a high speed fringe detection and locating circuit. This board includes a dc level discriminator type fringe detector, a counter circuit to determine fringe center, a pulsed laser triggering circuit, and a control circuit to operate the shutter for the He-Ne reference laser beam. The fringe center information is supplied to the third board, a commercial single board computer, which governs the data collection process and interprets the results.

  6. Cesarean section in a wedged head.

    PubMed

    Khosla, A H; Dahiya, K; Sangwan, K

    2003-05-01

    Cesarean section many a times, has to be done late in labour when the head is deeply wedged in the pelvis. The techniques described in standard text books, usually result in extension of the incision either laterally into the broad ligament or vertically upwards into the upper segment or downwards posterior to the bladder from the centre of the incision line. In this study we have reviewed the Patwardhan's technique for the extraction of baby and fetomaternal outcome was compared with cases where this technique was not used. There was no extension of the incision either laterally into broad ligament or upwards or downwards. Haemorrhage due to extension of incision requiring blood transfusion occurred in 24% of patients in group II as compared to nil in group I. PMID:14514249

  7. Characterization of CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A fringe detection and measurement system was constructed for use with the CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner, consisting of three circuit boards. The first board is a standard Reticon RC-100 B motherboard which is used to provide the timing, video processing, and housekeeping functions required by the Reticon RL-512 G photodiode array used in the system. The sampled and held video signal from the motherboard is processed by a second, custom fabricated circuit board which contains a high speed fringe detection and locating circuit. This board includes a dc level discriminator type fringe detector, a counter circuit to determine fringe center, a pulsed laser triggering circuit, and a control circuit to operate the shutter for the He-Ne reference laser beam. The fringe center information is supplied to the third board, a commercial single board computer, which governs the data collection process and interprets the results.

  8. Configuration and Generation of Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiangning

    The substorm current wedge (SCW), a core element of substorm dynamics coupling the magnetotail to the ionosphere, is crucial in understanding substorms. It has been suggested that the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the SCW are caused by either pressure gradients or flow vortices, or both. Our understanding of FAC generations is based predominately on numerical simulations, because it has not been possible to organize spacecraft observations in a coordinate system determined by the SCW. This dissertation develops an empirical inversion model of the current wedge and inverts midlatitude magnetometer data to obtain the parameters of the current wedge for three solar cycles. This database enables statistical data analysis of spacecraft plasma and magnetic field observations relative to the SCW coordinate. In chapter 2, a new midlatitude positive bay (MPB) index is developed and calculated for three solar cycles of data. The MPB index is processed to determine the substorm onset time, which is shown to correspond to the auroral breakup onset with at most 1-2 minutes difference. Substorm occurrence rate is found to depend on solar wind speed while substorm duration is rather constant, suggesting that substorm process has an intrinsic pattern independent of external driving. In chapter 3, an SCW inversion technique is developed to determine the strength and locations of the FACs in an SCW. The inversion parameters for FAC strength and location, and ring current strength are validated by comparison with other measurements. In chapter 4, the connection between earthward flows and auroral poleward expansion is examined using improved mapping, obtained from a newly-developed dynamic magnetospheric model by superimposing a standard magnetospheric field model with substorm current wedge obtained from the inversion technique. It is shown that the ionospheric projection of flows observed at a fixed point in the equatorial plane map to the bright aurora as it expands poleward

  9. Photon-photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1996-01-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et al., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention [1]. A 1990 article by V.I. Telnov describes the situation at that time [2]. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held [3]. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons—the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  10. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Assessment of Automated Measurement and Verification (M&V) Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Granderson, Jessica; Touzani, Samir; Custodio, Claudine; Sohn, Michael; Fernandes, Samuel; Jump, David

    2015-07-01

    This report documents the application of a general statistical methodology to assess the accuracy of baseline energy models, focusing on its application to Measurement and Verification (M&V) of whole-building energy savings.

  12. Analysis of Oblique Wedges Using Analog and Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, S. S.; Koster, K.; Martin, R. S.; Flesch, L. M.

    2010-12-01

    Oblique plate motion is understood to be a primary factor in determining the style and location of deformation at many convergent margins. These margins are frequently characterized by a dominant strike-slip fault parallel to the margin, which accommodates margin-parallel motion and shear and is adjacent to partitioned and near margin-normal thrusting. We have performed a series of analog experiment in which we have simulated oblique wedges with frictional and layered, friction over viscous, rheologies. Using the detailed analysis of topography and strain from these analog models we have compared them to geometrically similar 2D and 3D numerical models. While our pure frictional analog wedges are characterized by numerous discrete thrust faults in the pro-wedge and a zone of shear between the pro-wedge and the retro-wedges, our layered wedges have a dominate shear zone that is long-lived. In all models the highest rate of contractional deformation is at the thrust front, while the highest rate of shear is isolated in a relatively narrow zone at the back of the pro-wedge. Because the layered analog wedge is better able isolate shear behind the pro-wedge it can better partition strain into dip-slip thrusting normal to the margin. Our numerical simulations support the assertion that a relatively small amount of extensional stress is needed to play a significant role in the structural evolution of convergent systems. However, the manner in which this stress is localized on discrete structures, and in particular, how the style of strain (extension or contraction) will evolve, is a strong function of rheology and its strength at depth for a given initial geometry.

  13. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  14. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jerome P.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Draggoo, Vaughn G.

    1994-01-01

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  15. Octave spanning wedge dispersive mirrors with low dispersion oscillations.

    PubMed

    Habel, Florian; Shirvanyan, Vage; Trubetskov, Michael; Burger, Christian; Sommer, Annkatrin; Kling, Matthias F; Schultze, Martin; Pervak, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A novel concept for octave spanning dispersive mirrors with low spectral dispersion oscillations is presented. The key element of the so-called wedge dispersive mirror is a slightly wedged layer which is coated on a specially optimized dispersive multilayer stack by a common sputter coating process. The group delay dispersion (GDD) of a pulse reflected on a wedge dispersive mirror is nearly free of oscillations. Fabricated mirrors with negative GDD demonstrate the compression of a pulse down to 3.8 fs as good as double angled mirrors optimized for the same bandwidth.

  16. Ancient Yedoma carbon loss: primed by ice wedge thaw?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, K. L.; Vonk, J. E.; Mann, P. J.; Zimov, N.; Bulygina, E. B.; Davydova, A.; Spencer, R. G.; Holmes, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Northeast Siberian permafrost is dominated by frozen Yedoma deposits containing ca. 500 Gt of carbon, nearly a quarter of northern permafrost organic carbon (OC). Yedoma deposits are Pleistocene-age alluvial and/or aeolian accumulations characterized by high ice wedge content (~50%), making them particularly vulnerable to a warming climate and to surface collapse upon thaw. Dissolved OC in streams originating primarily from Yedoma has been shown to be highly biolabile, relative to waters containing more modern OC. The cause of this biolability, however, remains speculative. Here we investigate the influence of ice wedge input upon the bioavailability of Yedoma within streams from as a potential cause of Yedoma carbon biolability upon release into the Kolyma River from the thaw-eroding river exposures of Duvannyi Yar, NE Siberia. We measured biolability on (1) ice wedge, Kolyma, and Yedoma leachate controls; (2) ice wedge and Kolyma plus Yedoma OC (8 g/L); and (3) varying ratios of ice wedge water to Kolyma river water. Biolability assays were conducted using both 5-day BOD (biological oxygen demand) and 11-day BDOC (biodegradable dissolved organic carbon) incubations. We found that ancient DOC in Yedoma soil leachate alone was highly biolabile with losses of 52±0.1% C over a 5-day BOD incubation. Similarly, DOC contained in pure ice wedge water was found to be biolabile, losing 21±0% C during a 5-day BOD incubation. Increased ice wedge contributions led to higher overall C losses in identical Yedoma soil leachates, with 8.9±0.6% losses of Yedoma C with 100% ice wedge water, 7.1±1% (50% ice wedge/ 50% Kolyma) and 5±0.3% with 100% Kolyma River water. We discuss potential mechanisms for the increased loss of ancient C using associated measurements of nutrient availability, carbon quality (CDOM/FDOM) and extracellular enzyme activity rates. Our initial results indicate that ice wedge meltwater forming Yedoma streams makes Yedoma OC more bioavailable than it would

  17. VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING NORTH - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  18. VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING SOUTHEAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  19. DETAIL VIEW OF THREEPART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE-PART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF QUARRY WALL, FACING NORTHWEST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  20. DETAIL VIEW OF THREEPART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE-PART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF QUARRY WALL, FACING EAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  1. Structure and Kinematics of the Indo-Burmese Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, T.; Rangin, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Burma subduction trench and the associated Indo Burmese wedge mark the present eastern boundary of the Indian plate in the northern Bengal area. The initiation, duration and history of the Bengal crust subduction beneath Burma is still debated. The aim of this paper is to provide a structural and kinematic analysis of the Indo- Burmese wedge in order to better constraints the Bengal crust subduction history beneath Burma. On the basis of field observations, seismic reflection data interpretation and well logs data we present a structural analysis of the Outer Indo-Burmese Wedge. We also constrain the onset of this Outer Wedge to be younger than 2Ma, implying a recent and fast westward growth (~10cm/yr) since Late Pliocene in close relationship with the onset of the Shillong plateau. Restoration process of a synthetic cross section through the Outer Wedge allowed us to estimate the amount of EW shortening accommodated in the Outer Wedge to be 5.1mm/yr since 2Ma. These results combined with previous available GPS data from central Myanmar suggest strain partitioning at wedge scale. The core of the wedge is affected by shear deformation and acts as a buttress for a frontal wedge that accommodates a more compressive strain component. Finally we propose that the main characteristic of the Indo-Burmese wedge growth mechanism is the progressive incorporation of the most internal part of the wedge, formerly affected by transpressive thin-skinned tectonics, to the buttress where they are subsequently affected by shear deformation. The crustal structure boarding the newly formed buttress seems to be guided by the subducting crust fabrics. We are in favour of a very recent (Late Miocene) onset of the present Indian crust subduction beneath Burma coeval with the global plate kinematics reorganisation related to the Indian/Australian plate spliting. This subduction postdates the Indo Burmese range onset that must have started in early Miocene. This range first began to

  2. Structure and Kinematics of the Indo-Burmese Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, T.; Rangin, C.

    2004-12-01

    The Burma subduction trench and the associated Indo Burmese wedge mark the present eastern boundary of the Indian plate in the northern Bengal area. The initiation, duration and history of the Bengal crust subduction beneath Burma is still debated. The aim of this paper is to provide a structural and kinematic analysis of the Indo- Burmese wedge in order to better constraints the Bengal crust subduction history beneath Burma. On the basis of field observations, seismic reflection data interpretation and well logs data we present a structural analysis of the Outer Indo-Burmese Wedge. We also constrain the onset of this Outer Wedge to be younger than 2Ma, implying a recent and fast westward growth (~10cm/yr) since Late Pliocene in close relationship with the onset of the Shillong plateau. Restoration process of a synthetic cross section through the Outer Wedge allowed us to estimate the amount of EW shortening accommodated in the Outer Wedge to be 5.1mm/yr since 2Ma. These results combined with previous available GPS data from central Myanmar suggest strain partitioning at wedge scale. The core of the wedge is affected by shear deformation and acts as a buttress for a frontal wedge that accommodates a more compressive strain component. Finally we propose that the main characteristic of the Indo-Burmese wedge growth mechanism is the progressive incorporation of the most internal part of the wedge, formerly affected by transpressive thin-skinned tectonics, to the buttress where they are subsequently affected by shear deformation. The crustal structure boarding the newly formed buttress seems to be guided by the subducting crust fabrics. We are in favour of a very recent (Late Miocene) onset of the present Indian crust subduction beneath Burma coeval with the global plate kinematics reorganisation related to the Indian/Australian plate spliting. This subduction postdates the Indo Burmese range onset that must have started in early Miocene. This range first began to

  3. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  4. The statics of the wedge-shaped jar opener

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donolato, C.

    2015-11-01

    This paper analyzes the static equilibrium of a simple jar opener on the basis of rigid-body mechanics with friction. The opener-lid system is described as a disk lying inside a wedge, where only one side has friction; the disk is assumed to be acted upon by a wedging force and a torque. The resulting equilibrium equations have an exact solution that yields the non-sliding conditions for the disk as functions of applied forces and system parameters.

  5. Towards a 700 mV silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.; Blakers, A. W.; Gauja, E.; Willison, M. R.; Szpitalak, T.

    1982-01-01

    The key to improved silicon solar cell performance lies in increasing cell open circuit voltage. Not only does improved voltage direclty increase cell efficiency, but it also increases the limiting value of fill factor and decreases the temperature sensitivity of the cell. Limits on attainable open circuit voltage are not well defined. A thermodynamic limit of 850 mV exists for black body silicon cells, with 700 mV long regarded as a practical limit. This paper describes experimental work which has resulted in experimental devices with open circuit voltages approaching 700 mV. Values up to 694 (AM0, 25 C) have been demonstrated. The cells are similar in structure to conventional p-n junction cells, but particular attention is paid to passivating the entire top surface of the cell, including regions under the top contact.

  6. Volumetric Arc Therapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Primary Prostate Radiotherapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Intraprostatic Lesion With 6 and 18 MV: A Planning Comparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ost, Piet; Speleers, Bruno; De Meerleer, Gert; De Neve, Wilfried; Fonteyne, Valerie; Villeirs, Geert; De Gersem, Werner

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), in the treatment of prostate cancer with maximal dose escalation to the intraprostatic lesion (IPL), without violating the organ-at-risk constraints. Additionally, the use of 6-MV photons was compared with 18-MV photons for all techniques. Methods and Materials: A total of 12 consecutive prostate cancer patients with an IPL on magnetic resonance imaging were selected for the present study. Plans were made for three IMRT field setups (three, five, and seven fields) and one VMAT field setup (single arc). First, optimal plans were created for every technique using biologic and physical planning aims. Next, an additional escalation to the IPL was planned as high as possible without violating the planning aims of the first step. Results: No interaction between the technique and photon energy (p = .928) occurred. No differences were found between the 6- and 18-MV photon beams, except for a reduction in the number of monitor units needed for 18 MV (p < .05). All techniques, except for three-field IMRT, allowed for dose escalation to a median dose of {>=}93 {+-} 6 Gy (mean {+-} standard deviation) to the IPL. VMAT was superior to IMRT for rectal volumes receiving 20-50 Gy (p < .05). Conclusion: VMAT allowed for dose escalation to the IPL with better sparing of the rectum than static three-, five-, and seven-field IMRT setups. High-energy photons had no advantage over low-energy photons.

  7. Modeling Structural and Mechanical Responses to Localized Erosional Processes on a Bivergent Orogenic Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzen, R.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    Critical Coulomb wedge theory established that orogenic and accretionary wedges should develop self-similarly and maintain a critical taper that reflects the balance of strength of the wedge material and a basal décollement. However, a variety of geological processes can perturb that balance, forcing readjustment of the wedge. For example, glacial erosion and landsliding can concentrate erosion on a localized portion of the wedge slope, leaving that portion of the wedge with an out-of-equilibrium slope that would need to re-develop for the wedge to resume self-similar growth. We use the discrete element method to analyze how growing bivergent wedges with different cohesive strengths respond structurally and mechanically to erosional events localized along upper, middle, and lower segments of the pro-wedge. Mechanically, pro-wedge erosion results in a sudden decrease followed by a quick recovery of the mean stress and maximum shear stress throughout the pro-wedge. However, when erosion is localized in the mid- to lower portions of the pro-wedge, a zone of increased mean stress develops where the wedge is concentrating deformation to recover its taper. In contrast, when erosion is localized in the upper axial zone, there is almost no recovery of the wedge taper, reflecting the fact that the material at the top of the wedge is being carried passively in a transition zone between the pro-wedge and retro-wedge. Structurally, wedges composed of lower cohesion material recover their critical taper almost immediately through distributed deformation, while wedges of higher-cohesion material recover more slowly, and incompletely, by concentrating deformation along existing fault surfaces. As a result, localized erosional episodes can have a lasting effect on the wedge morphology when the wedge is composed of higher cohesion material.

  8. Tunable spatial decoherers for polarization-entangled photons.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Graciana; Voigt, Dirk; Aiello, Andrea; Woerdman, J P

    2006-07-01

    We report a novel controllable source of spatial decoherence for twin photons, based upon commercially available wedge depolarizers. This allows us to convert the polarization-entangled singlet state into a tunable mixed state. A full characterization of this mixed state, by means of quantum tomography, shows that such a spatial decoherer can be used for synthesizing Werner-like states on demand.

  9. The effect of photon energy on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Wonmo; Park, Jong Min; Choi, Chang Heon; Ha, Sung Whan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of common three photon energies (6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans to treat prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with prostate cancer treated locally to 81.0 Gy were retrospectively studied. 6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV IMRT plans for each patient were generated using suitable planning objectives, dose constraints, and 8-field setting. The plans were analyzed in terms of dose-volume histogram for the target coverage, dose conformity, organs at risk (OAR) sparing, and normal tissue integral dose. Results Regardless of the energies chosen at the plans, the target coverage, conformity, and homogeneity of the plans were similar. However, there was a significant dose increase in rectal wall and femoral heads for 6-MV compared to those for 10-MV and 15-MV. The V20 Gy of rectal wall with 6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV were 95.6%, 88.4%, and 89.4% while the mean dose to femoral heads were 31.7, 25.9, and 26.3 Gy, respectively. Integral doses to the normal tissues in higher energy (10-MV and 15-MV) plans were reduced by about 7%. Overall, integral doses in mid and low dose regions in 6-MV plans were increased by up to 13%. Conclusion In this study, 10-MV prostate IMRT plans showed better OAR sparing and less integral doses than the 6-MV. The biological and clinical significance of this finding remains to be determined afterward, considering neutron dose contribution. PMID:23120741

  10. Five questions to consider before conducting a stepped wedge trial.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, James R; Copas, Andrew J; Beard, Emma; Osrin, David; Lewis, James J; Davey, Calum; Thompson, Jennifer A; Baio, Gianluca; Fielding, Katherine L; Prost, Audrey

    2015-08-17

    Researchers should consider five questions before starting a stepped wedge trial. Why are you planning one? Researchers sometimes think that stepped wedge trials are useful when there is little doubt about the benefit of the intervention being tested. However, if the primary reason for an intervention is to measure its effect, without equipoise there is no ethical justification for delaying implementation in some clusters. By contrast, if you are undertaking pragmatic research, where the primary reason for rolling out the intervention is for it to exert its benefits, and if phased implementation is inevitable, a stepped wedge trial is a valid option and provides better evidence than most non-randomized evaluations. What design will you use? Two common stepped wedge designs are based on the recruitment of a closed or open cohort. In both, individuals may experience both control and intervention conditions and you should be concerned about carry-over effects. In a third, continuous-recruitment, short-exposure design, individuals are recruited as they become eligible and experience either control or intervention condition, but not both. How will you conduct the primary analysis? In stepped wedge trials, control of confounding factors through secular variation is essential. 'Vertical' approaches preserve randomization and compare outcomes between randomized groups within periods. 'Horizontal' approaches compare outcomes before and after crossover to the intervention condition. Most analysis models used in practice combine both types of comparison. The appropriate analytic strategy should be considered on a case-by-case basis. How large will your trial be? Standard sample size calculations for cluster randomized trials do not accommodate the specific features of stepped wedge trials. Methods exist for many stepped wedge designs, but simulation-based calculations provide the greatest flexibility. In some scenarios, such as when the intracluster correlation coefficient is

  11. Empirical evidence for two nightside current wedges during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from a comprehensive statistical study of the ionospheric current system and its coupling to the magnetosphere during classical bulge type substorms. We identified 116 substorms and determined the global ionospheric current system before and during the substorm using the SuperMAG initiative and global auroral images obtained by the Polar VIS Earth camera. The westward electrojet (WEJ) display a distinct latitudinal shift between the pre- and post-midnight region and we find evidence that the two WEJ regions are disconnected. This, and other observational facts, led us to propose a new 3D current system configuration that consists of 2 wedge type systems: a current wedge in the pre-midnight region (substorm current wedge), and another current wedge system in the post-midnight region (oval current wedge). There is some local time overlap between the two systems. The former maps to the region inside the near Earth neutral line and is associated with structured BPS type electron precipitation. The latter maps to the inner magnetosphere and is associated with diffuse electron precipitation. We present results of the statistical study, show typical events, results from Biot-Savart simulations, and discuss the implications for our understanding of the 3D current system associated with substorms.

  12. Diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagumennyi, Ia V.; Dimitrieva, N. F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the problem of evolution of diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle is analyzed numerically. The governing set of fundamental equations is solved using original solvers from the open source OpenFOAM package on supercomputer facilities. Due to breaking of naturally existing diffusion flux of a stratifying agent by the impermeable surface of the wedge a complex multi-level vortex system of compensatory fluid motions is formed around the obstacle. Sharp edges of the obstacle generate extended high-gradient horizontal interfaces which are clearly observed in laboratory experiments by high-resolution Schlieren visualization. Formation of an intensive pressure depression zone in front of the leading vertex of the wedge is responsible for generation of propulsive force resulting in a self-displacement of the obstacle along the neutral buoyancy horizon in a stably stratified environment. The size of the pressure deficiency area near the sharp vertex of a concave wedge is about twice that for a convex one. This demonstrates a more intensive propulsion mechanism in case of the concave wedge and, accordingly, a higher velocity of its self-movement in a continuously stratified medium.

  13. Casimir effect for a semitransparent wedge and an annular piston

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, Kimball A.; Wagner, Jef; Kirsten, Klaus

    2009-12-15

    We consider the Casimir energy due to a massless scalar field in a geometry of an infinite wedge closed by a Dirichlet circular cylinder, where the wedge is formed by {delta}-function potentials, so-called semitransparent boundaries. A finite expression for the Casimir energy corresponding to the arc and the presence of both semitransparent potentials is obtained, from which the torque on the sidewalls can be derived. The most interesting part of the calculation is the nontrivial nature of the angular mode functions. Numerical results are obtained which are closely analogous to those recently found for a magnetodielectric wedge, with the same speed of light on both sides of the wedge boundaries. Alternative methods are developed for annular regions with radial semitransparent potentials, based on reduced Green's functions for the angular dependence, which allows calculations using the multiple-scattering formalism. Numerical results corresponding to the torque on the radial plates are likewise computed, which generalize those for the wedge geometry. Generally useful formulas for calculating Casimir energies in separable geometries are derived.

  14. Casimir effect for a semitransparent wedge and an annular piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kimball A.; Wagner, Jef; Kirsten, Klaus

    2009-12-01

    We consider the Casimir energy due to a massless scalar field in a geometry of an infinite wedge closed by a Dirichlet circular cylinder, where the wedge is formed by δ-function potentials, so-called semitransparent boundaries. A finite expression for the Casimir energy corresponding to the arc and the presence of both semitransparent potentials is obtained, from which the torque on the sidewalls can be derived. The most interesting part of the calculation is the nontrivial nature of the angular mode functions. Numerical results are obtained which are closely analogous to those recently found for a magnetodielectric wedge, with the same speed of light on both sides of the wedge boundaries. Alternative methods are developed for annular regions with radial semitransparent potentials, based on reduced Green’s functions for the angular dependence, which allows calculations using the multiple-scattering formalism. Numerical results corresponding to the torque on the radial plates are likewise computed, which generalize those for the wedge geometry. Generally useful formulas for calculating Casimir energies in separable geometries are derived.

  15. Relative biological damage and electron fluence in and out of a 6 MV photon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syme, A.; Kirkby, C.; Mirzayans, R.; Mac Kenzie, M.; Field, C.; Fallone, B. G.

    2009-11-01

    Scattered radiation in the penumbra of a megavoltage radiation therapy beam can deposit a non-negligible dose in the healthy tissue around a target volume. The lower energy of the radiation in this region suggests that its biological effectiveness might not be the same as that of the open beam. In this work, we determined the relative biological damage in normal human fibroblasts after megavoltage irradiation in two geometries. The first was an open-beam irradiation and the second was a blocked configuration in which only scattered radiation could reach the target cells. The biological damage was evaluated by the γ-H2AX immunofluorescence assay, which is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks in individual cells. We report that the scattered radiation is more effective at producing biological damage than the open beam radiation. We found a 27% enhancement in the net mean nuclear γ-H2AX fluorescence intensity at 2 Gy and a 48% enhancement at 4 Gy. These findings are of interest due to the increased doses of penumbral radiation close to target volumes both in dose escalation studies and in IMRT treatment deliveries where high dose gradients exist for the purpose of conformal avoidance of healthy tissues.

  16. Reverse wedge osteotomy of the distal radius in Madelung's deformity.

    PubMed

    Mallard, F; Jeudy, J; Rabarin, F; Raimbeau, G; Fouque, P-A; Cesari, B; Bizot, P; Saint-Cast, Y

    2013-06-01

    Madelung's deformity results from a growth defect in the palmar and ulnar region of the distal radius. It presents as an excessively inclined radial joint surface, inducing "spontaneous progressive palmar subluxation of the wrist". The principle of reverse wedge osteotomy (RWO) consists in the reorientation of the radial joint surface by taking a circumferential bone wedge, the base of which is harvested from the excess of the radial and dorsal cortical bone of the distal radius, then turning it over and putting back this reverse wedge into the osteotomy so as to obtain closure on the excess and opening on the deficient cortical bone. RWO corrects the palmar subluxation of the carpus and improves distal radio-ulnar alignment. All five bilaterally operated patients were satisfied, esthetically and functionally. Its corrective power gives RWO a place apart among the surgical techniques currently available in Madelung's deformity.

  17. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, E.S.

    1980-05-09

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  18. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Edward S.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  19. COMMISSIONING AND OPERATION OF THE CEBAF 100 MV CRYOMODULES

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Trent; Davis, G; Drury, Michael; Harwood, Leigh; Hogan, John; Kimber, Andrew; Lahti, George; Merz, William; Nelson, Richard; Plawski, Tomasz; Seidman, David; Spata, Michael; Wilson, Michael; Hovater, J

    2012-07-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of ten new 100 MV cryomodules and RF systems. The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at a maximum accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m. To support the higher gradients and higher Q{sub L} ({approx} 3 x 10{sup 7}), a new RF system has been developed and is being installed to power and control the cavities. The RF system employs digital control and 13 kW klystrons. Recently, two of these cryomodules and associated RF hardware and software have been installed and commissioned in the CEBAF accelerator. Electrons at linac currents up to 540 {micro}A have been successfully accelerated and used for nuclear physics experiments. This paper reports on the commissioning and operation of the RF system and cryomodules.

  20. Intermediate Megavoltage Photon Beams for Improved Lung Cancer Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuanming; Ahmad, Munir; Ming, Xin; Zhou, Li; Deng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of intermediate megavoltage (3-MV) photon beams on SBRT lung cancer treatments. To start with, a 3-MV virtual beam was commissioned on a commercial treatment planning system based on Monte Carlo simulations. Three optimized plans (6-MV, 3-MV and dual energy of 3- and 6-MV) were generated for 31 lung cancer patients with identical beam configuration and optimization constraints for each patient. Dosimetric metrics were evaluated and compared among the three plans. Overall, planned dose conformity was comparable among three plans for all 31 patients. For 21 thin patients with average short effective path length (< 10 cm), the 3-MV plans showed better target coverage and homogeneity with dose spillage index R50% = 4.68±0.83 and homogeneity index = 1.26±0.06, as compared to 4.95±1.01 and 1.31±0.08 in the 6-MV plans (p < 0.001). Correspondingly, the average/maximum reductions of lung volumes receiving 20 Gy (V20Gy), 5 Gy (V5Gy), and mean lung dose (MLD) were 7%/20%, 9%/30% and 5%/10%, respectively in the 3-MV plans (p < 0.05). The doses to 5% volumes of the cord, esophagus, trachea and heart were reduced by 9.0%, 10.6%, 11.4% and 7.4%, respectively (p < 0.05). For 10 thick patients, dual energy plans can bring dosimetric benefits with comparable target coverage, integral dose and reduced dose to the critical structures, as compared to the 6-MV plans. In conclusion, our study indicated that 3-MV photon beams have potential dosimetric benefits in treating lung tumors in terms of improved tumor coverage and reduced doses to the adjacent critical structures, in comparison to 6-MV photon beams. Intermediate megavoltage photon beams (< 6-MV) may be considered and added into current treatment approaches to reduce the adjacent normal tissue doses while maintaining sufficient tumor dose coverage in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26672752

  1. Citrus alongside the sinking wreckage of MV Pacific Star in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Citrus alongside the sinking wreckage of MV Pacific Star in the Pacific Ocean. Pacific Star's captain used his vessel to ram the cutter after he was ordered to stop and submit to inspection by a boarding team. Citrus was not seriously damaged in the collision. U.S. Coast Guard personnel recovered a large amount of marijuana from the wreckage - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter CITRUS, Coos Bay, Coos County, OR

  2. An analysis of scattering from a reentrant wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Ambika

    In this thesis the scattering of acoustic pressure from a rigid wedge is examined. The wedges having re-entrant geometry are of particular interest. The incident field is considered from a time harmonic point source. The solution for the scattered pressure field is obtained by modal, image and asymptotic analysis. It is numerically shown that the exact modal solution and image based solution for different incident frequencies and source positions are the same. It is also shown that the asymptotic solution obtained matches with the image based solution.

  3. 5 MV 30 mA industrial electron processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Y.; Mizusawa, K.

    1991-05-01

    Industrial electron beam processing systems have been in use in various application fields such as: improving heat resistivity of wire insulation; controlling quality of automobile rubber tires and melt index characteristics of PE foams; and curing paintings or printing inks. Recently, there has come up a need for electron beam with an energy higher than 3 MV in order to disinfect salmonella in chicken meat, to kill bugs in fruits, and to sterilize medical disposables. To meet this need we developed a 5 MV 30 mA electron processing system with an X-ray conversion target. The machine was tested in NHV's plant in Kyoto at continuous operation of full voltage and full current. It proved to be very steady in operation with a high efficiency (as much as 72%). Also, the X-ray target was tested in a continuous run of 5 MV 30 mA (150 kW). It proved to be viable in industrial utilization. This paper introduces the process and the results of the development.

  4. TH-C-12A-08: New Compact 10 MV S-Band Linear Accelerator: 3D Finite-Element Design and Monte Carlo Dose Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, D; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B; Steciw, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a new compact S-band linac waveguide capable of producing a 10 MV x-ray beam, while maintaining the length (27.5 cm) of current 6 MV waveguides. This will allow higher x-ray energies to be used in our linac-MRI systems with the same footprint. Methods: Finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics was used to design an accelerator cavity matching one published in an experiment breakdown study, to ensure that our modeled cavities do not exceed the threshold electric fields published. This cavity was used as the basis for designing an accelerator waveguide, where each cavity of the full waveguide was tuned to resonate at 2.997 GHz by adjusting the cavity diameter. The RF field solution within the waveguide was calculated, and together with an electron-gun phase space generated using Opera3D/SCALA, were input into electron tracking software PARMELA to compute the electron phase space striking the x-ray target. This target phase space was then used in BEAM Monte Carlo simulations to generate percent depth doses curves for this new linac, which were then used to re-optimize the waveguide geometry. Results: The shunt impedance, Q-factor, and peak-to-mean electric field ratio were matched to those published for the breakdown study to within 0.1% error. After tuning the full waveguide, the peak surface fields are calculated to be 207 MV/m, 13% below the breakdown threshold, and a d-max depth of 2.42 cm, a D10/20 value of 1.59, compared to 2.45 cm and 1.59, respectively, for the simulated Varian 10 MV linac and brehmsstrahlung production efficiency 20% lower than a simulated Varian 10 MV linac. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the design of a functional 27.5 cm waveguide producing 10 MV photons with characteristics similar to a Varian 10 MV linac.

  5. Modeling transmission and scatter for photon beam attenuators.

    PubMed

    Ahnesjö, A; Weber, L; Nilsson, P

    1995-11-01

    The development of treatment planning methods in radiation therapy requires dose calculation methods that are both accurate and general enough to provide a dose per unit monitor setting for a broad variety of fields and beam modifiers. The purpose of this work was to develop models for calculation of scatter and transmission for photon beam attenuators such as compensating filters, wedges, and block trays. The attenuation of the beam is calculated using a spectrum of the beam, and a correction factor based on attenuation measurements. Small angle coherent scatter and electron binding effects on scattering cross sections are considered by use of a correction factor. Quality changes in beam penetrability and energy fluence to dose conversion are modeled by use of the calculated primary beam spectrum after passage through the attenuator. The beam spectra are derived by the depth dose effective method, i.e., by minimizing the difference between measured and calculated depth dose distributions, where the calculated distributions are derived by superposing data from a database for monoenergetic photons. The attenuator scatter is integrated over the area viewed from the calculation point of view using first scatter theory. Calculations are simplified by replacing the energy and angular-dependent cross-section formulas with the forward scatter constant r2(0) and a set of parametrized correction functions. The set of corrections include functions for the Compton energy loss, scatter attenuation, and secondary bremsstrahlung production. The effect of charged particle contamination is bypassed by avoiding use of dmax for absolute dose calibrations. The results of the model are compared with scatter measurements in air for copper and lead filters and with dose to a water phantom for lead filters for 4 and 18 MV. For attenuated beams, downstream of the buildup region, the calculated results agree with measurements on the 1.5% level. The accuracy was slightly less in situations

  6. Analysis of a free-running synchronization artifact correction for MV-imaging with aSi:H flat panels

    SciTech Connect

    Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Sedlmayer, Felix; Deutschmann, Heinz; Huber, Stefan

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Solid state flat panel electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are widely used for megavolt (MV) photon imaging applications in radiotherapy. In addition to their original purpose in patient position verification, they are convenient to use in quality assurance and dosimetry to verify beam geometry and dose deposition or to perform linear accelerator (linac) calibration procedures. However, native image frames from amorphous silicon (aSi:H) detectors show a range of artifacts which have to be eliminated by proper correction algorithms. When a panel is operated in free-running frame acquisition mode, moving vertical stripes (periodic synchronization artifacts) are a disturbing feature in image frames. Especially for applications in volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or motion tracking, the synchronization (sync) artifacts are the limiting factor for potential and accuracy since they become even worse at higher frame rates and at lower dose rates, i.e., linac pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs). Methods: The authors introduced a synchronization correction method which is based on a theoretical model describing the interferences of the panel's readout clocking with the linac's dose pulsing. Depending on the applied PRF, a certain number of dose pulses is captured per frame which is readout columnwise, sequentially. The interference of the PRF with the panel readout is responsible for the period and the different gray value levels of the sync stripes, which can be calculated analytically. Sync artifacts can then be eliminated multiplicatively in precorrected frames without additional information about radiation pulse timing. Results: For the analysis, three aSi:H EPIDs of various types were investigated with 6 and 15 MV photon beams at varying PRFs of 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 pulses per second. Applying the sync correction at panels with gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators improved single frame flood field image quality drastically

  7. Pseudo-ice-wedge casts of Connecticut, northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Robert F.

    1983-07-01

    Since 1965, ice-wedge casts have been reported in deposits of sand and gravel in Connecticut. These are wedge forms up to 1.1 m wide and many meters high. Most are single forms, not in polygonal array. They are found in adjoining states as well. Their distribution, dimensions, structure, and fabric and an assessment of the former physical environment preclude their origin as permafrost features. They appear to be tension fractures produced by the loading of coarse clastics on fine clastics near and below the water table where sediments creep toward a stream or depression. Locally movement started with kettle formation during deglaciation. However, some wedges cut horizontal layers of iron-coated sand and gravel and must be younger than those distinctly postglacial phenomena. Moreover, modern B horizons of the overlying soil have moved down into some wedges more than 2 m, indicating that fracturing is still active today. Complex fracture fillings in bedrock also have been attributed to a permafrost origin, but this too seems unlikely.

  8. Flowfield Establishment and Unsteadiness in Hypervelocity Double Wedge Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swantek, A. B.; Knisely, A. M.; Austin, J. M.

    Significant discrepancies between experiments and simulations have been reported in the normalized establishment times for hypervelocity double wedge and double cone flows. Experimental results for flow establishment times based on heat transfer measurements have been reported by Holden and Mallinson, Gai, and Mudford [1, 2].

  9. Magnetic and structural instabilities of ultrathin Fe(100) wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S.D.; Li, Dongqi; Qiu, Z.Q.

    1994-05-01

    An overview is provided of recent efforts to explore magnetic and related structural issues for ultrathin Fe films grown epitaxially as wedge structures onto Ag(100) and Cu(100). Experiments were carried out utilizing the surface magneto-optic Kerr effect (SMOKE). Ordinary bcc Fe is lattice-matched to the primitive unit cell of the Ag(100) surface. Fe wedges on Ag(100) can be fabricated whose thick end has in-plane magnetic easy axes due to the shape anisotropy, and whose thin end has perpendicular easy axes due to the surface magnetic anisotrophy. A spin-reorientation transition can thus be studied in the center of the wedge where the competing anisotropies cancel. The goal is to test the Mermin-Wagner theorem which states that long-range order is lost at finite temperatures in an isotropic two-dimensional Heisenberg system. Fe wedges on Cu(100) can be studied in like manner, but the lattice matching permits fcc and tetragonally-distorted fcc phases to provide structural complexity in addition to the interplay of competing magnetic anisotropies. The results of these studies are new phase identifications that help both to put previous work into perspective and to define issues to pursue in the future.

  10. Thrusting and wedge growth, Southern Alps of Lombardia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, Dietrich

    1992-06-01

    A south-vergent fold-thrust belt of Miocene-Recent age accompanies the south slope of the Lombardian Alps and is partly buried beneath Plio-Pleistocene Po Valley basin fill. The belt is probably detached along a trans-crustal thrust, named Main South Alpine Thrust (MSAT), with an estimated dip slip of 70-100 km. Transport on this thrust piggybacks the Adamello pluton of Late Eocene age, pre-Adamello folds, and Oligocene-Miocene Insubric strike-slip structures, by ramping up through 12-15 km of Austro-Alpine (Adria) crust and through 8-10 km of Triassic to Eocene sediments. Folds in the Front Ranges are ascribed to MSAT ramping, not to pre-Adamello compression. The MSAT soles upward in a blind thrust beneath 3-4 km of Oligocene-Pliocene foredeep fill. Initial regional failure along the MSAT implies substantial and pre-existing topographic relief near the Insubric line. An average of 25% wedge thickening during MSAT transport is consistent with the requirement of Coulomb critical taper. Progression of the south-Alpine detachment from the MSAT to the base of the foreland sediments has added a thickness of 6-12 km in footwall imbrications to the base and the toe of the thrust wedge. This addition in wedge volume is consistent with wedge dynamics only if a mid-Miocene or younger spike of excess Alpine topography is admitted.

  11. How important is randomisation in a stepped wedge trial?

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, James R; Prost, Audrey; Fielding, Katherine L; Copas, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    In cluster randomised trials, randomisation increases internal study validity. If enough clusters are randomised, an unadjusted analysis should be unbiased. If a smaller number of clusters are included, stratified or matched randomisation can increase comparability between trial arms. In addition, an adjusted analysis may be required; nevertheless, randomisation removes the possibility for systematically biased allocation and increases transparency. In stepped wedge trials, clusters are randomised to receive an intervention at different start times ('steps'), and all clusters eventually receive it. In a recent study protocol for a 'modified stepped wedge trial', the investigators considered randomisation of the clusters (hospital wards), but decided against it for ethical and logistical reasons, and under the assumption that it would not add much to the rigour of the evaluation. We show that the benefits of randomisation for cluster randomised trials also apply to stepped wedge trials. The biggest additional issue for stepped wedge trials in relation to parallel cluster randomised trials is the need to control for secular trends in the outcome. Analysis of stepped wedge trials can in theory be based on 'horizontal' or 'vertical' comparisons. Horizontal comparisons are based on measurements taken before and after the intervention is introduced in each cluster, and are unbiased if there are no secular trends. Vertical comparisons are based on outcome measurements from clusters that have switched to the intervention condition and those from clusters that have yet to switch, and are unbiased under randomisation since at any time point, which clusters are in intervention and control conditions will have been determined at random. Secular outcome trends are a possibility in many settings. Many stepped wedge trials are analysed with a mixed model, including a random effect for cluster and fixed effects for time period to account for secular trends, thereby combining both

  12. Computation of the seismic stability of rock wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Haupt, W.

    1989-04-01

    Newmark's concept of computing the permanent displacement under seismic loads has been combined with the conventional limit equilibrium analysis to compute the displacements of a rock wedge. The rock wedge formed by the intersecting planes may or may not have a tension crack in the upper slope surface. As the static analysis of a rock wedge is available from the literature, only the seismic problem is treated theoretically in more details. A computer program has been developed to compute the displacements from the digitised input data of the acceleration-time-history. The program can take into account the water pressure on the intersecting planes and on the planes of the tension crack. The effect of rock anchors if present is also taken care of in addition to static surcharge loads. The program calculates the conventional static factor of safety, remaining resistance against sliding, the critical acceleration, exciting force, relative velocity with time and the cumulative displacements. Two model examples are presented: one with simple sinusoidal acceleration and the other one with actual earthquake data considering the different systems of forces acting on the wedge. The results are critically discussed with respect to the different parameters e. g. anchor forces, water pressure and cohesion influencing the magnitude of displacements under seismic loads. It is shown that the critical acceleration is a better index for the seismic stability than the conventional factor of safety. The critical acceleration presented in this paper serves as a very handy tool for a site engineer to get the first hand information about the stability of the wedge for a given acceleration-time-history without going into the details of dynamic analysis.

  13. 76 FR 58112 - Safety Zone; M/V DAVY CROCKETT, Columbia River

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... cofferdam at the M/V DAVY CROCKETT removal sight at approximate river mile 117. The original safety zone was... M/V DAVY CROCKETT removal sight is located on the Washington State side of the Columbia River...

  14. Neutron Spectra and H*(10) in a 15 MV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Benites, J.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Rivera, T.; Carrillo, A.; Mondragon, R.

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated inside the bunker of a 15 MV Varian linac model CLINAC iX. Calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. Neutron spectra in the vicinity of isocentre show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons produced by the source term, while epithermal and thermal neutron remain constant regardless the distance respect to isocentre, due to room return. Along the maze neutron spectra becomes softer as the detector moves along the maze. The ambient dose equivalent is decreased but do not follow the 1/r{sup 2} rule due to changes in the neutron spectra.

  15. Neutron Spectra and H*(10) in a 15 MV Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benites, J.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Rivera, T.; Carrillo, A.; Mondragon, R.

    2010-12-01

    Neutron spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated inside the bunker of a 15 MV Varian linac model CLINAC iX. Calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. Neutron spectra in the vicinity of isocentre show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons produced by the source term, while epithermal and thermal neutron remain constant regardless the distance respect to isocentre, due to room return. Along the maze neutron spectra becomes softer as the detector moves along the maze. The ambient dose equivalent is decreased but do not follow the 1/r2 rule due to changes in the neutron spectra.

  16. Vertebral Osteotomies in Ankylosing Spondylitis-Comparison of Outcomes Following Closing Wedge Osteotomy versus Opening Wedge Osteotomy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ravinsky, Robert A; Ouellet, Jean-Albert; Brodt, Erika D; Dettori, Joseph R

    2013-04-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale To seek out and assess the best quality evidence available comparing opening wedge osteotomy (OWO) and closing wedge osteotomy (CWO) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis to determine whether their results differ with regard to several different subjective and objective outcome measures. Objective The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a difference in subjective and objective outcomes when comparing CWO and OWO in patients with ankylosing spondylitis suffering from clinically significant thoracolumbar kyphosis with respect to quality-of-life assessments, complication risks, and the amount of correction of the spine achieved at follow-up. Methods A systematic review was undertaken of articles published up to July 2012. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify studies comparing effectiveness and safety outcomes between adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis who received closing wedge versus opening wedge osteotomies. Studies that included pediatric patients, polysegmental osteotomies, or revision procedures were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the GRADE criteria and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results From a total of 67 possible citations, 4 retrospective cohorts (class of evidence III) met our inclusion criteria and form the basis for this report. No differences in Oswestry Disability Index, visual analog scale for pain, Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-24 score, SRS-22 score, and patient satisfaction were reported between the closing and opening wedge groups across two studies. Regarding radiological outcomes following closing versus opening osteotomies, mean change in sagittal vertical axis ranged from 8.9 to 10.8 cm and 8.0 to 10.9 cm, respectively, across three studies; mean change in lumbar lordosis ranged from 36 to 47 degrees and 19 to 41 degrees across four studies; and mean change

  17. Gold nanoparticle induced vasculature damage in radiotherapy: Comparing protons, megavoltage photons, and kilovoltage photons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuting Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan; McMahon, Stephen J.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to investigate the radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticle (GNP) induced vasculature damage for proton, megavoltage (MV) photon, and kilovoltage (kV) photon irradiation. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using tool for particle simulation (TOPAS) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in close proximity up to 20 μm from the GNPs. The spatial dose distribution from GNPs was used as an input to calculate the dose deposited to the blood vessels. GNP induced vasculature damage was evaluated for three particle sources (a clinical spread out Bragg peak proton beam, a 6 MV photon beam, and two kV photon beams). For each particle source, various depths in tissue, GNP sizes (2, 10, and 20 nm diameter), and vessel diameters (8, 14, and 20 μm) were investigated. Two GNP distributions in lumen were considered, either homogeneously distributed in the vessel or attached to the inner wall of the vessel. Doses of 30 Gy and 2 Gy were considered, representing typical in vivo enhancement studies and conventional clinical fractionation, respectively. Results: These simulations showed that for 20 Au-mg/g GNP blood concentration homogeneously distributed in the vessel, the additional dose at the inner vascular wall encircling the lumen was 43% of the prescribed dose at the depth of treatment for the 250 kVp photon source, 1% for the 6 MV photon source, and 0.1% for the proton beam. For kV photons, GNPs caused 15% more dose in the vascular wall for 150 kVp source than for 250 kVp. For 6 MV photons, GNPs caused 0.2% more dose in the vascular wall at 20 cm depth in water as compared to at depth of maximum dose (Dmax). For proton therapy, GNPs caused the same dose in the vascular wall for all depths across the spread out Bragg peak with 12.7 cm range and 7 cm modulation. For the same weight of GNPs in the vessel, 2 nm diameter GNPs caused three times more damage to the vessel than 20 nm diameter GNPs. When the GNPs were attached

  18. Experimental measurement of radiological penumbra associated with intermediate energy x-rays (1 MV) and small radiosurgery field sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M.; Beachey, David J.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-10-15

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is used to treat intracranial lesions with a high degree of accuracy. At the present time, x-ray energies at or above Co-60 gamma rays are used. Previous Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that intermediate energy x-ray photons or IEPs (defined to be photons in the energy range of 0.2-1.2 MeV), combined with small field sizes, produce a reduced radiological penumbra leading to a sharper dose gradient, improved dose homogeneity and sparing of critical anatomy adjacent to the target volume. This hypothesis is based on the fact that, for small x-ray fields, a dose outside the treatment volume is dictated mainly by the range of electrons set into motion by x-ray photons. The purpose of this work is: (1) to produce intermediate energy x rays using a detuned medical linear accelerator (2) to characterize the energy of this beam (3) to measure the radiological penumbra for IEPs and small fields to compare with that produced by 6 MV x rays or Co-60, and (4) to compare these experimental measurements with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The maximum photon energy of our IEP x-ray spectrum was measured to be 1.2 MeV. Gafchromic EBT films (ISP Technologies, Wayne, NJ) were irradiated and read using a novel digital microscopy imaging system with high spatial resolution. Under identical irradiation conditions the measured radiological penumbra widths (80%-20% distance), for field sizes ranging from 0.3x0.3 to 4.0x4.0 cm{sup 2}, varied from 0.3-0.77 mm (1.2 MV) and from 1.1-2.1 mm (6 MV). Even more dramatic were the differences found when comparing the 90%-10% or the 95%-5% widths, which are in fact more significant in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations agreed well with the experimental findings. The reduction in radiological penumbra could be substantial for specific clinical situations such as in the treatment of an ocular melanoma abutting the macula or for the treatment of functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia (a nonlethal

  19. Optical linear polarimetry of Solar System bodies using a Wedged Double Wollaston.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorosabel, J.; García Muñoz, A.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Hueso, R.; Pérez Hoyos, S.

    2015-05-01

    The gases and aerosols contained in a planetary atmosphere leave characteristic signatures on the reflected radiation. Hence we could use the polarization state of emergent radiation to investigate the atmospheric optical properties of the planet. We report on the first polarimetric tests of Jupiter and Saturn recently carried out with a Wedged Double Wollaston (WeDoWo) prism attached to the ALFOSC instrument mounted at NOT. A WeDoWo is composed of a suitable combination of two glass wedges and two Wollaston prisms in the parallel beam ALFOSC. The edges split the beam and feed the Wollaston prims with axes rotated by 45 deg. Thus, the relative intensities of the output light provides the angle and degree of the input photons. The four images are taken simultaneously and hence at identical planet rotation and atmospheric conditions. In order avoid overlap of the 4 images in the CCD, a 10" wide slit is placed on the telescope focal plane. Polarimetry complements the extended technique of photometry by probing different atmospheric altitudes, characterizing the particles in suspension in the atmosphere. In observations with spatial resolution of the planet disk, polarimetry may be sensitive to the phenomenon of limb polarization and to the occurrence of polar hazes (as for Jupiter). We plan to complement the observational work with modelling. For that purpose, we are using a novel Pre-conditioned Backward Monte Carlo (PBMC) algorithm that computes the full Stokes vector for multiple scattering. We are also developing a new calibration code in order to systematize the data reduction. Despite the potentialities of the technique, there has been no systematic survey of the Solar System planets in polarimetric mode. In the medium term we plan to extend the WeDoWo use to other objects of the Solar System.

  20. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  1. Experimental investigation of sound absorption of acoustic wedges for anechoic chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, I. V.; Golubev, A. Yu.; Zverev, A. Ya.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Palchikovskiy, V. V.; Sobolev, A. F.; Chernykh, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The results of measuring the sound absorption by acoustic wedges, which were performed in AC-3 and AC-11 reverberation chambers at the Central Aerohydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI), are presented. Wedges of different densities manufactured from superfine basaltic and thin mineral fibers were investigated. The results of tests of these wedges were compared to the sound absorption of wedges of the operating AC-2 anechoic facility at TsAGI. It is shown that basaltic-fiber wedges have better sound-absorption characteristics than the investigated analogs and can be recommended for facing anechoic facilities under construction.

  2. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC.

    PubMed

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-11-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed (28)Al, (24)Na, (54)Mn and (60)Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is (28)Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several (28)Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received.

  3. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC.

    PubMed

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-11-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed (28)Al, (24)Na, (54)Mn and (60)Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is (28)Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several (28)Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  4. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC

    PubMed Central

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-01-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed 28Al, 24Na, 54Mn and 60Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is 28Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several 28Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  5. [Sensitometry of Mammographic Screen-film System Using Bootstrap Aluminum Step-Wedge.].

    PubMed

    Abe, Shinji; Imada, Ryou; Terauchi, Takashi; Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Monma, Masahiko; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Mochizuki, Yasuo

    2005-01-01

    Recently, a few types of step-wedges for bootstrap sensitometry with a mammographic screen-film system have been proposed. In this study, the bootstrap sensitometry with the mammographic screen-film system was studied for two types of aluminum step-wedges. Characteristic X-ray energy curves were determined using mammographic and general radiographic aluminum step-wedges devised to prevent scattered X-rays generated from one step penetrating into the region of another one, and dependence of the characteristic curves on the wedges was also discussed. No difference was found in the characteristic curves due to the difference in the step-wedges for mammography and general radiography although there was a slight difference in shape at the shoulder portion for the two types of step-wedges. Therefore, it was concluded that aluminum step-wedges for mammography and general radiography could be employed in bootstrap sensitometry with the mammographic screen-film system. PMID:16479054

  6. Mechanism of Hot Finger Formation in Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, M. Y.; Tamura, Y.; Sakaguchi, H.

    2013-12-01

    Processes of mantle melting and volcanic eruptions along subduction zones are often illustrated by the use of two-dimensional cross-section models of convergent margins. However, Quaternary volcanoes in the NE Japan arc could be grouped into ten volcano clusters striking transverse to the arc; these have an average width of ~ 50 km, and are separated by parallel gaps 30-75 km wide (Tamura et al., 2002). Moreover, the structure of the mantle wedge and arc crust beneath the NE Japan arc and the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc, respectively, suggest that the third dimension, lying along the strike of the arc, is necessary to understand the actual production of magmas in subduction zones (e.g., Nakajima et al., 2001; Hasegawa & Nakajima, 2004; Kodaira et al., 2007; Kodaira et al., 2008). Common periodic structural variations, having wavelengths of 80-100 km, can be observed in both areas. This grouping of volcanoes and the structural variations may be related to locally developed hot regions within the mantle wedge that have the form of inclined, 50 km-wide fingers (hot fingers). The 'hot fingers' models (Tamura et al., 2002) may play an important role in linking the 3D structures within the mantle wedge and overlying arc crust to volcanic eruptions at the surface. To explore a physical and mathematical mechanism to produce a hot finger pattern, we develop a hydrodynamic model of mantle convection in mantle wedge. A hypothesis incorporated in our model is a double diffusive mechanism of mantle materials; diffusion of composition of mantle materials is much weaker than temperature diffusion. We show that our model shows a spatiotemporal pattern in a mantle material composition, temperature, and velocity that are similar to the spatiotemporal patterns observed in the NE Japan arc.

  7. Modal Analysis in Lined Wedge-Shaped Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechel, F. P.

    1998-10-01

    It has been suggested to describe the sound field in a wedge-shaped duct in a cylindrical co-ordinate system in which the boundaries of the wedge lie in a co-ordinate surface. This suggestion was developed in a companion paper [1]. The wave equation can be separated only if the boundaries are ideally reflecting (rigid or soft). Two solutions were proposed in reference [1] for absorbing boundaries. In the first solution the sound field is composed of “ideal modes” (modes in a wedge with ideally reflecting boundaries); the boundary condition at the absorbing boundary then leads to a system of equations for the mode amplitudes. The problem with this method lies in the fact that there is no radial orthogonality of the ideal modes so that the precision of the field synthesis by ideal modes is doubtful. In the second method in reference [1] one defines “fictitious modes” which satisfy the boundary conditions at the flanks exactly and which are based on hypergeometric functions as radial functions, but which produce a “rest” in the wave equation. It was described how this rest can be minimized; this procedure leads to slow numerical integrations. In the present paper, the wedge is subdivided into duct sections with parallel walls (the boundary is stepped); the fields in the sections are composed of duct modes (modes in a straight lined duct); the mode amplitudes are determined from the boundary conditions at the section limits. The advantages of the present method are (analytically) the duct modes are orthogonal across the sections, so the mode amplitudes can be determined with the usual precision of a modal analysis, and (numerically) no numerical integrations are needed.

  8. The effect of 6 and 15 MV on intensity-modulated radiation therapy prostate cancer treatment: plan evaluation, tumour control probability and normal tissue complication probability analysis, and the theoretical risk of secondary induced malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, M; Aldridge, S; Guerrero Urbano, T; Nisbet, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 and 15-MV photon energies on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) prostate cancer treatment plan outcome and to compare the theoretical risks of secondary induced malignancies. Methods Separate prostate cancer IMRT plans were prepared for 6 and 15-MV beams. Organ-equivalent doses were obtained through thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements in an anthropomorphic Aldersen radiation therapy human phantom. The neutron dose contribution at 15 MV was measured using polyallyl-diglycol-carbonate neutron track etch detectors. Risk coefficients from the International Commission on Radiological Protection Report 103 were used to compare the risk of fatal secondary induced malignancies in out-of-field organs and tissues for 6 and 15 MV. For the bladder and the rectum, a comparative evaluation of the risk using three separate models was carried out. Dose–volume parameters for the rectum, bladder and prostate planning target volume were evaluated, as well as normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumour control probability calculations. Results There is a small increased theoretical risk of developing a fatal cancer from 6 MV compared with 15 MV, taking into account all the organs. Dose–volume parameters for the rectum and bladder show that 15 MV results in better volume sparing in the regions below 70 Gy, but the volume exposed increases slightly beyond this in comparison with 6 MV, resulting in a higher NTCP for the rectum of 3.6% vs 3.0% (p=0.166). Conclusion The choice to treat using IMRT at 15 MV should not be excluded, but should be based on risk vs benefit while considering the age and life expectancy of the patient together with the relative risk of radiation-induced cancer and NTCPs. PMID:22010028

  9. X-Ray CT of Highly-Attenuating Objects: 9- or 15- MV Spectra?

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G; Trebes, J; Perry, R; Schneberk, D; Logan, C

    2005-08-29

    We imaged-highly attenuating test objects in three dimensions with 9-MV (at LLNL) and 15-MV (at Hill Air Force Base) x-ray spectra. While we used the same detector and motion control, there were differences that we could not control in the two radiography bays and in the sources. The results show better spatial resolution for the 9-MV spectrum and better contrast for the 15-MV spectrum. The 15-MV data contains a noise pattern that obfuscates the data. It is our judgment that if sufficient attention were given to design of the bay, beam dump, collimation, filtration and linac spot size; a 15-MV imaging system using a flat panel could be developed with spatial resolution of 5 lp/mm and contrastive performance better than we have demonstrated using a 9-MV spectrum.

  10. The photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Russell L.

    2009-10-01

    There are no TEM waves, only photons. Lets build a photon, using a radio antenna. A short antenna (2L<< λ) simplifies the calculation, letting B fall off everywhere as 1/r^2. The Biot-Savart law finds B = (μ0/4π)(LI0/r^2)θφt. The magnetic flux thru a semi-circle of radius λ/2 is set equal to the flux quantum h/e, determining the needed source strength, LI0. From this, one can integrate the magnetic energy density over a sphere of radius λ/2 and finds it to be 1.0121 hc/λ. Pretty close. A B field collapses when the current ceases, but the photon evades this by creating a ɛ0E / t displacement current at center that fully supports the toroidal B assembly as it moves at c. This E=vxB arises because the photon moves at c. Stopped, a photon decays. At every point along the photon's path, an observer will note a transient oscillation of an E field. This sources the EM ``guiding wave'', carrying little or no energy and expanding at c. At the head of the photon, all these spherical guiding waves gather ``in-phase'' as a planar wavefront. This model speaks to all the many things we know about light. The photon is tiny, but its guiding wave is huge.

  11. On the acoustic wedge design and simulation of anechoic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Changyong; Zhang, Shangyu; Huang, Lixi

    2016-10-01

    This study proposes an alternative to the classic wedge design for anechoic chambers, which is the uniform-then-gradient, flat-wall (UGFW) structure. The working mechanisms of the proposed structure and the traditional wedge are analyzed. It is found that their absorption patterns are different. The parameters of both structures are optimized for achieving minimum absorber depth, under the condition of absorbing 99% of normal incident sound energy. It is found that, the UGFW structure achieves a smaller total depth for the cut-off frequencies ranging from 100 Hz to 250 Hz. This paper also proposes a modification for the complex source image (CSI) model for the empirical simulation of anechoic chambers, originally proposed by Bonfiglio et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134 (1), 285-291 (2013)]. The modified CSI model considers the non-locally reactive effect of absorbers at oblique incidence, and the improvement is verified by a full, finite-element simulation of a small chamber. With the modified CSI model, the performance of both decorations with the optimized parameters in a large chamber is simulated. The simulation results are analyzed and checked against the tolerance of 1.5 dB deviation from the inverse square law, stipulated in the ISO standard 3745(2003). In terms of the total decoration depth and anechoic chamber performance, the UGFW structure is better than the classic wedge design.

  12. Dual Double-Wedge Pseudo-Depolarizer with Anamorphic PSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter; Thompson, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A polarized scene, which may occur at oblique illumination angles, creates a radiometric signal that varies as a function of viewing angle. One common optical component that is used to minimize such an effect is a polarization scrambler or depolarizer. As part of the CLARREO mission, the SOLARIS instrument project at Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a new class of polarization scramblers using a dual double-wedge pseudo-depolarizer that produces an anamorphic point spread function (PSF). The SOLARIS instrument uses two Wollaston type scramblers in series, each with a distinct wedge angle, to image a pseudo-depolarized scene that is free of eigenstates. Since each wedge is distinct, the scrambler is able to produce an anamorphic PSF that maintains high spatial resolution in one dimension by sacrificing the spatial resolution in the other dimension. This scrambler geometry is ideal for 1-D imagers, such as pushbroom slit spectrometers, which require high spectral resolution, high spatial resolution, and low sensitivity to polarized light. Moreover, the geometry is applicable to a wide range of scientific instruments that require both high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) and low sensitivity to polarized scenes

  13. Shock interaction mechanisms on a double wedge at Mach 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durna, Ahmet Selim; El Hajj Ali Barada, Mohamad; Celik, Bayram

    2016-09-01

    Present computational study investigates formation and interaction mechanisms of shocks and boundary layer for low enthalpy Mach 7 flows of nitrogen over double wedges, which have fixed fore and various aft angles of 30° and 45°-60°, respectively. We use a density based finite-volume Navier-Stokes solver to simulate low enthalpy Mach 7 flows of nitrogen over double wedges. The solver is first and second order accurate in time and space, respectively. The meshes used in simulations of two-dimensional laminar flows consist of multiple blocks of structured mesh. Depending on the intensity, impingement angle, and impingement location of transmitted shock wave, the resulting adverse pressure gradient related disturbances on the wedge surface can trigger complex flow physics both in subsonic and supersonic regions. We observe a strong interaction between the deformation of the boundary layer and the bow shock as well as the transmitted shock for high aft angles. Comparison of the obtained results in terms of general flow physics shows that there exists an aft angle threshold value for such interaction which is in the range of 45°-50°.

  14. Reflection of cylindrical converging shock wave over a plane wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fu; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun

    2016-08-01

    The cylindrical converging shock reflection over a plane wedge is investigated experimentally and numerically in a specially designed shock tube which converts a planar shock into a cylindrical one. When the converging shock is moving along the wedge, both the shock strength and the incident angle are changing, which provides the possibility for the wave transition. The results show that both regular reflection (RR) and Mach reflection (MR) are found on the wedge with different initial incident angles. The wave transitions from direct Mach reflection (DiMR) to inverse Mach reflection (InMR) and further to transitioned regular reflection (TRR) are observed with appropriate initial incident angles. The instability development in the shear layer and strong vortices formation near the wall are evident, which are ascribed not only to the interaction of two shear layers but also to the shock impact and the shock converging effect. Because of the flow unsteadiness after the converging shock, the detachment criterion provides a good estimation for the RR → MR transition, but fails to predict the DiMR → InMR transition, and MR is found to persist slightly below the mechanical equilibrium condition. A hysteresis process is found in the MR → TRR transition and becomes more apparent as the increase of the initial incident angle due to the shock converging effect.

  15. The wedge hot-film anemometer in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A commercial wedge hot-film probe is studied to determine its heat transfer response in transonic to low supersonic flows of high unit Reynolds number. The results of this study show that its response in this flow regime differs from the response of cylindrical type sensors. Whereas the cylindrical sensor has the same sensitivity to velocity as to density for free-stream Mach numbers exceeding 1.3, the wedge probe sensitivity to velocity is always greater than its sensitivity to density over the entire flow regime. This property requires determination of three fluctuation components due to density, velocity, and temperature, in a transonic or supersonic turbulent flow. Sensitivity equations are derived based on the observed behavior of the wedge probe. Both the durability and the frequency response of the probe are excellent, the square wave insertion test indicating frequency response near 130 kHz. The directional response of the probe at sonic speed is poor and requires further examination before Reynolds stress measurements are attempted with dual sensor probes.

  16. Geomorphological-thermo-mechanical modeling: Application to orogenic wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, K.; Willett, S. D.; Gerya, T.; Ruh, J.

    2015-09-01

    Coupled geomorphological-thermo-mechanical modeling is presented in a new implementation that combines two established thermo-mechanical and landscape evolution models. A finite-difference marker-in-cell technique is used to solve for the thermo-mechanical problem including complex visco-plastic rheologies in high resolution. Each timestep is synchronously solved with a fluvial landscape evolution model that includes numerical solution of fluvial incision and analytical hillslope processes for both diffusive and slope-limited processes on an adaptive grid. The implementation is successful in modeling large deformation at different scales. We demonstrate high degrees of coupling through processes such as exhumation of rocks with different erodibilities. Sensitivity of the coupled system evolution to surface parameters, and mechanical parameters, is explored for the established case of development of compressive wedges. The evolution of wedge models proves to be primarily sensitive to erodibility and the degree of river network integration. Relief follows deformation in propagating forward with wedge growth. We apply the method to a large-scale model of continental collision, in which a close relationship between deep tectonics, fluvial network evolution, and uplift and erosion can be demonstrated.

  17. Missing wedge computed tomography by iterative algorithm DIRECTT.

    PubMed

    Kupsch, Andreas; Lange, Axel; Hentschel, Manfred P; Lück, Sebastian; Schmidt, Volker; Grothausmann, Roman; Hilger, André; Manke, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    A strategy to mitigate typical reconstruction artefacts in missing wedge computed tomography is presented. These artefacts appear as elongations of reconstructed details along the mean direction (i.e. the symmetry centre of the projections). Although absent in standard computed tomography applications, they are most prominent in advanced electron tomography and also in special topics of X-ray and neutron tomography under restricted geometric boundary conditions. We investigate the performance of the DIRECTT (Direct Iterative Reconstruction of Computed Tomography Trajectories) algorithm to reduce the directional artefacts in standard procedures. In order to be sensitive to the anisotropic nature of missing wedge artefacts, we investigate isotropic substructures of metal foam as well as circular disc models. Comparison is drawn to filtered backprojection and algebraic techniques. Reference is made to reconstructions of complete data sets. For the purpose of assessing the reconstruction quality, Fourier transforms are employed to visualize the missing wedge directly. Deficient reconstructions of disc models are evaluated by a length-weighted kernel density estimation, which yields the probabilities of boundary orientations. The DIRECTT results are assessed at different signal-to-noise ratios by means of local and integral evaluation parameters. PMID:26367127

  18. Washing wedges: a capillary instability in a gradient of confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Ludovic; Herbaut, Remy; Bico, Jose; Reyssat, Etienne

    2015-11-01

    When a drop of oil is introduced into a gradient of confinement (two glass plates forming a sharp wedge) capillary forces drive it toward the most confined regions, where the solid-fluid contact area is maximal. A surfactant solution subsequently introduced into the wedge undergoes the same movement until it reaches the oil previously added. If the aqueous phase wets the solid better than the oil, a complex exchange process between both phases occurs. The water-oil interface destabilizes, oil fingers grow in the water phase, pinch-off and lead to the formation of droplets that migrate away from the tip of the wedge. The whole oil phase is eventually extracted. A linear stability analysis of the interface is presented and captures the size of the oil droplets. The dynamics of the system is however not perfectly explained by a simple Poiseuille flow. Indeed, more refined models should account for the dissipation in meniscii and lubrication films. Finally, we suggest that our model experiment may constitute a useful tool to select optimal systems for oil recovery processes.

  19. Integrated waste management as a climate change stabilization wedge.

    PubMed

    Bahor, Brian; Van Brunt, Michael; Stovall, Jeff; Blue, Katherine

    2009-11-01

    Anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas emissions are known to contribute to global increases in greenhouse gas concentrations and are widely believed to contribute to climate change. A reference carbon dioxide concentration of 383 ppm for 2007 is projected to increase to a nominal 500 ppm in less than 50 years according to business as usual models. This concentration change is equivalent to an increase of 7 billion tonnes of carbon per year (7 Gt C year(-1)). The concept of a stabilization wedge was introduced by Pacala and Socolow (Science, 305, 968-972, 2004) to break the 7 Gt C year(- 1) into more manageable 1 Gt C year(- 1) reductions that would be achievable with current technology. A total of fifteen possible 'wedges' were identified; however, an integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management system based on the European Union's waste management hierarchy was not evaluated as a wedge. This analysis demonstrates that if the tonnage of MSW is allocated to recycling, waste to energy and landfilling in descending order in lieu of existing 'business-as-usual' practices with each option using modern technology and best practices, the system would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 1 Gt C year( -1). This integrated waste management system reduces CO(2) by displacing fossil electrical generation and avoiding manufacturing energy consumption and methane emissions from landfills.

  20. A piecewise-focused high DQE detector for MV imaging

    PubMed Central

    Star-Lack, Josh; Shedlock, Daniel; Swahn, Dennis; Humber, Dave; Wang, Adam; Hirsh, Hayley; Zentai, George; Sawkey, Daren; Kruger, Isaac; Sun, Mingshan; Abel, Eric; Virshup, Gary; Shin, Mihye; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Electronic portal imagers (EPIDs) with high detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) are sought to facilitate the use of the megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy treatment beam for image guidance. Potential advantages include high quality (treatment) beam’s eye view imaging, and improved cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) generating images with more accurate electron density maps with immunity to metal artifacts. One approach to increasing detector sensitivity is to couple a thick pixelated scintillator array to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) incorporating amorphous silicon thin film electronics. Cadmium tungstate (CWO) has many desirable scintillation properties including good light output, a high index of refraction, high optical transparency, and reasonable cost. However, due to the 0 1 0 cleave plane inherent in its crystalline structure, the difficulty of cutting and polishing CWO has, in part, limited its study relative to other scintillators such as cesium iodide and bismuth germanate (BGO). The goal of this work was to build and test a focused large-area pixelated “strip” CWO detector. Methods: A 361  ×  52 mm scintillator assembly that contained a total of 28 072 pixels was constructed. The assembly comprised seven subarrays, each 15 mm thick. Six of the subarrays were fabricated from CWO with a pixel pitch of 0.784 mm, while one array was constructed from BGO for comparison. Focusing was achieved by coupling the arrays to the Varian AS1000 AMFPI through a piecewise linear arc-shaped fiber optic plate. Simulation and experimental studies of modulation transfer function (MTF) and DQE were undertaken using a 6 MV beam, and comparisons were made between the performance of the pixelated strip assembly and the most common EPID configuration comprising a 1 mm-thick copper build-up plate attached to a 133 mg/cm2 gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screen (Cu-GOS). Projection radiographs and CBCT images of phantoms were acquired. The work

  1. Transient Beam Dynamics in the LBL 2 MV Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E; Grote, D

    1999-12-07

    A driver-scale injector for the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator project has been built at LBL. This machine has exceeded the design goals of high voltage (> 2 MV), high current (> 0.8 A of K{sup +}) and low normalized emittance (< 1 {pi} mm-mr). The injector consists of a 750 keV gun pre-injector followed by an electrostatic quadrupole accelerator (ESQ) which provides strong (alternating gradient) focusing for the space-charge dominated beam, and simultaneously accelerates the ions to 2 MeV. A matching section is being built to match the beam to the electrostatic accelerator ELISE. The gun preinjector, designed to hold up to 1 MV with minimal breakdown risks, consists of a hot aluminosilicate source with a large curved emitting surface surrounded by a thick ''extraction electrode''. During beam turn-on the voltage at the source is biased from a negative potential, enough to reverse the electric field on the emitting surface and avoid emission, to a positive potential to start extracting the beam; it stays constant for about 1 {micro}s, and is reversed to turn-off the emission. Since the Marx voltage applied on the accelerating quadrupoles and the main pre-injector gap is a long, constant pulse (several {micro}s), the transient behavior is dominated by the extraction pulser voltage time profile. The transient longitudinal dynamics of the beam in the injector was simulated by running the Particle in Cell codes GYMNOS and WARP3d in a time dependent mode. The generalization and its implementation in WAIW3d of a method proposed by Lampel and Tiefenback to eliminate transient oscillations in a one-dimensional planar diode will be presented.

  2. Subduction zone evolution and low viscosity wedges and channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Vlad; Gurnis, Michael

    2007-12-01

    Dehydration of subducting lithosphere likely transports fluid into the mantle wedge where the viscosity is decreased. Such a decrease in viscosity could form a low viscosity wedge (LVW) or a low viscosity channel (LVC) on top of the subducting slab. Using numerical models, we investigate the influence of low viscosity wedges and channels on subduction zone structure. Slab dip changes substantially with the viscosity reduction within the LVWs and LVCs. For models with or without trench rollback, overthickening of slabs is greatly reduced by LVWs or LVCs. Two divergent evolutionary pathways have been found depending on the maximum depth extent of the LVW and wedge viscosity. Assuming a viscosity contrast of 0.1 with background asthenosphere, models with a LVW that extends down to 400 km depth show a steeply dipping slab, while models with an LVW that extends to much shallower depth, such as 200 km, can produce slabs that are flat lying beneath the overriding plate. There is a narrow range of mantle viscosities that produces flat slabs (5 to10 × 10 19 Pa s) and the slab flattening process is enhanced by trench rollback. Slab can be decoupled from the overriding plate with a LVC if the thickness is at least a few 10 s of km, the viscosity reduction is at least a factor of two and the depth extent of the LVC is several hundred km. These models have important implications for the geochemical and spatial evolution of volcanic arcs and the state of stress within the overriding plate. The models explain the poor correlation between traditional geodynamic controls, subducting plate age and convergence rates, on slab dip. We predict that when volcanic arcs change their distance from the trench, they could be preceded by changes in arc chemistry. We predict that there could be a larger volatile input into the wedge when arcs migrate toward the trench and visa-versa. The transition of a subduction zone into the flat-lying regime could be preceded by changes in the volatile

  3. Robustness of oscillatory α2 dynamos in spherical wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, E.; Brandenburg, A.; Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Large-scale dynamo simulations are sometimes confined to spherical wedge geometries by imposing artificial boundary conditions at high latitudes. This may lead to spatio-temporal behaviours that are not representative of those in full spherical shells. Aims: We study the connection between spherical wedge and full spherical shell geometries using simple mean-field dynamos. Methods: We solve the equations for one-dimensional time-dependent α2 and α2Ω mean-field dynamos with only latitudinal extent to examine the effects of varying the polar angle θ0 between the latitudinal boundaries and the poles in spherical coordinates. Results: In the case of constant α and ηt profiles, we find oscillatory solutions only with the commonly used perfect conductor boundary condition in a wedge geometry, while for full spheres all boundary conditions produce stationary solutions, indicating that perfect conductor conditions lead to unphysical solutions in such a wedge setup. To search for configurations in which this problem can be alleviated we choose a profile of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity that decreases toward the poles, corresponding to high conductivity there. Oscillatory solutions are now achieved with models extending to the poles, but the magnetic field is strongly concentrated near the poles and the oscillation period is very long. By changing both the turbulent magnetic diffusivity and α profiles so that both effects are more concentrated toward the equator, we see oscillatory dynamos with equatorward drift, shorter cycles, and magnetic fields distributed over a wider range of latitudes. Those profiles thus remove the sensitive and unphysical dependence on θ0. When introducing radial shear, we again see oscillatory dynamos, and the direction of drift follows the Parker-Yoshimura rule. Conclusions: A reduced α effect near the poles with a turbulent diffusivity concentrated toward the equator yields oscillatory dynamos with equatorward migration and

  4. SU-E-T-560: Monte Carlo Simulation of the Neutron Radiation Field Around a Medical 18 MV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, F; Czarnecki, D; Zink, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Today the majority of radiation therapy treatments are performed at medical electron linear accelerators (linacs). The accelerated electrons are used for the generation of bremsstrahlung photons. The use of higher electron respectively photon energies has some advantages over lower energies such as the longer dose build-up. However photons with energies higher than ∼7 MeV can additionally to the interaction with bound electrons undergo inelastic reactions with nuclei. These photonuclear reactions lead to the emission of fast neutrons which contaminate the primary photon field. The neutrons might penetrate through the collimators and deliver out-of-field dose to the patient. Furthermore the materials inside the linac head as well as the air inside the treatment room get activated which might deliver dose to the medical employees even when the linac is not in operation. A detailed knowledge of these effects is essential for adequate radiation protection of the employees and an optimal patient treatment. Methods: It is a common method to study the radiation fields of such linacs by means of Monte Carlo simulations. For the investigation of the effects caused by photonuclear reactions a typical linac in high energy mode (Varian Clinac 18 MV-X) as well as the surrounding bunker were modelled and simulated using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA which includes extensive nuclear reaction and neutron transport models additional to electron-photon transport as well as capabilities for a detailed study of effective dose distributions and activation yields. Results: Neutron spectra as well as neutron effective dose distributions within the bunker were obtained, reaching up to some mSv/Gy in the patient’s plane. The results are normalized per Gy in the depth dose maximum at 10×10 cm{sup 2} field size. Therefore an absolute interpretation is possible. Conclusion: The obtained data gives a better understanding of the photonuclear reaction caused effects.

  5. SU-E-T-322: The Evaluation of the Gafchromic EBT3 Film in Low Dose 6 MV X-Ray Beams with Different Scanning Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H; Sung, J; Yoon, M; Kim, D; Chung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the response of the Gafchromic EBT3 film in low dose for 6 MV x-ray beams with two scanning modes, the reflection scanning mode and the transmission scanning mode. Methods: We irradiated the Gafcromic EBT3 film using a 60 degree enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) with 6 MV x-ray beams from Clinac iX Linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The irradiated Gafchromic EBT3 film was scanned with different scanning modes, the reflection scanning mode and the transmission scanning mode. The scanned Gafchromic EBT3 film was analyzed with MATLAB. Results: When 7.2 cGy was irradiated to the Gafchromic EBT3 film, the uncertainty was 0.54 cGy with reflection scanning mode and was 0.88 cGy with transmission scanning mode. When 24 cGy was irradiated to the Gafchromic EBT3 film, the uncertainty was similar to the case of 7.2 cGy irradiation showing 0.51 cGy of uncertainty with reflection scanning mode and 0.87 cGy of uncertainty with transmission scanning mode. The result suggests that the reflection mode should be used in Gafchromic EBT3 film for low irradiation. Conclusion: The result suggests that the reflection mode should be used in Gafchromic EBT3 film for low irradiation.

  6. Study of stress distribution of forming slandering of automobile semi-axes with multi-wedge cross wedge rolling by FEM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Shu, Xuedao; Hu, Zhenghuan

    2005-12-01

    Cross wedge rolling with multi-wedge (MCWR) is a new advanced technology of forming the slandering of automobile semi-axes. However, restriction relationship between main wedges and side wedges is complex, there is not almost theory forming automobile axes at inland or overseas. According to the characteristics of forming slandering of automobile semi-axes by MCWR, three-dimensional parameterized model of the MCWR and corresponding program of finite element simulation is worked out. Adopting FEM analysis technology, rules of stress distribution in work piece at main stages, such as knifing zone, stretching zone in main wedges was investigated. The results indicate that forming automobile semi-axes by MCWR is feasible. It provides reliable theory foundation for designing mould of rolling automobile axes by MCWR and choosing technology parameters.

  7. Study of the impact of truncations on wedge waves by using the laser ultrasound technique.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jing; Shen, Zhonghua; Sun, KaiHua

    2015-08-20

    This research focuses on measuring the impact of truncations on the dispersion characteristics of wedge waves propagating along the wedge tip by using the laser-generated ultrasound. First, the finite element method was used to simulate laser-induced wedge waves and the dispersion curves were obtained by using the 2D Fourier transformation method. Pulsed laser excitation and laser-based wedge wave detection were also utilized to investigate these characteristics experimentally. For the 20° and 60° line wedges, both experimental and numerical results indicated that a nonideal wedge tip had great impact on the wedge waves. The modes of the 20° line wedge with truncations presented anomalous dispersion, low mode closed to high mode in high frequency, and the characteristics of antisymmetric Lamb waves as truncation increased. Meanwhile, the modes of the 60° line wedge with truncations showed the characteristics of antisymmetric Lamb waves, and the A1 mode was also observed clearly. The findings of this study can be used to evaluate and detect wedge structure.

  8. SU-E-T-100: Designing a QA Tool for Enhance Dynamic Wedges Based On Dynalog Files

    SciTech Connect

    Yousuf, A; Hussain, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A robust quality assurance (QA) program for computer controlled enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) has been designed and tested. Calculations to perform such QA test is based upon the EDW dynamic log files generated during dose delivery. Methods: Varian record and verify system generates dynamic log (dynalog) files during dynamic dose delivery. The system generated dynalog files contain information such as date and time of treatment, energy, monitor units, wedge orientation, and type of treatment. It also contains the expected calculated segmented treatment tables (STT) and the actual delivered STT for the treatment delivery as a verification record. These files can be used to assess the integrity and precision of the treatment plan delivery. The plans were delivered with a 6 MV beam from a Varian linear accelerator. For available EDW angles (10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°, 45°, and 60°) Varian STT values were used to manually calculate monitor units for each segment. It can also be used to calculate the EDW factors. Independent verification of fractional MUs per segment was performed against those generated from dynalog files. The EDW factors used to calculate MUs in TPS were dosimetrically verified in solid water phantom with semiflex chamber on central axis. Results: EDW factors were generated from the STT provided by Varian and verified against practical measurements. The measurements were in agreement of the order of 1 % to the calculated EDW data. Variation between the MUs per segment obtained from dynalog files and those manually calculated was found to be less than 2%. Conclusion: An efficient and easy tool to perform routine QA procedure of EDW is suggested. The method can be easily implemented in any institution without a need for expensive QA equipment. An error of the order of ≥2% can be easily detected.

  9. Characteristics of mobile MOSFET dosimetry system for megavoltage photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. Sathish; Sharma, S. D.; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of a mobile metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (mobile MOSFET) detector for standard bias were investigated for megavoltage photon beams. This study was performed with a brass alloy build-up cap for three energies namely Co-60, 6 and 15 MV photon beams. The MOSFETs were calibrated and the performance characteristics were analyzed with respect to dose rate dependence, energy dependence, field size dependence, linearity, build-up factor, and angular dependence for all the three energies. A linear dose-response curve was noted for Co-60, 6 MV, and 15 MV photons. The calibration factors were found to be 1.03, 1, and 0.79 cGy/mV for Co-60, 6 MV, and 15 MV photon energies, respectively. The calibration graph has been obtained to the dose up to 600 cGy, and the dose-response curve was found to be linear. The MOSFETs were found to be energy independent both for measurements performed at depth as well as on the surface with build-up. However, field size dependence was also analyzed for variable field sizes and found to be field size independent. Angular dependence was analyzed by keeping the MOSFET dosimeter in parallel and perpendicular orientation to the angle of incidence of the radiation with and without build-up on the surface of the phantom. The maximum variation for the three energies was found to be within ± 2% for the gantry angles 90° and 270°, the deviations without the build-up for the same gantry angles were found to be 6%, 25%, and 60%, respectively. The MOSFET response was found to be independent of dose rate for all three energies. The dosimetric characteristics of the MOSFET detector make it a suitable in vivo dosimeter for megavoltage photon beams. PMID:25190992

  10. Characteristics of mobile MOSFET dosimetry system for megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A Sathish; Sharma, S D; Ravindran, B Paul

    2014-07-01

    The characteristics of a mobile metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (mobile MOSFET) detector for standard bias were investigated for megavoltage photon beams. This study was performed with a brass alloy build-up cap for three energies namely Co-60, 6 and 15 MV photon beams. The MOSFETs were calibrated and the performance characteristics were analyzed with respect to dose rate dependence, energy dependence, field size dependence, linearity, build-up factor, and angular dependence for all the three energies. A linear dose-response curve was noted for Co-60, 6 MV, and 15 MV photons. The calibration factors were found to be 1.03, 1, and 0.79 cGy/mV for Co-60, 6 MV, and 15 MV photon energies, respectively. The calibration graph has been obtained to the dose up to 600 cGy, and the dose-response curve was found to be linear. The MOSFETs were found to be energy independent both for measurements performed at depth as well as on the surface with build-up. However, field size dependence was also analyzed for variable field sizes and found to be field size independent. Angular dependence was analyzed by keeping the MOSFET dosimeter in parallel and perpendicular orientation to the angle of incidence of the radiation with and without build-up on the surface of the phantom. The maximum variation for the three energies was found to be within ± 2% for the gantry angles 90° and 270°, the deviations without the build-up for the same gantry angles were found to be 6%, 25%, and 60%, respectively. The MOSFET response was found to be independent of dose rate for all three energies. The dosimetric characteristics of the MOSFET detector make it a suitable in vivo dosimeter for megavoltage photon beams. PMID:25190992

  11. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  12. Photonic lanterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Argyros, Alexander; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-12-01

    Multimode optical fibers have been primarily (and almost solely) used as "light pipes" in short distance telecommunications and in remote and astronomical spectroscopy. The modal properties of the multimode waveguides are rarely exploited and mostly discussed in the context of guiding light. Until recently, most photonic applications in the applied sciences have arisen from developments in telecommunications. However, the photonic lantern is one of several devices that arose to solve problems in astrophotonics and space photonics. Interestingly, these devices are now being explored for use in telecommunications and are likely to find commercial use in the next few years, particularly in the development of compact spectrographs. Photonic lanterns allow for a low-loss transformation of a multimode waveguide into a discrete number of single-mode waveguides and vice versa, thus enabling the use of single-mode photonic technologies in multimode systems. In this review, we will discuss the theory and function of the photonic lantern, along with several different variants of the technology. We will also discuss some of its applications in more detail. Furthermore, we foreshadow future applications of this technology to the field of nanophotonics.

  13. Variability of the continental wedge density at the maximum slip segment of the Chilean 2010 megathrust earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymowicz, A.; Contereras-Reyes, E.; Trehu, A. M.; Ruiz, S.; Ruiz, J.

    2013-12-01

    In subduction zones, the long-term tectonic evolution of the fore-arc region and the rupture process during earthquakes are part of the same dynamic system; however, the interplay between these two processes of different time scales is not fully understood. At several sites in the Circum-Pacific region, a correlation between patches of maximum slip during megathrust earthquakes and the location of the slope basins and/or lows in the free-air gravity anomaly have been observed, indicating long-term control of upper plate structure on megathrust rupture. On the other hand, inhomogeneities of the coseismic slip distribution can also be associated with subducted features on the lower plate that may act as barriers and/or asperities in the seismogenic contact. Here, we modeled the free-air gravity anomaly of the Nazca-South America margin along five 2-D profiles located at the segment of maximum slip of the Chilean 2010 megathrust earthquake in order to analyze variability in the density and shape of the continental wedge in relation to the seismotectonics of the studied area. We analyze a grid generated by merging two gravity databases: (a) marine data acquired in May 2012 during expedition MV1206 of the R/V Melville as part of the Chile-PEPPER (The 2010 Maule, Chile Earthquake: Project Evaluating Prism Post-Earthquake Response) project, and (b) the global gravity model of Sandwell and Smith (2009). At a regional scale, the models show a spatial correlation between the maximum slip zone and a decrease in vertical loading over the seismogenic contact. Additionally, assuming non-cohesive critical Coulomb wedge theory, changes in the shape of the continental wedge can be explained by a decrease in the static basal friction coefficient in the same area. Within the maximum slip patch, numerous aftershocks of the Maule earthquake are grouped around a local gravity anomaly that can be modeled as a high-density body near the subduction interface, which may be associated with a

  14. Gap test modeling to predict wedge tests initiation of PBXN-103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Clinton T.

    1998-07-01

    The experimental initiation of PBXN-103 by the standard wedge test has been modeled by using the HVRB initiation and growth model in the CTH code. The P-081 plane wave lens was used as initiator in these experiments. The wedge test was converted to a gap test by replacing the PBXN-103 wedge by a PBXN-103 cylinder. By modeling this gap test, shock initiation in PBXN-103 was calculated. The results of these calculations are in agreement with the data of the wedge test experiments. Comparison of the CTH code calculations with the wedge test data was accomplished by using an auxiliary program called the BCAT code. In particular, it computes the "pop plot" and compares it to the wedge test data. Shock initiation of PBX-9404 was also calculated by the HVRB model and the results compared to the initiation of PBX-9404 using the Lee-Tarver model. The two calculations from both of the models are very compatible.

  15. Medial Closing-Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy: Fixation With Proximal Tibial Locking Plate

    PubMed Central

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Distal femoral varus osteotomy is a well-established procedure for the treatment of lateral compartment cartilage lesions and degenerative disease, correcting limb alignment and decreasing the progression of the pathology. Surgical techniques can be performed with a lateral opening-wedge or medial closing-wedge correction of the deformity. Fixation methods for lateral opening-wedge osteotomies are widely available, and there are various types of implants that can be used for fixation. However, there are currently only a few options of implants for fixation of a medial closing-wedge osteotomy on the market. This report describes a medial, supracondylar, V-shaped, closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy using a locked anterolateral proximal tibial locking plate that fits anatomically to the medial side of the distal femur. This is a great option as a stable implant for a medial closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26870647

  16. Modes of continental extension in a crustal wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangliang; Lavier, Luc L.; Choi, Eunseo

    2015-07-01

    We ran numerical experiments of the extension of a crustal wedge as an approximation to extension in an orogenic belt or a continental margin. We study the effects of the strength of the lower crust and of a weak mid-crustal shear zone on the resulting extension styles. A weak mid-crustal shear zone effectively decouples upper crustal extension from lower crustal flow. Without the mid-crustal shear zone, the degree of coupling between the upper and the lower crust increases and extension of the whole crust tends to focus on the thickest part of the wedge. We identify three distinct modes of extension determined by the strength of the lower crust, which are characterized by 1) localized, asymmetric crustal exhumation in a single massif when the lower crust is weak, 2) the formation of rolling-hinge normal faults and the exhumation of lower crust in multiple core complexes with an intermediate strength lower crust, and 3) distributed domino faulting over the weak mid-crustal shear zone when the lower crust is strong. A frictionally stronger mid-crustal shear zone does not change the overall model behaviors but extension occurred over multiple rolling-hinges. The 3 modes of extension share characteristics similar to geological models proposed to explain the formation of metamorphic core complexes: 1) the crustal flow model for the weak lower crust, 2) the rolling-hinge and crustal flow models when the lower crust is intermediate and 3) the flexural uplift model when the lower crust is strong. Finally we show that the intensity of decoupling between the far field extension and lower crustal flow driven by the regional pressure gradient in the wedge control the overall style of extension in the models.

  17. 78 FR 48180 - Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the M/V IRON STAN, 1246342

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the M/V IRON STAN, 1246342 AGENCY: Coast... Compliance was issued for the Uninspected Towing Vessel M/V IRON STAN as required by 33 U.S.C. 1605(c) and 33.... 1605(c) and 33 CFR 81.18, has been issued for the M/V IRON STAN. The vessel's primary purpose is...

  18. Inverted-wedge silica resonators for controlled and stable coupling.

    PubMed

    Bo, Fang; Huang, Steven He; Özdemir, Sahin Kaya; Zhang, Guoquan; Xu, Jingjun; Yang, Lan

    2014-04-01

    Silica microresonators with an inverted-wedge shape were fabricated using conventional semiconductor fabrication methods. The measured quality factors of the resonators were greater than 10(6) in 1550 nm band. Controllable coupling from undercoupling to the overcoupling regime through the critical coupling point was demonstrated by horizontally moving a fiber taper while in touch with the top surface of the resonator. The thin outer ring of the resonator provided a support for the fiber taper leading to robust stable coupling. PMID:24686619

  19. The Newton two-knife experiment: Intricacies of wedge diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Strange, Wayne

    1996-06-01

    About a century before Young's celebrated two-slit experiment, Isaac Newton quantitatively investigated the diffraction of light from a wedge aperture, but failed to understand the implications of his findings. We have reexamined this unusual system theoretically within the framework of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff scalar diffraction theory, and experimentally using a laser light source with pinhole spatial filter and CCD camera. Both the far-field shadow region and near-field directly illuminated region reveal aesthetically striking images that are deducible from the mathematical analysis, but whose interpretation is subtle and best elucidated by an alternative and less widely known perspective of diffraction.

  20. Hexahedron, wedge, tetrahedron, and pyramid diffusion operator discretization

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.M.

    1996-08-06

    The diffusion equation, {phi}({rvec x}), is solved by finding the extrema of the functional, {Gamma}[{phi}] = {integral}({1/2}D{rvec {nabla}}{phi}{center_dot}{rvec {nabla}}{phi} + {1/2}{sigma}{sub a}{phi}{sup 2} - {ital Q}{phi}){ital d}{sup 3}{ital x}. A matrix is derived that is investigated for hexahedron, wedge, tetrahedron, and pyramid cells. The first term of the diffusion integration was concentrated and the others dropped; these dropped terms are also considered. Results are presented for hexahedral meshes and three weighting methods.

  1. Comparing gold nano-particle enhanced radiotherapy with protons, megavoltage photons and kilovoltage photons: a Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuting; McMahon, Stephen J; Scarpelli, Matthew; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2014-12-21

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown potential to be used as a radiosensitizer for radiation therapy. Despite extensive research activity to study GNP radiosensitization using photon beams, only a few studies have been carried out using proton beams. In this work Monte Carlo simulations were used to assess the dose enhancement of GNPs for proton therapy. The enhancement effect was compared between a clinical proton spectrum, a clinical 6 MV photon spectrum, and a kilovoltage photon source similar to those used in many radiobiology lab settings. We showed that the mechanism by which GNPs can lead to dose enhancements in radiation therapy differs when comparing photon and proton radiation. The GNP dose enhancement using protons can be up to 14 and is independent of proton energy, while the dose enhancement is highly dependent on the photon energy used. For the same amount of energy absorbed in the GNP, interactions with protons, kVp photons and MV photons produce similar doses within several nanometers of the GNP surface, and differences are below 15% for the first 10 nm. However, secondary electrons produced by kilovoltage photons have the longest range in water as compared to protons and MV photons, e.g. they cause a dose enhancement 20 times higher than the one caused by protons 10 μm away from the GNP surface. We conclude that GNPs have the potential to enhance radiation therapy depending on the type of radiation source. Proton therapy can be enhanced significantly only if the GNPs are in close proximity to the biological target.

  2. Demonstration of Color Separation with 2ω KDP Wedge in High Power Laser Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Li, Fu-Quan; Han, Wei; Feng, Bin; Zhou, Li-Dan; Jia, Huai-Ting; Cao, Hua-Bao

    2014-01-01

    A 2ω wedge design is proposed with KDP crystal to disperse the unconverted light away from the target in a high power laser facility for inertial confinement fusion. The ultraviolet B-integral problem is released, and about 1.2 times in color separation angle is achieved according to both theoretical and experimental investigations when compared with conventional 3ω wedge. The frequency conversion efficiency is unaffected when the wedge is along the non-sensitive axis of the tripler.

  3. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts Version 4.0

    SciTech Connect

    2015-11-02

    Document outlines the Federal Energy Management Program's standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  4. Beam modeling and verification of a photon beam multisource model

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnesjoe, Anders; Weber, Lars; Murman, Anders; Saxner, Mikael; Thorslund, Ingvar; Traneus, Erik

    2005-06-15

    Dose calculations for treatment planning of photon beam radiotherapy require a model of the beam to drive the dose calculation models. The beam shaping process involves scattering and filtering that yield radiation components which vary with collimator settings. The necessity to model these components has motivated the development of multisource beam models. We describe and evaluate clinical photon beam modeling based on multisource models, including lateral beam quality variations. The evaluation is based on user data for a pencil kernel algorithm and a point kernel algorithm (collapsed cone) used in the clinical treatment planning systems Helax-TMS and Nucletron-Oncentra. The pencil kernel implementations treat the beam spectrum as lateral invariant while the collapsed cone involves off axis softening of the spectrum. Both algorithms include modeling of head scatter components. The parameters of the beam model are derived from measured beam data in a semiautomatic process called RDH (radiation data handling) that, in sequential steps, minimizes the deviations in calculated dose versus the measured data. The RDH procedure is reviewed and the results of processing data from a large number of treatment units are analyzed for the two dose calculation algorithms. The results for both algorithms are similar, with slightly better results for the collapsed cone implementations. For open beams, 87% of the machines have maximum errors less than 2.5%. For wedged beams the errors were found to increase with increasing wedge angle. Internal, motorized wedges did yield slightly larger errors than external wedges. These results reflect the increased complexity, both experimentally and computationally, when wedges are used compared to open beams.

  5. SU-E-J-14: A Comparison of a 2.5MV Imaging Beam to KV and 6MV Imaging Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Nitsch, P; Robertson, D; Balter, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare image quality metrics and dose of TrueBeam V2.0’s 2.5MV imaging beam and kV and 6MV images. Methods: To evaluate the MV image quality, the Standard Imaging QC-3 and Varian Las Vegas (LV) phantoms were imaged using the ‘quality’ and ‘low dose’ modes and then processed using RIT113 V6.3. The LEEDS phantom was used to evaluate the kV image quality. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) was also evaluated in patient images using Matlab. In addition, dose per image was evaluated at a depth of 5cm using solid water for a 28.6 cm × 28.6 cm field size, which is representative of the largest jaw settings at an SID of 150cm. Results: The 2.5MV images had lower dose than the 6 MV images and a contrast to noise ratio (CNR) about 1.4 times higher, when evaluated using the QC-3. When energy was held constant but dose varied, the different modes, ‘low dose’ and ‘quality’, showed less than an 8% difference in CNR. The ‘quality’ modes demonstrated better spatial resolution than the ‘low dose’; however, even with the ‘low dose’ all line pairs were distinct except for the 0.75lp/mm on the 2.5MV. The LV phantom was used to measure low contrast detectability and showed similar results to the QC-3. Several patient images all confirmed that SNR were highest in kV images followed by 2.5MV and then 6MV. Qualitatively, for anatomical areas with large variability in thickness, like lateral head and necks, 2.5MV images show more anatomy, such as shoulder position, than kV images. Conclusions: The kV images clearly provide the best image metrics per unit dose. The 2.5MV beam showed excellent contrast at a lower dose than 6MV and may be superior to kV for difficult to image areas that include large changes in anatomical thickness. P Balter: Varian, Sun Nuclear, Philips, CPRIT.

  6. SU-E-J-27: Shifting Multiple EPID Imager Layers to Improve Image Quality and Resolution in MV CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Rottmann, J; Yip, S; Berbeco, R; Morf, D; Fueglistaller, R; Star-Lack, J; Zentai, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Vertical stacking of four conventional EPID layers can improve DQE for MV-CBCT applications. We hypothesize that shifting each layer laterally by half a pixel relative to the layer above, will improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image resolution. Methods: For CNR assessment, a 20 cm diameter digital phantom with 8 inserts is created. The attenuation coefficient of the phantom is similar to lung at the average energy of a 6 MV photon beam. The inserts have attenuations 1, 2…8 times of lung. One of the inserts is close to soft tissue, resembling the case of a tumor in lung. For resolution assessment, a digital phantom featuring a bar pattern is created. The phantom has an attenuation coefficient similar to soft tissue and the bars have an attenuation coefficient of calcium sulfate. A 2 MeV photon beam is attenuated through these phantoms and hits each of the four stacked detector layers. Each successive layer is shifted by half a pixel in the x only, y only, and x and y (combined) directions, respectively. Blurring and statistical noise are added to the projections. Projections from one, two, three and four layers are used for reconstruction. CNR and image resolution are evaluated and compared. Results: When projections from multiple layers are combined for reconstruction, CNR increases with the number of layers involved. CNR in reconstructions from two, three and four layers are 1.4, 1.7 and 1.99 times that from one layer. The resolution from the shifted four layer detector is also improved from a single layer. In a comparison between one layer versus four layers in this preliminary study, the resolution from four shifted layers is at least 20% better. Conclusion: Layer-shifting in a stacked EPID imager design enhances resolution as well as CNR for half scan MV-CBCT. The project described was supported, in part, by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc., and Award No. R01CA188446-01 from the National Cancer Institute. The content is solely

  7. Predicting Run Distances for a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Robert J.; Lee, Richard; Sutherland, Gerrit

    2012-03-01

    Simulations were used to aid in the development of a modified wedge test (MWT). This explosive sensitivity experiment allows the shockwave curvature to be defined in order to investigate the effect of combined shock-shear loading on sensitivity. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with a linewave generator and a Detasheet booster, and the shock wave was attenuated using a slab of PMMA. In developing simulations for these three material experiments, calibrations of the PBXN-110 ignition and growth model and of the PMMA constitutive model were investigated in order to choose between several models found in the literature. A calibration shot from the MWT was also used to demonstrate the appropriateness of the models selected. Experimental results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distances predicted in CTH for the thicker donor slab compare very favorably with the actual experiments; however, for thinner donor slabs, the actual experimental results seem to suggest a more sensitive behavior than the simulations are able to capture.

  8. Predicting Run Distances for a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Robert; Lee, Richard; Sutherland, Gerrit

    2011-06-01

    Simulations were used to aid in the development of a modified wedge test (MWT). This explosive sensitivity experiment allows the shockwave curvature to be defined in order to investigate the effect of combined shock-shear loading on sensitivity. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with a linewave generator and a Detasheet booster, and the shock wave was attenuated using a slab of PMMA. In developing simulations for these three material experiments, calibrations of the PBXN-110 ignition and growth model and of the PMMA constitutive model were investigated in order to choose between several models found in the literature. A calibration shot from the MWT was also used to demonstrate the appropriateness of the models selected. Experimental results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distances predicted in CTH for the thicker donor slab compare very favorably with the actual experiments; however, for thinner donor slabs, the actual experimental results seem to suggest a more sensitive behavior than the simulations are able to capture. DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release, distribution unlimited. (96ABW-2011-0053)

  9. An automated optical wedge calibrator for Dobson ozone spectrophotometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. D.; Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Dobson ozone spectrophotometer measures the difference of intensity between selected wavelengths in the ultraviolet. The method uses an optical attenuator (the 'Wedge') in this measurement. The knowledge of the relationship of the wedge position to the attenuation is critical to the correct calculation of ozone from the measurement. The procedure to determine this relationship is time-consuming, and requires a highly skilled person to perform it correctly. The relationship has been found to change with time. For reliable ozone values, the procedure should be done on a Dobson instrument at regular intervals. Due to the skill and time necessary to perform this procedure, many instruments have gone as long as 15 years between procedures. This article describes an apparatus that performs the procedure under computer control, and is adaptable to the majority of existing Dobson instruments. Part of the apparatus is usable for normal operation of the Dobson instrument, and would allow computer collection of the data and real-time ozone measurements.

  10. Dying Flow Bursts as Generators of the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.

    2015-12-01

    Many theories or conjectures exist on the driver of the substorm current wedge, e.g. rerouting of the tail current, current disruption, flow braking, vortex formation, and current sheet collapse. Magnitude, spatial scale, and temporal development of the related magnetic perturbations suggest that the generator is related to the interaction of the flow bursts with the dipolar magnetosphere after onset of reconnection in the near-Earth tail. The question remains whether it is the flow energy that feeds the wedge current or the internal energy of the arriving plasma. In this presentation I argue for the latter. The current generation is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the preceding layer of high-beta plasma after flow braking. The generator current is the grad-B current at the outer boundary of the compressed high-beta plasma layers. It needs the sequential arrival of several flow bursts to account for duration and magnitude of the ionospheric closure current.

  11. Dying Flow Bursts as Generators of the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    Many theories or conjectures exist on the driver of the substorm current wedge, e.g. rerouting of the tail current, current disruption, flow braking, vortex formation, and current sheet collapse. Magnitude, spatial scale, and temporal development of the related magnetic perturbations suggest that the generator is related to the interaction of the flow bursts with the dipolar magnetosphere after onset of reconnection in the near-Earth tail. The question remains whether it is the flow energy that feeds the wedge current or the internal energy of the arriving plasma. In this presentation I argue for the latter. The current generation is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the preceding layer of high-beta plasma after flow braking. The generator current is the grad-B current at the outer boundary of the compressed high-beta plasma layers. It needs the sequential arrival of several flow bursts to account for duration and magnitude of the ionospheric closure current.

  12. The wedge bias in reionization 21-cm power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Hannes; Majumdar, Suman; Mellema, Garrelt; Lidz, Adam; Iliev, Ilian T.; Dixon, Keri L.

    2016-02-01

    A proposed method for dealing with foreground emission in upcoming 21-cm observations from the epoch of reionization is to limit observations to an uncontaminated window in Fourier space. Foreground emission can be avoided in this way, since it is limited to a wedge-shaped region in k∥, k⊥ space. However, the power spectrum is anisotropic owing to redshift-space distortions from peculiar velocities. Consequently, the 21-cm power spectrum measured in the foreground avoidance window - which samples only a limited range of angles close to the line-of-sight direction - differs from the full redshift-space spherically averaged power spectrum which requires an average over all angles. In this paper, we calculate the magnitude of this `wedge bias' for the first time. We find that the bias amplifies the difference between the real-space and redshift-space power spectra. The bias is strongest at high redshifts, where measurements using foreground avoidance will overestimate the redshift-space power spectrum by around 100 per cent, possibly obscuring the distinctive rise and fall signature that is anticipated for the spherically averaged 21-cm power spectrum. In the later stages of reionization, the bias becomes negative, and smaller in magnitude (≲20 per cent).

  13. Mass stranding of wedge-tailed shearwater chicks in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Rameyer, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Unusual numbers of wedge-tailed shearwater (Puffinus pacificus) chicks stranded on Oahu (Hawaii, USA) in 1994. Compared to healthy wedge-tailed shearwater (WTSW) chicks, stranded chicks were underweight, dehydrated, leukopenic, lymphopenic, eosinopenic, and heterophilic; some birds were toxemic and septic. Stranded chicks also were hypoglycemic and had elevated aspartate amino transferase levels. Most chicks apparently died from emaciation, dehydration, or bacteremia. Because many birds with bacteremia also had severe necrosis of the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa associated with bacteria, we suspect the GI tract to be the source of disseminated bacterial infection. The identity of the bacteria was not confirmed. The daily number of chicks stranded was significantly related to average wind speeds, and the mortality coincided with the fledging period for WTSW. Strong southeasterly winds were a distinguishing meteorologic factor in 1994 and contributed to the distribution of stranded chicks on Oahu. More objective data on WTSW demographics would enhance future efforts to determine predisposing causes of WTSW wrecks and their effects on seabird colonies.

  14. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  15. Photons Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batic, Matej; Begalli, Marcia; Han, Min Cheol; Hauf, Steffen; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Han Sung; Grazia Pia, Maria; Saracco, Paolo; Weidenspointner, Georg

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review of methods and data for the Monte Carlo simulation of photon interactions is in progress: it concerns a wide set of theoretical modeling approaches and data libraries available for this purpose. Models and data libraries are assessed quantitatively with respect to an extensive collection of experimental measurements documented in the literature to determine their accuracy; this evaluation exploits rigorous statistical analysis methods. The computational performance of the associated modeling algorithms is evaluated as well. An overview of the assessment of photon interaction models and results of the experimental validation are presented.

  16. Green photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-02-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas.

  17. Laboratory and numerical investigation of transport processes occurring above and within a saltwater wedge.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Woo; Clement, T Prabhakar

    2013-04-01

    Salt wedges divide coastal groundwater flow regime into two distinct regions that include a freshwater region above the saltwater-freshwater interface and a saltwater region below the interface. Several recent studies have investigated saltwater transport in coastal aquifers and the associated flow and mixing processes. Most of these studies, however, have either focused on studying the movement of salt wedge itself or on studying contaminant transport processes occurring above the wedge. As per our knowledge, so far no one has completed laboratory experiments to study contaminant transport processes occurring within a saltwater wedge. In this study, we completed laboratory experiments to understand contaminant transport dynamics occurring within a saltwater wedge. We used a novel experimental approach that employed multiple neutral-density tracers to map and compare the mixing and transport processes occurring above and within a saltwater wedge. The experimental data were simulated using SEAWAT, and the model was used to further investigate the saltwater flow and transport dynamics within a wedge. The laboratory data show that the transport rates active within the wedge are almost two orders of magnitude slower than the transport rates active above the wedge for the small-scale experimental system which is characterized by very low level of mixing. The numerical results, however, postulate that for large-scale systems involving higher levels of mixing (or dispersion) the transport rate active within the wedge could be comparable or even higher than the rates active above the wedge. More field or laboratory studies completed under high dispersion conditions are needed to further test this hypothesis.

  18. Wedge and spring assembly for securing coils in electromagnets and dynamoelectric machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, M.; Cottingham, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    A wedge and spring assembly for use in electromagnets or dynamoelectric machines having a housing with an axis therethrough and a plurality of coils supported on salient poles that extend radially inward from the housing toward the housing axis to define a plurality of interpole spaces, respectively between the housing and adjacent coils, the interpole spaces each extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge and spring assembly includes a nonmagnetic retainer spring and a nonmagnetic wedge. The retainer spring is formed to fit into one of the interpole spaces, and has juxtaposed ends defining between them a slit extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge for insertion into the slit provides an outwardly directed force on respective portions of the juxtaposed ends defining the slit to expand the slit so that respective portions of the retainer spring engage areas of the coils adjacent thereto, thereby resiliently holding the coils against their respective salient poles. Preferably, the spring retainer and wedge are self-locking wherein wedge is fabricated from a material softer than a material the retainer spring is fabricated from, so that the wedge is securely retained in the slit. The retainer spring is generally triangular shaped to fit within the interpole space and fabricated from berryllium-copper alloy, and the wedge is generally T-shaped and fabricated from aluminum. Alternatively, a wedge and spring assembly includes a wedge having divergent sloped surfaces in which each surface and the respective juxtaposed ends of the retainer spring are angled relative to one another so that the wedge is securely retained in the slit by friction existing between its sloped surfaces and the juxtaposed ends of the retaining spring.

  19. Feasibility of MV CBCT-based treatment planning for urgent radiation therapy: dosimetric accuracy of MV CBCT-based dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Held, Mareike; Sneed, Penny K; Fogh, Shannon E; Pouliot, Jean; Morin, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Unlike scheduled radiotherapy treatments, treatment planning time and resources are limited for emergency treatments. Consequently, plans are often simple 2D image-based treatments that lag behind technical capabilities available for nonurgent radiotherapy. We have developed a novel integrated urgent workflow that uses onboard MV CBCT imaging for patient simulation to improve planning accuracy and reduce the total time for urgent treatments. This study evaluates both MV CBCT dose planning accuracy and novel urgent workflow feasibility for a variety of anatomic sites. We sought to limit local mean dose differences to less than 5% compared to conventional CT simulation. To improve dose calculation accuracy, we created separate Hounsfield unit-to-density calibration curves for regular and extended field-of-view (FOV) MV CBCTs. We evaluated dose calculation accuracy on phantoms and four clinical anatomical sites (brain, thorax/spine, pelvis, and extremities). Plans were created for each case and dose was calculated on both the CT and MV CBCT. All steps (simulation, planning, setup verification, QA, and dose delivery) were performed in one 30 min session using phantoms. The monitor units (MU) for each plan were compared and dose distribution agreement was evaluated using mean dose difference over the entire volume and gamma index on the central 2D axial plane. All whole-brain dose distributions gave gamma passing rates higher than 95% for 2%/2 mm criteria, and pelvic sites ranged between 90% and 98% for 3%/3 mm criteria. However, thoracic spine treatments produced gamma passing rates as low as 47% for 3%/3 mm criteria. Our novel MV CBCT-based dose planning and delivery approach was feasible and time-efficient for the majority of cases. Limited MV CBCT FOV precluded workflow use for pelvic sites of larger patients and resulted in image clearance issues when tumor position was far off midline. The agreement of calculated MU on CT and MV CBCT was acceptable for all

  20. Feasibility of MV CBCT-based treatment planning for urgent radiation therapy: dosimetric accuracy of MV CBCT-based dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Held, Mareike; Sneed, Penny K; Fogh, Shannon E; Pouliot, Jean; Morin, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Unlike scheduled radiotherapy treatments, treatment planning time and resources are limited for emergency treatments. Consequently, plans are often simple 2D image-based treatments that lag behind technical capabilities available for nonurgent radiotherapy. We have developed a novel integrated urgent workflow that uses onboard MV CBCT imaging for patient simulation to improve planning accuracy and reduce the total time for urgent treatments. This study evaluates both MV CBCT dose planning accuracy and novel urgent workflow feasibility for a variety of anatomic sites. We sought to limit local mean dose differences to less than 5% compared to conventional CT simulation. To improve dose calculation accuracy, we created separate Hounsfield unit-to-density calibration curves for regular and extended field-of-view (FOV) MV CBCTs. We evaluated dose calculation accuracy on phantoms and four clinical anatomical sites (brain, thorax/spine, pelvis, and extremities). Plans were created for each case and dose was calculated on both the CT and MV CBCT. All steps (simulation, planning, setup verification, QA, and dose delivery) were performed in one 30 min session using phantoms. The monitor units (MU) for each plan were compared and dose distribution agreement was evaluated using mean dose difference over the entire volume and gamma index on the central 2D axial plane. All whole-brain dose distributions gave gamma passing rates higher than 95% for 2%/2 mm criteria, and pelvic sites ranged between 90% and 98% for 3%/3 mm criteria. However, thoracic spine treatments produced gamma passing rates as low as 47% for 3%/3 mm criteria. Our novel MV CBCT-based dose planning and delivery approach was feasible and time-efficient for the majority of cases. Limited MV CBCT FOV precluded workflow use for pelvic sites of larger patients and resulted in image clearance issues when tumor position was far off midline. The agreement of calculated MU on CT and MV CBCT was acceptable for all

  1. Characterization of a 2.5 MV inline portal imaging beam.

    PubMed

    Grafe, James L; Owen, Jennifer; Villarreal-Barajas, J Eduardo; Khan, Rao F H

    2016-01-01

    A new megavoltage (MV) energy was recently introduced on Varian TrueBeam linear accelerators for imaging applications. This work describes the experimental characterization of a 2.5 MV inline portal imaging beam for commissioning, routine clinical use, and quality assurance purposes. The beam quality of the 2.5 MV beam was determined by measuring a percent depth dose, PDD, in water phantom for 10 × 10 cm2 field at source-to-surface distance 100 cm with a CC13 ion chamber, plane parallel Markus chamber, and GafChromic EBT3 film. Absolute dosimetric output calibration of the beam was performed using a traceable calibrated ionization chamber, following the AAPM Task Group 51 procedure. EBT3 film measurements were also performed to measure entrance dose. The output stability of the imaging beam was monitored for five months. Coincidence of 2.5 MV imaging beam with 6 MV therapy beam was verified with hidden-target cubic phantom. Image quality was studied using the Leeds and QC3 phantom. The depth of maximum dose, dmax, and percent dose at 10 cm depth were, respectively, 5.7 mm and 51.7% for CC13, 6.1 mm and 51.9% for Markus chamber, and 5.1 mm and 51.9% for EBT3 film. The 2.5 MV beam quality is slightly inferior to that of a 60Co teletherapy beam; however, an estimated kQ of 1.00 was used for output calibration purposes. The beam output was found to be stable to within 1% over a five-month period. The relative entrance dose as measured with EBT3 films was 63%, compared to 23% for a clinical 6 MV beam for a 10 × 10 cm2 field. Overall coincidence of the 2.5 MV imaging beam with the 6 MV clinical therapy beam was within 0.2 mm. Image quality results for two com-monly used imaging phantoms were superior for the 2.5 MV beam when compared to the conventional 6 MV beam. The results from measurements on two TrueBeam accelerators show that 2.5 MV imaging beam is slightly softer than a therapeutic 60Co beam, it provides superior image quality than a 6 MV therapy beam, and has

  2. Modeling silicon diode energy response factors for use in therapeutic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2009-10-21

    Silicon diodes have good spatial resolution, which makes them advantageous over ionization chambers for dosimetry in fields with high dose gradients. However, silicon diodes overrespond to low-energy photons, that are more abundant in scatter which increase with large fields and larger depths. We present a cavity-theory-based model for a general response function for silicon detectors at arbitrary positions within photon fields. The model uses photon and electron spectra calculated from fluence pencil kernels. The incident photons are treated according to their energy through a bipartition of the primary beam photon spectrum into low- and high-energy components. Primary electrons from the high-energy component are treated according to Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Low-energy primary photons together with all scattered photons are treated according to large cavity theory supplemented with an energy-dependent factor K(E) to compensate for energy variations in the electron equilibrium. The depth variation of the response for an unshielded silicon detector has been calculated for 5 x 5 cm(2), 10 x 10 cm(2) and 20 x 20 cm(2) fields in 6 and 15 MV beams and compared with measurements showing that our model calculates response factors with deviations less than 0.6%. An alternative method is also proposed, where we show that one can use a correlation with the scatter factor to determine the detector response of silicon diodes with an error of less than 3% in 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams.

  3. Tritanium acetabular wedge augments: short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Camilo; Heller, Snir

    2016-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of acetabular defects in total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents a great challenge to orthopaedic surgeons. Previous studies have reported on the use and outcomes of trabecular metal acetabular augments for the reconstruction of acetabular defects. However, no study has been conducted evaluating the short-term results of tritanium acetabular wedge augments for the reconstruction of acetabular defects in THA. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using a prospective database at a single institution including primary and revision THA patients from January 2013 to December 2014. Patients were included if they received a tritanium acetabular wedge augment system and had a minimum of 2-year follow-up (average 2.2 years ±0.3, range, 2–2.6 years). Demographic data and outcomes data [Harris Hip Score—HHS and Short Form (SF)-36] was collected. Radiographic data was also collected on THA revision cases (Paprosky classification), developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) cases (Crowe classification), and radiographic follow-up using DeLee and Charnley’s classification system. Results There were 4 revision THA patients, 3 DDH patients, and 1 patient with posttraumatic arthritis. At the latest radiographic follow-up, there were no lucent lines in DeLee and Charnley Zones I, II or III. During the follow-up period, there was no open revision surgery. The SF-36 physical score significantly improved from preoperative measurement (29.6±2.2) to postoperative measurement (52.2±8.7, P=0.003), and the SF-36 mental score also significantly improved from preoperative assessment (34.5±4.5) to postoperative assessment (52.2±7.5, P=0.003). Total HHS scores also significantly improved postoperatively (P=0.02), with significant improvements in both the pain score (P=0.01) and function score (P=0.02). Conclusions Tritanium acetabular wedge augments in this short follow-up case series exhibit high clinical outcome scores, no radiographic lucency, and no

  4. Revisit the classical Newmark displacement method for earthquake-induced wedge slide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Che-Ming; Cheng, Hui-Yun; Wu, Wen-Jie; Hsu, Chang-Hsuan; Dong, Jia-Jyun; Lee, Chyi-Tyi

    2016-04-01

    Newmark displacement method has been widely used to study the earthquake-induced landslides and adopted to explore the initiation and kinematics of catastrophic planar failure in recent years. However, surprisingly few researchers utilize the Newmark displacement method to study the earthquake-induced wedge slide. The classical Newmark displacement method for earthquake-induced wedge sliding assumed the wedge is rigid and the vertical acceleration, as well as the horizontal acceleration perpendicular to the sliding direction, is neglected. Moreover, the friction coefficients on the weak planes are assumed as unchanged during sliding. The purpose of this study is to test the reasonableness of the aforementioned assumptions. This study uses Newmark displacement method incorporating the rigid wedge method (RWM) and maximum shear stress method (MSSM) to evaluate the influence of wedge deformation. We design the geometry of the wedge and input the synthetic seismicity to trigger the wedge slide. The influence for neglecting the vertical and horizontal (perpendicular to the sliding direction) accelerations is also assessed. Besides, this research incorporates the velocity-displacement dependent friction law in the analysis to evaluate the influence of constant friction coefficient assumption. Result of this study illustrated that the aforementioned assumptions have significant effects on the calculated permeant displacement, moving speed, and failure initiation. To conclude, this study provides new insights on the initiation and kinematics of an earthquake induced wedge slide.

  5. Immediate and 1 week effects of laterally wedge insoles on gait biomechanics in healthy females.

    PubMed

    Weinhandl, Joshua T; Sudheimer, Sarah E; Van Lunen, Bonnie L; Stewart, Kimberly; Hoch, Matthew C

    2016-03-01

    It is estimated that approximately 45% of the U.S. population will develop knee osteoarthritis, a disease that creates significant economic burdens in both direct and indirect costs. Laterally wedged insoles have been frequently recommended to reduce knee abduction moments and to manage knee osteoarthritis. However, it remains unknown whether the lateral wedge will reduce knee abduction moments over a prolonged period of time. Thus, the purposes of this study were to (1) examine the immediate effects of a laterally wedged insole in individuals normally aligned knees and (2) determine prolonged effects after the insole was worn for 1 week. Gait analysis was performed on ten women with and without a laterally wedged insole. After participants wore the wedges for a week, a second gait analysis was performed with and without the insole. The wedged insole did not affect peak knee abduction moment, although there was a significant increase in knee abduction angular impulse after wearing the insoles for 1 week. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in vertical ground reaction force at the instance of peak knee abduction moment with the wedges. While the laterally wedged insole used in the current study did not alter knee abduction moments as expected, other studies have shown alterations. Future studies should also examine a longer acclimation period, the influence of gait speed, and the effect of different shoe types with the insole.

  6. Preliminary analysis of coil wedge dimensional variation in SSC Prototype Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, D.; Brown, G.; Dwyer, S.; Gattu, R.; Warner, D.

    1993-05-01

    The wedges used in SSC Prototype Dipole Magnets determine the relative position of conductor blocks within magnet coils. They serve to compensate partially for the less than full keystoning of the superconductor cable and to adjust current distribution with azimuth to determine the magnetic field shape. The ability to control the size and uniformity of wedges therefore is an important factor influencing magnet quality. This paper presents preliminary results of a Statistical Quality Control study of wedge dimensional variation and predicted field quality. Dimensions of samples from outer wedges for magnet DCA102 have been measured using a programmable optical comparator. The data is used to evaluate wedge manufacturing process capability, wedge uniformity, and to predict changes in conductor block position due to wedge deviation. Expected multipole variation attributable to observed wedge variation is discussed. This work focuses on a Prototype Dipole Magnet being built at the SSCL Magnet Development Laboratory (SSCL MDL) in Waxahachie, Texas. The magnet is of the same design as the DCA3xx series magnets built at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in 1991--92 and later used in the 1992 Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST).

  7. Enhancement of linear and second-order hyperpolarizabilities in wedge-shaped nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayabalan, J.; Singh, Manoranjan P.; Rustagi, K. C.

    2003-08-01

    Analytical solutions for the wave functions for free electrons inside a wedge-shaped quantum dot are reported. For silver wedge-shaped quantum dots, linear and second-order hyperpolarizabilities are calculated for various apex angles. It is found that linear and nonlinear hyperpolarizabilities both increase with decreasing apex angle.

  8. Pan-Arctic ice-wedge degradation in warming permafrost and its influence on tundra hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljedahl, Anna K.; Boike, Julia; Daanen, Ronald P.; Fedorov, Alexander N.; Frost, Gerald V.; Grosse, Guido; Hinzman, Larry D.; Iijma, Yoshihiro; Jorgenson, Janet C.; Matveyeva, Nadya; Necsoiu, Marius; Raynolds, Martha K.; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Schulla, Jörg; Tape, Ken D.; Walker, Donald A.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Yabuki, Hironori; Zona, Donatella

    2016-04-01

    Ice wedges are common features of the subsurface in permafrost regions. They develop by repeated frost cracking and ice vein growth over hundreds to thousands of years. Ice-wedge formation causes the archetypal polygonal patterns seen in tundra across the Arctic landscape. Here we use field and remote sensing observations to document polygon succession due to ice-wedge degradation and trough development in ten Arctic localities over sub-decadal timescales. Initial thaw drains polygon centres and forms disconnected troughs that hold isolated ponds. Continued ice-wedge melting leads to increased trough connectivity and an overall draining of the landscape. We find that melting at the tops of ice wedges over recent decades and subsequent decimetre-scale ground subsidence is a widespread Arctic phenomenon. Although permafrost temperatures have been increasing gradually, we find that ice-wedge degradation is occurring on sub-decadal timescales. Our hydrological model simulations show that advanced ice-wedge degradation can significantly alter the water balance of lowland tundra by reducing inundation and increasing runoff, in particular due to changes in snow distribution as troughs form. We predict that ice-wedge degradation and the hydrological changes associated with the resulting differential ground subsidence will expand and amplify in rapidly warming permafrost regions.

  9. Performance of an isolated two-dimensional wedge nozzle with fixed cowl and variable wedge centerbody at Mach numbers up to 2.01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation has been conducted to determine the aeropropulsion performance (thrust minus drag) of an isolated, two-dimensional wedge nozzle with a simulated variable-wedge mechanism and a fixed cowl. The investigation was conducted statically and at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20 in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel and at a Mach number of 2.01 in the Langley 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel. The ratio of exhaust jet total pressure to free-stream static pressure was varied up to 27 depending on free-stream Mach number. The results indicate that the aeropropulsion performance of the two-dimensional fixed-cowl variable-wedge nozzle is slightly lower (0.7 to 1.4 percent of ideal thrust) than that achieved for a two-dimensional wedge nozzle with a translating shroud, although part of the difference in performance is attributed to internal-performance differences. The effects of cowl boattail angle, internal expansion area ratio, and wedge half-angle on the performance of the two-dimensional wedge nozzle are discussed.

  10. Photon-photon collisions via relativisitic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, James K.

    2012-07-11

    Photon-photon scattering at low energies has been predicted theoretically for many years. However, due to the extremely small cross section there has been no experimental confirmation of this. Due to the rapid increase in laser irradiances and projected peak irradiances in planned facilities regimes could be reached where photon-photon scattering could be experimentally observed. We will first review basic aspects of photon-photon collisions concentrating on the calculation of the photon-photon scattering cross section. Then we will discuss the possibilities for observing these phenomena in ultra-high irradiance laser-plasma interactions involving relativistic mirrors.

  11. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females. PMID:27630437

  12. Periodic nanostructures from self assembled wedge-type block-copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Yan; Sveinbjornsson, Benjamin R.; Grubbs, Robert H.; Weitekamp, Raymond; Miyake, Garret M.; Piunova, Victoria; Daeffler, Christopher Scot

    2015-06-02

    The invention provides a class of wedge-type block copolymers having a plurality of chemically different blocks, at least a portion of which incorporates a wedge group-containing block providing useful properties. For example, use of one or more wedge group-containing blocks in some block copolymers of the invention significantly inhibits chain entanglement and, thus, the present block copolymers materials provide a class of polymer materials capable of efficient molecular self-assembly to generate a range of structures, such as periodic nanostructures and microstructures. Materials of the present invention include copolymers having one or more wedge group-containing blocks, and optionally for some applications copolymers also incorporating one or more polymer side group-containing blocks. The present invention also provides useful methods of making and using wedge-type block copolymers.

  13. Wedge and spring assembly for securing coils in electromagnets and dynamoelectric machines

    DOEpatents

    Lindner, Melvin; Cottingham, James G.

    1996-03-12

    A wedge and spring assembly for use in electromagnets or dynamoelectric machines having a housing with an axis therethrough and a plurality of coils supported on salient poles that extend radially inward from the housing toward the housing axis to define a plurality of interpole spaces. The wedge and spring assembly includes a nonmagnetic retainer spring and a nonmagnetic wedge. The retainer spring is formed to fit into one of the interpole spaces, and has juxtaposed ends defining between them a slit extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge for insertion into the slit provides an outwardly directed force on respective portions of the juxtaposed ends to expand the slit so that respective portions of the retainer spring engage areas of the coils adjacent thereto, thereby resiliently holding the coils against their respective salient poles. The retainer spring is generally triangular shaped to fit within the interpole space, and the wedge is generally T-shaped.

  14. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females.

  15. Mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges Cohesive Coulomb theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.; Suppe, J.; Davis, D.

    1984-01-01

    A self-consistent theory for the mechanics of thin-skinned accretionary Coulomb wedges is developed and applied to the active fold-and-thrust belt of western Taiwan. The state of stress everywhere within a critical wedge is determined by solving the static equilibrium equations subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. The influence of wedge cohesion, which gives rise to a concave curvature of the critical topographic surface and affects the orientation of the principal stresses and Coulomb fracture within the wedge, is considered. The shape of the topographic surface and the angles at which thrust faults step up from the basal decollement in the Taiwanese belt is analyzed taking into account the extensive structural and fluid-pressure data available there. It is concluded that the gross geometry and structure of the Taiwan wedge are consistent with normal laboratory frictional and fracture strengths of sedimentary rocks.

  16. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females. PMID:27630437

  17. The Cimmerian accretionary wedge of Anarak, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Malaspina, Nadia; Zanchetta, Stefano; Berra, Fabrizio; Benciolini, Luca; Bergomi, Maria; Cavallo, Alessandro; Javadi, Hamid Reza; Kouhpeyma, Meyssam

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence in Iran of several ophiolite belts dating between Late Palaeozoic to Triassic poses several questions on the possible existence of various sutures marking the closure of the Palaeotethys ocean between Eurasia and this Gondwana-derived microplate. In this scenario, the Anarak region in Central Iran still represents a conundrum. Contrasting geochronological, paleontological, paleomagnetic data and reported field evidence suggest different origins for the Anarak Metamorphic Complex (AMC). The AMC is either interpreted, as: (1) relict of an accretionary wedge developed at the Eurasia margin during the Palaeotethys subduction as part of the Cimmerian suture zone of NE Iran, displaced to Central Iran by a large counter-clockwise rotation of the central Iranian blocks; (2) autochthonous unit forming a secondary branch of the main suture zone. Our structural, petrographic and geochemical data indicate that the AMC consists of several metamorphic units also including dismembered "ophiolites" which display different tectono-metamorphic evolutions. Three main ductile deformational events can be distinguished in the AMC. The Morghab and Chah Gorbeh complexes preserve a different M1 metamorphism, characterized by blueschist relics in the S1 foliation of the former unit, and greenschist assemblages in the latter. They share a subsequent similar D2 deformational and M2 metamorphic history, showing a prograde metamorphism with syn- to post-deformation growth of blueschist facies mineral assemblages on pre-existing greenschist facies associations. High pressure, low temperature (HP/LT) metamorphism responsible for the growth of sodic amphibole has been recognized also within marble lenses at the contact between the Chah Gorbeh Complex and serpentinites. Evidence of HP/LT metamorphism also occurs in glaucophane-bearing meta-pillow lavas and serpentinites, which contain antigorite and form most of the "ophiolites" within the AMC. Structural relationships show that the

  18. Magnetic quantum well states in ultrathin film and wedge structures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Bader, S.D.

    1996-04-01

    Magnetic quantum-well (QW) states are probed with angle- and spin-resolved photoemission to address critical issues pertaining to the origin of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) optimization and oscillatory coupling of magnetic multilayers. Two epitaxial systems are highlighted: Cu/Co(wedge)/Cu(100) and Cr/Fe(100)-whisker. The confinement of Cu sp-QW states by a Co barrier requires a characteristic Co thickness of 2.2 {+-} 0.6 {angstrom}, which is consistent with the interfacial Co thickness reported to optimize the GMR of permalloy-Cu structures. The controversial k-space origin of the 18-{angstrom} long period oscillation in Fe/Cr multilayers is identified by the vector that spans the d-derived lens feature of the Cr Fermi surface, based on the emergence of QW states with 17 {+-} 2 {angstrom} periodicity in this region.

  19. Anterolateral Biplanar Proximal Tibial Opening-Wedge Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Dean, Chase S; Chahla, Jorge; Moulton, Samuel G; Nitri, Marco; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Proximal tibial anterolateral opening-wedge osteotomies have been reported to achieve successful biplanar lower-extremity realignment. Indications for a proximal tibial anterolateral osteotomy include symptomatic genu recurvatum with genu valgus alignment, usually in patients with a flat sagittal-plane tibial slope. The biplanar approach is able to simultaneously address both components of a patient's malalignment with a single procedure. The correction amount is verified with spacers and intraoperative imaging, while correction of the patient's heel height is simultaneously measured. A plate is secured into the osteotomy site, and the site is filled with bone allograft. The anterolateral tibial osteotomy has been reported to be an effective surgical procedure for correcting concomitant genu recurvatum and genu valgus malalignment. PMID:27656374

  20. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-12-15

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria.

  1. Numerical investigation of shedding partial cavities over a sharp wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budich, B.; Neuner, S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution, we examine transient dynamics and cavitation patterns of periodically shedding partial cavities by numerical simulations. The investigation reproduces reference experiments of the cavitating flow over a sharp wedge. Utilizing a homogeneous mixture model, full compressibility of the two-phase flow of water and water vapor is taken into account by the numerical method. We focus on inertia-dominated mechanisms, thus modeling the flow as inviscid. Based on the assumptions of thermodynamic equilibrium and barotropic flow, the thermodynamic properties are computed from closed-form analytical relations. Emphasis is put on a validation of the employed numerical approach. We demonstrate that computed shedding dynamics are in agreement with the references. Complex flow features observed in the experiments, including cavitating hairpin and horse-shoe vortices, are also predicted by the simulations. Furthermore, a condensation discontinuity occurring during the collapse phase at the trailing portion of the partial cavity is equally obtained.

  2. Landward thrusting in accretionary wedges: evidence for seafloor rupture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubas, N.; Souloumiac, P.

    2015-12-01

    The 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Japan earthquakes took the community by surprise because they ruptured frontal sections of megathrust thought to slip aseismically. Studying the deformation of accretionary prisms can help in characterizing the specific structures associated to frontal propagation and determining the mechanical properties leading to this behavior. Recent observations suggest a correlation between landward faults and frontal propagation of earthquakes along the Sumatra subduction zone. Large sections of landward thrusts are also observed along Cascadia known to have ruptured in 1700 with a M~9 generating a large tsunami. In this study, we propose to investigate if specific frictional properties could lead to a landward sequence of thrusting with the limit analysis approach. We first show that such sequence requires very low effective friction along the megathrust with a rather high internal effective friction. We also show that landward sequence appears close to the extensional critical limit. We retrieve the megathrust effective friction for three wedges with different sediment incomes. For Cascadia, we find a maximal effective friction of 0.032. For northern and southern Sumatra, we find μ≤0.02 and μ≤ 0.08 respectively. This very low effective friction is probably due to lithostatic pore pressure. This high pore pressure could either be a long-term property or due to dynamic effects such as thermal pressurization. The fact that landward vergence appears far from the compressional critical limit favors a dynamic effect. Indeed, a wedge would move away from this limit if material is added synchronously to the deformation or if it is suddenly submitted to a lower effective friction. In addition, the long-term high pore pressure could be due to a low permeability enhancing thermal pressurization and co-seismic slip along the frontal part of the megathrust.

  3. Distribution of strain rates in the Taiwan orogenic wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouthereau, F.; Fillon, C.; Ma, K.-F.

    2009-07-01

    To constrain the way Eurasian crust is accreted to the Taiwan orogenic wedge we investigate the present-day 3D seismogenic deformation field using the summation of 1129 seismic moment tensors of events ( Mw > 4) covering a period of 11 years (1995 to 2005). Based on the analysis of the principal strain-rate field, including dilatation and maximum shear rates, we distinguish four domains. Domain I comprises the Coastal Plain and the Western Foothills. It is mainly contractional in both the horizontal plane and in cross-section. Domain II comprises the eastern Western Foothills, the Hsuehshan Range and the Backbone Range. It is characterized by the highest contraction rates of 10 - 6 yr - 1 in association with area expansion in cross-section and area contraction in the horizontal plane. Domain III corresponds to the Central Range. It is characterized by area contraction in cross-section and area expansion in the horizontal plane. The maximum contractional axis is typically low and plunges ~ 30°E. Extension is larger, horizontal and strikes parallel to the axis of the mountain range. Domain IV corresponding to the Coastal Range and offshore Luzon Arc shows deformation patterns similar to domain II. This seismogenic strain-rate field, which is found in good agreement with the main features of the geodetic field, supports shortening within a thick wedge whose basal décollement is relatively flat and located in the middle-to-lower crust > 20 km. The east plunges of maximum strain-rate axes below the Central Range argue for the development of top-to-the-east transport of rocks resulting from the extrusion of the whole crust along west-dipping crustal-scale shear zones. The study of seismogenic strain rates argues that the initiation of subduction reversal has already started in the Taiwan collision domain.

  4. The Substorm Current Wedge: Further Insights from MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2015-01-01

    Using a recent magnetohydrodynamic simulation of magnetotail dynamics, we further investigate the buildup and evolution of the substorm current wedge (SCW), resulting from flow bursts generated by near-tail reconnection. Each flow burst generates an individual current wedge, which includes the reduction of cross-tail current and the diversion to region 1 (R1)-type field-aligned currents (earthward on the dawn and tailward on the duskside), connecting the tail with the ionosphere. Multiple flow bursts generate initially multiple SCW patterns, which at later times combine to a wider single SCW pattern. The standard SCWmodel is modified by the addition of several current loops, related to particular magnetic field changes: the increase of Bz in a local equatorial region (dipolarization), the decrease of |Bx| away from the equator (current disruption), and increases in |By| resulting from azimuthally deflected flows. The associated loop currents are found to be of similar magnitude, 0.1-0.3 MA. The combined effect requires the addition of region 2 (R2)-type currents closing in the near tail through dawnward currents but also connecting radially with the R1 currents. The current closure at the inner boundary, taken as a crude proxy of an idealized ionosphere, demonstrates westward currents as postulated in the original SCW picture as well as North-South currents connecting R1- and R2-type currents, which were larger than the westward currents by a factor of almost 2. However, this result should be applied with caution to the ionosphere because of our neglect of finite resistance and Hall effects.

  5. Isolating active orogenic wedge deformation in the southern Subandes of Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jonathan R.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Foster, James H.; Bevis, Michael; Echalar, Arturo; Caccamise, Dana; Heck, Jacob; Kendrick, Eric; Ahlgren, Kevin; Raleigh, David; Smalley, Robert; Vergani, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    A new GPS-derived surface velocity field for the central Andean backarc permits an assessment of orogenic wedge deformation across the southern Subandes of Bolivia, where recent studies suggest that great earthquakes (>Mw 8) are possible. We find that the backarc is not isolated from the main plate boundary seismic cycle. Rather, signals from subduction zone earthquakes contaminate the velocity field at distances greater than 800 km from the Chile trench. Two new wedge-crossing velocity profiles, corrected for seasonal and earthquake affects, reveal distinct regions that reflect (1) locking of the main plate boundary across the high Andes, (2) the location of and loading rate at the back of orogenic wedge, and (3) an east flank velocity gradient indicative of décollement locking beneath the Subandes. Modeling of the Subandean portions of the profiles indicates along-strike variations in the décollement locked width (WL) and wedge loading rate; the northern wedge décollement has a WL of ~100 km while accumulating slip at a rate of ~14 mm/yr, whereas the southern wedge has a WL of ~61 km and a slip rate of ~7 mm/yr. When compared to Quaternary estimates of geologic shortening and evidence for Holocene internal wedge deformation, the new GPS-derived wedge loading rates may indicate that the southern wedge is experiencing a phase of thickening via reactivation of preexisting internal structures. In contrast, we suspect that the northern wedge is undergoing an accretion or widening phase primarily via slip on relatively young thrust-front faults.

  6. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  7. Microalgae photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floume, Timmy; Coquil, Thomas; Sylvestre, Julien

    2011-05-01

    Due to their metabolic flexibility and fast growth rate, microscopic aquatic phototrophs like algae have a potential to become industrial photochemical converters. Algae photosynthesis could enable the large scale production of clean and renewable liquid fuels and chemicals with major environmental, economic and societal benefits. Capital and operational costs are the main issues to address through optical, process and biochemical engineering improvements. In this perspective, a variety of photonic approaches have been proposed - we introduce them here and describe their potential, limitations and compatibility with separate biotechnology and engineering progresses. We show that only sunlight-based approaches are economically realistic. One of photonics' main goals in the algae field is to dilute light to overcome photosaturation effects that impact upon cultures exposed to full sunlight. Among other approaches, we introduce a widely-compatible broadband spectral adaptation technique called AlgoSun® that uses luminescence to optimize sunlight spectrum in view of the bioconverter's requirements.

  8. Vertebral body or intervertebral disc wedging: which contributes more to thoracolumbar kyphosis in ankylosing spondylitis patients?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao; Qian, Bang-Ping; Qiu, Yong; Wang, Yan; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Ze-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both vertebral body wedging and disc wedging are found in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis. However, their relative contribution to thoracolumbar kyphosis is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to compare different contributions of vertebral and disc wedging to the thoracolumbar kyphosis in AS patients, and to analyze the relationship between the apical vertebral wedging angle and thoracolumbar kyphosis. From October 2009 to October 2013, a total of 59 consecutive AS patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis with a mean age of 38.1 years were recruited in this study. Based on global kyphosis (GK), 26 patients with GK < 70° were assigned to group A, and the other 33 patients with GK ≥ 70° were included in group B. Each GK was divided into disc wedge angles and vertebral wedge angles. The wedging angle of each disc and vertebra comprising the thoracolumbar kyphosis was measured, and the proportion of the wedging angle to the GK was calculated accordingly. Intergroup and intragroup comparisons were subsequently performed to investigate the different contributions of disc and vertebra to the GK. The correlation between the apical vertebral wedging angle and GK was calculated by Pearson correlation analysis. The duration of disease and sex were also recorded in this study. With respect to the mean disease duration, significant difference was observed between the two groups (P < 0.01). The wedging angle and wedging percentage of discs were significantly higher than those of vertebrae in group A (34.8° ± 2.5° vs 26.7° ± 2.7°, P < 0.01 and 56.6% vs 43.4%, P < 0.01), whereas disc wedging and disc wedging percentage were significantly lower than vertebrae in group B (37.6° ± 7.0° vs 50.1° ± 5.1°, P < 0.01 and 42.7% vs 57.3%, P < 0.01). The wedging of vertebrae was significantly higher in group B than in group A (50.1° ± 5.1° vs 26.7° ± 2.7°, P < 0

  9. Low-Z linac targets for low-MV gold nanoparticle radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiamas, P.; Mishra, P.; Berbeco, R. I.; Marcus, K.; Zygmanski, P. E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu; Cifter, F.; Sajo, E. E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of low-Z/low-MV (low-Z) linac targets for gold nanoparticle radiotherapy (GNPT) and to determine the microscopic dose enhancement ratio (DER) due to GNP for the alternative beamlines. In addition, to evaluate the degradation of dose enhancement arising from the increased attenuation of x rays and larger skin dose in water for the low-MV beams compared to the standard linac. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were used to compute dose and DER for various flattening-filter-free beams (2.5, 4, 6.5 MV). Target materials were beryllium, diamond, and tungsten-copper high-Z target. Target thicknesses were selected based on 20%, 60%, 70%, and 80% of the continuous slowing down approximation electron ranges for a given target material and energy. Evaluation of the microscopic DER was carried out for 100 nm GNP including the degradation factors due to beam attenuation. Results: The greatest increase in DER compared to the standard 6.5 MV linac was for a 2.5 MV Be-target (factor of ∼2). Skin dose ranged from ∼10% (Be, 6.5 MV-80%) to ∼85% (Be, 2.5 MV-20%) depending on the target case. Attenuation of 2.5 MV beams at 22 cm was higher by ∼75% compared with the standard beam. Taking into account the attenuation at 22 cm depth, the effective dose enhancement was up to ∼60% above the DER of the high-Z target. For these cases the effective DER ranged between ∼1.6 and 6 compared with the standard linac. Conclusions: Low-Z (2.5 MV) GNPT is possible even after accounting for greater beam attenuation for deep-seated tumors (22 cm) and the increased skin dose. Further, it can lead to significant sparing of normal tissue while simultaneously escalating the dose in the tumor cells.

  10. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  11. Ice-wedge based permafrost chronologies and stable-water isotope records from Arctic Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, Sebastian; Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Schwamborn, Georg; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Dereviagin, Alexander Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Late Quaternary permafrost of northern latitudes contains large proportions of ground ice, including pore ice, segregation ice, massive ice, buried glacier ice and in particular ice wedges. Fossil ice-wedges are remnants of polygonal patterned ground in former tundra areas, which evolved over several tens of thousands of years in non-glaciated Beringia. Ice wedges originate from repeated frost cracking of the ground in winter and subsequent crack filling by snowmelt and re-freezing in the ground in spring. Hence, the stable water isotope composition (δ18O, δD, d excess) of wedge ice derives from winter precipitation and is commonly interpreted as wintertime climate proxy. Paleoclimate studies based on ice-wedge isotope data cover different timescales and periods of the late Quaternary. (MIS 6 to MIS 1). In the long-term scale the temporal resolution is rather low and corresponds to mid- and late Pleistocene and Holocene stratigraphic units. Recent progress has been made in developing centennial Late Glacial and Holocene time series of ice-wedge stable isotopes by applying radiocarbon dating of organic remains in ice samples. Ice wedges exposed at both coasts of the Dmitry Laptev Strait (East Siberian Sea) were studied to deduce winter climate conditions since about 200 kyr. Ice wedges aligned to distinct late Quaternary permafrost strata were studied for their isotopic composition and dated by radiocarbon ages of organic matter within the wedge ice or by cosmogenic nuclide ratios (36Cl/Cl-) of the ice. The paleoclimate interpretation is furthermore based on geocryological and paleoecological proxy data and geochronological information (radiocarbon, luminescence, radioisotope disequilibria 230Th/U) from ice-wedge embedding frozen deposits. Coldest winter conditions are mirrored by most negative δ18O mean values of -37 ‰ and δD mean values of -290 ‰ from ice wedges of the Last Glacial Maximum (26 to 22 kyr BP) while late Holocene (since about 4 kyr BP) and in

  12. Hyper-extended continental crust deformation in the light of Coulomb critical wedge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, Michael; Manatschal, Gianreto; Yuan, Xiaoping; Kusznir, Nick; Maillot, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The rocks forming the wedge shape termination of hyper-extended continental crust are deformed in the frictional field during the last stage of continental rifting due to cooling and hydration. Seismic interpretation and field evidence show that the basal boundary of the wedge is a low frictional décollement level. The wedge shape, the frictional deformation and the basal décollement correspond to the requirements of the critical Coulomb wedge (CCW) theory which describes the stability limit of a frictional wedge over a décollement. In a simple shear separation model the upper-plate margin (in the hangingwall of the detachment fault) corresponds to a tectonic extensional wedge whereas the lower plate (in the footwall of the detachment fault) is a gravitational wedge. This major difference causes the asymmetry of conjugate hyper-extended rifted margins. We measure a dataset of upper and lower hyper-extended wedge and compare it to the stability envelope of the CCW theory for serpentine and clay friction. We find a good fit by adjusting fluid pressure. The main results of our analysis are that the crustal wedges of lower plate margins are close to the critical shape, which explains their low variability whereas upper plate wedges can be critical, sub- or sup- critical due to the detachment evolution during rifting. On the upper plate side, according to the Coulomb tectonic extensional wedge, faults should be oriented toward the continent. Observations showed some continentward faults in the termination of the continental crust but there are also oceanward faults. This can be explained by two processes, first continentward faults are created only over the detachment, therefore if part of the hyper-extended upper plate crust is not directly over the detachment it will not be part of the wedge. Secondly the tip block of the wedge can be detached creating an extensional allochthon induced by the flattening of the detachment near the surface, therefore continentward

  13. Critical taper wedge strength varies with structural style: results from distinct-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, L. M.; Suppe, J.

    2015-12-01

    Critical-taper theory has given diverse insight into kinematics, roles of erosion and sedimentation, and the morphology of compressive mountain belts. We have made progress by recasting the parameter-rich mathematics into a simpler form that describes a linear, co-varying relationship between surface slope and detachment dip (α, β), and internal- and basal-sliding strengths (W, F). Using distinct-element models, we tested this simpler theory over a range of wedge strengths and structural styles. We also obtained W & F from observations of surface slope α and detachment dip β in active natural systems, all of which including the numerical models, show wedges are strong but detachments are weak, with F/W=0.1 or less. Model-derived W & F vary about a mean that matches geometry-derived values. Time- and spatially-averaged dynamical F & W are observed to be equal to wedge-derived results. Critical taper reflects the dynamical strengths during wedge growth and is controlled dynamically as base friction varies between an assigned quasi-static value and lower values during slip events. In the wedge, W varies more than F, which may also be true for natural systems. Detachments have frictional stick/slip behavior on a basal wall, but the wedge has more going on within it. Tandem faulting & folding serve to simultaneously weaken and strengthen the wedge, and may occur anywhere: structural style appears to be important to wedge strength evolution. The dynamics of deformation within the wedge and slip upon the base control the finite wedge geometry: static strengths drop to dynamic levels during seismicity, resulting in materials and faults that are weaker than prescribed in models or determined by testing. Relationships between α and W & F are complex. All sudden, stepwise changes in α, W & F with time coincide with seismicity spikes in the models. Large events trigger or are triggered by large changes in F and W. We examine the complex details of dynamically driven

  14. A Study in Wedge Waves with Applications in Acoustic Delay- line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Po-Hsien; Wang, Wen-Chi; Yang, Che-Hua

    The acoustic delay line is usually used to supply protection from dangerous environment, to enhance signal intensity by fit geometry of analyte, or to achieve specific angle/focusing by Snell's law, but rarely to avoid noise from coupling agent and to raise spatial resolution by reducing contact area. This study is focused on wedge waves with applications in delay-line to solve the knot of traditionally transducer measurement. Wedge waves are guided acoustic waves propagating along the tip of a wedge. The advantages of wedge being used in acoustic delay line are wedge waves has large motion amplitude of anti-symmetric flexural (ASF) mode, low energy attenuation and the velocity of ASF more is regular weather frequency varied or not. According the characteristic of wedge wave and vibration direction of particle, the acoustical wedge delay line with high signal- noise-ratio, approximate point-like contact area, without coupling agent and in/out vibration measurement by specific experimental setup is developed.

  15. Biomechanical effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles on unilateral weight bearing

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Tomonori; Kito, Nobuhiro; Yukimune, Masaki; Tokuda, Kazuki; Tanimoto, Kenji; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral wedge insoles reduce the peak external knee adduction moment and are advocated for patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, some patients demonstrate adverse biomechanical effects with treatment. In this study, we examined the immediate effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles under unilateral weight bearing. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. The subjects were assessed by using the foot posture index, and were divided into three groups: normal foot, pronated foot, and supinated foot groups. The knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm under the studied conditions were measured by using a three-dimensional motion capture system and force plates. [Results] In the normal and pronated groups, the change in knee adduction moment significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition compared with the medial wedge insole condition. In the normal group, the change in the knee-ground reaction force lever arm also significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition than under the medial wedge insole condition. [Conclusion] Lateral wedge insoles significantly reduced the knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm during unilateral weight bearing in subjects with normal feet, and the biomechanical effects varied according to individual foot alignment. PMID:26957775

  16. Biomechanical effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles on unilateral weight bearing.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Tomonori; Kito, Nobuhiro; Yukimune, Masaki; Tokuda, Kazuki; Tanimoto, Kenji; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral wedge insoles reduce the peak external knee adduction moment and are advocated for patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, some patients demonstrate adverse biomechanical effects with treatment. In this study, we examined the immediate effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles under unilateral weight bearing. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. The subjects were assessed by using the foot posture index, and were divided into three groups: normal foot, pronated foot, and supinated foot groups. The knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm under the studied conditions were measured by using a three-dimensional motion capture system and force plates. [Results] In the normal and pronated groups, the change in knee adduction moment significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition compared with the medial wedge insole condition. In the normal group, the change in the knee-ground reaction force lever arm also significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition than under the medial wedge insole condition. [Conclusion] Lateral wedge insoles significantly reduced the knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm during unilateral weight bearing in subjects with normal feet, and the biomechanical effects varied according to individual foot alignment.

  17. Inferring the spatial variation of the wedge strength based on a modified critical taper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Liu, H.; Hsieh, Y.; Dong, J.

    2013-12-01

    Critical taper wedge theory has been widely applied to evaluate the strength of the detachment fault and the wedge by measuring taper angle. Traditional taper model, which incorporated constant cohesion and friction angle, fails to explain the lateral variation of the taper angle. A modified critical taper model adopting nonlinear Hoek-Brown failure criterion is proposed accordingly. The fold-and-thrust belt of central Taiwan was studied. Based on the field works and laboratory tests, the geological strength index (GSI) and the uniaxial compressive strength were obtained and the wedge strength can be estimated accordingly. The GSI values from investigation are decreased from the west to the east along the cross section due to the wedge strength heterogeneity. The uniaxial compressive strength of intact rock varies from the age of formation and lithology. The estimated wedge strength exhibits a strong spatial variation. The strength of the detachment fault was derived from rotary shear tests using fault gouge materials under different velocities and normal stresses. General speaking, the steady-state friction coefficient are about 0.29-0.46 when the shear velocity less than 0.1 m/s. The friction coefficient is not sensitive to the normal stress. Consequently, the lateral variation of the taper angle, which calculated by modified critical taper model, is mainly dominated by the wedge strength heterogeneity and the thickening of the wedge from the west to the east.

  18. Gap Test Modeling to Predict Wedge Tests Initiation of PBXN-103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Clinton Thomas

    1997-07-01

    The experimental Initiation of PBXN-103 by the standard wedge test has been modeled by using the HVRB initiation and growth model in the CTH code. The P-081 plane wave lens was used as initiator in these experiments. The wedge test was converted to a gap test by replacing the PBXN-103 wedge by a PBXN-103 cylinder. By modeling this gap test, shock initiation in the PBXN-103 was calculated. The results of these calculations are in agreement with the experimental results of the wedge tests. Comparison of the CTH code calculations with the wedge test data was accomplished by using an auxiliary program to the CTH code called the BCAT code. In particular, it computes the ``pop plot'' and compares it to the wedge test data. It also predicts other fundamental results of the wedge test. Shock initiation of PBX-9404 was also calculated by the HVRB model and compared to the same calculation using the Lee-Tarver model. Comparison of the two calculations indicate that the HVRB model is apparently as good as the Lee-Tarver model.

  19. Semi-analytical solutions of groundwater flow in multi-zone (patchy) wedge-shaped aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samani, Nozar; Sedghi, Mohammad M.

    2015-03-01

    Alluvial fans are potential sites of potable groundwater in many parts of the world. Characteristics of alluvial fans sediments are changed radially from high energy coarse-grained deposition near the apex to low energy fine-grained deposition downstream so that patchy wedge-shaped aquifers with radial heterogeneity are formed. The hydraulic parameters of the aquifers (e.g. hydraulic conductivity and specific storage) change in the same fashion. Analytical or semi-analytical solutions of the flow in wedge-shaped aquifers are available for homogeneous cases. In this paper we derive semi-analytical solutions of groundwater flow to a well in multi-zone wedge-shaped aquifers. Solutions are provided for three wedge boundary configurations namely: constant head-constant head wedge, constant head-barrier wedge and barrier-barrier wedge. Derivation involves the use of integral transforms methods. The effect of heterogeneity ratios of zones on the response of the aquifer is examined. The results are presented in form of drawdown and drawdown derivative type curves. Heterogeneity has a significant effect on over all response of the pumped aquifer. Solutions help understanding the behavior of heterogeneous multi-zone aquifers for sustainable development of the groundwater resources in alluvial fans.

  20. Diffuse holographic interferometric observation of shock wave reflection from a skewed wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, D.; Ohtani, K.; Takayama, K.

    2009-06-01

    The pattern of shock wave reflection over a wedge is, in general, either a regular reflection or a Mach reflection, depending on wedge angles, shock wave Mach numbers, and specific heat ratios of gases. However, regular and Mach reflections can coexist, in particular, over a three-dimensional wedge surface, whose inclination angles locally vary normal to the direction of shock propagation. This paper reports a result of diffuse double exposure holographic interferometric observations of shock wave reflections over a skewed wedge surface placed in a 100 × 180 mm shock tube. The wedge consists of a straight generating line whose local inclination angle varies continuously from 30° to 60°. Painting its surface with fluorescent spray paint and irradiating its surface with a collimated object beam at a time interval of a few microseconds, we succeeded in visualizing three-dimensional shock reflection over the skewed wedge surface. Experiments were performed at shock Mach numbers, 1.55, 2.02, and 2.53 in air. From reconstructed holographic images, we estimated critical transition angles at these shock wave Mach numbers and found that these were very close to those over straight wedges. This is attributable to the flow three-dimensionality.

  1. Role of Hydrogen in stagnant slabs and big mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Zhao, D.

    2008-12-01

    Recent seismic tomography data imply that subducting slabs are stagnant at some regions such as beneath Japan and Northeast China [1, 2]. The stagnant slab can have an important effect on the overlying transition zone and upper mantle. A big mantle wedge (BMW) model has been proposed by Zhao [2], in which the stagnant slab in the transition zone could play an essential role in the intra-plate volcanic activities overlying the slab. Water released by the stagnant slab could be important for such igneous activities, such as Mt. Changbai in Northeast China. In cold subducting slabs, several hydrous minerals together with nominally anhydrous minerals accommodate OH and transport water into the transition zone [3]. The effect of dehydration of the stagnant slab has been analyzed by Richard et al. [4]. They argued that warming of the stagnant slab due to heat conduction could play an important role for the slab dehydration, and local oversaturation could be achieved due to decrease of the water solubility in minerals with temperature, and fluid can be formed in the overlying transition zone. We determined the hydrogen diffusion in wadsleyite and ringwoodite under the transition zone conditions in order to clarify the deep processes of the stagnant slabs, and found that diffusion rates of hydrogen are comparable with that of olivine [5]. We also determined the dihedral angle of aqueous fluid between wadsleyite grains and majorite grains under the transition zone conditions. The dihedral angles are very small, around 20-40 degrees, indicating that the oversaturated fluids can move rapidly by the percolation mechanism in the transition zone. The fluids moved to the top of the 410 km discontinuity can generate heavy hydrous melts due to a larger depression of the wet solidus at the base of the upper mantle [6]. Gravitationally stable hydrous melts can be formed at the base of the upper mantle, which is consistent with seismological observations of the low velocity beneath

  2. Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Two Wedge Airfoil Sections Including Unsteady Flow Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick J.

    1959-01-01

    A two-dimensional wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted on a 20-percent-thick single-wedge airfoil section. Steady-state forces and moments were determined from pressure measurements at Mach numbers from 0.70 to about 1.25. Additional information on the flows about the single wedge is provided by means of instantaneous pressure measurements at Mach numbers up to unity. Pressure distributions were also obtained on a symmetrical double-wedge or diamond-shaped profile which had the same leading-edge included angle as the single-wedge airfoil. A comparison of the data on the two profiles to provide information on the effects of the afterbody showed that with the exception of drag, the single-wedge profile proved to be aerodynamically superior to the diamond profile in all respects. The lift effectiveness of the single-wedge airfoil section far exceeded that of conventional thin airfoil sections over the speed range of the investigation. Pitching-moment irregularities, caused by negative loadings near the trailing edge, generally associated with conventional airfoils of equivalent thicknesses were not exhibited by the single-wedge profile. Moderately high pulsating pressures existing over the base of the single-wedge airfoil section were significantly reduced as the Mach number was increased beyond 0.92 and the boundaries of the dead airspace at the base of the model converged to eliminate the vortex street in the wake. Increasing the leading-edge radius from 0 to 1 percent of the chord had a minor effect on the steady-state forces and generally raised the level of pressure pulsations over the forward part of the single-wedge profile.

  3. Ground Penetrating Radar Detection of Ice Wedge Geometry: Implications for Climate Change Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. K.; Haltigin, T.; Pollard, W. H.

    2011-12-01

    Polygonal features in the Canadian High Arctic are found in many areas, have diverse appearances, and occur in a variety of surface materials. As part of a larger project using geophysical methods to study ice wedge depth, width, and thickness, ground penetrating radar (GPR) data were collected across polygonal surface features on Devon Island. As with polygonal features in other locations on Earth, not all of the features studied on Devon Island contain subsurface ice, however polygons with notable surface troughs did contain fairly large ice wedges. The polygons in this study were formed in fine sediments near Thomas Lee Inlet east of the Haughton impact crater, and GPR data were collected at 200 MHz and 400 MHz using the GSSI, Inc. SIR-3000 system. Although both GPR and capacity-coupled resistivity (CCR) data were collected, the CCR data may have been adversely affected by melt water at the base of the active layer. Conversely, the GPR data show the thickness of the active layer, the width of the top of the ice wedge, and other subsurface stratigraphic features very well. Locations and widths of wedge ice were confirmed by augering and trenching to the tops of the ice wedges. GPR data clearly delineate the edges of the tops of ice wedges. Interestingly, the GPR-determined edges correlate with surface tensional cracks that appear to be related to subsidence above the wedge. It is possible that this subsidence is caused by an increase in active layer thickness and downward melting of the ice wedge in response to increasing temperatures over several years or more. If this is the case, small amounts of surface subsidence above ice wedges could be a useful indicator of past and current climate change in Arctic regions. To address this possibility, a broader study is proposed.

  4. 2. VIEW NORTHEAST AT NORTHERN BANK OF BAYOU LAFOURCHE; M/V ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHEAST AT NORTHERN BANK OF BAYOU LAFOURCHE; M/V 'FOX' LIES UNDER TREES AT CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH - Motorized Sailing Vessel "Fox", Beached on East Bank ofBayou Lafourche, Larose, Lafourche Parish, LA

  5. WE-G-18A-02: Calibration-Free Combined KV/MV Short Scan CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M; Loo, B; Bazalova, M; Fahrig, R; Star-Lack, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To combine orthogonal kilo-voltage (kV) and Mega-voltage (MV) projection data for short scan cone-beam CT to reduce imaging time on current radiation treatment systems, using a calibration-free gain correction method. Methods: Combining two orthogonal projection data sets for kV and MV imaging hardware can reduce the scan angle to as small as 110° (90°+fan) such that the total scan time is ∼18 seconds, or within a breath hold. To obtain an accurate reconstruction, the MV projection data is first linearly corrected using linear regression using the redundant data from the start and end of the sinogram, and then the combined data is reconstructed using the FDK method. To correct for the different changes of attenuation coefficients in kV/MV between soft tissue and bone, the forward projection of the segmented bone and soft tissue from the first reconstruction in the redundant region are added to the linear regression model. The MV data is corrected again using the additional information from the segmented image, and combined with kV for a second FDK reconstruction. We simulated polychromatic 120 kVp (conventional a-Si EPID with CsI) and 2.5 MVp (prototype high-DQE MV detector) projection data with Poisson noise using the XCAT phantom. The gain correction and combined kV/MV short scan reconstructions were tested with head and thorax cases, and simple contrast-to-noise ratio measurements were made in a low-contrast pattern in the head. Results: The FDK reconstruction using the proposed gain correction method can effectively reduce artifacts caused by the differences of attenuation coefficients in the kV/MV data. The CNRs of the short scans for kV, MV, and kV/MV are 5.0, 2.6 and 3.4 respectively. The proposed gain correction method also works with truncated projections. Conclusion: A novel gain correction and reconstruction method was developed to generate short scan CBCT from orthogonal kV/MV projections. This work is supported by NIH Grant 5R01CA138426-05.

  6. Metastable olivine wedge beneath northeast China and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, G.; Zhao, D.; Zhang, G.

    2013-12-01

    When the Pacific slab subducted into the mantle transition zone, there might exist a metastable olivine wedge (MOW) inside the slab due to the phase transition. Lots of researchers have adopted such various methods to detect the characteristics of this MOW as the forward modeling of travel times, shear wave amplitude patterns, teleseismic P wave coda, receiver function imaging, thermodynamic simulation and so on. Almost all results could be more or less affected by the source, the receiver and/or the velocity model passed through by the seismic rays. In this study, we have used 21 deep earthquakes, greater than 400 km and locating beneath northeast China, to study the velocity within the MOW. For more precisions, we have done further modifications in two ways based on our previous studies. (1) Double-difference location method is used to relocate all events with an error of 1-2 km with the data recorded by stations both at northeast China and at Japan. All relocated events locate in a zone about 30 km away from the upper boundary of Pacific slab. (2) Double residual travel times, generated by an event-pair at a common station at only Japan, are used to constrain the velocity anomaly rather than the residuals themselves. As a result, we have found that an ultra-lower velocity zone (ULVZ), averagely -7% relative to the iasp91 model, exists within the subducted Pacific slab around the deep earthquakes, which might be represented as the metastable olivine wedge. Because of the lower-velocity corresponding to the lower-density, the MOW would provide upward buoyancy forces which might prevent the slab from free subduction into the mantle transition zone. This feed-back mechanism of MOW to the slab is called ';parachute-effect', which is characterized by other researchers. In addition, the existence of the ULVZ or the MOW in the slab may supply a possible mechanism for triggering deep earthquakes, called ';phase transformation faulting', which was already proposed few

  7. Links Between Displacement Rates and Erosion in Experimental Tectonic Wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, L.; Hilley, G.; Take, A.

    2008-12-01

    Erosional redistribution of mass along Earth's surface modifies the near-surface lithostatic stresses, altering displacement rates and the kinematics within orogens. In this study we use analogue experiments of a deforming sand wedge to systematically examine the impact that erosion may have had on the kinematics of the Argentine Precordilleran fold-and-thrust belt at ~32.5°S. Here, the history of deformation has been superbly documented by others, and that work resolves changes in shortening rates over time throughout the range. Specifically, total shortening rates across the fold-and-thrust belt may have changed over time, and out-of-sequence thrusting may have played an important role accommodating deformation at various times in the history of the fold-and-thrust belt. We hypothesize that such changes may be the response of the fold-and-thrust belt to changing erosion of these ranges. To this end, we have constructed an analogue sandbox experiments whose specific layered rheology is akin to that documented in the Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt in central Argentina. Our contractional experimental apparatus (sandbox) includes a servo-controlled feedback system that allows for a variety of boundary conditions to be applied to the moving wall, including constant displacement rate, time-varying displacement rate, constant loading, and time-varying loading. The application of a loading rate allows us to explicitly investigate feedbacks between topographic construction, erosion, strain softening within the dry sand, and temporal changes in total shortening rates that would be difficult to examine using the constant velocity conditions that are usually applied to the analogue models. We also apply Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) techniques to digital images from the experimental model to derive high-resolution kinematics and calculate strain, uplift and exhumation rates. Preliminary results indicate that changes in the erosional efficiency in the experimental

  8. Application of the critical Coulomb wedge theory to hyper-extended, magma-poor rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, M.; Manatschal, G.; Yuan, X. P.; Kusznir, N. J.; Maillot, B.

    2016-05-01

    The Critical Coulomb Wedge Theory (CCWT) has been extensively used in compressional tectonics to resolve the shape of orogenic or accretionary prisms, while it is less applied to extensional and gravitational wedges despite the fact that it can be described by the same equation. In particular, the hyper-extended domain at magma-poor rifted margins, forming the oceanward termination of extended continental crust, satisfies the three main requirements of the CCWT: 1) it presents a wedge shape, 2) the rocks forming the wedge are completely brittle (frictional), and 3) the base of the wedge corresponds to a low friction décollement. However hyper-extended margins present a fully frictional behaviour only for a very thin crust; therefore this study is limited to the termination of hyper-extended continental crust which deforms in the latest stage of continental rifting. In this paper we define a method to measure the surface slope and the basal deep of this wedge that we apply to 17 hyper-extended, magma-poor rifted margins in order to compare the results to the values predicted by the CCWT. Because conjugate pairs of hyper-extended, magma-poor rifted margins are commonly asymmetric, due to detachment faulting, the wedges in the upper and lower plate margins corresponding respectively to the hanging wall and footwall of the detachment system are different. While the stress field in the upper plate wedge corresponds to a tectonic extensional wedge, the one in the lower plate matches that of a gravity extensional wedge. Using typical frictional properties of phyllosilicates (e.g. clays and serpentine), the shape of the hyper-extended wedges can be resolved by the CCWT using consistent fluid overpressures. Our results show that all lower plate margins are gravitationally stable and therefore have a close to critical shape whereas the tectonic extensional wedges at upper plate margins are critical, sub or sup critical due to the detachment initial angle and the duration of

  9. Line-shape flattening resulting from hypersonic nozzle wedge flow in low-pressure chemical lasers.

    PubMed

    Livingston, P M; Bullock, D L

    1980-07-01

    The new hypersonic wedge nozzle (HYWN) supersonic wedge nozzle design produces a significant component of directed gas flow along the optical axis of a laser cavity comparable to thermal speeds. The gain-line-shape function is broadened and the refractive-index line shape is also spread as a function of wedge-flow half-angle. An analytical treatment as well as a numerical study is presented that evaluates the Doppler-directed-flow impact on the number of longitudinal modes and their frequencies as well as on gain and refractive-index saturation of those that lase in a Fabry-Perot cavity.

  10. Sol-gel based anti-reflection coatings on wedged laser rods using a spin coater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareek, R.; Joshi, A. S.; Gupta, P. D.; Biswas, P. K.; Das, S.

    2005-07-01

    Anti-reflection (AR) sol-gel coatings are deposited on wedge glass optics for high-power lasers using spin coating technique. Characterization of these coatings on BK-7 glass substrates is carried out in terms of thickness profile across the surface, thickness variation w.r.t. wedge angle, and its effect on AR coating reflectivity, at different wedge angles from 1° to 7°. Results of the study are used to deposit AR coatings on inclined end faces of Nd:phosphate glass laser rods.

  11. Photon Calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1989-01-01

    A photon calorimeter (20, 40) is provided that comprises a laminar substrate (10, 22, 42) that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating (28, 48, 52), that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions (30, 50, 54) are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly.

  12. Photon calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1988-04-22

    A photon calorimeter is provided that comprises a laminar substrate that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating, that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions, are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly. 4 figs.

  13. Complex cytokine modulation of a continuous line of mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1Lu).

    PubMed

    Kelley, J; Baldor, L; Absher, M

    1992-01-01

    The continuous mink lung epithelial cell line Mv1Lu has proven to be a sensitive reporter line in the bioassay for purified TGF-beta, exhibiting a sigmoid-shaped concentration-response relationship with an EC50 of 12 pM (0.3 ng/mL). Maximal inhibition of Mv1Lu cells generates a 75-95% decrement in the number of adherent cells. However, this bioassay is not specific for TGF-beta as originally claimed. Mv1Lu cells are sensitive to other cytokines and substances found in complex biological fluids. In this study the effects of other biological response modifiers in this assay were tested and several were found to have important growth modulatory capacities that confound the quantitation of TGF-beta. EGF, TGF-alpha, fibronectin, and IGF-I all induce Mv1Lu cell proliferation. In contrast, neither PDGF (-AA, -AB, -BB) nor endotoxin (< or = 10 micrograms/mL) affect Mv1Lu cell number. TGF-beta and TNF-alpha at high concentrations (> or = 10 ng/mL) are the only cytokines examined that inhibit Mv1Lu proliferation. TGF-beta decreases final cell number both by preventing mitosis and by inhibition of adherence of cells to the uncoated dish. Several strategies are suggested to assure the specificity of this otherwise convenient bioassay for TGF-beta.

  14. Design of a -1 MV dc UHV power supply for ITER NBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Takemoto, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Dairaku, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Taniguchi, M.; Tobari, H.; Umeda, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Inoue, T.

    2009-05-01

    Procurement of a dc -1 MV power supply system for the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) is shared by Japan and the EU. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency as the Japan Domestic Agency (JADA) for ITER contributes to the procurement of dc -1 MV ultra-high voltage (UHV) components such as a dc -1 MV generator, a transmission line and a -1 MV insulating transformer for the ITER NBI power supply. The inverter frequency of 150 Hz in the -1 MV power supply and major circuit parameters have been proposed and adopted in the ITER NBI. The dc UHV insulation has been carefully designed since dc long pulse insulation is quite different from conventional ac insulation or dc short pulse systems. A multi-layer insulation structure of the transformer for a long pulse up to 3600 s has been designed with electric field simulation. Based on the simulation the overall dimensions of the dc UHV components have been finalized. A surge energy suppression system is also essential to protect the accelerator from electric breakdowns. The JADA contributes to provide an effective surge suppression system composed of core snubbers and resistors. Input energy into the accelerator from the power supply can be reduced to about 20 J, which satisfies the design criteria of 50 J in total in the case of breakdown at -1 MV.

  15. Validation of the Spanish Addiction Severity Index Multimedia Version (S–ASI–MV)

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Stephen F.; Redondo, José Pedro; Fernandez, Kathrine C.; Villapiano, Albert

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and test the reliability and validity of a Spanish adaptation of the ASI-MV, a computer administered version of the Addiction Severity Index, called the S–ASI–MV. Participants were 185 native Spanish-speaking adult clients from substance abuse treatment facilities serving Spanish-speaking clients in Florida, New Mexico, California, and Puerto Rico. Participants were administered the S–ASI–MV as well as Spanish versions of the general health subscale of the SF-36, the work and family unit subscales of the Social Adjustment Scale Self-Report, the Michigan Alcohol Screening Test, the alcohol and drug subscales of the Personality Assessment Inventory, and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-90. Three-to-five-day test-retest reliability was examined along with criterion validity, convergent/discriminant validity, and factorial validity. Measurement invariance between the English and Spanish versions of the ASI-MV was also examined. The S–ASI–MV demonstrated good test-retest reliability (ICCs for composite scores between .59 and .93), criterion validity (rs for composite scores between .66 and .87), and convergent/discriminant validity. Factorial validity and measurement invariance were demonstrated. These results compared favorably with those reported for the original interviewer version of the ASI and the English version of the ASI-MV. PMID:18718727

  16. The role of pore fluid overpressure in the substrates of advancing salt sheets, ice glaciers, and critical-state wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gang; Flemings, Peter B.; Hudec, Michael R.; Nikolinakou, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Critical-state wedges, ice glaciers, and salt sheets have many geometric and mechanical similarities. Each has a tapering geometry and moves along a basal detachment. Their motions result from the combined effects of internal deformation and basal sliding. Wedge deformation and geometry, basal conditions, and overpressure (pore fluid pressure less hydrostatic pore fluid pressure) development within the substrate interact with each other in this mechanically coupled system. However, the nature of this interaction is poorly understood. In order to investigate this coupled system, we have developed two-dimensional poromechanical finite-element models with porous fluid flow in sediments. We have simulated the advance of a salt sheet wedge across poroelastic sediments in this study. We emphasize that our results have applications beyond salt wedges to both critical-state wedges and ice glaciers. Overpressure develops within the substrate over time during the advance of the wedge. The magnitude of the overpressure influences the wedge geometry and the wedge advance rate. Lower overpressure results in a thicker and steeper wedge geometry, and a slower advance rate, while higher overpressure favors a thinner, wider, and more flattened wedge geometry and a faster advance rate. This study provides key insights into the links between wedge geometry, basal shear stress, and overpressure in substrates.

  17. Influence of intermolecular forces at critical-point wedge filling.

    PubMed

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Parry, Andrew O

    2016-04-01

    We use microscopic density functional theory to study filling transitions in systems with long-ranged wall-fluid and short-ranged fluid-fluid forces occurring in a right-angle wedge. By changing the strength of the wall-fluid interaction we can induce both wetting and filling transitions over a wide range of temperatures and study the order of these transitions. At low temperatures we find that both wetting and filling transitions are first order in keeping with predictions of simple local effective Hamiltonian models. However close to the bulk critical point the filling transition is observed to be continuous even though the wetting transition remains first order and the wetting binding potential still exhibits a small activation barrier. The critical singularities for adsorption for the continuous filling transitions depend on whether retarded or nonretarded wall-fluid forces are present and are in excellent agreement with predictions of effective Hamiltonian theory even though the change in the order of the transition was not anticipated.

  18. Transonic flow past a wedge profile with detached bow wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincenti, Walter G; Wagoner, Cleo B

    1952-01-01

    A theoretical study has been made of the aerodynamic characteristics at zero angle of attack of a thin, doubly symmetrical double-wedge profile in the range of supersonic flight speed in which the bow wave is detached. The analysis utilizes the equations of the transonic small-disturbance theory and involves no assumptions beyond those implicit in this theory. The mixed flow about the front half of the profile is calculated by relaxation solution of boundary conditions along the shock polar and sonic line. The purely subsonic flow about the rear of the profile is found by means of the method of characteristics specialized to the transonic small-disturbance theory. Complete calculations were made for four values of the transonic similarity parameter. These were found sufficient to bridge the gap between the previous results of Guderley and Yoshihara at a Mach number of 1 and the results which are readily obtained when the bow wave is attached and the flow is completely supersonic.

  19. Hydrodynamics of superfluids confined in blocked rings and wedges.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Chandan; Valls, Oriol T

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by many recent experimental studies of nonclassical rotational inertia (NCRI) in superfluid and supersolid samples, we present a study of the hydrodynamics of a superfluid confined in the two-dimensional region (equivalent to a long cylinder) between two concentric arcs of radii b and a (bwedges (b=0) with beta>pi , we find an unexpected divergence of the velocity at the origin, which implies the presence of either a region of normal fluid or a vortex for any nonzero value of the angular velocity. Implications of our results for experiments on "supersolid" behavior in solid 4He are discussed. A number of mathematical issues are pointed out and resolved. PMID:19257135

  20. Performance of an isolated two-dimensional variable-geometry wedge nozzle with translating shroud and collapsing wedge at speeds up to Mach 2.01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the aeropropulsion performance (thrust-minus-drag) of a single-engine, variable-geometry, two-dimensional (2-D) wedge nozzle with simulated translating-shroud and collapsing-wedge mechanisms. The investigation was conducted statically and at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.01 at an angle of attack of 0 deg and at varied jet total-pressure ratios up to 21, depending on the Mach number. The results indicate that the isolated aeropropulsion performance of a variable-geometry two-dimensional wedge nozzle is competitive with axisymmetric nozzles at transonic and supersonic speeds, but the isolated performance is slightly inferior for static take-off and low subsonic speeds. With the use of a simple tertiary-air ejector, the static take-off performance was increased.

  1. Low-energy photons in high-energy photon fields--Monte Carlo generated spectra and a new descriptive parameter.

    PubMed

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rühmann, Antje; Poppe, Björn

    2011-09-01

    The varying low-energy contribution to the photon spectra at points within and around radiotherapy photon fields is associated with variations in the responses of non-water equivalent dosimeters and in the water-to-material dose conversion factors for tissues such as the red bone marrow. In addition, the presence of low-energy photons in the photon spectrum enhances the RBE in general and in particular for the induction of second malignancies. The present study discusses the general rules valid for the low-energy spectral component of radiotherapeutic photon beams at points within and in the periphery of the treatment field, taking as an example the Siemens Primus linear accelerator at 6 MV and 15 MV. The photon spectra at these points and their typical variations due to the target system, attenuation, single and multiple Compton scattering, are described by the Monte Carlo method, using the code BEAMnrc/EGSnrc. A survey of the role of low energy photons in the spectra within and around radiotherapy fields is presented. In addition to the spectra, some data compression has proven useful to support the overview of the behaviour of the low-energy component. A characteristic indicator of the presence of low-energy photons is the dose fraction attributable to photons with energies not exceeding 200 keV, termed P(D)(200 keV). Its values are calculated for different depths and lateral positions within a water phantom. For a pencil beam of 6 or 15 MV primary photons in water, the radial distribution of P(D)(200 keV) is bellshaped, with a wide-ranging exponential tail of half value 6 to 7 cm. The P(D)(200 keV) value obtained on the central axis of a photon field shows an approximately proportional increase with field size. Out-of-field P(D)(200 keV) values are up to an order of magnitude higher than on the central axis for the same irradiation depth. The 2D pattern of P(D)(200 keV) for a radiotherapy field visualizes the regions, e.g. at the field margin, where changes of

  2. Geometric validation of MV topograms for patient localization on TomoTherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco Kiely, Janid P.; White, Benjamin M.; Low, Daniel A.; Qi, Sharon X.

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to geometrically validate the use of mega-voltage orthogonal scout images (MV topograms) as a fast and low-dose alternative to mega-voltage computed tomography (MVCT) for daily patient localization on the TomoTherapy system. To achieve this, anthropomorphic head and pelvis phantoms were imaged on a 16-slice kilo-voltage computed tomography (kVCT) scanner to synthesize kilo-voltage digitally reconstructed topograms (kV-DRT) in the Tomotherapy detector geometry. MV topograms were generated for couch speeds of 1-4 cm s-1 in 1 cm s-1 increments with static gantry angles in the anterior-posterior and left-lateral directions. Phantoms were rigidly translated in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and lateral (LAT) directions to simulate potential setup errors. Image quality improvement was demonstrated by estimating the noise level in the unenhanced and enhanced MV topograms using a principle component analysis-based noise level estimation algorithm. Average noise levels for the head phantom were reduced by 2.53 HU (AP) and 0.18 HU (LAT). The pelvis phantom exhibited average noise level reduction of 1.98 HU (AP) and 0.48 HU (LAT). Mattes Mutual Information rigid registration was used to register enhanced MV topograms with corresponding kV-DRT. Registration results were compared to the known rigid displacements, which assessed the MV topogram localization’s sensitivity to daily positioning errors. Reduced noise levels in the MV topograms enhanced the registration results so that registration errors were  <1 mm. The unenhanced head MV topograms had discrepancies  <2.1 mm and the pelvis topograms had discrepancies  <2.7 mm. Result were found to be consistent regardless of couch speed. In total, 64.7% of the head phantom MV topograms and 60.0% of the pelvis phantom MV topograms exactly measured the phantom offsets. These consistencies demonstrated the potential for daily patient positioning using MV topogram pairs in the

  3. The dosimetric impact of different photon beam energy on RapidArc radiotherapy planning for cervix carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Lalit; Yadav, Girigesh; Raman, Kothanda; Bhushan, Manindra; Pal, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to know the effect of three different photon energies viz., 6, 10, and 15 mega voltage (MV) on RapidArc (RA) planning for deep-seated cervix tumor and to develop clinically acceptable RA plans with suitable photon energy. RA plans were generated for 6, 10, and 15 MV photon energies for twenty patients reported with cervix carcinoma. RA plans were evaluated in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, dose to organs at risk (OARs), conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient measure, external volume index of dose distribution produced, total number of monitor units (MUs), nontumor integral dose (ID), and low dose volume of normal tissue. A two-sample paired t-test was performed to compare the dosimetric parameters of RA plans. Irrespective of photon energy used for RA planning, plans were dosimetrically similar in terms of PTV coverage, OARs sparing, CI and HI. The numbers of MUs were 13.4 ± 1.4% and 18.2 ± 1.5% higher and IDs were 2.7 ± 0.8% and 3.7 ± 0.9% higher in 6 MV plans in comparison to that in the 10 and 15 MV plans, respectively. V1Gy, V2Gy, V3Gy, and V4Gy were higher in 6 MV plans in comparison to that in 10 and 15 MV plans. Based on this study, 6 MV photon beam is a good choice for RA planning in case of cervix carcinoma, as it does not deliver additional exposure to patients caused by photoneutrons produced in high energy beams. PMID:26865756

  4. Testing the critical Coulomb wedge theory on hyper-extended rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, Michael; Manatschal, Gianreto; Kusznir, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Deformation of hyper-extended continental crust and its relationship with the underlying mantle is a key process in the evolution of rifted margins. Recent studies have focused on hyper-extension in rifted margins using different approaches such as numerical modelling, seismic interpretation, potential field methods and field observations. However many fundamental questions about the observed structures and their evolution during the formation of hyper-extended margins are still debated. In this study an observation driven approach has been used to characterise geometrical and physical attributes of the continental crust termination, considered as a hyper-extended wedge, in order to test the applicability of critical Coulomb wedge theory to hyper-extended margins. The Coulomb wedge theory was first developed on accretionary prisms and on fold and thrust belts, but it has also been applied in extensional settings. Coulomb wedge theory explains the evolution of the critical aperture angle of the wedge as a function of basal sliding without deformation in the overlying wedge. This critical angle depends on the frictional parameters of the material, the basal friction, the surface slope, the basal dip and the fluid pressure. If the evolution of hyper-extended wedges could be described by the critical Coulomb wedge theory, it would have a major impact in the understanding of the structural and physical evolution of rifted domains during the hyper-extension processes. On seismic reflection lines imaging magma-poor hyper-extended margins, the continental crust termination is often shown to form a hyper-extended wedge. ODP Sites 1067, 900 and 1068 on the Iberian margin as well as field observations in the Alps give direct access to the rocks forming the hyper-extended wedge, which are typically composed of highly deformed and hydrated continental rocks underlain by serpentinised mantle. The boundary between the hydrated continental and mantle rocks corresponds to a

  5. Measurements of dose from secondary radiation outside a treatment field: effects of wedges and blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sherazi, S.; Kase, K.R.

    1985-12-01

    Radiation dose outside the radiotherapy treatment field can be significant and therefore is of clinical interest in estimating organ doses. In a previous paper we reported the results of measurements made using unmodified radiation fields. We have extended this study to include the effects of wedge filters and blocks. For a given dose on the central axis of a radiation field, wedges can cause a factor of 2 to 4 increase in dose at any point outside the field compared with the dose when no wedge is used. Adding blocks to a treatment field can cause an increase in dose at points outside the field, but the effect is much smaller than the effect of a wedge, and generally less than a factor of 2. From the results of these measurements, doses to selected organs outside the field for specified treatment geometries were estimated, and the potential for reducing these organ doses by additional shielding was assessed.

  6. Crustal wedge deformation in an internally-driven, numerical subduction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dinther, Ylona; Morra, Gabriele; Funiciello, Francesca; Rossetti, Federico; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The Earth's active convergent margins are characterized by dynamic feedback mechanisms that interact to form an intricate system in which a crustal wedge is shaped and metamorphosed at the will of two large, converging plates. This framework is accompanied by complicated processes, such as seismogenesis and the exhumation of high pressure rocks. To honor the dynamic interaction between different entities and advance on these persisting issues, we model the interaction between the subducting and overriding lithospheres, the mantle and the crustal wedge explicitly, and observe how a crustal wedge evolves in detail within a set of rigid, internally-driven boundary conditions. We model crustal wedge evolution in an intra-oceanic subduction setting by using a plane-strain implicit solid-mechanical Finite Element Model, in which the mechanical conservation equations are solved using the software package ABAQUS. The crustal wedge is modeled as a thick-skinned accretionary wedge of inter-mediate thickness with a linear visco-elastic bulk rheology. The dynamic interaction between the subducting plate, the overriding plate, and crustal wedge is implemented using a Coulomb frictional algorithm. The interaction with the mantle is incorporated using a computationally favorable mantle drag formulation that simulates induced three-dimensional mantle flow. This results in a quasi-static framework with a freely moving slab, trench, and fault, where a weaker wedge deforms in response to self-regulating, rigid boundary conditions formed by single, frictional bounding faults. The self-regulating evolution of crustal wedge architecture follows three phases; 1) initial vertical growth, 2) coeval compression and extension leading to internal corner flow, and 3) a steady-state taper with continuous corner flow. Particle trajectories show that, as shortening continues throughout the second phase, wedge material is constantly forced upward against the backstop, while extension and ocean

  7. Study on Mach stems induced by interaction of planar shock waves on two intersecting wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Gaoxiang; Wang, Chun; Teng, Honghui; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Zonglin

    2016-06-01

    The properties of Mach stems in hypersonic corner flow induced by Mach interaction over 3D intersecting wedges were studied theoretically and numerically. A new method called "spatial dimension reduction" was used to analyze theoretically the location and Mach number behind Mach stems. By using this approach, the problem of 3D steady shock/shock interaction over 3D intersecting wedges was transformed into a 2D moving one on cross sections, which can be solved by shock-polar theory and shock dynamics theory. The properties of Mach interaction over 3D intersecting wedges can be analyzed with the new method, including pressure, temperature, density in the vicinity of triple points, location, and Mach number behind Mach stems. Theoretical results were compared with numerical results, and good agreement was obtained. Also, the influence of Mach number and wedge angle on the properties of a 3D Mach stem was studied.

  8. Plane-wave diffraction by a wedge: A spectral domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarkowski, A.; Mittra, R.

    1981-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the canonical problem of plane wave diffraction by a wedge in the context of the spectral domain approach which exploits the relationship between the induced current on a scatterer and its far field. We show how the Sommerfeld solution to the wedge diffraction problem can be manipulated in a form which enables one to interpret the far scattered field as the Fourier transform of the physical optics current on the two faces of the wedge, augmented by the fringe current near the tip of the wedge. We also show that the uniform asymptotic expansion derived by Lee and Deschamps on the basis of the Lewis, Ahluwalia and Boersma ansatz can be rigorously obtained using the approach presented in this paper.

  9. Plane-wave diffraction by a wedge - A spectral domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarkowski, A.; Boersma, J.; Mittra, R.

    1984-01-01

    The canonical problem of plane wave diffraction by a wedge in the context of the spectral domain approach which exploits the relationship between the induced current on a scatterer and its far field is investigated. It is shown how the exact solution to the wedge diffraction problem can be manipulated in a form which enables one to interpret the far scattered field as the Fourier transform of the physical optics (PO) current on the two faces of the wedge augmented by the fringe current near the tip of the wedge. A uniform asymptotic expansion for the total field which slightly modifies the Ansatz in the uniform asymptotic theory of electromagnetic edge diffraction is constructed.

  10. Salt-wedge propagation in a Mediterranean micro-tidal river mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haralambidou, Kiriaki; Sylaios, Georgios; Tsihrintzis, Vassilios A.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics of a seasonally formed salt-wedge propagating along the micro-tidal channel of Strymon River estuary, Northern Greece, and its consequences on river water quality, are thoroughly studied through intensive sampling campaigns. The wedge is developed at the downstream river part, under the summer limited freshwater discharge conditions ( Q < 30 m 3/s). The geometric features of the wedge (length and thickness) appeared directly related to Strymon River discharge. A maximum intrusion length of 4.7 km along Strymon River estuary was observed under minimum river discharge of almost 6 m 3/s. Relations produced from in situ data illustrate that limited river flow expands the wedge horizontally, reducing its vertical dimension, while higher flows lead to increased wedge thickness. Estuarine flushing time ranges between 0.2 and 1.5 days, exponentially dependent on Strymon River discharge. Wedge velocities depicted tidal asymmetry between tidal phases, with consistent inward motion, even under the ebb tidal stage. Strong vertical stratification prevails throughout the tidal cycle, proving the limited vertical mixing between the two layers, although higher interfacial stresses are produced in ebb. Bottom topography plays an interesting role in wedge propagation, as the presence of an underwater sill either prevents saline intrusion during flood or isolates the front of the wedge from its core at the ebb. Ecological consequences of salt-wedge propagation in Strymon River estuary are the frequent evidence of bottom hypoxic conditions and the increased TSS levels, leading to the occurrence of a turbidity maximum at the tip of the salt-wedge. Higher BOD and ammonium levels were mostly observed at the river end, associated to point and non-point pollution sources. Nitrates and silicates were found associated with freshwater fluxes, while ammonia levels were related to saline intrusions. The reduced phosphorus freshwater fluxes, resulting from phosphorus uptake at the

  11. Dose response of commercially available optically stimulated luminescent detector, Al2O3:C for megavoltage photons and electrons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Chung, Weon Kuu; Shin, Dong Oh; Yoon, Myonggeun; Hwang, Ui-Jung; Rah, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Sang Yeob; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the dose response of an optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter (OSLD) to megavoltage photon and electron beams. A nanoDot™ dosemeter was used to measure the dose response of the OSLD. Photons of 6-15 MV and electrons of 9-20 MeV were delivered by a Varian 21iX machine (Varian Medical System, Inc. Milpitas, CA, USA). The energy dependency was <1 %. For the 6-MV photons, the dose was linear until 200 cGy. The superficial dose measurements revealed photon irradiation to have an angular dependency. The nanoDot™ dosemeter has potential use as an in vivo dosimetric tool that is independent of the energy, has dose linearity and a rapid response compared with normal in vivo dosimetric tools, such as thermoluminescence detectors. However, the OSLD must be treated very carefully due to the high angular dependency of the photon beam.

  12. Jets and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-03-01

    This Letter applies the concept of “jets,” as constructed from calorimeter cell four-vectors, to jets composed (primarily) of photons (or leptons). Thus jets become a superset of both traditional objects such as QCD jets, photons, and electrons, and more unconventional objects such as photon jets and electron jets, defined as collinear photons and electrons, respectively. Since standard objects such as single photons become a subset of jets in this approach, standard jet substructure techniques are incorporated into the photon finder toolbox. Using a (reasonably) realistic calorimeter model we demonstrate that, for a single photon identification efficiency of 80% or above, the use of jet substructure techniques reduces the number of QCD jets faking photons by factors of 2.5 to 4. Depending on the topology of the photon jets, the substructure variables reduce the number of photon jets faking single photons by factors of 10 to 103 at a single photon identification efficiency of 80%.

  13. Stress and displacement fields in the outer wedge induced by megathrust earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukao, Yoshio; Hori, Takane; Kodaira, Shuichi

    2014-05-01

    We model plate boundary slip at the outer (oceanward) segment of the megathrust wedge as slip at the base of a two-dimensional elastic wedge, subject to gravity force, with a sloping seafloor at the top, and drag at the bottom from a rigid plate in frictional contact. The stress and displacement fields in the wedge are given analytically as functions of basal frictional coefficient μe. Unlike either conventional dislocation models (constant slip) or crack models (constant stress drop), our wedge model (constant μe drop) does not show a stress singularity at the updip toe of the plate boundary. The slip increases, but the stress drop decreases updip along the fault toward the trench axis. There is a minimum stress difference state in the wedge when μe is varied. By referring to this state (μe = μec), the stress state is separated into a horizontally tensile regime (μe < μec) and a horizontally compressional regime (μe > μec). Slip associated with a μe drop in the range μe ≤ μec occurs toward increasing horizontal tension and shear energy. Such earthquakes include tsunami earthquakes occurring in the outer segment and the 2011 great Tohoku-Oki earthquake, which involved both the outer and inner segments, with much larger slip in the outer segment. These earthquakes are characterized by an almost complete drop of basal stress, which brings the wedge into the maximum tensile state, leading to the rare occurrence of thrust aftershocks at the base of the wedge and frequent occurrence of normal fault aftershocks within the wedge.

  14. Biological and molecular variation of Iranian Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) isolates.

    PubMed

    Farzadfar, Shirin; Pourrahim, Reza

    2013-10-01

    Seventeen provinces of Iran were surveyed during 2003-2012 to find Brassicaceae hosts of Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV). A total 397 samples were collected from plants with virus-like symptoms. Among those tested by ELISA, 255 samples (67.2 %) were found to be infected with CaMV. Mechanical transmission tests showed that the Iranian isolates have similar biological properties on a number of Brassica and Raphanus plant species and cultivars tested. However, the isolates varied in the severity of symptoms they induced and in the capacity to infect B. oleracea var. capitata, on the basis of which they were grouped into two distinct biotypes L/MMo (latent/mild mottle) and severe (S) infection. The molecular diversity of natural population of CaMV were investigated based on the complete sequences of OFR 6 of 36 Iranian isolates collected from different geographically distant regions in Iran alongside the sequences of 14 previously reported isolates. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Iranian CaMV isolates belong to two groups (GI and GII). Most of the Iranian isolates fell into GI with other exotic isolates; however, the isolates from North-East Iran with Xinjiang from China fell into GII. The phylogenetic group GII (the North-East Iranian isolates) closely corresponded to the S biological group however other Iranian isolates corresponded to the L/MMo biological group. The within-population diversity was lower than the between population diversity suggesting the contribution of a founder effect on diversification of CaMV isolates. The Iranian isolates were differentiated from other exotic CaMV isolates and clustered into two RFLP groups using Hpy99I which closely corresponded to the biological and phylogenetic groups. This study showed the evolutionary process in CaMV isolates is shaped by a combination of host range differentiation and nucleotide substitution using the approach of population genetics. PMID:23828619

  15. Combined kV and MV imaging for real-time tracking of implanted fiducial markers.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, R D; Mao, Weihua; Xing, L

    2008-04-01

    In the presence of intrafraction organ motion, target localization uncertainty can greatly hamper the advantage of highly conformal dose techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). To minimize the adverse dosimetric effect caused by tumor motion, a real-time knowledge of the tumor position is required throughout the beam delivery process. The recent integration of onboard kV diagnostic imaging together with MV electronic portal imaging devices on linear accelerators can allow for real-time three-dimensional (3D) tumor position monitoring during a treatment delivery. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a near real-time 3D internal fiducial tracking system based on the combined use of kV and MV imaging. A commercially available radiotherapy system equipped with both kV and MV imaging systems was used in this work. A hardware video frame grabber was used to capture both kV and MV video streams simultaneously through independent video channels at 30 frames per second. The fiducial locations were extracted from the kV and MV images using a software tool. The geometric tracking capabilities of the system were evaluated using a pelvic phantom with embedded fiducials placed on a moveable stage. The maximum tracking speed of the kV/MV system is approximately 9 Hz, which is primarily limited by the frame rate of the MV imager. The geometric accuracy of the system is found to be on the order of less than 1 mm in all three spatial dimensions. The technique requires minimal hardware modification and is potentially useful for image-guided radiation therapy systems.

  16. Assessment of a multibeam Fizeau wedge interferometer for Doppler wind lidar.

    PubMed

    McKay, Jack A

    2002-03-20

    The Fabry-Perot interferometer is the standard instrument for the direct detection Doppler lidar measurement of atmospheric wind speeds. The multibeam Fizeau wedge has some practical advantages over the Fabry-Perot, such as the linear fringe pattern, and is evaluated for this application. The optimal Fizeau must have a resolving power of 10(6) or more. As the multibeam Fizeau wedge is pushed to such high resolving power, the interference fringes of the device become complicated by asymmetry and secondary maxima. A simple condition for the interferometer plate reflectance, optical gap, and wedge angle reveals whether a set of parameters will yield simple, Airy-like fringes or complex Fizeau fringes. Tilting of the Fizeau wedge improves the fringe shape and permits an extension of the regime of Airy-like fringes to higher resolving power. Sufficient resolving power for the wind lidar application is shown to be possible with a large-gap, low-finesse multibeam Fizeau wedge. Liabilities of the multibeam Fizeau wedge in the wind lidar application include a smaller acceptance solid angle and calibration sensitivity to localized deviations of the plates from the ideal. PMID:11921807

  17. Improve the transconductance of a graphene field-effect transistor by folding graphene into a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guiming; Liu, Weihua; Cao, Meng; Li, Xin; Zhang, Anping; Wang, Xiaoli; Chen, Bangdao

    2016-07-01

    The transport property of a graphene wedge channel is studied theoretically and its leakage current through field emission is estimated when considering the effect of the internal electric field. The transconductance of the graphene transistor is improved from 0.016 to 0.321 μS μm‑1 when the graphene is folded into a wedge (with angle of wedge π/6 and radius curvature 2.7 nm at the tip), while the wedge height is much smaller than the space between the top-gate and the channel. The improved transconductance is due to the locally enhanced electric field, which results in a potential well and causes electron accumulation at the wedge tip. The leakage current through field emission J FE shows a super-linear increase with the channel conductive current J DS, where overall the electron supply for the field emission at the wedge tip is improved by the channel bias voltage V DS.

  18. Assessment of a multibeam Fizeau wedge interferometer for Doppler wind lidar.

    PubMed

    McKay, Jack A

    2002-03-20

    The Fabry-Perot interferometer is the standard instrument for the direct detection Doppler lidar measurement of atmospheric wind speeds. The multibeam Fizeau wedge has some practical advantages over the Fabry-Perot, such as the linear fringe pattern, and is evaluated for this application. The optimal Fizeau must have a resolving power of 10(6) or more. As the multibeam Fizeau wedge is pushed to such high resolving power, the interference fringes of the device become complicated by asymmetry and secondary maxima. A simple condition for the interferometer plate reflectance, optical gap, and wedge angle reveals whether a set of parameters will yield simple, Airy-like fringes or complex Fizeau fringes. Tilting of the Fizeau wedge improves the fringe shape and permits an extension of the regime of Airy-like fringes to higher resolving power. Sufficient resolving power for the wind lidar application is shown to be possible with a large-gap, low-finesse multibeam Fizeau wedge. Liabilities of the multibeam Fizeau wedge in the wind lidar application include a smaller acceptance solid angle and calibration sensitivity to localized deviations of the plates from the ideal.

  19. Improve the transconductance of a graphene field-effect transistor by folding graphene into a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guiming; Liu, Weihua; Cao, Meng; Li, Xin; Zhang, Anping; Wang, Xiaoli; Chen, Bangdao

    2016-07-01

    The transport property of a graphene wedge channel is studied theoretically and its leakage current through field emission is estimated when considering the effect of the internal electric field. The transconductance of the graphene transistor is improved from 0.016 to 0.321 μS μm-1 when the graphene is folded into a wedge (with angle of wedge π/6 and radius curvature 2.7 nm at the tip), while the wedge height is much smaller than the space between the top-gate and the channel. The improved transconductance is due to the locally enhanced electric field, which results in a potential well and causes electron accumulation at the wedge tip. The leakage current through field emission J FE shows a super-linear increase with the channel conductive current J DS, where overall the electron supply for the field emission at the wedge tip is improved by the channel bias voltage V DS.

  20. The Effects of a Lateral Wedge Insole on Knee and Ankle Joints During Slope Walking.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yuki; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kiyama, Ryoji; Kawada, Masayuki; Tokunaga, Ken; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Ohshige, Tadasu; Yoshimoto, Yoichi; Yone, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint. PMID:26252560

  1. Field observation of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation characteristics of an estuarine salt wedge.

    PubMed

    Reeder, D Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The estuarine environment often hosts a salt wedge, the stratification of which is a function of the tide's range and speed of advance, river discharge volumetric flow rate, and river mouth morphology. Competing effects of temperature and salinity on sound speed in this stratified environment control the degree of acoustic refraction occurring along an acoustic path. A field experiment was carried out in the Columbia River Estuary to test the hypothesis: the estuarine salt wedge is acoustically observable in terms of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation. Linear frequency-modulated acoustic signals in the 500-2000 Hz band were transmitted during the advance and retreat of the salt wedge during May 27-29, 2013. Results demonstrate that the salt wedge front is the dominant physical mechanism controlling acoustic propagation in this environment: received signal energy is relatively stable before and after the passage of the salt wedge front when the acoustic path consists of a single medium (either entirely fresh water or entirely salt water), and suffers a 10-15 dB loss and increased variability during salt wedge front passage. Physical parameters and acoustic propagation modeling corroborate and inform the acoustic observations. PMID:26827001

  2. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Investigation of Acoustical Shielding by a Wedge-Shaped Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tweed, John

    2004-01-01

    Experiments on a scale model of an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended Wing Body (BWB), have demonstrated significant shielding of inlet-radiated noise. A computational model of the shielding mechanism has been developed using a combination of boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and equivalent source method (ESM). The computation models the incident sound from a point source in a nacelle and determines the scattered sound field. In this way the sound fields with and without the airfoil can be estimated for comparison to experiment. An experimental test bed using a simplified wedge-shape airfoil and a broadband point noise source in a simulated nacelle has been developed for the purposes of verifying the analytical model and also to study the effect of engine nacelle placement on shielding. The experimental study is conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The analytic and experimental results are compared at 6300 and 8000 Hz. These frequencies correspond to approximately 150 Hz on the full scale aircraft. Comparison between the experimental and analytic results is quite good, not only for the noise scattering by the airframe, but also for the total sound pressure in the far field. Many of the details of the sound field that the analytic model predicts are seen or indicated in the experiment, within the spatial resolution limitations of the experiment. Changing nacelle location produces comparable changes in noise shielding contours evaluated analytically and experimentally. Future work in the project will be enhancement of the analytic model to extend the analysis to higher frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the high bypass ratio ducted fan engines that are expected to power the BWB.

  4. Modes of continental extension in a lithospheric wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G.; Lavier, L. L.; Choi, E.

    2014-12-01

    We studied extension of a lithospheric wedge as an approximation to an orogenic belt or a continental margin. We ran a series of numerical models to quantify the effects of the strength of the lower crust and a mid-crustal shear zone (MCSZ) on the extension processes. When the MCSZ is present, we found that the regional lower crustal flow plays a critical role in controlling the modes of extension. The compensation is long-wavelength when the lower crust flows from the highest to the lowest elevation in order to compensate upper crustal thinning. In response to this motion, the mantle flows towards the highest elevation in order to balance for the lower crust leaving the area under the highest topography. For weak (wet quartz regime with partial melting) or intermediate (wet quartz regime), or strong (dry quartz regime) lower crust, we recognized three predominantly decoupled modes of extension characterized by 1) significant lower crustal exhumation exemplified as a large massif, 2) formation of core complexes and detachment faults, and 3) distributive domino faulting, respectively. Without the MCSZ, however, the lower crustal flow is essentially subdued with predominantly coupled extension. For weak or intermediate, or strong lower crust, we recognized three coupled modes characterized by 1) localized generally symmetric crustal exhumation, 2) distributed grabens and narrow rifts, and 3) wide continental margins, respectively. The MCSZ controls the degree of decoupling of the lower crustal flow such that a frictionally stronger MCSZ does not change the behaviors of the models but results in a more distributed extension. Due to the long-wavelength compensation, subhorizontal Moho is achieved where intensive extension occurred for all the decoupled models with a MCSZ. Natural counterparts for each mode may be easily identified, for instance, in the Basin and Range or the Aegean.

  5. Grounding zone wedges, Kveithola Trough (NW Barents Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebesco, Michele; Urgeles, Roger; Özmaral, Asli; Hanebuth, Till; Caburlotto, Andrea; Hörner, Tanja; Lantzsch, Hendrik; LLopart, Juame; Lucchi, Renata; Skøtt Nicolaisen, Line; Giacomo, Osti; Sabbatini, Anna; Camerlenghi, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    Swath bathymetry within Kveithola Trough (NW Barents Sea) shows a seafloor characterized by E-W trending megascale glacial lineations (MSGLs) overprinted by transverse Grounding Zone Wedges (GZWs), which give the trough a stair profile (Rebesco et al., 2011). GZWs are formed by deposition of subglacial till at temporarily stable ice-stream fronts in between successive episodic retreats (Rüther et al., 2012; Bjarnadóttir et al., 2012). Sub-bottom data show that present-day morphology is largely inherited from palaeo-seafloor topography of GZWs, which is draped by a deglacial to early Holocene glaciomarine sediments (about 15 m thick). The ice stream that produced such subglacial morphology was flowing from East to West inside Kveithola Trough during Last Glacial Maximum. Its rapid retreat was likely associated with progressive lift-offs, and successive rapid melting of the grounded ice, induced by the eustatic sea-level rise (Lucchi et al., 2013). References: Bjarnadóttir, L.R., Rüther, D.C., Winsborrow, M.C.M., Andreassen, K., 2012. Grounding-line dynamics during the last deglaciation of Kveithola, W Barents Sea, as revealed by seabed geomorphology and shallow seismic stratigraphy. Boreas, 42, 84-107. Lucchi R.G., et al. 2013. Postglacial sedimentary processes on the Storfjorden and Kveithola TMFs: impact of extreme glacimarine sedimentation. Global and Planetary Change, 111, 309-326. Rebesco, M., et al. 2011. Deglaciation of the Barents Sea Ice Sheet - a swath bathymetric and subbottom seismic study from the Kveitehola Trough. Marine Geology, 279, 141-14. Rüther, D.C., Bjarnadóttir, L.R., Junttila, J., Husum, K., Rasmussen, T.L., Lucchi, R.G., Andreassen, K., 2012. Pattern and timing of the north-western Barents Sea Ice Sheet deglaciation and indications of episodic Holocene deposition. Boreas 41, 494-512.

  6. Saline Fluids in Subduction Channels and Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, T.; Hertwig, A.; Schertl, H. P.; Maresch, W. V.; Shigeno, M.; Mori, Y.; Nishiyama, T.

    2015-12-01

    Saline fluids can transport large-ion-lithophile elements and carbonate. Subduction-zone fluids contain salts with various amounts of NaCl equivalent similar to that of the present and/or Phanerozoic seawater (about 3.5 wt% NaCl). The salinity of aqueous fluids in the mantle wedge decreases from trench side to back-arc side, although available data have been limited. Such saline fluids from mantle peridotite underneath Pinatubo, a frontal volcano of the Luzon arc, contain 5.1 wt% NaCl equivalent and CO2 [Kawamoto et al., 2013 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA] and in Ichinomegeta, a rear-arc volcano of the Northeast Japan arc, contain 3.7 wt% NaCl equivalent and CO2 [Kumagai et al., Contrib Mineral Petrol 2014]. Abundances of chlorine and H2O in olivine-hosted melt inclusions also suggest that aqueous fluids to produce frontal basalts have higher salinity than rear-arc basalts in Guatemala arc [Walker et al., Contrib Mineral Petrol 2003]. In addition to these data, quartz-free jadeitites contain fluid inclusions composed of aqueous fluids with 7 wt% NaCl equivalent and quartz-bearing jadeitite with 4.6 wt% NaCl equivalent in supra-subduction zones in Southwest Japan [Mori et al., 2015, International Eclogite Conference] and quartz-bearing jadeitite and jadeite-rich rocks contain fluid inclusions composed of aqueous fluids with 4.2 wt% NaCl equivalent in Rio San Juan Complex, Dominica Republic [Kawamoto et al., 2015, Goldschmidt Conference]. Aqueous fluids generated at pressures lower than conditions for albite=jadeite+quartz occurring at 1.5 GPa, 500 °C may contain aqueous fluids with higher salinity than at higher pressures.

  7. Investigation of Acoustical Shielding by a Wedge-Shaped Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tweed, John

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on a scale model of an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended Wing Body (BWB), have demonstrated significant shielding of inlet-radiated noise. A computational model of the shielding mechanism has been developed using a combination of boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and equivalent source method (ESM). The computation models the incident sound from a point source in a nacelle and determines the scattered sound field. In this way the sound fields with and without the airfoil can be estimated for comparison to experiment. An experimental test bed using a simplified wedge-shape airfoil and a broadband point noise source in a simulated nacelle has been developed for the purposes of verifying the analytical model and also to study the effect of engine nacelle placement on shielding. The experimental study is conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The analytic and experimental results are compared at 6300 and 8000 Hz. These frequencies correspond to approximately 150 Hz on the full scale aircraft. Comparison between the experimental and analytic results is quite good, not only for the noise scattering by the airframe, but also for the total sound pressure in the far field. Many of the details of the sound field that the analytic model predicts are seen or indicated in the experiment, within the spatial resolution limitations of the experiment. Changing nacelle location produces comparable changes in noise shielding contours evaluated analytically and experimentally. Future work in the project will be enhancement of the analytic model to extend the analysis to higher frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the high bypass ratio ducted fan engines that are expected to power the BWB.

  8. Flow Pattern relative to the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms play a key role in the coupling of the solar wind and the magnetosphere. The Substorm Current Wedge (SCW) is a key element in the present physical model of substorms. It is widely accepted that the SCW is created by earthward busty flows, but the generation mechanism is still unknown. Previous studies suggest pressure gradients and magnetic vortices are possible candidates. Due to the sparse coverage of satellites in space, these studies were strongly dependent on the assumption that the satellites were in the generation region of the field-aligned currents (FAC) forming the SCW. In this work, we take advantage of an inversion technique that determines the parameters describing the SCW and perform a statistical study on the plasma and magnetic field parameters of the flow pattern relative to the SCW. The inversion technique finds the location and the intensity of the SCW from midlatitude magnetic data. The technique has been validated using auroral observations, Equivalent Ionospheric Currents (EIC), SYM-H index from SuperMAG, and magnetic perturbations at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES satellite. A database of substorm events has been created using midlatitude positive bays, which are the ground signature of the SCW at lower latitudes. The inversion technique is applied to each event in the database to determine the location of the origin of the SCW. The inversion results are also used to find conjunction events with space observations from VAP (RBSP), THEMIS and GOES. The plasma and magnetic field parameters such as the pressure gradient and magnetic vorticity are then categorized as a function of their location relative to the origin of the SCW. How the distribution/pattern of the pressure gradient and vorticity are related to the properties of the SCW (locations and intensity of the FAC), and flows (entropy, velocity and density) will be determined.

  9. Flow bursts, breakup arc, and substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Energy liberated by the reconnection process in the near-Earth tail is transported via flow bursts toward the dipolar magnetosphere during substorms. The breakup arc is a manifestation of the arrival of the bursts under flow braking and energy deposition. Its structure and behavior is analyzed on the basis of five striking spatial, temporal, and energetic properties, qualitatively and in part also quantitatively. A key element is the formation of stop layers. They are thin layers, of the width of an ion gyro radius, in which the magnetic field makes a transition from tail to near-dipolar magnetosphere configurations and in which the kinetic energy of fast flows is converted into electromagnetic energy of kinetic Alfvén waves. The flows arise from the relaxation of the strong magnetic shear stresses in the leading part of the flow bursts. The bright narrow arcs of less than 10 km width inside the broad poleward expanding breakup arc, Alfvénic in nature and visually characterized by erratic short-lived rays, are seen as traces of the stop layers. The gaps between two narrow and highly structured arcs are filled with more diffuse emissions. They are attributed to the relaxation of the less strained magnetic field of the flow bursts. Eastward flows along the arcs are linked to the shrinking gaps between two successive arcs and the entry of auroral streamers into the dipolar magnetosphere in the midnight sector. Flow braking in the stop layers forms multiple pairs of narrow balanced currents and cannot be behind the formation of the substorm current wedge. Instead, its origin is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the high-beta plasma, after the high magnetic shears have relaxed and the fast flows and stop layer process have subsided, in other words, to the "dying flow bursts."

  10. Discrete dislocation plasticity analysis of the wedge indentation of films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, D. S.; Deshpande, V. S.; Needleman, A.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2006-11-01

    The plane strain indentation of single crystal films on a rigid substrate by a rigid wedge indenter is analyzed using discrete dislocation plasticity. The crystals have three slip systems at ±35.3∘ and 90∘ with respect to the indentation direction. The analyses are carried out for three values of the film thickness, 2, 10 and 50 μm, and with the dislocations all of edge character modeled as line singularities in a linear elastic material. The lattice resistance to dislocation motion, dislocation nucleation, dislocation interaction with obstacles and dislocation annihilation are incorporated through a set of constitutive rules. Over the range of indentation depths considered, the indentation pressure for the 10 and 50 μm thick films decreases with increasing contact size and attains a contact size-independent value for contact lengths A>4 μm. On the other hand, for the 2 μm films, the indentation pressure first decreases with increasing contact size and subsequently increases as the plastic zone reaches the rigid substrate. For the 10 and 50 μm thick films sink-in occurs around the indenter, while pile-up occurs in the 2 μm film when the plastic zone reaches the substrate. Comparisons are made with predictions obtained from other formulations: (i) the contact size-independent indentation pressure is compared with that given by continuum crystal plasticity; (ii) the scaling of the indentation pressure with indentation depth is compared with the relation proposed by Nix and Gao [1998. Indentation size effects in crystalline materials: a law for strain gradient plasticity. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 43, 411-423]; and (iii) the computed contact area is compared with that obtained from the estimation procedure of Oliver and Pharr [1992. An improved technique for determining hardness and elastic-modulus using load and displacement sensing indentation experiments, J. Mater. Res. 7, 1564-1583].

  11. Nonlinearity in MCF7 Cell Survival Following Exposure to Modulated 6 MV Radiation Fields: Focus on the Dose Gradient Zone.

    PubMed

    Lacoste-Collin, Laetitia; Castiella, Marion; Franceries, Xavier; Cassol, Emmanuelle; Vieillevigne, Laure; Pereda, Veronica; Bardies, Manuel; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The study of cell survival following exposure to nonuniform radiation fields is taking on particular interest because of the increasing evidence of a nonlinear relationship at low doses. We conducted in vitro experiments using the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. A 2.4 × 2.4 cm(2) square area of a T25 flask was irradiated by a Varian Novalis accelerator delivering 6 MV photons. Cell survival inside the irradiation field, in the dose gradient zone and in the peripheral zone, was determined using a clonogenic assay for different radiation doses at the isocenter. Increased cell survival was observed inside the irradiation area for doses of 2, 10, and 20 Gy when nonirradiated cells were present at the periphery, while the cells at the periphery showed decreased survival compared to controls. Increased survival was also observed at the edge of the dose gradient zone for cells receiving 0.02 to 0.01 Gy when compared with cells at the periphery of the same flask, whatever the isocenter dose. These data are the first to report cell survival in the dose gradient zone. Radiotherapists must be aware of this nonlinearity in dose response. PMID:26740805

  12. SU-E-J-09: Image Quality Comparison and Dose Quantification for 2.5 MV

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, M; DiCostanzo, D; Ayan, A; Woollard, J; Gupta, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the image quality of the 2.5MV imaging beam (2.5X-IMB) to that of a 6MV beam and to quantify the imaging dose of a 2.5X-IMB for constancy as specified by AAPM TG-142 Methods: The image quality of the 2.5X-IMB was compared to the 6MV imaging beam using the SNC ImagePro MV-QA phantom and the Varian supplied Las Vegas phantom (LVP). High resolution (1280×1280×16, 2 frames at 1.5MU/frame) and low resolution (640×640×16, 2 frames at 0.75MU/frame) images were compared for each phantom. MV-QA phantom images were evaluated quantitatively, and the LVP images were evaluated qualitatively. The imaging dose for 2.5X-IMB was quantified using the procedure outlined in TG51. PTWCC13-31013 chambers were used to measure a percent depth dose (PDD) curve for the 2.5X-IMB. All the factors described in TG51 were calculated using the 2.5X-IMB and a PTW30013 farmer chamber. Results: A comparison between 2.5X-IMB and 6MV image quality was performed both visually and with DoseLab software. The optimal window and level were set for each image of the LVP by the user. Visual inspection showed greater contrast resolution with the 2.5MV beam, but no significant difference with the change in imaging resolution. DoseLab reported similar spatial resolutions between the two energies, but the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was greater for 2.5MV. The PDDx(10cm) for a 10x10cm2 field was measured to be 51.5%. Although this PDD value is off the scale of Figure 4 in TG51, the trend of the curve corresponding to the PTW31003 (equivalent) chamber led to an approximate kQ value of 1.00. Conclusion: When compared to 6MV imaging, 2.5X-IMB results in a better CNR. At low resolution, the DoseLab results for the two energies are comparable, but visual analysis favors the 2.5X-IMB images. Imaging dose was quantified for the 2.5X-IMB after following the TG51 methodology with appropriate approximations.

  13. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  14. Systematic offset of kV and MV localization systems as a function of gantry angle.

    PubMed

    Mullins, John P; Herman, Michael G

    2010-11-09

    Mechanical flex of the gantry and mounted imaging panels leads to systematic offsets in localization image isocenter as a function of gantry angle for linear accelerator-mounted image guidance systems. Subsequently, object positions obtained from localization radiographs may be offset, resulting in greater target positioning uncertainty. While current QA procedures measure kV/MV image agreement, these measurements do not provide insight to apparent isocenter position for either single imaging system as a function of gantry rotation. This study measures offset as a function of gantry angle in kV and MV imaging systems on four treatment machines to investigate the magnitude of systematic offsets and their reproducibility between systems and machines, as well as over time. It is shown that each machine and energy has a reproducible pattern of offset as a function of gantry angle that is independent of kV/MV agreement, and it varies by machine. kV and MV offset ranges are on the order of 1.5 mm in the R/L and A/P directions, and 0.5 mm in the S/I direction. Variability of kV-MV agreement is on the order of 0.7 mm. At certain angles, combinations of localization images could show a compounded offset of over 2 mm, exceeding the desired certainty threshold. Since these trends are persistent over time for each machine, online correction for image offsets as a function of gantry angle could improve the margin of positioning uncertainty.

  15. Three-Dimensional Vertebral Wedging in Mild and Moderate Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Sophie-Anne; Begon, Mickaël; Leardini, Alberto; Coillard, Christine; Rivard, Charles-Hilaire; Allard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background Vertebral wedging is associated with spinal deformity progression in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Reporting frontal and sagittal wedging separately could be misleading since these are projected values of a single three-dimensional deformation of the vertebral body. The objectives of this study were to determine if three-dimensional vertebral body wedging is present in mild scoliosis and if there are a preferential vertebral level, position and plane of deformation with increasing scoliotic severity. Methodology Twenty-seven adolescent idiopathic scoliotic girls with mild to moderate Cobb angles (10° to 50°) participated in this study. All subjects had at least one set of bi-planar radiographs taken with the EOS® X-ray imaging system prior to any treatment. Subjects were divided into two groups, separating the mild (under 20°) from the moderate (20° and over) spinal scoliotic deformities. Wedging was calculated in three different geometric planes with respect to the smallest edge of the vertebral body. Results Factorial analyses of variance revealed a main effect for the scoliosis severity but no main effect of vertebral Levels (apex and each of the three vertebrae above and below it) (F = 1.78, p = 0.101). Main effects of vertebral Positions (apex and above or below it) (F = 4.20, p = 0.015) and wedging Planes (F = 34.36, p<0.001) were also noted. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated a greater wedging in the inferior group of vertebrae (3.6°) than the superior group (2.9°, p = 0.019) and a significantly greater wedging (p≤0.03) along the sagittal plane (4.3°). Conclusions Vertebral wedging was present in mild scoliosis and increased as the scoliosis progressed. The greater wedging of the inferior group of vertebrae could be important in estimating the most distal vertebral segment to be restrained by bracing or to be fused in surgery. Largest vertebral body wedging values obtained in the sagittal plane support the claim

  16. The energy dependence and dose response of a commercial optically stimulated luminescent detector for kilovoltage photon, megavoltage photon, and electron, proton, and carbon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reft, Chester S.

    2009-05-15

    Optically stimulated luminescent detectors, which are widely used in radiation protection, offer a number of potential advantages for application in radiation therapy dosimetry. Their introduction into this field has been somewhat hampered by the lack of information on their radiation response in megavoltage beams. Here the response of a commercially available optically stimulated luminescent detector (OSLD) is determined as a function of energy, absorbed dose to water, and linear energy transfer (LET). The detector response was measured as a function of energy for absorbed doses from 0.5 to 4.0 Gy over the following ranges: 125 kVp to18 MV for photons, 6-20 MeV for electrons, 50-250 MeV for protons, and 290 MeV/u for the carbon ions. For the low LET beams, the response of the detector was linear up to 2 Gy with supralinearity occurring at higher absorbed doses. For the kilovoltage photons, the detector response relative to 6 MV increased with decreasing energy due to the higher atomic number of aluminum oxide (11.2) relative to water (7.4). For the megavoltage photons and electrons, the response was independent of energy. The response for protons was also independent of energy, but it was about 6% higher than its response to 6 MV photons. For the carbon ions, the dose response was linear for a given LET from 0.5 to 4.0 Gy, and no supralinearity was observed. However, it did exhibit LET dependence on the response relative to 6 MV photons decreasing from 1.02 at 1.3 keV/{mu}m to 0.41 at 78 keV/{mu}m. These results provide additional information on the dosimetric properties for this particular OSL detector and also demonstrate the potential for their use in photon, electron, and proton radiotherapy dosimetry with a more limited use in high LET radiotherapy dosimetry.

  17. Oncologic Safety of Laparoscopic Wedge Resection with Gastrotomy for Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Comparison with Conventional Laparoscopic Wedge Resection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sejin; Kim, You Na; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Various laparoscopic wedge resection (LWR) techniques requiring gastrotomy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) of the stomach have been applied to facilitate tumor resection and preserve the remnant gastric volume. However, there is the possibility of cancer cell dissemination during these procedures. The aim of this study was to assess the oncologic safety of LWR with gastrotomy (LWR-G) compared to LWR without luminal exposure. Materials and Methods Clinicopathologic and operative results of 193 patients who underwent LWR for gastric GIST were retrospectively analyzed from 2003 to 2013. We stratified the patients into two groups: LWR-G and LWR without gastrotomy (LWR-C). Clinicopathologic features, short-term outcomes, and long-term outcomes were compared. Results A total of 26 patients underwent LWR-G, and 167 patients underwent LWR-C. The LWR-G group showed significantly more anterior wall-located (n=10, 38.5%), intraluminal (n=20, 76.9%), and ulcerative (n=13, 50.0%) tumors than the LWR-C group (n=33, 19.8%; n=96, 57.5%; n=46, 27.5%, respectively). Postoperative short-term outcomes did not differ between the two groups. When tumor staging was compared, no statistical difference was noted. There was no recurrence in the LWR-G group, while 2 patients in the LWR-C group experienced recurrence. The two recurrences in the LWR-C group were found in the liver and in the remnant stomach at 63 and 12 months after the operation, respectively. No gastric GIST-related death was recorded in any group during the study period. Conclusions LWR-G for gastric GIST is an oncologically safe procedure even for masses with ulcerations. PMID:26819802

  18. Influence of photon energy on the quality of prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy plans based on analysis of physical indices.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, Sundaram; Jayakumar, S; Govindarajan, K N; Supe, Sanjay S; Nagarajan, V; Nagarajan, M

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to study the effects of low- and high-energy intensity-modulated photon beams on the planning of target volume and the critical organs in cases of localized prostate tumors in a cohort of 8 patients. To ensure that the difference between the plans is due to energy alone, all other parameters were kept constant. A mean dose volume histogram (DVH) for each value of energy and for each contoured structure was created and was considered as completely representative for all patients. To facilitate comparison between 6-MV and 15-MV beams, the DVH-s were normalized. The different parameters that were compared for 6-MV and 15-MV beams included mean DVH, different homogeneity indices, conformity index, etc. Analysis of several indices depicts more homogeneous dose for 15-MV beam and more conformity for 6-MV beam. Comparison of all these parameters showed that there was little difference between the 6-MV and 15-MV beams. For rectum, 2 to 4 % more volume received high dose with the 6-MV beam in comparison with the 15-MV beam, which was not clinically significant, since in practice much tighter constraints are maintained, such that Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) is kept within 5 %. Such tighter constraints might increase the dose to other regions and other critical organs but are unlikely to increase their complication probabilities. Hence the slight advantages of 15-MV beam in providing benefits of better normal-tissue sparing and better coverage cannot be considered to outweigh its well-known risk of non-negligible neutron production.

  19. Process Based Explanations for Correlations Between the Structural and Seismic Segmentation of the Cascadia Subduction Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, C. W.; Brandon, M. T.; Willett, S. D.

    2006-12-01

    Variations in the geological and geophysical characteristics of the Cascadia subduction wedge, the region between the trench and arc, result in along-strike wedge segmentation. We focus on explaining the large-scale structural segmentation and how processes causing this segmentation influence segmentation with respect to the seismic behavior of the wedge and subduction thrust. The relationships we develop illustrate the fundamental interplay of processes controlling long-term structure and short-term seismic behavior. Our conclusions are based on the results of numerical models designed to simulate the growth and evolution of the Cascadia subduction wedge through the accretion of a thin layer of sediment to the basaltic Coast Range Terrane (CRT) of the Cascadia margin. Two aspects of wedge structural segmentation are of interest: (1) segmentation with respect to the location or absence of large, continental shelf, forearc basins, and (2) segmentation with respect to the Coastal Range (CR) structural high. Our models illustrate that the form of the submarine portion of the Cascadia wedge, including the basins or lack thereof, is a consequence of the frictional behavior of this region of wedge, subduction thrust strength, wedge strength, and dip thrust. We propose that basin segments have stronger wedge material, a weaker thrust, or a steeper thrust than basin free segments. The presence of basins is significant because they stabilize the margin and prevent subduction and accretion related deformation. This stabilization allows the thrust to preferentially support thermally induced, fluid overpressures and undergo fault healing thus increasing the likelihood of large coseismic slip within basin segments. While no historical earthquake data supporting this argument exists for Cascadia, such behavior has been observed in many margins (Song and Simons, 2003; Wells et al., 2003). It is reasonable to assume that large earthquakes in Cascadia will have the same association

  20. Assessment of image quality and dose calculation accuracy on kV CBCT, MV CBCT, and MV CT images for urgent palliative radiotherapy treatments.

    PubMed

    Held, Mareike; Cremers, Florian; Sneed, Penny K; Braunstein, Steve; Fogh, Shannon E; Nakamura, Jean; Barani, Igor; Perez-Andujar, Angelica; Pouliot, Jean; Morin, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A clinical workflow was developed for urgent palliative radiotherapy treatments that integrates patient simulation, planning, quality assurance, and treatment in one 30-minute session. This has been successfully tested and implemented clinically on a linac with MV CBCT capabilities. To make this approach available to all clin-ics equipped with common imaging systems, dose calculation accuracy based on treatment sites was assessed for other imaging units. We evaluated the feasibility of palliative treatment planning using on-board imaging with respect to image quality and technical challenges. The purpose was to test multiple systems using their commercial setup, disregarding any additional in-house development. kV CT, kV CBCT, MV CBCT, and MV CT images of water and anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired on five different imaging units (Philips MX8000 CT Scanner, and Varian TrueBeam, Elekta VersaHD, Siemens Artiste, and Accuray Tomotherapy linacs). Image quality (noise, contrast, uniformity, spatial resolution) was evaluated and compared across all machines. Using individual image value to density calibrations, dose calculation accuracies for simple treatment plans were assessed for the same phantom images. Finally, image artifacts on clinical patient images were evaluated and compared among the machines. Image contrast to visualize bony anatomy was sufficient on all machines. Despite a high noise level and low contrast, MV CT images provided the most accurate treatment plans relative to kV CT-based planning. Spatial resolution was poorest for MV CBCT, but did not limit the visualization of small anatomical structures. A comparison of treatment plans showed that monitor units calculated based on a prescription point were within 5% difference relative to kV CT-based plans for all machines and all studied treatment sites (brain, neck, and pelvis). Local dose differences > 5% were found near the phantom edges. The gamma index for 3%/3 mm criteria was ≥ 95% in most

  1. Metabolome of Vanilla planifolia (Orchidaceae) and related species under Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) infection.

    PubMed

    Palama, Tony Lionel; Grisoni, Michel; Fock-Bastide, Isabelle; Jade, Katia; Bartet, Laetitia; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2012-11-01

    The genus Vanilla which belongs to the Orchidaceae family comprises more than 110 species of which two are commercially cultivated (Vanilla planifolia and Vanilla xtahitensis). The cured pods of these species are the source of natural vanilla flavor. In intensive cultivation systems the vines are threatened by viruses such as Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV). In order to investigate the effect of CymMV on the growth and metabolome of vanilla plants, four accessions grown in intensive cultivation systems under shadehouse, CR01 (V. planifolia), CR17 (V. xtahitensis), CR03 (V. planifolia × V. xtahitensis) and CR18 (Vanilla pompona), were challenged with an isolate of CymMV. CymMV infected plants of CR01, CR03 and CR17 had a reduced growth compared to healthy plants, while there was no significant difference in the growth of CR18 vines. Interestingly, CR18 had qualitatively more phenolic compounds in leaves and a virus titre that diminished over time. No differences in the metabolomic profiles of the shadehouse samples obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were observed between the virus infected vs. healthy plants. However, using in- vitro V. planifolia plants, the metabolomic profiles were affected by virus infection. Under these controlled conditions the levels of amino acids and sugars present in the leaves were increased in CymMV infected plants, compared to uninfected ones, whereas the levels of phenolic compounds and malic acid were decreased. The metabolism, growth and viral status of V. pompona accession CR18 contrasted from that of the other species suggesting the existence of partial resistance to CymMV in the vanilla germplasm.

  2. A cell line (NTU-MV) established from Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): Characterization, viral susceptibility, and polyhedra production.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Shih-Chia; Lee, Song-Tay; Wu, Chih-Yu; Wang, Chung-Hsiung

    2007-10-01

    Here we describe the establishment of a new cell line, NTU-MV, derived from pupal tissues of an economically important pest, the legume pod borer Maruca vitrata. This cell line contained four major cell types: polymorphic cells, round cells, spindle-shaped cells, and comma cells. The doubling time of MV cells in TNM-FH medium supplemented with 8% FBS at 28 degrees C was 27h. The chromosome numbers of MV cells varied widely from 16 to 268. Compared to other insect cell lines, the MV cell line produced distinct isozyme patterns with esterase, malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Confirmation that NTU-MV was derived from M. vitrata was demonstrated by showing that the sequence of the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of the MV cells was 98% identical to that of M. vitrata larvae. Two NTU-MV cell strains, NTU-MV1 and NTU-MV56, were selected based on susceptibility to MaviMNPV (M. vitrata multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus). NTU-MV, MV1, and MV56 cells showed a high susceptibility to MaviMNPV and produced high yields of polyhedra (47-50OBs/cell, 4x10(7)-5.96x10(7)OBs/ml) after 2 weeks of MaviMNPV infection. We conclude that the NTU-MV cell line will be a useful tool for studying MaviMNPV as well as for the mass production of MaviMNPV polyhedra for the biocontrol of M. vitrata.

  3. Effect of Laterally Wedged Insoles on the External Knee Adduction Moment across Different Reference Frames

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Kitamura, Masako; Ushikubo, Tomohiro; Murata, Atsushi; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Sasho, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Biomechanical effects of laterally wedged insoles are assessed by reduction in the knee adduction moment. However, the degree of reduction may vary depending on the reference frame with which it is calculated. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of reference frame on the reduction in the knee adduction moment by laterally wedged insoles. Methods Twenty-nine healthy participants performed gait trials with a laterally wedged insole and with a flat insole as a control. The knee adduction moment, including the first and second peaks and the angular impulse, were calculated using four different reference frames: the femoral frame, tibial frame, laboratory frame and the Joint Coordinate System. Results There were significant effects of reference frame on the knee adduction moment first and second peaks (P < 0.001 for both variables), while the effect was not significant for the angular impulse (P = 0.84). No significant interaction between the gait condition and reference frame was found in either of the knee adduction moment variables (P = 0.99 for all variables), indicating that the effects of laterally wedged insole on the knee adduction moments were similar across the four reference frames. On the other hand, the average percent changes ranged from 9% to 16% for the first peak, from 16% to 18% for the second peak and from 17% to 21% for the angular impulse when using the different reference frames. Conclusion The effects of laterally wedged insole on the reduction in the knee adduction moment were similar across the reference frames. On the other hand, Researchers need to recognize that when the percent change was used as the parameter of the efficacy of laterally wedged insole, the choice of reference frame may influence the interpretation of how laterally wedged insoles affect the knee adduction moment. PMID:26397375

  4. Climate adaptation wedges: a case study of premium wine in the western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Diffenbaugh, Noah; White, Michael A; Jones, Gregory V; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2011-01-01

    Design and implementation of effective climate change adaptation activities requires quantitative assessment of the impacts that are likely to occur without adaptation, as well as the fraction of impact that can be avoided through each activity. Here we present a quantitative framework inspired by the greenhouse gas stabilization wedges of Pacala and Socolow. In our proposed framework, the damage avoided by each adaptation activity creates an 'adaptation wedge' relative to the loss that would occur without that adaptation activity. We use premium winegrape suitability in the western United States as an illustrative case study, focusing on the near-term period that covers the years 2000 39. We find that the projected warming over this period results in the loss of suitable winegrape area throughout much of California, including most counties in the high-value North Coast and Central Coast regions. However, in quantifying adaptation wedges for individual high-value counties, we find that a large adaptation wedge can be captured by increasing the severe heat tolerance, including elimination of the 50% loss projected by the end of the 2030 9 period in the North Coast region, and reduction of the projected loss in the Central Coast region from 30% to less than 15%. Increased severe heat tolerance can capture an even larger adaptation wedge in the Pacific Northwest, including conversion of a projected loss of more than 30% in the Columbia Valley region of Washington to a projected gain of more than 150%. We also find that warming projected over the near-term decades has the potential to alter the quality of winegrapes produced in the western US, and we discuss potential actions that could create adaptation wedges given these potential changes in quality. While the present effort represents an initial exploration of one aspect of one industry, the climate adaptation wedge framework could be used to quantitatively evaluate the opportunities and limits of climate adaptation

  5. Rainfall induced groundwater mound in wedge-shaped promontories: The Strack-Chernyshov model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacimov, A. R.; Kayumov, I. R.; Al-Maktoumi, A.

    2016-11-01

    An analytical solution to the Poisson equation governing Strack's discharge potential (squared thickness of a saturated zone in an unconfined aquifer) is obtained in a wedge-shaped domain with given head boundary conditions on the wedge sides (specified water level in an open water body around a porous promontory). The discharge vector components, maximum elevation of the water table in promontory vertical cross-sections, quantity of groundwater seeping through segments of the wedge sides, the volume of fresh groundwater in the mound are found. For acute angles, the solution to the problem is non-unique and specification of the behaviour at infinity is needed. A "basic" solution is distinguished, which minimizes the water table height above a horizontal bedrock. MODFLOW simulations are carried out in a finite triangular island and compare solutions with a constant-head, no-flow and "basic" boundary condition on one side of the triangle. Far from the tip of an infinite-size promontory one has to be cautious with truncation of the simulated flow domains and imposing corresponding boundary conditions. For a right and obtuse wedge angles, there are no positive solutions for the case of constant accretion on the water table. In a particular case of a confined rigid wedge-shaped aquifer and incompressible fluid, from an explicit solution to the Laplace equation for the hydraulic head with arbitrary time-space varying boundary conditions along the promontory rays, essentially 2-D transient Darcian flows within the wedge are computed. They illustrate that surface water waves on the promontory boundaries can generate strong Darcian waves inside the porous wedge. Evaporation from the water table and sea-water intruded interface (rather than a horizontal bed) are straightforward generalizations for the Poissonian Strack potential.

  6. Measured Hydrologic Storage Characteristics of Three Major Ice Wedge Polygon Types, Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, A. J.; Liljedahl, A.; Wilson, C. J.; Cable, W.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    Model simulations have suggested that the hydrologic fluxes and stores of Arctic wetlands are constrained by the micro-topographical features of ice wedge polygons, which are abundant in lowland tundra landscapes. Recently observed changes in ice wedge polygon landscapes - in particular, ice wedge degradation and trough formation - emphasize the need to better understand how differing ice wedge polygon morphologies affect the larger hydrologic system. Here we present three seasons of measured end-of-winter snow accumulation, continuous soil moisture and water table elevations, and repeated frost table mapping. Together, these describe the hydrologic characteristics of three main ice wedge polygon types: low centered polygons with limited trough development (representative of a ~500 year old vegetated drained thaw lake basin), and low- and high-centered polygons with well-defined troughs. Dramatic spatiotemporal variability exists both between polygon types and between the features of an individual polygon (e.g. troughs, centers, rims). Landscape-scale end-of-winter snow water equivalent is similar between polygon types, while the sub-polygon scale distribution of the surface water differs, both as snow and as ponded water. Some sub-polygon features appear buffered against large variations in water levels, while others display periods of prolonged recessions and large responses to rain events. Frost table elevations in general mimic the ground surface topography, but with spatiotemporal variability in thaw rate. The studied thaw seasons represented above long-term average rainfall, and in 2014, record high June precipitation. Differing ice wedge polygon types express dramatically different local hydrology, despite nearly identical climate forcing and landscape-scale snow accumulation, making ice wedge polygons an important component when describing the Arctic water, nutrient and energy system.

  7. SIRIUS - A new 6 MV accelerator system for IBA and AMS at ANSTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuovic, Zeljko; Button, David; Cohen, David; Fink, David; Garton, David; Hotchkis, Michael; Ionescu, Mihail; Long, Shane; Levchenko, Vladimir; Mann, Michael; Siegele, Rainer; Smith, Andrew; Wilcken, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science (CAS) facility at ANSTO has been expanded with a new 6 MV tandem accelerator system supplied by the National Electrostatic Corporation (NEC). The beamlines, end-stations and data acquisition software for the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) were custom built by NEC for rare isotope mass spectrometry, while the beamlines with end-stations for the ion beam analysis (IBA) are largely custom designed at ANSTO. An overview of the 6 MV system and its performance during testing and commissioning phase is given with emphasis on the IBA end-stations and their applications for materials modification and characterisation.

  8. Distribution of lithium in the Cordilleran Mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Jean, M. M.; Seitz, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Enriched fluid-mobile element (i.e., B, Li, Be) concentrations in peridotites from the Coast Range ophiolite are compelling evidence that this ophiolite originated in a subduction environment. A new method presented in Shervais and Jean (2012) for modeling the fluid enrichment process, represents the total addition of material to the mantle wedge source region and can be applied to any refractory mantle peridotite that has been modified by melt extraction and/or metasomatism. Although the end-result is attributed to an added flux of aqueous fluid or fluid-rich melt phase derived from the subducting slab, in the range of tens of parts per million - the nature and composition of this fluid could not be constrained. To address fluid(s) origins, we have analyzed Li isotopes in bulk rock peridotite and eclogite, and garnet separates, to identify possible sources, and fluid flow mechanisms and pathways. Bulk rock Li abundances of CRO peridotites (δ7Li = -14.3 to 5.5‰; 1.9-7.5 ppm) are indicative of Li addition and δ7Li-values are lighter than normal upper mantle values. However, Li abundances of clino- and orthopyroxene appear to record different processes operating during the CRO-mantle evolution. Low Li abundances in orthopyroxene (<1 ppm) suggest depletion via partial melting, whereas high concentrations in clinopyroxenes (>2 ppm) record subsequent interaction with Li-enriched fluids (or melts). The preferential partitioning of lithium in clinopyroxene could be indicative of a particular metasomatic agent, e.g., fluids from a dehydrating slab. Future in-situ peridotite isotope studies via laser ablation will further elucidate the fractionation of lithium between orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and serpentine. To obtain a more complete picture of the slab to arc transfer processes, we also measured eclogites and garnet separates to δ7Li= -18 to 3.5‰ (11.5-32.5 ppm) and δ7Li= 1.9 to 11.7‰ (0.7-3.9 ppm), respectively. In connection with previous studies focused

  9. Laser-based linear and nonlinear guided elastic waves at surfaces (2D) and wedges (1D).

    PubMed

    Hess, Peter; Lomonosov, Alexey M; Mayer, Andreas P

    2014-01-01

    The characteristic features and applications of linear and nonlinear guided elastic waves propagating along surfaces (2D) and wedges (1D) are discussed. Laser-based excitation, detection, or contact-free analysis of these guided waves with pump-probe methods are reviewed. Determination of material parameters by broadband surface acoustic waves (SAWs) and other applications in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) are considered. The realization of nonlinear SAWs in the form of solitary waves and as shock waves, used for the determination of the fracture strength, is described. The unique properties of dispersion-free wedge waves (WWs) propagating along homogeneous wedges and of dispersive wedge waves observed in the presence of wedge modifications such as tip truncation or coatings are outlined. Theoretical and experimental results on nonlinear wedge waves in isotropic and anisotropic solids are presented.

  10. Response of TLD-100 in mixed fields of photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, Michael J.; Junell, Stephanie; Hammer, Cliff; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are routinely used for dosimetric measurements of high energy photon and electron fields. However, TLD response in combined fields of photon and electron beam qualities has not been characterized. This work investigates the response of TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) to sequential irradiation by high-energy photon and electron beam qualities. Methods: TLDs were irradiated to a known dose by a linear accelerator with a 6 MV photon beam, a 6 MeV electron beam, and a NIST-traceable {sup 60}Co beam. TLDs were also irradiated in a mixed field of the 6 MeV electron beam and the 6 MV photon beam. The average TLD response per unit dose of the TLDs for each linac beam quality was normalized to the average response per unit dose of the TLDs irradiated by the {sup 60}Co beam. Irradiations were performed in water and in a Virtual Water Trade-Mark-Sign phantom. The 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV electron beam were used to create dose calibration curves relating TLD response to absorbed dose to water, which were applied to the TLDs irradiated in the mixed field. Results: TLD relative response per unit dose in the mixed field was less sensitive than the relative response in the photon field and more sensitive than the relative response in the electron field. Application of the photon dose calibration curve to the TLDs irradiated in a mixed field resulted in an underestimation of the delivered dose, while application of the electron dose calibration curve resulted in an overestimation of the dose. Conclusions: The relative response of TLD-100 in mixed fields fell between the relative response in the photon-only and electron-only fields. TLD-100 dosimetry of mixed fields must account for this intermediate response to minimize the estimation errors associated with calibration factors obtained from a single beam quality.

  11. RR photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cámara, Pablo G.; Ibáñez, Luis E.; Marchesano, Fernando

    2011-09-01

    Type II string compactifications to 4d generically contain massless Ramond-Ramond U(1) gauge symmetries. However there is no massless matter charged under these U(1)'s, which makes a priori difficult to measure any physical consequences of their existence. There is however a window of opportunity if these RR U(1)'s mix with the hypercharge U(1) Y (hence with the photon). In this paper we study in detail different avenues by which U(1) RR bosons may mix with D-brane U(1)'s. We concentrate on Type IIA orientifolds and their M-theory lift, and provide geometric criteria for the existence of such mixing, which may occur either via standard kinetic mixing or via the mass terms induced by Stückelberg couplings. The latter case is particularly interesting, and appears whenever D-branes wrap torsional p-cycles in the compactification manifold. We also show that in the presence of torsional cycles discrete gauge symmetries and Aharanov-Bohm strings and particles appear in the 4d effective action, and that type IIA Stückelberg couplings can be understood in terms of torsional (co)homology in M-theory. We provide examples of Type IIA Calabi-Yau orientifolds in which the required torsional cycles exist and kinetic mixing induced by mass mixing is present. We discuss some phenomenological consequences of our findings. In particular, we find that mass mixing may induce corrections relevant for hypercharge gauge coupling unification in F-theory SU(5) GUT's.

  12. Energy Modulated Photon Radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuanming; Ming, Xin

    2016-01-01

    A novel treatment modality termed energy modulated photon radiotherapy (EMXRT) was investigated. The first step of EMXRT was to determine beam energy for each gantry angle/anatomy configuration from a pool of photon energy beams (2 to 10 MV) with a newly developed energy selector. An inverse planning system using gradient search algorithm was then employed to optimize photon beam intensity of various beam energies based on presimulated Monte Carlo pencil beam dose distributions in patient anatomy. Finally, 3D dose distributions in six patients of different tumor sites were simulated with Monte Carlo method and compared between EMXRT plans and clinical IMRT plans. Compared to current IMRT technique, the proposed EMXRT method could offer a better paradigm for the radiotherapy of lung cancers and pediatric brain tumors in terms of normal tissue sparing and integral dose. For prostate, head and neck, spine, and thyroid lesions, the EMXRT plans were generally comparable to the IMRT plans. Our feasibility study indicated that lower energy (<6 MV) photon beams could be considered in modern radiotherapy treatment planning to achieve a more personalized care for individual patient with dosimetric gains. PMID:26977413

  13. Photon-Photon Collisions -- Past and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2005-12-02

    I give a brief review of the history of photon-photon physics and a survey of its potential at future electron-positron colliders. Exclusive hadron production processes in photon-photon and electron-photon collisions provide important tests of QCD at the amplitude level, particularly as measures of hadron distribution amplitudes. There are also important high energy {gamma}{gamma} and e{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, including the production of jets in photon-photon collisions, deeply virtual Compton scattering on a photon target, and leading-twist single-spin asymmetries for a photon polarized normal to a production plane. Since photons couple directly to all fundamental fields carrying the electromagnetic current including leptons, quarks, W's and supersymmetric particles, high energy {gamma}{gamma} collisions will provide a comprehensive laboratory for Higgs production and exploring virtually every aspect of the Standard Model and its extensions. High energy back-scattered laser beams will thus greatly extend the range of physics of the International Linear Collider.

  14. Characterizing and configuring motorized wedge for a new generation telecobalt machine in a treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Sharma, Smriti; Upreti, Rituraj; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2007-01-01

    A new generation telecobalt unit, Theratron Equinox-80, (MDS Nordion, Canada) has been evaluated. It is equipped with a single 60-degree motorized wedge (MW), four universal wedges (UW) for 15°, 30°, 45° and 60°. MW was configured in Eclipse (Varian, Palo Alto, USA) 3D treatment planning system (TPS). The profiles and central axis depth doses (CADD) were measured with radiation field analyzer blue water phantom for MW. These profiles and CADD for MW were compared with UW in a homogeneous phantom generated in Eclipse for various field sizes. The absolute dose was measured for a field size of 10 × 10 cm2 only in a MEDTEC water phantom at 10 cm depth with a 0.13 cc thimble ion chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Uppsala, Sweden) and a NE electrometer (Nuclear Enterprises, UK). Measured dose with ion chamber was compared with the TPS predicted dose. MW angle was verified on the Equinox for four angles (15°, 30°, 45° and 60°). The variation in measured and calculated dose at 10 cm depth was within 2%. The measured and the calculated wedge angles were in well agreement within 2°. The motorized wedges were successfully configured in Eclipse for four wedge angles. PMID:21217916

  15. Investigation of turbulent wedges generated by different single surface roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traphan, Dominik; Meinlschmidt, Peter; Lutz, Otto; Peinke, Joachim; Gülker, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    It is known that small faults on rotor blades of wind turbines can cause significant power loss. In order to better understand the governing physical effects, in this experimental study, the formation of a turbulent wedge over a flat plate induced by single surface roughness elements is under investigation. The experiments are performed at different ambient pressure gradients, thus allowing conclusions about the formation of a turbulent wedge over an airfoil. With respect to typical initial faults on operating airfoils, the roughness elements are modified in both size and shape (raised or recessed). None intrusive experimental methods, such as stereoscopic PIV and LDA, enable investigations based on temporally and spatially highly resolved velocity measurements. In this way, a spectral analysis of the turbulent boundary layer is performed and differences in coherent structures within the wedge are identified. These findings are correlated with global measurements of the wedge carried out by infrared thermography. This correlation aims to enable distinguishing the cause and main properties of a turbulent wedge by the easy applicable method of infrared thermography, which is of practical relevance in the field of condition monitoring of wind turbines.

  16. Effect of Shockwave Curvature on Run Distance Observed with a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Dorgan, Robert; Sutherland, Gerrit; Benedetta, Ashley; Milby, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    The effect of wave curvature on shock initiation in PBXN-110 was investigated using a modified wedge test configuration. Various thicknesses of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with line-wave generators so that the introduced shock would be the same shape, magnitude and duration across the entire input surface of the wedge. The shock parameters were varied for a given donor thickness via different widths of PMMA spacers placed between the donor and the wedge. A framing camera was used to observe where initiation occurred along the face of the wedge. Initiation always occurred at the center of the shock front instead of the sides like that reported by others using a much smaller test format. Results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distance predicted in CTH for a 50.8 mm thick donor slab (low curvature) compared favorably with experimental results. However, results from thinner donor slabs (higher curvature) indicate a more sensitive behavior than the simulations predicted.

  17. Effect of shockwave curvature on run distance observed with a modified wedge test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Dorgan, Robert J.; Sutherland, Gerrit; Benedetta, Ashley; Milby, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    The effect of wave curvature on shock initiation in PBXN-110 was investigated using a modified wedge test configuration. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with line-wave generators so that the shock from the donor would be the same shape, magnitude and duration across the entire input surface of the wedge. The shock parameters were varied for a given donor with PMMA spacers placed between the donor and the wedge sample. A high-speed electronic framing camera was used to observe where initiation occurred along the face of the wedge. Initiation always occurred at the center of the shock front instead of along the sides like that reported by others using a much smaller test format. Results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distance predicted in CTH for a 50.8 mm wide donor slab (low curvature) compared favorably with experimental results. However, results from thinner donor slabs (higher curvature) indicate a more sensitive behavior than the simulations predicted.

  18. Wedge and spring assembly for securing coils in electromagnets and dynamoelectric machines

    DOEpatents

    Lindner, M.; Cottingham, J.G.

    1996-03-12

    A wedge and spring assembly for use in electromagnets or dynamoelectric machines is disclosed having a housing with an axis therethrough and a plurality of coils supported on salient poles that extend radially inward from the housing toward the housing axis to define a plurality of interpole spaces. The wedge and spring assembly includes a nonmagnetic retainer spring and a nonmagnetic wedge. The retainer spring is formed to fit into one of the interpole spaces, and has juxtaposed ends defining between them a slit extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge for insertion into the slit provides an outwardly directed force on respective portions of the juxtaposed ends to expand the slit so that respective portions of the retainer spring engage areas of the coils adjacent thereto, thereby resiliently holding the coils against their respective salient poles. The retainer spring is generally triangular shaped to fit within the interpole space, and the wedge is generally T-shaped. 6 figs.

  19. Parental arc magma compositions dominantly controlled by mantle-wedge thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Stephen J.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Katz, Richard F.; Dungan, Michael A.; Escrig, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    The processes that lead to the fourfold variation in arc-averaged compositions of mafic arc lavas remain controversial. Control by the mantle-wedge thermal structure is supported by chemical correlations with the thickness of the underlying arc crust, which affects the thermal state of the wedge. Control by down-going slab temperature is supported by correlations with the slab thermal parameter. The Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone provides a test of these hypotheses. Here we use chemical data to demonstrate that the Southern Volcanic Zone and global arc averages define the same chemical trends, both among elements and between elements and crustal thickness. But in contrast to the global arc system, the Southern Volcanic Zone is built on crust of variable thickness with a constant slab thermal parameter. This natural experiment, along with a set of numerical simulations, shows that global arc compositional variability is dominated by different extents of melting that are controlled by the thermal structure of the mantle wedge. Slab temperatures play a subordinate role. Variations in the subducting slab's fluid flux and sediment compositions, as well as mantle-wedge heterogeneities, produce second-order effects that are manifested as distinctive trace element and isotopic signatures; these can be more clearly elucidated once the importance of wedge thermal structure is recognized.

  20. Interaction of disturbances with an oblique detonation wave attached to a wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasseigne, D. G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1992-01-01

    The linear response of an oblique overdriven detonation to impose free stream disturbances or to periodic movements of the wedge is examined. The free stream disturbances are assumed to be steady vorticity waves and the wedge motions are considered to be time periodic oscillations either about a fixed pivot point or along the plane of symmetry of the wedge aligned with the incoming stream. The detonation is considered to be a region of infinitesmal thickness in which a finite amount of heat is released. The response to the imposed disturbances is a function of the Mach number of the incoming flow, the wedge angle, and the exothermocity of the reaction within the detonation. It is shown that as the degree of overdrive increases, the amplitude of the response increases significantly; furthermore, a fundamental difference in the dependence of the response on the parameters of the problem is found between the response to a free stream disturbance and to a disturbance emanating from the wedge surface.

  1. Medpor Craniotomy Gap Wedge Designed to Fill Small Bone Defects along Cranial Bone Flap

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Duck-Ho; Kim, Gyoung-Ju

    2009-01-01

    Objective Medpor porous polyethylene was used to reconstruct small bone defects (gaps and burr holes) along a craniotomy bone flap. The feasibility and cosmetic results were evaluated. Methods Medpor Craniotomy Gap Wedges, V and T, were designed. The V implant is a 10 cm-long wedge strip, the cross section of which is an isosceles triangle with a 4 mm-long base, making it suitable for gaps less than 4 mm after trimming. Meanwhile, the Medpor T wedge includes a 10 mm-wide thin plate on the top surface of the Medpor V Wedge, making it suitable for gaps wider than 4 mm and burr holes. Sixty-eight pterional craniotomies and 39 superciliary approaches were performed using the implants, and the operative results were evaluated with respect to the cosmetic results and pain or tenderness related to the cranial flap. Results The small bone defects were eliminated with less than 10 minutes additional operative time. In a physical examination, there were no considerable cosmetic problems regarding to the cranial bone defects, such as a linear depression or dimple in the forehead, anterior temporal hollow, preauricular depression, and parietal burr hole defect. Plus, no patient suffered from any infectious complications. Conclusion The Medpor Craniotomy Gap Wedge is technically easy to work with for reconstructing small bone defects, such as the bone gaps and burr holes created by a craniotomy, and produces excellent cosmetic results. PMID:19844617

  2. Determination of the pulmonary capillary wedge position in patients with giant left atrial V waves.

    PubMed

    Moore, R A; Neary, M J; Gallagher, J D; Clark, D L

    1987-04-01

    Thirteen patients with giant left atrial V waves during preoperative cardiac catheterization were admitted into the study group. While awake and breathing spontaneously, simultaneous recordings of electrocardiographic leads II and V5, radial arterial traces, and pulmonary arterial or pulmonary capillary wedge traces were obtained. Measurements were made on four consecutive cardiac cycles in the unwedged and wedged positions for the following intervals: Q wave to the radial arterial upstroke (220 +/- 20 milliseconds) and peak (360 +/- 10 milliseconds), Q wave to the pulmonary arterial upstroke (170 +/- 20 milliseconds) and peak (350 +/- 20 milliseconds), Q wave to the V wave upstroke (280 +/- 20 milliseconds) and peak (570 +/- 20 milliseconds), and QT interval (420 +/- 20 milliseconds). These findings indicate that the radial arterial and pulmonary arterial upstrokes and peaks occur nearly simultaneously. Upon wedging, the V wave upstroke occurs significantly later in the cardiac cycle (P less than .05) compared with the pulmonary arterial upstroke, and the V wave peak occurs significantly later compared with both the pulmonary arterial and the radial arterial peak (P less than .05). A rapid, simple beat-to-beat method for differentiating pulmonary arterial from pulmonary capillary wedge positions in the presence of giant left atrial V waves is the superimposition of the pulmonary arterial trace on the radial arterial trace. When a wedge position is attained, there is an immediate rightward shift in the upstroke and peak of the pulmonary arterial pressure trace, which can be easily identified by observing the relationship between the pulmonary arterial and systemic arterial traces.

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry at the 4 MV Dynamitron Tandem in Bochum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubritto, C.; Rogalla, D.; Rubino, M.; Marzaioli, F.; Passariello, I.; Romano, M.; Spadaccini, G.; Casa, G.; Di Leva, A.; De Cesare, N.; D'Onofrio, A.; Gialanella, L.; Imbriani, G.; Palmieri, A.; Roca, V.; Rolfs, C.; Sabbarese, C.; Strieder, F.; Schüermann, D.; Terrasi, F.

    2004-07-01

    A feasibility test for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been carried out successfully at the 4 MV Dynamitron Tandem Laboratory in Bochum in conjunction with a new recoil separator. We describe the facility as well as results concerning the reproducibility and accuracy of 14C content measurements of several standard samples.

  4. 76 FR 34862 - Safety Zone; M/V DAVY CROCKETT, Columbia River

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; M/V DAVY CROCKETT, Columbia River AGENCY... enforcement of a safety zone established on the waters of the Columbia River surrounding the M/ V DAVY... hazards associated with ongoing salvage operations involving the M/ V DAVY CROCKETT. All persons...

  5. 76 FR 49664 - Safety Zone; M/V DAVY CROCKETT, Columbia River

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; M/V DAVY CROCKETT, Columbia River AGENCY... enforcement of a safety zone established on the waters of the Columbia River surrounding the M/ V DAVY... hazards associated with ongoing salvage operations involving the M/ V DAVY CROCKETT. All persons...

  6. Infectious full-length clones of Calibrachoa Mottle Virus (CbMV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Full-length cDNA clones derived from genomic RNA (gRNA) and subgenomic RNAs (sgRNAs) of Calibrachoa mottle virus (CbMV) were constructed under the control of the T7 RNA promoter and ligated into plasmid pUC-18. The capped and uncapped in vitro transcripts, synthesized from full length genomic cDNA...

  7. Fast internal marker tracking algorithm for onboard MV and kV imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Mao, W; Wiersma, R D; Xing, L

    2008-05-01

    Intrafraction organ motion can limit the advantage of highly conformal dose techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) due to target position uncertainty. To ensure high accuracy in beam targeting, real-time knowledge of the target location is highly desired throughout the beam delivery process. This knowledge can be gained through imaging of internally implanted radio-opaque markers with fluoroscopic or electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). In the case of MV based images, marker detection can be problematic due to the significantly lower contrast between different materials in comparison to their kV-based counterparts. This work presents a fully automated algorithm capable of detecting implanted metallic markers in both kV and MV images with high consistency. Using prior CT information, the algorithm predefines the volumetric search space without manual region-of-interest (ROI) selection by the user. Depending on the template selected, both spherical and cylindrical markers can be detected. Multiple markers can be simultaneously tracked without indexing confusion. Phantom studies show detection success rates of 100% for both kV and MV image data. In addition, application of the algorithm to real patient image data results in successful detection of all implanted markers for MV images. Near real-time operational speeds of approximately 10 frames/sec for the detection of five markers in a 1024 x 768 image are accomplished using an ordinary PC workstation.

  8. A measurement of the fast luminescent decays of the MV-50 LED.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The fast luminescent decay of the MV-50 GaAs doped Si light-emitting diode has been studied. This diode is found to provide a fast, inexpensive, bright, and convenient light source for the calibration of fast optical timing systems. A simple passive electronic module is described that allows driving the light source directly by a laboratory pulse generator.

  9. Effects of an acrylic resin tray on relative surface doses for 10 MV x ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.

    1980-09-01

    Relative surface doses (RSD) for 10 MV x rays were measured and analyzed with an acrylic resin block tray present in the beam. It was found that the secondary electron contamination becomes significant for large fields in isocentric set-ups. Medium and high Z filters are investigated and suggested to be used to reduce RSD.

  10. Fast internal marker tracking algorithm for onboard MV and kV imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Mao, W.; Wiersma, R. D.; Xing, L.

    2008-01-01

    Intrafraction organ motion can limit the advantage of highly conformal dose techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) due to target position uncertainty. To ensure high accuracy in beam targeting, real-time knowledge of the target location is highly desired throughout the beam delivery process. This knowledge can be gained through imaging of internally implanted radio-opaque markers with fluoroscopic or electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). In the case of MV based images, marker detection can be problematic due to the significantly lower contrast between different materials in comparison to their kV-based counterparts. This work presents a fully automated algorithm capable of detecting implanted metallic markers in both kV and MV images with high consistency. Using prior CT information, the algorithm predefines the volumetric search space without manual region-of-interest (ROI) selection by the user. Depending on the template selected, both spherical and cylindrical markers can be detected. Multiple markers can be simultaneously tracked without indexing confusion. Phantom studies show detection success rates of 100% for both kV and MV image data. In addition, application of the algorithm to real patient image data results in successful detection of all implanted markers for MV images. Near real-time operational speeds of ∼10 frames∕sec for the detection of five markers in a 1024×768 image are accomplished using an ordinary PC workstation. PMID:18561670

  11. 78 FR 35638 - Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the M/V CHARLEVOIX, 225736

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... 81.18. DATES: The Certificate of Alternative Compliance was issued on May 10, 2013. ADDRESSES: The... CFR 81.18, has been issued for the M/V CHARLEVOIX. The vessel's primary purpose is a cable guided.... This notice is issued under authority of 33 U.S.C. 1605(c), and 33 CFR 81.18. Dated: May 24, 2013. S....

  12. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  13. Nuclear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  14. Simultaneous MV-kV imaging for intrafractional motion management during volumetric-modulated arc therapy delivery*

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Margie A.; Sonnick, Mark; Pham, Hai; Regmi, Rajesh; Xiong, Jian-ping; Morf, Daniel; Mageras, Gig S.; Zelefsky, Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and clinical feasibility of a motion monitoring method employing simultaneously acquired MV and kV images during volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Short-arc digital tomosynthesis (SA-DTS) is used to improve the quality of the MV images that are then combined with orthogonally acquired kV images to assess 3D motion. An anthropomorphic phantom with implanted gold seeds was used to assess accuracy of the method under static, typical prostatic, and respiratory motion scenarios. Automatic registration of kV images and single MV frames or MV SA-DTS reconstructed with arc lengths from 2° to 7° with the appropriate reference fiducial template images was performed using special purpose-built software. Clinical feasibility was evaluated by retrospectively analyzing images acquired over four or five sessions for each of three patients undergoing hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy. The standard deviation of the registration error in phantom using MV SA-DTS was similar to single MV images for the static and prostate motion scenarios (σ = 0.25 mm). Under respiratory motion conditions, the standard deviation of the registration error increased to 0.7mm and 1.7 mm for single MV and MV SA-DTS, respectively. Registration failures were observed with the respiratory scenario only and were due to motion-induced fiducial blurring. For the three patients studied, the mean and standard deviation of the difference between automatic registration using 4° MV SA-DTS and manual registration using single MV images results was 0.07±0.52mm. The MV SA-DTS results in patients were, on average, superior to single-frame MV by nearly 1 mm — significantly more than what was observed in phantom. The best MV SA-DTS results were observed with arc lengths of 3° to 4°. Registration failures in patients using MV SA-DTS were primarily due to blockage of the gold seeds by the MLC. The failure rate varied from 2% to 16%. Combined MV SA

  15. Real-time automatic fiducial marker tracking in low contrast cine-MV images

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wei-Yang; Lin, Shu-Fang; Yang, Sheng-Chang; Liou, Shu-Cheng; Nath, Ravinder; Liu Wu

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To develop a real-time automatic method for tracking implanted radiographic markers in low-contrast cine-MV patient images used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: Intrafraction motion tracking using radiotherapy beam-line MV images have gained some attention recently in IGRT because no additional imaging dose is introduced. However, MV images have much lower contrast than kV images, therefore a robust and automatic algorithm for marker detection in MV images is a prerequisite. Previous marker detection methods are all based on template matching or its derivatives. Template matching needs to match object shape that changes significantly for different implantation and projection angle. While these methods require a large number of templates to cover various situations, they are often forced to use a smaller number of templates to reduce the computation load because their methods all require exhaustive search in the region of interest. The authors solve this problem by synergetic use of modern but well-tested computer vision and artificial intelligence techniques; specifically the authors detect implanted markers utilizing discriminant analysis for initialization and use mean-shift feature space analysis for sequential tracking. This novel approach avoids exhaustive search by exploiting the temporal correlation between consecutive frames and makes it possible to perform more sophisticated detection at the beginning to improve the accuracy, followed by ultrafast sequential tracking after the initialization. The method was evaluated and validated using 1149 cine-MV images from two prostate IGRT patients and compared with manual marker detection results from six researchers. The average of the manual detection results is considered as the ground truth for comparisons. Results: The average root-mean-square errors of our real-time automatic tracking method from the ground truth are 1.9 and 2.1 pixels for the two patients (0.26 mm/pixel). The

  16. 77 FR 63729 - Fixed and Moving Safety Zone; Around the USACE Bank Grading Units, Mat Sinking Unit, and the M/V...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... Grading Units, Mat Sinking Unit, and the M/V Harrison and M/V William James AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS..., Mat Sinking Unit and M/V Harrison and M/V William James while operating on the Mississippi River....

  17. Quantitative comparisons of analogue models of brittle wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreurs, Guido

    2010-05-01

    Analogue model experiments are widely used to gain insights into the evolution of geological structures. In this study, we present a direct comparison of experimental results of 14 analogue modelling laboratories using prescribed set-ups. A quantitative analysis of the results will document the variability among models and will allow an appraisal of reproducibility and limits of interpretation. This has direct implications for comparisons between structures in analogue models and natural field examples. All laboratories used the same frictional analogue materials (quartz and corundum sand) and prescribed model-building techniques (sieving and levelling). Although each laboratory used its own experimental apparatus, the same type of self-adhesive foil was used to cover the base and all the walls of the experimental apparatus in order to guarantee identical boundary conditions (i.e. identical shear stresses at the base and walls). Three experimental set-ups using only brittle frictional materials were examined. In each of the three set-ups the model was shortened by a vertical wall, which moved with respect to the fixed base and the three remaining sidewalls. The minimum width of the model (dimension parallel to mobile wall) was also prescribed. In the first experimental set-up, a quartz sand wedge with a surface slope of ˜20° was pushed by a mobile wall. All models conformed to the critical taper theory, maintained a stable surface slope and did not show internal deformation. In the next two experimental set-ups, a horizontal sand pack consisting of alternating quartz sand and corundum sand layers was shortened from one side by the mobile wall. In one of the set-ups a thin rigid sheet covered part of the model base and was attached to the mobile wall (i.e. a basal velocity discontinuity distant from the mobile wall). In the other set-up a basal rigid sheet was absent and the basal velocity discontinuity was located at the mobile wall. In both types of experiments

  18. Growth of the deposit wedge in the mountain reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Song, G.

    2011-12-01

    The sedimentary problem of mountain reservoirs in Taiwan is getting serious year by year.Due to eroded sediments enter downstream reservoirs,the loss of sediment transport capacity may cause deposition of sediment in reservoirs.This phenomenon make problems to small mountain reservoirs.To realize the interaction between deposit wedges and mountain reservoirs,we selected Wushe reservoir which is situated in central Taiwan for a case study. Wushe reservoir is long and narrow.In recent years,most sediment is introduced during rain events that now accompany climate change are very important in sediment supply.In this thesis,we collected data of underwater landform and sub-bottom bedding information by using high resolution Multibeam Survey System(MBS) and seismic-reflection system.Up to now,we already had the bathymetric data for more than ten years,moreover,in 2010,we used 3.5kHz sub-bottom seismic profiler to analysis the sedimentary bedding situation in this area.These methods provide us accurate reservoir topography,sediment accumulation and the major ways of sediment transportation.The study purposes are as follows: First,according to the available underwater data for last ten years,we recognize the geomorphological characters of sedimentation as well as complete the mappings.Comparing to bathymetric images each year,we evaluate the carried ways of sediment.The flow water which enters this area transports along the thalweg,which in eastern reservoir.The range of water level variation cause alteration of sedimentary morphology,it also affects the scope of alluvial fan.The alluvial fan is located in the middle of the reservoir,the edge of it had moved forward 500 meters for last ten years.The annual mean of forward velocity was 50 meters,the elevation of fan edge also accelerated 10 meters per year.In a word,the large volume of the sedimentary delta is in Wushe reservoir now. Second,trying to clarify the composition of sedimentation and explain the sub

  19. Three-dimensional measurement of wedged scoliotic vertebrae and intervertebral disks.

    PubMed

    Aubin, C E; Dansereau, J; Petit, Y; Parent, F; de Guise, J A; Labelle, H

    1998-01-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis involves complex spinal intrinsic deformations such as the wedging of vertebral bodies (VB) and intervertebral disks (ID), and it is obvious that the clinical evaluation obtained by the spinal projections on the two-dimensional (2D) radiographic planes do not give a full and accurate interpretation of scoliotic deformities. This paper presents a method that allows reconstruction in 3D of the vertebral body endplates and measurement of the 3D wedging angles. This approach was also used to verify whether 2D radiographic measurements could lead to a biased evaluation of scoliotic spine wedging. The 3D reconstruction of VB contours was done using calibrated biplanar X-rays and an iterative projection computer procedure that fits 3D oriented ellipses of adequate diameters onto the 3D endplate contours. "3D wedging angles" of the VB and ID (representing the maximum angle between adjacent vertebrae) as well as their angular locations with respect to the vertebral frontal planes were computed by finding the positions of the shortest and longest distances between consecutive endplates along their contour. This method was extensively validated using several approaches: (1) by comparing the 3D reconstructed endplates of a cadaveric functional unit (T8-T9) with precise 3D measurements obtained using a coordinate measuring machine for 11 different combinations of vertebral angular positions; (2) by a sensitivity study on 400 different vertebral segments mathematically generated, with errors randomly introduced on the digitized points (standard deviations of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mm); (3) by comparing the clinical wedging measurements (on postero-anterior and lateral radiographs) at the thoracic apical level of 34 scoliotic patients (15 degrees < Cobb < 45 degrees) to the computed values. Mean errors for the 11 vertebral positions were 0.5 +/- 0.4 mm for VB thickness, less than 2.2 degrees for endplate orientation, and about 11 degrees (3 mm) for the location of

  20. Wedge energy bands of monolayer black phosphorus: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Minwoo; Bae, Hyeonhu; Lee, Seunghan; Yang, Li; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of first-principles calculations, we present intriguing electronic properties of halogen-striped functionalized monolayer black phosphorus. The halogen-striped monolayer black phosphorus is found to have a wedge energy band with the energy-momentum relation of E\\propto {{p}y} when the stripe–stripe distance is smaller than ~40 Å. Our tight-binding study shows that the wedge energy band occurs when 2-atom basis 1D lattices are periodically repeated aligned with each other in a 2D lattice. We also discuss the possible applications of this wedge energy band in electron supercollimation with high mobility or severely anisotropic electronic transport, which can be used for the development of optics-like nano-electronics.

  1. Relationship between colloid osmotic pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure in patients with acute cardiorespiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Weil, M H; Henning, R J; Morissette, M; Michaels, S

    1978-04-01

    Close relationships between progressive respiratory failure, roentgenographic signs of pulmonary opacification and decreases in the difference between colloid osmotic pressure of plasma and the pulmonary artery wedge pressure (colloid-hydrosatic pressure gradient) were demonstrated in 49 critically ill patients with multisystem failure, in patients in shock. The potential importance of this relationship is underscored by the observation that fatal progression of pulmonary edema was related to a critical reduction in the colloid-hydrostatic pressure gradient to levels of less than 0 mm Hg. More often, reduction in colloid osmotic pressure rather than increases in left ventricular filling pressure (pulmonary artery wedge pressure) accounted for the decline in colloid-hydrostatic pressure gradient. Routine measurement of colloid osmotic pressure, preferably in conjunction with pulmonary artery wedge pressure, is likely to improve understanding of the mechanisms of acute pulmonary edema.

  2. Wedge energy bands of monolayer black phosphorus: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Minwoo; Bae, Hyeonhu; Lee, Seunghan; Yang, Li; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of first-principles calculations, we present intriguing electronic properties of halogen-striped functionalized monolayer black phosphorus. The halogen-striped monolayer black phosphorus is found to have a wedge energy band with the energy-momentum relation of E\\propto {{p}y} when the stripe-stripe distance is smaller than ~40 Å. Our tight-binding study shows that the wedge energy band occurs when 2-atom basis 1D lattices are periodically repeated aligned with each other in a 2D lattice. We also discuss the possible applications of this wedge energy band in electron supercollimation with high mobility or severely anisotropic electronic transport, which can be used for the development of optics-like nano-electronics.

  3. Wedge Shock and Nozzle Exhaust Plume Interaction in a Supersonic Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Heath, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the nozzle exhaust plume. Aft body shock waves that interact with the exhaust plume contribute to the near-field pressure signature of a vehicle. The plume and shock interaction was studied using computational fluid dynamics and compared with experimental data from a coaxial convergent-divergent nozzle flow in an open jet facility. A simple diamond-shaped wedge was used to generate the shock in the outer flow to study its impact on the inner jet flow. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the opposite plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the nozzle exhaust plume was modified by the presence of the wedge. Both the experimental results and computational predictions show changes in plume deflection.

  4. Wedge energy bands of monolayer black phosphorus: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Park, Minwoo; Bae, Hyeonhu; Lee, Seunghan; Yang, Li; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of first-principles calculations, we present intriguing electronic properties of halogen-striped functionalized monolayer black phosphorus. The halogen-striped monolayer black phosphorus is found to have a wedge energy band with the energy-momentum relation of [Formula: see text] when the stripe-stripe distance is smaller than ~40 Å. Our tight-binding study shows that the wedge energy band occurs when 2-atom basis 1D lattices are periodically repeated aligned with each other in a 2D lattice. We also discuss the possible applications of this wedge energy band in electron supercollimation with high mobility or severely anisotropic electronic transport, which can be used for the development of optics-like nano-electronics. PMID:27299467

  5. Achieving Hard X-ray Nanofocusing Using a Wedged Multilayer Laue Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaojing; Conley, Raymond; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Macrander, Albert; Maser, Jorg; Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Chu, Yong S.

    2015-05-04

    Here, we report on the fabrication and the characterization of a wedged multilayer Laue lens for x-ray nanofocusing. The lens was fabricated using a sputtering deposition technique, in which a specially designed mask was employed to introduce a thickness gradient in the lateral direction of the multilayer. X-ray characterization shows an efficiency of 27% and a focus size of 26 nm at 14.6 keV, in a good agreement with theoretical calculations. Our results indicate that the desired wedging is achieved in the fabricated structure. Furthermore, we anticipate that continuous development on wedged MLLs will advance x-ray nanofocusing optics to new frontiers and enrich capabilities and opportunities for hard X-ray microscopy.

  6. Effectiveness of a Wedge Probe to Measure Sonic Boom Signatures in a Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.

    2013-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the effectiveness of a wedge probe to measure sonic boom pressure signatures compared to a slender conical probe. A generic business jet model at a constant angle of attack and at a single model to probe separation distance was used to generate a sonic boom signature. Pressure signature data were acquired with both the wedge probe and a slender conical probe for comparison. The test was conducted at a Mach number of 2.0 and a free-stream unit Reynolds number of 2 million per foot. The results showed that the wedge probe was not effective in measuring the sonic boom pressure signature of the aircraft model in the supersonic wind tunnel. Data plots and a discussion of the results are presented. No tabulated data or flow visualization photographs are included.

  7. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in A549 Cells Exposed to 6 MV X-rays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuning; Xu, Jing; Shao, Weixian; Geng, Chong; Li, Jia; Guo, Feng; Miao, Hui; Shen, Wenbin; Ye, Tao; Liu, Yazhou; Xu, Haiting; Zhang, Xuguang

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study is to explore the bystander effects in A549 cells that have been exposed to 6MV X-ray. Control group, irradiated group, irradiated conditioned medium (ICM)-received group, and fresh medium group were designed in this study. A549 cells in the logarithmic growth phase were irradiated with 6MV X-ray at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2. In ICM-received group, post-irradiation A549 cells were cultured for 3 h and were transferred into non-irradiated A549 cells for further cultivation. Clone forming test was applied to detect the survival fraction of cells. Annexin V-FITC/PI double-staining assay was used to detect the apoptosis of A549 cells 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after 2-Gy 6MV X-ray irradiation, and the curves of apoptosis were drawn. The changes in the cell cycles 4, 48, 72, and 96 h after 2-Gy 6MV X-ray irradiation were detected using PI staining flow cytometry. With the increase of irradiation dose, the survival fraction of A549 cells after the application of 0.5 Gy irradiation was decreasing continuously. In comparison to the control group, the apoptosis rate of the ICM-received group was increased in a time-dependent pattern, with the highest apoptosis rate observed at 72 h (p < 0.05). Cell count in G2/M stages was obviously increased compared with that of the control group (p < 0.05), with the highest count observed at 72 h, after which G2/M stage arrest was diminished. ICM can cause apparent A549 cell damage, indicating that 6MV X-ray irradiation can induce bystander effect on A549 cells, which reaches a peak at 72 h.

  8. Identification of arabidopsis proteins that interact with the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) movement protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z; Andrianov, V M; Han, Y; Howell, S H

    2001-11-01

    Gene I of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) encodes a protein that is required for virus movement. The CaMV movement protein (MP) was used in a yeast 2-hybrid system to screen an Arabidopsis cDNA library for cDNAs encoding MP-interacting (MPI) proteins. Three different clones were found encoding proteins (MPI1, -2 and -7) that interact with the N-terminal third of the CaMV MP. The interaction in the 2-hybrid system between MPI7 and CaMV MP mutants correlated with the infectivity of the mutants. A non-infectious MP mutant, ER2A, with two amino acid changes in the N-terminal third of the MP failed to interact with MPI7, while an infectious second-site mutant, that differed from ER2A by only a single amino acid change, interacted in the 2-hybrid system. MPI7 is encoded by a member of a large, but diverse gene family in Arabidopsis. MPI7 is related in sequence, size and hydropathy profile to mammalian proteins (such as rat PRA1) described as a rab acceptor. The gene encoding MPI7 is expressed widely is Arabidopsis plants. and in transgenic plants the MPI7:GFP fusion protein is localized in the cytoplasm, concentrated in punctate spots. In protoplasts transfected with CFP:MP and MPI7:YFP, CFP:MP colocalized to some of the sites where MPI7:YFP is expressed. At these sites, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorophores was observed indicating an interaction in planta between the CaMV MP and MPI7.

  9. Modeling of High-Energy Photon Bursts From Lightning Leader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, S. J.; Xu, W.; Pasko, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from the Earth's atmosphere in association with thunderstorm activity [e.g., Briggs et al., JGR, 118, 3805, 2013]. Additionally, X-ray bursts observed from the ground have been discovered to be produced by negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) lightning leaders in association with stepping processes [Dwyer et al., GRL, 32, L01803, 2005]. Using numerical modeling, it has been shown that the production of thermal runaway electrons by stepping lightning leaders and their further acceleration could explain the TGF spectrum for intracloud (IC) lightning potentials above ~100 MV [Xu et al., GRL, 39, L08801, 2012] and X-ray burst spectrum for -CG lightning potentials of ~5 MV [Xu et al., GRL, 41, 7406, 2014]. In this work, we address the physical processes leading to X-ray bursts from -CG discharges and TGFs produced by IC discharges in a unified fashion. We show how the leader-produced photon spectrum becomes harder with increasing lightning leader potential and how it progressively converges to typical photon spectrum associated with relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) in large-scale ambient electric fields for potentials greater than ~150 MV. We also demonstrate that the photon fluence in a burst is a very sharp function of the potential. This implies that only lightning leaders forming the strongest potentials can lead to the production of observable TGFs from space. We specifically study the effects of source altitudes on the results and the production of the required high potentials in lightning leaders in realistic thunderstorm charge configurations.

  10. Effect of the thermoplastic masks on dose distribution in the build-up region for photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Półtorak, Michał; Fujak, Edyta; Kukołowicz, Paweł

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of thermoplastic masks material (Klarity Medical&Equipment Co., Guangzhou, China) with different diameters of holes (ϕ 0.25 cm and ϕ 0.40 cm) on the dose distribution in the build-up region for photon beams. Measurements were made for external radiation beams produced by the linear accelerator (TrueBeam, Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA, USA) using the Markus parallel plane ionization chamber and the Unidos electrometer (both from PTW, Freiburg, Germany). Measurements were made in a solid water phantom for two photon energies 6 MV and 15 MV, at 90 cm source to skin distance, for four fields of 5 cm × 5 cm, 10 cm × 10 cm, 15 cm × 15 cm and 20 cm × 20 cm. Compared to the open field, the maximum dose with mask was closer to the surface of the phantom by about 1.4 mm and 1.2 mm for 6 MV and 15 MV X-Rays, respectively. The surface dose increase from 10% to 42% for 6 MV and from 5% to 28% for 15 MV X-Rays.

  11. Influence of the corn resistance gene Mv on the fitness of Peregrinus maidis (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) and on the transmission of maize mosaic virus (Rhabdoviridae: Nucleorhabdovirus).

    PubMed

    Higashi, C H V; Brewbaker, J L; Bressan, A

    2013-08-01

    Crops that are resistant to pests and pathogens are cost-effective for the management of pests and diseases. A corn (Zea mays L.) breeding program conducted in Hawaii has identified a source of heritable resistance to maize mosaic virus (MMV) (Rhabdoviridae: Nucleorhabdovirus). This resistance is controlled by the gene Mv, which has been shown to have a codominant action. To date, no studies have examined whether the resistance associated with this gene affects only MMV or whether it also affects the insect vector, the corn planthopper Peregrinus maidis (Ashmead) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae). Here, we examined the life history of the corn planthopper and its ability to transmit MMV on near isogenic lines that were homozygous dominant (Mv/Mv), homozygous recessive (mv/mv), or heterozygous (Mv/mv) for the gene. A field trial was also conducted to study the colonization of the corn plants with different genotypes by the planthopper. Although field observations revealed slightly lower densities ofplanthoppers on corn with the genotype Mv/Mv than on the inbreds with the genotype mv/mv and their hybrids with the genotype Mv/mv, laboratory assays showed no effects of the gene on planthopper development, longevity, or fecundity. In the field, the corn lines Mv/Mv had a lower incidence of MMV-infected plants. However, in the greenhouse, the transmission of MMV to corn seedlings did not differ across the near isogenic lines, although the corn lines Mv/Mv showed a delayed onset of symptoms compared with the corn lines mv/mv and Mv/mv. The acquisition of MMV by corn planthoppers on the corn genotypes Mv/Mv and Mv/mv averaged 0.2, whereas the acquisition on the corn genotypes mv/mv averaged > 0.3. Our results show that the Mv gene does not influence the fitness of the planthopper vector, suggesting that it may confer resistance by other means, possibly by limiting virus replication or movement within the host plant.

  12. Tectonic and gravity extensional collapses in overpressured cohesive and frictional wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X. P.; Leroy, Y. M.; Maillot, B.

    2015-03-01

    Two modes of extensional collapse in a cohesive and frictional wedge of arbitrary topography, finite extent, and resting on an inclined weak décollement are examined by analytical means. The first mode consists of the gravitational collapse by the action of a half-graben, rooting on the décollement and pushing seaward the frontal part of the wedge. The second mode results from the tectonics extension at the back wall with a similar half-graben kinematics and the landward sliding of the rear part of the wedge. The predictions of the maximum strength theorem, equivalent to the kinematic approach of limit analysis and based on these two collapse mechanisms, not only match exactly the solutions of the critical Coulomb wedge theory, once properly amended, but generalizes them in several aspects: wedge of finite size, composed of cohesive material and of arbitrary topography. This generalization is advantageous to progress in our understanding of many laboratory experiments and field cases. For example, it is claimed from analytical results validated by experiments that the stability transition for a cohesive, triangular wedge occurs with the activation of the maximum length of the décollement. It is shown that the details of the topography, for the particular example of the Mejillones peninsula (North Chile) is, however, responsible for the selection of a short length-scale, dynamic instability corresponding to a frontal gravitational instability. A reasonable amount of cohesion is sufficient for the pressures proposed in the literature to correspond to a stability transition and not with a dynamically unstable state.

  13. 3D stability of accretionary wedges by application of the maximum strength theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souloumiac, P.; Leroy, Y. M.; Krabbenhoft, K.; Maillot, B.

    2009-04-01

    The objective is to capture the 3D failure modes in accretionary wedges and their analogue experiments in the laboratory from the sole knowledge of the material and interface strengths. The proposed methodology relies on the maximum strength theorem inherited from classical limit analysis. The virtual velocity field is constructed by spatial discretization. The numerical scheme is first applied to a perfectly-triangular 2D wedge. It is shown that the 2D critical slope αc for stability is captured precisely by the numerical scheme, the ramp and the back thrust corresponding to regions of localized virtual strain. The influence of the back-wall friction on αc is explored, explained by the Mohr construction and by analogue experiments with sand. The first 3D problem concerns a wedge with a lateral variation in its topographic slope α so that it is sub-critical (α < αc) and super-critical (α > αc) to the right and to the left boundary, respectively. It is shown that the localized deformation of the ramp on the right side, is getting diffuse as one moves to the left side where more décollement is activated. The influence of the two lateral boundaries is felt for wedge widths even greater than the length. The second 3D problem explores the influence of the side wall friction on the results of laboratory experiments. It is found that the deformation is diffuse close to the side wall with a vertical stretching and less dcollement activated. The side wall influences the rest of the wedge over a width 1.5 times the wedge thickness, for realistic friction angles. Comparison with analogue experiments shows the connection between the virtual 3D velocity field and the actual deformation.

  14. The mantle wedge's transient 3-D flow regime and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, D. R.; Le Voci, G.; Goes, S.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Arc volcanism, volatile cycling, mineralization, and continental crust formation are likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure. Wedge flow is often assumed to follow a regular corner-flow pattern. However, studies that incorporate a hydrated rheology and thermal buoyancy predict internal small-scale-convection (SSC). Here, we systematically explore mantle-wedge dynamics in 3-D simulations. We find that longitudinal "Richter-rolls" of SSC (with trench-perpendicular axes) commonly occur if wedge hydration reduces viscosities to Pa s, although transient transverse rolls (with trench-parallel axes) can dominate at viscosities of Pa s. Rolls below the arc and back arc differ. Subarc rolls have similar trench-parallel and trench-perpendicular dimensions of 100-150 km and evolve on a 1-5 Myr time-scale. Subback-arc instabilities, on the other hand, coalesce into elongated sheets, usually with a preferential trench-perpendicular alignment, display a wavelength of 150-400 km and vary on a 5-10 Myr time scale. The modulating influence of subback-arc ridges on the subarc system increases with stronger wedge hydration, higher subduction velocity, and thicker upper plates. We find that trench-parallel averages of wedge velocities and temperature are consistent with those predicted in 2-D models. However, lithospheric thinning through SSC is somewhat enhanced in 3-D, thus expanding hydrous melting regions and shifting dehydration boundaries. Subarc Richter-rolls generate time-dependent trench-parallel temperature variations of up to K, which exceed the transient 50-100 K variations predicted in 2-D and may contribute to arc-volcano spacing and the variable seismic velocity structures imaged beneath some arcs.

  15. Separation over a flat plate-wedge configuration at oceanic Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of flow over a two-dimensional flat plate-wedge configuration is presented. The investigation encompasses a range of Reynolds numbers characteristics of conditions encountered by deep submersible oceanic vehicles. Flow separation, similar to that found on high speed aircraft control surfaces, is reported and discussed in light of the laminar or transitional nature of the separated shear layer. As discovered in previous high Mach number studies of plate-wedge or ramp configurations, the dependency of the size of the separated region on free stream Reynolds number is reversed for laminar and transitional types of flow separation.

  16. A wedged-peak-pulse design with medium fuel adiabat for indirect-drive fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Zhengfeng; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Bin; Wu, Junfeng; He, X. T.; Liu, Jie; Wang, L. F.; Ye, Wenhua

    2014-10-15

    In the present letter, we propose the design of a wedged-peak pulse at the late stage of indirect drive. Our simulations of one- and two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics show that the wedged-peak-pulse design can raise the drive pressure and capsule implosion velocity without significantly raising the fuel adiabat. It can thus balance the energy requirement and hydrodynamic instability control at both ablator/fuel interface and hot-spot/fuel interface. This investigation has implication in the fusion ignition at current mega-joule laser facilities.

  17. Comparison of infinite and wedge fringe settings in Mach Zehnder interferometer for temperature field measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Haridas, Divya; P, Vibin Antony; Sajith, V.; Sobhan, C. B.

    2014-10-15

    Interferometric method, which utilizes the interference of coherent light beams, is used to determine the temperature distribution in the vicinity of a vertical heater plate. The optical components are arranged so as to obtain wedge fringe and infinite fringe patterns and isotherms obtained in each case were compared. In wedge fringe setting, image processing techniques has been used for obtaining isotherms by digital subtraction of initial parallel fringe pattern from deformed fringe pattern. The experimental results obtained are compared with theoretical correlations. The merits and demerits of the fringe analysis techniques are discussed on the basis of the experimental results.

  18. Developing a numerical model of ice wedge degradation and trough formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garayshin, V.; Nicolsky, D.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    The research was initiated as a part of the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) in the Arctic and also as a part of the Integrated Ecosystem Model for Alaska. The presented project explores influence of climate (mean annual and summer temperatures, and snow cover depth and density) and physical properties, soil textures and moisture content on thawing and destabilization of ice wedges on the North Slope of Alaska. Recall that ice wedges formed many years ago, when ground cracked and the cracks were filled by water. The infiltrated water then became frozen and turned into ice. When the annual and summer air temperatures become higher, the depth of the active layer increases. Deeper seasonal thawing may cause melting of the ice wedges from their tops. Consequently, the ground starts to settle and a trough form above the ice wedge. Once the trough is formed, the winter snow cover becomes deeper above it and provides a potential feedback mechanism to the further degradation of permafrost. The work deals with analysis of temperature regimes and moisture distribution and dynamics during seasonal cycles of freezing and thawing. The research focuses on the development of a computational approach to the study of seasonal temperature dynamics of the active layer, ice wedge and surrounding it permafrost. A thermo-mechanical model of the ice wedge based on principles of macroscopic thermodynamics and continuum mechanics is presented. The model includes the energy and mass conservation equations, a visco-poroelastic rheology for ground deformation, and an empirical formula which relates unfrozen water content to temperature. The complete system is reduced to a computationally convenient set of coupled equations for the temperature, pore water pressure, ground velocities and porosity in a two-dimensional domain. A finite element method and an implicit scheme in time were utilized to construct a non-linear system of equations, which was solved iteratively. The model

  19. [Radiocarbon dating of pollen and spores in wedge ice from Iamal and Kolyma].

    PubMed

    Vasil'chuk, A K

    2004-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating of pollen concentrate from late Pleistocene syngenetic wedge ice was carried out using acceleration mass spectrometry (AMS) in Seyakha and Bizon sections. Comparison of the obtained dating with palynological analysis and AMS radiocarbon dating previously obtained for other organic fractions of the same samples allowed us to evaluate accuracy of dating of different fractions. Quantitative tests for data evaluation were considered in terms of possible autochthonous or allochthonous accumulation of the material on the basis of pre-Pleistocene pollen content in these samples. Paleoecological information content of pollen spectra from late Pleistocene syngenetic wedge ice was evaluated.

  20. Comparison of infinite and wedge fringe settings in Mach Zehnder interferometer for temperature field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridas, Divya; P, Vibin Antony; Sajith, V.; Sobhan, C. B.

    2014-10-01

    Interferometric method, which utilizes the interference of coherent light beams, is used to determine the temperature distribution in the vicinity of a vertical heater plate. The optical components are arranged so as to obtain wedge fringe and infinite fringe patterns and isotherms obtained in each case were compared. In wedge fringe setting, image processing techniques has been used for obtaining isotherms by digital subtraction of initial parallel fringe pattern from deformed fringe pattern. The experimental results obtained are compared with theoretical correlations. The merits and demerits of the fringe analysis techniques are discussed on the basis of the experimental results.

  1. Oblique wedge osteotomy for femoral diaphyseal deformity in fibrous dysplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Hashimoto, Y; Mizuno, K

    2001-03-01

    A patient with fibrous dysplasia who had a three-dimensional diaphyseal deformity in the left femur was treated using an oblique wedge osteotomy. The patient was 26-year-old man with a history of two pathologic fractures in the midshaft of the femur. A 22 degrees angular deformity in the coronal plane and 15 degrees anterior bowing were corrected. The results at a followup 2 years after surgery were satisfactory in functional and radiologic terms. The technique and advantages of the oblique wedge osteotomy are discussed. PMID:11249172

  2. Characterization of Vibrio tapetis strains isolated from diseased cultured Wedge sole (Dicologoglossa cuneata Moreau).

    PubMed

    López, J R; Balboa, S; Núñez, S; de la Roca, E; de la Herran, R; Navas, J I; Toranzo, A E; Romalde, J L

    2011-04-01

    The first isolation of Vibrio tapetis from Wedge sole (Dicologoglossa cuneata) is reported. The bacterium was recovered from ulcers of ailing cultured fish, from two different outbreaks occurred in spring 2005. The four isolates found (a200, a201, a204 and a255) were biochemically, genetically and serologically characterized and diagnosis was confirmed by PCR V. tapetis specific primers and multilocus sequencing analysis (MLSA). The isolates constituted a homogeneous phenotypic and genotypic group, being distinct to the already serological and genetic groups defined within the species. A virulence evaluation of the isolate a255 was also carried out; however this strain was unable to induce disease in fry and juvenile Wedge sole.

  3. Reconstruction of Bulk Operators within the Entanglement Wedge in Gauge-Gravity Duality.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xi; Harlow, Daniel; Wall, Aron C

    2016-07-01

    In this Letter we prove a simple theorem in quantum information theory, which implies that bulk operators in the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence can be reconstructed as CFT operators in a spatial subregion A, provided that they lie in its entanglement wedge. This is an improvement on existing reconstruction methods, which have at most succeeded in the smaller causal wedge. The proof is a combination of the recent work of Jafferis, Lewkowycz, Maldacena, and Suh on the quantum relative entropy of a CFT subregion with earlier ideas interpreting the correspondence as a quantum error correcting code. PMID:27447499

  4. Reconstruction of Bulk Operators within the Entanglement Wedge in Gauge-Gravity Duality.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xi; Harlow, Daniel; Wall, Aron C

    2016-07-01

    In this Letter we prove a simple theorem in quantum information theory, which implies that bulk operators in the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence can be reconstructed as CFT operators in a spatial subregion A, provided that they lie in its entanglement wedge. This is an improvement on existing reconstruction methods, which have at most succeeded in the smaller causal wedge. The proof is a combination of the recent work of Jafferis, Lewkowycz, Maldacena, and Suh on the quantum relative entropy of a CFT subregion with earlier ideas interpreting the correspondence as a quantum error correcting code.

  5. Controllable photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszetzky, Dániel; Nagy, Attila; Czitrovszky, Aladár

    2006-10-01

    We have developed our pervious experimental setup using correlated photon pairs (to the calibration of photo detectors) to realize a controllable photon source. For the generation of such photon pairs we use the non-linear process of parametric down conversion. When a photon of the pump beam is incident to a nonlinear crystal with phase matching condition, a pair of photons (signal and idler) is created at the same time with certain probability. We detect the photons in the signal beam with a single photon counting module (SPCM), while delaying those in the idler beam. Recently we have developed a fast electronic unit to control an optical shutter (a Pockels cell) placed to the optical output of the idler beam. When we detect a signal photon with the controlling electronic unit we are also able to open or close the fast optical shutter. Thus we can control which idler photons can propagate through the Pockels cell. So with this photon source we are able to program the number of photons in a certain time window. This controllable photon source that is able to generate a known number of photons with specified wavelength, direction, and polarization could be useful for applications in high-accuracy optical characterisation of photometric devices at the ultra-low intensities. This light source can also serve as a standard in testing of optical image intensifiers, night vision devices, and in the accurate measurement of spectral distribution of transmission and absorption in optical materials.

  6. SU-E-J-176: Results of Images Acquired with Backscattered MV Radiation Using a Pinhole Collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D; Turian, J; Wu, Z; Darwish, N; Chu, J; Bernard, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the feasibility of acquiring real time images of small lung tumors from scattered photons while undergoing radiation treatment.There are several methodologies currently used to track tumor location such as MV-cine acquisition and kV fluoroscopy. However, MVcine offers no information parallel to the beam axis while kV fluoroscopy offers little potential for soft tissue discernability while also increasing the patient dose. This study investigates the feasibility of observing an actual simulated tumor while exploring techniques that may improve image quality. Methods: A prototype imager consisting of a gamma camera pinhole collimator and a computed radiography (CR) plate were used in conjunction with a Varian TrueBeam linac. One study consisted of a 2.5 cm diameter solid water cylinder representing a solid tumor imbedded within a lung equivalent material slab. The cylinder with the lung slab was sandwiched between 1 cm lung equivalent slabs and these were sandwiched between 2 slabs of solid water. The top water slab was 1 cm thick. The other imaging study consisted of three different density plugs, 0.46, 1.09, and 1.82 g/cm3 placed on the accelerator couch. The gantry was orientated 70° relative to the CR plate. The slabs and plugs were irradiated with 2000 MU and 500 MU respectively using the 6FFF mode. Results: The solid water plug was visually discernible in the slab phantom. The ratio of the signal coming from the higher density plugs (placed on the treatment couch) to that between the plugs increased from 1.02 to about 3.0 after subtracting the background image acquired with no plugs present. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicate that a lung tumor could be visualized with scattered radiation during treatment. Improvements in discerning an object can be enhanced by filtering out the head leakage and background scattered radiation not emanating from the imaged object.

  7. Photonuclear dose calculations for high-energy photon beams from Siemens and Varian linacs.

    PubMed

    Chibani, Omar; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie

    2003-08-01

    The dose from photon-induced nuclear particles (neutrons, protons, and alpha particles) generated by high-energy photon beams from medical linacs is investigated. Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNPX code are performed for three different photon beams from two different machines: Siemens 18 MV, Varian 15 MV, and Varian 18 MV. The linac head components are simulated in detail. The dose distributions from photons, neutrons, protons, and alpha particles are calculated in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Neutrons are generated in both the linac head and the phantom. This study includes (a) field size effects, (b) off-axis dose profiles, (c) neutron contribution from the linac head, (d) dose contribution from capture gamma rays, (e) phantom heterogeneity effects, and (f) effects of primary electron energy shift. Results are presented in terms of absolute dose distributions and also in terms of DER (dose equivalent ratio). The DER is the maximum dose from the particle (neutron, proton, or alpha) divided by the maximum photon dose, multiplied by the particle quality factor and the modulation scaling factor. The total DER including neutrons, protons, and alphas is about 0.66 cSv/Gy for the Siemens 18 MV beam (10 cm x 10 cm). The neutron DER decreases with decreasing field size while the proton (or alpha) DER does not vary significantly except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field. Both Varian beams (15 and 18 MV) produce more neutrons, protons, and alphas particles than the Siemens 18 MV beam. This is mainly due to their higher primary electron energies: 15 and 18.3 MeV, respectively, vs 14 MeV for the Siemens 18 MV beam. For all beams, neutrons contribute more than 75% of the total DER, except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field (approximately 50%). The total DER is 1.52 and 2.86 cSv/Gy for the 15 and 18 MV Varian beams (10 cm x 10 cm), respectively. Media with relatively high-Z elements like bone may increase the dose from heavy charged particles by a factor 4. The total DER is sensitive to

  8. Model-based calculations of off-axis ratio of conic beams for a dedicated 6 MV radiosurgery unit

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J. N.; Ding, X.; Du, W.; Pino, R.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Because the small-radius photon beams shaped by cones in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) lack lateral electronic equilibrium and a detector's finite cross section, direct experimental measurement of dosimetric data for these beams can be subject to large uncertainties. As the dose calculation accuracy of a treatment planning system largely depends on how well the dosimetric data are measured during the machine's commissioning, there is a critical need for an independent method to validate measured results. Therefore, the authors studied the model-based calculation as an approach to validate measured off-axis ratios (OARs). Methods: The authors previously used a two-component analytical model to calculate central axis dose and associated dosimetric data (e.g., scatter factors and tissue-maximum ratio) in a water phantom and found excellent agreement between the calculated and the measured central axis doses for small 6 MV SRS conic beams. The model was based on that of Nizin and Mooij [''An approximation of central-axis absorbed dose in narrow photon beams,'' Med. Phys. 24, 1775-1780 (1997)] but was extended to account for apparent attenuation, spectral differences between broad and narrow beams, and the need for stricter scatter dose calculations for clinical beams. In this study, the authors applied Clarkson integration to this model to calculate OARs for conic beams. OARs were calculated for selected cones with radii from 0.2 to 1.0 cm. To allow comparisons, the authors also directly measured OARs using stereotactic diode (SFD), microchamber, and film dosimetry techniques. The calculated results were machine-specific and independent of direct measurement data for these beams. Results: For these conic beams, the calculated OARs were in excellent agreement with the data measured using an SFD. The discrepancies in radii and in 80%-20% penumbra were within 0.01 cm, respectively. Using SFD-measured OARs as the reference data, the authors found that the

  9. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  10. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  11. An Experimental and Theoretical Approach on the Modeling of Sliding Response of Rock Wedges under Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydan, Ömer; Kumsar, Halil

    2010-11-01

    The stability of rock slopes under dynamic loading in mining and civil engineering depends upon the slope geometry, mechanical properties of rock mass and discontinuities, and the characteristics of dynamic loads with time. The wedge failure is one of the common forms of slope failures. The authors presented some stability conditions for rock wedges under dynamic loading and they confirmed their validity through the laboratory experimental studies in a previous paper in 2000, which is often quoted by others to validate their softwares, including some commercial software. In this study, the authors investigate the sliding responses of rock wedges under dynamic loads rather than the initiation of wedge sliding. First, some laboratory model tests are described. On the basis of these model tests on rock wedges, the theoretical model proposed previously is extended to compute the sliding responses of rock wedges in time domain. The proposed theoretical model is applied to simulate the sliding responses of rock wedge model tests and its validity is discussed. In the final part, the method proposed is applied to actual wedge failures observed in 1995 Dinar earthquake and 2005 Pakistan-Kashmir earthquake, and the results are discussed.

  12. 75 FR 44720 - Safety Zone; Live-Fire Gun Exercise, M/V Del Monte, James River, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Live-Fire Gun Exercise, M/V Del Monte... specified waters of the James River to protect mariners from the hazards associated with live fire and... conduct a live fire and explosive training event onboard the M/V Del Monte in the vicinity of the...

  13. Latest Pleistocene Sediment Wedge on the New Jersey Outer Continental Shelf - Forced Regressive Paleo-Hudson Delta?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, M.; Goff, J. A.; Steel, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The offlapping sediment wedge on the outer shelf off New Jersey that overlies the regional reflector R-horizon shows many of the characteristic features of a progradational succession deposited during falling sea level (forced regression). This interpretation is consistent with the estimated latest Pleistocene age of the wedge - a well-established period of large-scale eustatic sea level fall. The sediment wedge occupies the outer shelf of New Jersey south of the Hudson Shelf Valley, extending down to the shelf edge. The sediment wedge appears to be strongly strike-oriented. The absence of any record of time-equivalent fluvial/distributary channels on the proximal part of the sediment wedge led some previous workers to the interpretation that the wedge was a product of redistribution of sediment on the shelf rather than a deltaic feature supplied by a fluvial source. The absence of fluvial and coastal plain deposits capping the proximal end of the wedge is actually a characteristic feature of forced regressive deposits and does not preclude a fluvial source for the sediments constituting the wedge. Reinterpretation of high-resolution (1-12 kHz), deep-towed and hull-mounted CHIRP seismic data collected on the New Jersey outer shelf in 2001, 2002 and 2006 shows possible terminal distributary channel deposits and mass transport deposits preserved in the distal part of the wedge that have not been described previously. These channel-like features are restricted in their distribution and their preservation in the sedimentary record is possibly due to punctuated sea-level rise within the overall falling trajectory of sea level that preceded the last glacial maximum (LGM). The presence of these channels and the mass transport complexes point to a direct fluvial feeder, which supplied the sediments to build the sediment wedge on New Jersey outer continental shelf. Detailed mapping of the sediment wedge using the CHIRP data shows that the sediment wedge is composed of

  14. Dosimetric Comparison of 6 MV and 15 MV Single Arc Rapidarc to Helical TomoTherapy for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jing; Yue Jinbo; McLawhorn, Robert; Yang Wensha; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Dunlap, Neal E.; Sheng Ke; Yin Fangfang; Benedict, Stanley H.

    2011-10-01

    We conducted a planning study to compare Varian's RapidArc (RA) and helical TomoTherapy (HT) for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Three intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were generated for 8 patients with pancreatic cancer: one using HT with 6-MV beam (Plan{sub HT6}), one using single-arc RA with 6-MV beam (Plan{sub RA6}), and one using single-arc RA with 15-MV beam (Plan{sub RA15}). Dosimetric indices including high/low conformality index (CI{sub 100%}/CI{sub 50%}), heterogeneity index (HI), monitor units (MUs), and doses to organs at risk (OARs) were compared. The mean CI{sub 100%} was statistically equivalent with respect to the 2 treatment techniques, as well as beam energy (0.99, 1.01, and 1.02 for Plan{sub HT6}, Plan{sub RA6}, and Plan{sub RA156,} respectively). The CI{sub 50%} and HI were improved in both RA plans over the HT plan. The RA plans significantly reduced MU (MU{sub RA6} = 697, MU{sub RA15} = 548) compared with HT (MU{sub HT6} = 6177, p = 0.008 in both cases). The mean maximum cord dose was decreased from 29.6 Gy in Plan{sub HT6} to 21.6 Gy (p = 0.05) in Plan{sub RA6} and 21.7 Gy (p = 0.04) in Plan{sub RA15}. The mean bowel dose decreased from 17.2 Gy in Plan{sub HT6} to 15.2 Gy (p = 0.03) in Plan{sub RA6} and 15.0 Gy (p = 0.03) Plan{sub RA15}. The mean liver dose decreased from 8.4 Gy in Plan{sub HT6} to 6.3 Gy (p = 0.04) in Plan{sub RA6} and 6.2 Gy in Plan{sub RA15}. Variations of the mean dose to the duodenum, kidneys, and stomach were statistically insignificant. RA and HT can both deliver conformal dose distributions to target volumes while limiting the dose to surrounding OARs in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Dosimetric advantages might be gained by using RA over HT by reducing the dose to OARs and total MUs used for treatment.

  15. Long range hybrid tube-wedge plasmonic waveguide with extreme light confinement and good fabrication error tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Xu, Kai; Wang, Liang

    2016-02-22

    We studied a novel long range hybrid tube-wedge plasmonic (LRHTWP) waveguide consisting of a high index dielectric nanotube placed above a triangular metal wedge substrate. Using comprehensive numerical simulations on guiding properties of the designed waveguide, it is found that extreme light confinement and low propagation loss are obtained due to strong coupling between dielectric nanotube mode and wedge plasmon polariton. Comparing with previous studied hybrid plasmonic waveguides, the LRHTWP waveguide has longer propagation length and tighter mode confinement. In addition, the LRHTWP waveguide is quite tolerant to practical fabrication errors such as variation of the wedge tip angle and the horizontal misalignment between the nanotube and the metal wedge. The proposed LRHTWP waveguide could have many application potentials for various high performance nanophotonic components.

  16. Widespread Degradation of Ice Wedges on the Arctic Coastal Plain in Northern Alaska in Response to the Recent Warmer Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Y.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Pullman, E. R.

    2003-12-01

    The continuous permafrost on the Arctic Coastal Plain in northern Alaska has been considered stable because permafrost temperatures remain low, even with an increase of several degrees during the last decades. Ice wedges, however, are particularly susceptible to degradation because only a very thin layer of permafrost (the transient layer) exists between the ice and the bottom of the active layer. An increase in the active layer during unusually warm periods causes the thawing front to encounter the underlying ice wedges and initiate degradation. Field observations and photogrammetric analysis of 1945, 1979, and 2001 aerial photography indicate that there has been widespread degradation of the ice wedges on the Arctic Coastal Plain west of the Colville Delta over the recent 57-year period, and indications are that most of the degradation occurred during the last two decades. Field sampling at 46 polygonal troughs and their intersections showed that ice wedge degradation has been relatively recent as indicated by newly drowned vegetation. We found thermokarst was widespread on a variety of terrain conditions, but most prevalent on, ice-rich centers of old drained lake basins and alluvial-marine terraces, which have the greatest ice wedge development in the studied landscape. Ice wedges on these terrains typically occupy from 10 to 20 % of the upper permafrost. We attributed the natural degradation to warm weather during the last decades, because disturbance of the ground surface, which could have similar impact on ice wedges, was not evident. While, ice-wedge degradation probably has been periodically occurring at low rates over the preceding centuries, it has greatly accelerated during the last several decades. We identified six stages of ice-wedge degradation and stabilization. They include: (1) the loss of transient layer of upper permafrost above ice wedges, leading to enhanced nutrient availability and vegetative growth; (2) thawing of ice wedges and surface

  17. New MV cable design for wet environments in underground distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, M.D.R. Jr. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes the development of new wet design MV power cables, up to 35 kV, using EPDM compound as insulation and longitudinal water tightness. The combination of the cable design and the type of insulation compound allow for reduction of the insulation thickness in such a way, as to have an electrical stress at the conductor of 4 kV/mm which is significantly greater than used in MV distribution cables. Following a methodology established, at the author's company, the reliability of this design, cable and EPDM's formulation, in wet location, without metallic water barriers, was well demonstrated. Mini-installation of model cables in service-like conditions, to estimate the ageing rate, are presented and discussed.

  18. Fabrication Technologies of the High Gradient Accelerator Structures at 100MV/M Range

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Juwen; Lewandowski, James; Van Pelt, John; Yoneda, Charles; Gudkov, Boris; Riddone, Germana; Higo, Toshiyasu; Takatomi, Toshikazu; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-07-03

    A CERN-SLAC-KEK collaboration on high gradient X-band structure research has been established in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC baseline design for the main linac stably operating at more than 100 MV/m loaded accelerating gradient. Several prototype CLIC structures were successfully fabricated and high power tested. They operated at 105 MV/m with a breakdown rate that meets the CLIC linear collider specifications of < 5 x 10{sup -7}/pulse/m. This paper summarizes the fabrication technologies including the mechanical design, precision machining, chemical cleaning, diffusion bonding as well as vacuum baking and all related assembly technologies. Also, the tolerances control, tuning and RF characterization will be discussed.

  19. Critical taper wedge mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts on Venus - Initial results from Magellan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suppe, John; Connors, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Examples of fold-and-thrust belts from a variety of tectonic settings on Venus are introduced. Predictions for the mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts on Venus are examined on the basis of wedge theory, rock mechanics data, and currently known conditions on Venus. The theoretical predictions are then compared with new Magellan data.

  20. Geochemical interaction between subducting slab and mantle wedge:Insight from observation and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baitsch Ghirardello, B.; Gerya, T. V.; Burg, J.-P.; Jagoutz, O.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the subduction factory and geochemical interactions between subducting slab and the overlying non homogeneously depleted mantle wedge requires better knowledge of passways of slab-derived fluids and melts and their interactions with the melt source in the mantle wedge. Our approach of understanding subduction-related processes consists in coupled geochemical-petrological-thermomechanical numerical geodynamic modelling of subduction zones. With this method we can simulate and visualize the evolution of various fields such as temperature, pressure, melt production etc. Furthermore we extend this tool for 2D and 3D modelling of the evolution of various geochemical signatures in subduction zones. Implementation of geochemical signatures in numerical models is based on marker-in-cell method and allows capturing influences of various key processes such as mechanical mixing of crustal and mantle rocks, fluid release, transport and consuming and melt generation and extraction. Concerning the isotopic signatures, we focus at the first stage on a limited number of elements: Pb, Hf, Sr and Nd. These incompatible elements are transported by hydrated fluids and/or melts through the mantle wedge and therefore they are good tracers for presenting the interaction between mantle wedge and slab. The chosen incompatible elements are also well explored and a large data set is available from literature. At this stage we focus on intra-oceanic subduction and numerical modelling predictions are compared to natural geochemical data from various modern and fossil subduction zones (Aleutian, Marianas, New Britain, Kermadec arcs, Kohistan, Vanuatu).

  1. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 223 - Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening 17 Figure 17 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1508 - Crib Slat Loading Wedge

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Crib Slat Loading Wedge 1 Figure 1 to Part 1508 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS Pt. 1508, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1508—Crib Slat...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1508 - Crib Slat Loading Wedge

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Crib Slat Loading Wedge 1 Figure 1 to Part 1508 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS Pt. 1508, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1508—Crib Slat...

  4. Non-Coulomb wedges, wrong-way thrusting, and natural hazards in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, Marc-André; Klaeschen, Dirk; Flueh, Ernst; Malavieille, Jacques

    2001-05-01

    Landward vergence in accretionary wedges is an uncommon phenomenon not readily explained by classical Mohr-Coulomb critical wedge theory. Predominantly landward- vergent thrust faults are observed along the Cascadia convergent margin from 45°N to 48°N. We present depth-migrated multichannel seismic images of the internal structure of the accretionary wedge offshore Washington collected during the ORWELL project in 1996. These reveal a high p-wave velocity (≥4 km/s) basal layer that thickens landward and serves as a décollement for a series of overlying landward-vergent thrust faults. Analog modeling using a ductile basal layer consisting of silicone putty produces an array of trenchward-propagating, landward-vergent thrusts and offers a plausible mechanical model for the evolution of these structures. The rheological properties of a basal calcareous mudstone layer offshore Cascadia are discussed in relation to the mechanics of landward vergence and to rapid loading due to the prograding Nitinat and Astoria deep-sea fans. A viscoelastic layer beneath the accretionary wedge is considered to be capable of rupturing during great interplate earthquakes and thus represents an increased risk for both the maximum size of such an event and for the generation of tsunamis.

  5. Driving forces in moving-contact problems of dynamic elasticity: Indentation, wedging and free sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepyan, Leonid I.; Brun, Michele

    2012-11-01

    The steady-state solution for an elastic half-plane under a moving frictionless smooth indenter of arbitrary shape is derived based on the corresponding transient problem and on a condition concerning energy fluxes. Resulting stresses and displacements are found explicitly starting from their expressions in terms of a single analytical function. This solution incorporates all speed ranges, including the super-Rayleigh subsonic and intersonic speed regimes, which received no final description to date. Next, under a similar formulation the wedging of an elastic plane is considered for a finite wedge moving at a distance from the crack tip. Finally, we solve the problem for such a wedge moving along the interface of two elastic half-planes compressed together. Considering these problems we determine the driving forces caused by the main underlying factors: the stress field singular points on the contact area (super-Rayleigh subsonic speed regime), the wave radiation (intersonic and supersonic regimes) and the fracture resistance (wedging problem). In addition to the sub-Rayleigh speed regime, where the sliding contact itself gives no contribution to the driving forces, there exists a sharp decrease in the resistance in the vicinity of the longitudinal wave speed with zero limit at this speed.

  6. Analysis and measurement of electromagnetic scattering by pyramidal and wedge absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, B. T.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1986-01-01

    By modifying the reflection coefficients in the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction a solution that approximates the scattering from a dielectric wedge is found. This solution agrees closely with the exact solution of Rawlins which is only valid for a few minor cases. This modification is then applied to the corner diffraction coefficient and combined with an equivalent current and geometrical optics solutions to model scattering from pyramid and wedge absorbers. Measured results from 12 inch pyramid absorbers from 2 to 18 GHz are compared to calculations assuming the returns add incoherently and assuming the returns add coherently. The measured results tend to be between the two curves. Measured results from the 8 inch wedge absorber are also compared to calculations with the return being dominated by the wedge diffraction. The procedures for measuring and specifying absorber performance are discussed and calibration equations are derived to calculate a reflection coefficient or a reflectivity using a reference sphere. Shaping changes to the present absorber designs are introduced to improve performance based on both high and low frequency analysis. Some prototypes were built and tested.

  7. Accretion in the wake of terrane collision: The Neogene accretionary wedge off Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fruehn, J.; Von Huene, R.; Fisher, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Subduction accretion and repeated terrane collision shaped the Alaskan convergent margin. The Yakutat Terrane is currently colliding with the continental margin below the central Gulf of Alaska. During the Neogene the terrane's western part was subducted after which a sediment wedge accreted along the northeast Aleutian Trench. This wedge incorporates sediment eroded from the continental margin and marine sediments carried into the subduction zone on the Pacific plate. Prestack depth migration was performed on six seismic reflection lines to resolve the structure within this accretionary wedge and its backstop. The lateral extent of the structures is constrained by high-resolution swath bathymetry and seismic lines collected along strike. Accretionary structure consists of variably sized thrust slices that were deformed against a backstop during frontal accretion and underplating. Toward the northeast the lower slope steepens, the wedge narrows, and the accreted volume decreases notwith-standing a doubling of sediments thickness in the trench. In the northeasternmost transect, near the area where the terrane's trailing edge subducts, no frontal accretion is observed and the slope is eroded. The structures imaged along the seismic lines discussed here most likely result from progressive evolution from erosion to accretion, as the trailing edge of the Yakutat Terrane is subducting.

  8. Geodetic observations of megathrust earthquakes and backarc wedge deformation across the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, J. R.; Brooks, B. A.; Foster, J. H.; Bevis, M. G.; Echalar, A.; Caccamise, D.; Heck, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) data offer an opportunity to investigate active orogenic wedges yet surface velocity fields are available for only a few examples worldwide. More observations are needed to link deformation processes across multiple timescales and to better understand strain accumulation and release in active wedge settings. Here we present a new GPS velocity field for the central Andes and the backarc orogenic wedge comprising the southern Subandes of Bolivia (SSA), a region previously thought to be mostly isolated from the plate boundary earthquake cycle. The time span of our observations (2000 to mid-2014) includes two megathrust earthquakes along the Chile trench that affected the SSA. The 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake resulted in a regional postseismic decrease in the eastward component of horizontal surface velocities. Preliminary analysis of the deformation field from the April 01 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua, Chile earthquake also indicates a postseismic signal extending into the SSA. We create an interseismic velocity field for the SSA by correcting campaign GPS site velocities for the seasonal cycles estimated from continuous GPS site time series. We remove the effects of both megathrust events by estimating coseismic steps and fitting linear and logarithmic functions to the postseismic GPS site motions. The velocity estimates at most locations increase after correcting for the transients. This finding suggests that forces leading to shortening and earthquakes in the backarc wedge are not as temporally consistent as previously considered.

  9. Arc-parallel flow in the mantle wedge beneath Costa Rica and Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Hoernle, Kaj; Abt, David L; Fischer, Karen M; Nichols, Holly; Hauff, Folkmar; Abers, Geoffrey A; van den Bogaard, Paul; Heydolph, Ken; Alvarado, Guillermo; Protti, Marino; Strauch, Wilfried

    2008-02-28

    Resolving flow geometry in the mantle wedge is central to understanding the thermal and chemical structure of subduction zones, subducting plate dehydration, and melting that leads to arc volcanism, which can threaten large populations and alter climate through gas and particle emission. Here we show that isotope geochemistry and seismic velocity anisotropy provide strong evidence for trench-parallel flow in the mantle wedge beneath Costa Rica and Nicaragua. This finding contradicts classical models, which predict trench-normal flow owing to the overlying wedge mantle being dragged downwards by the subducting plate. The isotopic signature of central Costa Rican volcanic rocks is not consistent with its derivation from the mantle wedge or eroded fore-arc complexes but instead from seamounts of the Galapagos hotspot track on the subducting Cocos plate. This isotopic signature decreases continuously from central Costa Rica to northwestern Nicaragua. As the age of the isotopic signature beneath Costa Rica can be constrained and its transport distance is known, minimum northwestward flow rates can be estimated (63-190 mm yr(-1)) and are comparable to the magnitude of subducting Cocos plate motion (approximately 85 mm yr(-1)). Trench-parallel flow needs to be taken into account in models evaluating thermal and chemical structure and melt generation in subduction zones.

  10. Geant4 simulations on medical Linac operation at 18 MV: Experimental validation based on activation foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagena, E.; Stoulos, S.; Manolopoulou, M.

    2016-03-01

    The operation of a medical linear accelerator was simulated using the Geant4 code regarding to study the characteristics of an 18 MeV photon beam. Simulations showed that (a) the photon spectrum at the isocenter is not influenced by changes of the primary electron beam's energy distribution and spatial spread (b) 98% of the photon energy fluence scored at the isocenter is primary photons that have only interacted with the target (c) the number of contaminant electrons is not negligible since it fluctuated around 5×10-5 per primary electron or 2.40×10-3 per photon at the isocenter (d) the number of neutrons that are created by (γ, n) reactions is 3.13×10-6 per primary electron or 1.50×10-3 per photon at the isocenter (e) a flattening filter free beam needs less primary electrons in order to deliver the same photon fluence at the isocenter than a normal flattening filter operation (f) there is no significant increase of the surface dose due to the contaminant electrons by removing the flattening filter (g) comparing the neutron fluences per incident electron for the flattened and unflattened beam, the neutron fluencies is 7% higher for the unflattened beams. To validate the simulations results, the total neutron and photon fluence at the isocenter field were measured using nickel, indium, and natural uranium activation foils. The percentage difference between simulations and measurements was 1.26% in case of uranium and 2.45% in case of the indium foil regarding photon fluencies while for neutrons the discrepancy is higher up to 8.0%. The photon and neutron fluencies of the simulated experiments fall within a range of ±1 and ±2 sigma error, respectively, compared to the ones obtained experimentally.

  11. The influence of physical wedges on penumbra and in-field dose uniformity in ocular proton beams.

    PubMed

    Baker, Colin; Kacperek, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    A physical wedge may be partially introduced into a proton beam when treating ocular tumours in order to improve dose conformity to the distal border of the tumour and spare the optic nerve. Two unwanted effects of this are observed: a predictable broadening of the beam penumbra on the wedged side of the field and, less predictably, an increase in dose within the field along a relatively narrow volume beneath the edge (toe) of the wedge, as a result of small-angle proton scatter. Monte Carlo simulations using MCNPX and direct measurements with radiochromic (GAFCHROMIC(®) EBT2) film were performed to quantify these effects for aluminium wedges in a 60 MeV proton beam as a function of wedge angle and position of the wedge relative to the patient. For extreme wedge angles (60° in eye tissue) and large wedge-to-patient distances (70 mm in this context), the 90-10% beam penumbra increased from 1.9 mm to 9.1 mm. In-field dose increases from small-angle proton scatter were found to contribute up to 21% additional dose, persisting along almost the full depth of the spread-out-Bragg peak. Profile broadening and in-field dose enhancement are both minimised by placing the wedge as close as possible to the patient. Use of lower atomic number wedge materials such as PMMA reduce the magnitude of both effects as a result of a reduced mean scattering angle per unit energy loss; however, their larger physical size and greater variation in density are undesirable. PMID:26988936

  12. M.V. Volkenstein, evolutionary thinking and the structure of fitness landscapes.

    PubMed

    Conrad, M; Ebeling, W

    1992-01-01

    High dimensional fitness landscapes are robustly dominated by saddle points, not isolated peaks. We present an argument to this effect that is reminiscent of May's complexity stability analysis and trace out the significance for the dynamics of speciation, the connection between the neutral and punctuated aspects of evolution and evolution on moving landscapes. The paper is written in honor of M.V. Volkenstein (October 23rd, 1912-February 18th, 1992), who devoted his last papers to uniting dynamics with evolutionary thinking.

  13. 33 CFR 165.T13-175 - Safety Zone; M/V DAVY CROCKETT, Columbia River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...°34′51.02″ N, 122°28′07.32″ W, then proceeding to the shoreline to the fourth point on the Washington... the M/V DAVY CROCKETT. (b) Regulations. In accordance with the general regulations in 33 CFR Part 165...) Enforcement period. The safety zone created in this section will be in effect from May 23, 2011 through...

  14. Optimized Hybrid MV-kV Imaging Protocol for Volumetric Prostate Arc Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wu; Wiersma, Rodney D.; Xing, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To develop a real-time prostate position monitoring technique for modern arc radiotherapy through novel usage of cine-MV imaging together with as-needed kV imaging. Methods We divided the task of monitoring intrafraction prostate motion into two steps for rotational deliveries: (i) to detect potential target motion beyond a pre-defined threshold using MV images from different viewing angles by taking advantage of gantry rotation during arc therapy and (ii) to verify the displacement and determine whether an intervention is needed using fiducial/tumor position information acquired from combined MV-kV imaging (by turning on the kV imager). A Varian Trilogy™ linac with onboard kV imager was used to examine selected typical trajectories using a 4D motion phantom. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated using phantom measurements and computer simulation for 536 Calypso-measured tracks from 17 patients. Results Fiducial displacement relative to the MV beam was limited to within a range of 3mm for 99.9% of the time with better than 1mm accuracy. On average, only ∼0.5 intervention per arc delivery was needed to achieve this level of accuracy. Compared to other fluoroscopy-based tracking techniques, kV usage is significantly reduced to an average of less than 15 times per arc delivery. Conclusions By focusing the attention to detecting a pre-defined abnormal motion (i.e., “failure” detection) and utilizing the inherent mechanism of gantry rotation during arc radiotherapy, the current approach provides us with a high confidence about the prostate position in real-time without paying the unwanted overhead of continuous or periodic kV imaging strategy. PMID:20472354

  15. New concepts on MV distribution from insulated shield wires of HV lines

    SciTech Connect

    Iliceto, F. ); Cinieri, E. . Ist. di Fisica); Casely-Hayford, L. )

    1989-10-01

    The paper deals with the problem of the most cost effective power supply to the villages and communities of developing countries, located along the route of HV lines, up to 100 km distant from the HV/MV transformer stations. In the first part of the paper a novel solution is presented. This consists of: (i) insulation of the shield wire(s) of an HV line, and wire(s) energization at MV (10 to 34.5 kV) from the closest transformer station; (ii) supply of villages along the line route by means of standard MV/LV distribution transformers connected between the shield wire(s) and ground. Four different schemes are presented, two of them suitable for single-phase distribution, the others for 3-phase supply. The behaviour in steady-state and in transient conditions is analyzed. The second part of the paper reports the positive results of 33 months of operation of an experimental scheme tested in Ghana for supply of single-phase and 3-phase loads from the two insulated shield wires of a 161 kV line. Finally the paper describes the distribution schemes along 407 km of new 161 kV lines in Northern Ghana, where the novel solution is applied to supply power to both domestic and industrial loads in 12 small towns with a design aggregate load of 5000 kW.

  16. An Analytical Investigation of an Oscillating Wedge in a Supersonic Perfect Gas Flow. Ph.D Thesis - North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. M.

    1971-01-01

    Several aspects of the oscillating wedge are investigated to evaluate both the resulting trends for the wedge and methods of analyzing unsteady flows. An existing hypersonic small disturbance theory for an oscillating thin wedge is extended and applied. A perturbation method involving linearization about the known flow is then derived and discussed. Subsequently, a finite difference technique for calculating the complete unsteady flow field of the wedge in motion is presented and discussed in conjunction with some calculated quasi-static nonlinear trends.

  17. Role of ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks in recent ice wedge degradation and stabilization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mark Torre Jorgenson,; Mikhail Kanevskiy,; Yuri Shur,; Natalia Moskalenko,; Dana Brown,; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Striegl, Rob; Koch, Joshua C.

    2015-01-01

    Ground ice is abundant in the upper permafrost throughout the Arctic and fundamentally affects terrain responses to climate warming. Ice wedges, which form near the surface and are the dominant type of massive ice in the Arctic, are particularly vulnerable to warming. Yet processes controlling ice wedge degradation and stabilization are poorly understood. Here we quantified ice wedge volume and degradation rates, compared ground ice characteristics and thermal regimes across a sequence of five degradation and stabilization stages and evaluated biophysical feedbacks controlling permafrost stability near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Mean ice wedge volume in the top 3 m of permafrost was 21%. Imagery from 1949 to 2012 showed thermokarst extent (area of water-filled troughs) was relatively small from 1949 (0.9%) to 1988 (1.5%), abruptly increased by 2004 (6.3%) and increased slightly by 2012 (7.5%). Mean annual surface temperatures varied by 4.9°C among degradation and stabilization stages and by 9.9°C from polygon center to deep lake bottom. Mean thicknesses of the active layer, ice-poor transient layer, ice-rich intermediate layer, thermokarst cave ice, and wedge ice varied substantially among stages. In early stages, thaw settlement caused water to impound in thermokarst troughs, creating positive feedbacks that increased net radiation, soil heat flux, and soil temperatures. Plant growth and organic matter accumulation in the degraded troughs provided negative feedbacks that allowed ground ice to aggrade and heave the surface, thus reducing surface water depth and soil temperatures in later stages. The ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks greatly complicate efforts to assess permafrost responses to climate change.

  18. Role of ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks in recent ice wedge degradation and stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, M. T.; Kanevskiy, M.; Shur, Y.; Moskalenko, N.; Brown, D. R. N.; Wickland, K.; Striegl, R.; Koch, J.

    2015-11-01

    Ground ice is abundant in the upper permafrost throughout the Arctic and fundamentally affects terrain responses to climate warming. Ice wedges, which form near the surface and are the dominant type of massive ice in the Arctic, are particularly vulnerable to warming. Yet processes controlling ice wedge degradation and stabilization are poorly understood. Here we quantified ice wedge volume and degradation rates, compared ground ice characteristics and thermal regimes across a sequence of five degradation and stabilization stages and evaluated biophysical feedbacks controlling permafrost stability near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Mean ice wedge volume in the top 3 m of permafrost was 21%. Imagery from 1949 to 2012 showed thermokarst extent (area of water-filled troughs) was relatively small from 1949 (0.9%) to 1988 (1.5%), abruptly increased by 2004 (6.3%) and increased slightly by 2012 (7.5%). Mean annual surface temperatures varied by 4.9°C among degradation and stabilization stages and by 9.9°C from polygon center to deep lake bottom. Mean thicknesses of the active layer, ice-poor transient layer, ice-rich intermediate layer, thermokarst cave ice, and wedge ice varied substantially among stages. In early stages, thaw settlement caused water to impound in thermokarst troughs, creating positive feedbacks that increased net radiation, soil heat flux, and soil temperatures. Plant growth and organic matter accumulation in the degraded troughs provided negative feedbacks that allowed ground ice to aggrade and heave the surface, thus reducing surface water depth and soil temperatures in later stages. The ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks greatly complicate efforts to assess permafrost responses to climate change.

  19. Opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a seven - to twelve-year study

    PubMed Central

    PIPINO, GENNARO; INDELLI, PIER FRANCESCO; TIGANI, DOMENICO; MAFFEI, GIUSEPPE; VACCARISI, DAVIDE

    2016-01-01

    Purpose medial opening-wedge osteotomy is a widely performed procedure used to treat moderate isolated medial knee osteoarthritis. Historically, the literature has contained reports showing satisfactory mid-term results when accurate patient selection and precise surgical techniques were applied. This study was conducted to investigate the clinical and radiographic seven- to twelve-year results of opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy in a consecutive series of patients affected by varus knee malalignment with isolated medial compartment degenerative joint disease. Methods we reviewed a case series of 147 medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomies at an average follow-up of 9.5 years. Endpoints for evaluation included the reporting of adverse effects, radiographic evidence of bone union, radiographic changes in the correction angle during union, and clinical and functional final outcomes. Results good or excellent results were obtained in 94% of the cases: the patients reported no major complications related to the opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy surgical technique, bone graft resorption, implant choice or postoperative rehabilitation protocol. At final follow-up, the average hip-knee angle was 4° of valgus without major loss of correction during the healing process. A statistically significant change in the patellar height was detected postoperatively, with a trend towards patella infera. Conclusions medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy is still a reliable method for correcting varus deformity while producing stable fixation, thus allowing satisfactory stability, adequate bone healing and satisfactory mid- to long-term results. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic cases series. PMID:27386441

  20. Complex interactions between diapirs and 4-D subduction driven mantle wedge circulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, R. T.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Analogue laboratory experiments generate 4-D flow of mantle wedge fluid and capture the evolution of buoyant mesoscale diapirs. The mantle is modeled with viscous glucose syrup with an Arrhenius type temperature dependent viscosity. To characterize diapir evolution we experiment with a variety of fluids injected from multiple point sources. Diapirs interact with kinematically induced flow fields forced by subducting plate motions replicating a range of styles observed in dynamic subduction models (e.g., rollback, steepening, gaps). Data is collected using high definition timelapse photography and quantified using image velocimetry techniques. While many studies assume direct vertical connections between the volcanic arc and the deeper mantle source region, our experiments demonstrate the difficulty of creating near vertical conduits. Results highlight extreme curvature of diapir rise paths. Trench-normal deflection occurs as diapirs are advected downward away from the trench before ascending into wedge apex directed return flow. Trench parallel deflections up to 75% of trench length are seen in all cases, exacerbated by complex geometry and rollback motion. Interdiapir interaction is also important; upwellings with similar trajectory coalesce and rapidly accelerate. Moreover, we observe a new mode of interaction whereby recycled diapir material is drawn down along the slab surface and then initiates rapid fluid migration updip along the slab-wedge interface. Variability in trajectory and residence time leads to complex petrologic inferences. Material from disparate source regions can surface at the same location, mix in the wedge, or become fully entrained in creeping flow adding heterogeneity to the mantle. Active diapirism or any other vertical fluid flux mechanism employing rheological weakening lowers viscosity in the recycling mantle wedge affecting both solid and fluid flow characteristics. Many interesting and insightful results have been presented based