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Sample records for mx devices

  1. Mx oligomer: a novel capsid pattern sensor?

    PubMed

    Kong, Jia; Ma, Min; He, Shuangyi; Qin, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    Myxovirus resistance proteins represent a family of interferon-induced restriction factors of the innate and adaptive immune system. Human MxB acts as a novel restriction factor with antiviral activity against a range of HIV-1 and other retroviruses mainly by inhibiting the uncoating process after reverse transcription but prior to integration. Based on published data and conservation analysis, we propose a novel hypothesis, in which MxB dimers form higher order oligomers that restrict retroviral replication by binding to the viral capsid. Insights into the mechanistic basis of structural and functional characteristics of MxB will greatly advance our understanding of MxB. PMID:27492442

  2. Mx1 and Mx2 key antiviral proteins are surprisingly lost in toothed whales.

    PubMed

    Braun, Benjamin A; Marcovitz, Amir; Camp, J Gray; Jia, Robin; Bejerano, Gill

    2015-06-30

    Viral outbreaks in dolphins and other Delphinoidea family members warrant investigation into the integrity of the cetacean immune system. The dynamin-like GTPase genes Myxovirus 1 (Mx1) and Mx2 defend mammals against a broad range of viral infections. Loss of Mx1 function in human and mice enhances infectivity by multiple RNA and DNA viruses, including orthomyxoviruses (influenza A), paramyxoviruses (measles), and hepadnaviruses (hepatitis B), whereas loss of Mx2 function leads to decreased resistance to HIV-1 and other viruses. Here we show that both Mx1 and Mx2 have been rendered nonfunctional in Odontoceti cetaceans (toothed whales, including dolphins and orcas). We discovered multiple exon deletions, frameshift mutations, premature stop codons, and transcriptional evidence of decay in the coding sequence of both Mx1 and Mx2 in four species of Odontocetes. We trace the likely loss event for both proteins to soon after the divergence of Odontocetes and Mystocetes (baleen whales) ∼33-37 Mya. Our data raise intriguing questions as to what drove the loss of both Mx1 and Mx2 genes in the Odontoceti lineage, a double loss seen in none of 56 other mammalian genomes, and suggests a hitherto unappreciated fundamental genetic difference in the way these magnificent mammals respond to viral infections.

  3. Mx1 and Mx2 key antiviral proteins are surprisingly lost in toothed whales

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Benjamin A.; Marcovitz, Amir; Camp, J. Gray; Jia, Robin; Bejerano, Gill

    2015-01-01

    Viral outbreaks in dolphins and other Delphinoidea family members warrant investigation into the integrity of the cetacean immune system. The dynamin-like GTPase genes Myxovirus 1 (Mx1) and Mx2 defend mammals against a broad range of viral infections. Loss of Mx1 function in human and mice enhances infectivity by multiple RNA and DNA viruses, including orthomyxoviruses (influenza A), paramyxoviruses (measles), and hepadnaviruses (hepatitis B), whereas loss of Mx2 function leads to decreased resistance to HIV-1 and other viruses. Here we show that both Mx1 and Mx2 have been rendered nonfunctional in Odontoceti cetaceans (toothed whales, including dolphins and orcas). We discovered multiple exon deletions, frameshift mutations, premature stop codons, and transcriptional evidence of decay in the coding sequence of both Mx1 and Mx2 in four species of Odontocetes. We trace the likely loss event for both proteins to soon after the divergence of Odontocetes and Mystocetes (baleen whales) ∼33–37 Mya. Our data raise intriguing questions as to what drove the loss of both Mx1 and Mx2 genes in the Odontoceti lineage, a double loss seen in none of 56 other mammalian genomes, and suggests a hitherto unappreciated fundamental genetic difference in the way these magnificent mammals respond to viral infections. PMID:26080416

  4. Comparison of MX-857 versus MX-641 chemistries for type 2485 film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourque, P. F.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted to evaluate Kodak MX-857 and MX-641 chemistry systems for use with film Type 2485 to be used in the dim light experiments on Apollo 16. The test program objectives were to: (1) retain a minimum ASA speed of at least 4000; (2) maintain a base-plus-fog level of 0.21 density units or less; and (3) minimize the granularity but do not exceed the granularity level of the Apollo 15 imagery. Test results on the Versamat processor indicate that the use of MX-857 chemistry is preferred over MX-641 chemistry in satisfying the stated test objectives.

  5. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of monolayer MX2 with metallic nano particles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Duan; Wu, Ye-Cun; Yang, Mei; Liu, Xiao; Coileáin, Cormac Ó; Abid, Mourad; Abid, Mohamed; Wang, Jing-Jing; Shvets, Igor; Xu, Hongjun; Chun, Byong Sun; Liu, Huajun; Wu, Han-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S) exhibit remarkable electronic and optical properties, making them candidates for application within flexible nano-optoelectronics. The ability to achieve a high optical signal, while quantitatively monitoring strain in real-time is the key requirement for applications in flexible sensing and photonics devices. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) allows us to achieve both simultaneously. However, the SERS depends crucially on the size and shape of the metallic nanoparticles (NPs), which have a large impact on its detection sensitivity. Here, we investigated the SERS of monolayer MX2, with particular attention paid to the effect of the distribution of the metallic NPs. We show that the SERS depends crucially on the distribution of the metallic NPs and also the phonon mode of the MX2. Moreover, strong coupling between MX2 and metallic NPs, through surface plasmon excitation, results in splitting of the and modes and an additional peak becomes apparent. For a WS2-Ag system the intensity of the additional peak increases exponentially with local strain, which opens another interesting window to quantitatively measure the local strain using SERS. Our experimental study may be useful for the application of monolayer MX2 in flexible nano-optoelectronics. PMID:27457808

  6. A class of monolayer metal halogenides MX2: Electronic structures and band alignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng; Wang, Weichao; Luo, Xiaoguang; Xie, Xinjian; Cheng, Yahui; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Wei-Hua

    2016-03-01

    With systematic first principles calculations, a class of monolayer metal halogenides MX2 (M = Mg, Ca, Zn, Cd, Ge, Pb; M = Cl, Br, I) has been proposed. Our study indicates that these monolayer materials are semiconductors with the band gaps ranging from 2.03 eV of ZnI2 to 6.08 eV of MgCl2. Overall, the band gap increases with the increase of the electronegativity of the X atom or the atomic number of the metal M. Meanwhile, the band gaps of monolayer MgX2 (X = Cl, Br) are direct while those of other monolayers are indirect. Based on the band edge curvatures, the derived electron (me) and hole (mh) effective masses of MX2 monolayers are close to their corresponding bulk values except that the me of CdI2 is three times larger and the mh for PbI2 is twice larger. Finally, the band alignments of all the studied MX2 monolayers are provided using the vacuum level as energy reference. These theoretical results may not only introduce the monolayer metal halogenides family MX2 into the emerging two-dimensional materials, but also provide insights into the applications of MX2 in future electronic, visible and ultraviolet optoelectronic devices.

  7. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of monolayer MX2 with metallic nano particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duan; Wu, Ye-Cun; Yang, Mei; Liu, Xiao; Coileáin, Cormac Ó; Abid, Mourad; Abid, Mohamed; Wang, Jing-Jing; Shvets, Igor; Xu, Hongjun; Chun, Byong Sun; Liu, Huajun; Wu, Han-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S) exhibit remarkable electronic and optical properties, making them candidates for application within flexible nano-optoelectronics. The ability to achieve a high optical signal, while quantitatively monitoring strain in real-time is the key requirement for applications in flexible sensing and photonics devices. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) allows us to achieve both simultaneously. However, the SERS depends crucially on the size and shape of the metallic nanoparticles (NPs), which have a large impact on its detection sensitivity. Here, we investigated the SERS of monolayer MX2, with particular attention paid to the effect of the distribution of the metallic NPs. We show that the SERS depends crucially on the distribution of the metallic NPs and also the phonon mode of the MX2. Moreover, strong coupling between MX2 and metallic NPs, through surface plasmon excitation, results in splitting of the and modes and an additional peak becomes apparent. For a WS2-Ag system the intensity of the additional peak increases exponentially with local strain, which opens another interesting window to quantitatively measure the local strain using SERS. Our experimental study may be useful for the application of monolayer MX2 in flexible nano-optoelectronics. PMID:27457808

  8. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of monolayer MX2 with metallic nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Duan; Wu, Ye-Cun; Yang, Mei; Liu, Xiao; Coileáin, Cormac Ó.; Abid, Mourad; Abid, Mohamed; Wang, Jing-Jing; Shvets, Igor; Xu, Hongjun; Chun, Byong Sun; Liu, Huajun; Wu, Han-Chun

    2016-07-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S) exhibit remarkable electronic and optical properties, making them candidates for application within flexible nano-optoelectronics. The ability to achieve a high optical signal, while quantitatively monitoring strain in real-time is the key requirement for applications in flexible sensing and photonics devices. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) allows us to achieve both simultaneously. However, the SERS depends crucially on the size and shape of the metallic nanoparticles (NPs), which have a large impact on its detection sensitivity. Here, we investigated the SERS of monolayer MX2, with particular attention paid to the effect of the distribution of the metallic NPs. We show that the SERS depends crucially on the distribution of the metallic NPs and also the phonon mode of the MX2. Moreover, strong coupling between MX2 and metallic NPs, through surface plasmon excitation, results in splitting of the and modes and an additional peak becomes apparent. For a WS2-Ag system the intensity of the additional peak increases exponentially with local strain, which opens another interesting window to quantitatively measure the local strain using SERS. Our experimental study may be useful for the application of monolayer MX2 in flexible nano-optoelectronics.

  9. Structural Insight into HIV-1 Restriction by MxB

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Frances Joan D.; Summers, Brady J.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Engelman, Alan; Xiong, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Summary The myxovirus resistance (Mx) proteins are interferon-induced dynamin GTPases that can inhibit a variety of viruses. Recently, MxB, but not MxA, was shown to restrict HIV-1 by an unknown mechanism that likely occurs in close proximity to the host cell nucleus and involves the viral capsid. Here, we present the crystal structure of MxB and reveal determinants involved in HIV-1 restriction. MxB adopts an extended anti-parallel dimer and dimerization, but not higher-ordered oligomerization, is critical for restriction. Although MxB is structurally similar to MxA, the orientation of individual domains differs between MxA and MxB and their antiviral functions rely on separate determinants, indicating distinct mechanisms for virus inhibition. Additionally, MxB directly binds the HIV-1 capsid and this interaction depends on dimerization and the N-terminus of MxB as well as the assembled capsid lattice. These insights establish a framework for understanding the mechanism by which MxB restricts HIV-1. PMID:25312384

  10. Phonon and thermal expansion properties in Weyl semimetals MX (M = Nb, Ta; X = P, As): ab initio studies.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dahu; Liu, Yaming; Rao, Fengfei; Wang, Fei; Sun, Qiang; Jia, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Weyl semimetal (WSM) is a new type of topological quantum material for future spintronic devices. Using the first-principles density functional theory, we systematically investigated the thermal expansion properties, and the temperature dependence of isovolume heat capacity and bulk modulus in WSMs MX (M = Nb, Ta; X = P, As). We also presented the phonon dispersion curves and its variation under stress in MX and the anisotropic thermal expansion properties due to the anisotropic crystal structure in WSMs have been predicted in our calculations. Intriguing, we found that the heat capacities increase more rapidly with increasing temperature in the low temperature region for all MX. Furthermore, our results showed that the thermal expansion properties are determined mainly by the isovolume heat capacity at low temperatures, while the bulk modulus has the major effect at high temperatures. These results are useful for applications of WSMs in electronic and spintronic devices. PMID:27174542

  11. MX-INDUCED URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIAL HYPERPLASIA IN EKER RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MX-INDUCED URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIAL HYPERPLASIA IN EKER RATS

    Epidemiological studies have shown a positive association between chronic exposure to chlorinated drinking water and human cancer, particularly of the urinary bladder. MX (3- chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydrox...

  12. Characterization of four Mx isoforms in the European eel, Anguilla anguilla.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bei; Huang, Wen Shu; Nie, P

    2013-09-01

    Mx protein is known to play an important role in vertebrate immune response to viral infection. In this study, cDNA sequences of four Mx isoforms, designated as MxA, B, C and D were characterized in the European eel, Anguilla anguilla. These sequences contained an open reading frame of 1899, 1896, 1866, 1779 bp, flanked by 95, 53, 138, 69 bp of 5' untranslated region and 389, 241, 136, 124 bp of 3' untranslated region, respectively. A phylogenetic tree constructed with Mx peptide sequences from vertebrates revealed that MxA, C and D in the European eel formed into a clade containing zebrafish MxA and MxB and Mx proteins in other teleosts, whereas MxB in the eel was clustered together with zebrafish MxD, MxG and MxF. The transcription level of all Mx isoforms increased in a poly I:C dose-dependent manner in peripheral blood leukocytes of eels, as revealed by real-time PCR. A further experiment was conducted to reveal the temporal change in expression of these isoforms in various organs/tissues following poly I:C stimulation, and significant increase in expression was observed at various degrees in different organs or in different sampling occasions within the 12 h experimental period. In particular, MxA had the highest level of increase, while MxB had the lowest; and three isoforms, MxA, MxB and MxD had the highest increase in intestine, while the highest increase of MxC expression was observed in liver. These four isoforms of eel Mx are thus expressed differentially, and further work is certainly required to clarify the activity of promoter elements and antiviral activity of these Mx isoforms.

  13. OpenMx: An Open Source Extended Structural Equation Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boker, Steven; Neale, Michael; Maes, Hermine; Wilde, Michael; Spiegel, Michael; Brick, Timothy; Spies, Jeffrey; Estabrook, Ryne; Kenny, Sarah; Bates, Timothy; Mehta, Paras; Fox, John

    2011-01-01

    OpenMx is free, full-featured, open source, structural equation modeling (SEM) software. OpenMx runs within the "R" statistical programming environment on Windows, Mac OS-X, and Linux computers. The rationale for developing OpenMx is discussed along with the philosophy behind the user interface. The OpenMx data structures are introduced--these…

  14. Software development tools for the CDF MX scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Stuermer, W.; Turner, K.; Littleton-Sestini, S.

    1991-11-01

    This paper discuses the design of the high level assembler and diagnostic control program developed for the MX, a high speed, custom designed computer used in the CDF data acquisition system at Fermilab. These programs provide a friendly productive environment for the development of software on the MX. Details of their implementation and special features, and some of the lessons learned during their development are included.

  15. Structural and functional analysis of the bovine Mx1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kohji; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Onogi, Akio; Takasuga, Akiko; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Ueda, Junji; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2009-04-01

    The bovine Mx1 promoter region was found to contain 4 IFN-stimulated response elements (ISREs), 7 GC boxes, 2 IL-6 responsive elements, 2 NFκB-binding sites and 2 AP-1-binding sites. Among Holstein, Charolai, and Brahman breeds, 5 nucleotide substitutions were detected in the promoter region. After the Mx1 promoter region from Holstein had been constructed with pGL-basic expression vector, the transfected cells showed promoter activity after IFN induction. Several artificial deletion mutants were prepared to determine the important regulatory elements responsible for the promoter activity, and it was found that ISRE has a key function in IFN response. The proximal ISRE1 showed potential induction by IFN. Furthermore, the proximal GC boxes were found to be essential for IFN response in the bovine Mx1 promoter with the deletion mutants. In this case, the 2 GC boxes exhibited a synergistic activation in the IFN response. Mithramycin A, an agent that inhibits gene expression selectively by coating GC boxes, was used, and Mx mRNA expression in MDBK cells was suppressed by this chemical. Therefore, GC boxes were also shown to be essential for IFN response in the bovine Mx1 gene. PMID:19203250

  16. Oligomerization Requirements for MX2-Mediated Suppression of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dicks, Matthew D. J.; Goujon, Caroline; Pollpeter, Darja; Betancor, Gilberto; Apolonia, Luis; Bergeron, Julien R. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2/MXB) is an interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) and was recently identified as a late postentry suppressor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, inhibiting the nuclear accumulation of viral cDNAs. Although the HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein is believed to be the viral determinant of MX2-mediated inhibition, the precise mechanism of antiviral action remains unclear. The MX family of dynamin-like GTPases also includes MX1/MXA, a well-studied inhibitor of a range of RNA and DNA viruses, including influenza A virus (FLUAV) and hepatitis B virus but not retroviruses. MX1 and MX2 are closely related and share similar domain architectures and structures. However, MX2 possesses an extended N terminus that is essential for antiviral function and confers anti-HIV-1 activity on MX1 [MX1(NMX2)]. Higher-order oligomerization is required for the antiviral activity of MX1 against FLUAV, with current models proposing that MX1 forms ring structures that constrict around viral nucleoprotein complexes. Here, we performed structure-function studies to investigate the requirements for oligomerization of both MX2 and chimeric MX1(NMX2) for the inhibition of HIV-1 infection. The oligomerization state of mutated proteins with amino acid substitutions at multiple putative oligomerization interfaces was assessed using a combination of covalent cross-linking and coimmunoprecipitation. We show that while monomeric MX2 and MX1(NMX2) mutants are not antiviral, higher-order oligomerization does not appear to be required for full antiviral activity of either protein. We propose that lower-order oligomerization of MX2 is sufficient for the effective inhibition of HIV-1. IMPORTANCE Interferon plays an important role in the control of virus replication during acute infection in vivo. Recently, cultured cell experiments identified human MX2 as a key effector in the interferon-mediated postentry block to HIV-1 infection. MX2 is a member of a family

  17. Influenza Virus Pathophysiology and Brain Invasion in Mice with Functional and Dysfunctional Mx1 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Nicole R.; Bohnet, Stewart G.; Majde, Jeannine A.; Krueger, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Mice with a dysfunctional myxovirus resistance-1 (dMx1) gene transport intranasally-instilled PR8 influenza virus to the olfactory bulb (OB) within 4 h post-infection. To determine if the presence of a functional Mx1 (fMx1) gene would influence this brain viral localization and/or disease, we infected mature C57BL/6 dMx1 and fMx1 mice under the same conditions and observed sickness behaviors, viral nucleoprotein (NP) RNA expression and innate immune mediator (IIM) mRNA expression in selected tissues at 15 and 96 h post-infection. Virus invaded the OB and lungs comparably in both sub-strains at 15 and 96 h as determined by nested PCR. In contrast, virus was present in blood and somatosensory cortex of dMx1, but not fMx1 mice at 96 h. At 15 h, sickness behaviors were comparable in both sub-strains; by 96 h dMx1, but not fMx1, were moribund. In both 15 h and 96 h lungs, viral NP was significantly elevated in the dMx1 mice compared to the fMx1 mice, as determined by quantitative PCR. OB expression of most IIM mRNAs was similar at both time periods in both sub-strains. In contrast, lung IIM mRNAs were elevated in fMx1 at 15 h, but by 96 h were consistently reduced compared to dMx1 mice. In conclusion, functional Mx1 did not alter OB invasion by virus but attenuated illness compared to dMx1 mice. Inflammation was similar in OBs and lungs of both strains at 15 h but by 96 h it was suppressed in lungs, but not in OBs, of fMx1 mice. PMID:21821116

  18. ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF VERACRUZ, MX ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an international technology transfer activity between EPA's Office of Research and Development and the state of Veracruz's Sub-secretary of the Environment, 50 stations within estuaries along the gulf coast of the state of Veracruz MX, were sampled during June and July...

  19. Current advances in synchrotron radiation instrumentation for MX experiments.

    PubMed

    Owen, Robin L; Juanhuix, Jordi; Fuchs, Martin

    2016-07-15

    Following pioneering work 40 years ago, synchrotron beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX) have improved in almost every aspect as instrumentation has evolved. Beam sizes and crystal dimensions are now on the single micron scale while data can be collected from proteins with molecular weights over 10 MDa and from crystals with unit cell dimensions over 1000 Å. Furthermore it is possible to collect a complete data set in seconds, and obtain the resulting structure in minutes. The impact of MX synchrotron beamlines and their evolution is reflected in their scientific output, and MX is now the method of choice for a variety of aims from ligand binding to structure determination of membrane proteins, viruses and ribosomes, resulting in a much deeper understanding of the machinery of life. A main driving force of beamline evolution have been advances in almost every aspect of the instrumentation comprising a synchrotron beamline. In this review we aim to provide an overview of the current status of instrumentation at modern MX experiments. The most critical optical components are discussed, as are aspects of endstation design, sample delivery, visualisation and positioning, the sample environment, beam shaping, detectors and data acquisition and processing. PMID:27046341

  20. Controlling spin lifetime with Dresselhaus and Rashba fields in the 2D semiconductor MX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Li, Pengke

    It is widely believed that whenever spin encodes logic state in a semiconductor device, transport channel materials with the longest spin lifetime are the most suitable choice. However, once a logic operation is completed, residual spins can and will interfere with those involved in future operations. We propose to solve this problem by utilizing the unique properties of spin-orbit effects in the electronic structure of monolayer of group-III metal-monochalcogenide (MX) semiconductors. The interplay of Dresselhaus and Rashba effective magnetic fields in these materials will be shown to provide effective external control over spin polarization lifetime, potentially useful for future spin-enabled digital devices. Based upon: Pengke Li and Ian Appelbaum, arXiv:1508.06963 (to appear in Phys. Rev. B). We acknowledge support from NSF, DTRA, and ONR.

  1. Expression dynamics of bovine MX genes in the endometrium and placenta during early to mid pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    SHIROZU, Takahiro; SASAKI, Keisuke; KAWAHARA, Manabu; YANAGAWA, Yojiro; NAGANO, Masashi; YAMAUCHI, Nobuhiko; TAKAHASHI, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    MX belongs to a family of type I interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes, and the MX protein has antiviral activity. MX has at least two isoforms, known as MX1 and MX2, in mammals. Moreover, bovine MX1 has been found to have alternative splice variants—namely, MX1-a and MX1B. In ruminants, IFN-τ—a type I IFN—is temporarily produced from the conceptus before implantation and induces MX expression in the endometrium. However, the expression dynamics of MX after implantation are not clear. In the present study, we investigated the expression of MX1-a, MX1B and MX2 in the endometrium and placenta before and after implantation along with the expression of IFN-α, type I receptors (IFNAR1 and IFNAR2) and interferon regulatory factors (IRF3 and IRF9). Pregnant uterine samples were divided into five groups according to pregnancy days 14–18, 25–40, 50–70, 80–100, and 130–150. Tissue samples were collected from the intercaruncular endometrium (IC), caruncular endometrium (C) and fetal placenta (P). Although all the MX expressions were significantly higher in the IC and C at days 14–18, presumably caused by embryo-secreted IFN-τ stimulation, their expressions were also detectable in the IC, C and P after implantation. Furthermore, IFN-α expression was significantly higher in the IC. RT-PCR indicated IFNAR1, IFNAR2, IRF3 and IRF9 mRNA in all the tissues during pregnancy. These results suggest that all the MX genes are affected by the type I IFN pathway during pregnancy and are involved in an immune response to protect the mother and fetus. PMID:26498202

  2. Specific intracellular localization and antiviral property of genetic and splicing variants in bovine Mx1.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kohji; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Onogi, Akio; Ueda, Junji; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2009-12-01

    In bovine Mx1, only an amino acid substitution between Ile and Met at position 120 was detected by the nucleotide sequence and mismatched PCR-RFLP technique. The Ile variant was assumed to distribute mainly in the bovine population since the gene frequency was 79.3%. Furthermore, we cloned water buffalo Mx1 cDNA, which showed 51 nucleotide and 20 amino acid substitutions in comparison with that of the cow. Another kind of Mx1 cDNA, bovine Mx1B cDNA, was found and it was deduced to cause 27 amino acid substitutions at the N-terminus compared to the original Mx1 by alternative splicing. However, no variation was detected in 27 amino acids specific for Mx1B among 29 cows and a water buffalo. We established four kinds of mRNA-expressing 3T3 cells and Vero cells. When infection experiments were performed using recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVDeltaG*-G), bovine Ile and Met types and water buffalo Mx1 mRNA-expressing cell lines showed equally positive antiviral activities (p < 0.05). On the other hand, bovine Mx1B mRNA-expressing cell lines did not have activity against VSVDeltaG*-G. Intracellular localization of bovine Mx1 and Mx1B proteins was examined by a transiently GFP-fused expression system in 3T3 cells. Bovine Mx1 was localized in the cytoplasm, while bovine Mx1B was mainly localized in the nucleus. An arginine-rich nuclear localization signal was found in 27 amino acids specific for Mx1B. N-terminus-deleted Mx1B was only localized in the cytoplasm, and the deleted Mx1B-expressing cell lines showed significantly positive antiviral activities (p < 0.05) against VSVDeltaG*-G.

  3. AmeriFlux MX-Lpa La Paz

    DOE Data Explorer

    Oechel, Walter [San Diego State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site MX-Lpa La Paz. Site Description - As evident by some very large Cardon (5-7 meters), according to Coyle and Roberts, 1975, extent vegetation has likely been around at least 200 years. Until about 15 years ago from 1996, site was used for livestock production and selective firewood extraction. However, when I look over the fence where there has been livestock activity, not much difference

  4. In vitro inhibition of the replication of classical swine fever virus by porcine Mx1 protein.

    PubMed

    He, Dan-ni; Zhang, Xiao-min; Liu, Ke; Pang, Ran; Zhao, Jin; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Pu-yan

    2014-04-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative pathogen of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious disease of swine. Mx proteins are interferon-induced dynamin-like GTPases present in all vertebrates with a wide range of antiviral activities. Although Zhao et al. (2011) have reported that human MxA can inhibit CSFV replication, whether porcine Mx1 (poMx1) has anti-CSFV activity remains unknown. In this study, we generated a cell line designated PK-15/EGFP-poMx1 which expressed porcine Mx1 protein constitutively, and we observed that the proliferation of progeny virus in this cell line was significantly inhibited as measured by virus titration, indirect immune fluorescence assay, Q-PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, when PTD-poMx1 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli (Zhang et al., 2013) was used to treat CSFV-infected PK-15 cells, the results showed that PTD-poMx1 inhibited CSFV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the proliferation of progeny virus was inhibited as measured by virus titration and Q-PCR. Overall, the results demonstrated that poMx1 effectively inhibited CSFV replication, suggesting that poMx1 may be a valuable therapeutic agent against CSFV infection.

  5. In vivo pharmacodynamics of new lipopeptide MX-2401.

    PubMed

    Craig, W A; Andes, D R; Stamstad, T

    2010-12-01

    MX-2401 is a novel lipopeptide (amphomycin analog) with a broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against Gram-positive organisms. We used murine thigh and lung infection models in neutropenic and normal mice to characterize the in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) activities of MX-2401. The compound (2.5 to 40 mg/kg of body weight) demonstrated linear PK characterized by an area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of 228 to 3,265 μg·h/ml and half-lives of 5.7 to 8.8 h. MICs ranged from 0.25 to 2 μg/ml. The in vivo postantibiotic effect was prolonged (8.5 h with Staphylococcus aureus and 10.3 to 12.3 with Streptococcus pneumoniae). MX-2401 exhibited dose-dependent in vivo activity against various strains of S. pneumoniae and S. aureus; penicillin and macrolide resistance in the pneumococci and methicillin resistance in the staphylococci had no impact on the antimicrobial activity of the drug. To determine which PK/PD index correlated best with MX-2401 activity, dose fractionation studies over a 72-hour period were performed. The maximum concentration of drug in serum divided by the MIC (C(max)/MIC) correlated best with the efficacy for both S. aureus and S. pneumoniae. Static doses required free-drug C(max)/MIC values of 0.683 to 1.06. Free-drug 72-h AUC/MIC values for the static dose were in the range of 7.49 to 32.3 and were less than expected. The drug showed modest enhancement in activity in the presence of white blood cells (1.7- to 3.4-fold). The potency of the drug in the lung was only marginally lower than in the thigh (1.3- to 1.9-fold). Based on its PK/PD profile, MX-2401 appears to be a promising new lipopeptide agent for treatment of infections by Gram-positive bacteria, including those induced by antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  6. In Vivo Pharmacodynamics of New Lipopeptide MX-2401▿

    PubMed Central

    Craig, W. A.; Andes, D. R.; Stamstad, T.

    2010-01-01

    MX-2401 is a novel lipopeptide (amphomycin analog) with a broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against Gram-positive organisms. We used murine thigh and lung infection models in neutropenic and normal mice to characterize the in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) activities of MX-2401. The compound (2.5 to 40 mg/kg of body weight) demonstrated linear PK characterized by an area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of 228 to 3,265 μg·h/ml and half-lives of 5.7 to 8.8 h. MICs ranged from 0.25 to 2 μg/ml. The in vivo postantibiotic effect was prolonged (8.5 h with Staphylococcus aureus and 10.3 to 12.3 with Streptococcus pneumoniae). MX-2401 exhibited dose-dependent in vivo activity against various strains of S. pneumoniae and S. aureus; penicillin and macrolide resistance in the pneumococci and methicillin resistance in the staphylococci had no impact on the antimicrobial activity of the drug. To determine which PK/PD index correlated best with MX-2401 activity, dose fractionation studies over a 72-hour period were performed. The maximum concentration of drug in serum divided by the MIC (Cmax/MIC) correlated best with the efficacy for both S. aureus and S. pneumoniae. Static doses required free-drug Cmax/MIC values of 0.683 to 1.06. Free-drug 72-h AUC/MIC values for the static dose were in the range of 7.49 to 32.3 and were less than expected. The drug showed modest enhancement in activity in the presence of white blood cells (1.7- to 3.4-fold). The potency of the drug in the lung was only marginally lower than in the thigh (1.3- to 1.9-fold). Based on its PK/PD profile, MX-2401 appears to be a promising new lipopeptide agent for treatment of infections by Gram-positive bacteria, including those induced by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. PMID:20855736

  7. Bovine and water buffalo Mx2 genes: polymorphism and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Babiker, H A E; Nakatsu, Y; Yamada, K; Yoneda, A; Takada, A; Ueda, J; Hata, H; Watanabe, T

    2007-01-01

    Millennia-long selective pressure of single-strand RNA viruses on the bovine Mx locus has increased the advantages of using the bovine Mx protein to evaluate the ultimate significance of the antiviral role of Mx proteins. The conclusions of research based only on the bovine Mx1 protein showed the need for comprehensive studies that demonstrate the role of all isoforms, individually or together, especially in the presence of a second isoform, the bovine Mx2 gene. This study provides information about bovine and water buffalo Mx2 genes, as well as their allelic polymorphism and basic antiviral potential. Observation of an Mx2 cDNA sequence (2,381 bp) obtained from 15 animals from 11 breeds using primers based on a previous sequence (NCBI accession no. AF335147) revealed several nucleotide substitutions, with eight different alleles and two amino acid exchanges: Gly to Ser at position 302 and Ile to Val at position 354, though the latter was found only in the NCBI database. A water buffalo Mx2 cDNA sequence was identified for the first time, revealing 46 nucleotide substitutions with 12 amino acid variations, in addition to a 9-bp insertion in the 5' untranslated region UTR, compared with the bovine Mx2 cDNA. Transfected 3T3 cells expressing bovine Mx2 mRNAs coding Gly or Ser at position 302, water buffalo Mx2 mRNA, positive control bovine Mx1 mRNA-expressing cells, and negative control parental 3T3 were subjected to infection with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVDeltaG*-G), as were empty pCI-neo vector-transfected cells. The positive control and all cells expressing Mx2 mRNAs displayed significantly higher levels of antiviral activity against VSVDeltaG*-G (P < 0.01) than did the negative controls.

  8. Evolutionary Analyses Suggest a Function of MxB Immunity Proteins Beyond Lentivirus Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Patrick S.; Young, Janet M.; Emerman, Michael; Malik, Harmit S.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses impose diverse and dynamic challenges on host defenses. Diversifying selection of codons and gene copy number variation are two hallmarks of genetic innovation in antiviral genes engaged in host-virus genetic conflicts. The myxovirus resistance (Mx) genes encode interferon-inducible GTPases that constitute a major arm of the cell-autonomous defense against viral infection. Unlike the broad antiviral activity of MxA, primate MxB was recently shown to specifically inhibit lentiviruses including HIV-1. We carried out detailed evolutionary analyses to investigate whether genetic conflict with lentiviruses has shaped MxB evolution in primates. We found strong evidence for diversifying selection in the MxB N-terminal tail, which contains molecular determinants of MxB anti-lentivirus specificity. However, we found no overlap between previously-mapped residues that dictate lentiviral restriction and those that have evolved under diversifying selection. Instead, our findings are consistent with MxB having a long-standing and important role in the interferon response to viral infection against a broader range of pathogens than is currently appreciated. Despite its critical role in host innate immunity, we also uncovered multiple functional losses of MxB during mammalian evolution, either by pseudogenization or by gene conversion from MxA genes. Thus, although the majority of mammalian genomes encode two Mx genes, this apparent stasis masks the dramatic effects that recombination and diversifying selection have played in shaping the evolutionary history of Mx genes. Discrepancies between our study and previous publications highlight the need to account for recombination in analyses of positive selection, as well as the importance of using sequence datasets with appropriate depth of divergence. Our study also illustrates that evolutionary analyses of antiviral gene families are critical towards understanding molecular principles that govern host-virus interactions and

  9. Evolutionary Analyses Suggest a Function of MxB Immunity Proteins Beyond Lentivirus Restriction.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick S; Young, Janet M; Emerman, Michael; Malik, Harmit S

    2015-12-01

    Viruses impose diverse and dynamic challenges on host defenses. Diversifying selection of codons and gene copy number variation are two hallmarks of genetic innovation in antiviral genes engaged in host-virus genetic conflicts. The myxovirus resistance (Mx) genes encode interferon-inducible GTPases that constitute a major arm of the cell-autonomous defense against viral infection. Unlike the broad antiviral activity of MxA, primate MxB was recently shown to specifically inhibit lentiviruses including HIV-1. We carried out detailed evolutionary analyses to investigate whether genetic conflict with lentiviruses has shaped MxB evolution in primates. We found strong evidence for diversifying selection in the MxB N-terminal tail, which contains molecular determinants of MxB anti-lentivirus specificity. However, we found no overlap between previously-mapped residues that dictate lentiviral restriction and those that have evolved under diversifying selection. Instead, our findings are consistent with MxB having a long-standing and important role in the interferon response to viral infection against a broader range of pathogens than is currently appreciated. Despite its critical role in host innate immunity, we also uncovered multiple functional losses of MxB during mammalian evolution, either by pseudogenization or by gene conversion from MxA genes. Thus, although the majority of mammalian genomes encode two Mx genes, this apparent stasis masks the dramatic effects that recombination and diversifying selection have played in shaping the evolutionary history of Mx genes. Discrepancies between our study and previous publications highlight the need to account for recombination in analyses of positive selection, as well as the importance of using sequence datasets with appropriate depth of divergence. Our study also illustrates that evolutionary analyses of antiviral gene families are critical towards understanding molecular principles that govern host-virus interactions and

  10. Resilient data staging through MxN distributed transactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwan, Karsten; Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald Fredrick, II; Dayal, Jai

    2011-11-01

    Scientific computing-driven discoveries are frequently driven from workflows that use persistent storage as a staging area for data between operations. With the bad and progressively worse bandwidth vs. data size issues as we continue towards exascale, eliminating persistent storage through techniques like data staging will both enable these workflows to continue online, but also enable more interactive workflows reducing the time to scientific discoveries. Data staging has shown to be an effective way for applications running on high-end computing platforms to offload expensive I/O operations and to manage the tremendous amounts of data they produce. This data staging approach, however, lacks the ACID style guarantees traditional straight-to-disk methods provide. Distributed transactions are a proven way to add ACID properties to data movements, however distributed transactions follow 1xN data movement semantics, where our highly parallel HPC environments employ MxN data movement semantics. In this paper we present a novel protocol that extends distributed transaction terminology to include MxN semantics which allows our data staging areas to benefit from ACID properties. We show that with our protocol we can provide resilient data staging with a limited performance penalty over current data staging implementations.

  11. Human MxA protein inhibits the replication of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yicheng; Pang, Daxin; Wang, Tiedong; Yang, Xin; Wu, Rong; Ren, Linzhu; Yuan, Ting; Huang, Yongye; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2011-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) has a spherical enveloped particle with a single stranded RNA genome, the virus belonging to a pestivirus of the family Flaviviridae is the causative agent of an acute contagious disease classical swine fever (CSF). The interferon-induced MxA protein has been widely shown to inhibit the life cycle of certain RNA viruses as members of the Bunyaviridae family and others. Interestingly, it has been reported that expression of MxA in infected cells was blocked by CSFV and whether MxA has an inhibitory effect against CSFV remains unknown to date until present. Here, we report that CSFV replicated poorly in cells stably transfected with human MxA. The proliferation of progeny virus in both PK-15 cell lines and swine fetal fibroblasts (PEF) continuously expressing MxA was shown significantly inhibited as measured by virus titration, indirect immune fluorescence assay and real-time PCR.

  12. Overexpression of the influenza virus polymerase can titrate out inhibition by the murine Mx1 protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, T; Pavlovic, J; Staeheli, P; Krystal, M

    1992-07-01

    The murine Mx1 protein is an interferon-inducible protein which confers selective resistance to influenza virus infection both in vitro and in vivo. The precise mechanism by which the murine Mx1 specifically inhibits replication of influenza virus is not known. Previously, sensitive replication systems for influenza virus ribonucleoprotein, in which a synthetic influenza virus-like ribonucleoprotein is replicated and transcribed by influenza virus proteins provided in trans, have been developed. With these systems, the antiviral activity of the murine Mx1 protein was examined. It was found that continued expression of influenza polymerase polypeptides via vaccinia virus vectors can titrate out the inhibitory action of the murine Mx1 protein. This titration of inhibitory activity also occurs when the viral PB2 protein alone is overexpressed, suggesting that an antiviral target for the murine Mx1 polypeptide is the viral PB2 protein.

  13. Precipitation of Nanosized MX at Coherent Cu-Rich Phases in Super304H Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Ping; Xing, Hui; Sun, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation of transmission electron microscopy reports the precipitation of nanosized and cubical-shaped incoherent Nb-rich MX at the coherent Cu-rich phases in the austenitic matrix of the Super304H steel. In addition, the nanosized Nb-rich MX phases were often observed to precipitate on dislocations during creep. It is concluded that the dense incoherent Nb-rich MX and coherent Cu-rich precipitates with a nanosized diameter contribute excellent creep resistance in the steel.

  14. Effect of MX type particles on creep strength of ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, M.; Sakasegawa, H.; Kohyama, A.; Esaka, H.; Shinozuka, K.

    2003-09-01

    Creep rupture strength at 650 °C and microstructures of the plain ferritic steels with fine particles of the NaCl type (MX) were studied. Precipitation hardening by the fine MX type particles is more effective than solid solution hardening by tungsten. Excess precipitation of MX type particles relatively weakens the grain boundaries as compared with the matrix and, as a consequence, lowers the rupture strength. The equivalent obstacle spacing for mobile dislocations is calculated from the rupture data and is comparable to the interparticle distance observed by transmission electron microscopy. By controlling the interparticle distance of MX type particles with some adjustments of the chemical composition to meet the engineering requirements, it is feasible to develop a new alloy with high rupture strength at 650 °C which is superior to the conventional ferritic steels.

  15. Automatic sample Dewar for MX beam-line

    SciTech Connect

    Charignon, T.; Tanchon, J.; Trollier, T.; Ravex, A.; Theveneau, P.

    2014-01-29

    It is very common for crystals of large biological macromolecules to show considerable variation in quality of their diffraction. In order to increase the number of samples that are tested for diffraction quality before any full data collections at the ESRF*, an automatic sample Dewar has been implemented. Conception and performances of the Dewar are reported in this paper. The automatic sample Dewar has 240 samples capability with automatic loading/unloading ports. The storing Dewar is capable to work with robots and it can be integrated in a full automatic MX** beam-line. The samples are positioned in the front of the loading/unloading ports with and automatic rotating plate. A view port has been implemented for data matrix camera reading on each sample loaded in the Dewar. At last, the Dewar is insulated with polyurethane foam that keeps the liquid nitrogen consumption below 1.6 L/h. At last, the static insulation also makes vacuum equipment and maintenance unnecessary. This Dewar will be useful for increasing the number of samples tested in synchrotrons.

  16. Flexible Mx specification of various extended twin kinship designs.

    PubMed

    Maes, Hermine H; Neale, Michael C; Medland, Sarah E; Keller, Matthew C; Martin, Nicholas G; Heath, Andrew C; Eaves, Lindon J

    2009-02-01

    The extended twin kinship design allows the simultaneous testing of additive and nonadditive genetic, shared and individual-specific environmental factors, as well as sex differences in the expression of genes and environment in the presence of assortative mating and combined genetic and cultural transmission (Eaves et al., 1999). It also handles the contribution of these sources of variance to the (co)variation of multiple phenotypes. Keller et al. (2008) extended this comprehensive model for family resemblance to allow or a flexible specification of assortment and vertical transmission. As such, it provides a general framework which can easily be reduced to fit subsets of data such as twin-parent data, children-of-twins data, etc. A flexible Mx specification of this model that allows handling of these various designs is presented in detail and applied to data from the Virginia 30,000. Data on height, body mass index, smoking status, church attendance, and political affiliation were obtained from twins and their families. Results indicate that biases in the estimation of variance components depend both on the types of relative available for analysis, and on the underlying genetic and environmental architecture of the phenotype of interest.

  17. Lattice dynamics of crystals having R2MX6 structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. I.; Freire, J. D.; Katiyar, R. S.

    1997-10-01

    The theory of lattice dynamics in the harmonic approximation using a rigid-ion model due to Born and Huang [Dynamical Theory of Crystal Lattices (Oxford University Press, New York, 1954)], is applied to ionic crystals of the R2MX6 type with antifluorite structure namely, K2SnCl6, K2PtBr6, Cs2SnBr6, and Rb2SnBr6 in the cubic phase. The model expresses the potential energy as the sum of long-range Coulomb interactions and repulsive short-range interactions between ions in the primitive cell. A function of axially symmetric type is used to approximate the short-range part, and the number of force constant parameters were reduced utilizing stability conditions in the manner described by Katiyar [J. Phys. C 3, 1087 (1970)]. The remaining constants were determined by a nonlinear least-squares analysis of some experimental frequencies at the critical point Γ. The long-range contributions were calculated using the Ewald transformation as described by Cowley [Acta Crystallogr. 15, 687 (1962)]. Phonon frequencies and the normal modes of vibrations at the zone center were obtained; of particular interest is the resulting lowest librational frequency for each crystal. We obtained excellent agreement between the calculated and the observed frequencies. The resulting effective charge parameters indicated that these crystals are partially ionic. In general, the results offered a better vision of the structural phase transition mechanism involving the rotational mode T1g.

  18. New polymorphism of the influenza virus resistance Mx1 gene in Iberian domestic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Godino, RF; Fernández, AI

    2016-01-01

    Mx1 (Myxovirus (Influenza virus) resistance 1, interferon-inducible protein p78) gene has been implicated in the resistance to a wide range of RNA viruses including influenza A in several species such as Sus scrofa. In the present study a 28-bp deletion in exon 14 of the Mx1 gene has been identified in Iberian domestic pigs but not in other domestic breeds neither in wild boars. The mutation produces a frameshift giving a protein with 6 amino acid substitutions and the extension of the C-terminal region with additional 20 amino acids with respect to the wild type MX1 protein. The new allelic polymorphism affects the antiviral domain of the MX1 protein and therefore might impact its anti-influenza virus activity. It has been demonstrated that polymorphisms in the Mx1 murine locus, affect the survival rate of mice upon experimental infection with influenza virus. It might be possible to improve the innate resistance of pigs to influenza virus infection by determining the porcine Mx1 alleles with more potent antiviral activity and genetically selecting animals bearing such alleles.

  19. Characterization of MxFIT, an iron deficiency induced transcriptional factor in Malus xiaojinensis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lili; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Mudan; Zhang, Xinzhong; Xu, Xuefeng; Han, Zhenhai

    2014-02-01

    Iron deficiency often results in nutritional disorder in fruit trees. Transcription factors play an important role in the regulation of iron uptake. In this study, we isolated an iron deficiency response transcription factor gene, MxFIT, from an iron-efficient apple genotype of Malus xiaojinensis. MxFIT encoded a basic helix-loop-helix protein and contained a 966 bp open reading frame. MxFIT protein was targeted to the nucleus in onion epidermal cells and showed strong transcriptional activation in yeast cells. Spatiotemporal expression analysis revealed that MxFIT was up-regulated in roots under iron deficiency at both mRNA and protein levels, while almost no expression was detected in leaves irrespective of iron supply. Ectopic expression of MxFIT resulted in enhanced iron deficiency responses in Arabidopsis under iron deficiency and stronger resistance to iron deficiency. Thus, MxFIT might be involved in iron uptake and plays an important role in iron deficiency response.

  20. Nanosized MX Precipitates in Ultra-Low-Carbon Ferritic/Martensitic Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feng-Shi; Jung, Woo-Sang

    2009-02-01

    Nanosized MX precipitates in ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant 9Cr-W-Mo-VNbTiN steels were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) using carbon film replicas. The steels were prepared by vacuum induction melting followed by hot forging and rolling into plates. The plates were normalized at 1100 °C for 1 hour, cooled in air, and tempered at 700 °C for 1 hour. The results show that bimodal nanosized MX precipitates distribute densely and homogeneously in the matrix within martensitic lath after normalizing-and-tempering heat treatment. The larger nanosized MX precipitates with the size of 30 to 50 nm are rich in Nb, while the smaller ones with the size of about 10 nm contain less Nb but more V. Small addition of Ti causes an increase in the number of the larger nanosized MX precipitates. The total number density of the nanosized MX precipitates in the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic steels is measured to be over 300/ μm2, much higher than that in conventional ferritic/martensitic steels. Short-term creep test results show that the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic steels with high dense nanosized MX precipitates have much higher creep rupture strength than conventional ASME-P92 steel. The strength degradation of the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels during creep is also discussed in this article.

  1. Baseline MxA mRNA Expression Predicts Interferon Beta Response in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matas, Elisabet; Bau, Laura; Martínez-Iniesta, María; Romero-Pinel, Lucía; Mañé, M. Alba; Cobo-Calvo, Álvaro; Martínez-Yélamos, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Background Myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA) is a molecule induced after interferon-beta injection, mostly used to evaluate its bioactivity. There is little available data on clinical utility of baseline MxA mRNA status. The objective of the study is to investigate whether baseline MxA mRNA expression can predict relapse and disease progression in multiple sclerosis patients treated with interferon-beta. Methods Baseline blood samples were obtained before the first interferon-beta dose was administered to evaluate MxA mRNA expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Demographic and clinical variables were prospectively recorded to define treatment responder and non responder groups. Results 104 patients were included in the study. Baseline MxA mRNA expression was significantly lower in the group of patients who met the definition of responders (1.07 vs 1.95, Student t test, p<0.0001). A threshold of 1.096 was established using Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis to differentiate between responders and non-responders (sensitivity 73.9%, specificity 69.0%). Survival analysis using this threshold showed that time to next relapse (p<0.0001) and to EDSS progression (p = 0.01) were significantly higher in patients with lower MxA titers. Conclusion The results suggest that baseline MxA mRNA levels may be useful for predicting whether multiple sclerosis patients will respond or not to interferon-beta treatment. PMID:25396411

  2. Inactivation of the Progesterone Receptor in Mx1+ Cells Potentiates Osteogenesis in Calvaria but Not in Long Bone

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhendong A.; Sun, Weihua; Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Hongliang; Lane, Nancy E.; Yao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The effect of progesterone on bone remains elusive. We previously reported that global progesterone receptor (PR) knockout mice displayed high bone mass phenotype, suggesting that PR influences bone growth and modeling. Recently, Mx1+ cells were characterized to be mesenchymal stem cell-like pluripotent Cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the PR in Mx1+ cells regulates osteogenesis. Using the Mx1-Cre;mT/mG reporter mouse model, we found that the calvarial cells exhibited minimal background Mx1-Cre activity prior to Cre activation by IFNα treatment as compared to the bone marrow stromal cells. IFNα treatment significantly activated Mx1-Cre in the calvarial cells. When the PR gene was deleted in the Mx1-Cre;PR-flox calvarial cells in vitro, significantly higher levels of expression of osteoblast maturation marker genes (RUNX2, Osteocalcin, and Dmp1) and osteogenic potential were detected. The PR-deficient calvariae exhibited greater bone volume, especially in the males. Although Mx1-Cre activity could be induced on the bone surface in vivo, the Mx1+ cells did not differentiate into osteocytes in long bones. Bone volumes at the distal femurs and the bone turnover marker serum Osteocalcin were similar between the Mx1-Cre;PR-flox mutant mice and the corresponding wild types in both sexes. In conclusion, our data demonstrates that blocking progesterone signaling via PRs in calvarial Mx1+ cells promoted osteoblast differentiation in the calvaria. Mx1+ was expressed by heterogeneous cells in bone marrow and did not differentiate into osteocyte during long bone development in vivo. Selectively inactivating the PR gene in Mx1+ cells affected the membrane bone formation but did not affect peripheral skeletal homeostasis. PMID:26431032

  3. GT3X+ accelerometer, Yamax pedometer and SC-StepMX pedometer step count accuracy in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Webber, Sandra C; Magill, Sheila M; Schafer, Jenessa L; Wilson, Kaylie C S

    2014-07-01

    The purpose was to compare step count accuracy of an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X+), a mechanical pedometer (Yamax SW200), and a piezoelectric pedometer (SC-StepMX). Older adults (n = 13 with walking aids, n = 22 without; M = 81.5 years old, SD = 5.0) walked 100 m wearing the devices. Device-detected steps were compared with manually counted steps. We found no significant differences among monitors for those who walked without aids (p = .063). However, individuals who used walking aids exhibited slower gait speeds (M = 0.83 m/s, SD = 0.2) than non-walking aid users (M = 1.21 m/s, SD = 0.2, p < .001), and for them the SC-StepMX demonstrated a significantly lower percentage of error (Mdn = 1.0, interquartile range [IQR] = 0.5-2.0) than the other devices (Yamax SW200, Mdn = 68.9, IQR = 35.9-89.3; left GT3X+, Mdn = 52.0, IQR = 37.1-58.9; right GT3X+, Mdn = 51.0, IQR = 32.3-66.5; p < .05). These results support using a piezoelectric pedometer for measuring steps in older adults who use walking aids and who walk slowly.

  4. The antiviral potential of interferon-induced cotton rat Mx proteins against orthomyxovirus (influenza), rhabdovirus, and bunyavirus.

    PubMed

    Stertz, Silke; Dittmann, Jan; Blanco, Jorge C G; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Haller, Otto; Kochs, Georg

    2007-10-01

    Influenza A virus (FLUAV) is an important human pathogen able to cause devastating pandemics. Recently, cotton rats have been proposed as an animal model to study the innate immune response against FLUAV and other human pathogens. The interferon (IFN)-induced Mx GTPases are part of the cell-autonomous innate immune response against viruses. We, therefore, tested the antiviral activity of the two cotton rat Mx proteins that were recently identified. The nuclear cotton rat Mx1 protein was found to be a strong inhibitor of FLUAV, whereas the cytoplasmic cotton rat Mx2 protein was inactive. Cotton rat Mx2, but not cotton rat Mx1, was able to inhibit the rhabdovirus vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the bunyavirus Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) known to replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Thus, cotton rats possess two Mx proteins that have selective antiviral activity that depends on their intracellular localization. We conclude that the Mx status of cotton rats differs from that of conventional inbred mouse strains, which are known to have defective Mx genes. Therefore, cotton rats are a suitable animal model to study experimental infections with FLUAV and other RNA viruses.

  5. Effects of Nb and V on the Precipitation Phases of MX in Q345E Applicable to Cryogenic Flange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Fan, Dingdong; Xia, Yunjin

    2015-04-01

    Thermodynamic software (Thermo-Calc) is utilized to Q345E applicable to cryogenic flange. The aim is to study the equilibrium precipitation phases between 400 and 1600 °C, and the solubility of Nb and V in austenite. The effects of alloying elements, such as C, N, Nb and V, on these equilibrium precipitation phases are also discussed. Besides theoretical calculation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to observe these precipitation phases. The results show that main equilibrium precipitation phases are M7C3, MX#1 (Nb-rich), MX#2 (V-rich) and AlN. Among them, the MX#1 phase is composed of major elements (Nb, C, and N) and minor elements (V and Cr). For MX#2 phase, its major elements are V, C, Nb, and N, and minor element is Cr. The precipitation amount and temperature of MX#1 phase were controlled by Nb content, and little affected by the contents of C, N and V. TEM results reveal that the size of precipitation phases varied from several nanometers to more than 100 nm. Large precipitation particles belong to MX#1 phase (Nb-rich), and their morphology tends to be cubic. On the other side, the small precipitation particles are attributed to MX#2 phase (V-rich), and their morphology is spherical or elliptical. These results are consistent with the thermodynamic calculation results about phase composition and precipitation temperature of MX#1 and MX#2.

  6. Optically pumped quantum Mx-MR magnetometer with high oscillating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhi-Chao; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Yang, Kai-Yong; Luo, Hui

    2015-08-01

    A dip of the transverse component of the magnetic moment as a function of resonance frequency-detuning will emerge when the intensity of oscillating magnetic field exceeds a specific value, which is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. The linewidth of magnetic-resonance signal can be much smaller than when the Mx-MR magnetometer operates on condition that the intensity of oscillating magnetic field is smaller than this specific value, and the Mx-MR magnetometer can possess a much higher signal-to-noise ratio. The experimental result shows that the sensitivity of Mx-MR magnetometer can be improved by an order of magnitude under this condition. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61475192) and the Science Research Program of National University of Defense Technology, China (Grant No. JC140702).

  7. Association of functional polymorphisms in the MxA gene with susceptibility to enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoai; Xu, Hongmei; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Xiujun; Wang, Xianjun; Ding, Shujun; Zhang, Renli; Liu, Lijuan; He, Cui; Zhuang, Lu; Li, Hao; Zhang, Panhe; Yang, Hong; Li, Tingyu; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wuchun

    2014-02-01

    Myxovirus resistance A (MxA) is an antiviral protein induced by type I interferons α and β (IFN-α and IFN-β) that can inhibit virus replication. We examined whether the MxA polymorphisms were related to the risk and severity of enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection in Chinese populations. The MxA C-123A and G-88T polymorphisms were genotyped in two independent case-control populations in China by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). MxA messenger RNA was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 45 healthy children and 19 patients with EV71 infection. Significantly decreased susceptibility to EV71 infection was observed for the -123A allele and -88T allele carriers, with ORs (95% CIs) estimated as 0.56 (0.39-0.81) and 0.64 (0.47-0.88), respectively, in the northern population. This association was confirmed in the southern population, with ORs (95% CIs) estimated as 0.58 (0.38-0.89) and 0.67(0.47-0.95), respectively. The A- 123T- 88 haplotype was also significantly associated with lower risk of EV71 infection in both the northern (OR = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.44-0.85) and the southern population (OR = 0.63; 95% CI = 0.43-0.92). Furthermore, we observed higher MxA messenger RNA levels in IFNβ1a-stimulated PBMCs from the -123A or -88T allele carriers compared with that from nocarriers. Our findings suggest that polymorphisms in the MxA promoter may play a role in mediating the susceptibility to EV71 infection in Chinese population.

  8. Structural studies of CsKBi mixed chlorides relation to the crystal structures of A2BMX6, A3MX6, and A2MX6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benachenhou, Farida; Mairesse, Gaëtan; Nowogrocki, Guy; Thomas, Daniel

    1986-11-01

    The room-temperature crystal structures of Cs 3BiCl 6(I) and CsK 2BiCl 6(II) have been determined from X-ray single-crystal data. These compounds are both monoclinic, space group {C2}/{c}, with eight formula units per cell and cell parameters a = 27.017(17), b = 8.252(8), c = 13.121(10) Å, β = 99.70(11)° (I), a = 25.653(13), b = 7.799(5), c = 12.874(9) Å, β = 99.24(8)° (II). The crystal structures have been refined to final R values of 0.069(I) and 0.044(II) from 1706(I) and 2008(II) independent reflections and 93 variable parameters. The BiCl 6 octahedra are slightly distorted (average dBiCl = 2.699 Å) and the alkaline cations are coordinated with eleven or eight chlorine atoms. These structures are better described using the notion of "layers of close-packed octahedra" and can therefore be easily compared with the A2BMX6 (elpasolite type), A3MX6 (cryolite type), and A2MX6 (K 2PtCl 6 type) crystal structures. In these compounds, the "layers" of isolated octahedral MX6 entities ( X = F, Cl, Br, O) define "tetrahedral" and "octahedral" holes, entirely or partially occupied by the A and/or B cations.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Commensalibacter papalotli MX01, a Symbiont Identified from the Guts of Overwintering Monarch Butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quinto, Andrés; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Commensalibacter papalotli strain MX01, isolated from the intestines of an overwintering monarch butterfly. The 2,332,652-bp AT-biased genome of C. papalotli MX01 is the smallest genome for a member of the Acetobacteraceae family and provides the first evidence of plasmids in Commensalibacter. PMID:24604647

  10. Interferon-induced, antiviral human MxA protein localizes to a distinct subcompartment of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Stertz, Silke; Reichelt, Mike; Krijnse-Locker, Jacomine; Mackenzie, Jason; Simpson, Jeremy C; Haller, Otto; Kochs, Georg

    2006-09-01

    Human MxA protein belongs to the superfamily of dynamin-like large GTPases that are involved in intracellular membrane trafficking. MxA is induced by interferons-alpha/beta (IFN-alpha/beta) and is a key component of the antiviral response against RNA viruses. Here, we show that MxA localizes to membranes that are positive for specific markers of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum, such as Syntaxin17, but is excluded from other membrane compartments. Overexpression of MxA leads to a characteristic reorganization of the associated membranes. Interestingly, Hook3, mannose-6-phosphate receptor, and Lamp-1, which normally accumulate in cis- Golgi, endosomes, and lysosomes, respectively, also colocalized with MxA, indicating that these markers were redistributed to the MxA-positive compartment. Functional assays, however, did not show any effect of MxA on endocytosis or the secretory pathway. The present results demonstrate that MxA is an IFN-induced antiviral effector protein that resembles the constitutively expressed large GTPase family members in its capacity to localize to and reorganize intracellular membranes.

  11. P-NITROPHENOL AND GLUTATHIONE RESPONSE IN MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES) EXPOSED TO MX, A DRINKING WATER CARCINOGEN.

    EPA Science Inventory

    When chlorine is introduced into public drinking water for disinfection, it can react with organic compounds in surface waters to form toxic by-products such as 3-chloro-4- (dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-furanone (MX). We investigated the effect of exposure to MX on cytochr...

  12. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenen, Antje; Gillespie, Leah; Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der; Khromykh, Alexander; Mackenzie, Jason

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  13. p-Nitrophenol and glutathione response in medaka (Oryzias latipes)exposed to MX, a drinking water carcinogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    When chlorine is introduced into public drinking water for disinfection, it can react with organic compounds in surface waters to form toxic by-products such as 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-furanone (MX). We investigated the effect of exposure to MX on cytochrome ...

  14. Molecular Signatures Associated with Mx1-Mediated Resistance to Highly Pathogenic Influenza Virus Infection: Mechanisms of Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cilloniz, Cristian; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J.; Ni, Chester; Carter, Victoria S.; Korth, Marcus J.; Swayne, David E.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the role of host factors during lethal influenza virus infection is critical to deciphering the events that determine the fate of the host. One such factor is encoded by the Mx1 gene, which confers resistance to influenza virus infection. Here, we compared pathology and global gene expression profiles in lung tissue from BALB/c (Mx1−) and BALB · A2G-Mx1 mice (Mx1+/+) infected with the fully reconstructed 1918 pandemic influenza virus. Mx1+/+ mice showed less tissue damage than Mx− animals, and pathology and mortality were further reduced by treating the mice with interferon prior to infection. Using global transcriptional profiling, we identified distinct molecular signatures associated with partial protection, complete protection, and the contribution of interferon to the host response. In the absence of interferon treatment, partial protection was characterized by the generation of an acute response with the upregulation of genes associated with apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, and cell migration. Complete protection was characterized by the downregulation of cytokine and chemokine genes previously associated with influenza virus pathogenesis. The contribution of interferon treatment to total protection in virus-infected Mx1+/+ mice was characterized by the altered regulation of cell cycle genes. These genes were upregulated in Mx1+/+ mice treated with interferon but downregulated in the absence of interferon treatment. Our results suggest that Mx1+/+ mice generate a protective antiviral response by controlling the expression of key modulator molecules associated with influenza virus lethality. PMID:22190720

  15. A new set of bending Td symmetry coordinates for MX4 molecules.

    PubMed

    Schmidling, David

    2013-12-15

    The conventional set of Td symmetry coordinates for the bending modes of MX4 molecules can lead to ambiguous geometries when displacements from equilibrium are large. It is proposed here to use internal coordinates that are haversines of the bending angles divided by their sum. The A1 representation becomes a constant, enabling recovery of the bending angles unambiguously, analytically, and without approximation.

  16. MxCuBE: a synchrotron beamline control environment customized for macromolecular crystallography experiments.

    PubMed

    Gabadinho, José; Beteva, Antonia; Guijarro, Matias; Rey-Bakaikoa, Vicente; Spruce, Darren; Bowler, Matthew W; Brockhauser, Sandor; Flot, David; Gordon, Elspeth J; Hall, David R; Lavault, Bernard; McCarthy, Andrew A; McCarthy, Joanne; Mitchell, Edward; Monaco, Stéphanie; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Nurizzo, Didier; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Thibault, Xavier; Walsh, Martin A; Leonard, Gordon A; McSweeney, Sean M

    2010-09-01

    The design and features of a beamline control software system for macromolecular crystallography (MX) experiments developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are described. This system, MxCuBE, allows users to easily and simply interact with beamline hardware components and provides automated routines for common tasks in the operation of a synchrotron beamline dedicated to experiments in MX. Additional functionality is provided through intuitive interfaces that enable the assessment of the diffraction characteristics of samples, experiment planning, automatic data collection and the on-line collection and analysis of X-ray emission spectra. The software can be run in a tandem client-server mode that allows for remote control and relevant experimental parameters and results are automatically logged in a relational database, ISPyB. MxCuBE is modular, flexible and extensible and is currently deployed on eight macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the ESRF. Additionally, the software is installed at MAX-lab beamline I911-3 and at BESSY beamline BL14.1.

  17. MX, A DRINKING WATER CARCINOGEN, DOES NOT INDUCE MUTATIONS IN THE LIVER OF CII TRANSGENIC MEDAKA

    EPA Science Inventory

    MX, a drinking water carcinogen, does not induce mutations in the liver of cII transgenic medaka
    Geter, DR; Winn, RN; Fournie, JW; Norris, MB; DeAngelo, AB; and Hawkins, WE

    Abstract

    Geter et al., page 2
    Abstract
    "Salmonella" mutagenicity assays have shown t...

  18. Induction of Abasic Sites by the Drinking-Water Mutagen MX in Salmonella TA100

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagen X (MX) is a chlorinated furanone that accounts for more of the mutagenic activity of drinking water than any other disinfection by-product. It is one of the most potent base-substitution mutagens in the Salmonella (Ames) mutagenicity assay, producing primarily GC to TA mu...

  19. MoS2/MX2 heterobilayers: bandgap engineering via tensile strain or external electrical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ning; Guo, Hongyan; Li, Lei; Dai, Jun; Wang, Lu; Mei, Wai-Ning; Wu, Xiaojun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-02-01

    We have performed a comprehensive first-principles study of the electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterobilayers MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W, Fe, V; X = S, Se). For M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se, all heterobilayers show semiconducting characteristics with an indirect bandgap with the exception of the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer which retains the direct-bandgap character of the constituent monolayer. For M = Fe, V; X = S, Se, the MX2/MoS2 heterobilayers exhibit metallic characters. Particular attention of this study has been focused on engineering the bandgap of the TMD heterobilayer materials via application of either a tensile strain or an external electric field. We find that with increasing either the biaxial or uniaxial tensile strain, the MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se) heterobilayers can undergo a semiconductor-to-metal transition. For the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer, a direct-to-indirect bandgap transition may occur beyond a critical biaxial or uniaxial strain. For M (=Fe, V) and X (=S, Se), the magnetic moments of both metal and chalcogen atoms are enhanced when the MX2/MoS2 heterobilayers are under a biaxial tensile strain. Moreover, the bandgap of MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se) heterobilayers can be reduced by the vertical electric field. For two heterobilayers MSe2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr), PBE calculations suggest that the indirect-to-direct bandgap transition may occur under an external electric field. The transition is attributed to the enhanced spontaneous polarization. The tunable bandgaps in general and possible indirect-direct bandgap transitions due to tensile strain or external electric field make the TMD heterobilayer materials a viable candidate for optoelectronic applications.We have performed a comprehensive first-principles study of the electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterobilayers MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W, Fe, V; X = S, Se). For

  20. MxB Is Not Responsible for the Blocking of HIV-1 Infection Observed in Alpha Interferon-Treated Cells

    PubMed Central

    Opp, Silvana; Vieira, Daniel A. S. A.; Schulte, Bianca; Chanda, Sumit K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT MxB restricts HIV-1 infection by directly interacting with the HIV-1 core, which is made of viral capsid; however, the contribution of MxB to the HIV-1 restriction observed in alpha interferon (IFN-α)-treated human cells is unknown. To understand this contribution, we used HIV-1 bearing the G208R capsid mutant (HIV-1-G208R), which overcomes the restriction imposed by cells expressing MxB. Here we showed that the reason why MxB does not block HIV-1-G208R is that MxB does not interact with HIV-1 cores bearing the mutation G208R. To understand whether MxB contributes to the HIV-1 restriction imposed by IFN-α-treated human cells, we challenged IFN-α-treated cells with HIV-G208R and found that MxB does not contribute to the restriction imposed by IFN-α-treated cells. To more directly test the contribution of MxB, we challenged IFN-α-treated human cells that are knocked out for the expression of MxB with HIV-1. These experiments suggested that MxB does not contribute to the HIV-1 restriction observed in IFN-α-treated human cells. IMPORTANCE MxB is a restriction factor that blocks HIV-1 infection in human cells. Although it has been postulated that MxB is the factor that blocks HIV-1 infection in IFN-α-treated cells, this is a hard concept to grasp due to the great number of genes that are induced by IFN-α in cells from the immune system. The work presented here elegantly demonstrates that MxB has minimal or no contribution to the ability of IFN-α-treated human cells to block HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, this work suggests the presence of novel restriction factors in IFN-α-treated human cells that block HIV-1 infection. PMID:26719253

  1. Effect of Alkyl Group on MxOy(-) + ROH (M = Mo, W; R = Me, Et) Reaction Rates.

    PubMed

    Ray, Manisha; Waller, Sarah E; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2016-03-10

    A systematic comparison of MxOy(-) + ROH (M = Mo vs W; R = Me vs Et) reaction rate coefficients and product distributions combined with results of calculations on weakly bound MxOy(-)·ROH complexes suggest that the overall reaction mechanism has three distinct steps, consistent with recently reported results on analogous MxOy(-) + H2O reactivity studies. MxOy(-) + ROH → MxOy+1(-) + RH oxidation reactions are observed for the least oxidized clusters, and MxOy(-) + ROH → MxOyROH(-) addition reactions are observed for clusters in intermediate oxidation states, as observed previously in MxOy(-) + H2O reactions. The first step is weakly bound complex formation, the rate of which is governed by the relative stability of the MxOy(-)·ROH charge-dipole complexes and the Lewis acid-base complexes. Calculations predict that MoxOy(-) clusters form more stable Lewis acid-base complexes than WxOy(-), and the stability of EtOH complexes is enhanced relative to MeOH. Consistent with this result, MoxOy(-) + ROH rate coefficients are higher than analogous WxOy(-) clusters. Rate coefficients range from 2.7 × 10(-13) cm(3) s(-1) for W3O8(-) + MeOH to 3.4 × 10(-11) cm(3) s(-1) for Mo2O4(-) + EtOH. Second, a covalently bound complex is formed, and anion photoelectron spectra of the several MxOyROH(-) addition products observed are consistent with hydroxyl-alkoxy structures that are formed readily from the Lewis acid-base complexes. Calculations indicate that addition products are trapped intermediates in the MxOy(-) + ROH → MxOy+1(-) + RH reaction, and the third step is rearrangement of the hydroxyl group to a metal hydride group to facilitate RH release. Trapped intermediates are more prevalent in MoxOy(-) reaction product distributions, indicating that the rate of this step is higher for WxOy+1RH(-) than for MoxOy+1RH(-). This result is consistent with previous computational studies on analogous MxOy(-) + H2O reactions predicting that barriers along the pathway in the

  2. MoS2/MX2 heterobilayers: bandgap engineering via tensile strain or external electrical field.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ning; Guo, Hongyan; Li, Lei; Dai, Jun; Wang, Lu; Mei, Wai-Ning; Wu, Xiaojun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-03-01

    We have performed a comprehensive first-principles study of the electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterobilayers MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W, Fe, V; X = S, Se). For M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se, all heterobilayers show semiconducting characteristics with an indirect bandgap with the exception of the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer which retains the direct-bandgap character of the constituent monolayer. For M = Fe, V; X = S, Se, the MX2/MoS2 heterobilayers exhibit metallic characters. Particular attention of this study has been focused on engineering the bandgap of the TMD heterobilayer materials via application of either a tensile strain or an external electric field. We find that with increasing either the biaxial or uniaxial tensile strain, the MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se) heterobilayers can undergo a semiconductor-to-metal transition. For the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer, a direct-to-indirect bandgap transition may occur beyond a critical biaxial or uniaxial strain. For M (=Fe, V) and X (=S, Se), the magnetic moments of both metal and chalcogen atoms are enhanced when the MX2/MoS2 heterobilayers are under a biaxial tensile strain. Moreover, the bandgap of MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se) heterobilayers can be reduced by the vertical electric field. For two heterobilayers MSe2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr), PBE calculations suggest that the indirect-to-direct bandgap transition may occur under an external electric field. The transition is attributed to the enhanced spontaneous polarization. The tunable bandgaps in general and possible indirect-direct bandgap transitions due to tensile strain or external electric field make the TMD heterobilayer materials a viable candidate for optoelectronic applications.

  3. Functional Comparison of Mx1 from Two Different Mouse Species Reveals the Involvement of Loop L4 in the Antiviral Activity against Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Verhelst, Judith; Spitaels, Jan; Nürnberger, Cindy; De Vlieger, Dorien; Ysenbaert, Tine; Staeheli, Peter; Fiers, Walter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The interferon-induced Mx1 gene is an important part of the mammalian defense against influenza viruses. Mus musculus Mx1 inhibits influenza A virus replication and transcription by suppressing the polymerase activity of viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). Here, we compared the anti-influenza virus activity of Mx1 from Mus musculus A2G with that of its ortholog from Mus spretus. We found that the antiviral activity of M. spretus Mx1 was less potent than that of M. musculus Mx1. Comparison of the M. musculus Mx1 sequence with the M. spretus Mx1 sequence revealed 25 amino acid differences, over half of which were present in the GTPase domain and 2 of which were present in loop L4. However, the in vitro GTPase activity of Mx1 from the two mouse species was similar. Replacement of one of the residues in loop L4 in M. spretus Mx1 by the corresponding residue of A2G Mx1 increased its antiviral activity. We also show that deletion of loop L4 prevented the binding of Mx1 to influenza A virus nucleoprotein and, hence, abolished the antiviral activity of mouse Mx1. These results indicate that loop L4 of mouse Mx1 is a determinant of antiviral activity. Our findings suggest that Mx proteins from different mammals use a common mechanism to inhibit influenza A viruses. IMPORTANCE Mx proteins are evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates and inhibit a wide range of viruses. Still, the exact details of their antiviral mechanisms remain largely unknown. Functional comparison of the Mx genes from two species that diverged relatively recently in evolution can provide novel insights into these mechanisms. We show that both Mus musculus A2G Mx1 and Mus spretus Mx1 target the influenza virus nucleoprotein. We also found that loop L4 in mouse Mx1 is crucial for its antiviral activity, as was recently reported for primate MxA. This indicates that human and mouse Mx proteins, which have diverged by 75 million years of evolution, recognize and inhibit influenza A viruses by a common

  4. Computer simulation of the CSPAD, ePix10k, and RayonixMX170HS X-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tina, Adrienne

    2015-08-21

    The invention of free-electron lasers (FELs) has opened a door to an entirely new level of scientific research. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is an X-ray FEL that houses several instruments, each with its own unique X-ray applications. This light source is revolutionary in that while its properties allow for a whole new range of scientific opportunities, it also poses numerous challenges. For example, the intensity of a focused X-ray beam is enough to damage a sample in one mere pulse; however, the pulse speed and extreme brightness of the source together are enough to obtain enough information about that sample, so that no further measurements are necessary. An important device in the radiation detection process, particularly for X-ray imaging, is the detector. The power of the LCLS X-rays has instigated a need for better performing detectors. The research conducted for this project consisted of the study of X-ray detectors to imitate their behaviors in a computer program. The analysis of the Rayonix MX170-HS, CSPAD, and ePix10k in particular helped to understand their properties. This program simulated the interaction of X-ray photons with these detectors to discern the patterns of their responses. A scientist’s selection process of a detector for a specific experiment is simplified from the characterization of the detectors in the program.

  5. Molecular identification and comparative transcriptional analysis of myxovirus resistance GTPase (Mx) gene in goose (Anser cygnoide) after H9N2 AIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Miao; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-08-01

    Interferon (IFN)-induced myxovirus resistance (Mx) GTPases belong to the family of dynamin-like GTPases and control a diverse range of viruses. In this study, the identified goose Mx (goMx) mRNA is 2009bp long, shares partially conserved exons with other homologues, and shares highly conserved domains in its primary structure. The amino acid position 629 (629aa) of the goMx protein was identified as serine (Ser), in contrast to the Ser located at 631aa in chicken Mx, which is considered to be responsible for the lack of chicken Mx antiviral activity. In addition, the goMx 142aa residue in the dynamin family signature differs from that of other functional Mx proteins. Transcriptional analysis revealed that goMx was mainly expressed in the digestive, respiratory and immune systems in an age-specific manner. GoMx transcript levels in goose peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were found to be significantly up-regulated by various agonists and avian viruses. Furthermore, a time course study of the effects of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) on goMx expression in infected goslings suggested that H9N2 AIV affected goMx expression. However, significant changes in goMx expression were observed in the trachea, lung and small intestine of infected birds. Altogether, these results indicate that goMx protein may have acquired its broad antiviral activity by changing only a few amino acids at select sites, even as it shares a conserved architectures with species.

  6. Molecular identification and comparative transcriptional analysis of myxovirus resistance GTPase (Mx) gene in goose (Anser cygnoide) after H9N2 AIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Miao; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-08-01

    Interferon (IFN)-induced myxovirus resistance (Mx) GTPases belong to the family of dynamin-like GTPases and control a diverse range of viruses. In this study, the identified goose Mx (goMx) mRNA is 2009bp long, shares partially conserved exons with other homologues, and shares highly conserved domains in its primary structure. The amino acid position 629 (629aa) of the goMx protein was identified as serine (Ser), in contrast to the Ser located at 631aa in chicken Mx, which is considered to be responsible for the lack of chicken Mx antiviral activity. In addition, the goMx 142aa residue in the dynamin family signature differs from that of other functional Mx proteins. Transcriptional analysis revealed that goMx was mainly expressed in the digestive, respiratory and immune systems in an age-specific manner. GoMx transcript levels in goose peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were found to be significantly up-regulated by various agonists and avian viruses. Furthermore, a time course study of the effects of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) on goMx expression in infected goslings suggested that H9N2 AIV affected goMx expression. However, significant changes in goMx expression were observed in the trachea, lung and small intestine of infected birds. Altogether, these results indicate that goMx protein may have acquired its broad antiviral activity by changing only a few amino acids at select sites, even as it shares a conserved architectures with species. PMID:27477505

  7. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher),more » devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.« less

  8. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Marcia

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher), devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.

  9. OpenMx 2.0: Extended Structural Equation and Statistical Modeling.

    PubMed

    Neale, Michael C; Hunter, Michael D; Pritikin, Joshua N; Zahery, Mahsa; Brick, Timothy R; Kirkpatrick, Robert M; Estabrook, Ryne; Bates, Timothy C; Maes, Hermine H; Boker, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    The new software package OpenMx 2.0 for structural equation and other statistical modeling is introduced and its features are described. OpenMx is evolving in a modular direction and now allows a mix-and-match computational approach that separates model expectations from fit functions and optimizers. Major backend architectural improvements include a move to swappable open-source optimizers such as the newly written CSOLNP. Entire new methodologies such as item factor analysis and state space modeling have been implemented. New model expectation functions including support for the expression of models in LISREL syntax and a simplified multigroup expectation function are available. Ease-of-use improvements include helper functions to standardize model parameters and compute their Jacobian-based standard errors, access to model components through standard R $ mechanisms, and improved tab completion from within the R Graphical User Interface. PMID:25622929

  10. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a Full-Scale Model of the Hughes MX-904 Missile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted to determine the stability and control characteristics of a full-size model of the Hughes MX-904 missile. Aerodynamic characteristics of the complete model through moderate ranges of angles of attack and yaw, with an additional test made through an angle of attack of 180 degrees, are presented. The effects of horizontal tail deflection are also included.

  11. Expression of the interferon-induced Mx proteins in biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, Abdul Nasser; Flemming, Peer; Rodeck, Burkhard; Melter, Michael; Leonhardt, Johannes; Petersen, Claus

    2006-06-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare disease of the newborn for which the Kasai procedure is curative only for a few of the patients. The dilemma is that all therapeutic attempts to cure the disease are symptomatic because the etiology is still unclear. One theory suggests a progressive inflammatory process, possibly induced by a viral infection. The aim of the present study was to investigate the activity of type I interferons (IFNs) in the livers of patients with BA. Mx proteins, which mediate an early innate immune response, are a very sensitive marker for type I IFN activity (eg, to viral infection). Liver biopsies were taken during the Kasai procedure from 13 newborns with BA who were serologically negative for hepatotropic viruses. Age-matched controls originated from 7 patients with neonatal cholestasis (eg, inspissated bile syndrome), 3 aborted fetuses, and a 10-year-old child. The immunostaining procedure (alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase) was performed with Mx-specific monoclonal antibody. Immunostaining for Mx proteins was positive in the hepatocytes of all newborns with BA, whereas the intrahepatic bile ducts were positive in all but one. In the control group, 8 of 11 liver samples were Mx-negative. This is the first study dealing with the detection of type I IFN activity in the liver of patients with BA. This observation supports the etiologic consideration of type I IFN-mediated immune response. Although positive findings of viruses in patients with BA are still inconsistent, the present study retraces the progressive inflammatory process in BA one more step toward its beginning.

  12. Improved ambient-pressure organic superconductor. [Bis(ethylenedithio)TTF-MX/sub 2/

    DOEpatents

    Williams, J.M.; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Beno, M.A.

    1985-05-29

    Disclosed is a new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET)/sub 2/MX/sub 2/ wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET)/sub 2/AuI/sub 2/ exhibits a transition temperature of 5/sup 0/K which is high for organic superconductors.

  13. Associations of chicken Mx1 polymorphism with antiviral responses in avian influenza virus infected embryos and broilers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Brahmakshatriya, V; Lupiani, B; Reddy, S; Okimoto, R; Li, X; Chiang, H; Zhou, H

    2012-12-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is a major respiratory disease of poultry that causes catastrophic losses to the poultry industry. The Mx protein has been shown to confer antiviral responses to influenza viruses in mice. One nonsynonymous substitution (S631N) in the chicken Mx protein is reported to be associated with resistance to AIV infection in vitro. The previous studies suggested controversy over whether this substitution in the Mx protein plays an important antiviral role in AIV infection in the chicken. It would be intriguing to investigate if the substitution is associated with resistance to AIV infection both in ovo and in vivo in chickens. In this study, the embryos and young chicks were generated from the cross of Mx1 heterozygous (S631N) parents with an expected segregating ratio of 1:2:1 in the progeny. A PCR length polymorphism was developed to genotype the Mx1 gene from 119 embryos and 48 chickens. The embryonated chicken eggs were inoculated with 10(6) 50% embryo infectious dose (EID(50)) H5N9 AIV on d 13. Hemagglutinating units in allantoic fluid were determined at 48 h postinoculation. For the in vivo study, twenty-four 1-wk-old broilers were inoculated with 10(6) EID(50) H5N3, and virus titers in lungs were evaluated at d 4 postinoculation. This is the first report revealing no significant association between Mx1 genotypes and low pathogenesis AIV infection both in ovo and in vivo in the chicken. Total RNA samples were isolated from chicken lung tissues in the in vivo study, and the Mx1 mRNA expression assay among 3 genotypes also suggested that only heterozygote birds had significantly greater expression with AIV infection than noninfected birds. A recombination breakpoint within Mx1 gene was also first identified, which has laid a solid foundation for further understanding biological function of the Mx1 gene in chickens. The current study provides valuable information on the effect of the Mx1 gene on the genetic resistance to AIV in chickens, and

  14. Band gap modulation of transition-metal dichalcogenide MX2 nanosheets by in-plane strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiangying; Ju, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruizhi; Guo, Chongfeng; Yong, Yongliang; Cui, Hongling; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    The electronic properties of quasi-two-dimensional honeycomb structures of MX2 nanosheets (M=Mo, W and X=S, Se) subjected to in-plane biaxial strain have been investigated using first-principles calculations. We demonstrate that the band gap of MX2 nanosheets can be widely tuned by applying tensile or compressive strain, and these ultrathin materials undergo a universal reversible semiconductor-metal transition at a critical strain. Compared to WX2, MoX2 need a smaller critical tensile strain for the band gap close, and MSe2 need a smaller critical compressive strain than MS2. Taking bilayer MoS2 as an example, the variation of the band structures was studied and the semiconductor-metal transition involves a slightly different physical mechanism between tensile and compressive strain. The ability to tune the band gap of MX2 nanosheets in a controlled fashion over a wide range of energy opens up the possibility for its usage in a range of application.

  15. Influenza A viruses escape from MxA restriction at the expense of efficient nuclear vRNP import.

    PubMed

    Götz, Veronika; Magar, Linda; Dornfeld, Dominik; Giese, Sebastian; Pohlmann, Anne; Höper, Dirk; Kong, Byung-Whi; Jans, David A; Beer, Martin; Haller, Otto; Schwemmle, Martin

    2016-01-01

    To establish a new lineage in the human population, avian influenza A viruses (AIV) must overcome the intracellular restriction factor MxA. Partial escape from MxA restriction can be achieved when the viral nucleoprotein (NP) acquires the critical human-adaptive amino acid residues 100I/V, 283P, and 313Y. Here, we show that introduction of these three residues into the NP of an avian H5N1 virus renders it genetically unstable, resulting in viruses harboring additional single mutations, including G16D. These substitutions restored genetic stability yet again yielded viruses with varying degrees of attenuation in mammalian and avian cells. Additionally, most of the mutant viruses lost the capacity to escape MxA restriction, with the exception of the G16D virus. We show that MxA escape is linked to attenuation by demonstrating that the three substitutions promoting MxA escape disturbed intracellular trafficking of incoming viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), thereby resulting in impaired nuclear import, and that the additional acquired mutations only partially compensate for this import block. We conclude that for adaptation to the human host, AIV must not only overcome MxA restriction but also an associated block in nuclear vRNP import. This inherent difficulty may partially explain the frequent failure of AIV to become pandemic. PMID:26988202

  16. Influenza A viruses escape from MxA restriction at the expense of efficient nuclear vRNP import

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Veronika; Magar, Linda; Dornfeld, Dominik; Giese, Sebastian; Pohlmann, Anne; Höper, Dirk; Kong, Byung-Whi; Jans, David A.; Beer, Martin; Haller, Otto; Schwemmle, Martin

    2016-01-01

    To establish a new lineage in the human population, avian influenza A viruses (AIV) must overcome the intracellular restriction factor MxA. Partial escape from MxA restriction can be achieved when the viral nucleoprotein (NP) acquires the critical human-adaptive amino acid residues 100I/V, 283P, and 313Y. Here, we show that introduction of these three residues into the NP of an avian H5N1 virus renders it genetically unstable, resulting in viruses harboring additional single mutations, including G16D. These substitutions restored genetic stability yet again yielded viruses with varying degrees of attenuation in mammalian and avian cells. Additionally, most of the mutant viruses lost the capacity to escape MxA restriction, with the exception of the G16D virus. We show that MxA escape is linked to attenuation by demonstrating that the three substitutions promoting MxA escape disturbed intracellular trafficking of incoming viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), thereby resulting in impaired nuclear import, and that the additional acquired mutations only partially compensate for this import block. We conclude that for adaptation to the human host, AIV must not only overcome MxA restriction but also an associated block in nuclear vRNP import. This inherent difficulty may partially explain the frequent failure of AIV to become pandemic. PMID:26988202

  17. A triple-arginine motif in the amino-terminal domain and oligomerization are required for HIV-1 inhibition by human MX2.

    PubMed

    Goujon, Caroline; Greenbury, Rebecca A; Papaioannou, Stelios; Doyle, Tomas; Malim, Michael H

    2015-04-01

    We have employed molecular genetic approaches to understand the domain organization of the HIV-1 resistance factor myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2). First, we describe an essential triple-arginine motif in the amino-terminal domain. Second, we demonstrate that this 91-residue domain mediates antiviral activity when appended to heterologous proteins, and we provide genetic evidence that protein oligomerization is required for MX2 function. These insights will facilitate future work aiming to elucidate MX2's mechanism of action.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism mining and nucleotide sequence analysis of Mx1 gene in exonic regions of Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    Niraj, Diwesh Kumar; Kumar, Pushpendra; Mishra, Chinmoy; Narayan, Raj; Bhattacharya, Tarun Kumar; Shrivastava, Kush; Bhushan, Bharat; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar; Saxena, Vishesh; Sahoo, Nihar Ranjan; Sharma, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Aim: An attempt has been made to study the Myxovirus resistant (Mx1) gene polymorphism in Japanese quail. Materials and Methods: In the present, investigation four fragments viz. Fragment I of 185 bp (Exon 3 region), Fragment II of 148 bp (Exon 5 region), Fragment III of 161 bp (Exon 7 region), and Fragment IV of 176 bp (Exon 13 region) of Mx1 gene were amplified and screened for polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism technique in 170 Japanese quail birds. Results: Out of the four fragments, one fragment (Fragment II) was found to be polymorphic. Remaining three fragments (Fragment I, III, and IV) were found to be monomorphic which was confirmed by custom sequencing. Overall nucleotide sequence analysis of Mx1 gene of Japanese quail showed 100% homology with common quail and more than 80% homology with reported sequence of chicken breeds. Conclusion: The Mx1 gene is mostly conserved in Japanese quail. There is an urgent need of comprehensive analysis of other regions of Mx1 gene along with its possible association with the traits of economic importance in Japanese quail. PMID:27047057

  19. Partial antiviral activities of the Asn631 chicken Mx against newcastle disease virus and vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Bichun; Fu, Dezhi; Zhang, Yani; Xu, Qi; Ni, Ligang; Chang, Guobin; Zheng, Mengmeng; Gao, Bo; Sun, Huaichang; Chen, Guohong

    2012-08-01

    Conflicting data existed for the antiviral potential of the chicken Mx protein and the importance of the Asn631 polymorphism in determination of the antiviral activity. In this study we modified the chicken Mx cDNA from the Ser631 to Asn631 genotype and transfected them into COS-I cells, chicken embryonic fibroblast (CEF) or NIH 3T3 cells. The Mx protein was mainly located at the cytoplasm. The transfected cell cultures were challenged with newcastle disease virus (NDV) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), cytopathic affect (CPE) inhibition assay showed that the times for development of visible and full CPE were significantly postponed by the Asn631 cDNA transfection at 48 h transfection, but not by the Ser631 cDNA transfection. Viral titration assay showed that the virus titers were significantly reduced before 72 h postinfection. CEF cells was incubated by the cell lysates extracted from the COS-I cells transfected with pcDNA-Mx/Asn631, could resist and delayed NDV infection. These data suggested the importance of the Asn631 polymorphism of the chicken Mx in determination of the antiviral activities against NDV and VSV at early stage of viral infection, which were relatively weak and not sufficient to inhibit the viral replication at late stage of viral infection.

  20. Selected test-well data from the MX-missile siting study, Tooele, Juab, Millard, Beaver, and Iron counties, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, James; Atwood, J.W.; Buettner, P.S.

    1985-01-01

    Ground-water data obtained from the MX-missile siting study in western Utah are presented in this report. The test drilling was divided into two phases, verification and water resources. In the verification phase, numerous borings ranging in depth from 92 to 205 feet were made to obtain data necessary for the design of the MX-basing system. Test wells drilled for the water resources phase ranged in depth from 310 to 1,399 feet; they were designed to determine ground-water availability and to estimate the effects of ground-water withdrawals planned for construction of the MX-basing system. This report includes: well-completion data, water-level measurements, and lithologic logs of selected wells. (USGS)

  1. Insight into HIV of IFN-Induced Myxovirus Resistance 2 (MX2) Expressed by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tzu-Chieh; Lee, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Chan, Yueh-Chiu

    2014-01-01

    Recently, an important topic of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had been published in 2013. In this report, the expression of the IFN-induced myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) had been defined the function to kill the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The screening from the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) database by simulating molecular docking and molecular dynamics could select candidate compounds, which may express MX2 against HIV. Saussureamine C, Crotalaburnine, and Precatorine are selected based on the highest docking score and other TCM compounds. The data from molecular dynamics are helpful in the analysis and detection of protein-ligand interactions. According to the docking poses, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen bond with structure variations, this research could assess the interaction between protein and ligand interaction. In addition to the detection of TCM compound efficacy, we suggest that Saussureamine C is better than the others in protein-ligand interaction and the structural variation to express MX2. PMID:25045710

  2. Adsorption of Procion Red MX 8B using spent tea leaves as adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heraldy, Eddy; Osa, Riesta Ramdhaniyati; Suryanti, Venty

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of Procion Red MX 8B using spent tea leaves (STL) as adsorbent, has been studied by batch adsorption technique. The adsorbent was activated by NaOH 4% for 24 hours for delignification process. The adsorbent was characterized using FTIR to indetify the functional groups of cellulose was shown by uptake -OH, C-H and C-O. The optimum conditions of adsorption experiments were achieved when pH was set as 6 with contact time of 75 minutes and capacity of adsorption was 3.28 mg/g. The equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir and Isotherm Freundlichs. The kinetic models, pseudo first order and pseudo second order were employed to describe the adsorption mechanism. The experimental results showed that the pseudo second order equation was the best model that described the adsorption behavior with the coefficient of correlation (R2) was equal higher than 0.99 The results suggested that STL had high potential to be used as effective adsorbent for Procion Red MX 8B removal.

  3. Layering effects on low frequency modes in n-layered MX2 transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Cammarata, Antonio; Polcar, Tomas

    2016-02-14

    n-Layered (n = 2, 3, 4) MX2 transition metal dichalcogenides (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te) have been studied using DFT techniques. Long-range van der Waals forces have been modeled using the Grimme correction to capture interlayer interactions. We study the dynamic and electronic dependence of atomic displacement on the number of layers. We find that the displacement patterns mainly affected by a change in the layer number are low-frequency modes at Γ and A k-points; such modes are connected with the intrinsic tribological response. We disentangle electro-phonon coupling by combining orbital polarization, covalency and cophonicity analysis with phonon band calculations. We find that the frequency dependence on the number of layers and the atomic type has a non-trivial relation with the electronic charge distribution in the interlayer region. We show that the interlayer electronic density can be adjusted by appropriately tuning M-X cophonicity, acting as a knob to control vibrational frequencies, hence the intrinsic frictional response. The present results can be exploited to study the electro-phonon coupling effects in TMD-based materials beyond tribological applications. PMID:26806673

  4. Power-cycle studies for a geothermal electric plant for MX operating bases

    SciTech Connect

    Bliem, C.J.; Kochan, R.J.

    1981-11-01

    Binary geothermal plants were investigated for providing electrical power for MX missile bases. A number of pure hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon mixtures were evaluated as working fluids for geothermal resource temperatures of 365, 400, and 450/sup 0/F. Cycle thermodynamic analyses were conducted for pure geothermal plants and for two types of coal-geothermal hybrid plants. Cycle performance results were presented as net geofluid effectiveness (net plant output in watts per geofluid flow in 1 bm/hr) and cooling water makeup effectiveness (net plant output in watts per makeup water flow in 1 bm/hr). A working fluid containing 90% (mass) isobutane/10% hexane was selected, and plant statepoints and energy balances were determined for 20MW(e) geothermal plants at each of the three resource temperatures. Working fluid heaters and condensers were sized for these plants. It is concluded that for the advanced plants investigated, geothermal resources in the 365 to 450/sup 0/F range can provide useful energy for powering MX missile bases.

  5. MxCSM: A massively-multiplexed coronal spectropolarimetric magnetometer for spaced-based coronal magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haosheng

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of a new coronal spectropolarimeter that employs large-scale multiplexing strategy to enable small coronagraphs to perform high-sensitivity measurements of the polarizations of multiple coronal emission lines (CELs) of the whole corona. The massively multiplexed coronal spectropolarimetric magnetometer (mxCSM) is a 25 cm catadioptric off-axis Gregorian coronagraph equipped with two 3-wavelength, 100-slit spectrographs to measure the polarization of six CELs simultaneously at 100 slits over a 1.2 degree x 1.0 degree (2.4 Rsun x 2.0 Rsun ) field of view. The large multiplexing capability of this design allows small coronagraphs to perform high sensitivity spectropolarimetric observations over a large FOV that until now is possible only with large aperture telescopes. Therefore, this design is ideally suited for space missions in which payload size and weight are important considerations. Future space missions with multiple mxCSMs in circumsolar orbits can provide polarization measurements of CELs from multiple lines of sight to enable true tomographic inversion of the coronal magnetic fields.

  6. Early diagnosis of a Mexican variant of Papaya meleira virus (PMeV-Mx) by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Zamudio-Moreno, E; Ramirez-Prado, J H; Moreno-Valenzuela, O A; Lopez-Ochoa, L A

    2015-02-06

    Papaya meleira disease was identified in Brazil in the 1980s. The disease is caused by a double-stranded RNA virus known as Papaya meleira virus (PMeV), which has also been recently reported in Mexico. However, previously reported PMeV primers failed to diagnose the Mexican form of the disease. A genomic approach was used to identify sequences of the Mexican virus isolate, referred here to as PMeV-Mx, to develop a diagnostic method. A mini cDNA library was generated using total RNA from the latex of fruits; this RNA was also sequenced using the Illumina platform. Sequences corresponding to the previously reported 669-base pair sequence for PMeV from Brazil (PMeV-Br) were identified within the PMeV-Mx genome, exhibiting 79-92% identity with PMeV-Br. In addition, a new sequence of 1154-base pairs encoding a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified in PMeV-Mx. Primers designed against this sequence detected both virus isolates, 2 amplicons of 173 and 491 base pairs from PMeV-Br and PMeV-Mx, and shared 100 and 98% identity, respectively. PMeV-Mx was found in the latex of fruits, in seedlings, and in the leaves, flowers, petioles, and seeds of mature plants. PMeV-Mx was more abundant in the latex of fruits than in the leaves. The limit of detection of the CB38/CB39 primer pair was 1 fg and 1 pg using total RNA extracted from the latex of fruits and from seedlings, respectively. A sensitive and early diagnosis protocol was developed; this method will enable the certification of seeds and seedlings prior to transplantation to the field.

  7. Protection from Severe Influenza Virus Infections in Mice Carrying the Mx1 Influenza Virus Resistance Gene Strongly Depends on Genetic Background

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dai-Lun; Hatesuer, Bastian; Bergmann, Silke; Nedelko, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus infections represent a serious threat to human health. Both extrinsic and intrinsic factors determine the severity of influenza. The MX dynamin-like GTPase 1 (Mx1) gene has been shown to confer strong resistance to influenza A virus infections in mice. Most laboratory mouse strains, including C57BL/6J, carry nonsense or deletion mutations in Mx1 and thus a nonfunctional allele, whereas wild-derived mouse strains carry a wild-type Mx1 allele. Congenic C57BL/6J (B6-Mx1r/r) mice expressing a wild-type allele from the A2G mouse strain are highly resistant to influenza A virus infections, to both mono- and polybasic subtypes. Furthermore, in genetic mapping studies, Mx1 was identified as the major locus of resistance to influenza virus infections. Here, we investigated whether the Mx1 protective function is influenced by the genetic background. For this, we generated a congenic mouse strain carrying the A2G wild-type Mx1 resistance allele on a DBA/2J background (D2-Mx1r/r). Most remarkably, congenic D2-Mx1r/r mice expressing a functional Mx1 wild-type allele are still highly susceptible to H1N1 virus. However, pretreatment of D2-Mx1r/r mice with alpha interferon protected them from lethal infections. Our results showed, for the first time, that the presence of an Mx1 wild-type allele from A2G as such does not fully protect mice from lethal influenza A virus infections. These observations are also highly relevant for susceptibility to influenza virus infections in humans. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus represents a major health threat to humans. Seasonal influenza epidemics cause high economic loss, morbidity, and deaths each year. Genetic factors of the host strongly influence susceptibility and resistance to virus infections. The Mx1 (MX dynamin-like GTPase 1) gene has been described as a major resistance gene in mice and humans. Most inbred laboratory mouse strains are deficient in Mx1, but congenic B6-Mx1r/r mice that carry the wild-type Mx1

  8. Feedback on the use of the MX6 Mox Fuel transport cask: reduction of the dose uptake during operations

    SciTech Connect

    Blachet, L.; Lallemant, Th.

    2007-07-01

    In the framework of the quality, safety and environment policy of AREVA, TN International has implemented a global management system according to ISO 9001, OHSAS 18001 and ISO 14001 requirements with certification obtained from third part organization (1). The design of the MX6 cask is an example of the implementation of this system in order to guarantee safety and the health of everyone involved and the protection of the environment. The MX6 design has allowed ALARA dose rates for the workers during all the phases of use of the cask, to be significantly reduced compared to previous design. The MX6 cask was developed by TN International for the transport of either BWR or PWR fresh MOX fuel assemblies. Replacing the previous SIEMENS type III and SIEMENS BWR packaging, the MX6 has been firstly used in the German Nuclear Power Plants. Complying with the TS-R-1 (IAEA 1996) regulations, the MX6 cask is based on innovative solutions implemented at each step of the design and the manufacturing. Its design includes an efficient neutron shielding for high Plutonium content and an easy use content restraining system. The large payload of the MX6 cask, 6 PWR MOX fuel assemblies or 16 BWR MOX fuel assemblies, minimizes the doses uptake during its unloading at the NPP. Moreover, new sequences of loading and unloading operations were proposed for testing and implementation in each Nuclear Facility. Concurrently, total dose uptakes by the operators were assessed in order to prove the efficiency of the packaging and the proposed sequences. In this paper, the main contributors to the transports to Germany with the MX6 cask will present their involvement and feedback for the reduction of the dose uptakes by the operators during the loading and unloading operations. Presently in use at GUNDREMMINGEN and ISAR Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), the MX6 cask use will be extended to other German and Swiss NPPs from 2006 onwards. (1) AFAQ-AFNOR Certification for ISO 9001, OHSAS 18001 and ISO

  9. An uncleaved signal peptide directs the Malus xiaojinensis iron transporter protein Mx IRT1 into the ER for the PM secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Tan, Song; Berry, James O; Li, Peng; Ren, Na; Li, Shuang; Yang, Guang; Wang, Wei-Bing; Qi, Xiao-Ting; Yin, Li-Ping

    2014-11-07

    Malus xiaojinensis iron-regulated transporter 1 (Mx IRT1) is a highly effective inducible iron transporter in the iron efficient plant Malus xiaojinensis. As a multi-pass integral plasma membrane (PM) protein, Mx IRT1 is predicted to consist of eight transmembrane domains, with a putative N-terminal signal peptide (SP) of 1-29 amino acids. To explore the role of the putative SP, constructs expressing Mx IRT1 (with an intact SP) and Mx DsIRT1 (with a deleted SP) were prepared for expression in Arabidopsis and in yeast. Mx IRT1 could rescue the iron-deficiency phenotype of an Arabidopsis irt1 mutant, and complement the iron-limited growth defect of the yeast mutant DEY 1453 (fet3fet4). Furthermore, fluorescence analysis indicated that a chimeric Mx IRT1-eGFP (enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein) construct was translocated into the ER (Endoplasmic reticulum) for the PM sorting pathway. In contrast, the SP-deleted Mx DsIRT1 could not rescue either of the mutant phenotypes, nor direct transport of the GFP signal into the ER. Interestingly, immunoblot analysis indicated that the SP was not cleaved from the mature protein following transport into the ER. Taken together, data presented here provides strong evidence that an uncleaved SP determines ER-targeting of Mx IRT1 during the initial sorting stage, thereby enabling the subsequent transport and integration of this protein into the PM for its crucial role in iron uptake.

  10. Bovine Mx1 enables resistance against foot-and-mouth disease virus in naturally susceptible cells by inhibiting the replication of viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, H-M; Xia, X-Z; Hu, G-X; Yu, L; He, H-B

    2016-03-01

    Innate immunity, especially the anti-viral genes, exerts an important barrier function in preventing viral infections. Myxovirus-resistant (Mx) gene take an anti-viral role, whereas its effects on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in naturally susceptible cells are still unclear. The bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cell line BPTE-siMx1, in which bovine Mx1 gene was silenced, was established and treated with IFN alpha for 6 hr before FMDV infection. The copy numbers of the negative and positive strand viral RNA were determined by strand-specific real-time fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR. The TCID50 of BPTE-siMx1 cells increased at least 17-fold as compared to control cells BPTE-LacZ at 8 hr post infection, thus silencing of bovine Mx1 could promote the replication of FMDV. The amount of both the negative and positive strand viral RNA in BPTE-siMx1 cells significantly increased as compared to BPTE-LacZ cells, indicating that the replication levels of viral RNA were promoted by silencing bovine Mx1. The bovine Mx1 gene could provide resistance against FMDV in the bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cells via suppressing the replication of viral RNA. PMID:26982472

  11. Bovine Mx1 enables resistance against foot-and-mouth disease virus in naturally susceptible cells by inhibiting the replication of viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, H-M; Xia, X-Z; Hu, G-X; Yu, L; He, H-B

    2016-03-01

    Innate immunity, especially the anti-viral genes, exerts an important barrier function in preventing viral infections. Myxovirus-resistant (Mx) gene take an anti-viral role, whereas its effects on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in naturally susceptible cells are still unclear. The bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cell line BPTE-siMx1, in which bovine Mx1 gene was silenced, was established and treated with IFN alpha for 6 hr before FMDV infection. The copy numbers of the negative and positive strand viral RNA were determined by strand-specific real-time fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR. The TCID50 of BPTE-siMx1 cells increased at least 17-fold as compared to control cells BPTE-LacZ at 8 hr post infection, thus silencing of bovine Mx1 could promote the replication of FMDV. The amount of both the negative and positive strand viral RNA in BPTE-siMx1 cells significantly increased as compared to BPTE-LacZ cells, indicating that the replication levels of viral RNA were promoted by silencing bovine Mx1. The bovine Mx1 gene could provide resistance against FMDV in the bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cells via suppressing the replication of viral RNA.

  12. The toxicity of the mutagen 'MX' and its analogue, mucochloric acid, to rainbow trout hepatocytes and gill epithelial cells and to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Isomaa, B; Holmström, T H; Lilius, H; Franzén, R; Kronberg, L

    1995-06-26

    The cytotoxicity of the, in Salmonella, potent mutagenic compound, 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its structural analogue 3,4-dichloro-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-furanone (mucochloric acid, MCA), was studied in freshly isolated rainbow trout hepatocytes and gill epithelial cells by determining 86Rb-leakage and decrease in fluorescence intensity in calcein AM-loaded cells. The acute toxicity of the compounds to Daphnia magna was studied by determining the concentration causing immobilization of the organism. MX proved to be more toxic than MCA both in the cellular assays and in the acute toxicity test with D. magna. MX was more toxic to hepatocytes than to gill epithelial cells. The uptake of [14C]MX was also much more efficient in hepatocytes than in gill epithelial cells. The uptake of [14C]MX in hepatocytes was not inhibited by taurocholic acid in excess, indicating that MX is not taken up by the carrier complex responsible for the uptake of taurocholate in the hepatocytes. Both the acute toxicity to D. magna and cytotoxicity of MX and MCA was rather low (EC50 values > 0.1 mM) and we conclude that it is very unlikely that MX and MCA at concentrations occurring in recipients receiving chlorination effluents from pulp mills or chlorinated domestic sewage, as regards their acute toxicity, implies a risk for aquatic animals.

  13. In vivo virulence of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss correlates inversely with in vitro Mx gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cano, Irene; Collet, Bertrand; Pereira, Clarissa; Paley, Richard; van Aerle, Ronny; Stone, David; Taylor, Nick G H

    2016-05-01

    The in vitro replication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates from each VHSV genotype and the associated cellular host Mx gene expression were analysed. All the isolates were able to infect RTG-2 cells and induce increased Mx gene expression (generic assay detecting isoforms 1 and 3 [Mx1/3]). A trout pathogenic, genotype Ia isolate (J167), showing high replication in RTG-2 cells (by infective titre and N gene expression) induced lower Mx1/3 gene expression than observed in VHSV isolates known to be non-pathogenic to rainbow trout: 96-43/8, 96-43/10 (Ib); 1p49, 1p53 (II); and MI03 (IVb). Paired co-inoculation assays were analysed using equal number of plaque forming units per ml (PFU) of J167 (Ia genotype) with other less pathogenic VHSV genotypes. In these co-inoculations, the Mx1/3 gene expression was significantly lower than for the non-pathogenic isolate alone. Of the three rainbow trout Mx isoforms, J167 did not induce Mx1 up-regulation in RTG-2 or RTgill-W1 cells. Co-inoculating isolates resulted in greater inhibition of Mx in both rainbow trout cell lines studied. Up-regulation of sea bream Mx in SAF-1 cells induced by 96-43/8 was also lower in co-inoculation assays with J167. The RTG-P1 cell line, expressing luciferase under the control of the interferon-induced Mx rainbow trout gene promoter, showed low luciferase activity when inoculated with pathogenic strains: J167, DK-5131 (Ic), NO-A-163/68 (Id), TR-206239-1, TR-22207111 (Ie), 99-292 (IVa), and CA-NB00-01 (IVc). Co-inoculation assays showed a J167-dose dependent inhibition of the luciferase activity. The data suggest that virulent VHSV isolates may interfere in the interferon pathways, potentially determining higher pathogenicity.

  14. In vivo virulence of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss correlates inversely with in vitro Mx gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cano, Irene; Collet, Bertrand; Pereira, Clarissa; Paley, Richard; van Aerle, Ronny; Stone, David; Taylor, Nick G H

    2016-05-01

    The in vitro replication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates from each VHSV genotype and the associated cellular host Mx gene expression were analysed. All the isolates were able to infect RTG-2 cells and induce increased Mx gene expression (generic assay detecting isoforms 1 and 3 [Mx1/3]). A trout pathogenic, genotype Ia isolate (J167), showing high replication in RTG-2 cells (by infective titre and N gene expression) induced lower Mx1/3 gene expression than observed in VHSV isolates known to be non-pathogenic to rainbow trout: 96-43/8, 96-43/10 (Ib); 1p49, 1p53 (II); and MI03 (IVb). Paired co-inoculation assays were analysed using equal number of plaque forming units per ml (PFU) of J167 (Ia genotype) with other less pathogenic VHSV genotypes. In these co-inoculations, the Mx1/3 gene expression was significantly lower than for the non-pathogenic isolate alone. Of the three rainbow trout Mx isoforms, J167 did not induce Mx1 up-regulation in RTG-2 or RTgill-W1 cells. Co-inoculating isolates resulted in greater inhibition of Mx in both rainbow trout cell lines studied. Up-regulation of sea bream Mx in SAF-1 cells induced by 96-43/8 was also lower in co-inoculation assays with J167. The RTG-P1 cell line, expressing luciferase under the control of the interferon-induced Mx rainbow trout gene promoter, showed low luciferase activity when inoculated with pathogenic strains: J167, DK-5131 (Ic), NO-A-163/68 (Id), TR-206239-1, TR-22207111 (Ie), 99-292 (IVa), and CA-NB00-01 (IVc). Co-inoculation assays showed a J167-dose dependent inhibition of the luciferase activity. The data suggest that virulent VHSV isolates may interfere in the interferon pathways, potentially determining higher pathogenicity. PMID:27066706

  15. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF POTENTIALLY HAZARDOUS BYPRODUCTS OF OZONATION AND CHLORINATION - PART I: STUDIES OF CHROMATOGRAPHIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF MX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas chromatographic (GC) and Fourier transform infrared and mass spectroscopic (FT-IR and MS, respectively) properties of (Z)-2-chloro-3-(dichloromethyl)4-oxobutenoic acid (MX) (a highly mutagenic byproduct of drinking water chlorination) and several related compounds were st...

  16. TOXICOGENOMIC ANALYSIS INCORPORATING OPERON-TRANSCRIPTIONAL COUPLING AND TOXICANT CONCENTRATRION-EXPRESSION RESPONSE: Analysis of MX-Treated Salmonella

    EPA Science Inventory

    What is the study? This study is the first to use microarray analysis in the Ames strains of Salmonella. The microarray chips were custom-designed for this study and are not commercially available, and we evaluated the well-studied drinking water mutagen, MX. Because much inform...

  17. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein.

    PubMed

    Hoenen, Antje; Gillespie, Leah; Morgan, Garry; van der Heide, Peter; Khromykh, Alexander; Mackenzie, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNVKUN) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNVKUN particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNVKUN under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNVKUN assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNVKUN assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system.

  18. p-Nitrophenol and glutathione response in medaka (Oryzias latipes) exposed to MX, a drinking water carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Geter, David R; Fournie, John W; Brouwer, Marius H; DeAngelo, Anthony B; Hawkins, William E

    2003-03-01

    When chlorine is introduced into public drinking water for disinfection, it can react with organic compounds in surface waters to form toxic by-products such as 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-furanone (MX). We investigated the effect of exposure to MX on cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1)-like activity and total glutathione (GSH) in the liver of the small fish model, medaka (Oryzias latipes). The multi-site carcinogen methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAMAc) was the positive control compound. Both medaka liver microsome preparations and S-9 fractions catalyzed the hydroxylation of p-nitrophenol (PNP), suggesting CYP2E1-like activity in the medaka. Male medaka exposed for 96 h to the CYP2E1 inducers ethanol and acetone under fasted conditions showed significant increases in PNP-hydroxylation activity. Furthermore, total reduced hepatic GSH was reduced in fish fasted for 96 h, indicating that normal feeding is a factor in maintaining xenobiotic defenses. Exposure to MX and MAMAc induced significant increases in hepatic CYP2E1-like activity, however MX exposure did not alter hepatic GSH levels. These data strengthen the role of the medaka as a suitable species for examining cytochrome P450 and GSH detoxification processes and the role these systems play in chemical carcinogenesis.

  19. Coarsening behavior of MX carbonitrides in type 347H heat-resistant austenitic steel during thermal aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying-hui; Liu, Chen-xi; Liu, Yong-chang; Guo, Qian-ying; Li, Hui-jun

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the growth kinetics of MX (M = metal, X = C/N) nanoprecipitates in type 347H austenitic steel was systematically studied. To investigate the coarsening behavior and the growth mechanism of MX carbonitrides during long-term aging, experiments were performed at 700, 800, 850, and 900°C for different periods (1, 24, 70, and 100 h). The precipitation behavior of carbonitrides in specimens subjected to various aging conditions was explored using carbon replicas and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. The corresponding sizes of MX carbonitrides were measured. The results demonstrates that MX carbonitrides precipitate in type 347H austenitic steel as Nb(C,N). The coarsening rate constant is time-independent; however, an increase in aging temperature results in an increase in coarsening rate of Nb(C,N). The coarsening process was analyzed according to the calculated diffusion activation energy of Nb(C,N). When the aging temperature was 800-900°C, the mean activation energy was 294 kJ·mol-1, and the coarsening behavior was controlled primarily by the diffusion of Nb atoms.

  20. Complex Interplay between HIV-1 Capsid and MX2-Independent Alpha Interferon-Induced Antiviral Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bulli, Lorenzo; Apolonia, Luis; Kutzner, Juliane; Pollpeter, Darja; Goujon, Caroline; Herold, Nikolas; Schwarz, Sarah-Marie; Giernat, Yannick; Keppler, Oliver T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferons (IFNs), including IFN-α, upregulate an array of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) and potently suppress Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infectivity in CD4+ T cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and dendritic cells. Recently, we and others identified ISG myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) as an inhibitor of HIV-1 nuclear entry. However, additional antiviral blocks exist upstream of nuclear import, but the ISGs that suppress infection, e.g., prior to (or during) reverse transcription, remain to be defined. We show here that the HIV-1 CA mutations N74D and A105T, both of which allow escape from inhibition by MX2 and the truncated version of cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 6 (CPSF6), as well as the cyclophilin A (CypA)-binding loop mutation P90A, all increase sensitivity to IFN-α-mediated inhibition. Using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology, we demonstrate that the IFN-α hypersensitivity of these mutants in THP-1 cells is independent of MX2 or CPSF6. As expected, CypA depletion had no additional effect on the behavior of the P90A mutant but modestly increased the IFN-α sensitivity of wild-type virus. Interestingly, the infectivity of wild-type or P90A virus could be rescued from the MX2-independent IFN-α-induced blocks in THP-1 cells by treatment with cyclosporine (Cs) or its nonimmunosuppressive analogue SDZ-NIM811, indicating that Cs-sensitive host cell cyclophilins other than CypA contribute to the activity of IFN-α-induced blocks. We propose that cellular interactions with incoming HIV-1 capsids help shield the virus from recognition by antiviral effector mechanisms. Thus, the CA protein is a fulcrum for the dynamic interplay between cell-encoded functions that inhibit or promote HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 is the causative agent of AIDS. During acute HIV-1 infection, numerous proinflammatory cytokines are produced, including type I interferons (IFNs). IFNs can

  1. Dynamics and photoexcitation in MX and MXX[prime] chain solids

    SciTech Connect

    Gammel, J.T. ); Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Nonlinear adiabatic dynamics associated with nonlinear excitations in MX and MXX' chain materials are numerically studied within a discrete, 3/4-filled, two-band, tight-binding extended Peierls-Hubbard model. Both Hartree-Fock (HF) adiabatic molecular relaxation and molecular dynamics techniques are employed to investigate the time evolution of solitons, polarons, bipolarons in charge-density-wave (CDW), bond-order-wave (BOW) and spin-density-wave (SDW) ground state materials. Photoexcitations are performed between (i) continuum levels, (ii) localized levels, (iii) continuum and localized levels. The subsequent formation and time evolution of excitons, defect pairs, breathers, and, for the MXX' solids, charge separation are studied in terms of energy levels and distortion patterns. These results are compared with the dynamics of previously studied 1/2-filled, one-band, SSH-type electron-phonon models, used for studying polyenes and polyynes, and experimental data.

  2. Dynamics and photoexcitation in MX and MXX{prime} chain solids

    SciTech Connect

    Gammel, J.T.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1992-12-01

    Nonlinear adiabatic dynamics associated with nonlinear excitations in MX and MXX` chain materials are numerically studied within a discrete, 3/4-filled, two-band, tight-binding extended Peierls-Hubbard model. Both Hartree-Fock (HF) adiabatic molecular relaxation and molecular dynamics techniques are employed to investigate the time evolution of solitons, polarons, bipolarons in charge-density-wave (CDW), bond-order-wave (BOW) and spin-density-wave (SDW) ground state materials. Photoexcitations are performed between (i) continuum levels, (ii) localized levels, (iii) continuum and localized levels. The subsequent formation and time evolution of excitons, defect pairs, breathers, and, for the MXX` solids, charge separation are studied in terms of energy levels and distortion patterns. These results are compared with the dynamics of previously studied 1/2-filled, one-band, SSH-type electron-phonon models, used for studying polyenes and polyynes, and experimental data.

  3. Photon-beam stabilization systems for the MX2 beamline at LNLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfelici, Lucas; de Mattos, Fernando

    2011-09-01

    The MX2, a wiggler beamline dedicated to macromolecular crystallography, started routinely operating for users in 2007. Late in the commissioning phase, several experiments started to be conducted in order to characterize photon-beam stability. At that time, position movements of typically 150 μm per shift and severe energy drifts reaching 0.8 eV/h were observed at sample position, which would certainly spoil the MAD experiments. The severity of this scenario for a recently delivered beamline led us to install temperature sensors and inclinometers along the optical hutch, besides performing exhaustive tests to clarify the disturbance paths. To elucidate the main instability mechanisms, three control systems for beam stabilization were considered—position stabilization, ground motion canceling and, the most important of all, temperature control for the optical hutch. Results and perspectives are presented hereafter.

  4. Production of trace elements in coastal sea water certified reference material NMIA MX014.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Jeffrey P; Saxby, David L; White, Ian E A W; Antin, Luminita; Murby, E John

    2016-06-01

    A certified reference material (CRM) for trace elements in acidified sea water, NMIA MX014, has been produced by the National Measurement Institute Australia (NMIA). The CRM consists of natural coastal sea water with 12 elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se and V) fortified to levels relevant to environmental regulatory testing in Australia ranging from 0.4 to 22 μg/kg. Certified values for these 12 elements were assigned using reference methods developed at NMIA, using either isotope dilution or standard addition with ICP-MS measurement. Specialised sample preparation (coprecipitation) and ICP-MS optimisation (online dilution, collision/reaction chemistry, high mass resolution) were used to negate the effect of the high level of dissolved solids. Multiple confirmatory experiments were performed in order to verify that ICP-MS spectral interferences were eliminated and to estimate the measurement uncertainty contribution from method precision and method trueness. Extensive homogeneity and stability testing was performed and the measurement uncertainty of certified values includes contributions from between-bottle homogeneity, short-term stability, medium-term stability and long-term stability. Special attention was paid to the stability of Hg due to well-known preservation problems. Acidified sea water matrix was satisfactory for stabilising Hg at 0.4 μg/kg for at least 4 years. Relative expanded uncertainties (k = 2) for the 12 certified values were between 1 and 11 %. NMIA MX014 is intended for use as a reference material for analytical method validation and quality control for quantification of trace elements in saline water and other similar sample types. PMID:27108283

  5. A Triple-Arginine Motif in the Amino-Terminal Domain and Oligomerization Are Required for HIV-1 Inhibition by Human MX2

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, Rebecca A.; Papaioannou, Stelios; Doyle, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    We have employed molecular genetic approaches to understand the domain organization of the HIV-1 resistance factor myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2). First, we describe an essential triple-arginine motif in the amino-terminal domain. Second, we demonstrate that this 91-residue domain mediates antiviral activity when appended to heterologous proteins, and we provide genetic evidence that protein oligomerization is required for MX2 function. These insights will facilitate future work aiming to elucidate MX2's mechanism of action. PMID:25673704

  6. Ballistic performance comparison of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jiwon; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2014-02-01

    We study the transport properties of monolayer MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te) n- and p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) using full-band ballistic non-equilibrium Green's function simulations with an atomistic tight-binding Hamiltonian with hopping potentials obtained from density functional theory. We discuss the subthreshold slope, drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL), as well as gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL) for different monolayer MX2 MOSFETs. We also report the possibility of negative differential resistance behavior in the output characteristics of nanoscale monolayer MX2 MOSFETs.

  7. The Relationship between MX [3-Chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone], Routinely Monitored Trihalomethanes, and Other Characteristics in Drinking Water in a Long-Term Survey.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel B; Bennett, James E; Rantakokko, Panu; Martinez, David; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Toledano, Mireille B

    2015-06-01

    MX (3-Chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone) is a drinking water disinfection byproduct (DBP). It is a potent mutagen and is of concern to public health. Data on MX levels in drinking water, especially in the UK, are limited. Our aim was to investigate factors associated with variability of MX concentrations at the tap, and to evaluate if routinely measured trihalomethanes (THMs) are an appropriate proxy measure for MX. We conducted quarterly water sampling at consumers' taps in eight water supply zones in and around Bradford, UK, between 2007 and 2010. We collected 79 samples which were analyzed for MX using GC-HRMS. Other parameters such as pH, temperature, UV-absorbance and free chlorine were measured concurrently, and total THMs were modeled from regulatory monitoring data. To our knowledge this is the longest MX measurement survey undertaken to date. Concentrations of MX varied between 8.9 and 45.5 ng/L with a median of 21.3 ng/L. MX demonstrated clear seasonality with concentrations peaking in late summer/early fall. Multivariate regression showed that MX levels were associated with total trihalomethanes, UV-absorbance and pH. However, the relationship between TTHM and MX may not be sufficiently consistent across time and location for TTHM to be used as a proxy measure for MX in exposure assessment.

  8. Modelling of geochemical reactions and experimental cation exchange in MX 80 bentonite.

    PubMed

    Montes-H, G; Fritz, B; Clement, A; Michau, N

    2005-10-01

    Bentonites are widely used for waste repository systems because of their hydrodynamic, surface and chemical-retention properties. MX 80 bentonite (bentonite of Wyoming) contains approximately 85% Na/Ca-montmorillonite and 15% accessory minerals. The dominant presence of Na/Ca-montmorillonite in this clay mineral could cause it to perform exceptionally well as an engineered barrier for a radioactive waste repository because this buffer material is expected to fill up by swelling the void between canisters containing waste and the surrounding ground. However, the Na/Ca-montmorillonite could be transformed to other clay minerals as a function of time under repository conditions. Previous modelling studies based on the hydrolysis reactions have shown that the Na/Ca-montmorillonite-to-Ca-montmorillonite conversion is the most significant chemical transformation. In fact, this chemical process appears to be a simple cation exchange into the engineered barrier. The purpose of the present study was two-fold. Firstly, it was hoped to predict the newly formed products of bentonite-fluid reactions under repository conditions by applying a thermokinetic hydrochemical code (KIRMAT: Kinetic Reactions and Mass Transport). The system modelled herein was considered to consist of a 1-m thick zone of water-saturated engineered barrier. This non-equilibrated system was placed in contact with a geological fluid on one side, which was then allowed to diffuse into the barrier, while the other side was kept in contact with iron-charged water. Reducing initial conditions ( [P(O)2 approximately equals 0] ; Eh=-200 mV) and a constant reaction temperature (100 degrees C) were considered. Secondly, it was hoped to estimate the influence of inter-layer cations (Ca and Na) on the swelling behaviour of the MX 80 bentonite by using an isothermal system of water vapour adsorption and an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) coupled with a digital image analysis (DIA) program. Here, the

  9. Microstructural investigation of MX-80 bentonite and Na/Ca-montmorillonite using basal spacing determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmboe, M.; Wold, S.

    2010-12-01

    Knowledge about the microstructure of saturated compacted bentonite is of fundamental importance in order to describe and predict diffusive transport through the bentonite barrier in a deep geological repository. If the mineral composition is well characterized, microstructural models of compacted bentonite on the nanoscale can be based on accurate information of the basal spacings and corresponding interlayer distances within the montmorillonite particles. From the average basal spacing, the interlayer and the so-called interparticle or free porosity can be calculated [1]. The basal spacings of the montmorillonite particles can be measured by neutron and X-ray small-angle scattering or diffraction. However, due to microstructural heterogeneity and interstratification of different hydration states, profile fitting through mixed layered modeling is necessary although challenging [2,3]. In this study, we have used low-angle XRD in reflection mode together with one-dimensional analysis of mixed layered clays [2] in order to compare both the relative layer distribution and average basal spacing of MX-80 bentonite and Na/Ca-montmorillonite samples. Two different methods for water saturation commonly used in the literature were compared, saturation by constant relative humidity (adsorption and desorption) and saturation under constant volume conditions, forming compacted clay with dry densities of 0.5-1.8 g/cm3. No significant difference in basal spacings was observed between highly compacted (< 4 H2O layers) homoionic montmorillonite and MX-80 bentonite samples saturated under volume constricted conditions, if the accessory minerals and lower smectite content was accounted for. This was however not the case for the samples saturated at constant RH%, which indicates mixing of the exchangeable cations in the interlayers. Interestingly, even if the total water content was the same water uptake restricted by water activity did not always result in the same magnitude of

  10. Electronic structures and elastic properties of monolayer and bilayer transition metal dichalcogenides MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = O, S, Se, Te): A comparative first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fan; Zhang, Wei-Bing; Tang, Bi-Yu

    2015-09-01

    First-principle calculations with different exchange-correlation functionals, including LDA, PBE, and vdW-DF functional in the form of optB88-vdW, have been performed to investigate the electronic and elastic properties of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) with the formula of MX2(M = Mo, W; X = O, S, Se, Te) in both monolayer and bilayer structures. The calculated band structures show a direct band gap for monolayer TMDCs at the K point except for MoO2 and WO2. When the monolayers are stacked into a bilayer, the reduced indirect band gaps are found except for bilayer WTe2, in which the direct gap is still present at the K point. The calculated in-plane Young moduli are comparable to that of graphene, which promises possible application of TMDCs in future flexible and stretchable electronic devices. We also evaluated the performance of different functionals including LDA, PBE, and optB88-vdW in describing elastic moduli of TMDCs and found that LDA seems to be the most qualified method. Moreover, our calculations suggest that the Young moduli for bilayers are insensitive to stacking orders and the mechanical coupling between monolayers seems to be negligible. Project supported by the Construct Program of the Key Discipline in Hunan Province, China and Aid Program for Science and Technology Innovative Research Team in Higher Educational Institutions of Hunan Province, China.

  11. Fabrication of CuAl1-xMxO2 (M = Fe, Cr)/Ni film delafossite compounds using spin coating and their microstructure and dielectric constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diantoro, Markus; Yuwita, Pelangi Eka; Olenka, Desyana; Nasikhudin

    2014-09-01

    The discovery of delafossite compound has encouraged more rapid technological developments particularly in transparent electronic devices. Copper oxide-based transparent thin films delafossite semiconductor recently give much attention in the field of optoelectronic technology, after the discovery of p-type CuAlO2. The potential applications of a p-type semiconductor transparent conductive oxides (TCO) have been applied in broad field of optoelectronics. To explore a broad physical properties interms of magnetic conducting subtitution is understudied. In this work we report the fabrication of delafossite film on Ni substrate and their characterization of CuAl1-xMxO2 delafossite compounds doped with Cr3+ and Fe3+ from the raw material of Cu(NO3)2˙3H2O, Al(NO3)3˙9H2O, Fe(NO3)3˙9H2O and Cr(NO3)3˙9H2O. The films were prepared using spin coating through a sol-gel technique at various concentrations of x = 0, 0.03, 0.04, and 0.05 for chromium and x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, and 0.08 for iron doped. Crystal and microstructure were characterized by means of Cu-Kα Bragg-Brentano X-RD followed by High Score Plus and SEM-EDAX. The dielectric constants of the films were characterized using LCR meter. It was found that the CuAl1-xMxO2/Ni delafossite films were successfully fabricated. The CuAl1-xFexO2 compound crystallized with lattice parameters of a = b ranged from 2.8603 Å to 2.8675 Å and c ranged from 16.9576 to 17.0763 Å. The increase of the dopant give rise to the increase of the lattice parameters. Since iron has bigger ionic radius (69 pm) than original site of Al3+ with radius of 53 pm the crystal volume lattice also increase. Further analyses of increasing volume of the crystal, as expected, affected to the decreasing of its dielectric constant. The similar trends also shown by Cr3+ doped of CuAl1-xCrxO2 films with smaller effects.

  12. Probing hydrodesulfurization over bimetallic phosphides using monodisperse Ni2-xMxP nanoparticles encapsulated in mesoporous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danforth, Samuel J.; Liyanage, D. Ruchira; Hitihami-Mudiyanselage, Asha; Ilic, Boris; Brock, Stephanie L.; Bussell, Mark E.

    2016-06-01

    Metal phosphide nanoparticles encapsulated in mesoporous silica provide a well-defined system for probing the fundamental chemistry of the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reaction over this new class of hydrotreating catalysts. To investigate composition effects in bimetallic phosphides, the HDS of dibenzothiophene (DBT) was carried out over a series of Ni-rich Ni2-xMxP@mSiO2 (M = Co, Fe) nanocatalysts (x ≤ 0.50). The Ni2-xMxP nanoparticles (average diameters: 11-13 nm) were prepared by solution-phase arrested precipitation and encapsulated in mesoporous silica, characterized by a range of techniques (XRD, TEM, IR spectroscopy, BET surface area, CO chemisorption) and tested for DBT HDS activity and selectivity. The highest activity was observed for a Ni1.92Co0.08P@mSiO2 nanocatalyst, but the overall trend was a decrease in HDS activity with increasing Co or Fe content. In contrast, the highest turnover frequency (TOF) was observed for the most Co- and Fe-rich compositions based on sites titrated by CO chemisorption. IR spectral studies of adsorbed CO on the Ni2-xMxP@mSiO2 catalysts indicate that an increase in electron density occurs on Ni sites as the Co or Fe content is increased, which may be responsible for the increased TOFs of the catalytic sites. The Ni2-xMxP@mSiO2 nanocatalysts exhibit a strong preference for the direct desulfurization pathway (DDS) for DBT HDS that changes only slightly with increasing Co or Fe content.

  13. Effective tight-binding model for MX2 under electric and magnetic fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shanavas, Kavungal Veedu; Satpathy, S.

    2015-06-15

    We present a systematic method for developing a five band Hamiltonian for the metal d orbitals that can be used to study the effect of electric and magnetic fields on multilayer MX2 (M=Mo,W and X=S,Se) systems. On a hexagonal lattice of d orbitals, the broken inversion symmetry of the monolayers is incorporated via fictitious s orbitals at the chalcogenide sites. A tight-binding Hamiltonian is constructed and then downfolded to get effective d orbital overlap parameters using quasidegenerate perturbation theory. The steps to incorporate the effects of multiple layers, external electric and magnetic fields are also detailed. We find that anmore » electric field produces a linear-k Rashba splitting around the Γ point, while a magnetic field removes the valley pseudospin degeneracy at the ±K points. Lastly, our model provides a simple tool to understand the recent experiments on electric and magnetic control of valley pseudospin in monolayer dichalcogendies.« less

  14. Mx1-Cre mediated Rgs12 conditional knockout mice exhibit increased bone mass phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuying; Li, Yi-ping; Liu, Tongjun; He, Xiaoning; Yuan, Xue; Li, Chunyi; Cao, Jay; Kim, Yunjung

    2013-01-01

    Regulators of G-protein Signaling (Rgs) proteins are the members of a multigene family of GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAP) for the Galpha subunit of heterotrimeric G-proteins. Rgs proteins play critical roles in the regulation of G protein couple receptor (GPCR) signaling in normal physiology and human diseases such as cancer, heart diseases and inflammation. Rgs12 is the largest protein of the Rgs protein family. Some in vitro studies have demonstrated that Rgs12 plays a critical role in regulating cell differentiation and migration; however its function and mechanism in vivo is largely unknown. Here, we generated a floxed Rgs12 allele (Rgs12flox/flox) in which the exon 2, containing both PDZ and PTB_PID domains of Rgs12, was flanked with two loxp sites. By using the inducible Mx1-cre and Poly I:C system to specifically delete Rgs12 at postnatal 10 days in interferon-responsive cells including monocyte and macrophage cells, we found that Rgs12 mutant mice had growth retardation with the phenotype of increased bone mass. We further found that deletion of Rgs12 reduced osteoclast numbers and had no significant effect on osteoblast formation. Thus, Rgs12flox/flox conditional mice provide a valuable tool for in vivo analysis of Rgs12 function and mechanism through time- and cell-specific deletion of Rgs12. PMID:23349096

  15. A Theoretical Investigation of the Dynamic Lateral Stability Characteristics of the MX-838 (XB-51) Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, Jon W.

    1948-01-01

    At the request of the Air Material Command, U. S. Air Force, a theoretical study has been made of the dynamic lateral stability characteristics of the MX-838 (XB-51) airplane. The calculations included the determination of the neutral-oscillatory-stability boundary (R = 0), the period and time to damp to one-half amplitude of the lateral oscillation, end the time to damp to one-half amplitude for the spiral mode. Factors varied in the investigation were lift coefficient, wing incidence, wing loading, and altitude. The results of the investigation showed that the lateral oscillation of the airplane is unstable below a lift coefficient of 1.2 with flaps . deflected 40deg but is stable over the entire speed range with flaps deflected 20deg or 0deg. The results showed that satisfactory oscillatory stability can probably be obtained for all lift coefficients with the proper variation of flap deflection and wing incidence with airspeed. Reducing the positive wing incidence improved the oscillatory stability characteristics. The airplane is spirally unstable for most conditions but the instability is mild and the Air Force requirements are easily met.

  16. Peculiar velocities of cD galaxies - MX spectroscopy of Abell 1795

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.; Hintzen, Paul; Oegerle, W. R.; Romanishin, W.; Lesser, M. P.; Eisenhamer, J. D.; Batuski, D. J.

    1988-09-01

    Spectroscopic observations of galaxies in the Abell 1795 field have been obtained using the MX multiple-object spectrograph on the Steward Observatory 2.3 m telescope. Redshifts are presented for 46 galaxies, including 41 cluster members. It is found that the A1795 cD galaxy is not at rest in the cluster gravitational potential well; it has a peculiar radial velocity, cz, of 365 km/s, and the hypothesis that the mean cluster velocity is as large as the cD's velocity can be rejected at the 99.5 percent confidence level. This conclusion is supported by spectroscopic data for the 'cooling flow' gas found in the central region of the cluster; this gas, except for the portion coincident with the cD nucleus, lies at the velocity derived for the cluster mean. It is suggested that current models of the formation of cD galaxies are unlikely to account for the large peculiar velocities of the cD galaxies in A1795 and A2670 unless substantial subclustering is still present. However, the available data show no evidence for velocity subclustering in either A1795 or A2670.

  17. Host genetics of severe influenza: from mouse Mx1 to human IRF7.

    PubMed

    Ciancanelli, Michael J; Abel, Laurent; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Influenza viruses cause mild to moderate respiratory illness in most people, and only rarely devastating or fatal infections. The virulence factors encoded by viral genes can explain seasonal or geographic differences at the population level but are unlikely to account for inter-individual clinical variability. Inherited or acquired immunodeficiencies may thus underlie severe cases of influenza. The crucial role of host genes was first demonstrated by forward genetics in inbred mice, with the identification of interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible Mx1 as a canonical influenza susceptibility gene. Reverse genetics has subsequently characterized the in vivo role of other mouse genes involved in IFN-α/β and -λ immunity. A series of in vitro studies with mouse and human cells have also refined the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of protection against influenza viruses. Population-based human genetic studies have not yet uncovered variants with a significant impact. Interestingly, human primary immunodeficiencies affecting T and B cells were also not found to predispose to severe influenza. Recently however, human IRF7 was shown to be essential for IFN-α/β- and IFN-λ-dependent protective immunity against primary influenza in vivo, as inferred from a patient with life-threatening influenza revealed to be IRF7-deficient by whole exome sequencing. Next generation sequencing of human exomes and genomes will facilitate the analysis of the human genetic determinism of severe influenza.

  18. mxSPEC: a massively multiplexed full-disk spectroheliograph for solar physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haosheng

    2014-07-01

    The Massively Multiplexed Spectrograph (mxSPEC) is a new instrument concept that takes advantage of modern high-speed large-format focal plane arrays (FPAs) and high efficiency bandpass isolation filters to multiplex spectra from many slices of the telescope field simultaneously onto the FPAs within a single grating spectrograph. This design greatly reduces the time required to scan a large telescope field, and with current technologies can achieve more than a factor of 50 or more improvement of the system efficiency over a conventional long-slit spectrograph. Furthermore, several spectral lines can be observed at the same time with proper selection of the diffraction grating, further improving the efficiency of this design to more than two orders of magnitude over conventional single-slit, single-wavelength instrument. This paper describes an experimental, proof-of-concept, 40-slit full-disk spectrograph that demonstrates the feasibility of this new instrument concept and its potential for solar physics research including helioseismology, dynamic solar events, and global scale magnetic field observation of the solar disk and the corona. We also present the preliminary design of a 4-line, 55-slit spectroheliograph that can serve as the template for the instruments of the next generation synoptic solar observatory.

  19. Genetic mapping of the Mx influenza virus resistance gene within the region of mouse chromosome 16 that is homologous to human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, R.H.; O'Hara, B.F.; Pavan, W.J.; Gearhart, J.D.; Haller, O.

    1988-11-01

    A total of 318 progeny from four backcrosses involving different laboratory strains and subspecies of Mus musculus were analyzed to map the Mx gene to the region of mouse chromosome 16 (MMU 16) which is homologous to human chromosome 21 (HSA 21). This result suggests that Mx will be found in the region of HSA 21 which has been implicated in Down syndrome when inherited in three copies.

  20. Emergence of superconductivity in (NH3)yMxMoSe2 (M: Li, Na and K)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xiao; Nishiyama, Saki; Zheng, Lu; Goto, Hidenori; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Ota, Hiromi; Kambe, Takashi; Terashima, Kensei; Yokoya, Takayoshi; Nguyen, Huyen T. L.; Kagayama, Tomoko; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo; Ishii, Hirofumi; Liao, Yen-Fa; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    We report syntheses of new superconducting metal-doped MoSe2 materials (MxMoSe2). The superconducting MxMoSe2 samples were prepared using a liquid NH3 technique, and can be represented as ‘(NH3)yMxMoSe2’. The Tcs of these materials were approximately 5.0 K, independent of x and the specific metal atom. X-ray diffraction patterns of (NH3)yNaxMoSe2 were recorded using polycrystalline powders. An increase in lattice constant c showed that the Na atom was intercalated between MoSe2 layers. The x-independence of c was observed in (NH3)yNaxMoSe2, indicating the formation of a stoichiometric compound in the entire x range, which is consistent with the x-independence of Tc. A metallic edge of the Fermi level was observed in the photoemission spectrum at 30 K, demonstrating its metallic character in the normal state. Doping of MoSe2 with Li and K also yielded superconductivity. Thus, MoSe2 is a promising material for designing new superconductors, as are other transition metal dichalcogenides.

  1. Emergence of superconductivity in (NH3)yMxMoSe2 (M: Li, Na and K).

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiao; Nishiyama, Saki; Zheng, Lu; Goto, Hidenori; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Ota, Hiromi; Kambe, Takashi; Terashima, Kensei; Yokoya, Takayoshi; Nguyen, Huyen T L; Kagayama, Tomoko; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo; Ishii, Hirofumi; Liao, Yen-Fa; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report syntheses of new superconducting metal-doped MoSe2 materials (MxMoSe2). The superconducting MxMoSe2 samples were prepared using a liquid NH3 technique, and can be represented as '(NH3)yMxMoSe2'. The Tcs of these materials were approximately 5.0 K, independent of x and the specific metal atom. X-ray diffraction patterns of (NH3)yNaxMoSe2 were recorded using polycrystalline powders. An increase in lattice constant c showed that the Na atom was intercalated between MoSe2 layers. The x-independence of c was observed in (NH3)yNaxMoSe2, indicating the formation of a stoichiometric compound in the entire x range, which is consistent with the x-independence of Tc. A metallic edge of the Fermi level was observed in the photoemission spectrum at 30 K, demonstrating its metallic character in the normal state. Doping of MoSe2 with Li and K also yielded superconductivity. Thus, MoSe2 is a promising material for designing new superconductors, as are other transition metal dichalcogenides. PMID:27404919

  2. Procion red MX-3B-derived poly(HEMA/EGDMA) microspheres for removal of cadmium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Denizli, A.; Bueyuektuncel, E.; Genc, O.; Piskin, E.

    1998-12-01

    The heavy metal pollution is becoming more and more serious an environmental problem throughout the world due to rapid industrialization. Heavy metals such as cadmium and mercury exhibit human toxicity at extremely low concentrations. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate/ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) [poly(HEMA/EGDMA)]-Procion Red MX-3B microspheres were used for removal of Cd(II) ions from aqueous solutions containing different amounts of Cd(II) ions (5--60 ppm). Dye-derived microbeads carrying 8.95 {micro}mol Procion Red MX-3B/g polymer were used in the adsorption-desorption of Cd(II) ions. High adsorption rates were observed at the beginning of adsorption and then equilibrium was achieved in about 5--10 min. The maximum adsorption of Cd(II) ions onto the Procion Red MX-3B-derived microspheres (i.e., by chelate formation of Cd(II) ions with dye molecules) was about 4.2 mg Cd(II) ions/g polymer, which was observed at pH 7.0. While non-specific adsorption onto the underived microspheres was 0.93 mg Cd(II) ions/g polymer. More than 96% of the adsorbed Cd(II) ions was desorbed in 15 min by using 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} as an desorption agent. The regenerability of the dye-derived atmospheres was also sufficient.

  3. Emergence of superconductivity in (NH3)yMxMoSe2 (M: Li, Na and K)

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xiao; Nishiyama, Saki; Zheng, Lu; Goto, Hidenori; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Ota, Hiromi; Kambe, Takashi; Terashima, Kensei; Yokoya, Takayoshi; Nguyen, Huyen T. L.; Kagayama, Tomoko; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo; Ishii, Hirofumi; Liao, Yen-Fa; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report syntheses of new superconducting metal-doped MoSe2 materials (MxMoSe2). The superconducting MxMoSe2 samples were prepared using a liquid NH3 technique, and can be represented as ‘(NH3)yMxMoSe2’. The Tcs of these materials were approximately 5.0 K, independent of x and the specific metal atom. X-ray diffraction patterns of (NH3)yNaxMoSe2 were recorded using polycrystalline powders. An increase in lattice constant c showed that the Na atom was intercalated between MoSe2 layers. The x-independence of c was observed in (NH3)yNaxMoSe2, indicating the formation of a stoichiometric compound in the entire x range, which is consistent with the x-independence of Tc. A metallic edge of the Fermi level was observed in the photoemission spectrum at 30 K, demonstrating its metallic character in the normal state. Doping of MoSe2 with Li and K also yielded superconductivity. Thus, MoSe2 is a promising material for designing new superconductors, as are other transition metal dichalcogenides. PMID:27404919

  4. Insights into the flexibility of ZrMxOy (M = Na, Mg, Al) nanofibrous membranes as promising infrared stealth materials.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xue; Bai, Ying; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2016-04-21

    A surprising brittle to flexible transition in ZrMxOy (M = Na, Mg, Al) nanofibrous membranes was found by varying the undersized dopant species and content. The fiber morphology, crystalline structure, and pore structure of the ZrMxOy nanofibrous membranes can be significantly modulated by varying the dopant valence from +1 to 3 and the dopant content from 1 to 20 mol%, respectively. Meanwhile, a classical Hall-Petch effect was revealed for the ZrMxOy nanofibrous membranes systems, which corresponded to a nanocrystalline size of 22.8 nm and an enhanced flexibility of 23 mN. Moreover, the substitutional solid solution and interstitial solid solution dissolution processes of Na, Mg, and Al into ZrO2 were analyzed using vacancy compensation and dopant interstitial compensation mechanisms, respectively. Most importantly, the flexible Al doped zirconia nanofibrous membranes exhibit a low infrared emissivity of 0.589 and 0.703 in the 3-5 μm and 8-14 μm wavebands, respectively, which suggests them to be a promising candidate for infrared stealth materials in the confrontation strategy field for personnel, aircraft, missiles, satellites, etc.

  5. Insights into the flexibility of ZrMxOy (M = Na, Mg, Al) nanofibrous membranes as promising infrared stealth materials.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xue; Bai, Ying; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2016-04-21

    A surprising brittle to flexible transition in ZrMxOy (M = Na, Mg, Al) nanofibrous membranes was found by varying the undersized dopant species and content. The fiber morphology, crystalline structure, and pore structure of the ZrMxOy nanofibrous membranes can be significantly modulated by varying the dopant valence from +1 to 3 and the dopant content from 1 to 20 mol%, respectively. Meanwhile, a classical Hall-Petch effect was revealed for the ZrMxOy nanofibrous membranes systems, which corresponded to a nanocrystalline size of 22.8 nm and an enhanced flexibility of 23 mN. Moreover, the substitutional solid solution and interstitial solid solution dissolution processes of Na, Mg, and Al into ZrO2 were analyzed using vacancy compensation and dopant interstitial compensation mechanisms, respectively. Most importantly, the flexible Al doped zirconia nanofibrous membranes exhibit a low infrared emissivity of 0.589 and 0.703 in the 3-5 μm and 8-14 μm wavebands, respectively, which suggests them to be a promising candidate for infrared stealth materials in the confrontation strategy field for personnel, aircraft, missiles, satellites, etc. PMID:26974663

  6. Expression of porcine Mx1 with FMDV IRES enhances the antiviral activity against foot-and-mouth disease virus in PK-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bing; Fang, Hui; Shen, Chao; Zheng, Congyi

    2015-08-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the most contagious pathogen in cloven-hoofed (two-toed) animals. Due to the rapid replication and spread of FMDV, novel therapeutic strategies are greatly needed to reduce or block FMDV shedding in cases of disease outbreak. Here, we generated an IRES-Mx1 construct in which the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of FMDV was inserted between the promoter and open reading frame (ORF) of porcine myxovirus resistance protein 1 (poMx1). This construct provides more powerful protection against FMDV infection than the IRES-IFN construct that was previously generated by our group. The results indicate that this IRES-Mx1 construct was able to express poMx1 12 h after transfection and induce a robust immune response. In contrast to the control, the proliferation of virus in transfected cells was significantly inhibited, as evaluated by morphology monitoring, real-time RT-PCR, virus titration and Western blot. In addition, we also found that the antiviral activity in cells transfected with pc-IRES-Mx1 was abolished when the JAK/STAT pathway was repressed, which indicates that the antiviral mechanism of poMx1 is JAK/STAT pathway dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that the antiviral activity of poMx1 is possibly produced by affecting the host cells themselves, instead of interacting with the virus directly. The new construct reported here could be used as a novel effective therapy against FMDV infection.

  7. Dosimetric investigations of laser-induced phase transition of MX1-cell membranes by use of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthan, J.; Dressler, C.; Minet, O.; Müller, G.

    2006-05-01

    It is well known that laser scattered-light applicators when applied for laser-induced tumor therapy allow the precise thermal destruction of metastases. Using laser radiation in the NIR spectral range (usually, Nd:YAG laser systems λ = 1064 nm), a penetration depth of 5-10 cm (1/ e is the decrease in radiation intensity) is achieved in biological tissues. The major tissue-optical parameters, i.e., absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, and the anisotropy factor g, show biological tissues to be strongly scattering media which have a so-called optical window in the NIR. As a consequence, the therapeutic laser radiation is scattered and absorbed at a deeper level, leading to a virtual enlargement of the laser applicator. The thermal sclerotization and the thermal cell damage originate within the absorbing volume of the laser radiation and spread outward by thermal diffusion. There are three dosimetrically relevant zones of thermal and biological damage: (1) a zone of thermal coagulation; (2) a threshold of partial necrosis (destruction of all metabolic processes in the cell is the maintenance of essential parts of the cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane); this is characterized by a specific temperature range, the so-called phase transition, which refers to the transition from the gel phase of the biomembrane to the fluid phase; the determination of this temperature zone is an integral part of the following experimental investigations on MX1 cells; (3) an external zone of thermal effects made up of partial and multiple damage with a statistical chance of survival. This paper describes the investigations on heat stress in cancer cells to verify the maximum phase transition of the outer MX1 cell membranes and the related results. For this purpose, a novel method of quantum dot fluorescence dosimetry was developed. The evaluation of the measured laser-induced fluorescences yields a first approximation of the determination of the phase transition on MX1

  8. MX1: a bending-magnet crystallography beamline serving both chemical and macromolecular crystallography communities at the Australian Synchrotron

    PubMed Central

    Cowieson, Nathan Philip; Aragao, David; Clift, Mark; Ericsson, Daniel J.; Gee, Christine; Harrop, Stephen J.; Mudie, Nathan; Panjikar, Santosh; Price, Jason R.; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Williamson, Rachel; Caradoc-Davies, Tom

    2015-01-01

    MX1 is a bending-magnet crystallography beamline at the 3 GeV Australian Synchrotron. The beamline delivers hard X-rays in the energy range from 8 to 18 keV to a focal spot at the sample position of 120 µm FWHM. The beamline endstation and ancillary equipment facilitate local and remote access for both chemical and biological macromolecular crystallography. Here, the design of the beamline and endstation are discussed. The beamline has enjoyed a full user program for the last seven years and scientific highlights from the user program are also presented. PMID:25537608

  9. MX1: a bending-magnet crystallography beamline serving both chemical and macromolecular crystallography communities at the Australian Synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Cowieson, Nathan Philip; Aragao, David; Clift, Mark; Ericsson, Daniel J; Gee, Christine; Harrop, Stephen J; Mudie, Nathan; Panjikar, Santosh; Price, Jason R; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Williamson, Rachel; Caradoc-Davies, Tom

    2015-01-01

    MX1 is a bending-magnet crystallography beamline at the 3 GeV Australian Synchrotron. The beamline delivers hard X-rays in the energy range from 8 to 18 keV to a focal spot at the sample position of 120 µm FWHM. The beamline endstation and ancillary equipment facilitate local and remote access for both chemical and biological macromolecular crystallography. Here, the design of the beamline and endstation are discussed. The beamline has enjoyed a full user program for the last seven years and scientific highlights from the user program are also presented.

  10. Characteristics and performance of an intensity-modulated optically pumped magnetometer in comparison to the classical M(x) magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Schultze, Volkmar; Ijsselsteijn, Rob; Scholtes, Theo; Woetzel, Stefan; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2012-06-18

    We compare the performance of two methods for the synchronization of the atomic spins in optically pumped magnetometers: intensity modulation of the pump light and the classical M(x) method using B(1) field modulation. Both techniques use the same set-up and measure the resulting features of the light after passing a micro-fabricated Cs cell. The intensity-modulated pumping shows several advantages: better noise-limited magnetic field sensitivity, misalignment between pumping and spin synchronization is excluded, and magnetometer arrays without any cross-talk can be easily set up.

  11. Transient Behaviour of Batch Arrival Queue with N-Policy and Single Vacation (Mx/G/1/N-POLICY)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, Anjana

    2009-07-01

    In this paper Mx/G/1 queuing system with N-policy and single vacation is considered. As soon as the system becomes empty, the server leaves the system for a vacation of random length V. When he returns from the vacation, if the system size is greater then or equal to predetermined value N (threshold), he begins to serve the customers. If not, the server waits in the system until the system size reaches or exceeds N. Here the time dependent system size distribution is obtained.

  12. Complete Mitochondrial and Plastid Genomes of the Green Microalga Trebouxiophyceae sp. Strain MX-AZ01 Isolated from a Highly Acidic Geothermal Lake

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2012-01-01

    We report the complete organelle genome sequences of Trebouxiophyceae sp. strain MX-AZ01, an acidophilic green microalga isolated from a geothermal field in Mexico. This eukaryote has the remarkable ability to thrive in a particular shallow lake with emerging hot springs at the bottom, extremely low pH, and toxic heavy metal concentrations. Trebouxiophyceae sp. MX-AZ01 represents one of few described photosynthetic eukaryotes living in such a hostile environment. The organelle genomes of Trebouxiophyceae sp. MX-AZ01 are remarkable. The plastid genome sequence currently presents the highest G+C content for a trebouxiophyte. The mitochondrial genome sequence is the largest reported to date for the Trebouxiophyceae class of green algae. The analysis of the genome sequences presented here provides insight into the evolution of organelle genomes of trebouxiophytes and green algae. PMID:23104370

  13. Complete mitochondrial and plastid genomes of the green microalga Trebouxiophyceae sp. strain MX-AZ01 isolated from a highly acidic geothermal lake.

    PubMed

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2012-11-01

    We report the complete organelle genome sequences of Trebouxiophyceae sp. strain MX-AZ01, an acidophilic green microalga isolated from a geothermal field in Mexico. This eukaryote has the remarkable ability to thrive in a particular shallow lake with emerging hot springs at the bottom, extremely low pH, and toxic heavy metal concentrations. Trebouxiophyceae sp. MX-AZ01 represents one of few described photosynthetic eukaryotes living in such a hostile environment. The organelle genomes of Trebouxiophyceae sp. MX-AZ01 are remarkable. The plastid genome sequence currently presents the highest G+C content for a trebouxiophyte. The mitochondrial genome sequence is the largest reported to date for the Trebouxiophyceae class of green algae. The analysis of the genome sequences presented here provides insight into the evolution of organelle genomes of trebouxiophytes and green algae.

  14. A Novel Martensitic Creep-Resistant Steel Strengthened by MX Carbonitrides with Extremely Low Coarsening Rates: Design and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Ma, Wenjie; Yan, Wei; Yang, Ke; Toda, Yoshiaki; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    A general computational alloy design approach, based on thermodynamics and thermokinetics and coupled with a genetic algorithm optimization routine, was applied to the design of novel creep martensitic resistant steels. The optimal alloy suggested by the model has a high density of barely coarsening MX carbonitride precipitates. The model yielded precise values for the concentrations of the 10 alloying elements considered. The model alloy was produced on a 10 kg lab scale. Samples of the new alloy of one of the best commercial martensitic steels on the market P92 were subjected to a high aging temperature of 923 K (650 °C) for times up to 1000 hours. The microstructure of the new alloy in the as-produced state as well as after 1000 hours exposure has all the intended features as predicted by the model. The coarsening rate of the MX rate carbonitrides was substantially lower than that of the precipitates in the P92 steel. The very low coarsening rate explains the superior hardness at very long exposure times.

  15. A Novel Martensitic Creep-Resistant Steel Strengthened by MX Carbonitrides with Extremely Low Coarsening Rates: Design and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Ma, Wenjie; Yan, Wei; Yang, Ke; Toda, Yoshiaki; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Xu, Wei

    2016-07-01

    A general computational alloy design approach, based on thermodynamics and thermokinetics and coupled with a genetic algorithm optimization routine, was applied to the design of novel creep martensitic resistant steels. The optimal alloy suggested by the model has a high density of barely coarsening MX carbonitride precipitates. The model yielded precise values for the concentrations of the 10 alloying elements considered. The model alloy was produced on a 10 kg lab scale. Samples of the new alloy of one of the best commercial martensitic steels on the market P92 were subjected to a high aging temperature of 923 K (650 °C) for times up to 1000 hours. The microstructure of the new alloy in the as-produced state as well as after 1000 hours exposure has all the intended features as predicted by the model. The coarsening rate of the MX rate carbonitrides was substantially lower than that of the precipitates in the P92 steel. The very low coarsening rate explains the superior hardness at very long exposure times.

  16. Effect of lipopolysaccharides from Vibrio alginolyticus on the Mx gene expression and virus recovery from gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.) experimentally infected with Nodavirus.

    PubMed

    Bravo, J; Real, F; Padilla, D; Olveira, J G; Grasso, V; Román, L; Acosta, F

    2013-01-01

    Infections with nodavirus affect a wild and farmed fish species throughout the world, mostly from the marine environment. The aim of this work was to determine the immune status of gilthead sea bream that comes as a result of a Nodavirus infection, induced by activation of the interferon response pathway by lipopolysaccharides from Vibrio alginolyticus and the expression of interferoninduced Mx protein in liver samples. The enhancement of Mx protein gene expression was detected in liver samples of experimentally nodavirus infected fish and, furthermore, the immunostimulant LPS of V. alginolyticus decreased almost three times the virus titration with respect to no-immunized or infected with nodavirus group of fish. PMID:23092730

  17. Effect of lipopolysaccharides from Vibrio alginolyticus on the Mx gene expression and virus recovery from gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.) experimentally infected with Nodavirus.

    PubMed

    Bravo, J; Real, F; Padilla, D; Olveira, J G; Grasso, V; Román, L; Acosta, F

    2013-01-01

    Infections with nodavirus affect a wild and farmed fish species throughout the world, mostly from the marine environment. The aim of this work was to determine the immune status of gilthead sea bream that comes as a result of a Nodavirus infection, induced by activation of the interferon response pathway by lipopolysaccharides from Vibrio alginolyticus and the expression of interferoninduced Mx protein in liver samples. The enhancement of Mx protein gene expression was detected in liver samples of experimentally nodavirus infected fish and, furthermore, the immunostimulant LPS of V. alginolyticus decreased almost three times the virus titration with respect to no-immunized or infected with nodavirus group of fish.

  18. Dispersion Modeling of Inert Particulate Matter in the El Paso, TX- Cd. Juarez, MX Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, R.; Fitzgerald, R.

    2005-05-01

    The El Paso, TX-Cd. Juarez, MX region is subject to the emission of inert particulate matter (PM) into the atmosphere, from a variety of sources. The impact of these emissions has been studied extensively in for regulatory compliance in the area of health effects, air quality and visibility. Little work has been done to study the fate and transport of the particulate matter within the region. The Environmental Physics Group at The University of Texas at El Paso has recently applied the SARMAP Air Quality Model (SAQM) to model the dispersion of inert particulate matter in the region. The meteorological data for the SAQM was created with the Penn State/NCAR meteorological modeling system, version 5 (MM5). The SAQM was used to simulate three common occurrences for large particulate emission and concentration. The first was times of heavy traffic volume at the international bridges which cause large numbers of cars to sit, with engines running, for extended periods of time. The second was moderate to high wind events that cause large amounts of coarse particulate matter to become entrained in the atmosphere and transported into and around the region. The third is a temperature inversion which traps the particulate matter at the surface during morning rush hour. The initial conditions for particulate matter, for the two cases involving mobile emissions, were derived from the 1999 version 3 national emissions inventory (NEI) mobile, on-road data from the EPA. Output from the MM5 was used to as the meteorological driver for the SAQM. The MM5 was initialized with data from the NCAR reanalysis project. Meteorological data collected in the region bye the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and the EPA was used for Four Dimensional Data Assimilation. The MM5 was nudged with gridded, surface and observational data. Statistical analysis was done on the MM5 for the variables, wind speed, wind direction, temperature and mixing ratio. The statistics performed included

  19. Differential response of the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) Mx promoter to viral infections in two salmonid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Torres, Daniel; Alonso, M Carmen; Garcia-Rosado, Esther; Collet, Bertrand; Béjar, Julia

    2014-10-15

    Mx proteins are main effectors of the antiviral innate immune defence mediated by type I interferon (IFN I). The IFN I response is under a complex regulation; hence, one of the key issues in understanding virus-host interaction is the knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms governing this response. With this purpose, in this study Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214) and rainbow trout gonad cells (RTG-2) were transiently transfected with a vector containing the luciferase reporter gene under the control of the Senegalese sole Mx promoter. These transfected cells were infected with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) and epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV) at different doses in order to study the luciferase fold induction in response to viral infections. Transfected CHSE-214 cells infected with EHNV showed significant induction of the luciferase reporter gene, compared to control non-infected cells, at different times post infection (p.i.). The maximum expression was recorded at 24h p.i. in cells inoculated with 5 × 10(2)TCID50/mL (2.17 folds compared to control cells). In these cells, the infection with IPNV and VHSV did not result in the luciferase expression at any time and doses tested. In transfected RTG-2 cells, VHSV stimulated luciferase expression, obtaining a maximum activity at 48 h p.i. in cells infected with 5 × 10(2)TCID50/mL (2.9 folds compared to control cells), whereas RTG-2 cells infected with IPNV and EHNV did not show significant luciferase activity at any time point. The different induction of the Senegalese sole Mx promoter in CHSE-214 and RTG-2 cells after infection with the same viruses indicates that cell-specific factors are significantly involved in the IFN-signalling response, and, probably, on the success of the strategies of these viruses to escape the IFN mechanisms. The use of these two different cellular systems might be an interesting approach to identify such

  20. Evaluation of the Pioneer PDP-502MX 4 x 3 Aspect Ratio, 50 Inch Diagonal Color Plasma Display Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-12-01

    NIDL evaluated the thin, large screen, flat panel Pioneer 50 inch plasma display panel (PDP) to determine its usefulness to the display of images that are of interest to imagery analysts and GI specialists, As NIDL's ratings show, the Pioneer PDP-502MX is not going to be useful as the primary imagery analysis display on an IEC workstation, It fails many of the IEC requirements so we rate it "F" for IEC workstation monoscopic and stereo applications, Rather, its usefulness comes from its large, 50 inch diagonal size and its high pixel count for a PDP, up to 1280 x 768 pixels in the 16:9 and 1024 x 768 pixels in the 4:3 format, that could make it appropriate for group conference discussions, The Pioneer PDP-502MX has a relatively good gray scale capability; it can display 245 of 256 differences in input levels for a 7,94 bit depth, Its linearity surpasses that we have measured for CRT monitors, and comes about because of its precisely formed pixel structure, This pixel structure, like in LCD monitors, can have several non- operating pixels, It has a very high (exceeds 60% over the entire screen) and a very uniform 1-pixel-on/1-pixel-off contrast modulation for both the horizontal and vertical directions, The PDP can have a maximum luminance up to 40 fL for a small patch of white, and a minimum luminance of 0.2 fL For full screen white, its luminance is 18 fL, limited by internal circuitry to minimize panel heat generation and its luminance is more uniform than a CRT monitor, The reflectivity and the viewing angle are about the same as for a CRT monitor, It has a capability to do stereo imaging at 43 Hz per eye, which is on the borderline of visible flicker, and its dynamic range in stereo is good, The extinction ratio is poor, and is probably limited by the long persistence of the green phosphor, Most who have seen the Pioneer PDP-502MX would love to have one, at least for football games, The price is about 18,000.

  1. Why 1986 Minus 1985 Does Not Equal One: A Comparison of Selected Demographics of the 1986 and 1985 Graduates of MxCC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muzeroll, Terry; And Others

    In 1986, a study was conducted at Middlesex Community College (MxCC) to examine selected demographics of that year's graduating class and to compare them with similar statistics compiled for 1985 graduates. The graduating classes were compared in terms of students' major, sex, age, full-/part-time status, average number of semesters attended,…

  2. Transcriptional characterization of Salmonella TA100 in log and stationary phase: influence of growth phase on mutagenicity of MX.

    PubMed

    Ward, William O; Swartz, Carol D; Hanley, Nancy M; DeMarini, David M

    2010-10-13

    The Salmonella mutagenicity assay can be performed using cells that are in different growth phases. Thus, the plate-incorporation assay involves plating stationary-phase cells with the mutagen, after which the cells undergo a brief lag phase and, consequently, are exposed to the mutagen and undergo mutagenesis while in the logarithmic (log) phase. In contrast, a liquid-suspension assay involves exposure of either log- or stationary-phase cells to the mutagen for a specified period of time, sometimes followed by a wash, resulting in the cells growing in medium in the absence of the mutagen. To explore global gene expression in Salmonella, and to test for possible effects of growth phase and transcriptional status on mutagenesis, we performed microarray analysis on cells of Salmonella strain TA100 exposed to the drinking-water mutagen MX in either the log or stationary phase. The genes in functional pathways involving amino acid transport and metabolism and energy metabolism were expressed differentially in log-phase cells, whereas genes in functional pathways involving protein trafficking, cell envelope, and two-component systems using common signal transduction were expressed differentially in stationary-phase cells. More than 90% of the ribosomal-protein biosynthesis genes were up-regulated in stationary- versus log-phase cells. MX was equally mutagenic to cells in log- and stationary-phase growth when the results were expressed as mutant frequencies (revertants/survivors/μM), but it was twice as mutagenic in stationary-phase cells when the results were expressed as mutant yields (revertants/nmole or revertants/μM). There was a complex transcriptional response underlying these results, with mucA/B being greatly up-regulated in log-phase cells but umuC/D up-regulated in stationary-phase cells. The transcriptional state of TA100 cells at the time of mutagen treatment may influence the outcome of mutagen treatment.

  3. Analysis of 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its brominated analogues in chlorine-treated water by gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Planas, Carles; Ventura, Francesc; Caixach, Josep; Martín, Jordi; Boleda, M Rosa; Paraira, Miquel

    2015-11-01

    A simple, selective and sensitive method for the analysis of the strong mutagen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its brominated analogues (BMXs) in chlorine-treated water has been developed. The method is based on gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS), previous liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of a smaller sample volume compared to other methods and on-line derivatization with a silylation reactive. GC-QqQ-MS/MS has been raised as an alternative easier to perform than gas chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) for the analysis of MX and BMXs, and it allows to achieve low LODs (0.3 ng/L for MX and 0.4-0.9 ng/L for BMXs). This technique had not been previously described for the analysis of MX and BMXs. Quality parameters were calculated and real samples related to 3 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs), tap water and both untreated and chlorinated groundwater were analyzed. Concentrations of 0.3-6.6 ng/L for MX and 1.0-7.3 ng/L for BMXs were detected. Results were discussed according to five of the main factors affecting MX and BMXs formation in chlorine-treated water (organic precursors, influence of bromide ions, evolution of MX and BMXs in the drinking water distribution system, groundwater chlorination and infiltration of water coming from chlorination processes in groundwater).

  4. Effects of TiO2 coating dosage and operational parameters on a TiO2/Ag photocatalysis system for decolorizing Procion red MX-5B.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chih; Lee, Ho-Shan

    2010-07-15

    In this study, titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) powder was coated onto the surface of a dendritic silver (Ag) carrier to synthesize TiO(2)/Ag for decolorizing Procion red MX-5B (MX-5B), and related operation factors were also studied. The results showed that even without ultraviolet-A (UVA) irradiation, the Ag carrier from the TiO(2)/Ag catalyst had oxidizing ability, which could effectively degrade MX-5B color, but TiO(2) was ineffective. In addition, TiO(2) from TiO(2)/Ag demonstrated photocatalysis performance when irradiated, and the Ag carrier further showed an electron-scavenging ability to mitigate electron-hole pair recombination, which can improve the photocatalytic efficacy. With the oxidization and electron-scavenging ability of Ag and the photocatalysis ability of TiO(2), TiO(2)/Ag can decolor MX-5B more efficiently than TiO(2). The heavier Ag carrier also improves the solid-liquid separation of nano-TiO(2), making TiO(2)/Ag more suitable for application in slurry systems of photocatalytic water treatment. When the TiO(2)/Ag coating ratio was 50% by weight, there was a sufficient amount of TiO(2) on Ag's surface with a good distribution, and it exhibited a good photocatalysis decolorizing effect. In a study of how operational factors impact the decolorizing of MX-5B in the TiO(2)/Ag photocatalysis system with UVA irradiation (UVA-TiO(2)/Ag), the decolorization efficiency was optimal when the solution was maintained at pH 6.35. The addition of 0.01 M hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) aided the photocatalysis decolorization efficiency, although excessive H(2)O(2) reacted with hydroxyl free radicals and decreased the active groups in the system, thereby reducing the photocatalysis activity. An operating temperature of 40 degrees C was conducive to MX-5B decolorization, which was better than operating at room temperature.

  5. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  6. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  7. MxMn8O16 (M = Ag or K) as promising cathode materials for secondary Mg based batteries: The role of the cation M

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Jianping; Takeuchi, Esther S.; Altug S. Poyraz; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Marschilok, Amy C.

    2016-02-15

    Here, AgxMn8O16 (Ag-OMS-2) and KxMn8O16 (K-OMS-2) were investigated as high voltage cathode materials for Mg based batteries. Both MxMn8O16 materials delivered high initial capacities (>180 mA h g–1), and KxMn8O16 showed high cycle stability with a reversible capacity of >170 mA h g–1 after 20 cycles.

  8. Administered activity and metastatic cure probability during radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer in nude mice with {sup 211}At-MX35 F(ab'){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Elgqvist, Joergen . E-mail: jorgen.elgqvist@radfys.gu.se; Andersson, Hakan; Bernhardt, Peter; Baeck, Tom; Claesson, Ingela; Hultborn, Ragnar; Jensen, Holger; Johansson, Bengt R.; Lindegren, Sture; Olsson, Marita; Palm, Stig; Warnhammar, Elisabet; Jacobsson, Lars

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the therapeutic efficacy of {alpha}-radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer in mice. This study: (i) estimated the minimum required activity (MRA), giving a reasonable high therapeutic efficacy; and (ii) calculated the specific energy to tumor cell nuclei and the metastatic cure probability (MCP) using various assumptions regarding monoclonal-antibody (mAb) distribution in measured tumors. The study was performed using the {alpha}-particle emitter Astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) labeled to the mAb MX35 F(ab'){sub 2}. Methods and Materials: Animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with {approx}1 x 10{sup 7} cells of the cell line NIH:OVCAR-3. Four weeks later animals were treated with 25, 50, 100, or 200 kBq {sup 211}At-MX35 F(ab'){sub 2} (n = 74). Another group of animals was treated with a nonspecific mAb: 100 kBq {sup 211}At-Rituximab F(ab'){sub 2} (n = 18). Eight weeks after treatment the animals were sacrificed and presence of macro- and microscopic tumors and ascites was determined. An MCP model was developed and compared with the experimentally determined tumor-free fraction (TFF). Results: When treatment was given 4 weeks after cell inoculation, the TFFs were 25%, 22%, 50%, and 61% after treatment with 25, 50, 100, or 200 kBq {sup 211}At-MX35 F(ab'){sub 2}, respectively, the specific energy to irradiated cell nuclei varying between {approx}2 and {approx}400 Gy. Conclusion: As a significant increase in the therapeutic efficacy was observed between the activity levels of 50 and 100 kBq (TFF increase from 22% to 50%), the conclusion was that the MRA is {approx}100 kBq {sup 211}At-MX35 F(ab'){sub 2}. MCP was most consistent with the TFF when assuming a diffusion depth of 30 {mu}m of the mAbs in the tumors.

  9. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy Versus Mexameter(®) MX18 Measurements of Melanin and Erythema in an African Population.

    PubMed

    Wright, Caradee Y; Karsten, Aletta E; Wilkes, Marcus; Singh, Ann; du Plessis, Johan; Albers, Patricia N; Karsten, Petrus A

    2016-07-01

    Melanin provides protection against excess exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and related adverse health effects. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) can be used to calculate cutaneous melanin and erythema, but this is complex and has been mostly used for light-to-medium pigmented skin. Handheld reflectance spectrophotometers, such as the Mexameter(®) MX18, can also be used. We compared DRS-calculated melanin and erythema values with Mexameter melanin and erythema index values to understand how these techniques/measurements correlate in an African population of predominantly deeply pigmented skin. Five hundred and three participants comprised 68.5% self-identified Black African, 9.9% Indian/Asian, 18.4% White and 2.9% Colored. The majority of Black African (45%), Indian/Asian (34%) and Colored (53%) participants self-identified their skin as being "brown." Measured melanin levels increased with darker self-reported skin color. DRS-calculated and Mexameter melanin values demonstrated a positive correlation (Spearman rho = 0.87, P < 0.001). The results from both instruments showed erythema values were strongly correlated with their own melanin values. This finding is considered spurious and may result from the complexity of separating brown and red pigment when using narrowband reflectance techniques. Further work is needed to understand melanin, erythema and color in Black skin given sun-related health risks in vulnerable groups in Africa. PMID:27276188

  10. Superconducting and normal state properties of the systems La1 -xMxPt4Ge12 (M = Ce ,Th )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Yazici, D.; White, B. D.; Jeon, I.; Breindel, A. J.; Pouse, N.; Maple, M. B.

    2016-09-01

    Electrical resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat measurements were performed on polycrystalline samples of the filled-skutterudite systems La1 -xMxPt4Ge12(M =Ce and Th ) . Superconductivity in LaPt4Ge12 was quickly suppressed with Ce substitution and no evidence for superconductivity was found down to 1.1 K for x >0.2 . Temperature-dependent specific heat data at low temperatures for La1 -xCexPt4Ge12 show a change from power-law to exponential behavior, which may be an indication for multiband superconductivity in LaPt4Ge12 . A similar crossover was observed in the Pr1 -xCexPt4Ge12 system. However, the suppression rates of the superconducting transition temperatures Tc(x ) in the two systems are quite disparate, indicating a difference in the nature of superconductivity, which is conventional in LaPt4Ge12 and unconventional in PrPt4Ge12 . In comparison, a nearly linear and smooth evolution of Tc with increasing Th was observed in the La1 -xThxPt4Ge12 system, with no change of the superconducting energy gap in the temperature dependence of the specific heat, suggesting similar types of superconductivity in both the LaPt4Ge12 and ThPt4Ge12 compounds.

  11. Preparation and characterization of ZnS:Fe/MX (M = Cd, Zn; X = S, Se) core-shell nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihua; Xie, Ruishi; Gu, Yongjun; Huang, Jinliang; Zhu, Jianguo

    2012-06-01

    ZnS:Fe/MX (M = Cd, Zn; X = S, Se) nanocrystals were synthesized by chemical precipitation method. Compared to ZnS:Fe nanocrystals, the diffraction peaks intensity of ZnS:Fe/ZnS nanocrystals reduced and the diffraction peaks of ZnS:Fe/ZnSe nanocrystals moved to lower angles. TEM photos show that ZnS:Fe and ZnS:Fe/ZnSe nanocrystals are spheroidal and the average particles size is about 2-4 nm. The selected-area electron diffraction pattern of ZnS:Fe/ZnSe nanocrystals shows the diffraction rings, indicating the ZnS:Fe/ZnSe nanocrystals have a polycrystalline structure. XPS shows that the divalent and trivalent of Fe ion are coexisted in ZnS:Fe nanocrystals. The emission peaks of ZnS:Fe nanocrystals were from S and Zn ions vacancy defects and surface defects for the range of 200-900 nm. The use of ZnS (CdS, ZnSe) as surface modifying reagent inhibited the luminescent intensity of ZnS:Fe nanocrystallines at 420 nm. The PL spectra of ZnS:Fe/CdS nanocrystals show a new peak at 554 nm.

  12. Heavy-impurity resonance, hybridization, and phonon spectral functions in Fe1-xMxSi (M =Ir , Os )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaire, O.; Al-Qasir, I. I.; May, A. F.; Li, C. W.; Sales, B. C.; Niedziela, J. L.; Ma, J.; Matsuda, M.; Abernathy, D. L.; Berlijn, T.

    2015-03-01

    The vibrational behavior of heavy substitutional impurities (M = Ir,Os) in Fe1-xMxSi (x =0 ,0.02 ,0.04 ,0.1 ) was investigated with a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), transport measurements, and first-principles simulations. Our INS measurements on single crystals mapped the four-dimensional dynamical structure factor, S (Q ,E ) , for several compositions and temperatures. Our results show that both Ir and Os impurities lead to the formation of a weakly dispersive resonance vibrational mode, in the energy range of the acoustic phonon dispersions of the FeSi host. We also show that Ir doping, which introduces free carriers, leads to softened interatomic force constants compared to doping with Os, which is isoelectronic to Fe. We analyze the phonon S (Q ,E ) from INS through a Green's-function model incorporating the phonon self-energy based on first-principles density functional theory simulations, and we study the disorder-induced lifetimes on large supercells. Calculations of the quasiparticle spectral functions in the doped system reveal the hybridization between the resonance and the acoustic phonon modes. Our results demonstrate a strong interaction of the host acoustic dispersions with the resonance mode, likely leading to the large observed suppression in lattice thermal conductivity.

  13. Heavy-impurity resonance, hybridization, and phonon spectral functions in Fe1-xMxSi, M=Ir,Os

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Delaire, O.; Al-Qasir, Iyad I.; May, Andrew F.; Sales, Brian C.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Ma, Jie; Matsuda, Masaaki; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Berlijn, Tom

    2015-03-31

    The vibrational behavior of heavy substitutional impurities (M=Ir,Os) in Fe1-xMxSi (x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.1) was investigated with a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), transport measurements, and first-principles simulations. In this paper, our INS measurements on single-crystals mapped the four-dimensional dynamical structure factor, S(Q;E), for several compositions and temperatures. Our results show that both Ir and Os impurities lead to the formation of a weakly dispersive resonance vibrational mode, in the energy range of the acoustic phonon dispersions of the FeSi host. We also show that Ir doping, which introduces free carriers and increases electron-phonon coupling, leads tomore » softened interatomic force-constants compared to doping with Os, which is isoelectronic to Fe. We analyze the phonon S(Q,E) from INS through a Green's function model incorporating the phonon self-energy based on first-principles density functional theory (DFT) simulations. Calculations of the quasiparticle spectral functions in the doped system reveal the hybridization between the resonance and the acoustic phonon modes. Finally, our results demonstrate a strong interaction of the host acoustic dispersions with the resonance mode, likely leading to the large observed suppression in lattice thermal conductivity.« less

  14. Pregnancy-Induced ISG-15 and MX-1 Gene Expression is Detected in the Liver of Holstein-Friesian Heifers During Late Peri-Implantation Period.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, M M; Mense, K; Knaack, H; Sandra, O; Schmicke, M

    2016-02-01

    The bovine embryonic signal interferon-τ (IFN-τ) produced by the trophoblast is known to pass through the uterine fluid towards the endometrium and further into the maternal blood, where IFN-τ induces specific expression of interferon-stimulated gene expression (ISG), for example in peripheral leucocytes. In sheep, it was shown experimentally by administration of IFN-τ that ISG is also detectable in the liver. The objective was to test whether ISG can be detected in liver biopsy specimens from Holstein-Friesian heifers during early pregnancy. Liver biopsies were taken on day 18 from pregnant and non-pregnant heifers (n = 19), and the interferon-stimulated protein 15 kDa (ISG-15) and myxovirus-resistance protein-1 (MX-1) gene expression was detected. The expression of both MX-1 (p: 24.33 ± 7.40 vs np: 9.00 ± 4.02) and ISG-15 (p: 43.73 ± 23.22 vs 7.83 ± 3.63) was higher in pregnant compared to non-pregnant heifers (p < 0.05). In conclusion, pregnancy induced ISG-15 and MX-1 gene expression in the liver already at day 18 in cattle. PMID:26549692

  15. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N S; Bäck, Tom; Machado, Camila Maria L; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Moro, Ana Maria; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Jacobsson, Lars; Cederkrantz, Elin; Washiyama, Kohshin; Aneheim, Emma; Palm, Stig; Jensen, Holger; Tuma, Maria Carolina B; Chammas, Roger; Hultborn, Ragnar; Albertsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics. PMID:25970341

  16. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200

    PubMed Central

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N. S.; Bäck, Tom; Machado, Camila Maria L.; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Moro, Ana Maria; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Jacobsson, Lars; Cederkrantz, Elin; Washiyama, Kohshin; Aneheim, Emma; Palm, Stig; Jensen, Holger; Tuma, Maria Carolina B.; Chammas, Roger; Hultborn, Ragnar; Albertsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics. PMID:25970341

  17. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N S; Bäck, Tom; Machado, Camila Maria L; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Moro, Ana Maria; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Jacobsson, Lars; Cederkrantz, Elin; Washiyama, Kohshin; Aneheim, Emma; Palm, Stig; Jensen, Holger; Tuma, Maria Carolina B; Chammas, Roger; Hultborn, Ragnar; Albertsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics.

  18. Non-monotonic course of protein solubility in aqueous polymer-salt solutions can be modeled using the sol-mxDLVO model.

    PubMed

    Herhut, Marcel; Brandenbusch, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-02-01

    Protein purification is often performed using cost-intensive chromatographic steps. To discover economic alternatives (e.g., crystallization), knowledge on protein solubility as a function of temperature, pH, and additives in solution as well as their concentration is required. State-of-the-art models for predicting protein solubility almost exclusively consider aqueous salt systems, whereas "salting-in" and "salting-out" effects induced by the presence of an additional polymer are not considered. Thus, we developed the sol-mxDLVO model. Using this newly developed model, protein solubility in the presence of one salt and one polymer, especially the non-monotonic course of protein solubility, could be predicted. Systems considered included salts (NaCl, Na-p-Ts, (NH(4))(2) SO(4)) and the polymer polyethylene glycol (MW: 2000 g/mol, 12000 g/mol) and proteins lysozyme from chicken egg white (pH 4 to 5.5) and D-xylose ketol-isomerase (pH 7) at 298.15 K. The results show that by using the sol-mxDLVO model, protein solubility in polymer-salt solutions can be modeled in good agreement with the experimental data for both proteins considered. The sol-mxDLVO model can describe the non-monotonic course of protein solubility as a function of polymer concentration and salt concentration, previously not covered by state-of-the-art models.

  19. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  20. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  1. Sealing device

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  2. BRAKE DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    O'Donnell, T.J.

    1959-03-10

    A brake device is described for utilization in connection with a control rod. The device comprises a pair of parallelogram link mechanisms, a control rod moveable rectilinearly therebetween in opposite directions, and shoes resiliently supported by the mechanism for frictional engagement with the control rod.

  3. Electrochromic devices

    DOEpatents

    Allemand, Pierre M.; Grimes, Randall F.; Ingle, Andrew R.; Cronin, John P.; Kennedy, Steve R.; Agrawal, Anoop; Boulton, Jonathan M.

    2001-01-01

    An electrochromic device is disclosed having a selective ion transport layer which separates an electrochemically active material from an electrolyte containing a redox active material. The devices are particularly useful as large area architectural and automotive glazings due to there reduced back reaction.

  4. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  5. Defect engineering of complex semiconductor alloys: Cu2-2xMxO1-yXy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lany, Stephan; Stevanovic, Vladan

    2013-03-01

    The electrical properties of semiconductors are generally controlled via doping, i.e., the incorporation of dilute concentrations of aliovalent impurity atoms, whereas the band structure properties (gap, effective masses, optical properties) are manipulated by alloying, i.e., the incorporation of much larger amounts of isovalent elements. Theoretical approaches usually address either doping or alloying, but rarely both problems at the same time. By combining defect supercell calculations, GW quasi-particle energy calculation, and thermodynamic modeling, we study the range of electrical and band structure properties accessible by alloying aliovalent cations (M = Mg, Zn, Cd) and isovalent anions (X = S, Se) in Cu2O. In order to extend dilute defect models to higher concentrations, we take into account the association/dissociation of defect pairs and complexes, as well as the composition dependence of the band gap and the band edge energies. Considering a composition window for the Cu2-2xMxO1-yXy alloys of 0 <= (x,y) <= 0.2, we predict a wide range of possible band gaps from 1.7 to 2.6 eV, and net doping concentrations between p = 1019 cm-3 and n = 1017cm-3, notably achieving type conversion from p- to n-type at Zn or Cd compositions around x = 0.1. This work is supported as part of the SunShot initiative by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 to NREL.

  6. Geothermal assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada. Final report, April 1, 1981-April 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Trexler, D.T.; Bruce, J.L.; Cates, D.; Dolan, H.H.; Covington, C.H.

    1982-06-01

    A preliminary geothermal resource assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada focused on Coyote Spring Valley in southeastern Nevada. Initially, an extensive literature search was conducted and a bibliography consisting of 750 entries was compiled covering all aspects of geology pertaining to the study area. A structural study indicates that Coyote Spring Valley lies in a tectonically active area which is favorable for the discovery of geothermal resources. Hot water may be funneled to the near-surface along an extensive fracture and fault system which appears to underlie the valley, according to information gathered during the literature search and aerial photo survey. A total of 101 shallow temperature probes were emplanted in Coyote Spring Valley. Three anomalous temperature points all lying within the same vicinity were identified in the north-central portion of the valley near a fault. A soil-mercury study also identified one zone of anomalous mercury concentrations around the north end of the Arrow Canyon Range. A literature search covering regional fluid geochemistry indicated that the three fluid samples taken from Coyote Spring Valley have a higher concentration of Na + K. During field work, seven fluid samples were collected in Coyote Spring Valley which also appear to be derived from volcanic units due to the presence of Ca-Mg or Na-K carbonate-bicarbonate. A temperature gradient study of six test water wells indicates that only one geothermal well with a temperature of 35.5/sup 0/C (96/sup 0/F) exists in the central portion of the valley at the north end of Arrow Canyon Range near the zone of anomalous soil-mercury points. A cultural assessment of Coyote Spring Valley was performed prior to field work.

  7. Analysis of 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its brominated analogues in chlorine-treated water by gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Planas, Carles; Ventura, Francesc; Caixach, Josep; Martín, Jordi; Boleda, M Rosa; Paraira, Miquel

    2015-11-01

    A simple, selective and sensitive method for the analysis of the strong mutagen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its brominated analogues (BMXs) in chlorine-treated water has been developed. The method is based on gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS), previous liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of a smaller sample volume compared to other methods and on-line derivatization with a silylation reactive. GC-QqQ-MS/MS has been raised as an alternative easier to perform than gas chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) for the analysis of MX and BMXs, and it allows to achieve low LODs (0.3 ng/L for MX and 0.4-0.9 ng/L for BMXs). This technique had not been previously described for the analysis of MX and BMXs. Quality parameters were calculated and real samples related to 3 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs), tap water and both untreated and chlorinated groundwater were analyzed. Concentrations of 0.3-6.6 ng/L for MX and 1.0-7.3 ng/L for BMXs were detected. Results were discussed according to five of the main factors affecting MX and BMXs formation in chlorine-treated water (organic precursors, influence of bromide ions, evolution of MX and BMXs in the drinking water distribution system, groundwater chlorination and infiltration of water coming from chlorination processes in groundwater). PMID:26452804

  8. Prospective Analysis of the Safety and Efficacy of Percutaneous Cryoablation for pT1NxMx Biopsy-Proven Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Ronald; Cizman, Ziga; Hong, Kelvin; Koliatsos, Alexandra; Georgiades, Christos

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: Our objective was to determine the efficacy and safety of image-guided, percutaneous cryoablation for American Joint Committee on Cancer pT1ANxMx and pT1BNxMx biopsy-proven renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and Methods: Computed tomography (CT)-guided, percutaneous cryoablation was used to treat 117 renal lesions in 113 consecutive patients with pT1NxMx RCC. All 117 ablations were included in the safety analysis, and complications were categorized according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 (CTCAE v3.0). Eighty-one lesions were biopsy-proven RCC and were included in the efficacy analysis. Technical success was defined as the 'ice-ball' covering the entire lesion plus a minimum 5-mm margin. Efficacy was defined as complete lack of enhancement and continuous decrease in size on subsequent follow-up imaging studies. Results: Technical success was 100%, with 15% of ablations requiring air or saline injection to prevent nontarget ablation. We recorded a 7% rate of clinically significant complications (CTCAE category {>=}2) and 0% mortality. Renal function was not adversely affected. Seventy percent of patients were discharged to home on the same day. Efficacy was 98.7% for a median follow-up of 67 weeks (range 7-172). For the subgroup of patients that reached a median follow-up of 2 (n = 59) and 3 years (n = 13), efficacy was 98.3 and 92.3%, respectively. Cancer specific survival was 100%. Conclusions: CT-guided, percutaneous cryoablation has an excellent safety and efficacy profile for stage T1A and T1B RCC; however, longer follow-up is needed to compare it with other nephron-sparing surgical treatments. It is a great option for nonsurgical patients, those in whom renal function cannot be further sacrificed, and those at risk for metachronous lesions.

  9. Application of the reuseable, KanMX selectable marker to industrial yeast: construction and evaluation of heterothallic wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, possessing minimal foreign DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Walker, Michelle E; Gardner, Jennie M; Vystavelova, Andrea; McBryde, Colin; de Barros Lopes, Miguel; Jiranek, Vladimir

    2003-12-01

    The characterisation of wine yeasts and the complex metabolic processes influencing wine fermentation and the quality of wine might best be achieved by exploiting the standard classical and recombinant genetic techniques which have been successfully used with laboratory strains. However, application of these techniques to industrial strains has been restricted because such strains are typically prototrophic and often polyploid. To overcome this problem, we have identified commercial wine strains with good mating and sporulation properties from which heterothallic derivatives were constructed by disruption of the HO gene. Consequently, these haploids are amenable to genetic analysis, whilst retaining desirable wine-making properties. The approach used was an adaptation of a previously published gene disruption procedure for laboratory yeast and is based on the acquisition of geneticin resistance from a removable KanMX marker. The present work is the first report of the application of a construct of this type to the disruption of the HO gene in wine yeasts that are in common commercial use. Most of the 4.9-kb disruption construct was successfully removed from the genome of the haploid derivative strains by loop-out of the KanMX marker through meiotic recombination. Sequencing of the HO region confirmed the reduction of foreign sequences to a 582-bp fragment comprised largely of a single direct repeat at the target gene. The removal of the active foreign gene (conferring antibiotic resistance) allows the application of other constructs based on the KanMX module without the need to resort to other selectable marker systems. Laboratory-scale fermentation trials typically showed minimal differences between the HO disruptants and the parental wine strains in terms of fermentation kinetics and formation of key metabolites.

  10. Tree-Ring Based Streamflow Reconstructions of the Yaqui River, MX and Implications for Drought and Water Management Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, K. J.; Ray, A. J.; Lukas, J. J.; Villanueva-Diaz, J.

    2008-05-01

    The Yaqui River is the irrigation source for an economically important agricultural region of Northwest Mexico. Currently, planning and forecasting are based on streamflow gauge data of only about 50 years. Understanding past variations in Yaqui streamflow is important to developing river forecasts and management plans. This presentation describes an effort to develop longer proxy records of streamflow to better understand the region's climate variability and drought history. The result is a 363-year dendrochronology based reconstruction model of Yaqui River streamflow. The model is based on a correlation between 44-years of Yaqui streamflow data and tree-ring chronologies dating to A.D. 1639. Chronologies are from Bisaloachi (28.66 N, 108.29 W), Cebadilla de Ocampo (28.122 N, 107.95 W) and Mesa de las Guacamayas (30.55 N, 108.62 W) in the state of Chihuahua, MX. The binary model uses a normalized index of annual total tree ring width (Tree-Ring Index, TRI). The model output is the probability that a given year experienced less than median streamflow, a possible indicator of drought. This model correctly predicts 100% of less than median streamflow years using a TRI input of <0.75. However, this model does not predict over 30% of less than median streamflow years, and thus is not adequate for assessing drought. The available data might limit assessment of low precipitation. Total ring width (TRW) is typically associated with winter precipitation (October-June, in this case), which represents less than 40% of annual streamflow in this region where much of the precipitation and streamflow are related to the North American Monsoon (NAM), typically from July-September. The late wood (LW) growth portion of tree-rings may better reflect the NAM precipitation and streamflow, and produce a better reconstruction model. These results show that representation of NAM streamflow is essential for a more accurate streamflow reconstruction model. More tree-ring chronologies from

  11. Initial clinical evaluation of radiolabeled MX-DTPA humanized BrE-3 antibody in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kramer, E L; Liebes, L; Wasserheit, C; Noz, M E; Blank, E W; Zabalegui, A; Melamed, J; Furmanski, P; Peterson, J A; Ceriani, R L

    1998-07-01

    To evaluate radiometal-labeled humanized BrE-3 (huBrE-3) monoclonal antibody as a radioimmunolocalization and therapeutic agent in breast cancer patients, tumor localization, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity of (111)In-labeled combined 1-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl 3-methyl- and 1-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl 4-methyldiethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (MX-DTPA) huBrE-3 were studied. Seven women with BrE-3 antigen-positive, metastatic breast carcinoma underwent (111)In huBrE-3 infusion (5 mCi; 50 mg), followed by serial gamma camera imaging and plasma sampling. Region of interest analysis of images was used to make radiation absorbed dose estimates for (111)In huBrE-3. Data were extrapolated to 90Y huBrE-3. Human anti-human antibody (HAHA) response was measured in serum samples obtained up to 3 months after infusion. Patients tolerated infusions well. Seventy-six percent of 105 known sites of disease were identified on planar and single-photon emission computed tomography scans. For six of seven patients, a biexponential model fit the plasma time-activity curve best with an average T1/2alpha=10.6+/-8.5 (SD) h and average T1/2beta=114.2+/-39.2 h. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for (111)In huBrE-3 for whole body averaged 0.53+/-.08 rads/mCi. Dose estimates for 90Y huBrE-3 for marrow averaged 8.4+/-11.9 rads/mCi, and for tumors, 70+/-31.5 rads/mCi. Liver radioactivity uptake averaged 19.7+/-8.8% injected dose at 24 h after infusion, translating into an average radiation absorbed dose 21.1+/-12 rads/90Y mCi administered. Only one of seven patients demonstrated a low level of HAHA response. Although the plasma half-lives are longer and marrow dose higher for radiolabeled huBrE-3 compared with the murine construct, the excellent tumor localization, good tumor dosimetry, and low immunogenicity support the use of 90Y-huBrE-3 antibody for radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer.

  12. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Brathenahl, A.; Furth, H.P.

    1962-04-10

    A device for producing a confined high temperature plasma is described. In the device the concave inner surface of an outer annular electrode is disposed concentrically about and facing the convex outer face of an inner annular electrode across which electrodes a high potential is applied to produce an electric field there between. Means is provided to create a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field and a gas is supplied at reduced pressure in the area therebetween. Upon application of the high potential, the gas between the electrodes is ionized, heated, and under the influence of the electric and magnetic fields there is produced a rotating annular plasma disk. The ionized plasma has high dielectric constant properties. The device is useful as a fast discharge rate capacitor, in controlled thermonuclear research, and other high temperature gas applications. (AEC)

  13. Medical Device Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Home Medical Devices Medical Device Safety Medical Device Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ...

  14. Ventricular assist device

    MedlinePlus

    VAD; RVAD; LVAD; BVAD; Right ventricular assist device; Left ventricular assist device; Biventricular assist device; Heart pump; Left ventricular assist system; LVAS; Implantable ventricular assist device

  15. Clinical Evaluation of an Unsintered Hydroxyapatite/Poly-L-Lactide Osteoconductive Composite Device for the Internal Fixation of Maxillofacial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sukegawa, Shintaro; Kanno, Takahiro; Katase, Naoki; Shibata, Akane; Takahashi, Yuka; Furuki, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: OSTEOTRANS MX (Takiron Co, Ltd, Osaka, Japan) is a resorbable osteosynthetic material composed of an unsintered hydroxyapatite/poly-l-lactide composite, and its osteoconductive capacity has been documented. The authors here report their clinical experience using OSTEOTRANS MX. Methods: The authors treated 35 patients (19 men, 16 women; age, 14–88 years; mean ± standard deviation, 38.4 ± 19.9 years) with maxillofacial fractures. The authors used standard surgery to stabilize fractures in all patients, fitting resorbable plates (thickness, 1.0 or 1.4 mm) and screws (diameter, 2 mm) according to Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen/Association (AO) for the Study of Internal Fixation guidelines. Results: All patients eventually achieved satisfactory healing with favorable restoration of form and function without foreign body reaction. Complications occurred in 3 patients—plate exposure in 2 and discomfort in 1. However, fracture sites healed in all patients. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the devices bonded directly to the bone without interposition of nonmineralized tissue. Conclusion: OSTEOTRANS MX is a useful material with few complications. Its osteoconductive bioactivity is advantageous for the early functional improvement of maxillofacial fractures. PMID:27428913

  16. The effect of different boiling and filtering devices on the concentration of disinfection by-products in tap water.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Turigas, Glòria; Villanueva, Cristina M; Goñi, Fernando; Rantakokko, Panu; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are ubiquitous contaminants in tap drinking water with the potential to produce adverse health effects. Filtering and boiling tap water can lead to changes in the DBP concentrations and modify the exposure through ingestion. Changes in the concentration of 4 individual trihalomethanes (THM4) (chloroform (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and bromoform (TBM)), MX, and bromate were tested when boiling and filtering high bromine-containing tap water from Barcelona. For filtering, we used a pitcher-type filter and a household reverse osmosis filter; for boiling, an electric kettle, a saucepan, and a microwave were used. Samples were taken before and after each treatment to determine the change in the DBP concentration. pH, conductivity, and free/total chlorine were also measured. A large decrease of THM4 (from 48% to 97%) and MX concentrations was observed for all experiments. Bromine-containing trihalomethanes were mostly eliminated when filtering while chloroform when boiling. There was a large decrease in the concentration of bromate with reverse osmosis, but there was a little effect in the other experiments. These findings suggest that the exposure to THM4 and MX through ingestion is reduced when using these household appliances, while the decrease of bromate is device dependent. This needs to be considered in the exposure assessment of the epidemiological studies.

  17. The Effect of Different Boiling and Filtering Devices on the Concentration of Disinfection By-Products in Tap Water

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Turigas, Glòria; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Goñi, Fernando; Rantakokko, Panu; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are ubiquitous contaminants in tap drinking water with the potential to produce adverse health effects. Filtering and boiling tap water can lead to changes in the DBP concentrations and modify the exposure through ingestion. Changes in the concentration of 4 individual trihalomethanes (THM4) (chloroform (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and bromoform (TBM)), MX, and bromate were tested when boiling and filtering high bromine-containing tap water from Barcelona. For filtering, we used a pitcher-type filter and a household reverse osmosis filter; for boiling, an electric kettle, a saucepan, and a microwave were used. Samples were taken before and after each treatment to determine the change in the DBP concentration. pH, conductivity, and free/total chlorine were also measured. A large decrease of THM4 (from 48% to 97%) and MX concentrations was observed for all experiments. Bromine-containing trihalomethanes were mostly eliminated when filtering while chloroform when boiling. There was a large decrease in the concentration of bromate with reverse osmosis, but there was a little effect in the other experiments. These findings suggest that the exposure to THM4 and MX through ingestion is reduced when using these household appliances, while the decrease of bromate is device dependent. This needs to be considered in the exposure assessment of the epidemiological studies. PMID:23476675

  18. Detection device

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber, (2) a central chamber, and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  19. Detection device

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  20. Electrochemical device

    DOEpatents

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Bellows, Richard J.

    1988-01-12

    A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

  1. Correlation between saturation magnetization, bandgap, and lattice volume of transition metal (M=Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, or Ni) doped Zn1-xMxO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, J.; Thurber, A.; Tenne, D. A.; Hanna, C. B.; Punnoose, A.

    2010-05-01

    This work reports on transition metal doped ZnO nanoparticles and compares the effects doping with different transition metal ions has on the structural, optical, and magnetic properties. Zn1-xMxO (M=Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, or Ni) nanoparticles were prepared by a chemical process for x=0.02 and 0.05 in powder form. The powders where characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), spectrophotometry, and magnetometry. The Zn1-xMxO samples showed a strong correlation between changes in the lattice parameters, bandgap energy, and the ferromagnetic saturation magnetization. Unit cell volume and bandgap, determined from XRD and spectrophotometry respectively, were maximized with Fe doping and decreased as the atomic number of the dopant moved away from Fe. Bandgap was generally lower at x=0.05 than x=0.02 for all dopants. The saturation magnetization reached a maximum of 6.38 memu/g for Zn0.95Fe0.05O.

  2. Effect of polymorphisms in the GBP1, Mx1 and CD163 genes on host responses to PRRSV infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Niu, Pengxia; Shabir, Nadeem; Khatun, Amina; Seo, Byoung-Joo; Gu, Suna; Lee, Sang-Myoung; Lim, Si-Kyu; Kim, Kwan-Suk; Kim, Won-Il

    2016-01-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is the most economically important disease to the swine industry, and effective prevention strategy for this disease is still required. Guanylate-binding protein 1 (GBP1) and myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1) are two important proteins belonging to the GTPase superfamily that have been previously described to show antiviral effects. CD163 is considered the most important receptor for PRRSV attachment and internalization. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of these genes on host resistance against PRRSV infection in conjunction with the host immune response following PRRSV challenge. The results showed that pigs with AG genotype for the GBP1 exon2 exhibited a significantly higher average daily weight gain (ADWG) and lower average viremia than AA or GG genotype. Furthermore, pigs harbouring the AG genotype for the GBP1 gene presented greater CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD8(+)CD25(+) T cell populations at 4 and 18 days post challenge (dpc), respectively, as compared with other genotypes whereas pigs with CC genotype for the CD163 gene displayed significantly higher nucleocapsid-specific antibody titers at 11dpc. However, pigs with a single 11-bp deletion or insertion in the Mx1 gene did not show significant differences in either weight gain or viremia. Based on these results, we concluded that GBP1 is most significantly associated with resistance against PRRSV infection and efficient T cell activation in pigs. PMID:26711047

  3. β-Glucan-supplemented diets increase poly(I:C)-induced gene expression of Mx, possibly via Tlr3-mediated recognition mechanism in common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Falco, Alberto; Miest, Joanna J; Pionnier, Nicolas; Pietretti, Danilo; Forlenza, Maria; Wiegertjes, Geert F; Hoole, David

    2014-02-01

    We have previously observed that in common carp (Cyprinus carpio), administration of β-glucan (MacroGard®) as feed additive leads to a lower expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines suggesting that this immunostimulant may be preventing an acute and potentially dangerous response to infection, particularly in the gut. However, in general, mechanisms to detect and eliminate pathogens must also be induced in order to achieve an efficient clearance of the infection. Protection against viral diseases acquired through β-glucan-supplemented feed has been extensively reported for several experimental models in fish but the underlining mechanisms are still unknown. Thus, in order to better characterize the antiviral action induced by β-glucans in fish, MacroGard® was administered daily to common carp in the form of supplemented commercial food pellets. Carp were fed for a period of 25 days prior to intra-peritoneal injection with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)), a well-known double-stranded RNA mimic that triggers a type-I interferon (IFN) response. Subsequently, a set of immune related genes, including mx, were analysed by real-time PCR on liver, spleen, head kidney and mid gut tissues. Results obtained confirmed that treatment with β-glucan alone generally down-regulated the mRNA expression of selected cytokines when compared to untreated fish, while mx gene expression remained stable or was slightly up-regulated. Injection with poly(I:C) induced a similar down-regulated gene expression pattern for cytokines in samples from β-glucan fed fish. In contrast, poly(I:C) injection markedly increased mx gene expression in samples from β-glucan fed fish but hardly in samples from fish fed control feed. In an attempt to explain the high induction of mx, we studied Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) gene expression in these carp. TLR3 is a prototypical pattern recognition receptor considered important for the binding of viral double-stranded RNA and triggering of a

  4. A two force-constant model for complexes B⋯M-X (B is a Lewis base and MX is any diatomic molecule): Intermolecular stretching force constants from centrifugal distortion constants DJ or ΔJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Dror M.; Walker, Nicholas R.; Legon, Anthony C.

    2016-02-01

    A two force-constant model is proposed for complexes of the type B⋯MX, in which B is a simple Lewis base of at least C2v symmetry and MX is any diatomic molecule lying along a Cn axis (n ≥ 2) of B. The model assumes a rigid subunit B and that force constants beyond quadratic are negligible. It leads to expressions that allow, in principle, the determination of three quadratic force constants F11, F12, and F22 associated with the r(B⋯M) = r2 and r(M-X) = r1 internal coordinates from the equilibrium centrifugal distortion constants DJ e or ΔJ e , the equilibrium principal axis coordinates a1 and a2, and equilibrium principal moments of inertia. The model can be applied generally to complexes containing different types of intermolecular bond. For example, the intermolecular bond of B⋯MX can be a hydrogen bond if MX is a hydrogen halide, a halogen-bond if MX is a dihalogen molecule, or a stronger, coinage-metal bond if MX is a coinage metal halide. The equations were tested for BrCN, for which accurate equilibrium spectroscopic constants and a complete force field are available. In practice, equilibrium values of DJ e or ΔJ e for B⋯MX are not available and zero-point quantities must be used instead. The effect of doing so has been tested for BrCN. The zero-point centrifugal distortion constants DJ 0 or ΔJ 0 for all B⋯MX investigated so far are of insufficient accuracy to allow F11 and F22 to be determined simultaneously, even under the assumption F12 = 0 which is shown to be reasonable for BrCN. The calculation of F22 at a series of fixed values of F11 reveals, however, that in cases for which F11 is sufficiently larger than F22, a good approximation to F22 is obtained. Plots of F22 versus F11 have been provided for Kr⋯CuCl, Xe⋯CuCl, OC⋯CuCl, and C2H2⋯AgCl as examples. Even in cases where F22 ˜ F11 (e.g., OC⋯CuCl), such plots will yield either F22 or F11 if the other becomes available.

  5. A two force-constant model for complexes B⋯M-X (B is a Lewis base and MX is any diatomic molecule): Intermolecular stretching force constants from centrifugal distortion constants D(J) or Δ(J).

    PubMed

    Bittner, Dror M; Walker, Nicholas R; Legon, Anthony C

    2016-02-21

    A two force-constant model is proposed for complexes of the type B⋯MX, in which B is a simple Lewis base of at least C2v symmetry and MX is any diatomic molecule lying along a Cn axis (n ≥ 2) of B. The model assumes a rigid subunit B and that force constants beyond quadratic are negligible. It leads to expressions that allow, in principle, the determination of three quadratic force constants F11, F12, and F22 associated with the r(B⋯M) = r2 and r(M-X) = r1 internal coordinates from the equilibrium centrifugal distortion constants DJ (e) or ΔJ (e), the equilibrium principal axis coordinates a1 and a2, and equilibrium principal moments of inertia. The model can be applied generally to complexes containing different types of intermolecular bond. For example, the intermolecular bond of B⋯MX can be a hydrogen bond if MX is a hydrogen halide, a halogen-bond if MX is a dihalogen molecule, or a stronger, coinage-metal bond if MX is a coinage metal halide. The equations were tested for BrCN, for which accurate equilibrium spectroscopic constants and a complete force field are available. In practice, equilibrium values of DJ (e) or ΔJ (e) for B⋯MX are not available and zero-point quantities must be used instead. The effect of doing so has been tested for BrCN. The zero-point centrifugal distortion constants DJ (0) or ΔJ (0) for all B⋯MX investigated so far are of insufficient accuracy to allow F11 and F22 to be determined simultaneously, even under the assumption F12 = 0 which is shown to be reasonable for BrCN. The calculation of F22 at a series of fixed values of F11 reveals, however, that in cases for which F11 is sufficiently larger than F22, a good approximation to F22 is obtained. Plots of F22 versus F11 have been provided for Kr⋯CuCl, Xe⋯CuCl, OC⋯CuCl, and C2H2⋯AgCl as examples. Even in cases where F22 ∼ F11 (e.g., OC⋯CuCl), such plots will yield either F22 or F11 if the other becomes available.

  6. LOADING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-10-01

    A device is presented for loading or charging bodies of fissionable material into a reactor. This device consists of a car, mounted on tracks, into which the fissionable materials may be placed at a remote area, transported to the reactor, and inserted without danger to the operating personnel. The car has mounted on it a heavily shielded magazine for holding a number of the radioactive bodies. The magazine is of a U-shaped configuration and is inclined to the horizontal plane, with a cap covering the elevated open end, and a remotely operated plunger at the lower, closed end. After the fissionable bodies are loaded in the magazine and transported to the reactor, the plunger inserts the body at the lower end of the magazine into the reactor, then is withdrawn, thereby allowing gravity to roll the remaining bodies into position for successive loading in a similar manner.

  7. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  8. [Devic disease].

    PubMed

    Papeix, Caroline

    2006-11-01

    Devic disease, also known as neuromyelitis optica, is a severe rare condition characterized clinically by one or more episodes of optical neuritis and myelitis. Pathologically, it is characterized by extensive demyelination associated with axon loss and deposits of complement and immunoglobulins (IgM) within the lesions. Specific antibodies for this disease (IgG NMO) were recently identified. Immunosuppressive treatment is currently the best option for preventing relapse. PMID:17086129

  9. Glomerular filtration rate after alpha-radioimmunotherapy with 211At-MX35-F(ab')2: a long-term study of renal function in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Bäck, Tom; Haraldsson, Börje; Hultborn, Ragnar; Jensen, Holger; Johansson, Martin E; Lindegren, Sture; Jacobsson, Lars

    2009-12-01

    Besides bone marrow, the kidneys are often dose-limiting organs in internal radiotherapy. The effects of high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the kidneys after alpha-radioimmunotherapy (alpha-RIT) with the alpha-particle emitter, (211)At, were studied in nude mice by serial measurements of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The renal toxicity was evaluated at levels close to the dose limit for the bone marrow and well within the range for therapeutic efficacy on tumors. Astatinated MX35-F(ab')(2) monoclonal antibodies were administered intravenously to nude mice. Both non-tumor-bearing animals and animals bearing subcutaneous xenografts of the human ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, were used. The animals received approximately 0.4, 0.8, or 1.2 MBq in one, two, or three fractions. The mean absorbed doses to the kidneys ranged from 1.5 to 15 Gy. The renal function was studied by serial GFR measurements, using plasma clearance of (51)Cr-EDTA, up to 67 weeks after the first astatine injection. A dose-dependent effect on GFR was found and at the time interval 8-30 weeks after the first administration of astatine, the absorbed doses causing a 50% decrease in GFR were 16.4 +/- 3.3 and 14.0 +/- 4.1 Gy (mean +/- SEM), tumor- and non-tumor-bearing animals, respectively. The reduction in GFR progressed with time, and at the later time interval, (31-67 weeks) the corresponding absorbed doses were 7.5 +/- 2.4 and 11.3 +/- 2.3 Gy, respectively, suggesting that the effects of radiation on the kidneys were manifested late. Examination of the kidney sections showed histologic changes that were overall subdued. Following alpha-RIT with (211)At-MX35-F(ab')(2) at levels close to the dose limit of severe myelotoxicity, the effects found on renal function were relatively small, with only minor to moderate reductions in GFR. These results suggest that a mean absorbed dose to the kidneys of approximately 10 Gy is acceptable, and that the kidneys would not be the primary

  10. Glomerular filtration rate after alpha-radioimmunotherapy with 211At-MX35-F(ab')2: a long-term study of renal function in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Bäck, Tom; Haraldsson, Börje; Hultborn, Ragnar; Jensen, Holger; Johansson, Martin E; Lindegren, Sture; Jacobsson, Lars

    2009-12-01

    Besides bone marrow, the kidneys are often dose-limiting organs in internal radiotherapy. The effects of high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the kidneys after alpha-radioimmunotherapy (alpha-RIT) with the alpha-particle emitter, (211)At, were studied in nude mice by serial measurements of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The renal toxicity was evaluated at levels close to the dose limit for the bone marrow and well within the range for therapeutic efficacy on tumors. Astatinated MX35-F(ab')(2) monoclonal antibodies were administered intravenously to nude mice. Both non-tumor-bearing animals and animals bearing subcutaneous xenografts of the human ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, were used. The animals received approximately 0.4, 0.8, or 1.2 MBq in one, two, or three fractions. The mean absorbed doses to the kidneys ranged from 1.5 to 15 Gy. The renal function was studied by serial GFR measurements, using plasma clearance of (51)Cr-EDTA, up to 67 weeks after the first astatine injection. A dose-dependent effect on GFR was found and at the time interval 8-30 weeks after the first administration of astatine, the absorbed doses causing a 50% decrease in GFR were 16.4 +/- 3.3 and 14.0 +/- 4.1 Gy (mean +/- SEM), tumor- and non-tumor-bearing animals, respectively. The reduction in GFR progressed with time, and at the later time interval, (31-67 weeks) the corresponding absorbed doses were 7.5 +/- 2.4 and 11.3 +/- 2.3 Gy, respectively, suggesting that the effects of radiation on the kidneys were manifested late. Examination of the kidney sections showed histologic changes that were overall subdued. Following alpha-RIT with (211)At-MX35-F(ab')(2) at levels close to the dose limit of severe myelotoxicity, the effects found on renal function were relatively small, with only minor to moderate reductions in GFR. These results suggest that a mean absorbed dose to the kidneys of approximately 10 Gy is acceptable, and that the kidneys would not be the primary

  11. Electrooptical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, C. E.

    1980-03-01

    This report covers work carried out with support of the Department of the Air Force during the period 1 October 1979 through 31 March 1980. A part of this support was provided by the Rome Air Development Center. CW operation at temperatures up to 55 C has been achieved for GaInAsP/InP double-heterostructure (DH) lasers emitting at 1.5 micrometers, which were grown without a GaInAsP buffer layer. These devices are of interest for use as sources in fiber-optics communications systems, since the lowest transmission loss reported for fused-silica optical fibers occurs at 1.55 micrometers. Surface passivation techniques developed for InP and GaInAsP avalanche photodiodes have resulted in reductions of dark current as large as four orders of magnitude, to values as low as .0000016 A/sq cm at 0.9 V(b) where V(b) is the breakdown voltage. Devices consisting entirely of InP have been passivated with plasma-deposited Si3N4, and those with a GaInAsP layer but with the p-n junction in InP have been passivated with polyimide. Neither of these techniques successfully reduces dark currents in devices with the p-n junction in the GaInAsP, but a film of photoresist sprayed with SF6 as the propellant has given excellent results. The electrical characteristics in InP ion implanted with Sn, Ge, Si, and C have been investigated. All of these column IV elements yielded n-type conductivity and Sn, Ge, and Si showed high electrical activation; however, implanted C was found to have a net electrical activation of only about 5 percent.

  12. OLED devices

    DOEpatents

    Sapochak, Linda Susan [Arlington, VA; Burrows, Paul Edward [Kennewick, WA; Bimalchandra, Asanga [Richland, WA

    2011-02-22

    An OLED device having an emission layer formed of an ambipolar phosphine oxide host material and a dopant, a hole transport layer in electrical communication with an anode, an electron transport layer in communication with a cathode, wherein the HOMO energy of the hole transport layer is substantially the same as the HOMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer, and the LUMO energy of the electron transport layer is substantially the same as the LUMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer.

  13. Device Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, John; Roberts, Ruth; Morris, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have to take numerous factors/data into their therapeutic decisions in daily life. Connecting the devices they are using by feeding the data generated into a database/app is supposed to help patients to optimize their glycemic control. As this is not established in practice, the different roadblocks have to be discussed to open the road. That large telecommunication companies are now entering this market might be a big help in pushing this forward. Smartphones offer an ideal platform for connectivity solutions. PMID:25614015

  14. Electrospray device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmons, Nathaniel (Inventor); Martin, Roy (Inventor); Hruby, Vladimir (Inventor); Roy, Thomas (Inventor); Spence, Douglas (Inventor); Ehrbar, Eric (Inventor); Zwahlen, Jurg (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electrospray device includes an electrospray emitter adapted to receive electrospray fluid; an extractor plate spaced from the electrospray emitter and having at least one aperture; and a power supply for applying a first voltage between the extractor plate and emitter for generating at least one Taylor cone emission through the aperture to create an electrospray plume from the electrospray fluid, the extractor plate as well as accelerator and shaping plates may include a porous, conductive medium for transporting and storing excess, accumulated electrospray fluid away from the aperture.

  15. Electrochromic device

    SciTech Connect

    Schwendemanm, Irina G.; Polcyn, Adam D.; Finley, James J.; Boykin, Cheri M.; Knowles, Julianna M.

    2011-03-15

    An electrochromic device includes a first substrate spaced from a second substrate. A first conductive member is formed over at least a portion of the first substrate. A first electrochromic material is formed over at least a portion of the first conductive member. The first electrochromic material includes an organic material. A second conductive member is formed over at least a portion of the second substrate. A second electrochromic material is formed over at least a portion of the second conductive member. The second electrochromic material includes an inorganic material. An ionic liquid is positioned between the first electrochromic material and the second electrochromic material.

  16. Diversionary device

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C.

    2001-01-01

    A diversionary device has a housing having at least one opening and containing a non-explosive propellant and a quantity of fine powder packed within the housing, with the powder being located between the propellant and the opening. When the propellant is activated, it has sufficient energy to propel the powder through the opening to produce a cloud of powder outside the housing. An igniter is also provided for igniting the cloud of powder to create a diversionary flash and bang, but at a low enough pressure to avoid injuring nearby people.

  17. Electroexplosive device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menichelli, V. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An electroexplosive device is presented which employs a header having contact pins hermetically sealed with glass passing through from a connector end of the header to a cavity filled with a shunt layer of a new nonlinear resistive composition and a heat-sink layer of a new dielectric composition having good thermal conductivity and capacity. The nonlinear resistive layer and the heat-sink layer are prepared from materials by mixing with a low temperature polymerizing resin. The resin is dissolved in a suitable solvent and later evaporated. The resultant solid composite is ground into a powder, press formed into the header and cured (polymerized) at about 250 to 300 F.

  18. URINE MUTAGENICITY AND BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF THE DRINKING WATER MUTAGEN, 3-CHLORO-4-(DICHLOROMETHYL)-5-HYDROXY-2[5H]-FURANONE (MX), FOLLOWING REPEATED ORAL ADMINISTRATION TO MICE AND RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagenicity analysis of urine from rats treated by oral gavage with MX at a dose of 64 mg/kg for 14 days revealed that only 0.3% of the administered compound was excreted in a genotoxically active form. At lower doses, mutagenicity was not detectable. No evidence of micronucleus...

  19. URINE MUTAGENICITY AND BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF THE DRINKING WATER MUTAGEN, 3-CHLORO-4-(DICHLOROMETHYL)-5-HYDROX-2[5H]-FURANONE (MX), FOLLOWING REPEATED ORAL ADMINISTRATION TO MICE AND RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagenicity analysis of urine from rats treated by oral gavage with MX at a dose of 64 mg/kg for 14 days revealed that only 0.3% of the administered cmpound was excreted in a genotoxically active form. At lower doses, mutagenicity was not detectable. No evidence of micronucleu...

  20. MX [3-Chloro-4-(Dichloromethyl)-5-Hydroxy-2[5H]-Furanone], A Drinking-Water Carcinogen, Does Not Induce Mutations in the Liver of Cii Transgenic Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagenicity assays with Salmonella have shown that 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-furanone (MX), a drinking water disinfection by-product is a potent mutagen, accounting for about one third of the mutagenic potency/potential of chlorinated drinking water. The abilit...

  1. Half-metallic ferromagnetism in chalcopyrite type compounds ZnMX{sub 2} (M=Sc, V, Mn, Fe; X = P, As)

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayalakshmi, D.; Kalpana, G. E-mail: g-kalpa@annauniv.edu

    2015-06-24

    Electronic structure and magnetic properties of ZnMX{sub 2} (M=Sc, V, Mn and Fe; X= As and P) compounds in body centred tetragonal chalcopyrite structure have been investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) within the local spin density approximation (LSDA). The spin-polarized electronic band structure and density of states of all these compounds show that the spin-up electrons have metallic and the spin-down electrons have a semiconducting gap and the magnetic moment mainly originates from the strong spin polarization of 3d states of transition metal (M=Sc, V, Mn and Fe) atoms and p-like states of anion X (P and As) atoms.

  2. Large magnetocaloric effect in La0.845Sr0.155Mn1-xMxO3 (M = Mn, Cu, Co) perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Phan, The-Long; Yu, Seong-Cho; Tho, Nguyen Duc; Chau, Nguyen

    2004-06-01

    We present the results of an investigation on the magnetocaloric effect in the perovskites of La0.845Sr0.155Mn1-xMxO3 (M = Mn, Cu, Co). It is found that there was a large magnetic entropy change, i.e. a large magneto-caloric effect, in all these samples. Among them, the magnetic entropy change reaches a maximum value of 2.67 J/kg K at the applied field of 13.5 kOe for the Cu-doped sample, suggesting that this material would be a suitable candidate for the advanced magnetic refrigeration technology. The large magnetic entropy change produced by the abrupt reduction of magnetization is attributed to the strong coupling between spin and lattice that occurs in the vicinity of the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition temperature (TC) - which is experimentally verified by electron paramagnetic resonance study.

  3. Light-shift suppression in a miniaturized Mx optically pumped Cs magnetometer array with enhanced resonance signal using off-resonant laser pumping.

    PubMed

    Scholtes, Theo; Schultze, Volkmar; IJsselsteijn, Rob; Woetzel, Stefan; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2012-12-31

    The performance of an optically pumped Mx magnetometer with miniaturized Cs cell at earth's magnetic field strength (50 μT) is investigated. Operation using detuned high intensity laser light is shown to be superior to the conventional resonant operation in terms of the projected shot-noise-limited ( 50 fT/√Hz) and the actual noise-limited sensitivity using a noise compensation method. The Zeeman light shift effect, emerging due to the off-resonant circularly polarized laser radiation and leading to a strong orientational dependence of the measurement, is suppressed by averaging two identical magnetometer configurations pumped with oppositely circularly polarized light. A residual heading error within the range of 14 nT, limited by the present experimental characterization setup, was achieved.

  4. Pattern recognition receptor mediated downregulation of microRNA‐650 fine‐tunes MxA expression in dendritic cells infected with influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Khatamzas, Elham; Liu, Xiao; Brain, Oliver; Delmiro Garcia, Magno; Leslie, Alasdair; Danis, Benedicte; Mayer, Alice; Baban, Dilair; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Weber, Alexander N. R.; Simmons, Alison

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are important posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression, which have been shown to fine‐tune innate immune responses downstream of pattern recognition receptor (PRR) signaling. This study identifies miR‐650 as a novel PRR‐responsive microRNA that is downregulated upon stimulation of primary human monocyte‐derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) with a variety of different microbe‐associated molecular patterns. A comprehensive target search combining in silico analysis, transcriptional profiling, and reporter assays reveals that miR‐650 regulates several well‐known interferon‐stimulated genes, including IFIT2 and MXA. In particular, downregulation of miR‐650 in influenza A infected MDDCs enhances the expression of MxA and may therefore contribute to the establishment of an antiviral state. Together these findings reveal a novel link between miR‐650 and the innate immune response in human MDDCs. PMID:26460926

  5. Benchmark Assessment of Density Functional Methods on Group II-VI MX (M = Zn, Cd; X = S, Se, Te) Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Azpiroz, Jon M; Ugalde, Jesus M; Infante, Ivan

    2014-01-14

    In this work, we build a benchmark data set of geometrical parameters, vibrational normal modes, and low-lying excitation energies for MX quantum dots, with M = Cd, Zn, and X = S, Se, Te. The reference database has been constructed by ab initio resolution-of-identity second-order approximate coupled cluster RI-CC2/def2-TZVPP calculations on (MX)6 model molecules in the wurtzite structure. We have tested 26 exchange-correlation density functionals, ranging from local generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and hybrid GGA to meta-GGA, meta-hybrid, and long-range corrected. The best overall functional is the hybrid PBE0 that outperforms all other functionals, especially for excited state energies, which are of particular relevance for the systems studied here. Among the DFT methodologies with no Hartree-Fock exchange, the M06-L is the best one. Local GGA functionals usually provide satisfactory results for geometrical structures and vibrational frequencies but perform rather poorly for excitation energies. Regarding the CdSe cluster, we also present a test of several basis sets that include relativistic effects via effective core potentials (ECPs) or via the ZORA approximation. The best basis sets in terms of computational efficiency and accuracy are the SBKJC and def2-SV(P). The LANL2DZ basis set, commonly employed nowadays on these types of nanoclusters, performs very disappointingly. Finally, we also provide some suggestions on how to perform calculations on larger systems keeping a balance between computational load and accuracy. PMID:26579893

  6. Study of Pt-Rh/CeO2-ZrO2-MxOy (M = Y, La)/Al2O3 three-way catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiaxiu, Guo; Zhonghua, Shi; Dongdong, Wu; Huaqiang, Yin; Maochu, Gong; Yaoqiang, Chen

    2013-05-01

    CeO2-ZrO2-MxOy (M = Y; La) mixed oxides, prepared by co-precipitation method and characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra (RM) and oxygen pulse reaction, were comparatively investigated to elucidate the combinational effects of Y and/or La oxide promoters on the catalytic activity and anti-aging performance of monolithic cordierite honeycomb catalysts with low Pt and Rh content. The catalytic activities, water-gas shift (WGS) and steam reforming reaction (SR) were studied under a simulated gas mixture. The catalysts were also characterized by H2-temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and O2-temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD). The results showed that the prepared CeO2-ZrO2-MxOy oxides have a face-centered cubic fluorite structure and are nanosize. La3+ ions can significantly improve thermal stability and efficiently retard CeO2-ZrO2 crystal sintering and growth. Doped CeO2-ZrO2 with Y3+ and La3+ has 105 and 60 m2/g surface area and 460 and 390 μmol/g OSC before and after aging. The T50 of fresh Pt-Rh/CZYL/LA is 170 °C for CO, 222 °C for C3H8 and 189 °C for NO, and shift to 205, 262 and 228 °C after hydrothermal aging, which are better than those of Pt-Rh/CZY/LA or Pt-Rh/CZL/LA. WGS and SR are relate to the OSC of oxygen storage materials and absorbed oxygen species on the catalyst surface and affect the three-way catalytic activities of catalysts. The reductive property of noble metals and the dissociatively adsorbed O2 on the surface of catalysts are closely related to the catalytic activities.

  7. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the trehalulose synthase MutB from Pseudomonas mesoacidophila MX-45

    SciTech Connect

    Ravaud, Stéphanie; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2005-01-01

    The trehalulose synthase MutB from P. mesoacidophila MX-45 has been crystallized in two different crystal forms and diffraction data have been collected to 1.6 and 1.8 Å, respectively. The trehalulose synthase (MutB) from Pseudomonas mesoacidophila MX-45, belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 13, catalyses the isomerization of sucrose to trehalulose (α-d-glucosylpyranosyl-1,1-d-fructofuranose) and isomaltulose (α-d-glucosylpyranosyl-1,6-d-fructofuranose) as main products and glucose and fructose in residual amounts from the hydrolytic reaction. To date, a three-dimensional structure of a sucrose isomerase that produces mainly trehalulose, as is the case for MutB, has been lacking. Crystallographic studies of this 64 kDa enzyme have therefore been initiated in order to contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis of sucrose decomposition, isomerization and of the selectivity of this enzyme that leads to the formation of different products. The MutB protein has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Two different crystal forms have been obtained: one diffracts X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and belongs to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 63.8, b = 72.0, c = 82.2 Å, α = 67.5, β = 73.1, γ = 70.8°, while the other form diffracts to 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 63.7, b = 85.9, c = 119.7 Å, β = 97.7°. A molecular-replacement solution has been found using the structure of the isomaltulose synthase (PalI) from Klebsiella sp. LX3 as a search model.

  8. Comparative study of toxicity of azo dye Procion Red MX-5B following biosorption and biodegradation treatments with the fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Almeida, E J R; Corso, C R

    2014-10-01

    Azo dyes are an important class of environmental contaminants and are characterized by the presence of one or more azo bonds (-N=N-) in their molecular structure. Effluents containing these compounds resist many types of treatments due to their molecular complexity. Therefore, alternative treatments, such as biosorption and biodegradation, have been widely studied to solve the problems caused by these substances, such as their harmful effects on the environment and organisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate biosorption and biodegradation of the azo dye Procion Red MX-5B in solutions with the filamentous fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus. Decolorization tests were performed, followed by acute toxicity tests using Lactuca sativa seeds and Artemia salina larvae. Thirty percent dye removal of the solutions was achieved after 3 h of biosorption. UV-Vis spectroscopy revealed that removal of the dye molecules occurred without major molecular changes. The acute toxicity tests confirmed lack of molecular degradation following biosorption with A. niger, as toxicity to L. sativa seed reduced from 5% to 0%. For A. salina larvae, the solutions were nontoxic before and after treatment. In the biodegradation study with the fungus A. terreus, UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy revealed molecular degradation and the formation of secondary metabolites, such as primary and secondary amines. The biodegradation of the dye molecules was evaluated after 24, 240 and 336 h of treatment. The fungal biomass demonstrated considerable affinity for Procion Red MX-5B, achieving approximately 100% decolorization of the solutions by the end of treatment. However, the solutions resulting from this treatment exhibited a significant increase in toxicity, inhibiting the growth of L. sativa seeds by 43% and leading to a 100% mortality rate among the A. salina larvae. Based on the present findings, biodegradation was effective in the decolorization of the samples, but generated

  9. Comparative study of toxicity of azo dye Procion Red MX-5B following biosorption and biodegradation treatments with the fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Almeida, E J R; Corso, C R

    2014-10-01

    Azo dyes are an important class of environmental contaminants and are characterized by the presence of one or more azo bonds (-N=N-) in their molecular structure. Effluents containing these compounds resist many types of treatments due to their molecular complexity. Therefore, alternative treatments, such as biosorption and biodegradation, have been widely studied to solve the problems caused by these substances, such as their harmful effects on the environment and organisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate biosorption and biodegradation of the azo dye Procion Red MX-5B in solutions with the filamentous fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus. Decolorization tests were performed, followed by acute toxicity tests using Lactuca sativa seeds and Artemia salina larvae. Thirty percent dye removal of the solutions was achieved after 3 h of biosorption. UV-Vis spectroscopy revealed that removal of the dye molecules occurred without major molecular changes. The acute toxicity tests confirmed lack of molecular degradation following biosorption with A. niger, as toxicity to L. sativa seed reduced from 5% to 0%. For A. salina larvae, the solutions were nontoxic before and after treatment. In the biodegradation study with the fungus A. terreus, UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy revealed molecular degradation and the formation of secondary metabolites, such as primary and secondary amines. The biodegradation of the dye molecules was evaluated after 24, 240 and 336 h of treatment. The fungal biomass demonstrated considerable affinity for Procion Red MX-5B, achieving approximately 100% decolorization of the solutions by the end of treatment. However, the solutions resulting from this treatment exhibited a significant increase in toxicity, inhibiting the growth of L. sativa seeds by 43% and leading to a 100% mortality rate among the A. salina larvae. Based on the present findings, biodegradation was effective in the decolorization of the samples, but generated

  10. Optoelectronic device

    DOEpatents

    Bonekamp, Jeffrey E.; Boven, Michelle L.; Gaston, Ryan S.

    2014-09-09

    The invention is an optoelectronic device comprising an active portion which converts light to electricity or converts electricity to light, the active portion having a front side for the transmittal of the light and a back side opposite from the front side, at least two electrical leads to the active portion to convey electricity to or from the active portion, an enclosure surrounding the active portion and through which the at least two electrical leads pass wherein the hermetically sealed enclosure comprises at the front side of the active portion a barrier material which allows for transmittal of light, one or more getter materials disposed so as to not impede the transmission of light to or from the active portion, and a contiguous gap pathway to the getter material which pathway is disposed between the active portion and the barrier material.

  11. CLOSURE DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Linzell, S.M.; Dorcy, D.J.

    1958-08-26

    A quick opening type of stuffing box employing two banks of rotatable shoes, each of which has a caraming action that forces a neoprene sealing surface against a pipe or rod where it passes through a wall is presented. A ring having a handle or wrench attached is placed eccentric to and between the two banks of shoes. Head bolts from the shoes fit into slots in this ring, which are so arranged that when the ring is rotated a quarter turn in one direction the shoes are thrust inwardly to cramp the neopnrene about the pipe, malting a tight seal. Moving the ring in the reverse direction moves the shoes outwardly and frees the pipe which then may be readily removed from the stuffing box. This device has particular application as a closure for the end of a coolant tube of a neutronic reactor.

  12. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1961-08-22

    A device is described for establishing and maintaining a high-energy, rotational plasma for use as a fast discharge capacitor. A disc-shaped, current- conducting plasma is formed in an axinl magnetic field and a crossed electric field, thereby creating rotational kinetic enengy in the plasma. Such energy stored in the rotation of the plasma disc is substantial and is convertible tc electrical energy by generator action in an output line electrically coupled to the plasma volume. Means are then provided for discharging the electrical energy into an external circuit coupled to the output line to produce a very large pulse having an extremely rapid rise time in the waveform thereof. (AE C)

  13. Electrophoresis device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, P. H.; Snyder, R. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A device for separating cellular particles of a sample substance into fractionated streams of different cellular species includes a casing having a distribution chamber, a separation chamber, and a collection chamber. The electrode chambers are separated from the separation chamber interior by means of passages such that flow variations and membrane variations around the slotted portion of the electrode chamber do not enduce flow perturbations into the laminar buffer curtain flowing in the separation chamber. The cellular particles of the sample are separated under the influence of the electrical field and the separation chamber into streams of different cellular species. The streams of separated cells enter a partition array in the collection chamber where they are fractionated and collected.

  14. Integrated device architectures for electrochromic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Jonathan Mack; Berland, Brian Spencer

    2015-04-21

    This disclosure describes systems and methods for creating monolithically integrated electrochromic devices which may be a flexible electrochromic device. Monolithic integration of thin film electrochromic devices may involve the electrical interconnection of multiple individual electrochromic devices through the creation of specific structures such as conductive pathway or insulating isolation trenches.

  15. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  16. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  17. No consistent pattern of mutations in p53 and ras genes in liver tumors of rat treated with the drinking water mutagen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX).

    PubMed

    Komulainen, H; Hakulinen, P; Servomaa, K; Makkonen, K; Vasara, R; Mäki-Paakkanen, J; Kosma, V M

    2000-01-01

    The frequency of point mutations in p53 (exons 4-7) and in Ki-ras, Ha-ras, and N-ras (exons 1 and 2) and the expression of p53 protein were evaluated in the liver tumors of Wistar rats of a 104-week carcinogenicity study on 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX), a chlorine disinfection by-product in drinking water. Mutations were analyzed in 16 hepatocellular adenomas, 7 hepatocellular carcinomas, 23 cholangiomas, and 2 cholangiocarcinomas of the MX-treated animals and one hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma in control animals using PCR-SSCP (polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism) or PCR-TGGE (temperature gradient gel electrophoresis) and direct sequencing. The expression of the p53 protein (wild-type and mutated protein) was detected by immunohistochemistry (CM5 antibody). The expression of p53 and that of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, 19 A2) were also evaluated in livers of female animals exposed to MX for 1 week, 3 weeks, or 18 weeks. Altogether, four mutations were found in p53 in three tumors, in two hepatocellular adenomas, and one cholangiocarcinoma, all in females receiving the highest MX dose (6. 6 mg/kg/day) of the study. Three of the mutations were G:C --> A:T transitions and one was an A:T --> T:A transversion. The mutations were scattered at different codons and positions of the codon. One hepatocellular adenoma contained two p53 mutations. All cholangiomas and cholangiocarcinomas, but no hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas, overexpressed the p53 protein. MX treatment did not induce p53 expression at any age in the liver or alter the expression of the PCNA in the liver of younger animals. The p53 protein was overexpressed in hyperplastic bile ducts in aged rats but not in bile ducts of younger rats (up to 24 weeks). No mutations were observed in either Ki-ras, Ha-ras, or N-ras of the liver tumors. These data suggest that point mutations in p53, Ki-ras, Ha-ras, and N-ras are

  18. Medical devices: US medical device regulation.

    PubMed

    Jarow, Jonathan P; Baxley, John H

    2015-03-01

    Medical devices are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Center for Devices and Radiological Health is responsible for protecting and promoting the public health by ensuring the safety, effectiveness, and quality of medical devices, ensuring the safety of radiation-emitting products, fostering innovation, and providing the public with accurate, science-based information about the products we oversee, throughout the total product life cycle. The FDA was granted the authority to regulate the manufacturing and marketing of medical devices in 1976. It does not regulate the practice of medicine. Devices are classified based on complexity and level of risk, and "pre-1976" devices were allowed to remain on the market after being classified without FDA review. Post-1976 devices of lower complexity and risk that are substantially equivalent to a marketed "predicate" device may be cleared through the 510(k) premarket notification process. Clinical data are typically not needed for 510(k) clearance. In contrast, higher-risk devices typically require premarket approval. Premarket approval applications must contain data demonstrating reasonable assurance of safety and efficacy, and this information typically includes clinical data. For novel devices that are not high risk, the de novo process allows FDA to simultaneously review and classify new devices. Devices that are not legally marketed are permitted to be used for clinical investigation purposes in the United States under the Investigational Device Exemptions regulation.

  19. Theoretical study of interface structure and energetics in semicoherent Fe(001)/MX(001) systems ( M=Sc , Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Hf, Ta; X=C or N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fors, Dan H. R.; Wahnström, Göran

    2010-11-01

    We perform a systematic ab initio study of the electronic and atomic structure of semicoherent interfaces between bcc Fe and NaCl MX ( M=Sc , Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Hf, Ta; X=C or N). The interface energetics is accessed by using a Peierls-Nabarro framework, in which ab initio data for the chemical interactions across the interface are combined with a continuum description to account for the elastic distortions. The key factors to the trends in the interface energy are identified and discussed with respect to the size of the misfit and the electronic structure of the MX phase. Our approach shows that the inclusion of lattice misfit can have a significant contribution to the interface energy (up to 1.5J/m2 ) and must therefore be thoroughly accounted for in the interface description. The results will have important bearings on our ability to understand and describe precipitate stability in steels.

  20. Connector device for building integrated photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joe A.; Eurich, Gerald K.; Lesniak, Michael J.; Mazor, Michael H.; Cleerman, Robert J.; Gaston, Ryan S.

    2015-11-10

    The present invention is premised upon a connector device and method that can more easily electrically connect a plurality of PV devices or photovoltaic system components and/or locate these devices/components upon a building structure. It also may optionally provide some additional sub-components (e.g. at least one bypass diode and/or an indicator means) and may enhance the serviceability of the device.

  1. Connector device for building integrated photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Eurich, Gerald K.; Lesniak, Michael J.; Mazor, Michael H.; Cleereman, Robert J.; Gaston, Ryan S.

    2014-06-03

    The present invention is premised upon a connector device and method that can more easily electrically connect a plurality of PV devices or photovoltaic system components and/or locate these devices/components upon a building structure. It also may optionally provide some additional sub-components (e.g. at least one bypass diode and/or an indicator means) and may enhance the serviceability of the device.

  2. The Impact of IL28B Genotype and Liver Fibrosis on the Hepatic Expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 and Their Association with Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Domagalski, Krzysztof; Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Kozielewicz, Dorota; Dybowska, Dorota; Tretyn, Andrzej; Halota, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    The strong impact of interleukin 28B (IL28B) polymorphisms on sustained virological response (SVR) after peginterferon and ribavirin treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is well-known. We investigated IL28B variability and hepatic expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 in CHC patients, the relation of each with their clinical characteristics, and how they associated with responses to combined therapy. Genotyping and gene expression analysis were conducted in a selected cohort of treatment-naïve patients who underwent interferon and ribavirin treatment. Differential expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 genes was assessed from pretreatment liver biopsies using quantitative PCR. Histopathological evaluation of liver specimens was performed on the basis of the Scheuer’s modified scale. We showed that hepatic IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 expression was lower in the IL28B CC 12979860 and TT rs8099917 groups than in the CT-TT rs12979860 and TG-GG rs8099917 groups (P < 0.001). We found no differences in IP10 expression between the IL28B genotypes (P > 0.05); in contrast, IP10 expression was significantly affected by the progression of fibrosis (P = 0.007). We showed that the rs12979860 CC genotype was associated with successful treatment when compared to the rs12979860 CT-TT genotype (P = 0.004). Additionally, the expression levels of IP10, IFI27 and ISG15, but not MX1, were significantly higher in non-SVR patients than in SVR patients. The effect of variation in IL28B on the results of IFN-based treatment may be associated with changes in IFI27 and ISG15, but not with IP10. Silencing of IP10 is positive and independent from IL28B prediction of SVR, which is strongly associated with liver fibrosis in CHC patients. PMID:26115415

  3. Mechanical and thermal properties of h-MX{sub 2} (M = Cr, Mo, W; X = O, S, Se, Te) monolayers: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Çakır, Deniz Peeters, François M.; Sevik, Cem

    2014-05-19

    Using density functional theory, we obtain the mechanical and thermal properties of MX{sub 2} monolayers (where M = Cr, Mo, W and X = O, S, Se, Te). The Γ-centered phonon frequencies (i.e., A{sub 1}, A{sub 2}{sup ″}, E′, and E″), relative frequency values of A{sub 1}, and E′ modes, and mechanical properties (i.e., elastic constants, Young modulus, and Poisson's ratio) display a strong dependence on the type of metal and chalcogenide atoms. In each chalcogenide (metal) group, transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) with W (O) atom are found to be much stiffer. Consistent with their stability, the thermal expansion of lattice constants for TMDCs with O (Te) is much slower (faster). Furthermore, in a heterostructure of these materials, the difference of the thermal expansion of lattice constants between the individual components becomes quite tiny over the whole temperature range. The calculated mechanical and thermal properties show that TMDCs are promising materials for heterostructures.

  4. Preliminary Results of a Free-Flight Investigation of the Static Stability and Aileron Control Characteristics of 1/6 Scale Models of the Bell MX-776

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michal, David H.; Mitcham, Grady L.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation of the static longitudinal stability, static directional stability, and aileron control characteristics at transonic and supersonic speeds is being made of 1/6 scale rocket-propelled model of the Bell MX-776. A stability investigation has been made of two symmetrical models with controls undeflected and centers of gravity one-half and one-body diameter, respectively, ahead of the equivalent design center-of-gravity location of the full-scale version. Both models developed large normal-force coefficients in both the subsonic and supersonic ranges which indicated longitudinal instability at low angles of attack. The side-force coefficients were small for both models and indicated that the models were directionally stable. A possible tendency toward dynamic directional instability in the transonic region was indicated by short-period oscillations of the side forces. The results showed a partial-span inboard aileron to be ineffective or to cause negative control in the the transonic region when deflected approximately 5 deg but not when deflected 10 deg. An investigation of drag showed it to increase with a rearward movement of the center of gravity. This indicates an increase in the trim angle of attack as could be caused by a decrease in static stability.

  5. Systematics of the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity in Ba(Fe1-xMx)₂As₂ (M=Co, Rh, Ni, and Pd)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tanatar, M. A.; Ni, N.; Thaler, A.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Prozorov, R.

    2011-07-27

    Temperature-dependent interplane resistivity ρc(T) was measured systematically as a function of transition-metal substitution in the iron-arsenide superconductors Ba(Fe1-xMx)₂As₂, M=Ni, Pd, Rh. The data are compared with the behavior found in Ba(Fe1-xCox)₂As₂, revealing resistive signatures of pseudogap. In all compounds we find resistivity crossover at a characteristic pseudogap temperature T* from nonmetallic to metallic temperature dependence on cooling. Suppression of T* proceeds very similarly in cases of Ni and Pd doping and much faster than in similar cases of Co and Rh doping. In cases of Co and Rh doping an additional minimum in the temperature-dependent ρc emerges for high dopings,more » when superconductivity is completely suppressed. These features are consistent with the existence of a charge gap covering part of the Fermi surface. The part of the Fermi surface affected by this gap is notably larger for Ni- and Pd-doped compositions than in Co- and Rh-doped compounds.« less

  6. Stability and crystal chemistry of the ternary borides M2(Ni21-xMx)B6 (M tbnd Ti, Zr, Hf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artini, C.; Provino, A.; Valenza, F.; Pani, M.; Cacciamani, G.

    2016-01-01

    A crystallochemical study was undertaken to investigate the structural stability and the compositional extent of the ternary borides M2(Ni21-xMx)B6 (M tbnd Ti, Zr, Hf). This phase often occurs during the production of MB2 joints by means of Ni-B brazing alloys. Samples with the nominal compositions M2Ni21B6 and M3Ni20B6 were synthesized by arc melting and characterized by optical and electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Crystal structure refinements were performed by the Rietveld method. The compositional boundaries of the ternary phases were experimentally determined and found strictly related to the M/Ni size ratio. The stability of this structure is mainly determined by the capability of the structure to expand under the effect of the Ni substitution by the M atom. The CALPHAD modeling of the three M-Ni-B ternary systems in the Ni-rich corner of the phase diagram, performed on the basis of the obtained structural data, shows a good agreement with experimental results.

  7. SNPs in candidate genes MX dynamin-like GTPase and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-5 are associated with ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma progression in Latxa sheep.

    PubMed

    Larruskain, A; Esparza-Baquer, A; Minguijón, E; Juste, R A; Jugo, B M

    2015-12-01

    Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) is a contagious lung cancer in sheep caused by Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). OPA is present in many sheep-rearing countries causing economic and welfare issues, as currently no efficient vaccines or treatments are available. Breed differences suggest a host genetic component may influence the pathogenesis of OPA, but so far few genes have been identified. In this work, a genetic association study was carried out in Latxa dairy sheep which were classified as cases/controls based on the presence/absence of OPA lung tumours. Candidate genes included cytokines and a receptor and innate immunity genes. After SNPs in the candidate genes were identified, the distribution of alleles in cases and controls was compared by means of logistic regression analyses at the allelic, genotypic and haplotypic levels. The association analysis showed that several candidate genes were significantly associated with resistance or susceptibility to OPA; two of the candidates, CCR5 and MX1, remained significantly associated with resistance and susceptibility respectively, even after Bonferroni correction.

  8. Magnetic Phase Transition of the Mixed Antiferromagnets Ni1-xMxCl2·2H2O (M=Co, Mn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamasaki, T.; Zenmyo, K.; Kubo, H.

    2012-12-01

    Mixed antiferromagnets Ni1-xMxCl2·2H2O (M=Co, Mn) were prepared. The crystal structure of NiCl2-2H2O is a little different from that of CoCl2·2H2O and MnCl2·2H2O. In order to examine how Co or Mn spins in NiCl2·2H2O crystal structure behave, we determined precisely the phase transition temperatures by measuring the specific heats and have obtained the concentration dependence of the phase transition temperature. Substitution of Co for Ni increases a little the transition temperature and contrary to this the substitution of Mn decreases the transition temperature rapidly. The results are discussed on the basis of molecular field theory. In the case of M=Co, the concentration dependence of the phase transition temperature is well explained by molecular field theory. But, in the case of M=Mn, the molecular field theory cannot explain it sufficiently. Thus Mn spins in NiCl2·2H2O crystal show the peculiar behavior. We suppose that this may be attributed to a kind of the instability of Mn spins.

  9. New Insight into Phase Formation of MxMg2Al4+xSi5−xO18:Eu2+ Solid Solution Phosphors and Its Luminescence Properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Xia, Zhiguo; Chen, Mingyue; Molokeev, Maxim S.; Liu, Quanlin

    2015-01-01

    Here we reported the phase formation of MxMg2Al4+xSi5−xO18:Eu2+ (M = K, Rb) solid solution phosphors, where M+ ions were introduced into the void channels of Mg2Al4Si5O18 via Al3+/Si4+ substitution to keep the charge balance. XRD results revealed that the as-prepared phosphors with different M+ contents were iso-structural with Mg2Al4Si5O18 phase. The combined analysis of the Rietveld refinement and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results proved that M+ ions were surely introduced into the intrinsic channels in Mg2Al4Si5O18. The emission peaks of MxMg2Al4+xSi5−xO18:Eu2+ (M = K, Rb) phosphors with various x values performed a systematic red-shift tendency, which was ascribed to the elongation of [MgO6] octahedra. The temperature stable photoluminescence and internal quantum efficiency (QE) of MxMg2Al4+xSi5−xO18:Eu2+ (M = K, Rb) phosphors were enhanced owing to the filling of M+ in the void channels suggesting a new insight to design the solid solution phosphors with improved photoluminescence properties. PMID:26190348

  10. Medical Device Safety

    MedlinePlus

    A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They range from ... need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep instructions ...

  11. Infrared criminalistic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibin, Igor S.; Savkov, E. V.; Popov, Pavel G.

    1996-12-01

    We are presenting the devices of near-IR spectral range in this report. The devices may be used in criminalistics, in bank business, in restoration works, etc. the action principle of these devices is describing briefly.

  12. CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    DeShong, J.A.

    1960-03-01

    A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

  13. Theoretical study on ion-pair recognition of M(+)X(-) (M = Li, Na, K and X = F, Cl, Br) by formylaminocalix[4]arene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ju; Jin, Guolian; Sun, Long; Feng, Wenling; Lu, Pengfei; Diao, Guowang

    2012-12-01

    DFT calculations were reported for calix[4]arene derivatives [i.e., formylaminocalix[4]arene (1) and formylaminocalix[4]bis-crown-3 (2)] binding cations M(+) (Li(+), Na(+), and K(+)) and anions X(-) (F(-), Cl(-), and Br(-)) simultaneously. The B3LYP function together with the LANL2DZp basis set was used in order to obtain insights into the factors determining the nature of the interactions of these compounds with X(-) and M(+). Based on the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) analysis, the result complexes M(+)X(-)/H (H = 1, 2) were investigated. For all the complex structures, the most pronounced changes in geometric parameters upon interaction were observed in the host segment compared with the free receptors. Two main types of driving force, N-H∙∙∙X(-) hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions between M(+) and oxygen atoms, were confirmed. The recognition trends for 1 and 2 toward M(+)X(-) followed the same order: M(+)F(-) > M(+)Cl(-) > M(+)Br(-) (M(+) is same to each other) and Li(+)X(-) > Na(+)X(-) > K(+)X(-) (X(-) is same to each other). The binding energy, enthalpy change, Gibbs free energy change, and entropy change of complexation formation have been studied by the calculated thermodynamic data. In all cases, the inclusion energy changes with 2 were more negative than those with 1, correlating with the flexible space available by the two crown ether moieties in 2. The calculated results of the model system have been reported and should be useful to the experimental research in this field. PMID:22733275

  14. Composition-driven phase boundary and electrical properties in (Ba₀.₉₄Ca₀.₀₆)(Ti₁-xMx)O₃ (M = Sn, Hf, Zr) lead-free ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunlin; Wang, Hui; Xiong, Jie; Wu, Jiagang

    2016-04-21

    In this study, we systematically investigated the composition dependence of the phase structure, microstructure, and electrical properties of (Ba0.94Ca0.06)(Ti1-xMx)O3 (M = Sn, Hf, Zr) ceramics synthesised by the conventional solid-state reaction method. The phase boundary type strongly depends on the composition, and then different electrical properties were exhibited. The addition of Hf and Zr can more quickly shift phase transition temperatures (TR-O and TO-T) to a higher temperature with respect to Sn, leading to the formation of different phase boundaries. In addition, different phase boundaries can also be affected by their doped contents. The R-O and O-T phase boundaries can be shown in the Sn-doped ceramics with x = 0.10, and the R-O phase boundary can exist in the Hf (x = 0.07) or Zr (x = 0.075)-doped ceramics. A high piezoelectric property of d33 = 600 pC N(-1) can be achieved in the Sn-doped ceramics due to the involvement of converging R-O/O-T phase boundaries, an enhanced ferroelectric performance with Pr = 14.54 μC cm(-2) and Ec = 1.82 kV cm(-1) can be attained in the Zr-doped ceramics, and Hf would benefit from obtaining a large strain behaviour (∼0.20%). We believe that the electrical properties and the related physical mechanisms of BaTiO3-based ceramics can be well unveiled by studying their chemical modification behavior. PMID:26952807

  15. Supramolecular chemistry of halogens: complementary features of inorganic (M-X) and organic (C-X') halogens applied to M-X...X'-C halogen bond formation.

    PubMed

    Zordan, Fiorenzo; Brammer, Lee; Sherwood, Paul

    2005-04-27

    Electronic differences between inorganic (M-X) and organic (C-X) halogens in conjunction with the anisotropic charge distribution associated with terminal halogens have been exploited in supramolecular synthesis based upon intermolecular M-X...X'-C halogen bonds. The synthesis and crystal structures of a family of compounds trans-[MCl(2)(NC(5)H(4)X-3)(2)] (M = Pd(II), Pt(II); X = F, Cl, Br, I; NC(5)H(4)X-3 = 3-halopyridine) are reported. With the exception of the fluoropyridine compounds, network structures propagated by M-Cl...X-C halogen bonds are adopted and involve all M-Cl and all C-X groups. M-Cl...X-C interactions show Cl...X separations shorter than van der Waals values, shorter distances being observed for heavier halogens (X). Geometries with near linear Cl...X-C angles (155-172 degrees ) and markedly bent M-Cl...X angles (92-137 degrees ) are consistently observed. DFT calculations on the model dimers {trans-[MCl(2)(NH(3))(NC(5)H(4)X-3)]}(2) show association through M-Cl...X-C (X not equal F) interactions with geometries similar to experimental values. DFT calculations of the electrostatic potential distributions for the compounds trans-[PdCl(2)(NC(5)H(4)X-3)(2)] (X = F, Cl, Br, I) demonstrate the effectiveness of the strategy to activate C-X groups toward halogen bond formation by enhancing their electrophilicity, and explain the absence of M-Cl...F-C interactions. The M-Cl...X-C halogen bonds described here can be viewed unambiguously as nucleophile-electrophile interactions that involve an attractive electrostatic contribution. This contrasts with some types of halogen-halogen interactions previously described and suggests that M-Cl...X-C halogen bonds could provide a valuable new synthon for supramolecular chemists.

  16. Theoretical study on ion-pair recognition of M(+)X(-) (M = Li, Na, K and X = F, Cl, Br) by formylaminocalix[4]arene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ju; Jin, Guolian; Sun, Long; Feng, Wenling; Lu, Pengfei; Diao, Guowang

    2012-12-01

    DFT calculations were reported for calix[4]arene derivatives [i.e., formylaminocalix[4]arene (1) and formylaminocalix[4]bis-crown-3 (2)] binding cations M(+) (Li(+), Na(+), and K(+)) and anions X(-) (F(-), Cl(-), and Br(-)) simultaneously. The B3LYP function together with the LANL2DZp basis set was used in order to obtain insights into the factors determining the nature of the interactions of these compounds with X(-) and M(+). Based on the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) analysis, the result complexes M(+)X(-)/H (H = 1, 2) were investigated. For all the complex structures, the most pronounced changes in geometric parameters upon interaction were observed in the host segment compared with the free receptors. Two main types of driving force, N-H∙∙∙X(-) hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions between M(+) and oxygen atoms, were confirmed. The recognition trends for 1 and 2 toward M(+)X(-) followed the same order: M(+)F(-) > M(+)Cl(-) > M(+)Br(-) (M(+) is same to each other) and Li(+)X(-) > Na(+)X(-) > K(+)X(-) (X(-) is same to each other). The binding energy, enthalpy change, Gibbs free energy change, and entropy change of complexation formation have been studied by the calculated thermodynamic data. In all cases, the inclusion energy changes with 2 were more negative than those with 1, correlating with the flexible space available by the two crown ether moieties in 2. The calculated results of the model system have been reported and should be useful to the experimental research in this field.

  17. Use of a Standardized MxA Protein Measurement-Based Assay for Validation of Assays for the Assessment of Neutralizing Antibodies Against Interferon-β

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyam, Meena; Goelz, Susan; Goyal, Jaya; Jethwa, Vijay; Jones, Wendy; Files, James G.; Kramer, Daniel; Bird, Chris; Dilger, Paula; Tovey, Michael; Lallemand, Christophe; Thorpe, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Effective monitoring of the development of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against IFN-β in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients on IFN-β therapy is important for clinical decision making and disease management. To date, antiviral assays have been the favored approach for NAb determination, but variations in assay conditions between laboratories and the increasing use of novel assays have contributed to the reporting of inconsistent antibody data between laboratories and between products. This study, undertaken at the request of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA), is a joint effort by manufacturers of IFN-β products (approved in Europe) towards harmonization of a NAb assay that facilitates generation of comparable NAb data, which, in conjunction with clinical outcomes, should prove useful for clinicians treating MS patients with IFN-β products. This article describes the standardized cellular myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA) protein measurement-based assay for detection of IFN-β NAbs and its use for the validation of assays used for the quantitative determination of such antibodies. Although titers varied between laboratories and the products used, utilization of IFN-β1a rather than IFN-β1b as the challenge antigen produced more consistent results in the NAb assay. Adoption of the standardized assay improves comparability between laboratories circumventing problems that arise when different, nonstandardized assays are employed for immunogenicity assessment. Based on the data, the EMA recommended for standardization purposes, the use of IFN-β1a in NAb assays, independent of the therapeutic product used for therapy and validation of new NAb procedures against the standardized assay described. PMID:23848523

  18. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  19. Sealed container sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Sampling device, by means of a tapered needle, pierces a sealed container while maintaining the seal and either evacuates or pressurizes the container. This device has many applications in the chemical, preservative and battery-manufacturing industries.

  20. Evaluation of a combined MxA and CRP point-of-care immunoassay to identify viral and/or bacterial immune response in patients with acute febrile respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    Sambursky, Robert; Shapiro, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Challenges in the clinical differentiation of viral and/or bacterial respiratory infection lead to the misappropriation of antibiotics and increased healthcare costs. A tool to facilitate rapid and accurate point-of-care (POC) differentiation is needed. Methods and findings A prospective, single center, blinded, observational clinical trial was conducted at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center from December 2012 to August 2013 to determine the accuracy of a POC immunoassay to identify a clinically significant immune response to viral and/or bacterial infection. Sixty patients with acute febrile respiratory infection (19 pharyngitis and 41 lower respiratory tract infection [LRTI]) were enrolled. Participants provided fingerstick blood for immunoassay testing (myxovirus A [MxA] and c-reactive protein [CRP]) and four oropharyngeal samples for viral PCR and routine bacterial cell culture. A venous blood sample was collected. An ELISA was used to measure CRP and MxA. Paired serological testing was used to confirm atypical bacteria. A urine sample was provided for Streptococcus and Legionella antigen testing. Patients with suspected LRTI had sputum and blood cultures, chest X-ray, and WBC count measured. Viral infection was confirmed if oropharyngeal PCR was positive for viral pathogens. Bacterial infection was confirmed in positive throat or sputum cultures. Elevated immunoglobulin M antibodies or twofold increase in IgG antibodies between acute and convalescent phase indicated atypical bacteria. Positive Streptococcus or Legionella urine antigen assays also confirmed bacterial infection. The immunoassay correctly categorized subjects as 92% (22/24) negative, 80% (16/20) with bacterial infection, and 70% (7/10) with viral infection. Conclusions The interplay between an MxA value and a semi-quantitative CRP value can aid in the differentiation of infectious etiology. In isolation, neither MxA nor CRP alone is sensitive or specific. However, the pattern of

  1. Pulse detecting device

    DOEpatents

    Riggan, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

  2. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    DOEpatents

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  3. Photovoltaic device and method

    DOEpatents

    Cleereman, Robert J; Lesniak, Michael J; Keenihan, James R; Langmaid, Joe A; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K; Boven, Michelle L

    2015-01-27

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  4. Photovoltaic device and method

    SciTech Connect

    Cleereman, Robert; Lesniak, Michael J.; Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joe A.; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K.; Boven, Michelle L.

    2015-11-24

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  5. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  6. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  7. Biomechanics of interspinous devices.

    PubMed

    Parchi, Paolo D; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Vertuccio, Antonella; Piolanti, Nicola; Andreani, Lorenzo; Cervi, Valentina; Giannetti, Christian; Calvosa, Giuseppe; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    A number of interspinous devices (ISD) have been introduced in the lumbar spine implant market. Unfortunately, the use of these devices often is not associated with real comprehension of their biomechanical role. The aim of this paper is to review the biomechanical studies about interspinous devices available in the literature to allow the reader a better comprehension of the effects of these devices on the treated segment and on the adjacent segments of the spine. For this reason, our analysis will be limited to the interspinous devices that have biomechanical studies published in the literature. PMID:25114923

  8. Biomechanics of Interspinous Devices

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo D.; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Vertuccio, Antonella; Piolanti, Nicola; Andreani, Lorenzo; Cervi, Valentina; Giannetti, Christian; Calvosa, Giuseppe; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    A number of interspinous devices (ISD) have been introduced in the lumbar spine implant market. Unfortunately, the use of these devices often is not associated with real comprehension of their biomechanical role. The aim of this paper is to review the biomechanical studies about interspinous devices available in the literature to allow the reader a better comprehension of the effects of these devices on the treated segment and on the adjacent segments of the spine. For this reason, our analysis will be limited to the interspinous devices that have biomechanical studies published in the literature. PMID:25114923

  9. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1997-05-27

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method are disclosed. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors. 9 figs.

  10. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1997-01-01

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors.

  11. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  12. Portable data collection device

    DOEpatents

    French, Patrick D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a portable data collection device that has a variety of sensors that are interchangeable with a variety of input ports in the device. The various sensors include a data identification feature that provides information to the device regarding the type of physical data produced by each sensor and therefore the type of sensor itself. The data identification feature enables the device to locate the input port where the sensor is connected and self adjust when a sensor is removed or replaced. The device is able to collect physical data, whether or not a function of a time.

  13. Portable data collection device

    DOEpatents

    French, P.D.

    1996-06-11

    The present invention provides a portable data collection device that has a variety of sensors that are interchangeable with a variety of input ports in the device. The various sensors include a data identification feature that provides information to the device regarding the type of physical data produced by each sensor and therefore the type of sensor itself. The data identification feature enables the device to locate the input port where the sensor is connected and self adjust when a sensor is removed or replaced. The device is able to collect physical data, whether or not a function of a time. 7 figs.

  14. Solid state devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Solid State Device research program is directed toward developing innovative devices for space remote and in-situ sensing, and for data processing. Innovative devices can result from the standard structures in innovative materials such as low and high temperature superconductors, strained layer superlattices, or diamond films. Innovative devices can also result from innovative structures achieved using electron tunneling or nanolithography in standard materials. A final step is to use both innovative structures and innovative materials. A new area of emphasis is the miniaturization of sensors and instruments molded by using the techniques of electronic device fabrication to micromachine silicon into micromechanical and electromechanical sensors and actuators.

  15. Heat exchange device

    SciTech Connect

    Callison, G.

    1984-01-17

    A heat exchange device is adapted to recover heat from the fire box of a wood burning stove or the like for heating ambient air in a room or other enclosed space. The heat exchange device is adapted to mount in a recess in a stove top in place of a lid which is normally supplied with the stove. The device according to the invention includes heat exchange means which extend into the fire box of the stove below the top surface thereof. The heat from the heat exchange device is transmitted into a main cavity of the device where the heat is transferred to air forced through the main cavity by a blower mounted to an outside surface of the device. Air exit means are provided on a surface opposite to the surface on which the blower is mounted to provide a passage for heated air into the room or other enclosed space to be heated. The device may also include a top mounted isolated handle for ease in handling the device such as for moving from one area to another. In a second embodiment of the device, a high temperature heat exchange glass plate is mounted on the surface of the device which is in contact with the fire box. Heat is transmitted by heat exchange plate to the main cavity of the device where the air is heated and blown into the room as above.

  16. Electrochromic display device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, M. M.

    1984-07-01

    This invention relates to electrochromic devices. In one aspect it relates to electrically controllable display devices. In another aspect it relates to electrically tunable optical or light filters. In yet another aspect it relates to a chemical sensor device which employs a color changing film. There are many uses for electrically controllable display devices. A number of such devices have been in commercial use for some time. These display devices include liquid crystal displays, light emitting diode displays, plasma displays, and the like. Light emitting diode displays and plasma display panels both suffer from the fact that they are active. Light emissive devices which require substantial power for their operation, In addition, it is difficult to fabricate light emitting diode displays in a manner which renders them easily distinguishable under bright ambient illumination. Liquid crystal displays suffer from the disadvantage that they are operative only over a limited temperature range and have substantially no memory within the liquid crystal material.

  17. Functional PLC devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports recent advances in photonic functional devices. These devices are being developed for advanced optical networks and are fabricated by using planar lightwave circuit technology. After briefly summarizing the fabrication, properties, and progress of silica based planar lightwave circuits, this work describes lattice-form dynamic devices designed to compensate for unwanted fiber characteristics with respect to high-speed wavelength division multiplexing transmissions. These dynamic devices include adaptive chromatic dispersion, polarization-mode dispersion, and gain non-uniformity compensators. The paper then describes optical signal processing devices for communications use, namely an optical label recognition device, an optical encoder/decoder for time-spreading/wavelength-hopping code division multiple access, and a spectrum synthesis device.

  18. [NH2(C2H4)2O]MX5: a new family of morpholinium nonlinear optical materials among halogenoantimonate(III) and halogenobismuthate(III) compounds. Structural characterization, dielectric and piezoelectric properties.

    PubMed

    Owczarek, Magdalena; Szklarz, Przemysław; Jakubas, Ryszard; Miniewicz, Andrzej

    2012-06-28

    This paper presents the structural features of ionic complexes formed by morpholine and metal ions which belong to group VA, namely Sb(III) and Bi(III). A series of target inorganic-organic hybrid compounds of the general formula [NH(2)(C(2)H(4))(2)O](2)MX(5) (where M = Sb, Bi; X = Cl, Br) has been synthesized by incorporating the organic component (morpholine) into the highly polarizable one-dimensional halogenoantimonate(III)/halogenobismuthate(III) chain network. Among the studied compounds, four were found to crystallize in the room temperature phase in the piezoelectric, orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), Z = 4, the feature being confirmed by the powder second harmonic generation of light and piezoelectric measurements. Dielectric dispersion studies between 200 Hz and 2 MHz disclosed a relaxation process below room temperature well described by the Cole-Cole equation. Based on crystal structures available in Cambridge Structural Database (version 5.32, November 2010) we attempt to show a relationship between the acentric symmetry of compounds and the type of anionic network within the R(2)MX(5)-subgroup (where R denotes organic cation) of halogenoantimonates(III) and halogenobismuthates(III).

  19. Combating medical device fouling.

    PubMed

    Harding, Jacqueline L; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2014-03-01

    When interfaced with the biological environment, biomedical devices are prone to surface biofouling due to adhesion of microbial or thrombotic agents as a result of the foreign body response. Surface biofouling of medical devices occurs as a result of nonspecific adhesion of noxious substrates to the surface. Approaches for biofouling-resistant surfaces can be categorized as either the manipulation of surface chemical functionalities or through the incorporation of regulatory biomolecules. This review summarizes current strategies for creating biofouling-resistant surfaces based on surface hydrophilicity and charge, biomolecule functionalization, and drug elution. Reducing the foreign body response and restoring the function of cells around the device minimizes the risk of device rejection and potentially integrates devices with surrounding tissues and fluids. In addition, we discuss the use of peptides and NO as biomolecules that not only inhibit surface fouling, but also promote the integration of medical devices with the biological environment.

  20. Barrier breaching device

    DOEpatents

    Honodel, C.A.

    1983-06-01

    A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

  1. Barrier breaching device

    DOEpatents

    Honodel, Charles A.

    1985-01-01

    A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

  2. Sensor sentinel computing device

    DOEpatents

    Damico, Joseph P.

    2016-08-02

    Technologies pertaining to authenticating data output by sensors in an industrial environment are described herein. A sensor sentinel computing device receives time-series data from a sensor by way of a wireline connection. The sensor sentinel computing device generates a validation signal that is a function of the time-series signal. The sensor sentinel computing device then transmits the validation signal to a programmable logic controller in the industrial environment.

  3. Ion trap device

    DOEpatents

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  4. Active multistable twisting device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Two similarly shaped, such as rectangular, shells are attached to one another such that they form a resulting thin airfoil-like structure. The resulting device has at least two stable equilibrium shapes. The device can be transformed from one shape to another with a snap-through action. One or more actuators can be used to effect the snap-through; i.e., transform the device from one stable shape to another. Power to the actuators is needed only to transform the device from one shape to another.

  5. Interconnected semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Grimmer, Derrick P.; Paulson, Kenneth R.; Gilbert, James R.

    1990-10-23

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  6. EVA Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The EVA (Extra Vehicular Activity) Exercise Device for evaluation and effectiveness of weightlessness on astronauts during long duration spaceflights, at the NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California

  7. Benchmarking emerging logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonov, Dmitri

    2014-03-01

    As complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (CMOS FET) are being scaled to ever smaller sizes by the semiconductor industry, the demand is growing for emerging logic devices to supplement CMOS in various special functions. Research directions and concepts of such devices are overviewed. They include tunneling, graphene based, spintronic devices etc. The methodology to estimate future performance of emerging (beyond CMOS) devices and simple logic circuits based on them is explained. Results of benchmarking are used to identify more promising concepts and to map pathways for improvement of beyond CMOS computing.

  8. High efficiency photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Guha, Subhendu; Yang, Chi C.; Xu, Xi Xiang

    1999-11-02

    An N-I-P type photovoltaic device includes a multi-layered body of N-doped semiconductor material which has an amorphous, N doped layer in contact with the amorphous body of intrinsic semiconductor material, and a microcrystalline, N doped layer overlying the amorphous, N doped material. A tandem device comprising stacked N-I-P cells may further include a second amorphous, N doped layer interposed between the microcrystalline, N doped layer and a microcrystalline P doped layer. Photovoltaic devices thus configured manifest improved performance, particularly when configured as tandem devices.

  9. Preloaded latching device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor); Nagy, Kornel (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A latching device is disclosed which is lever operated sequentially to actuate a set of collet fingers to provide a radial expansion and to actuate a force mechanism to provide a compressive gripping force for attaching first and second devices to one another. The latching device includes a body member having elongated collet fingers which, in a deactuated condition, is insertable through bores on the first and second devices so that gripping terminal portions on the collet fingers are proximate to the end of the bore of the first device while a spring assembly on the body member is located proximate to the outer surface of a second device. A lever is rotatable through 90 deg to move a latching rod to sequentially actuate and expand collet fingers and to actuate the spring assembly by compressing it. During the first 30 deg of movement of the lever, the collet fingers are actuated by the latching rod to provide a radial expansion and during the last 60 deg of movement of the lever, the spring assembly acts as a force mechanism and is actuated to develop a compressive latching force on the devices. The latching rod and lever are connected by a camming mechanism. The amount of spring force in the spring assembly can be adjusted; the body member can be permanently attached by a telescoping assembly to one of the devices; and the structure can be used as a pulling device for removing annular bearings or the like from blind bores.

  10. Emergency-escape device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    Relatively simple inexpensive device uses reeled steel cable, is controlled by automotive-type shock absorber, and allows safe descent from burning building. Device is cheap to manufacture and assemble and requires neither skill, special knowledge, or athletic ability to operate. It is reliable and fireproof and can be deployed instantly.

  11. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  12. Device for removing blackheads

    DOEpatents

    Berkovich, Tamara

    1995-03-07

    A device for removing blackheads from pores in the skin having a elongated handle with a spoon shaped portion mounted on one end thereof, the spoon having multiple small holes piercing therethrough. Also covered is method for using the device to remove blackheads.

  13. STORM INLET FILTRATION DEVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five field tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Storm and Groundwater Enhancement Systems (SAGES) device for removing contaminants from stormwater. The SAGES device is a three-stage filtering system that could be used as a best management practices (BMP) retr...

  14. Microwave device investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, K. K. D.; Haddad, G. I.; Kwok, S. P.; Masnari, N. A.; Trew, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Materials, devices and novel schemes for generation, amplification and detection of microwave and millimeter wave energy are studied. Considered are: (1) Schottky-barrier microwave devices; (2) intermodulation products in IMPATT diode amplifiers; and (3) harmonic generation using Read diode varactors.

  15. Devices and Educational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nespor, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses Actor Network Theory to examine two cases of device-mediated educational change, one involving a computer-assisted interactive video module that provided a half-hour of instruction for a university course, the other an assistive communication device that proved a supposedly retarded pre-school child to be intelligent. The paper…

  16. Capillary interconnect device

    SciTech Connect

    Renzi, Ronald F

    2013-11-19

    An interconnecting device for connecting a plurality of first fluid-bearing conduits to a corresponding plurality of second fluid-bearing conduits thereby providing fluid communication between the first fluid-bearing conduits and the second fluid-bearing conduits. The device includes a manifold and one or two ferrule plates that are held by compressive axial forces.

  17. Assistive Listening Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warick, Ruth; Clark, Catherine; Dancer, Jesse; Sinclair, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    For most hard of hearing students, and for some who are deaf, hearing aids and related sound amplification devices are of great benefit in their communication and learning. Technology has more recently produced an additional array of electronic devices which benefit many hard of hearing students. This report will deal primarily with the relatively…

  18. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  19. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2007-06-19

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  20. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson; Craig P. , Visco; Steven J. , De Jonghe; Lutgard C.

    2010-11-09

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  1. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-04-08

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  2. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2010-01-10

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  3. Device for cutting protrusions

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2011-07-05

    An apparatus for clipping a protrusion of material is provided. The protrusion may, for example, be a bolt head, a nut, a rivet, a weld bead, or a temporary assembly alignment tab protruding from a substrate surface of assembled components. The apparatus typically includes a cleaver having a cleaving edge and a cutting blade having a cutting edge. Generally, a mounting structure configured to confine the cleaver and the cutting blade and permit a range of relative movement between the cleaving edge and the cutting edge is provided. Also typically included is a power device coupled to the cutting blade. The power device is configured to move the cutting edge toward the cleaving edge. In some embodiments the power device is activated by a momentary switch. A retraction device is also generally provided, where the retraction device is configured to move the cutting edge away from the cleaving edge.

  4. Emission rate measuring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckat, S.

    1980-09-01

    The development and application of an emission rate measuring device for gaseous components is explored. The device contains absorption fluid from a supply container that moistens a cylindrical paper sleeve. A newer model is provided with a direct current motor requiring less electricity than an older model. The hose pump is modified to avoid changing it and the filter sleeve is fastened more securely to the distributor head. Application of the measuring devices is discussed, particularly at the Cologne Cathedral, where damage to the stone is observed.

  5. Power Switching Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The MOS-Controlled Thyristor is a new type of power switching device for faster and more efficient control and management of power electronics. It enables power electronic switching at frequencies of 50 to 100 thousand times a second with much lower power losses than other semiconductor devices. Advantages include electric power savings and smaller space. The device is used in motor and power controllers, AC & DC motor drives and induction heating. Early development was supported by Lewis Research Center (LEW) and other agencies. General Electric''s power semiconductor operation, the initial NASA contractor, was later purchased by Harris Semiconductor.

  6. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  7. Corrosion Detection Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, B.

    2003-12-01

    Nondestructive Examination Systems' (NDE) specialists at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site have unique, remotely controllable, corrosion detection capabilities. The corrosion detection devices most frequently used are automated ultrasonic mapping systems, digital radiography imaging devices, infrared imaging, and eddy current mapping systems. These devices have been successfully used in a variety of applications, some of which involve high levels of background radiation. Not only is corrosion located and mapped but other types of anomalies such as cracks have been detected and characterized. Examples of actual corrosion that has been detected will be discussed along with the NDE systems that were used.

  8. INTERNAL CUTTING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Russell, W.H. Jr.

    1959-06-30

    A device is described for removing material from the interior of a hollow workpiece so as to form a true spherical internal surface in a workpiece, or to cut radial slots of an adjustable constant depth in an already established spherical internal surface. This is accomplished by a spring loaded cutting tool adapted to move axially wherein the entire force urging the tool against the workpiece is derived from the spring. Further features of importance involve the provision of a seal between the workpiece and the cutting device and a suction device for carrying away particles of removed material.

  9. SLUG HANDLING DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, J.R.

    1958-09-16

    A device is described for handling fuel elements of a neutronic reactor. The device consists of two concentric telescoped contalners that may fit about the fuel element. A number of ratchet members, equally spaced about the entrance to the containers, are pivoted on the inner container and spring biased to the outer container so thnt they are forced to hear against and hold the fuel element, the weight of which tends to force the ratchets tighter against the fuel element. The ratchets are released from their hold by raising the inner container relative to the outer memeber. This device reduces the radiation hazard to the personnel handling the fuel elements.

  10. Introduction to Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Kevin F.

    2005-03-01

    This volume offers a solid foundation for understanding the most important devices used in the hottest areas of electronic engineering today, from semiconductor fundamentals to state-of-the-art semiconductor devices in the telecommunications and computing industries. Kevin Brennan describes future approaches to computing hardware and RF power amplifiers, and explains how emerging trends and system demands of computing and telecommunications systems influence the choice, design and operation of semiconductor devices. In addition, he covers MODFETs and MOSFETs, short channel effects, and the challenges faced by continuing miniaturization. His book is both an excellent senior/graduate text and a valuable reference for practicing engineers and researchers.

  11. Optically detonated explosive device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.; Menichelli, V. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A technique and apparatus for optically detonating insensitive high explosives, is disclosed. An explosive device is formed by containing high explosive material in a house having a transparent window. A thin metallic film is provided on the interior surface of the window and maintained in contact with the high explosive. A laser pulse provided by a Q-switched laser is focussed on the window to vaporize the metallic film and thereby create a shock wave which detonates the high explosive. Explosive devices may be concurrently or sequentially detonated by employing a fiber optic bundle to transmit the laser pulse to each of the several individual explosive devices.

  12. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  13. Corneal seal device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A corneal seal device is provided which, when placed in an incision in the eye, permits the insertion of a surgical tool or instrument through the device into the eye. The device includes a seal chamber which opens into a tube which is adapted to be sutured to the eye and serves as an entry passage for a tool. A sealable aperture in the chamber permits passage of the tool through the chamber into the tube and hence into the eye. The chamber includes inlet ports adapted to be connected to a regulated source of irrigation fluid which provides a safe intraocular pressure.

  14. Wireless quantified reflex device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoyne, Robert Charles

    The deep tendon reflex is a fundamental aspect of a neurological examination. The two major parameters of the tendon reflex are response and latency, which are presently evaluated qualitatively during a neurological examination. The reflex loop is capable of providing insight for the status and therapy response of both upper and lower motor neuron syndromes. Attempts have been made to ascertain reflex response and latency, however these systems are relatively complex, resource intensive, with issues of consistent and reliable accuracy. The solution presented is a wireless quantified reflex device using tandem three dimensional wireless accelerometers to obtain response based on acceleration waveform amplitude and latency derived from temporal acceleration waveform disparity. Three specific aims have been established for the proposed wireless quantified reflex device: 1. Demonstrate the wireless quantified reflex device is reliably capable of ascertaining quantified reflex response and latency using a quantified input. 2. Evaluate the precision of the device using an artificial reflex system. 3.Conduct a longitudinal study respective of subjects with healthy patellar tendon reflexes, using the wireless quantified reflex evaluation device to obtain quantified reflex response and latency. Aim 1 has led to the steady evolution of the wireless quantified reflex device from a singular two dimensional wireless accelerometer capable of measuring reflex response to a tandem three dimensional wireless accelerometer capable of reliably measuring reflex response and latency. The hypothesis for aim 1 is that a reflex quantification device can be established for reliably measuring reflex response and latency for the patellar tendon reflex, comprised of an integrated system of wireless three dimensional MEMS accelerometers. Aim 2 further emphasized the reliability of the wireless quantified reflex device by evaluating an artificial reflex system. The hypothesis for aim 2 is that

  15. Solution controls for dissolved silica at 25, 50 and 90 °C for quartz, Callovo-Oxfordian claystone, illite and MX80 bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki-Muresan, Tomo; Vandenborre, Johan; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Grambow, Bernd

    -Oxfordian claystone, (2.4 ± 0.1) × 10 -13-(9.4 ± 0.5) × 10 -13 mol Si/m 2/s for illite du Puy and (1.2 ± 0.6) × 10 -12-(9.1 ± 0.5) × 10 -12 mol Si/m 2/s for bentonite. Precipitation rates were in the range of (8.4 ± 0.4) × 10 -12-(2.0 ± 0.1) × 10 -11 mol Si/m 2/s for quartz, (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10 -13-(2.5 ± 0.1) × 10 -12 for Callovo-Oxfordian claystone, (2.4 ± 0.1) × 10 -12-(5.2 ± 0.3) × 10 -12 mol Si/m 2/s for illite and (1.9 ± 0.1) × 10 -13-(6.9 ± 0.3) × 10 -13 mol Si/m 2/s for MX80 bentonite. The plot of dissolution rates versus precipitation rates gave a slope near one indicating a dynamic process of dissolution/precipitation. Through the experiment with the addition of a spike of 32Si-radiotracer in solution, we have showed that the activity of 32Si decreases in contact with clay containing at least 6% of Fe and Al, as for example illite, which seems to be a necessary condition. Finally, in the condition of nuclear glass waste disposal, the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone would be the phase controlling the solubility of dissolved Si from the nuclear waste and clay with a solubility value of 4.8 × 10 -4 mol/L at 90 °C in pore water of Bure site.

  16. Cloning and sequence analyses of cDNAs for interferon- and virus-induced human Mx proteins reveal that they contain putative guanine nucleotide-binding sites: functional study of the corresponding gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Horisberger, M A; McMaster, G K; Zeller, H; Wathelet, M G; Dellis, J; Content, J

    1990-01-01

    The human protein p78 is induced and accumulated in cells treated with type I interferon or with some viruses. It is the human homolog of the mouse Mx protein involved in resistance to influenza virus. A full-length cDNA clone encoding the human p78 protein was cloned and sequenced. It contained an open reading frame of 662 amino acids, corresponding to a polypeptide with a predicted molecular weight of 75,500, in good agreement with the Mr of 78,000 determined on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels for the purified natural p78 protein. The cloned gene was expressed in vitro and corresponded in size, pI, antigenic determinant(s), and NH2 terminus sequence to the natural p78 protein. A second cDNA was cloned which encoded a 633-amino-acid protein sharing 63% homology with human p78. This p78-related protein was translated in reticulocyte lysates where it shared an antigenic determinant(s) with p78. A putative 5' regulatory region of 83 base pairs contained within the gene promoter region upstream of the presumed p78 mRNA cap site conferred human alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) inducibility to the cat reporter gene. The p78 protein accumulated to high levels in cells treated with IFN-alpha. In contrast, the p78-related protein was not expressed at detectable levels. The rate of decay of p78 levels in diploid cells after a 24-h treatment with IFN-alpha was much slower than the rate of decay of the antiviral state against influenza A virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, suggesting that the p78 protein is probably not involved in an antiviral mechanism. Furthermore, we showed that these proteins, as well as the homologous mouse Mx protein, possess three consensus elements in proper spacing, characteristic of GTP-binding proteins. Images PMID:2154602

  17. High-speed semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, S. M.

    An introduction to the physical principles and operational characteristics of high-speed semiconductor devices is presented. Consideration is given to materials and technologies for high-speed devices, device building blocks, the submicron MOSFET, homogeneous field-effect transistors, and heterostructure field-effect transistors. Also considered are quantum-effect devices, microwave diodes, and high-speed photonic devices.

  18. Dielectrophoretically tunable optofluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su; Ren, Hongwen; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2013-12-01

    Tunable optofluidic devices exhibit some unique characteristics that are not achievable in conventional solid-state photonic devices. They provide exciting opportunities for emerging applications in imaging, information processing, sensing, optical communication, lab-on-a-chip and biomedical engineering. A dielectrophoresis effect is an important physical mechanism to realize tunable optofluidic devices. Via balancing the voltage-induced dielectric force and interfacial tension, the liquid interface can be dynamically manipulated and the optical output reconfigured or adaptively tuned in real time. Dielectrophoretically tunable optofluidic devices offer several attractive features, such as rapid prototyping, miniaturization, easy integration and low power consumption. In this review paper, we first explain the underlying operation principles and then review some recent progress in this field, covering the topics of adaptive lens, beam steering, iris, grating, optical switch/attenuator and single pixel display. Finally, the future perspectives are discussed.

  19. Ferroelectric Light Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Elliott, Jr., James R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A light control device is formed by ferroelectric material and N electrodes positioned adjacent thereto to define an N-sided regular polygonal region or circular region there between where N is a multiple of four.

  20. Devices for Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart an electric shock (as with a defibrillator ). For people with recurrent arrhythmias, medical devices such as a pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) can help by continuously monitoring the heart's ...

  1. Optical devices: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Technological developments in the field of optics devices which have potential utility outside the aerospace community are described. Optical instrumentation, light generation and transmission, and laser techniques are among the topics covered. Patent information is given.

  2. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  3. Authenticated sensor interface device

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Poland, Richard W.

    2016-10-18

    A system and method for the secure storage and transmission of data is provided. A data aggregate device can be configured to receive secure data from a data source, such as a sensor, and encrypt the secure data using a suitable encryption technique, such as a shared private key technique, a public key encryption technique, a Diffie-Hellman key exchange technique, or other suitable encryption technique. The encrypted secure data can be provided from the data aggregate device to different remote devices over a plurality of segregated or isolated data paths. Each of the isolated data paths can include an optoisolator that is configured to provide one-way transmission of the encrypted secure data from the data aggregate device over the isolated data path. External data can be received through a secure data filter which, by validating the external data, allows for key exchange and other various adjustments from an external source.

  4. Slit injection device

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.; Schlitt, Leland G.; Bradley, Laird P.

    1976-06-15

    A laser cavity electron beam injection device provided with a single elongated slit window for passing a suitably shaped electron beam and means for varying the current density of the injected electron beam.

  5. Halo traction device.

    PubMed

    Manthey, D E

    1994-08-01

    A thorough understanding of the underlying diseases and of the halo pin traction device will allow for appropriate treatment of complications. Consultation or referral to the neurosurgeon is advised to prevent serious sequelae. The following points should be remembered: 1. Pins should only be tightened during the first 24-hour period after application. 2. Pin infection is treated by local wound care in most cases. 3. CT scan cannot completely exclude the presence of an abscess secondary to artifact, but MRI may be compatible with the newer devices. 4. Pin penetration of the inner table of the skull requires admission. 5. Any suspected loss of alignment or reduction of the cervical spine requires C-spine immobilization. 5. Nasotracheal or fiberoptic intubation or emergent cricothyroidotomy should be used if orotracheal intubation proves difficult due to the device. 7. The anterior portion of the vest is removable for cardiopulmonary resuscitation without compromising the stability of the device. PMID:8062799

  6. Water-walking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, David L.; Prakash, Manu; Chan, Brian; Bush, John W. M.

    2007-11-01

    We report recent efforts in the design and construction of water-walking machines inspired by insects and spiders. The fundamental physical constraints on the size, proportion and dynamics of natural water-walkers are enumerated and used as design criteria for analogous mechanical devices. We report devices capable of rowing along the surface, leaping off the surface and climbing menisci by deforming the free surface. The most critical design constraint is that the devices be lightweight and non-wetting. Microscale manufacturing techniques and new man-made materials such as hydrophobic coatings and thermally actuated wires are implemented. Using high-speed cinematography and flow visualization, we compare the functionality and dynamics of our devices with those of their natural counterparts.

  7. Water-walking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, David L.; Prakash, Manu; Chan, Brian; Bush, John W. M.

    We report recent efforts in the design and construction of water-walking machines inspired by insects and spiders. The fundamental physical constraints on the size, proportion and dynamics of natural water-walkers are enumerated and used as design criteria for analogous mechanical devices. We report devices capable of rowing along the surface, leaping off the surface and climbing menisci by deforming the free surface. The most critical design constraint is that the devices be lightweight and non-wetting. Microscale manufacturing techniques and new man-made materials such as hydrophobic coatings and thermally actuated wires are implemented. Using highspeed cinematography and flow visualization, we compare the functionality and dynamics of our devices with those of their natural counterparts.

  8. Advanced underwater lift device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.; Hopkins, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible underwater lift devices ('lift bags') are used in underwater operations to provide buoyancy to submerged objects. Commercially available designs are heavy, bulky, and awkward to handle, and thus are limited in size and useful lifting capacity. An underwater lift device having less than 20 percent of the bulk and less than 10 percent of the weight of commercially available models was developed. The design features a dual membrane envelope, a nearly homogeneous envelope membrane stress distribution, and a minimum surface-to-volume ratio. A proof-of-concept model of 50 kg capacity was built and tested. Originally designed to provide buoyancy to mock-ups submerged in NASA's weightlessness simulators, the device may have application to water-landed spacecraft which must deploy flotation upon impact, and where launch weight and volume penalties are significant. The device may also be useful for the automated recovery of ocean floor probes or in marine salvage applications.

  9. High temperature measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  10. Thermoelectric materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); Talcott, Noel A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    New thermoelectric materials comprise highly [111]-oriented twinned group IV alloys on the basal plane of trigonal substrates, which exhibit a high thermoelectric figure of merit and good material performance, and devices made with these materials.

  11. Microreactor Array Device

    PubMed Central

    Wiktor, Peter; Brunner, Al; Kahn, Peter; Qiu, Ji; Magee, Mitch; Bian, Xiaofang; Karthikeyan, Kailash; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    We report a device to fill an array of small chemical reaction chambers (microreactors) with reagent and then seal them using pressurized viscous liquid acting through a flexible membrane. The device enables multiple, independent chemical reactions involving free floating intermediate molecules without interference from neighboring reactions or external environments. The device is validated by protein expressed in situ directly from DNA in a microarray of ~10,000 spots with no diffusion during three hours incubation. Using the device to probe for an autoantibody cancer biomarker in blood serum sample gave five times higher signal to background ratio compared to standard protein microarray expressed on a flat microscope slide. Physical design principles to effectively fill the array of microreactors with reagent and experimental results of alternate methods for sealing the microreactors are presented. PMID:25736721

  12. Microreactor Array Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktor, Peter; Brunner, Al; Kahn, Peter; Qiu, Ji; Magee, Mitch; Bian, Xiaofang; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Labaer, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    We report a device to fill an array of small chemical reaction chambers (microreactors) with reagent and then seal them using pressurized viscous liquid acting through a flexible membrane. The device enables multiple, independent chemical reactions involving free floating intermediate molecules without interference from neighboring reactions or external environments. The device is validated by protein expressed in situ directly from DNA in a microarray of ~10,000 spots with no diffusion during three hours incubation. Using the device to probe for an autoantibody cancer biomarker in blood serum sample gave five times higher signal to background ratio compared to standard protein microarray expressed on a flat microscope slide. Physical design principles to effectively fill the array of microreactors with reagent and experimental results of alternate methods for sealing the microreactors are presented.

  13. External incontinence devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. They protect the skin from constant leakage of stool or urine. Certain medical conditions can ... skin and apply a new pouch if any leakage has occurred. The device should be applied to ...

  14. Development of electrochromic devices.

    PubMed

    Pawlicka, A

    2009-01-01

    Electrochromic devices (ECD) are systems of considerable commercial interest due to their controllable transmission, absorption and/or reflectance. For instance, these devices are mainly applied to glare attenuation in automobile rearview mirrors and also in some smart windows that can regulate the solar gains of buildings. Other possible applications of ECDs include solar cells, small- and large-area flat panel displays, and frozen food monitoring and document authentication also are of great interest. Over the past 20 years almost 1000 patents and 1500 papers in journals and proceedings have been published with the key words "electrochromic windows". Most of these documents report on materials for electrochromic devices and only some of them about complete electrochromic devices. This paper describes the first patents and some of the recent ones on ECDs, whose development is possible due to the advances in nanotechnology. PMID:19958283

  15. Adhesion testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  16. Nanowire Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borshchevsky, Alexander; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Herman, Jennifer; Ryan, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    Nanowire thermoelectric devices, now under development, are intended to take miniaturization a step beyond the prior state of the art to exploit the potential advantages afforded by shrinking some device features to approximately molecular dimensions (of the order of 10 nm). The development of nanowire-based thermoelectric devices could lead to novel power-generating, cooling, and sensing devices that operate at relatively low currents and high voltages. Recent work on the theory of thermoelectric devices has led to the expectation that the performance of such a device could be enhanced if the diameter of the wires could be reduced to a point where quantum confinement effects increase charge-carrier mobility (thereby increasing the Seebeck coefficient) and reduce thermal conductivity. In addition, even in the absence of these effects, the large aspect ratios (length of the order of tens of microns diameter of the order of tens of nanometers) of nanowires would be conducive to the maintenance of large temperature differences at small heat fluxes. The predicted net effect of reducing diameters to the order of tens of nanometers would be to increase its efficiency by a factor of .3. Nanowires made of thermoelectric materials and devices that comprise arrays of such nanowires can be fabricated by electrochemical growth of the thermoelectric materials in templates that contain suitably dimensioned pores (10 to 100 nm in diameter and 1 to 100 microns long). The nanowires can then be contacted in bundles to form devices that look similar to conventional thermoelectric devices, except that a production version may contain nearly a billion elements (wires) per square centimeter, instead of fewer than a hundred as in a conventional bulk thermoelectric device or fewer than 100,000 as in a microdevice. It is not yet possible to form contacts with individual nanowires. Therefore, in fabricating a nanowire thermoelectric device, one forms contacts on nanowires in bundles of the

  17. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  18. Atherectomy devices: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Akkus, Nuri I; Abdulbaki, Abdulrahman; Jimenez, Enrique; Tandon, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Atherectomy is a procedure which is performed to remove atherosclerotic plaque from diseased arteries. Atherosclerotic plaques are localized in either coronary or peripheral arterial vasculature and may have different characteristics depending on the texture of the plaque. Atherectomy has been used effectively in treatment of both coronary and peripheral arterial disease. Atherectomy devices are designed differently to either cut, shave, sand, or vaporize these plaques and have different indications. In this article, current atherectomy devices are reviewed. PMID:25565904

  19. Inverted organic photosensitive device

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Tong, Xiaoran; Lee, Jun Yeob; Cho, Yong Joo

    2015-09-08

    There is disclosed a method for preparing the surface of a metal substrate. The present disclosure also relates to an organic photovoltaic device including a metal substrate made by such method. Also disclosed herein is an inverted photosensitive device including a stainless steel foil reflective electrode, an organic donor-acceptor heterojunction over the reflective electrode, and a transparent electrode over the donor-acceptor heterojunction.

  20. Exhaust gas purification device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, H.; Hibi, T.; Sayo, S.; Sugiura, Y.; Ueda, K.

    1980-02-19

    The exhaust gas purification device includes an exhaust manifold , a purification cylinder connected with the exhaust manifold through a first honey-comb shaped catalyst, and a second honeycomb shaped catalyst positioned at the rear portion of the purification cylinder. Each catalyst is supported by steel wool rings including coarse and dense portions of steel wool. The purification device further includes a secondary air supplying arrangement.

  1. Biomaterials and Biomedical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanker, Jacob S.; Giammara, Beverly L.

    1988-11-01

    This review discusses the factors important in the incorporation or integration of biomaterials and devices by tissue. Methods for surface modification and surface-sensitive techniques for analysis are cited. In vitro methods to evaluate the biocompatibility or efficacy of certain biomaterials and devices are presented. Present and future directions in neural prostheses, cardiovascular materials, blood or bone substitutes, controlled drug delivery, orthopedic prostheses, dental materials, artificial organs, plasma- and cytapheresis, and dialysis are discussed.

  2. REACTOR CONTROL DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, H.B.; Weiss, A.A.

    1959-08-18

    A shadow control device for controlling a nuclear reactor is described. The device comprises a series of hollow neutron-absorbing elements arranged in groups, each element having a cavity for substantially housing an adjoining element and a longitudinal member for commonly supporting the groups of elements. Longitudinal actuation of the longitudinal member distributes the elements along its entire length in which position maximum worth is achieved.

  3. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  4. Electronic security device

    DOEpatents

    Eschbach, Eugene A.; LeBlanc, Edward J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to a security device having a control box (12) containing an electronic system (50) and a communications loop (14) over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system (50) and a detection module (72) capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop.

  5. Electronic security device

    DOEpatents

    Eschbach, E.A.; LeBlanc, E.J.; Griffin, J.W.

    1992-03-17

    The present invention relates to a security device having a control box containing an electronic system and a communications loop over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system and a detection module capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop. 11 figs.

  6. Contamination control device

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Robert M.; Cronin, John C.

    1977-01-01

    A contamination control device for use in a gas-insulated transmission bus consisting of a cylindrical center conductor coaxially mounted within a grounded cylindrical enclosure. The contamination control device is electrically connected to the interior surface of the grounded outer shell and positioned along an axial line at the lowest vertical position thereon. The contamination control device comprises an elongated metallic member having a generally curved cross-section in a first plane perpendicular to the axis of the bus and having an arcuate cross-section in a second plane lying along the axis of the bus. Each opposed end of the metallic member and its opposing sides are tapered to form a pair of generally converging and downward sloping surfaces to trap randomly moving conductive particles in the relatively field-free region between the metallic member and the interior surface of the grounded outer shell. The device may have projecting legs to enable the device to be spot welded to the interior of the grounded housing. The control device provides a high capture probability and prevents subsequent release of the charged particles after the capture thereof.

  7. Diamond Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isberg, J.

    2010-11-01

    For high-power and high-voltage applications, silicon is by far the dominant semiconductor material. However, silicon has many limitations, e.g. a relatively low thermal conductivity, electric breakdown occurs at relatively low fields and the bandgap is 1.1 eV which effectively limits operation to temperatures below 175° C. Wide-bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond offer the potential to overcome both the temperature and power handling limitations of silicon. Diamond is the most extreme in this class of materials. By the fundamental material properties alone, diamond offers the largest benefits as a semiconductor material for power electronic applications. On the other hand, diamond has a problem with a large carrier activation energy of available dopants which necessitates specialised device concepts to allow room temperature (RT) operation. In addition, the role of common defects on the charge transport properties of diamond is poorly understood. Notwithstanding this, many proof-of-principle two-terminal and three-terminal devices have been made and tested. Two-terminal electronic diamond devices described in the literature include: p-n diodes, p-i-n diodes, various types of radiation detectors, Schottky diodes and photoconductive or electron beam triggered switches. Three terminal devices include e.g. MISFETs and JFETs. However, the development of diamond devices poses great challenges for the future. A particularly interesting way to overcome the doping problem, for which there has been some recent progress, is to make so-called delta doped (or pulse-doped) devices. Such devices utilise very thin (˜1 nm) doped layers in order to achieve high RT activation.

  8. The rectifying device for optical axis of sighting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, RongGuo; Chang, BenKang; Qian, YunSheng; Zhan, QiHai; Qiu, YaFeng

    2005-02-01

    The combination photo electronic sighting device usually composed of different optical devices, including telescope and low light level night vision device or infrared thermal imaging system. Every optical axle of the optical device of the combination sighting device is needed to be parallel. When a target away enough from the sighting device is observed, if the images of the target locate on the center of the field of the vision of the different optical devices, it shows that the axis are parallel. According to this principle, a rectifying device for optical axis of sighting device is designed. It includes off-axle paraboloid reflector, the target of cross line, light sources, precision modifying devices and other devices. The target of cross line is put on the focus of the off-axle paraboloid reflector, thus it forms a parallel light beam through the off-axle paraboloid reflector, the sighting device is immerged in the parallel light beam. The observing effect is like a target of long distance. The target is connected with a precision modifying device, by moving modifying device, until the image of the target coincide with the center of the field of vision of every optical device, whose degree of deviation of the optical axle can be calculated. The paper gives the structure of the rectifying device and the way of testing. The parameters of the device is given too.

  9. White organic electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Chuan-Cheng; Lu, Huei-Tzong; Yokoyama, Meiso

    2006-04-01

    This study investigates energy transfer between N, N'-bis-(1-naphthyl)- N, N'-diphenyl-1,1-biphenyl-4-4'-diamine (NPB) host material and 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-[2-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1 H,5 H-benzo[ ij]quinolizin-8-yl) vinyl]-4 H-pyran (DCM2) fluorescent dye in organic electroluminescent (OEL) devices to produce white-color emission. Bathocuproine (BCP) was applied as a hole-blocking layer (HBL) due to its significantly large HOMO, while tris-(8-hydroxy-quinoline) aluminum (Alq 3) was employed in the electron transport layer (ETL). Two OEL device structures were investigated, ITO/NPB:DCM2 ( x%)/Alq 3/Al, and ITO/NPB:DCM2 ( y%)/BCP/Alq 3/Al. In this study, doping DCM2 into the NPB host material could not yield red emission in the case of ITO/NPB:DCM2 ( x%)/Alq 3/Al structure device, even when the DCM2 doping concentration was increased from x=1% to 10%. However, when BCP was inserted between the NPB:DCM2 layer and the Alq 3 layer, the color turned when the concentration of DCM2 doped into NPB was changed. Consequently, the white OEL device with CIE coordinates (0.34,0.34) was observed for the device containing 1% DCM2 doping into NPB host material.

  10. Electrical apparatus lockout device

    DOEpatents

    Gonzales, Rick

    1999-01-01

    A simple lockout device for electrical equipment equipped with recessed power blades is described. The device comprises a face-plate (12) having a threaded member (14) attached thereto and apertures suitable for accommodating the power blades of a piece of electrical equipment, an elastomeric nose (16) abutting the face-plate having a hole for passage of the threaded member therethrough and power blade apertures in registration with those of the face-plate, a block (20) having a recess (34) in its forward face for receiving at least a portion of the hose, a hole therein for receiving the threaded member and an integral extension (26) extending from its rear face. A thumb screw (22) suitable for turning with the hands and having internal threads suitable for engaging the threaded member attached to the face-plate is inserted into a passage in the integral extension to engage the threaded member in such a fashion that when the device is inserted over the recessed power blades of a piece of electrical equipment and the thumb screw (22) tightened, the elastomeric nose (16) is compressed between the face-plate (12) and the block (20) forcing it to expand laterally thereby securing the device in the recess and precluding the accidental or intentional energization of the piece of equipment by attachment of a power cord to the recessed power blades. Means are provided in the interval extension and the thumb screw for the attachment of a locking device (46) which will satisfy OSHA standards.

  11. Spectral tailoring device

    DOEpatents

    Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.; Carter, L.L.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1987-08-05

    A spectral tailoring device for altering the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in a fast reactor thereby selectively to enhance or inhibit the transmutation rate of a target metrical to form a product isotope. Neutron moderators, neutron filters, neutron absorbers and neutron reflectors may be used as spectral tailoring devices. Depending on the intended use for the device, a member from each of these four classes of materials could be used singularly, or in combination, to provide a preferred neutron energy spectra and flux of the neutrons in the region of the target material. In one embodiment of the invention, an assembly is provided for enhancing the production of isotopes, such as cobalt 60 and gadolinium 153. In another embodiment of the invention, a spectral tailoring device is disposed adjacent a target material which comprises long lived or volatile fission products and the device is used to shift the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in the region of the fission products to preferentially transmute them to produce a less volatile fission product inventory. 6 figs.

  12. Ion manipulation device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Baker, Erin M

    2014-09-16

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area.

  13. Electrochromic optical switching device

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, C.M.; Visco, S.J.

    1992-08-25

    An electrochromic cell is disclosed which comprises an electrochromic layer, a polymerizable organo-sulfur layer which comprises the counter electrode of the structure, and an ionically conductive electronically insulating material which comprises the separator between the electrodes. In a preferred embodiment, both the separator and the organo-sulfur electrode (in both its charged and uncharged states) are transparent either to visible light or to the entire solar spectrum. An electrochromic device is disclosed which comprises such electrodes and separator encased in glass plates on the inner surface of each of which is formed a transparent electrically conductive film in respective electrical contact with the electrodes which facilitates formation of an external electrical connection or contact to the electrodes of the device to permit electrical connection of the device to an external potential source. 3 figs.

  14. Electrochromic optical switching device

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, Carl M.; Visco, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochromic cell is disclosed which comprises an electrochromic layer, a polymerizable organo-sulfur layer which comprises the counter electrode of the structure, and an ionically conductive electronically insulating material which comprises the separator between the electrodes. In a preferred embodiment, both the separator and the organo-sulfur electrode (in both its charged and uncharged states) are transparent either to visible light or to the entire solar spectrum. An electrochromic device is disclosed which comprises such electrodes and separator encased in glass plates on the inner surface of each of which is formed a transparent electrically conductive film in respective electrical contact with the electrodes which facilitates formation of an external electrical connection or contact to the electrodes of the device to permit electrical connection of the device to an external potential source.

  15. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  16. Nonaqueous Electrical Storage Device

    DOEpatents

    McEwen, Alan B.; Evans, David A.; Blakley, Thomas J.; Goldman, Jay L.

    1999-10-26

    An electrochemical capacitor is disclosed that features two, separated, high surface area carbon cloth electrodes sandwiched between two current collectors fabricated of a conductive polymer having a flow temperature greater than 130.degree. C., the perimeter of the electrochemical capacitor being sealed with a high temperature gasket to form a single cell device. The gasket material is a thermoplastic stable at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C., preferably a polyester or a polyurethane, and having a reflow temperature above 130.degree. C. but below the softening temperature of the current collector material. The capacitor packaging has good mechanical integrity over a wide temperature range, contributes little to the device equivalent series resistance (ESR), and is stable at high potentials. In addition, the packaging is designed to be easily manufacturable by assembly line methods. The individual cells can be stacked in parallel or series configuration to reach the desired device voltage and capacitance.

  17. Laser device and method

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J. D.

    1985-06-25

    A simplified, relatively inexpensive laser device, wherein the laser elements are fixed in a body exoskeleton of electrical insulating material having a low coefficient of thermal expansion. The preferred embodiment includes a shotgun type laser filter having parallel bores which receive the laser flashlamp and laser rod in fixed relation in a body chamber. The reflector surrounds the laser filter and retains the filter within the body chamber. In the preferred method of this invention, several controlled lasing pulses are generated with each illumination pulse of the flashlamp, substantially increasing the efficiency of the laser device. The number of pulses is generally controlled by increasing the voltage to the flashlamp. The rapid multiple lasing pulses generate an elongated plasma in a fluid medium, such as the vitreous fluid body of an eye which makes the laser device extemely efficient for treating glaucoma and other medical treatments.

  18. Regenerative combustion device

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B.

    2004-03-16

    A regenerative combustion device having a combustion zone, and chemicals contained within the combustion zone, such as water, having a first equilibrium state, and a second combustible state. Means for transforming the chemicals from the first equilibrium state to the second combustible state, such as electrodes, are disposed within the chemicals. An igniter, such as a spark plug or similar device, is disposed within the combustion zone for igniting combustion of the chemicals in the second combustible state. The combustion products are contained within the combustion zone, and the chemicals are selected such that the combustion products naturally chemically revert into the chemicals in the first equilibrium state following combustion. The combustion device may thus be repeatedly reused, requiring only a brief wait after each ignition to allow the regeneration of combustible gasses within the head space.

  19. Double face sealing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A double face sealing device for mounting between two surfaces to provide an airtight and fluid-tight seal between a closure member bearing one of the surfaces and a structure or housing bearing the other surface which extends around the opening or hatchway to be closed. The double face sealing device includes a plurality of sections or segments mounted to one of the surfaces, each having a main body portion, a pair of outwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, and a pair of inwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the inwardly extending and diverging spring arms. The double face sealing device has application or use in all environments requiring a seal, but is particularly useful to seal openings or hatchways between compartments of spacecraft or aircraft.

  20. Fragment capture device

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Lloyd R.; Cole, David L.

    2010-03-30

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point of the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.

  1. Silicon Carbide Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    The status of emerging silicon carbide (SiC) widebandgap semiconductor electronics technology is briefly surveyed. SiC-based electronic devices and circuits are being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot function. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are briefly illustrated for several applications. However, most of these operational benefits of SiC have yet to be realized in actual systems, primarily owing to the fact that the growth techniques of SiC crystals are relatively immature and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for widespread, reliable commercial use. Key crystal growth and device fabrication issues that limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and/or high-power SiC electronics are identified. The electrical and material quality differences between emerging SiC and mature silicon electronics technology are highlighted.

  2. Biochip scanner device

    DOEpatents

    Perov, Alexander; Belgovskiy, Alexander I.; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2001-01-01

    A biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips or biochips and method of use are provided. The biochip scanner device includes a laser for emitting a laser beam. A modulator, such as an optical chopper modulates the laser beam. A scanning head receives the modulated laser beam and a scanning mechanics coupled to the scanning head moves the scanning head relative to the biochip. An optical fiber delivers the modulated laser beam to the scanning head. The scanning head collects the fluorescence light from the biochip, launches it into the same optical fiber, which delivers the fluorescence into a photodetector, such as a photodiode. The biochip scanner device is used in a row scanning method to scan selected rows of the biochip with the laser beam size matching the size of the immobilization site.

  3. Spin Hall effect devices.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, Tomas; Wunderlich, Jörg; Olejník, Kamil

    2012-05-01

    The spin Hall effect is a relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomenon that can be used to electrically generate or detect spin currents in non-magnetic systems. Here we review the experimental results that, since the first experimental observation of the spin Hall effect less than 10 years ago, have established the basic physical understanding of the phenomenon, and the role that several of the spin Hall devices have had in the demonstration of spintronic functionalities and physical phenomena. We have attempted to organize the experiments in a chronological order, while simultaneously dividing the Review into sections on semiconductor or metal spin Hall devices, and on optical or electrical spin Hall experiments. The spin Hall device studies are placed in a broader context of the field of spin injection, manipulation, and detection in non-magnetic conductors.

  4. Nonimaging radiant energy device

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Ning, Xiaohui

    1996-01-01

    A nonimaging radiant energy device may include a hyperbolically shaped reflective element with a radiant energy inlet and a radiant energy outlet. A convex lens is provided at the radiant energy inlet and a concave lens is provided at the radiant energy outlet. Due to the provision of the lenses and the shape of the walls of the reflective element, the radiant energy incident at the radiant energy inlet within a predetermined angle of acceptance is emitted from the radiant energy outlet exclusively within an acute exit angle. In another embodiment, the radiant energy device may include two interconnected hyperbolically shaped reflective elements with a respective convex lens being provided at each aperture of the device.

  5. Nonimaging radiant energy device

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Ning, Xiaohui

    1993-01-01

    A nonimaging radiant energy device may include a hyperbolically shaped reflective element with a radiant energy inlet and a radiant energy outlet. A convex lens is provided at the radiant energy inlet and a concave lens is provided at the radiant energy outlet. Due to the provision of the lenses and the shape of the walls of the reflective element, the radiant energy incident at the radiant energy inlet within a predetermined angle of acceptance is emitted from the radiant energy outlet exclusively within an acute exit angle. In another embodiment, the radiant energy device may include two interconnected hyperbolically shaped reflective elements with a respective convex lens being provided at each aperture of the device.

  6. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. Raghavan, S.; Duesberg, G. S.; Pratap, R.

    2014-09-08

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ∼10 nA μm{sup −1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  7. [Electoro-surgical device].

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yuji

    2009-07-01

    Electro-surgical device is an essential instrument for bloodless surgery after the 1st introduction by Harvey Cushing in 1926. Basal mechanisms of electric scalpels (monopolar and bipolar), current waveforms (cut, coagulation and blend), high-frequency currents and electrical shocks were commented. After 1990s, several new electro-surgical devices such as argon beam coagulator, bipolar scissors and vessel sealing system (LigaSure) were developed and introduced in chest surgery. Argon beam coagulator is useful in sealing and hemostasis of bleeding from chest walls after extrapleural dissections. Bipolar scissors can seal small vessels less than diameter 2 mm and is useful in mediastinal lymphnode dissections. Vessel sealing system is able to seal and cut vessels up to diameter 7 mm. LigaSure V is the most suitable instrument for thymic vein handling in thoracoscopic thymectomy. Clinical applications of these new surgical devices in chest surgery are discussed. PMID:20715684

  8. Percutaneous connector device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, W. E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A device is reported for facilitating the passage of electrical signals from an external source through the skin of a patient to internal portions of the body such as muscles and nerves. The connector device includes a bio-compatible shell having an enlarged disk shaped portion for being implanted below the skin of the patient. The shell has a first and second electrically conductive post carried therein upon which a plug can be readily connected and disconnected. A modified form of the invention utilizes a unipolar connector that is adapted to be plugged into a shell implanted below the skin of a patient. Both of the connector devices are designed to be separated when a predetermined force is applied. This prevents excessive force from being applied to the implanted bio-compatible shell.

  9. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOEpatents

    Gonsalves, J.M.

    1997-09-30

    A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs.

  10. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOEpatents

    Gonsalves, John M.

    1997-01-01

    A detector testing device which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: 1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, 2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and 3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements.

  11. Sterilisation of implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Matthews, I P; Gibson, C; Samuel, A H

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis and rates of infection associated with the use of a wide variety of implantable devices are described. The multi-factorial nature of post-operative periprosthetic infection is outlined and the role of sterilisation of devices is explained. The resistance of bacterial spores is highlighted as a problem and a full description is given of the processes of sterilisation by heat, steam, ethylene oxide, low temperature steam and formaldehyde, ionising radiation and liquid glutaraldehyde. Sterility assurance and validation are discussed in the context of biological indicators and physical/chemical indicators. Adverse effects upon the material composition of devices and problems of process control are listed. Finally, possible optimisations of the ethylene oxide process and their potential significance to the field of sterilisation of implants is explored. PMID:10172076

  12. REACTOR CONTROL DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Graham, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A wholly mechanical compact control device is designed for automatically rendering the core of a fission reactor subcritical in response to core temperatures in excess of the design operating temperature limit. The control device comprises an expansible bellows interposed between the base of a channel in a reactor core and the inner end of a fuel cylinder therein which is normally resiliently urged inwardly. The bellows contains a working fluid which undergoes a liquid to vapor phase change at a temperature substantially equal to the design temperature limit. Hence, the bellows abruptiy expands at this limiting temperature to force the fuel cylinder outward and render the core subcritical. The control device is particularly applicable to aircraft propulsion reactor service. (AEC)

  13. Optoelectronic devices by GSMBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, L.

    1990-10-01

    The growth of high quality InP and GaInAsP alloy by gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE) is of high interest for the realization of optoelectronic devices in the wavelength region of 1.3-1.55 μm. This epitaxial technique is also well adapted to the growth of quantum well structure with very sharp interfaces. Optical devices of high performances, i.e. semiconductor amplifier and distributed feedback multi-quantum well (DFB-MQW) lasers, are fabricated with a hybrid process with GSMBE for the active structure and liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) for the regrowth of lateral confinement layers. These devices show excellent electrical and optical characteristics.

  14. Therapeutic Devices for Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic devices provide new options for treating drug-resistant epilepsy. These devices act by a variety of mechanisms to modulate neuronal activity. Only vagus nerve stimulation, which continues to develop new technology, is approved for use in the United States. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of anterior thalamus for partial epilepsy recently was approved in Europe and several other countries. Responsive neurostimulation, which delivers stimuli to one or two seizure foci in response to a detected seizure, recently completed a successful multicenter trial. Several other trials of brain stimulation are in planning or underway. Transcutaneous magnetic stimulation (TMS) may provide a noninvasive method to stimulate cortex. Controlled studies of TMS split on efficacy, and may depend on whether a seizure focus is near a possible region for stimulation. Seizure detection devices in the form of “shake” detectors via portable accelerometers can provide notification of an ongoing tonic-clonic seizure, or peace of mind in the absence of notification. Prediction of seizures from various aspects of EEG is in early stages. Prediction appears to be possible in a subpopulation of people with refractory seizures and a clinical trial of an implantable prediction device is underway. Cooling of neocortex or hippocampus reversibly can attenuate epileptiform EEG activity and seizures, but engineering problems remain in its implementation. Optogenetics is a new technique that can control excitability of specific populations of neurons with light. Inhibition of epileptiform activity has been demonstrated in hippocampal slices, but use in humans will require more work. In general, devices provide useful palliation for otherwise uncontrollable seizures, but with a different risk profile than with most drugs. Optimizing the place of devices in therapy for epilepsy will require further development and clinical experience. PMID:22367987

  15. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Nelson E.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam.

  16. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, N.E.

    1988-03-10

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

  17. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Finkel, M.P.

    1964-04-01

    A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

  18. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  19. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  20. Contaminate Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Robert H. (Inventor); Flynn, Kenneth P. (Inventor); Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A contaminate control device for filtering contaminates from a gas such as air is provided. The device includes a housing having a first inlet and a first outlet. An axial flow filter is fluidly coupled between the first inlet and the first outlet, the axial flow filter has a second inlet and a second outlet. A second filter disposed about the axial flow filter and is fluidly coupled between the first inlet and the first outlet, the second filter having a third inlet on an inner diameter and a third outlet disposed on an outer diameter. A flow restrictor is fluidly coupled between the second inlet and the first inlet.

  1. Precision positioning device

    DOEpatents

    McInroy, John E.

    2005-01-18

    A precision positioning device is provided. The precision positioning device comprises a precision measuring/vibration isolation mechanism. A first plate is provided with the precision measuring mean secured to the first plate. A second plate is secured to the first plate. A third plate is secured to the second plate with the first plate being positioned between the second plate and the third plate. A fourth plate is secured to the third plate with the second plate being positioned between the third plate and the fourth plate. An adjusting mechanism for adjusting the position of the first plate, the second plate, the third plate, and the fourth plate relative to each other.

  2. REMOTE CONTROLLED SWITCHING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, J.C.

    1959-02-01

    An electrical switching device which can be remotely controlled and in which one or more switches may be accurately operated at predetermined times or with predetermined intervening time intervals is described. The switching device consists essentially of a deck, a post projecting from the deck at right angles thereto, cam means mounted for rotation around said posts and a switch connected to said deck and actuated by said cam means. Means is provided for rotating the cam means at a constant speed and the switching apparatus is enclosed in a sealed container with external adjusting means and electrical connection elements.

  3. Biomedical materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hanker, J. S. ); Giammara, B. L. )

    1989-01-01

    This conference reports on how biomedical materials and devices are undergoing important changes that require interdisciplinary approaches, innovation expertise, and access to sophisticated preparative and analytical equipment and methodologies. The interaction of materials scientists with biomedical, biotechnological, bioengineering and clinical scientists in the last decade has resulted in major advances in therapy. New therapeutic modalities and bioengineering methods and devices for the continuous removal of toxins or pathologic products present in arthritis, atherosclerosis and malignancy are presented. Novel monitoring and controlled drug delivery systems and discussions of materials such as blood or plasma substitutes, artificial organs, and bone graft substitutes are discussed.

  4. Asphaltene based photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Chianelli, Russell R.; Castillo, Karina; Gupta, Vipin; Qudah, Ali M.; Torres, Brenda; Abujnah, Rajib E.

    2016-03-22

    Photovoltaic devices and methods of making the same, are disclosed herein. The cell comprises a photovoltaic device that comprises a first electrically conductive layer comprising a photo-sensitized electrode; at least one photoelectrochemical layer comprising metal-oxide particles, an electrolyte solution comprising at least one asphaltene fraction, wherein the metal-oxide particles are optionally dispersed in a surfactant; and a second electrically conductive layer comprising a counter-electrode, wherein the second electrically conductive layer comprises one or more conductive elements comprising carbon, graphite, soot, carbon allotropes or any combinations thereof.

  5. Phononic crystal devices

    DOEpatents

    El-Kady, Ihab F.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2012-01-10

    Phononic crystals that have the ability to modify and control the thermal black body phonon distribution and the phonon component of heat transport in a solid. In particular, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity can be modified by altering the phonon density of states in a phononic crystal. The present invention is directed to phononic crystal devices and materials such as radio frequency (RF) tags powered from ambient heat, dielectrics with extremely low thermal conductivity, thermoelectric materials with a higher ratio of electrical-to-thermal conductivity, materials with phononically engineered heat capacity, phononic crystal waveguides that enable accelerated cooling, and a variety of low temperature application devices.

  6. Semiconductor structure and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinkel, Nancy A. (Inventor); Goldstein, Bernard (Inventor); Ettenberg, Michael (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor devices such as lasers which include a substrate with a channel therein with a clad layer overlying the substrate and filling the channel exhibit irregularities such as terraces in the surface of the clad layer which are detrimental to device performance. These irregularities are substantially eliminated by forming the channel in a surface of a buffer layer greater than about 4 micrometers thick on the substrate and forming the clad layer over the buffer layer and the channel. CW lasers incorporating the principles of the invention exhibit the highest output power in a single spatial mode and maximum output power which have been observed to date.

  7. Portable emittance measurement device

    SciTech Connect

    Liakin, D.; Seleznev, D.; Orlov, A.; Kuibeda, R.; Kropachev, G.; Kulevoy, T.; Yakushin, P.

    2010-02-15

    In Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) the portable emittance measurements device is developed. It provides emittance measurements both with ''pepper-pot'' and ''two slits'' methods. Depending on the method of measurements, either slits or pepper-pot mask with scintillator are mounted on the two activators and are installed in two standard Balzer's cross chamber with CF-100 flanges. To match the angle resolution for measured beam, the length of the stainless steel pipe between two crosses changes is adjusted. The description of the device and results of emittance measurements at the ITEP ion source test bench are presented.

  8. Device configuration-management system

    SciTech Connect

    Nowell, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    The Fusion Chamber System, a major component of the Magnetic Fusion Test Facility, contains several hundred devices which report status to the Supervisory Control and Diagnostic System for control and monitoring purposes. To manage the large number of diversity of devices represented, a device configuration management system was required and developed. Key components of this software tool include the MFTF Data Base; a configuration editor; and a tree structure defining the relationships between the subsystem devices. This paper will describe how the configuration system easily accomodates recognizing new devices, restructuring existing devices, and modifying device profile information.

  9. Solid-State Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutliff, Ronald D.; And Others

    This self-study course is designed to familiarize Marine Corps enlisted personnel with the principles of solid-state devices and their functions. The course contains four study units. Each study unit begins with a general objective, which is a statement of what the student should learn from the unit. The study units are divided into numbered work…

  10. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A description is given of a super-regenerative oscillator ranging device provided with radiating and receiving means and being capable of indicating the occurrence of that distance between itself and a reflecting object which so phases the received echo of energy of a preceding emitted oscillation that the intervals between oscillations become uniform.

  11. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Nieset, R.T.

    1961-05-16

    A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

  12. Superlattice optical device

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Fritz, Ian J.; Gourley, Paul L.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    1986-01-01

    A semiconductor optical device which includes a superlattice having direct transitions between conduction band and valence band states with the same wave vector, the superlattice being formed from a plurality of alternating layers of two or more different materials, at least the material with the smallest bandgap being an indirect bandgap material.

  13. Superlattice optical device

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, R.M.; Fritz, I.J.; Gourley, P.L.; Osbourn, G.C.

    A semiconductor optical device which includes a superlattice having direct transitions between conduction band and valence band states with the same wave vector, the superlattice being formed from a plurality of alternating layers of two or more different materials, at least the material with the smallest bandgap being an indirect bandgap material.

  14. Cascaded thermoacoustic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Gregory W.; Backhaus, Scott N.; Gardner, David L.

    2003-12-09

    A thermoacoustic device is formed with a resonator system defining at least one region of high specific acoustic impedance in an acoustic wave within the resonator system. A plurality of thermoacoustic units are cascaded together within the region of high specific acoustic impedance, where at least one of the thermoacoustic units is a regenerator unit.

  15. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    ScienceCinema

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2016-07-12

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  16. LOADING AND UNLOADING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1960-08-16

    A device for loading and unloading fuel rods into and from a reactor tank through an access hole includes parallel links carrying a gripper. These links enable the gripper to go through the access hole and then to be moved laterally from the axis of the access hole to the various locations of the fuel rods in the reactor tank.

  17. Device Oriented Project Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Dalesio, Leo; Kraimer, Martin

    2013-11-20

    This proposal is directed at the issue of developing control systems for very large HEP projects. A de-facto standard in accelerator control is the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which has been applied successfully to many physics projects. EPICS is a channel based system that requires that each channel of each device be configured and controlled. In Phase I, the feasibility of a device oriented extension to the distributed channel database was demonstrated by prototyping a device aware version of an EPICS I/O controller that functions with the current version of the channel access communication protocol. Extensions have been made to the grammar to define the database. Only a multi-stage position controller with limit switches was developed in the demonstration, but the grammar should support a full range of functional record types. In phase II, a full set of record types will be developed to support all existing record types, a set of process control functions for closed loop control, and support for experimental beam line control. A tool to configure these records will be developed. A communication protocol will be developed or extensions will be made to Channel Access to support introspection of components of a device. Performance bench marks will be made on both communication protocol and the database. After these records and performance tests are under way, a second of the grammar will be undertaken.

  18. Condensate removal device

    DOEpatents

    Maddox, James W.; Berger, David D.

    1984-01-01

    A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

  19. Road-Cleaning Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    Roadways are literally soaked with petrochemical byproducts, oils, gasoline, and other volatile substances that eventually run off into sewers and end up in rivers, waterways, and other undesirable places. Can the roads be cleaned of these wastes, with their proper disposal? Can vehicles, robots, or other devices be designed that could be driven…

  20. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2012-01-01

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  1. Active terahertz metamaterial devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hou-Tong; Padilla, Willie J; Zide, Joshua M O; Gossard, Arthur C; Taylor, Antoinette J; Averitt, Richard D

    2006-11-30

    The development of artificially structured electromagnetic materials, termed metamaterials, has led to the realization of phenomena that cannot be obtained with natural materials. This is especially important for the technologically relevant terahertz (1 THz = 10(12) Hz) frequency regime; many materials inherently do not respond to THz radiation, and the tools that are necessary to construct devices operating within this range-sources, lenses, switches, modulators and detectors-largely do not exist. Considerable efforts are underway to fill this 'THz gap' in view of the useful potential applications of THz radiation. Moderate progress has been made in THz generation and detection; THz quantum cascade lasers are a recent example. However, techniques to control and manipulate THz waves are lagging behind. Here we demonstrate an active metamaterial device capable of efficient real-time control and manipulation of THz radiation. The device consists of an array of gold electric resonator elements (the metamaterial) fabricated on a semiconductor substrate. The metamaterial array and substrate together effectively form a Schottky diode, which enables modulation of THz transmission by 50 per cent, an order of magnitude improvement over existing devices. PMID:17136089

  2. Infections and intravascular devices.

    PubMed

    Elliott, T S; Faroqui, M H

    Complications associated with intravascular devices include infections mainly caused by Staphylococcus epidermis and S. aureus. The reported incidence of these infections varies. Several factors influence the propensity for catheter infections. We recommend strategies for the prevention and treatment of catheter-related sepsis. PMID:1422561

  3. Simulating nanoscale semiconductor devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Zhao, P.; Woolard, D. L.; Kelley, C. Tim; Lasater, Matthew S.

    2005-03-01

    The next generation of electronic devices will be developed at the nanoscale and molecular level, where quantum mechanical effects are observed. These effects must be accounted for in the design process for such small devices. One prototypical nanoscale semiconductor device under investigation is a resonant tunneling diode (RTD). Scientists are hopeful the quantum tunneling effects present in an RTD can be exploited to induce and sustain THz frequency current oscillations. To simulate the electron transport within the RTD, the Wigner-Poisson equations are used. These equations describe the time evolution of the electrons distribution within the device. In this paper, this model and a parameter study using this model will be presented. The parameter study involves calculating the steady-state current output from the RTD as a function of an applied voltage drop across the RTD and also calculating the stability of that solution. To implement the parameter study, the computational model was connected to LOCA (Library of Continuation Algorithms), a part of Sandia National Laboratories parallel solver project, Trilinos. Numerical results will be presented.

  4. Color identification testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

    1970-01-01

    Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

  5. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  6. Implantable electrical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fully implantable and self contained device is disclosed composed of a flexible electrode array for surrounding damaged nerves and a signal generator for driving the electrode array with periodic electrical impulses of nanoampere magnitude to induce regeneration of the damaged nerves.

  7. Human performance measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J.; Scow, J.

    1970-01-01

    Complex coordinator, consisting of operator control console, recorder, subject display panel, and limb controls, measures human performance by testing perceptual and motor skills. Device measures psychophysiological functions in drug and environmental studies, and is applicable to early detection of psychophysiological body changes.

  8. Devices for hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... bring the sound from your TV, radio, or music player directly to your inner ear. Many listening devices now work through a wireless link and can connect directly to your hearing aid. There is also television closed-captioning, which shows ...

  9. Electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

    1975-08-12

    This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

  10. ANNULAR IMPACTOR SAMPLING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Tait, G.W.C.

    1959-03-31

    A high-rate air sampler capable of sampling alphaemitting particles as small as 0.5 microns is described. The device is a cylindrical shaped cup that fits in front of a suction tube and which has sticky grease coating along its base. Suction forces contaminated air against the periodically monitored particle absorbing grease.

  11. Medical device regulation for manufacturers.

    PubMed

    McAllister, P; Jeswiet, J

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturers of medical devices are held to a higher standard than manufacturers of many other products due to the potential severity of the consequences of introducing inferior or unsafe products to the market-place. In Canada, the medical device industry is regulated by Health Canada under the Medical Device Regulations of the Food and Drug Act. The Medical Device Regulations define requirements of medical device design, development and manufacture to ensure that products reaching the public are safe and effective. Health Canada also requires that medical device manufacturers maintain distribution records to ensure that devices can be traced to the source and consumers can be contacted successfully in the event that a device is recalled. Medical devices exported from Canada must be compliant with the regulations of the country of import. The Canadian Medical Device Regulations were based on the Medical Device Directives of the European Union thus facilitating approval of Canadian devices for the European market. The United States Food and Drug Administration has separate and distinct requirements for safety and quality of medical devices. While effort has been made to facilitate approval and trade of Canadian medical devices in the United States and the European Union, obtaining approval from multiple regulatory bodies can result in increased device development time and cost. The Global Harmonization Task Force is an organization composed of members from Japanese, Australian, European, Canadian and American medical device regulatory bodies. This organization was formed with the objective of harmonizing medical device regulations in an effort to facilitate international trade and standardize the quality of medical devices available to all countries. This paper discusses the requirements that must be met by manufacturers when designing and manufacturing medical devices.

  12. Medical Devices; Ophthalmic Devices; Classification of Strabismus Detection Device. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-09-22

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the strabismus detection device into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the strabismus detection device's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:27658316

  13. Light modulating device

    SciTech Connect

    Rauh, R.D.; Goldner, R.B.

    1989-12-26

    In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity are disclosed. 1 fig.

  14. Dielectrokinetic chromatography devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chirica, Gabriela S; Fiechtner, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K

    2014-12-16

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for dielectrokinetic chromatography. As disclosed, the devices comprise microchannels having at least one perturber which produces a non-uniformity in a field spanning the width of the microchannel. The interaction of the field non-uniformity with a perturber produces a secondary flow which competes with a primary flow. By decreasing the size of the perturber the secondary flow becomes significant for particles/analytes in the nanometer-size range. Depending on the nature of a particle/analyte present in the fluid and its interaction with the primary flow and the secondary flow, the analyte may be retained or redirected. The composition of the primary flow can be varied to affect the magnitude of primary and/or secondary flows on the particles/analytes and thereby separate and concentrate it from other particles/analytes.

  15. Tire deflation device

    DOEpatents

    Barker, Stacey G [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-01-05

    A tire deflation device includes (1) a component having a plurality of bores, (2) a plurality of spikes removably insertable into the plurality of bores and (3) a keeper within each among the plurality of bores, the keeper being configured to contact a sidewall surface of a spike among the plurality of spikes and to exert force upon the sidewall surface. In an embodiment, the tire deflation device includes (a) a component including a bore in a material, the bore including a receiving region, a sidewall surface and a base surface, (b) a channel extending from the sidewall surface into the material, (c) a keeper having a first section housed within the channel and a second section which extends past the sidewall surface into the receiving region, and (d) a spike removably insertable into the bore.

  16. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest

    1986-01-01

    A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

  17. GAS DISCHARGE DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, S.

    1958-11-11

    An apparatus utilized in introducing tritium gas into envelope of a gas discharge device for the purpose f maintaining the discharge path in ionized condition is described. ln addition to the cathode and anode, the ischarge device contains a zirconium or tantalum ilament arranged for external excitation and a metallic seed containing tritium, and also arranged to have a current passed through it. Initially, the zirconium or tantalum filament is vaporized to deposit its material adjacent the main discharge region. Then the tritium gas is released and, due to its affinity for the first released material, it deposits in the region of the main discharge where it is most effective in maintaining the discharge path in an ionized condition.

  18. Micro-Organ Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steven R.; Leslie, Julia; Chang, Robert C.; Starly, Binil; Sun, Wei; Culbertson, Christopher; Holtorf, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Micro-organ devices (MODs) are being developed to satisfy an emerging need for small, lightweight, reproducible, biological-experimentati on apparatuses that are amenable to automated operation and that imp ose minimal demands for resources (principally, power and fluids). I n simplest terms, a MOD is a microfluidic device containing a variety of microstructures and assemblies of cells, all designed to mimic a complex in vivo microenvironment by replicating one or more in vivo micro-organ structures, the architectures and composition of the extr acellular matrices in the organs of interest, and the in vivo fluid flows. In addition to microscopic flow channels, a MOD contains one or more micro-organ wells containing cells residing in microscopic e xtracellular matrices and/or scaffolds, the shapes and compositions o f which enable replication of the corresponding in vivo cell assembl ies and flows.

  19. Inertial energy storage device

    DOEpatents

    Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Kelly, James J.; Pollard, Roy E.

    1978-01-01

    The inertial energy storage device of the present invention comprises a composite ring formed of circumferentially wound resin-impregnated filament material, a flanged hollow metal hub concentrically disposed in the ring, and a plurality of discrete filament bandsets coupling the hub to the ring. Each bandset is formed of a pair of parallel bands affixed to the hub in a spaced apart relationship with the axis of rotation of the hub being disposed between the bands and with each band being in the configuration of a hoop extending about the ring along a chordal plane thereof. The bandsets are disposed in an angular relationship with one another so as to encircle the ring at spaced-apart circumferential locations while being disposed in an overlapping relationship on the flanges of the hub. The energy storage device of the present invention has the capability of substantial energy storage due to the relationship of the filament bands to the ring and the flanged hub.

  20. Cable shield connecting device

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  1. Well blowout prevention device

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.A.

    1983-03-22

    The invention provides a device for preventing well blowouts in sucker rod pumping systems and particularly for sensing the parting of the polish rod from the stuffing box and preventing fluid flow through the stuffing box to the atmosphere. The device includes a valve body inserted between the stuffing box and the production-tee, a valve which is selectively capable of being opened or closed in the valve body, means for actuating the valve, and a wear block abutting against a polish rod for sensing when the polish rod parts from the stuffing box. When the polish rod parts from the stuffing box, the lever causes the valve to rapidly close to prevent blowout of the fluid in the well bore. When the wear block wears down to a predetermined amount, the lever senses and effectuates a signaling system to indicate that the wear block should be replaced.

  2. Quick stop device

    DOEpatents

    Hipwell, Roger L.; Hazelton, Andrew J.

    1996-01-01

    A quick stop device for abruptly interrupting the cutting of a workpiece by a cutter is disclosed. The quick stop device employs an outer housing connected to an inner workpiece holder by at least one shear pin. The outer housing includes an appropriate shank designed to be received in the spindle of a machine, such as a machine tool. A cutter, such as a drill bit, is mounted in a stationary position and the workpiece, mounted to the workpiece holder, is rotated during engagement with the cutter. A trigger system includes at least one spring loaded punch disposed for movement into engagement with the workpiece holder to abruptly stop rotation of the workpiece holder. This action shears the shear pin and permits continued rotation of the spindle and outer housing without substantially disturbing the chip root formed during cutting.

  3. Regenerative braking device

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1982-01-12

    Disclosed are several embodiments of a regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle. The device includes a plurality of rubber rollers (24, 26) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (14) connectable to the vehicle drivetrain and an output shaft (16) which is drivingly connected to the input shaft by a variable ratio transmission (20). When the transmission ratio is such that the input shaft rotates faster than the output shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy, thereby slowing the vehicle. When the transmission ratio is such that the output shaft rotates faster than the input shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally relaxed to deliver accumulated energy, thereby accelerating or driving the vehicle.

  4. Picosecond optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Ever since the invention of picosecond lasers, scientists and electronic engineers have been dreaming of inventing electronic devices that can record in real time the physical and electronic events that take place on picosecond time scales. With the exception of the expensive streak camera, this dream has been largely unfullfilled. Today, a real-time oscilloscope with picosecond time resolution is still not available. To fill the need for even better time resolution, researchers have turned to optical pulses and thus a hybrid technology has emerged-picosecond optoelectronics. This technology, based on bulk photoconductors, has had a slow start. However, because of the simplicity, scaleability, and jitterfree nature of the devices, the technology has recently experienced a rapid growth. This volume reviews the major developments in the field of picosecond optoelectronics over the past decade.

  5. Microelectromechanical reprogrammable logic device

    PubMed Central

    Hafiz, M. A. A.; Kosuru, L.; Younis, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    In modern computing, the Boolean logic operations are set by interconnect schemes between the transistors. As the miniaturization in the component level to enhance the computational power is rapidly approaching physical limits, alternative computing methods are vigorously pursued. One of the desired aspects in the future computing approaches is the provision for hardware reconfigurability at run time to allow enhanced functionality. Here we demonstrate a reprogrammable logic device based on the electrothermal frequency modulation scheme of a single microelectromechanical resonator, capable of performing all the fundamental 2-bit logic functions as well as n-bit logic operations. Logic functions are performed by actively tuning the linear resonance frequency of the resonator operated at room temperature and under modest vacuum conditions, reprogrammable by the a.c.-driving frequency. The device is fabricated using complementary metal oxide semiconductor compatible mass fabrication process, suitable for on-chip integration, and promises an alternative electromechanical computing scheme. PMID:27021295

  6. Anti-gravity device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palsingh, S. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An educational toy useful in demonstrating fundamental concepts regarding the laws of gravity is described. The device comprises a sphere 10 of radius r resting on top of sphere 12 of radius R. The center of gravity of sphere 10 is displaced from its geometrical center by distance D. The dimensions are so related that D((R+r)/r) is greater than r. With the center of gravity of sphere 10 lying on a vertical line, the device is in equilibrium. When sphere 10 is rolled on the surface of sphere 12 it will return to its equilibrium position upon release. This creates an illusion that sphere 10 is defying the laws of gravity. In reality, due to the above noted relationship of D, R, and r, the center of gravity of sphere 10 rises from its equilibrium position as it rolls a short distance up or down the surface of sphere 12.

  7. Light modulating device

    DOEpatents

    Rauh, R. David; Goldner, Ronald B.

    1989-01-01

    In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity.

  8. Support and maneuvering device

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    A support and maneuvering device includes an elongated flexible inflatable enclosure having a fixed end and a movable end. The movable end is collapsible toward the fixed end to a contracted position when the enclosure is in a noninflated condition. Upon inflation, the movable end is movable away from the fixed end to an extended position. The movable end includes means for mounting an article such as a solar reflector thereon. The device also includes a plurality of position controlling means disposed about the movable end to effect adjusting movement of portions thereof by predetermined amounts and for controlling an angle at which the article disposed at the movable end is oriented. The plurality of position controlling means limits a suitable number degrees of freedom of the movable end for transmitting a steering motion thereto and for controlling the position thereof.

  9. Support and maneuvering device

    DOEpatents

    Wood, R.L.

    1987-03-23

    A support and maneuvering device includes an elongated flexible inflatable enclosure having a fixed end and a movable end. The movable end is collapsible toward the fixed end to a contracted position when the enclosure is in a noninflated condition. Upon inflation, the movable end is movable away from the fixed end to an extended position. The movable end includes means for mounting an article such as a solar reflector thereon. The device also includes a plurality of position controlling means disposed about the movable end to effect adjusting movement of portions thereof by predetermined amounts and for controlling an angle at which the article disposed at the movable end is oriented. The plurality of position controlling means limits a suitable number degrees of freedom of the movable end for transmitting a steering motion thereto and for controlling the position thereof. 9 figs.

  10. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Peumans, Peter; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2013-01-22

    A photoactive device is provided. The device includes a first electrode, a second electrode, and a photoactive region disposed between and electrically connected to the first and second electrodes. The photoactive region further includes an organic donor layer and an organic acceptor layer that form a donor-acceptor heterojunction. The mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region are different by a factor of at least 100, and more preferably a factor of at least 1000. At least one of the mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region is greater than 0.001 cm.sup.2/V-sec, and more preferably greater than 1 cm.sup.2/V-sec. The heterojunction may be of various types, including a planar heterojunction, a bulk heterojunction, a mixed heterojunction, and a hybrid planar-mixed heterojunction.

  11. Stacked organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Xue, Jiangeng; Uchida, Soichi; Rand, Barry P.

    2007-03-27

    A device is provided having a first electrode, a second electrode, a first photoactive region having a characteristic absorption wavelength .lamda..sub.1 and a second photoactive region having a characteristic absorption wavelength .lamda..sub.2. The photoactive regions are disposed between the first and second electrodes, and further positioned on the same side of a reflective layer, such that the first photoactive region is closer to the reflective layer than the second photoactive region. The materials comprising the photoactive regions may be selected such that .lamda..sub.1 is at least about 10% different from .lamda..sub.2. The device may further comprise an exciton blocking layer disposed adjacent to and in direct contact with the organic acceptor material of each photoactive region, wherein the LUMO of each exciton blocking layer other than that closest to the cathode is not more than about 0.3 eV greater than the LUMO of the acceptor material.

  12. Integrated elastic microscope device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. M.; Wright, D.; Watkins, R.; Cen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    The growing power of imaging and computing power of smartphones is creating the possibility of converting your smartphone into a high power pocket microscopy system. High quality miniature microscopy lenses attached to smartphone are typically made with glass or plastics that can only be produce at low cost with high volume. To revise the paradigm of microscope lenses, we devised a simple droplet lens fabrication technique that which produces low cost and high performance lens. Each lens is integrated into thin 3-D printed holder with complimentary light emitted diode (LEDs) that clips onto majority of smartphones. The integrated device converts a smartphone into a high power optical microscope/dermatoscope at around $2. This low cost device has wide application in a multitude of practical uses such as material inspection, dermascope and educational microscope.

  13. Particle capture device

    DOEpatents

    Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2016-02-23

    In example embodiments, particle collection efficiency in aerosol analyzers and other particle measuring instruments is improved by a particle capture device that employs multiple collisions to decrease momentum of particles until the particles are collected (e.g., vaporized or come to rest). The particle collection device includes an aperture through which a focused particle beam enters. A collection enclosure is coupled to the aperture and has one or more internal surfaces against which particles of the focused beam collide. One or more features are employed in the collection enclosure to promote particles to collide multiple times within the enclosure, and thereby be vaporized or come to rest, rather than escape through the aperture.

  14. Motion restraining device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, A. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A motion-restraining device for dissipating at a controlled rate the force of a moving body is discussed. The device is characterized by a drive shaft adapted to be driven in rotation by a moving body connected to a tape wound about a reel mounted on the drive shaft, and an elongated pitman link having one end pivotally connected to the crankshaft and the opposite end thereof connected with the mass through an energy dissipating linkage. A shuttle is disposed within a slot and guided by rectilinear motion between a pair of spaced impact surfaces. Reaction forces applied at impact of the shuttle with the impact surfaces include oppositely projected force components angularly related to the direction of the applied impact forces.

  15. Portable biochip scanner device

    DOEpatents

    Perov, Alexander; Sharonov, Alexei; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2002-01-01

    A portable biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips (biochips) is provided. The portable biochip scanner device employs a laser for emitting an excitation beam. An optical fiber delivers the laser beam to a portable biochip scanner. A lens collimates the laser beam, the collimated laser beam is deflected by a dichroic mirror and focused by an objective lens onto a biochip. The fluorescence light from the biochip is collected and collimated by the objective lens. The fluorescence light is delivered to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) via an emission filter and a focusing lens. The focusing lens focuses the fluorescence light into a pinhole. A signal output of the PMT is processed and displayed.

  16. Microelectromechanical safe arm device

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.

    2012-06-05

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus and methods for operating, for preventing unintentional detonation of energetic components comprising pyrotechnic and explosive materials, such as air bag deployment systems, munitions and pyrotechnics. The MEM apparatus comprises an interrupting member that can be moved to block (interrupt) or complete (uninterrupt) an explosive train that is part of an energetic component. One or more latching members are provided that engage and prevent the movement of the interrupting member, until the one or more latching members are disengaged from the interrupting member. The MEM apparatus can be utilized as a safe and arm device (SAD) and electronic safe and arm device (ESAD) in preventing unintentional detonations. Methods for operating the MEM apparatus include independently applying drive signals to the actuators coupled to the latching members, and an actuator coupled to the interrupting member.

  17. Urine collection device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, R. B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A urine collection device for females is described. It is comprised of a collection element defining a urine collection chamber and an inlet opening into the chamber and is adapted to be disposed in surrounding relation to the urethral opening of the user. A drainage conduit is connected to the collection element in communication with the chamber whereby the chamber and conduit together comprise a urine flow pathway for carrying urine generally away from the inlet. A first body of wicking material is mounted adjacent the collection element and extends at least partially into the flow pathway. The device preferably also comprise a vaginal insert element including a seal portion for preventing the entry of urine into the vagina.

  18. Wire brush fastening device

    DOEpatents

    Meigs, R.A.

    1995-09-19

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus. 13 figs.

  19. Wire brush fastening device

    DOEpatents

    Meigs, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

  20. Microelectromechanical reprogrammable logic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, M. A. A.; Kosuru, L.; Younis, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    In modern computing, the Boolean logic operations are set by interconnect schemes between the transistors. As the miniaturization in the component level to enhance the computational power is rapidly approaching physical limits, alternative computing methods are vigorously pursued. One of the desired aspects in the future computing approaches is the provision for hardware reconfigurability at run time to allow enhanced functionality. Here we demonstrate a reprogrammable logic device based on the electrothermal frequency modulation scheme of a single microelectromechanical resonator, capable of performing all the fundamental 2-bit logic functions as well as n-bit logic operations. Logic functions are performed by actively tuning the linear resonance frequency of the resonator operated at room temperature and under modest vacuum conditions, reprogrammable by the a.c.-driving frequency. The device is fabricated using complementary metal oxide semiconductor compatible mass fabrication process, suitable for on-chip integration, and promises an alternative electromechanical computing scheme.

  1. PRESSURE SENSING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1959-12-15

    This device is primarily useful as a switch which is selectively operable to actuate in response to either absolute or differential predetermined pressures. The device generally comprises a pressure-tight housing divided by a movable impermeable diaphragm into two chambers, a reference pressure chamber and a bulb chamber containing the switching means and otherwise filled with an incompressible non-conducting fluid. The switch means comprises a normally collapsed bulb having an electrically conductive outer surface and a vent tube leading to the housing exterior. The normally collapsed bulb is disposed such that upon its inflation, respensive to air inflow from the vent, two contacts fixed within the bulb chamber are adapted to be electrically shorted by the conducting outer surface of the bulb.

  2. Residual gas analysis device

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven M.

    2012-07-31

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  3. Hybrid electroluminescent devices

    DOEpatents

    Shiang, Joseph John; Duggal, Anil Raj; Michael, Joseph Darryl

    2010-08-03

    A hybrid electroluminescent (EL) device comprises at least one inorganic diode element and at least one organic EL element that are electrically connected in series. The absolute value of the breakdown voltage of the inorganic diode element is greater than the absolute value of the maximum reverse bias voltage across the series. The inorganic diode element can be a power diode, a Schottky barrier diode, or a light-emitting diode.

  4. Thermal Memristive Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Luke; Walczak, Kamil

    We examine heat transfer via Coulomb Blockaded quantum systems connected to two heat reservoirs (thermal baths). Specifically, we propose simple models for negative differential thermal conductance and pinched hysteretic loops in the heat fluxes as functions of temperature. Our computational method is based on the theory of propagators, where additional mechanisms of shifting and blocking specific energy levels is incorporated. Those devices may play a major role in the future thermal management.

  5. Alignment reference device

    DOEpatents

    Patton, Gail Y.; Torgerson, Darrel D.

    1987-01-01

    An alignment reference device provides a collimated laser beam that minimizes angular deviations therein. A laser beam source outputs the beam into a single mode optical fiber. The output end of the optical fiber acts as a source of radiant energy and is positioned at the focal point of a lens system where the focal point is positioned within the lens. The output beam reflects off a mirror back to the lens that produces a collimated beam.

  6. Mechanical devices: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A collection of new technology items that should be of interest to mechanical engineers, machinists, and others who design or work with mechanical devices was described. Section 1 contains articles on several new or modified tools, Section 2 describes a number of specialized mechanical systems, and the last section is devoted to valves, bearings, and other parts that might be used with larger systems. The last patent information available is also given.

  7. Thermal Remote Anemometer Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Heath, D. Michele; Winfree, William P.; Miller, William E.; Welch, Christopher S.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal Remote Anemometer Device developed for remote, noncontacting, passive measurement of thermal properties of sample. Model heated locally by scanning laser beam and cooled by wind in tunnel. Thermal image of model analyzed to deduce pattern of airflow around model. For materials applications, system used for evaluation of thin films and determination of thermal diffusivity and adhesive-layer contact. For medical applications, measures perfusion through skin to characterize blood flow and used to determine viabilities of grafts and to characterize tissues.

  8. Organic electroluminescent devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sheats, J.R.; Antoniadis, H.; Hueschen, M.; Leonard, W.; Miller, J.; Moon, R.; Roitman, D.; Stocking, A.

    1996-08-16

    Electroluminscene from organic materials has the potential to enable low-cost, full-color flat-panel displays, as well as other emissive products. Some materials have now demonstrated adequate efficiencies (1 to 15 lumens/watt) and lifetimes (>5000 hours) for practical use; however, the factors that govern lifetime remain poorly understood. This article provides a brief review of device principles and applications requirements and focuses on the understanding of reliability issues. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Temperature measuring device

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; Bible, D.W.; Sohns, C.W.

    1999-10-19

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  10. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  11. Temperature measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Bible, Don W.; Sohns, Carl W.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  12. Liquid level sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid level sensing device comprising a load cell supporting a column or stack of segments freely resting on one another. The density of each element is substantially identical to that of the surrounding liquid. The elements are freely guided within a surrounding tube. As each element is exposed above the liquid level, its weight will be impressed through the column to the load cell, thereby providing a signal at the load cell directly proportional to the liquid level elevation.

  13. The Columbus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvetti, Matteo

    2005-10-01

    The Columbus device [1] is proposed as one component of a spectrum of experiments needed to explore the physics of fusion burning plasmas. Columbus has a larger volume than Ignitor by about 50%, lower current densities in the magnet systems and capability to sustain longer plasma pulses. The machine preserves the ability to confine, under macroscopically stable conditions, plasmas with peak pressures exceeding 3 MPa, corresponding to ignition at central plasma densities around 10^21 nuclei/m^3 and to reach this regime by ohmic heating alone. The presence of an ICRH system will expand the capabilities of the device. In our opinion, a spectrum of ``Science First'' devices is the only viable path to an efficient fusion program development and plasma ignition is an important milestone to be achieved before undertaking the construction of a Demo reactor requiring minimization of the external heating power. The Iter design envisages that about one third of its heating power be supplied from the outside in order to maintain its plasma pressure at the desired values. The Columbus program is proposed as a U.S. counterpart to the Ignitor project conducted in Italy and to be complementary to it. The machine costs can be minimized by incorporating the main engineering solutions devised for Ignitor. [1] Coppi,B. and Salvetti,M.,``Highlights of the Columbus Concept'', M.I.T. Report, PTP02/06 (2002).

  14. [Implantable hemodynamic monitoring devices].

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Butter, C

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure is one of the most frequent diagnoses in hospital admissions in Germany. In the majority of these admissions acute decompensation of an already existing chronic heart failure is responsible. New mostly wireless and remote strategies for monitoring, titration, adaptation and optimization are the focus for improvement of the treatment of heart failure patients and the poor prognosis. The implantation of hemodynamic monitoring devices follows the hypothesis that significant changes in hemodynamic parameters occur before the occurrence of acute decompensation requiring readmission. Three different hemodynamic monitoring devices have so far been investigated in clinical trials employing right ventricular pressure, left atrial pressure and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring. Only one of these systems, the CardioMENS™ HF monitoring system, demonstrated a significant reduction of hospitalization due to heart failure over 6 months in the CHAMPION trial. The systematic adaptation of medication in the CHAMPION trial significantly differed from the usual care of the control arm over 6 months. This direct day to day management of diuretics is currently under intensive investigation; however, further studies demonstrating a positive effect on mortality are needed before translation of this approach into guidelines. Without this evidence a further implementation of pressure monitoring into currently used devices and justification of the substantial technical and personnel demands are not warranted.

  15. Synchronous semiconductor memory device

    SciTech Connect

    Onno, C.; Hirata, M.

    1989-11-21

    This patent describes a synchronous semiconductor memory device. It comprises: first latch means for latching a write command in synchronism with clock signal; second latch means for latching a write data in synchronism with the clock signal and for outputting two write process signals based on the write data latched thereby; pulse generating means for generating an internal write pulse signal based on the write command latched by the first latch means. The internal write pulse signal having a semiconductor memory device; write control means supplied with the internal write pulse signal and the write process signals for controlling write and read operations of the synchronous semiconductor memory device; memory means for storing the write data latched by the second latch means; and noise preventing means coupled to the second latch means and the write control means for supplying the write process signals to the write control means only in the write mode responsive to the internal write pulse signal and for setting the write process signals to fixed potentials during a time other than the write mode.

  16. Power transmission device

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, S.; Kishizawa, Y.; Kato, Y.

    1988-11-22

    This patent describes a multistage gear shifting device for a motor vehicle in which first speed to fourth speed gear trains and reverse gear trains are arranged between two shafts in an order such that a low speed gear train comes first, one gear of each gear train being able to engage with and disengage from one of the two shafts through a hydraulic clutch, the gear shifting device including a manual valve which has operating positions corresponding to first speed to fourth speed and reverse and which is adapted to selectively operate hydraulic clutches for the respective gear trains, the one gear of the fourth speed gear train and one gear of the reverse gear train being integrally formed with each other and loosely fitting on one of two shafts and detachably engaged with one of the two shafts through a common hydraulic clutch, the other gears of the fourth speed and reverse gear trains being loosely fitting on the other shaft, the multistage gear shifting device including a selector for selectively engaging the other gears of the fourth speed and reverse gear trains, an actuator for actuating the selector in response to the action of the manual valve, and a switching valve annexed to the actuator, the switching valve guiding hydraulic oil from the manual valve to the common hydraulic clutch when the manual valve is brought to an operating position corresponding to fourth speed or reverse and discharging the hydraulic oil in the common hydraulic clutch to a drain through the manual valve.

  17. Double face sealing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A double face sealing device is disclosed for mounting between two surfaces to provide an air-tight and fluid-tight seal between a closure member bearing one of the surfaces and a structure or housing bearing the other surface which extends around the opening or hatchway to be closed. The double face sealing device includes a plurality of sections or segments mounted to one of the surfaces, each having a main body portion, a pair of outwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, and a pair of inwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, an elastomeric cover on the distal, free ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free ends of the inwardly extending and diverging spring arms. The double face sealing device has application or use in all environments requiring a seal, but is particularly useful to seal openings or hatchways between compartments of spacecraft or aircraft.

  18. Plasma jet ignition device

    DOEpatents

    McIlwain, Michael E.; Grant, Jonathan F.; Golenko, Zsolt; Wittstein, Alan D.

    1985-01-15

    An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

  19. Thermophotovoltaic energy conversion device

    DOEpatents

    Charache, Greg W.; Baldasaro, Paul F.; Egley, James L.

    1998-01-01

    A thermophotovoltaic device and a method for making the thermophotovoltaic device. The device includes an n-type semiconductor material substrate having top and bottom surfaces, a tunnel junction formed on the top surface of the substrate, a region of active layers formed on top of the tunnel junction and a back surface reflector (BSR). The tunnel junction includes a layer of heavily doped n-type semiconductor material that is formed on the top surface of the substrate and a layer of heavily doped p-type semiconductor material formed on the n-type layer. An optional pseudomorphic layer can be formed between the n-type and p-type layers. A region of active layers is formed on top of the tunnel junction. This region includes a base layer of p-type semiconductor material and an emitter layer of n-type semiconductor material. An optional front surface window layer can be formed on top of the emitter layer. An optional interference filter can be formed on top of the emitter layer or the front surface window layer when it is used.

  20. Thermophotovoltaic energy conversion device

    DOEpatents

    Charache, G.W.; Baldasaro, P.F.; Egley, J.L.

    1998-05-19

    A thermophotovoltaic device and a method for making the thermophotovoltaic device are disclosed. The device includes an n-type semiconductor material substrate having top and bottom surfaces, a tunnel junction formed on the top surface of the substrate, a region of active layers formed on top of the tunnel junction and a back surface reflector (BSR). The tunnel junction includes a layer of heavily doped n-type semiconductor material that is formed on the top surface of the substrate and a layer of heavily doped p-type semiconductor material formed on the n-type layer. An optional pseudomorphic layer can be formed between the n-type and p-type layers. A region of active layers is formed on top of the tunnel junction. This region includes a base layer of p-type semiconductor material and an emitter layer of n-type semiconductor material. An optional front surface window layer can be formed on top of the emitter layer. An optional interference filter can be formed on top of the emitter layer or the front surface window layer when it is used. 1 fig.

  1. Sectional device handling tool

    DOEpatents

    Candee, Clark B.

    1988-07-12

    Apparatus for remotely handling a device in an irradiated underwater environment includes a plurality of tubular sections interconnected end-to-end to form a handling structure, the bottom section being adapted for connection to the device. A support section is connected to the top tubular section and is adapted to be suspended from an overhead crane. Each section is flanged at its opposite ends. Axially retractable bolts in each bottom flange are threadedly engageable with holes in the top flange of an adjacent section, each bolt being biased to its retracted position and retained in place on the bottom flange. Guide pins on each top flange cooperate with mating holes on adjacent bottom flanges to guide movement of the parts to the proper interconnection orientation. Each section carries two hydraulic line segments provided with quick-connect/disconnect fittings at their opposite ends for connection to the segments of adjacent tubular sections upon interconnection thereof to form control lines which are connectable to the device and to an associated control console.

  2. DNA in nanofluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehn, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Nanochannels with a channel cross-section of around 100 nm x 100 nm or less are emerging as a powerful new technique for single-molecule DNA analysis. In these nanochannels, DNA is linearized to a constant fraction of its contour length, and thus spatial locations measured by fluorescence microscopy can be directly related to genomic locations. Because the stretching in nanochannels is caused by lateral confinement, molecules are free to undergo longitudinal fluctuations. Hence, time-averaging over a single molecule is meaningful, and a high resolution can be achieved even using few molecules. We will present how DNA imaging in nanochannels can be applied to common tasks in molecular biology that go beyond simple sizing. In particular, we will discuss the genomic identification of human DNA fragments using fluorescent markers, and how to perform enzymatic reactions, such as restriction mapping using endonucleases, in nanochannels. We will also present our recent progress in the development of ``nanoplumbing'', that is devices that contain junctions of nanochannels. We will show how device dimensions influence the transport of DNA at those nanochannel junctions, and how those properties can be utilized in the design of devices and exotic materials.

  3. Packaging of solid state devices

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.

    2006-01-03

    A package for one or more solid state devices in a single module that allows for operation at high voltage, high current, or both high voltage and high current. Low thermal resistance between the solid state devices and an exterior of the package and matched coefficient of thermal expansion between the solid state devices and the materials used in packaging enables high power operation. The solid state devices are soldered between two layers of ceramic with metal traces that interconnect the devices and external contacts. This approach provides a simple method for assembling and encapsulating high power solid state devices.

  4. Non- contacting capacitive diagnostic device

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Timothy

    2005-07-12

    A non-contacting capacitive diagnostic device includes a pulsed light source for producing an electric field in a semiconductor or photovoltaic device or material to be evaluated and a circuit responsive to the electric field. The circuit is not in physical contact with the device or material being evaluated and produces an electrical signal characteristic of the electric field produced in the device or material. The diagnostic device permits quality control and evaluation of semiconductor or photovoltaic device properties in continuous manufacturing processes.

  5. Nanoscale Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaoye

    Continuous downscaling in microelectronics has pushed conventional CMOS technology to its physical limits, while Moore's Law has correctly predicted the trend for decades, each step forward is accompanied with unprecedented technological difficulties and near-exponential increase in cost. At the same time, however, demands for low-power, low-cost and high-speed devices have never diminished, instead, even more stringent requirements have been imposed on device performances. It is therefore crucial to explore alternative materials and device architectures in order to alleviate the pressure caused by downscaling. To this end, we investigated two different approaches: (1) InSb nanowire based field effect transistors (NWFETs) and (2) single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) -- peptide nucleic acid (PNA) --SWCNT conjugate. Two types of InSb nanowires were synthesized by template-assisted electrochemistry and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) respectively. In both cases, NWFETs were fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL) and crystallinity was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns. For electrochemistry nanowire, ambipolar conduction was observed with strong p-type conduction, the effect of thermal annealing on the conductivity was analyzed, a NWFET model that took into consideration the underlapped region in top-gated NWFET was proposed. Hole mobility in the channel was calculated to be 292.84 cm2V-1s -1 with a density of 1.5x1017/cm3. For CVD nanowire, the diameter was below 40nm with an average of 20nm. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process was speculated to be the mechanism responsible for nanowire growth. The efficient gate control was manifested by high ION/I OFF ratio which was on the order of 106 and a small inverse subthreshold slope (<200 mV/decade). Scale analysis was used to successfully account for disparities observed among a number of sample devices. N-type conduction was found in all NWFETs with

  6. Advanced Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael S.; Maki, Paul A.; Kolodzey, James

    2007-06-01

    I. Wide band gap devices. Wide-Bandgap Semiconductor devices for automotive applications / M. Sugimoto ... [et al.]. A GaN on SiC HFET device technology for wireless infrastructure applications / B. Green ... [et al.]. Drift velocity limitation in GaN HEMT channels / A. Matulionis. Simulations of field-plated and recessed gate gallium nitride-based heterojunction field-effect transistors / V. O. Turin, M. S. Shur and D. B. Veksler. Low temperature electroluminescence of green and deep green GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / Y. Li ... [et al.]. Spatial spectral analysis in high brightness GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / T. Detchprohm ... [et al.]. Self-induced surface texturing of Al2O3 by means of inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching in Cl2 chemistry / P. Batoni ... [et al.]. Field and termionic field transport in aluminium gallium arsenide heterojunction barriers / D. V. Morgan and A. Porch. Electrical characteristics and carrier lifetime measurements in high voltage 4H-SiC PiN diodes / P. A. Losee ... [et al.]. Geometry and short channel effects on enhancement-mode n-Channel GaN MOSFETs on p and n- GaN/sapphire substrates / W. Huang, T. Khan and T. P. Chow. 4H-SiC Vertical RESURF Schottky Rectifiers and MOSFETs / Y. Wang, P. A. Losee and T. P. Chow. Present status and future Directions of SiGe HBT technology / M. H. Khater ... [et al.]Optical properties of GaInN/GaN multi-quantum Wells structure and light emitting diode grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy / J. Senawiratne ... [et al.]. Electrical comparison of Ta/Ti/Al/Mo/Au and Ti/Al/Mo/Au Ohmic contacts on undoped GaN HEMTs structure with AlN interlayer / Y. Sun and L. F. Eastman. Above 2 A/mm drain current density of GaN HEMTs grown on sapphire / F. Medjdoub ... [et al.]. Focused thermal beam direct patterning on InGaN during molecular beam epitaxy / X. Chen, W. J. Schaff and L. F. Eastman -- II. Terahertz and millimeter wave devices. Temperature-dependent microwave performance of

  7. A Preliminary Analysis of the Flying Qualities of the Consolidated Vultee MX-813 Delta-Wing Airplane Configuration at Transonic and Low Supersonic Speeds as Determined from Flights of Rocket-Powered Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcham, Grady L.

    1949-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of the flying qualities of the Consolidated Vultee MX-813 delta-wing airplane configuration has been made based on the results obtained from the first two 1/8 scale models flown at the NACA Pilotless Aircraft Research Station, Wallop's Island, VA. The Mach number range covered in the tests was from 0.9 to 1.2. The analysis indicates adequate elevator control for trim in level flight over the speed range investigated. Through the transonic range there is a mild trim change with a slight tucking-under tendency. The elevator control effectiveness in the supersonic range is reduced to about one-half the subsonic value although sufficient control for maneuvering is available as indicated by the fact that 10 deg elevator deflection produced 5g acceleration at Mach number of 1.2 at 40,000 feet.The elevator control forces are high and indicate the power required of the boost system. The damping. of the short-period oscillation is adequate at sea-level but is reduced at 40,000 feet. The directional stability appears adequate for the speed range and angles of attack covered.

  8. Dataset of the binding kinetic rate constants of anti-PCSK9 antibodies obtained using the Biacore T100, ProteOn XPR36, Octet RED384, and IBIS MX96 biosensor platforms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Danlin; Singh, Ajit; Wu, Helen; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    Here we provide data from a head-to-head comparison study using four biosensor platforms: GE Healthcare׳s Biacore T100, Bio-Rad׳s ProteOn XPR36, ForteBio׳s Octet RED384, and Wasatch Microfluidics׳s IBIS MX96. We used these instruments to analyze the binding interactions of a panel of ten high-affinity monoclonal antibodies with their antigen, human proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9). For each instrument, binding curves obtained at multiple densities of surface antibodies were fit to the 1:1 Langmuir kinetic model, and the association and dissociation rate constants and corresponding affinity constants were calculated. The data supplied in this article accompany the research article entitled, "Comparison of biosensor platforms in the evaluation of high affinity antibody-antigen binding kinetics" (Yang et al., 2016) [1], which further discusses the strengths and weaknesses of each biosensor platform with an emphasis on data consistency, comparability, and operational efficiency. PMID:27547794

  9. Intrauterine device developments.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Results of recent IUD research are presented. The largest study of postpartum IUD insertion to date, a multicenter comparative trail involving 3791 women at 15 sites in 13 countries, has shown that the practice is safe and effective if the IUD is correctly placed. Modifications in design of the device are unnecessary to reduce expulsions. In 1977, Family Health International (FHI) began developing IUDs that would have clinically acceptable expulsion rates following postpartum insertion. By adding chromic catgut suture material to the upper arms of the TCu andLippes Loop, FHI developed the Delta T and Delta Loop. Many of the centers involved in studies of postpartum IUD insertion were large urban maternity hospitals in developing countries with heavy caseloads of 10,000-30,000 deliveries/year. Results of the trials and of a 19-center evaluation of the timing of postpartum insertion support several conclusions: 1) insertion should take place within 10 minutes of placental expulsion; 2) if insertion is done within 10 minutes of delivery, there is no increased risk of infection or uterine perforation; 3) the type of device inserted is less important than the method of insertion; expulsion rates at different clinics ranged from 6-37/1000 women at 6 monts, and the fundal placement of the device is crucial; and 4) expulsions are higher for postpartum than interval insertions but not so high as to make the offer of an IUD immediately postpartum unacceptable. Since the incidence of pain or bleeding associated with IUD use is related to their size, attempts to decrease the side effects have centered on development of smaller copper devices. 1 such device, the copper i, consists of a straight stem with small crossarms in an 'x' configuration disigned to anchor the IUD in place. A copper wire around the stem of the device exposes 200 sq millimeters of cooper. A study of 98 women who used the Copper i showed an accidental pregnancy rate of 3.2 at 6 months and 9.0 at 12 months

  10. [Medical Devices Law for anesthesiologists].

    PubMed

    Regner, M

    2015-09-01

    The Medical Devices Law is a relatively new legal system, which has replaced the still well-known medical devices regulations in Germany. The Medical Devices Law in Germany is based on European directives, which have been translated into national law with the Medical Devices Act. The Medical Devices Act is a framework of regulations and incorporates a number of decrees that address specific topics within the medical devices directives and in turn individual regulations refer to guidelines and recommendations from other sources which provide detailed technical information on specific topics. Overall, the Medical Devices Act represents a very complex legal system, which needs to be permanently observed with respect to continuous updating and adjustment. In this article the design and the structure are described but most of all the article filters significant problem areas that need to be considered when using and operating medical devices, especially for anesthesiologists.

  11. Nonimaging radiant energy direction device

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1980-01-01

    A raidant energy nonimaging light direction device is provided. The device includes an energy transducer and a reflective wall whose contour is particularly determined with respect to the geometrical vector flux of a field associated with the transducer.

  12. 78 FR 1247 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Tablet Computers, Media...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Tablet Computers, Media... United States after importation of certain electronic devices, including wireless communication devices... importation of certain electronic devices, including wireless communication devices, tablet computers,...

  13. Portable source identification device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.; Gervais, Kevin L.

    2005-05-01

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is the primary enforcement agency protecting the nation"s ports of entry. CBP is enhancing its capability to interdict the illicit import of nuclear and radiological materials and devices that may be used by terrorists. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is providing scientific and technical support to CBP in their goal to enable rapid deployment of nuclear and radiation detection systems at U. S. ports of entry to monitor 100% of the incoming international traffic and cargo while not adversely impacting the operations or throughput of the ports. As the deployment of radiation detection systems proceeds, there is a need to adapt the baseline radiation portal monitor (RPM) system technology to operations at these diverse ports of entry. When screening produces an alarm in the primary inspection RPM, the alarming vehicle is removed from the flow of commerce and the alarm is typically confirmed in a secondary inspection RPM. The portable source identification device (PSID) is a radiation sensor panel (RSP), based on thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detector and gamma spectroscopic analysis hardware and software, mounted on a scissor lift on a small truck. The lift supports a box containing a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) sodium iodide detector that provides real-time isotopic identification, including neutron detectors to interdict Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and radiation dispersion devices (RDD). The scissor lift will lower the detectors to within a foot off the ground and raise them to approximately 24 feet (7.3 m) in the air, allowing a wide vertical scanning range.

  14. Portable Source Identification Device

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.; Gervais, Kevin L.

    2005-08-01

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is the primary enforcement agency protecting the nation’s ports of entry. CBP is enhancing its capability to interdict the illicit import of nuclear and radiological materials and devices that may be used by terrorists. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is providing scientific and technical support to CBP in their goal to enable rapid deployment of nuclear and radiation detection systems at U. S. ports of entry to monitor 100% of the incoming international traffic and cargo while not adversely impacting the operations or throughput of the ports. As the deployment of radiation detection systems proceeds, there is a need to adapt the baseline radiation portal monitor (RPM) system technology to operations at these diverse ports of entry. When screening produces an alarm in the primary inspection RPM, the alarming vehicle is removed from the flow of commerce and the alarm is typically confirmed in a secondary inspection RPM. The portable source identification device (PSID) is a radiation sensor panel (RSP), based on thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detector and gamma spectroscopic analysis hardware and software, mounted on a scissor lift on a small truck. The lift supports a box containing a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) sodium iodide detector that provides real-time isotopic identification, including neutron detectors to interdict Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and radiation dispersion devices (RDD). The scissor lift will lower the detectors to within a foot off the ground and raise them to approximately 24 feet in the air, allowing a wide vertical scanning range.

  15. Hybrid free electron laser devices

    SciTech Connect

    Asgekar, Vivek; Dattoli, G.

    2007-03-15

    We consider hybrid free electron laser devices consisting of Cerenkov and undulator sections. We will show that they can in principle be used as segmented devices and also show the possibility of exploiting Cerenkov devices for the generation of nonlinear harmonic coherent power. We discuss both oscillator and amplifier schemes.

  16. Medical devices and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Elizabeth

    2012-08-01

    Errors related to health care devices are not well understood. Nurses in intensive care and progressive care environments can benefit from understanding manufacturer-related error and device-use error, the principles of human factors engineering, and the steps that can be taken to reduce risk of errors related to health care devices.

  17. Barriers to medical device innovation

    PubMed Central

    Bergsland, Jacob; Elle, Ole Jakob; Fosse, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has defined a medical device as a health care product that does not achieve it’s purpose by chemical action or by being metabolized. This means that a vast number of products are considered medical devices. Such devices play an essential role in the practice of medicine. The FDA classifies medical devices in three classes, depending on the risk of the device. Since Class I and II devices have relatively simple requirements for getting to the market, this review will focus on “implantable devices”, which, in general, belong to Class III. The European Union and Canada use a slightly different classification system. While early generations of medical devices were introduced without much testing, either technical or clinical, the process of introducing a Class III medical device from concept to clinical practice has become strongly regulated and requires extensive technological and clinical testing. The modern era of implantable medical devices may be considered to have started in the 1920s with development of artificial hips. The implantable pacemaker was another milestone and pacemakers and cardioverters/defibrillators have since saved millions of lives and created commercial giants in the medical device industry. This review will include some examples of cardiovascular devices. Similar considerations apply to the total implantable device market, although clinical and technological applications obviously vary considerably. PMID:24966699

  18. FDA's perspectives on cardiovascular devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eric A; Patel-Raman, Sonna M; O'Callaghan, Kathryn; Hillebrenner, Matthew G

    2009-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decision process for approving or clearing medical devices is often determined by a review of robust clinical data and extensive preclinical testing of the device. The mission statement for the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) is to review the information provided by manufacturers so that it can promote and protect the health of the public by ensuring the safety and effectiveness of medical devices deemed appropriate for human use (Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act, Section 903(b)(1, 2(C)), December 31, 2004; accessed December 17, 2008 http://www.fda.gov/opacom/laws/fdcact/fdctoc.htm). For high-risk devices, such as ventricular assist devices (VADs), mechanical heart valves, stents, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices, pacemakers, and defibrillators, the determination is based on FDA's review of extensive preclinical bench and animal testing followed by use of the device in a clinical trial in humans. These clinical trials allow the manufacturer to evaluate a device in the intended use population. FDA reviews the data from the clinical trial to determine if the device performed as predicted and the clinical benefits outweigh the risks. This article reviews the regulatory framework for different marketing applications related to cardiovascular devices and describes the process of obtaining approval to study a cardiovascular device in a U.S. clinical trial.

  19. Nanochanneled Device and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Mauro (Inventor); Liu, Xuewu (Inventor); Grattoni, Alessandro (Inventor); Fine, Daniel (Inventor); Goodall, Randy (Inventor); Hosali, Sharath (Inventor); Medema, Ryan (Inventor); Hudson, Lee (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A nanochannel delivery device and method of manufacturing and use. The nanochannel delivery device comprises an inlet, an outlet, and a nanochannel. The nanochannel may be oriented parallel to the primary plane of the nanochannel delivery device. The inlet and outlet may be in direct fluid communication with the nanochannel.

  20. Superconducting quantum-interference devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. N.; Holdeman, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    Published document discusses devices which are based on weak-link Josephson elements that join superconductors. Links can take numerous forms, and circuitry utilizing links can perform many varied functions with unprecedented sensitivity. Theoretical review of Josephson's junctions include tunneling junctions, point contact devices, microbridges, and proximity-effect devices.

  1. Detached rock evaluation device

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A rock detachment evaluation device (10) having an energy transducer unit 1) for sensing vibrations imparted to a subject rock (172) for converting the sensed vibrations into electrical signals, a low band pass filter unit (12) for receiving the electrical signal and transmitting only a low frequency segment thereof, a high band pass filter unit (13) for receiving the electrical signals and for transmitting only a high frequency segment thereof, a comparison unit (14) for receiving the low frequency and high frequency signals and for determining the difference in power between the signals, and a display unit (16) for displaying indicia of the difference, which provides a quantitative measure of rock detachment.

  2. Nanotube resonator devices

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  3. Shrinking optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, W. H.; Pendry, J. B.

    2009-07-01

    Much of optics depends on objects being much larger than the wavelength of light: shadows of opaque objects are sharp only if free of diffraction effects, and 'cat's eye' retroreflectors function only if they are large. Here, we show how to make theoretically arbitrarily small versions of these devices by exploiting the power of a negatively refracting lens to magnify objects that are smaller than the wavelength, thus creating the effect of a large object while keeping all physical dimensions small. We also give a new perspective on the 'perfect lens theorem' on which the paper is based.

  4. Pneumatically actuated micropipetting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szita, Nicolas; Buser, Rudolf A.

    1998-03-01

    We have realized a valveless micropipetting device with an integrated sensor which can aspirate and dispense liquid volumes without any valves, hence without any reflow or dead volume. With an external pneumatic actuation, we have demonstrated aspirating and dispensing from 190nl of 6 (mu) l of water. Measurements showed a standard deviation of down to 1 percent. An integrated capacitive sensor will allow monitoring of the pressure throughout the pipetting process and detect malfunctions, e.g. clotting of the pipetting tip. It is our intention to use this demonstrated precise aspiration mechanism in combination with a micromachined reaction chamber and a miniaturized optical analysis system.

  5. COUNTERROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Halbach, K.; Baker, W.R.; Veron, D.

    1963-07-01

    An ion-electron plasma device having a conductive, cylindrical casing provided with an axially directed magneticmirror-type field is described. An axially aligned tubular electrode is disposed at each end of the casing with oppositely directed radial electric fields provided between each electrode and the casing. Simultaneous pulses of gas, injected from the inner end of each of the electrodes, become ionized and oppositely rotating plasma bodies are formed. The magnetic mirrors repel the plasma bodies and cause them to collide in the region between the mirrors. The opposite directions of rotation of the plasma bodies cause very high currents to flow therebetween and consequent heating occurs. (AEC)

  6. Fuel saving device

    SciTech Connect

    Imbert, J. C.

    1984-01-10

    The present invention relates to a fuel saving device adaptable to all types of carburetors, petrol engines and domestic or industrial burners, constituted by a solenoid generating a magnetic field which has an influence on the air-fuel mixture. Said solenoid has a red copper coil, has its axis oriented in parallel to the axis of the engine, and, periodically, in a first pre-determined direction, during the moon phase which goes from the full moon to the new moon, and in a second, opposite, direction, during the moon phase going from the new moon to the full moon. The invention finds an application in motor engine of low consumption.

  7. RADIATION MEASURING DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Bouricius, G.M.B.; Rusch, G.K.

    1960-03-22

    A radiation-measuring device is described having an a-c output. The apparatus has a high-energy particle source responsive to radiation flux disposed within a housing having a pair of collector plates. A potential gradient between the source and collector plates causes ions to flow to the plates. By means of electrostatic or magnetic deflection elements connected to an alternating potential, the ions are caused to flow alternately to each of the collector plates causing an a-c signal thereon.

  8. Micro environmental sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Polosky, Marc A.; Lukens, Laurance L.

    2006-05-02

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) acceleration switch is disclosed which includes a proof mass flexibly connected to a substrate, with the proof mass being moveable in a direction substantially perpendicular to the substrate in response to a sensed acceleration. An electrode on the proof mass contacts one or more electrodes located below the proof mass to provide a switch closure in response to the sensed acceleration. Electrical latching of the switch in the closed position is possible with an optional latching electrode. The MEM acceleration switch, which has applications for use as an environmental sensing device, can be fabricated using micromachining.

  9. Inflatable rescue device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, Scott A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention discloses, in one aspect, a personal rescue device for use in outer space which has an inflatable flexible tube with a shaper apparatus herein. Gas under pressure flows through the shaper apparatus and into the flexible tube. The flexible tube is mounted to the shaper so that as it inflates it expands and deploys lengthwise away from the shaper. In one embodiment a housing contains the shaper and the flexible tube and the housing is designed to facilitate movement of the expanding tube from the housing so the expanding tube does not bunch up in the housing.

  10. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1993-10-05

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

  11. Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen; Niebuhr, Jason; Cruz, Santana; Lamoreaux, chris

    2007-01-01

    The advanced resistive exercise device (ARED), now at the prototype stage of development, is a versatile machine that can be used to perform different customized exercises for which, heretofore, it has been necessary to use different machines. Conceived as a means of helping astronauts and others to maintain muscle and bone strength and endurance in low-gravity environments, the ARED could also prove advantageous in terrestrial settings (e.g., health clubs and military training facilities) in which many users are exercising simultaneously and there is heavy demand for use of exercise machines.

  12. Drop foot corrective device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, B. C. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A light weight, economical device to alleviate a plurality of difficulties encountered in walking by a victim suffering from a drop foot condition is discussed. A legband girdles the leg below the knee and above the calf providing an anchor point for the upper end of a ligament having its lower end attached to a toe of a shoe or a toe on the foot. The ligament is of such length that the foot is supported thereby and retained in a normal position during walking.

  13. Silicon active photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    Active photonic devices utilizing the optical nonlinearities of silicon have emerged in the last 5 years and the effort for commercial photonic devices in the material that has been the workhorse of electronics has been building up since. This dissertation presents the theory for some of these devices. We are concerned herein with CW lasers, amplifiers and wavelength converters that are based on the Raman effect. There have already been cursory experimental demonstrations of these devices and some of their limitations are already apparent. Most of the limitations observed are because of the appearance of effects that are competing with stimulated Raman scattering. Under the high optical powers that are necessary for the Raman effect (tens to hundrends of mW's) the process of optical two-photon (TPA) absorption occurs. The absorption of optical power that it causes itself is weak but in the process electrons and holes are generated which can further absorb light through the free-carrier absorption effect (FCA). The effective "lifetime" that these carriers have determines the magnitude of the FCA loss. We present a model for the carrier lifetime in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) waveguides and numerical simulations to understand how this critical parameter varies and how it can be controlled. A p-i-n junction built along SOI waveguides can help achieve lifetime of the order of 20--100 ps but the price one has to pay is on-chip electrical power consumption on the order of 100's of mWs. We model CW Raman lasers and we find that the carrier lifetime reduces the output power. If the carrier lifetime exceeds a certain "critical" value optical losses become overwhelming and lasing is impossible. As we show, in amplifiers, the nonlinear loss does not only result in diminished gain, but also in a higher noise figure. Finally the effect of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is examined. The effect is important because with a pump frequency at 1434nm coherent power

  14. Exhaust gas purifying device

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, S.; Hamada, S.

    1985-04-23

    An exhaust gas purifying device for use with a diesel engine comprising a filter block disposed in an engine exhaust passage for collecting exhaust gas particulates, and a heater for incinerating the collected exhaust gas particulates. The filter block has parallel channels defined therein and separated from one another by porous partition walls, some of the channels being closed at their inlet ends with blind plugs while the other channels are closed at their outlet ends with blind plugs. The heater is supported by the blind plugs.

  15. Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An exercise device 10 is particularly well suited for use in low gravity environments, and includes a frame 12 with plurality of resistance elements 30,82 supported in parallel on the frame. A load transfer member 20 is moveable relative to the frame for transferring the applied force to the free end of each captured resistance element. Load selection template 14 is removably secured both to the load transfer member, and a plurality of capture mechanisms engage the free end of corresponding resistance elements. The force applying mechanism 53 may be a handle, harness or other user interface for applying a force to move the load transfer member.

  16. Graphene device and method of using graphene device

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchiat, Vincent; Girit, Caglar; Kessler, Brian; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2015-08-11

    An embodiment of a graphene device includes a layered structure, first and second electrodes, and a dopant island. The layered structure includes a conductive layer, an insulating layer, and a graphene layer. The electrodes are coupled to the graphene layer. The dopant island is coupled to an exposed surface of the graphene layer between the electrodes. An embodiment of a method of using a graphene device includes providing the graphene device. A voltage is applied to the conductive layer of the graphene device. Another embodiment of a method of using a graphene device includes providing the graphene device without the dopant island. A dopant island is placed on an exposed surface of the graphene layer between the electrodes. A voltage is applied to the conductive layer of the graphene device. A response of the dopant island to the voltage is observed.

  17. [Medical device use errors].

    PubMed

    Friesdorf, Wolfgang; Marsolek, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    Medical devices define our everyday patient treatment processes. But despite the beneficial effect, every use can also lead to damages. Use errors are thus often explained by human failure. But human errors can never be completely extinct, especially in such complex work processes like those in medicine that often involve time pressure. Therefore we need error-tolerant work systems in which potential problems are identified and solved as early as possible. In this context human engineering uses the TOP principle: technological before organisational and then person-related solutions. But especially in everyday medical work we realise that error-prone usability concepts can often only be counterbalanced by organisational or person-related measures. Thus human failure is pre-programmed. In addition, many medical work places represent a somewhat chaotic accumulation of individual devices with totally different user interaction concepts. There is not only a lack of holistic work place concepts, but of holistic process and system concepts as well. However, this can only be achieved through the co-operation of producers, healthcare providers and clinical users, by systematically analyzing and iteratively optimizing the underlying treatment processes from both a technological and organizational perspective. What we need is a joint platform like medilab V of the TU Berlin, in which the entire medical treatment chain can be simulated in order to discuss, experiment and model--a key to a safe and efficient healthcare system of the future. PMID:19213452

  18. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T.; Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P.; Cook, S.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  19. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    McKay, Mark D.; Sweeney, Chad E.; Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel

    1993-01-01

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  20. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Vincent W.

    1994-01-01

    A device for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite.

  1. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, V.W.

    1994-12-27

    A device is disclosed for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite. 5 figures.

  2. Preface: Heterostructure terahertz devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhii, Victor

    2008-08-01

    The terahertz (THz) range of frequencies is borderline between microwave electronics and photonics. It corresponds to the frequency bands of molecular and lattice vibrations in gases, fluids, and solids. The importance of the THz range is in part due to numerous potential and emerging applications which include imaging and characterization, detection of hazardous substances, environmental monitoring, radio astronomy, covert inter-satellite communications, as well as biological and medical applications. During the last decades marked progress has been achieved in the development, fabrication, and practical implementation of THz devices and systems. This is primarily owing to the utilization of gaseous and free electron lasers and frequency converters using nonlinear optical phenomena as sources of THz radiation. However, such devices and hence the systems based on them are fairly cumbersome. This continuously stimulates an extensive search for new compact and efficient THz sources based on semiconductor heterostructures. Despite tremendous efforts lasting several decades, the so-called THz gap unbridged by semiconductor heterostructure electron and optoelectron devices still exists providing appropriate levels of power of the generated THz radiation. The invention and realization of quantum cascade lasers made of multiple quantum-well heterostructures already resulted in the partial solution of the problem in question, namely, in the successful coverage of the high-frequency portion of the THz gap (2-3 THz and higher). Further advancement to lower frequencies meets, perhaps, fundamental difficulties. All this necessitates further extensive theoretical and experimental studies of more or less traditional and novel semiconductor heterostructures as a basis for sources of THz radiation. This special issue includes 11 excellent original papers submitted by several research teams representing 14 institutions in Europe, America, and Asia. Several device concepts which

  3. Charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. W.; Hornbeck, L. J.; Stubbs, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of a program to design, fabricate, and test CCD arrays suitable for operation in an electron-bombarded mode. These intensified charge coupled devices have potential application to astronomy as photon-counting arrays. The objectives of this program were to deliver arrays of 250 lines of 400 pixels each and some associated electronics. Some arrays were delivered on tube-compatible headers and some were delivered after incorporation in vacuum tubes. Delivery of these devices required considerable improvements to be made in the processing associated with intensified operation. These improvements resulted in a high yield in the thinning process, reproducible results in the accumulation process, elimination of a dark current source in the accumulation process, solution of a number of header related problems, and the identification of a remaining major source of dark current. Two systematic failure modes were identified and protective measures established. The effects of tube processing on the arrays in the delivered ICCDs were determined and are reported along with the characterization data on the arrays.

  4. Micro-Organ Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  5. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

    1993-11-30

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

  6. Micro-organ device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); von Gustedt-Gonda, legal representative, Iris (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  7. Liver Cell Culture Devices

    PubMed Central

    Andria, B.; Bracco, A.; Cirino, G.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last 15 years many different liver cell culture devices, consisting of functional liver cells and artificial materials, have been developed. They have been devised for numerous different applications, such as temporary organ replacement (a bridge to liver transplantation or native liver regeneration) and as in vitro screening systems in the early stages of the drug development process, like assessing hepatotoxicity, hepatic drug metabolism, and induction/inhibition studies. Relevant literature is summarized about artificial human liver cell culture systems by scrutinizing PubMed from 2003 to 2009. Existing devices are divided in 2D configurations (e.g., static monolayer, sandwich, perfused cells, and flat plate) and 3D configurations (e.g., liver slices, spheroids, and different types of bioreactors). The essential features of an ideal liver cell culture system are discussed: different types of scaffolds, oxygenation systems, extracellular matrixes (natural and artificial), cocultures with nonparenchymal cells, and the role of shear stress problems. Finally, miniaturization and high-throughput systems are discussed. All these factors contribute in their own way to the viability and functionality of liver cells in culture. Depending on the aim for which they are designed, several good systems are available for predicting hepatotoxicity and hepatic metabolism within the general population. To predict hepatotoxicity in individual cases genomic analysis might be essential as well. PMID:26998397

  8. EDITORIAL: Photonic Crystal Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Pallab K.

    2007-05-01

    The engineering of electromagnetic modes at optical frequencies in artificial dielectric structures with periodic and random variation of the refractive index, enabling control of the radiative properties of the materials and photon localization, was first proposed independently by Yablonovitch and John in 1987. It is possible to control the flow of light in the periodic dielectric structures, known as photonic crystals (PC). As light waves scatter within the photonic crystal, destructive interference cancels out light of certain wavelengths, thereby forming a photonic bandgap, similar to the energy bandgap for electron waves in a semiconductor. Photons whose energies lie within the gap cannot propagate through the periodic structure. This property can be used to make a low-loss cavity. If a point defect, such as one or more missing periods, is introduced into the periodic structure a region is obtained within which the otherwise forbidden wavelengths can be locally trapped. This property can be used to realize photonic microcavities. Similarly, a line of defects can serve as a waveguide. While the realization of three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals received considerable attention initially, planar two-dimensional (2D) structures are currently favoured because of their relative ease of fabrication. 2D photonic crystal structures provide most of the functionality of 3D structures. These attributes have generated worldwide research and development of sub-μm and μm size active and passive photonic devices such as single-mode and non- classical light sources, guided wave devices, resonant cavity detection, and components for optical communication. More recently, photonic crystal guided wave devices are being investigated for application in microfludic and biochemical sensing. Photonic crystal devices have been realized with bulk, quantum well and quantum dot active regions. The Cluster of articles in this issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics provides a

  9. Stretchable and foldable electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang; Ko, Heung Cho; Stoykovich, Mark; Choi, Won Mook; Song, Jizhou; Ahn, Jong Hyun; Kim, Dae Hyeong

    2014-12-09

    Disclosed herein are stretchable, foldable and optionally printable, processes for making devices and devices such as semiconductors, electronic circuits and components thereof that are capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Strain isolation layers provide good strain isolation to functional device layers. Multilayer devices are constructed to position a neutral mechanical surface coincident or proximate to a functional layer having a material that is susceptible to strain-induced failure. Neutral mechanical surfaces are positioned by one or more layers having a property that is spatially inhomogeneous, such as by patterning any of the layers of the multilayer device.

  10. Stretchable and foldable electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang; Ko, Heung Cho; Stoykovich, Mark; Choi, Won Mook; Song, Jizhou; Ahn, Jong Hyun; Kim, Dae Hyeong

    2013-10-08

    Disclosed herein are stretchable, foldable and optionally printable, processes for making devices and devices such as semiconductors, electronic circuits and components thereof that are capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Strain isolation layers provide good strain isolation to functional device layers. Multilayer devices are constructed to position a neutral mechanical surface coincident or proximate to a functional layer having a material that is susceptible to strain-induced failure. Neutral mechanical surfaces are positioned by one or more layers having a property that is spatially inhomogeneous, such as by patterning any of the layers of the multilayer device.

  11. 21 CFR 868.5675 - Rebreathing device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rebreathing device. 868.5675 Section 868.5675 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5675 Rebreathing device. (a) Identification. A rebreathing device is a device that enables a patient to rebreathe exhaled gases. It may be used...

  12. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fixation device. 886.1290 Section 886.1290 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A fixation device is an AC-powered device intended for use as a fixation target for the patient...

  13. 21 CFR 874.5840 - Antistammering device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5840 Antistammering device. (a) Identification. An antistammering device is a device that electronically generates a noise when activated or when... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antistammering device. 874.5840 Section...

  14. 21 CFR 874.5840 - Antistammering device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5840 Antistammering device. (a) Identification. An antistammering device is a device that electronically generates a noise when activated or when... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antistammering device. 874.5840 Section...

  15. Medical Devices; Ophthalmic Devices; Classification of Nasolacrimal Compression Device. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the nasolacrimal compression device into class I (general controls). The Agency is classifying the device into class I (general controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:27295735

  16. Cybersecurity for Connected Diabetes Devices.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes devices are increasingly connected wirelessly to each other and to data-displaying reader devices. Threats to the accurate flow of information and commands may compromise the function of these devices and put their users at risk of health complications. Sound cybersecurity of connected diabetes devices is necessary to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data and commands. Diabetes devices can be hacked by unauthorized agents and also by patients themselves to extract data that are not automatically provided by product software. Unauthorized access to connected diabetes devices has been simulated and could happen in reality. A cybersecurity standard designed specifically for connected diabetes devices will improve the safety of these products and increase confidence of users that the products will be secure.

  17. Cybersecurity for Connected Diabetes Devices.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes devices are increasingly connected wirelessly to each other and to data-displaying reader devices. Threats to the accurate flow of information and commands may compromise the function of these devices and put their users at risk of health complications. Sound cybersecurity of connected diabetes devices is necessary to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data and commands. Diabetes devices can be hacked by unauthorized agents and also by patients themselves to extract data that are not automatically provided by product software. Unauthorized access to connected diabetes devices has been simulated and could happen in reality. A cybersecurity standard designed specifically for connected diabetes devices will improve the safety of these products and increase confidence of users that the products will be secure. PMID:25883162

  18. Cybersecurity for Connected Diabetes Devices

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes devices are increasingly connected wirelessly to each other and to data-displaying reader devices. Threats to the accurate flow of information and commands may compromise the function of these devices and put their users at risk of health complications. Sound cybersecurity of connected diabetes devices is necessary to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data and commands. Diabetes devices can be hacked by unauthorized agents and also by patients themselves to extract data that are not automatically provided by product software. Unauthorized access to connected diabetes devices has been simulated and could happen in reality. A cybersecurity standard designed specifically for connected diabetes devices will improve the safety of these products and increase confidence of users that the products will be secure. PMID:25883162

  19. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1983-08-15

    A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

  20. Polarization perception device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Victor S. (Inventor); Coulson, Kinsel L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A polarization perception device comprises a base and a polarizing filter having opposite broad sides and a centerline perpendicular thereto. The filter is mounted on the base for relative rotation and with a major portion of the area of the filter substantially unobstructed on either side. A motor on the base automatically moves the filter angularly about its centerline at a speed slow enough to permit changes in light transmission by virtue of such movement to be perceived as light-dark pulses by a human observer, but fast enough so that the light phase of each such pulse occurs prior to fading of the light phase image of the preceding pulse from the observer's retina. In addition to an observer viewing a scene in real time through the filter while it is so angularly moved, or instead of such observation, the scene can be photographed, filmed or taped by a camera whose lens is positioned behind the filter.