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Sample records for myc-mediated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

  1. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... purchased, 10% will be donated to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. iGive.com - Online Shopping Joing iGive.com to ... 5% of the purchase price to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. Bookmark the link http://smile.amazon.com/ch/ ...

  2. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Arrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, Luis de Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disorder with heterogeneity in mutations, forms of presentation, prognosis and treatment strategies. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is recognized as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death that occurs in young people, including athletes. The clinical diagnosis is complemented with the ecocardiographic study, in which an abnormal myocardial hypertrophy of the septum can be observed in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease (arterial systemic hypertension, aortic stenosis). The annual sudden mortality rate is 1% and, in selected populations, it ranges between 3 and 6%. The therapeutic strategies depend on the different subsets of patients according to the morbidity and mortality, sudden cardiac death, obstructive symptoms, heart failure or atrial fibrillation and stroke. High risk patients for sudden death may effectively be treated with the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

  3. Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Veselka, Josef; Anavekar, Nandan S; Charron, Philippe

    2017-03-25

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is an inherited myocardial disease defined by cardiac hypertrophy (wall thickness ≥15 mm) that is not explained by abnormal loading conditions, and left ventricular obstruction greater than or equal to 30 mm Hg. Typical symptoms include dyspnoea, chest pain, palpitations, and syncope. The diagnosis is usually suspected on clinical examination and confirmed by imaging. Some patients are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Patients with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death undergo cardioverter-defibrillator implantation; in patients with severe symptoms related to ventricular obstruction, septal reduction therapy (myectomy or alcohol septal ablation) is recommended. Life-long anticoagulation is indicated after the first episode of atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Misconceptions and Facts About Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Sherrid, Mark V; Messerli, Franz H

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common genetic heart disease. Once considered relentless, untreatable, and deadly, it has become a highly treatable disease with contemporary management. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is one of cardiology's "great masqueraders." Mistakes and delays in diagnosis abound. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy commonly "masquerades" as asthma, anxiety, mitral prolapse, and coronary artery disease. However, once properly diagnosed, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be effectively managed to improve both symptoms and survival. This review highlights some of the misconceptions about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Providers at all levels should have awareness of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to promptly diagnose and properly manage these individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Living with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Subasic, Kim

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an insider's account of what it is like to live with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic cardiovascular illness that carries the risk for sudden cardiac death. This study aims to reveal how HCM impacts the family and guides the decision whether or not to pursue genetic testing, how the physical limitations associated with HCM alter being-in-the-world, and how HCM alters social relationships. Fifteen adults with HCM were recruited for a longitudinal, phenomenological, qualitative study through purposive sampling and word of mouth. A total of 45 interviews were conducted by the researcher at a time and place designated by the participant between August 2011 and January 2012. The first interview with each participant was conducted in person. While efforts were made to conduct all interviews in person, a total of three interviews were conducted by telephone as requested by three participants due to scheduling conflicts. Through methods of interpretive phenomenology, three audio-recorded, semistructured interviews occurred over the course of 3 months. Detailed narratives were solicited and transcribed verbatim. Methodological and analytical documentation was supported with the identification of key phrases, similar experiences, themes, and documentation of the rationale for decisions throughout the research process. Participation in genetic testing carries a multitude of personal, familial, financial, and emotional implications. The results of a genetic test elicited an emotional response regardless of whether the results were negative, positive, or inconclusive. Living with a potentially life-threatening illness altered identity, disrupted social relationships, and generated chronic fear and uncertainty. A new normal was re-ordered or transformed by the demands and limitations posed by HCM, and by the person's concerns, priorities, and the meaning of the illness. Results from this study underscore the need for healthcare

  6. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O; Orlikowski, D; Annane, D

    2008-07-21

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by spinocerebellar degeneration. It is caused by a mutation that consists of an unstable expansion of GAA repeats in the first intron of the gene encoding frataxin on chromosome 9 (9q13). We reported a case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia in a twenty year old patient.

  7. Genetics of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Felix W; Carrier, Lucie

    2012-10-01

    Cardiomyopathies are categorized as extrinsic, being caused by external factors, such as hypertension, ischemia, inflammation, valvular dysfunction, or as intrinsic, which correspond to myocardial diseases without identifiable external causes. These so called primary cardiomyopathies can be categorized in four main forms: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathies are diagnosed by clinical expression, echocardiography, electrocardiography, non-invasive imaging, and sometimes by cardiac catheterization to rule out external causes as ischemia. The two main forms of primary cardiomyopathies are the hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Most of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 20-50% of dilated cardiomyopathy are familial showing a wide genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. This review presents the current knowledge on the causative genes, molecular mechanisms and the genotype � phenotype relations of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies.

  8. [The origin of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Moiseev, V S

    1985-01-01

    The author describes the clinical cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CMP). The development of obstructive CMP in a patient with hyperparathyroidism indicates a possible pathogenetic role of endocrine factors and calcium metabolism abnormalities. The familial character of the disease and its combination with hereditary diseases (familial microspherocytosis) point to the significance of genetic factors. In addition, marked hypertrophy of the myocardium (without dilatation) including hypertrophy with obstruction of the outflow tract of the left ventricle was observed in nonspecific protracted myocarditis, alcoholic injury to the heart, in athletes, in coronary heart disease (after survival of myocardial infarction). It is suggested that hypertrophic CMP (similarly to restrictive and congestive CMP) is most likely a syndrome of varying origin.

  9. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the early years.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2009-12-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) has four major features: (1) severe left ventricular hypertrophy, often most prominent in the basal interventricular septum; (2) frequent familial occurrence with autosomal dominant transmission; (3) occurrence of sudden cardiac death that is usually considered to be due to ventricular fibrillation; and (4) presence of hemodynamic evidence of labile intraventricular obstruction. The key papers describing the recognition of each of these features, as well as of various combinations of them, are reviewed in this paper. Particular attention is focused on the very frequent finding of marked lability of intraventricular obstruction. The recognition of this fourth and last major feature in 1959 makes 2009 the golden anniversary year marking completion of the description of the major features of HOCM.

  10. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Clinical recognition and management

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Cate, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the titles are: Hemodynamics and angiography; Familial and genetic aspects; Recognition and management in children; Morphologic and microscopic aspects of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; Clinical recognition; and Management with beta-adrenergic blocking drugs.

  11. Infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Fernando; Ramos, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela C.; Fariñas, M. Carmen; de Berrazueta, José Ramón; Zarauza, Jesús; Pericás Pulido, Juan Manuel; Paré, Juan Carlos; de Alarcón, Arístides; Sousa, Dolores; Rodriguez Bailón, Isabel; Montejo-Baranda, Miguel; Noureddine, Mariam; García Vázquez, Elisa; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infective endocarditis (IE) complicating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a poorly known entity. Although current guidelines do not recommend IE antibiotic prophylaxis (IEAP) in HCM, controversy remains. This study sought to describe the clinical course of a large series of IE HCM and to compare IE in HCM patients with IE patients with and without an indication for IEAP. Data from the GAMES IE registry involving 27 Spanish hospitals were analyzed. From January 2008 to December 2013, 2000 consecutive IE patients were prospectively included in the registry. Eleven IE HCM additional cases from before 2008 were also studied. Clinical, microbiological, and echocardiographic characteristics were analyzed in IE HCM patients (n = 34) and in IE HCM reported in literature (n = 84). Patients with nondevice IE (n = 1807) were classified into 3 groups: group 1, HCM with native-valve IE (n = 26); group 2, patients with IEAP indication (n = 696); group 3, patients with no IEAP indication (n = 1085). IE episode and 1-year follow-up data were gathered. One-year mortality in IE HCM was 42% in our study and 22% in the literature. IE was more frequent, although not exclusive, in obstructive HCM (59% and 74%, respectively). Group 1 exhibited more IE predisposing factors than groups 2 and 3 (62% vs 40% vs 50%, P < 0.01), and more previous dental procedures (23% vs 6% vs 8%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, Group 1 experienced a higher incidence of Streptococcus infections than Group 2 (39% vs 22%, P < 0.01) and similar to Group 3 (39% vs 30%, P = 0.34). Overall mortality was similar among groups (42% vs 36% vs 35%, P = 0.64). IE occurs in HCM patients with and without obstruction. Mortality of IE HCM is high but similar to patients with and without IEAP indication. Predisposing factors, previous dental procedures, and streptococcal infection are higher in IE HCM, suggesting that HCM patients could benefit from IEAP. PMID:27368014

  12. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  13. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  14. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  15. An unusual ST-segment elevation: apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy shows the ace up its sleeve.

    PubMed

    de Santis, Francesco; Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Pero, Gaetano; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Minardi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is part of the broad clinical and morphologic spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report a patient with electrocardiographic abnormalities in whom acute coronary syndrome was excluded and apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was demonstrated by careful differential diagnosis.

  16. Posterolateral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a rare, but clinically significant variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Perens, Gregory; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Posterolateral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare variant of HCM. Segmental HCM is seen in 12% of cases of HCM. Among the patterns of segmental HCM, posterolateral HCM is the least common type. Our case of an 18-year old male documents this unusual type of cardiomyopathy. In this form of HCM, left ventricular thickness and the extent of hypertrophy might be underestimated by 2-dimensional echocardiography. This case illustrates the echocardiographic and pathologic features of posterolateral HCM.

  17. Psychosocial impact of specialized cardiac genetic clinics for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Lind, Joanne M; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Semsarian, Christopher

    2008-02-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, an autosomal dominant chronic heart disease, can have significant implications, including increased risk of sudden death, exercise limitations, and risk of transmission to offspring. This study sought to describe the psychosocial factors associated with attending a specialty cardiac genetic clinic, and to determine whether these may be predictors of comorbid anxiety and depression in this population. Questionnaires were sent to 184 individuals attending the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic. Questionnaires were anonymous and comprised demographics, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Patient Experience Scales, and Patient Satisfaction Scales. Completed questionnaires were returned by 109 participants (59.2% response rate), of which 76.9% had a diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, while 23.1% were at-risk relatives attending for clinical screening. Patient satisfaction scores were generally high to very high across all groups, though only 24% of HCM patients showed good adjustment to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 10% had low worry about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy scores. Within the disease group, logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, gender, and education revealed adjustment to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and worry about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy scores to be significantly associated with anxiety, while adjustment scores and location of patient follow-up (i.e., Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy clinic or another cardiologist) to be significantly associated with depression scores. HCM patients who attend specialized cardiac genetic clinics are better adjusted and worry less, than those who do not attend. An integrated approach, including a genetic counselor, is important in the management of HCM families.

  18. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry: The rationale and design of an international, observational study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christopher M; Appelbaum, Evan; Desai, Milind Y; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; DiMarco, John P; Friedrich, Matthias G; Geller, Nancy; Heckler, Sarahfaye; Ho, Carolyn Y; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Ivey, Elizabeth A; Keleti, Julianna; Kim, Dong-Yun; Kolm, Paul; Kwong, Raymond Y; Maron, Martin S; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Piechnik, Stefan; Watkins, Hugh; Weintraub, William S; Wu, Pan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenic heart disease with a frequency as high as 1 in 200. In many cases, HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding the different components of the sarcomere apparatus. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, myofibrillar disarray, and myocardial fibrosis. The phenotypic expression is quite variable. Although most patients with HCM are asymptomatic, serious consequences are experienced in a subset of affected individuals who present initially with sudden cardiac death or progress to refractory heart failure. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry study is a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored 2,750-patient, 44-site, international registry and natural history study designed to address limitations in extant evidence to improve prognostication in HCM (NCT01915615). In addition to the collection of standard demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic variables, patients will undergo state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance for assessment of left ventricular mass and volumes as well as replacement scarring and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, genetic and biomarker analyses will be performed. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry has the potential to change the paradigm of risk stratification in HCM, using novel markers to identify those at higher risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys (Aotus spp.).

    PubMed

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly.

  20. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Owl Monkeys (Aotus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly. PMID:23759531

  1. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy simulating an infiltrative myocardial disease.

    PubMed Central

    Frustaci, A; Loperfido, F; Pennestrì, F

    1985-01-01

    Congestive heart failure developed in a patient with low electrocardiographic QRS voltages, diffuse thickening of the septum and free cardiac wall, and a reduction in left ventricular internal diameter, which suggested an infiltrative heart muscle disease. Histological examination at necropsy showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with symmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy. Myocardial disarray of type 1A disorganisation was extensive and equally distributed in the ventricular septum and the left anterior and left posterior ventricular free walls. Severe fibrosis (40%) was also present and may have been a possible cause of the electrocardiographic abnormalities as well as of the lack of ventricular dilatation. Images PMID:4041302

  2. Diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, Annina S; Perez-Tome, Maria Carrillo; Castelletti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is complex and includes a variety of phenotypes, which leads to different types of manifestations. Although most of the patients are asymptomatic, a significant proportion of them will develop symptoms or risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Therefore, the objectives of HCM diagnosis and management are to relieve the patients' symptoms (chest pain, heart failure, syncope, palpitations, etc.), prevent disease progression and major cardiovascular complications and SCD. The heterogeneity of HCM patterns, their symptoms and assessment is a challenge for the cardiologist. PMID:26693331

  3. Screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cats.

    PubMed

    Häggström, Jens; Luis Fuentes, Virginia; Wess, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats, and it can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Cats are often screened for HCM because of the presence of a heart murmur, but screening for breeding purposes has also become common. These cats are usually purebred cats of breeding age, and generally do not present with severe disease or with any clinical signs. This type of screening is particularly challenging because mild disease may be difficult to differentiate from a normal phenotype, and the margin for error is small, with potentially major consequences for the breeder. This article reviews HCM screening methods, with particular emphasis on echocardiography.

  4. Myocardial Fibrosis as an Early Manifestation of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; López, Begoña; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R.; Lakdawala, Neal K.; Cirino, Allison L.; Jarolim, Petr; Kwong, Raymond; González, Arantxa; Colan, Steven D.; Seidman, J.G.; Díez, Javier; Seidman, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Myocardial fibrosis is a hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a proposed substrate for arrhythmias and heart failure. In animal models, profibrotic genetic pathways are activated early, before hypertrophic remodeling. Data showing early profibrotic responses to sarcomere-gene mutations in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are lacking. METHODS We used echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and serum biomarkers of collagen metabolism, hemodynamic stress, and myocardial injury to evaluate subjects with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a confirmed genotype. RESULTS The study involved 38 subjects with pathogenic sarcomere mutations and overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 39 subjects with mutations but no left ventricular hypertrophy, and 30 controls who did not have mutations. Levels of serum C-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) were significantly higher in mutation carriers without left ventricular hypertrophy and in subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy than in controls (31% and 69% higher, respectively; P<0.001). The ratio of PICP to C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen was increased only in subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, suggesting that collagen synthesis exceeds degradation. Cardiac MRI studies showed late gadolinium enhancement, indicating myocardial fibrosis, in 71% of subjects with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy but in none of the mutation carriers without left ventricular hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS Elevated levels of serum PICP indicated increased myocardial collagen synthesis in sarcomere-mutation carriers without overt disease. This profibrotic state preceded the development of left ventricular hypertrophy or fibrosis visible on MRI. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:20818890

  5. Clinical predictors of genetic testing outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Sarina, Tanya; Yeates, Laura; Hunt, Lauren; Macciocca, Ivan; McCormack, Louise; Winship, Ingrid; McGaughran, Julie; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    Genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been commercially available for almost a decade; however, low mutation detection rate and cost have hindered uptake. This study sought to identify clinical variables that can predict probands with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in whom a pathogenic mutation will be identified. Probands attending specialized cardiac genetic clinics across Australia over a 10-year period (2002-2011), who met clinical diagnostic criteria for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and who underwent genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were included. Clinical, family history, and genotype information were collected. A total of 265 unrelated individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were included, with 138 (52%) having at least one mutation identified. The mutation detection rate was significantly higher in the probands with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with an established family history of disease (72 vs. 29%, P < 0.0001), and a positive family history of sudden cardiac death further increased the detection rate (89 vs. 59%, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified female gender, increased left-ventricular wall thickness, family history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and family history of sudden cardiac death as being associated with greatest chance of identifying a gene mutation. Multiple mutation carriers (n = 16, 6%) were more likely to have suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death (31 vs. 7%, P = 0.012). Family history is a key clinical predictor of a positive genetic diagnosis and has direct clinical relevance, particularly in the pretest genetic counseling setting.

  6. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Magri, Damiano; Santolamazza, Caterina

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the functional limitation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the most common inherited heart disease, is challenging. Beside the occurrence of disease-related complications, several factors are potential determinants of exercise limitation, including left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial fiber disarray, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, microvascular ischemia, and interstitial fibrosis. Furthermore, drugs commonly used in the daily management of these patients may interfere with exercise capacity, especially those with a negative chronotropic effect. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing can safely and objectively evaluate the functional capacity of these patients and help the physician in understanding the mechanisms that underlie this limitation. Features that reduce exercise capacity may predict progression to heart failure in these patients and even the risk of sudden cardiac death.

  7. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a neonate associated with nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mir, Arshid; Lemler, Matthew; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Blalock, Shannon; Ikemba, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a congenital nonprogressive skeletal muscle disorder with a characteristic rod body formation in the skeletal muscle fibers. Cardiac involvement in nemaline myopathy is rare, although both dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have been reported. We describe an infant diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypotonia on the first day of life. Muscle biopsy confirmed nemaline myopathy at 3 weeks of age. The diagnosis of nemaline myopathy precluded consideration of heart transplantation, thus shifting the focus to comfort care. This is the earliest presentation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy reported in the literature in the setting of nemaline myopathy. The approach to determining an etiology for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an infant is reviewed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in a patient with Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Conte, M R; Bonfiglio, G; Orzan, F; Mangiardi, L; Camaschella, C; Alfarano, A; Brusca, A

    1995-12-01

    A case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in a patient with Turner syndrome is reported. The most frequently associated cardiac anomalies are coarctation of the aorta and bicuspid aortic valve. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has never been reported in this syndrome but is frequent in Noonan syndrome. In these two conditions the phenotype may be indistinguishable but the cariotype is different: normal in Noonan and 45X in Turner syndrome. Our patient had the typical somatic features, and the cariotype was 45X in all examined cells. A familial form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was excluded by the normal clinical examination of other members of the family. The presence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also in Turner syndrome and the recent localization on the long arm of the chromosome 12 of the gene for Noonan syndrome might postulate a common pathogenesis of the two syndromes.

  9. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    MedlinePlus

    Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Two Cases of Apical Ballooning Syndrome Masking Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ranjini Raina; Hakim, Fayaz A.; Hurst, R. Todd; Simper, David; Appleton, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Apical akinesis and dilation in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease is a typical feature of stress-induced (takotsubo) cardiomyopathy, whereas apical hypertrophy is seen in apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report the cases of 2 patients who presented with takotsubo cardiomyopathy and were subsequently found to have apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, after the apical ballooning from the takotsubo cardiomyopathy had resolved. The first patient, a 43-year-old woman with a history of alcohol abuse, presented with shortness of breath, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic features consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, and no significant coronary artery disease. An echocardiogram 2 weeks later revealed a normal left ventricular ejection fraction and newly apparent apical hypertrophy. The 2nd patient, a 70-year-old woman with pancreatitis, presented with chest pain, apical akinesis, and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.39, consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. One month later, her left ventricular ejection fraction was normal; however, hypertrophy of the left ventricular apex was newly noted. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases in which apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was masked by apical ballooning from stress-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:24808780

  11. Cardiac sarcoid: a chameleon masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anushree; Sulemanjee, Nasir Z; Cheema, Omar; Downey, Francis X; Tajik, A Jamil

    2014-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology often seen in young adults, with cardiac involvement in more than one-quarter of sarcoid patients. The clinical presentation of cardiac sarcoid depends upon the location and extent of myocardium involved. Although cardiac sarcoid may produce asymmetrical septal hypertrophy, it is most commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. The hypertrophic stage of cardiac sarcoid is rarely seen. We describe a case of cardiac sarcoid in a young patient wherein a distinctive appearance of the cardiac sarcoid spectrum from "hypertrophic" stage to thinned/scarred stage, masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy followed by dilated cardiomyopathy, is demonstrated.

  12. Cardiac norepinephrine kinetics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, J.E. Jr.; Eisenhofer, G.; Garty, M.; Stull, R.; Maron, B.J.; Cannon, R.O. III; Panza, J.A.; Epstein, S.E.; Goldstein, D.S.

    1989-04-01

    We examined the uptake and release of norepinephrine in the cardiac circulation and other regional vascular beds in 11 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and in 10 control subjects during simultaneous infusion of tracer-labeled norepinephrine and isoproterenol. Cardiac neuronal uptake of norepinephrine was assessed by comparing regional removal of tracer-labeled norepinephrine with that of tracer-labeled isoproterenol (which is not a substrate for neuronal uptake) and by the relation between production of dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), an exclusively intraneuronal metabolite of norepinephrine, and regional spillover of norepinephrine. Cardiac extraction of norepinephrine averaged 59 +/- 17% in the patients with HCM, significantly less than in the control subjects (79 +/- 13%, p less than 0.05), whereas cardiac extraction of isoproterenol was similar in the two groups (13 +/- 23% versus 13 +/- 14%), indicating that neuronal uptake of norepinephrine was decreased in the patients with HCM. The cardiac arteriovenous difference in norepinephrine was significantly larger in the patients with HCM than in the control subjects (73 +/- 77 versus 13 +/- 50 pg/ml, p less than 0.05), as was the product of the arteriovenous difference in norepinephrine and coronary blood flow (7.3 +/- 7.3 versus 0.8 +/- 3.0 ng/min, p less than 0.05).

  13. Potential applications for transesophageal echocardiography in hypertrophic cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Widimsky, P; Ten Cate, F J; Vletter, W; van Herwerden, L

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential advantages of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in comparison with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in selected patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Ten patients with previously established or suspected diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were examined by TEE to solve specific clinical questions. TEE was well tolerated by all patients; no arrhythmias were seen during the procedure. The comparison of TTE and TEE showed the following: Advantages of TTE--better assessment of the left ventricle, myocardial thickness measurements available in all regions and sufficient for the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in nine out of 10 patients; advantages of TEE--precise assessment of mitral valve morphology and regurgitant jets, detailed evaluation of systolic anterior motion, and subaortic membrane (not seen by TTE) recognized in one patient. Clinically, in three patients TEE influenced the management (mitral leaflet perforation, subaortic membrane, and residual mitral regurgitation after valvuloplasty). Thus TEE enables more precise diagnosis in some patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and has the potential to influence their surgical management. However, for medical treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, TTE is sufficient.

  14. Williams-Beuren syndrome with brain malformation and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Noriko; Yamagata, Takanori; Yada, Yukari; Ichihashi, Ko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Momoi, Mariko Y; Mizuguchi, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a multisystemic genetic disorder caused by a contiguous gene deletion at 7q11.23. We report a severely affected WBS patient with cerebral and cerebellar dysplasia as well as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) detected a deletion on 7q11.23 expanding from RP11-614D7 to RP11-137E8, which is a typical deletion in WBS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of a WBS patient with severe congenital central nervous system anomaly and progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The relationship between the genes deleted in WBS and a CNS anomaly plus hypertrophic cardiomyopathy requires further analysis. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hyperthyroidism: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Symons, C.; Richardson, P. J.; Feizi, O.

    1974-01-01

    Symons, C., Richardson, P. J., and Feizi, O. (1974).Thorax, 29, 713-719. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hyperthyroidism. The combination of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hyperthyroidism gives rise to a complex clinical picture as some of the symptoms and signs may be common to both conditions. The presentation and investigation of three patients are reported. In one patient there was evidence of progression from the hypertrophic obstructive phase to that associated with loss of outflow tract obstruction. The echocardiogram was especially useful in assessing the presence or absence of hypertrophic disease in the thyrotoxic subject. It is suggested that the long continued high-output circulatory state in clinically undetected hyperthyroidism may prove to be a stimulus for unrestrained cardiac muscle hypertrophy. Images PMID:4281112

  16. Platelet activation in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tablin, F; Schumacher, T; Pombo, M; Marion, C T; Huang, K; Norris, J W; Jandrey, K E; Kittleson, M D

    2014-01-01

    Cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are at risk for development of systemic thromboembolic disease. However, the relationship between platelet activation state and cardiovascular parameters associated with HCM is not well described. To characterize platelet activation by flow cytometric evaluation of platelet P-selectin and semiquantitative Western blot analysis of soluble platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (sPECAM-1). Eight normal healthy cats (controls) owned by staff and students of the School of Veterinary Medicine and 36 cats from the UC Davis Feline HCM Research Laboratory were studied. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was used for all flow cytometry studies. Platelet surface CD41 and P-selectin expression were evaluated before and after ADP stimulation. sPECAM-1 expression was evaluated by Western blot analysis of platelet-poor plasma that had been stabilized with aprotinin. Standard echocardiographic studies were performed. Resting platelets from cats with severe HCM had increased P-selectin expression compared to controls, and expressed higher surface density of P-selectin reflected by their increased mean fluorescence intensities (MFI). Stimulation with ADP also resulted in significantly increased P-selectin MFI of platelets from cats with severe HCM. Increased P-selectin expression and MFI correlated with the presence of a heart murmur and end-systolic cavity obliteration (ESCO). sPECAM-1 expression from cats with moderate and severe HCM was significantly increased above those of control cats. P-selectin and sPECAM expression may be useful biomarkers indicating increased platelet activation in cats with HCM. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  17. A Tension-Based Model Distinguishes Hypertrophic versus Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer; Davis, L Craig; Correll, Robert N; Makarewich, Catherine A; Schwanekamp, Jennifer A; Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Wang, Dan; York, Allen J; Wu, Haodi; Houser, Steven R; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Regnier, Michael; Metzger, Joseph M; Wu, Joseph C; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2016-05-19

    The heart either hypertrophies or dilates in response to familial mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, which are responsible for contraction and pumping. These mutations typically alter calcium-dependent tension generation within the sarcomeres, but how this translates into the spectrum of hypertrophic versus dilated cardiomyopathy is unknown. By generating a series of cardiac-specific mouse models that permit the systematic tuning of sarcomeric tension generation and calcium fluxing, we identify a significant relationship between the magnitude of tension developed over time and heart growth. When formulated into a computational model, the integral of myofilament tension development predicts hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies in mice associated with essentially any sarcomeric gene mutations, but also accurately predicts human cardiac phenotypes from data generated in induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived myocytes from familial cardiomyopathy patients. This tension-based model also has the potential to inform pharmacologic treatment options in cardiomyopathy patients.

  18. Stress cardiomyopathy in a patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and myocardial bridging

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Miguel; Vinardell, Juan M; Arenas, Ivan; Santana, Orlando

    2017-01-01

    Stress cardiomyopathy is an acquired cardiomyopathy of unknown aetiology. It usually occurs in women over the age of 70 who have experienced physical or emotional stress. It is most commonly characterised by a transient, left ventricular systolic dysfunction in the apical portion and hyperkinesia in the basal segments, without obstructive coronary artery disease. Its association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and myocardial bridging is rare. Herein, we present such a case. PMID:28228389

  19. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Practical Steps for Preventing Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare cause of death among athletes, with deaths occurring in young, apparently healthy people. Differentiating HCM from conditioning hypertrophy is challenging. Routine detection involves family history, physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Keys to differential diagnosis include…

  20. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Practical Steps for Preventing Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare cause of death among athletes, with deaths occurring in young, apparently healthy people. Differentiating HCM from conditioning hypertrophy is challenging. Routine detection involves family history, physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Keys to differential diagnosis include…

  1. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, B.J.; Tajik, A.J.; Ruttenberg, H.D.; Graham, T.P.; Atwood, G.F.; Victorica, B.E.; Lie, J.T.; Roberts, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure.

  2. Sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: genetic profile in a Portuguese population.

    PubMed

    Brito, Dulce; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, Gabriel; Vale Pereira, Sónia; Silva, Doroteia; Diogo, António Nunes; Madeira, Hugo

    2012-09-01

    Sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has heterogeneous phenotypic expressions, of which sudden cardiac death is the most feared. A genetic diagnosis is essential to identify subjects at risk in each family. The spectrum of disease-causing mutations in the Portuguese population is unknown. Seventy-seven unrelated probands with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were systematically screened for mutations by PCR and sequencing of five sarcomeric genes: MYBPC3, MYH7, TNNT2, TNNI3 and MYL2. Familial cosegregation analysis was performed in most patients. Thirty-four different mutations were identified in 41 (53%) index patients, 71% with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The most frequently involved gene was MYBPC3 (66%) with 22 different mutations (8 novel) in 27 patients, followed by MYH7 (22%), TNNT2 (12%) and TNNI3 (2.6%). In three patients (7%), two mutations were found in MYBPC3 and/or MYH7. Additionally, 276 relatives were screened, leading to the identification of a mean of three other affected relatives for each pedigree with the familial form of the disease. Disease-associated mutations were identified mostly in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, corroborating the idea that rarely studied genes may be implicated in sporadic forms. Private mutations are the rule, MYBPC3 being the most commonly involved gene. Mutations in MYBPC3 and MYH7 accounted for most cases of sarcomere-related disease. Multiple mutations in these genes may occur, which highlights the importance of screening both. The detection of novel mutations strongly suggests that all coding regions should be systematically screened. Genotyping in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy enables a more precise diagnosis of the disease, with implications for risk stratification and genetic counseling. Copyright © 2011 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Evolutionary change mimicking apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hui-Jeong; Lee, Hyae-Min; Yang, In-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hee; Byun, Jong-Kyu; Sohn, Il Suk

    2014-11-01

    In this report, we introduce a case of thickening of the involved left ventricular apical segment on echocardiography and deep T-wave inversions in precordial leads on electrocardiography transiently seen in the course of recovery from biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy, mimicking apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This result suggests that the echocardiographic finding of transient myocardial edema can be identified by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Additionally, it persisted a few weeks after full functional recovery. We believe that this case will contribute in part toward clarifying the pathophysiology of takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cardiomyopathy is a heart condition characterized by thickening (hypertrophy) of the heart (cardiac) muscle . Thickening usually occurs ... also lead to symptoms of the condition. Cardiac hypertrophy often begins in adolescence or young adulthood, although ...

  5. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry (HCMR): The rationale and design of an international, observational study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.; Appelbaum, Evan; Desai, Milind Y.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; DiMarco, John P.; Friedrich, Matthias G.; Geller, Nancy; Heckler, Sarahfaye; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Ivey, Elizabeth A.; Keleti, Julianna; Kim, Dong-Yun; Kolm, Paul; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Maron, Martin S.; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Piechnik, Stefan; Watkins, Hugh; Weintraub, William S.; Wu, Pan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenic heart disease with a frequency as high as 1 in 200. In many cases, HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding the different components of the sarcomere apparatus. HCM is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), myofibrillar disarray, and myocardial fibrosis. The phenotypic expression is quite variable. While the majority of patients with HCM are asymptomatic, serious consequences are experienced in a subset of affected individuals who present initially with sudden cardiac death (SCD) or progress to refractory heart failure (HF). The HCMR study is a National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 2750 patient, 41 site, international registry and natural history study designed to address limitations in extant evidence to improve prognostication in HCM (NCT01915615). In addition to collection of standard demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic variables, patients will undergo state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) for assessment of left ventricular (LV) mass and volumes as well as replacement scarring and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, genetic and biomarker analysis will be performed. HCMR has the potential to change the paradigm of risk stratification in HCM, using novel markers to identify those at higher risk. PMID:26299218

  6. Analysis of 8 sarcomeric candidate genes for feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Meurs, K M; Norgard, M M; Kuan, M; Haggstrom, J; Kittleson, M

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats. Causative mutations have been identified in the Maine Coon (MC) and Ragdoll breed in the cardiac myosin binding protein C gene (MYBPC3). HCM is thought to be inherited in other breeds. That a causative mutation for HCM in the British Shorthair (BSH), Norwegian Forest (NWF), Siberian, Sphynx, or MC cats would be identified in the exonic and splice site regions of 1 of 8 genes associated with human familial HCM. Three affected BSH, NWF, Siberians, Sphynx, 2 MC (without the known MC mutation), and 2 Domestic Shorthair cats (controls) were studied. Prospective, observational study. Exonic and splice site regions of the genes encoding the proteins cardiac troponin I, troponin T, MYBPC3, cardiac essential myosin light chain, cardiac regulatory myosin light chain, alpha tropomyosin, actin, and beta-myosin heavy chain were sequenced. Sequences were compared for nucleotide changes between affected cats, the published DNA sequences, and control cats. Changes were considered to be causative for HCM if they involved a conserved amino acid and changed the amino acid to a different polarity, acid-base status, or structure. A causative mutation for HCM was not identified, although several single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected. Mutations within these cardiac genes do not appear to be the only cause of HCM in these breeds. Evaluation of additional cardiac genes is warranted to identify additional molecular causes of this feline cardiac disease.

  7. Age-dependent heterogeneity of familiar hypertrophic cardiomyopathy phenotype: a role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Glaveckaitė, Sigita; Rudys, Alfredas; Mikštienė, Violeta; Valevičienė, Nomeda; Palionis, Darius; Laucevičius, Aleksandras

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, we present familiar hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with age-dependent heterogeneity of the disease phenotype among the members of one family who carry the same mutation of the myosin-binding protein C gene. Phenotypic heterogeneity is common in patients with familial forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, both in clinical expression and outcome. Compared with other noninvasive cardiac imaging modalities, cardiovascular magnetic resonance provides an opportunity to more accurately characterize the varying phenotypic presentations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  8. Atrial Myxoma in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Mahmoud; Hayek, Salim; Williams, Byron R.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is the most common primary cardiac tumor. Patients with atrial myxoma typically present with obstructive, embolic, or systemic symptoms; asymptomatic presentation is very rare. To our knowledge, isolated association of atrial myxoma with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been reported only once in the English-language medical literature. We report the case of an asymptomatic 71-year-old woman with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in whom a left atrial mass was incidentally identified on cardiac magnetic resonance images. After surgical excision of the mass and partial excision of the left atrial septum, histopathologic analysis confirmed the diagnosis of atrial myxoma. The patient was placed on preventive implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy and remained asymptomatic. The management of asymptomatic cardiac myxoma is a topic of debate, because no reports definitively favor either conservative or surgical measures. PMID:24082380

  9. Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Persian cat.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Tiffany L; Jennings, Ryan N

    2017-07-01

    Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) are rare causes of primary pulmonary hypertension in humans, and, in 2016, were reported in dogs. A 1-y-old, neutered male Persian cat was presented for autopsy after sudden death several hours after grooming. Grossly, the lungs were mottled red-to-pink, contained rubbery-to-firm nodular foci, and there was moderate-to-marked left-sided cardiomegaly and left atrial dilation, consistent with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Microscopically, there was multifocal to regionally extensive capillary proliferation within pulmonary alveolar septa and around respiratory bronchioles, with nodular aggregates of densely arranged capillaries that replaced pulmonary alveolar spaces. Rare occlusive venous remodeling was identified in Verhoeff-van Gieson-stained sections. The gross and microscopic changes were consistent with PCH with rare features of PVOD. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was interpreted as potentially contributing to the cause of death, but unrelated to the pulmonary vascular proliferation.

  10. [Risk stratification of sudden death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 2016].

    PubMed

    Dubourg, Olivier; Charron, Philippe; Sirol, Marc; Siam-Tsieu, Valérie; Mansencal, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are at an increased risk of death from many causes and sudden cardiac death is one of them. The study of the sudden cardiac death of patients with HCM has allowed the identification of risk factors and among them major risk factor are: family history of sudden cardiac death, the occurrence of syncope/dizziness, the existence of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia an abnormal blood pressure response during stress test, presence of severe left ventricular hypertrophy≥30mm. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death is essential, for symptomatic or asymptomatic HCM patients. Two approaches are possible: the classical approach or risk stratification methods with major risk factors and the new approach using the risk-calculator recommended by the ESC. Both methods are not in opposition but complementary. The risk stratification in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy should be still improved to be sure that only the most high-risk patients receive an implantable cardiac defibrillator.

  11. Atrial fibrillation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: mechanisms, embolic risk and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ajith G; Fischer, Avi G

    2006-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is associated with an increased incidence of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in HCM with a prevalence of 20% and an annual incidence of two percent per year. Increased left atrial size and volume along with impaired left atrial function confer an increased likelihood of AF. The onset of AF is often accompanied by a decrease in functional status in conjunction with an increased risk of stroke and overall mortality.

  12. Primary amyloid heart disease presenting as hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, L.T.; Raybuck, B.D.; Robinowitz, M.; Brinker, J.A.; Oetgen, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the unusual presentation of a patient with primary cardiac amyloidosis. Initial clinical symptoms and hemodynamic studies, including Technetium-99m-pyrophosphate scintigraphy, suggested hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, but endomyocardial biopsy revealed diffuse amyloid infiltration. Only two other cases of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction due to cardiac amyloidosis have been reported. The false-negative technetium-99m-pyrophosphate scintigram in this patient argues for the use of endomyocardial biopsy to aid in the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  13. [Doppler evaluation of diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Borzi, M; Capria, A; Calò, L; Luzi, M; Cannata, D

    1995-01-01

    Diastolic function may play a significant role in patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, because abnormalities in diastolic function, even in presence of a normal systolic function, may determine the clinical features of the disease. Doppler ecocardiography, using a non-invasive and not highly expensive method, easily allows to analize the indexes of diastolic function, as soon as some morpho-functional parameters, represented by extent and localization of the myocardial hypertrophy and presence or absence of obstruction in the left ventricular outflow, which have always been considered relevant in the prognosis together with the typical arrhythmic abnormalities of the disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the behaviour of Doppler ecocardiographic parameters of diastolic function in 38 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and to analize whether they might be correlated with the morpho-functional patterns and clinical features of the disease, represented by the NYHA functional class and occurrence of ventricular tachycardia during 48 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. Diastolic function abnormalities, although occurring in most patients, do not seem to be related with clinical conditions and/or with the typical morpho-functional patterns of the disease; however, an increase in the left atrial size together with a specific increase in the rate of deceleration of flow velocity in early diastole that were detected in patients with ventricular tachycardia, by suggesting a relation between diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmogenic substrate, remarks the importance of the analysis of diastolic function for a better prognostic evaluation of the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  14. Reversible transition from a hypertrophic to a dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spillmann, Frank; Kühl, Uwe; Van Linthout, Sophie; Dominguez, Fernando; Escher, Felicitas; Schultheiss, Heinz‐Peter; Pieske, Burkert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report the case of a 17‐year‐old female patient with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a Wolff‐Parkinson‐White syndrome. She came to our department for further evaluation of a new diagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by an enlargement of the left ventricle and a fall in ejection fraction. Clinically, she complained about atypical chest pain, arrhythmic episodes with presyncopal events, and dyspnea (NYHA III) during the last 6 months. Non‐invasive and invasive examinations including magnetic resonance imaging, electrophysiological examinations, and angiography did not lead to a conclusive diagnosis. Therefore, endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) were taken to investigate whether a specific myocardial disease caused the impairment of the left ventricular function. EMB analysis resulted in the diagnosis of a virus‐negative, active myocarditis. Based on this diagnosis, an immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine was started, which led to an improvement of cardiac function and symptoms within 3 months after initiating therapy. In conclusion, we show that external stress triggered by myocarditis can induce a reversible transition from a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to a dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype. This case strongly underlines the need for a thorough and invasive examination of heart failure of unknown causes, including EMB investigations as recommend by the actual ESC position statement. PMID:27774273

  15. Electrocardiographic changes announcing the rapid development of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an adult male.

    PubMed

    Freites, Alfonso; Canovas, Ester; Rubio, J

    2015-07-01

    We presented the case of an adult male without structural heart disease, who in the period of 3 years developed apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. ECG changes preceded the development of ventricular hypertrophy. We discussed the appearance of ventricular enlargement during adulthood, in some cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), and how the ECG abnormalities may precede the onset of ventricular hypertrophy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Hearing Profile in Patients with Dilated and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Zarea, Gehan Abd El-Rahman; Hassan, Yasser Elsayed Mohamed; Mahmoud, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy may cause disruptions in the micro-vascular system of the stria vascularis in the cochlea, and, subsequently, may result in cochlear degeneration. Degeneration in the stria vascularis affects the physical and chemical processes in the organ of Corti, thereby causing a possible hearing impairment. The objective of this study was to assess the hearing profiles of patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies to determine the relationship between the degree of hearing loss and the degree and duration of the disease and to compare the dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies as regards hearing profile. Methods In this case control study, we studied 21 patients (cases/study group/group 1) and 15 healthy individuals (controls/group 2). Six patients (group 1a) had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and 15 patients (group 1b) had dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The data were analyzed using the t-test, chi-squared test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and the Multiple Mann-Whitney test. Results The results of this study showed that 80% of those patients with DCM (group 1b) had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), and 100% of the patients with HCM (group 1a) had mild to severe bilateral sloping SNHL. Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAEs) were present in 14% of the study group and in 100 % of the control group. The results of the measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) showed that 50% of the study group had abnormal latencies compared to the control group, and there was no correlation between the duration of the disease and the degree of hearing loss or DPOAE. Fifty percent of the patients with HCM and 35% of the patients with DCM had positive family histories of similar conditions, and 35% of those with HCM had a positive family history of sudden death. Conclusion The results of this study suggested that the link between heart disease and hearing loss and early identification of hearing loss in patients with

  17. Percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    van der Lee, C.; Foley, D.P.; Vletter, W.B.; ten Cate, F.J.; Kofflard, M.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Background Percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) is a new interventional technique to treat patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods Small doses of ethanol 96% were injected into a targeted septal artery causing a chemical myocardial infarction. Three patients were evaluated, including a follow-up of three months. Results There were no complications during the procedure LVOT gradient was reduced from 120±140 mmHg. At follow-up, all three patients showed improvement in validity. Conclusion The method requires an echocardiographic contrast determination of the myocardium at risk for ethanol treatment, in addition to haemodynamic monitoring. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3A PMID:25696698

  18. Atrial fibrillation and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: who to anticoagulate?

    PubMed

    Frontera, Antonio; Wilson, D G; Sekhon, H; Duncan, E R; Thomas, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is one of the most common genetic cardiac conditions. Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been demonstrated to be the most frequent arrhythmia encountered in HCM patients. Research focusing on AF and embolic stroke in HCM patients has been sparse and the sample size of most studies is small. The prognostic significance of AF in HCM patients is still not well known. The aim of this article is to provide further understanding of the anti-coagulation requirement of HCM patients with AF.

  19. Echocardiographic sign of right-sided hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Cardiel, E A; Alonso, M; Delcan, J L; Menarguez, L

    1978-01-01

    The echocardiographic and haemodynamic findings with a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) and dynamic subpulmonary stenosis, without left ventricular gradient, are described. The echocardiogram shows not only asymmetric septal hypertrophy, systolic anterior movement of the anterior mitral leaflet, and midsystolic collapse of the aortic valve, but also increase in the right ventricular wall echoes and systolic collapse of the pulmonary valve. We believe that in the absence of pulmonary hypertension these signs, particularly the systolic closing movement of the pulmonary valve cusp, may suggest right ventricular obstruction in HOCM. Images PMID:568930

  20. Recent progress in end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Yang, Kun-Qi; Jiang, Yong; Zhou, Xian-Liang

    2015-05-01

    Within the diverse spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a unique subgroup characterized by left ventricular enlargement and systolic dysfunction has emerged (defined as end-stage HCM [ES-HCM]). This underestimated entity provides challenging treatment strategies for extremely high risk of refractory heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Over the last 2 decades, the clinical features of ES-HCM have expanded and the underlying mechanisms gradually elucidated. Moreover, there is increasing evidence for early recognition of ES-HCM. New insights into early prevention and management will improve the clinical outcomes of this entity.

  1. Simultaneous pressure recording in mid-ventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Yousuke; Misumi, Ikuo; Rokutanda, Taku; Akahoshi, Ryuichiro; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Kaikita, Koichi; Yamamuro, Megumi; Sugiyama, Seigo; Ogawa, Hisao

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old man was diagnosed with mid-ventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (MVOHCM) with apical aneurysm and paradoxic jet flow. At cardiac catheterization, pressure study showed that there was a markedly high pressure-gradient of 90 mmHg between the apex and the base in systole. Apical pressure was 350 mmHg after premature ventricular contraction. The apical aneurysm was already dilated and spherical in late systole; the absence of active relaxation was considered to be the cause of the paradoxic jet flow. In this report, we suggest the pathogenesis of left ventricular apical aneurysm and paradoxic jet flow in MVOHCM.

  2. Surgical Myectomy after Failed Ablation for Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bougioukas, Ioannis; Hoppe, Uta; Danner, Bernhard; Schoendube, Friedrich A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic disease of the myocardial sarcolemma characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy. When obstruction to the left ventricular outflow tract is present and symptoms are refractory to medication, surgical myectomy or alcohol septal ablation is indicated. Case Description We report a case of a patient presented for myectomy due to recurrence only 1 year after alcohol ablation. Interesting findings were a firm subaortic membrane and a direct insertion of the papillary muscle into the mitral valve. Conclusion After myectomy and extensive papillary muscle mobilization, a significant relief of obstruction was achieved. PMID:28018818

  3. Genetic counseling and testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the pediatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Demo, Erin M; Skrzynia, Cécile; Baxter, Samantha

    2009-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common cardiac disease that is now being identified in the pediatric population. The etiology of this disease is largely genetic, and as a result, genetics professionals are becoming more involved in the management of these patients. We present multiple case scenarios that highlight the complex nature of this disease and how genetic counselors and cardiologists can interact to identify the genetic etiology of HCM and provide comprehensive care for these patients. Additionally, we describe knowledge gaps in this field and how research endeavors can assist in more effectively managing this patient cohort.

  4. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a mixed breed cat family.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kiyoshi; Takemura, Naoyuki; Machida, Noboru; Kawamura, Masamichi; Amasaki, Hajime; Hirose, Hisashi

    2002-07-01

    A spayed female mixed cat (case 1) and its female offspring, the result of a pairing between case 1 and its male sibling, were diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). A pedigree survey revealed that the prevalence of HCM was at least 12.5% in the family, which was considered to be significantly higher than that in a hospital-based population (approximately 1.6%). Thus, this finding seems to support the suspected occurrence of familial HCM in this group of related cats.

  5. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy hypertrophic obstructive.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Raimundo José Almeida de Oliveira; Santos, Adaílton Araújo dos; Azevedo, Mablo de Castro; Meira, Saulo Sacramento

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare clinical condition caused by a genetic change that results in the formation of structurally or functionally altered collagen. The clinical manifestations are varied, being the most obvious skin hypermotility and increased joint flexibility, although other systems - such as cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological - may also be affected. This paper presents the report of a patient who sought medical attention with complaints of atypical chest pain. Clinical evaluation enabled hypothetical diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Initial electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and 24 hours holter allowed the confirmation of the first hypothesis. A skin biopsy performed later associated clinical data and confirmed the second hypothesis.

  6. Two different cardiomyopathies in a single patient : hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Sunbul, M; Ozben, B; Mutlu, B

    2013-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a complex and relatively common genetic disorder characterized by left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, usually associated with a nondilated and hyperdynamic chamber with heterogeneous phenotypic expression and clinical course. On the other hand, LV noncompaction is an uncommon cardiomyopathy characterized by the persistence of fetal myocardium with a pattern of prominent trabecular meshwork and deep intertrabecular recesses, systolic dysfunction, and LV dilatation. We report a 29-year-old man with these two different inherent conditions. Our case raises the possibility of a genetic mutation common to these two clinical entities or different gene mutations existing in the same individual.

  7. Family communication in a population at risk for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Batte, Brittany; Sheldon, Jane P; Arscott, Patricia; Huismann, Darcy J; Salberg, Lisa; Day, Sharlene M; Yashar, Beverly M

    2015-04-01

    Encouraging family communication is an integral component of genetic counseling; therefore, we sought to identify factors impacting communication to family members at risk for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). Participants (N = 383) completed an online survey assessing: 1) demographics (gender, genetic test results, HCM family history, and disease severity); 2) illness representations; 3) family functioning and cohesiveness; 4) coping styles; 5) comprehension of HCM autosomal dominant inheritance; and 6) communication of HCM risk information to at-risk relatives. Participants were a national sample of individuals with HCM, recruited through the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. Data from 183 participants were analyzed using a logistic regression analysis, with family communication as a dichotomous dependent variable. We found that female gender and higher comprehension of autosomal dominant inheritance were significant predictors of participants' communication of HCM risk information to all their siblings and children. Our results suggest that utilizing interventions that promote patient comprehension (e.g., a teaching-focused model of genetic counseling) are important and may positively impact family communication within families with HCM.

  8. Subaortic and midventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with extreme segmental hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiadis, Georgios K; Giannakoulas, Georgios; Parcharidou, Despina G; Ziakas, Antonios G; Papadopoulos, Christodoulos E; Karoulas, Takis; Pliakos, Christodoulos; Parcharidis, Georgios

    2007-01-01

    Background Subaortic and midventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with extreme segmental hypertrophy exceeding the usual maximum wall thickness reported in the literature is a rare phenomenon. Case Presentation A 19-year-old man with recently diagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was referred for sudden death risk assessment. The patient had mild exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association functional class II), but without syncope or chest pain. There was no family history of HCM or sudden death. A two dimensional echocardiogram revealed an asymmetric type of LV hypertrophy; anterior ventricular septum = 49 mm; posterior ventricular septum = 20 mm; anterolateral free wall = 12 mm; and posterior free wall = 6 mm. The patient had 2 types of obstruction; a LV outflow obstruction due to systolic anterior motion of both mitral leaflets (Doppler-estimated 38 mm Hg gradient at rest); and a midventricular obstruction (Doppler-estimated 43 mm Hg gradient), but without apical aneurysm or dyskinesia. The patient had a normal blood pressure response on exercise test and no episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 24-h ECG recording. Cardiac MRI showed a gross late enhancement at the hypertrophied septum. Based on the extreme degree of LV hypertrophy and the myocardial hyperenhancement, an implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator was recommended prophylactically for primary prevention of sudden death. Conclusion Midventricular HCM is an infrequent phenotype, but may be associated with an apical aneurysm and progression to systolic dysfunction (end-stage HCM). PMID:17349063

  9. Imaging Phenotype vs. Genotype in Non-Hypertrophic Heritable Cardiomyopathies: Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Subha V.; Basso, Cristina; Tandri, Harikrishna; Taylor, Matthew R. G.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular imaging increasingly afford unique insights into heritable myocardial disease. As clinical presentation of genetic cardiomyopathies may range from nonspecific symptoms to sudden cardiac death, accurate diagnosis has implications for individual patients as well as related family members. The initial consideration of genetic cardiomyopathy may occur in the imaging laboratory, where one must recognize the patient with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) among the many with ventricular arrhythmia referred to define myocardial substrate. Accurate diagnosis of the patient presenting with dyspnea and palpitations whose first-degree relatives have lamin A/C cardiomyopathy may warrant genetic testing1, 2 plus imaging of diastolic function and myocardial fibrosis3. As advances in cardiac imaging afford detection of subclinical structural and functional changes, the imaging specialist must be attuned to signatures of specific genetic disorders. With increased availability of both advanced imaging as well as genotyping techniques, this review seeks to provide cardiovascular imaging specialists and clinicians with the contemporary information needed for more precise diagnosis and treatment of heritable myocardial disease. A companion paper in this series covers imaging phenotype and genotype considerations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This review details clinical features, imaging phenotype and current genetic understanding for two of the most common non-HCM conditions that prompt myocardial imaging - dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). While all modalities are considered herein, considerable focus is given to CMR with its unique capabilities for myocardial tissue characterization. PMID:21081743

  10. Down Syndrome with Complete Atrioventricular Septal Defect, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, and Pulmonary Vein Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mahadevaiah, Guruprasad; Gupta, Manoj; Ashwath, Ravi

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease in infants with Down syndrome is 40%, compared with 0.3% in children who have normal chromosomes. Atrioventricular and ventricular septal defects are often associated with chromosomal aberrations, such as in trisomy 21, whereas hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is chiefly thought to be secondary to specific gene mutations. We found only one reported case of congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and atrioventricular septal defect in an infant with Down syndrome. Here, we report atrioventricular septal defect, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and pulmonary vein stenosis in a neonate with Down syndrome-an apparently unique combination. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature.

  11. An Unusual Type of Localized Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy With Wolf Parkinson White Syndrome Presenting With Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Vatan, Mehmet Bulent; Gunduz, Huseyin; Gurel, Safiye; Kocayigit, Ibrahim; Vural, Ahmet; Demirtas, Saadet; Cakar, Mehmet Akif; Gunduz, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant heart disease that is the most common genetic cardiac disorder. The disease is characterized by excessive thickening of the left ventricular myocardium. The anterior portion of the interventricular ventricular septum is often involved. Asymmetric hypertrophy of apical site, left ventricular free wall, and right ventricle are less common in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that occur in 1% cases. We report a case of a patient with an unusual type of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Wolf Parkinson White (WPW) presenting with pulmonary edema.

  12. Determination of multidirectional myocardial deformations in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by using two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryohei; Mochizuki, Yohei; Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Teshima, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Koyama, Hidekazu

    2017-02-01

    Objectives Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a primary disorder of the myocardium, is the most common cardiac disease in cats. However, determination of myocardial deformation with two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in cats with various stages of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has not yet been reported. This study was designed to measure quantitatively multidirectional myocardial deformations of cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods Thirty-two client-owned cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 14 healthy cats serving as controls were enrolled and underwent assessment of myocardial deformation (peak systolic strain and strain rate) in the longitudinal, radial and circumferential directions. Results Longitudinal and radial deformations were reduced in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, despite normal systolic function determined by conventional echocardiography. Cats with severely symptomatic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also had lower peak systolic circumferential strain, in addition to longitudinal and radial strain. Conclusions and relevance Longitudinal and radial deformation may be helpful in the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Additionally, the lower circumferential deformation in cats with severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may contribute to clinical findings of decompensation, and seems to be related to severe cardiac clinical signs. Indices of multidirectional myocardial deformations by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography may be useful markers and help to distinguish between cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and healthy cats. Additionally, they may provide more detailed assessment of contractile function in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  13. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy hypertrophic obstructive*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Raimundo José Almeida de Oliveira; dos Santos, Adaílton Araújo; Azevedo, Mablo de Castro; Meira, Saulo Sacramento

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare clinical condition caused by a genetic change that results in the formation of structurally or functionally altered collagen. The clinical manifestations are varied, being the most obvious skin hypermotility and increased joint flexibility, although other systems - such as cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological - may also be affected. This paper presents the report of a patient who sought medical attention with complaints of atypical chest pain. Clinical evaluation enabled hypothetical diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Initial electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and 24 hours holter allowed the confirmation of the first hypothesis. A skin biopsy performed later associated clinical data and confirmed the second hypothesis. PMID:26312722

  14. Distinguishing Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Associated Mutations from Background Genetic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Bos, J. Martijn; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significant progress that has been made in identifying disease-associated mutations, the utility of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) genetic test is limited by a lack of understanding of the background genetic variation inherent to these sarcomeric genes in seemingly healthy subjects. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of genetic variation in 427 ostensibly healthy individuals for the HCM genetic test using the “Gold Standard” Sanger sequencing method validating the background rate identified in the publically available exomes. While mutations are clearly over-represented in disease, a background rate as high as ~5% among healthy individuals prevents diagnostic certainty. To this end, we have identified a number of estimated predictive value-based associations including gene-specific, topology, and conservation methods generating an algorithm aiding in the probabilistic interpretation of an HCM genetic test. PMID:24510615

  15. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ultra-endurance running - two incompatible entities?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regular and prolonged exercise is associated with increased left ventricular wall thickness that can overlap with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Differentiating physiological from pathological hypertrophy has important implications, since HCM is the commonest cause of exercise-related sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Most deaths have been reported in intermittent 'start-stop' sports such as football (soccer) and basketball. The theory is that individuals with HCM are unable to augment stroke volume sufficiently to meet the demands of endurance sports and are accordingly 'selected-out' of participation in such events. We report the case of an ultra-endurance athlete with 25 years of > 50 km competitive running experience, with genetically confirmed HCM; thereby demonstrating that these can be two compatible entities. PMID:22122802

  16. Fabry Disease Presenting with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and Tricuspid Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang-Cheol; Yoo, Han-Wook; Lee, Jae Won; Jang, Jeong Yoon; Heo, Ran

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old female who was diagnosed with nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy since 1999 presented with dyspnea and severe edema on both legs. For the management of her symptom, cardiac surgery including tricuspid annuloplasty, Maze operation and right atrial reduction plasty was performed. During follow-up after cardiac surgery, a plasma α-galactosidase activity was checked for the screening of Fabry disease and the result was around lower normal limit. DNA analysis was implemented for confirmation and it revealed a heterozygote α-galactosidase mutation at exon 6 [c.901C>T (p.Arg301Ter)]. This case suggests that Fabry disease might be easily undetected, and clinical suspicion is critical. PMID:28090261

  17. ICD Therapy for Primary Prevention in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common and heterogeneous disorder that increases an individual’s risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). This review article discusses the relevant factors that are involved in the challenge of preventing SCD in patients with HCM. The epidemiology of SCD in patients is reviewed as well as the structural and genetic basis behind ventricular arrhythmias in HCM. The primary prevention of SCD with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy is the cornerstone of modern treatment for individuals at high risk of SCD. The focus here is on the current and emerging predictors of SCD as well as risk stratification recommendations from both North American and European guidelines. Issues related to ICD implantation, such as programming, complications and inappropriate therapies, are discussed. The emerging role of the fully subcutaneous ICD and the data regarding its implantation are reviewed. PMID:28116084

  18. Features of a syndrome with congenital cataract and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cruysberg, J R; Sengers, R C; Pinckers, A; Kubat, K; van Haelst, U J

    1986-12-15

    We studied 12 patients from six unrelated families with a syndrome that has an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance and can be diagnosed from clinical, histologic, and biochemical characteristics. The four major symptoms are congenital cataract, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, mitochondrial myopathy of voluntary muscles, and exercise-related lactic acidosis. The patients had bilateral and total cataract in the first weeks of life, underwent cataract surgery, and developed nystagmus and strabismus. Corrected visual acuity was lower than 20/40 in aphakic eyes. Patients were mentally normal, and at school age they visited a school for blind and visually impaired children. The majority of the patients developed axial myopia with myopic fundus changes; aphakic refraction usually was lower than 10.0 diopters after the first decade. The cardiac myopathy was progressive and the cause of premature death. Three of the 12 patients died in the neonatal period and six patients died in early adulthood.

  19. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a heart in need of an energy bar?

    PubMed Central

    Vakrou, Styliani; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has been recently recognized as the most common inherited cardiovascular disorder, affecting 1 in 500 adults worldwide. HCM is characterized by myocyte hypertrophy resulting in thickening of the ventricular wall, myocyte disarray, interstitial and/or replacement fibrosis, decreased ventricular cavity volume and diastolic dysfunction. HCM is also the most common cause of sudden death in the young. A large proportion of patients diagnosed with HCM have mutations in sarcomeric proteins. However, it is unclear how these mutations lead to the cardiac phenotype, which is variable even in patients carrying the same causal mutation. Abnormalities in calcium cycling, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and energetic deficiency have been described constituting the basis of therapies in experimental models of HCM and HCM patients. This review focuses on evidence supporting the role of cellular metabolism and mitochondria in HCM. PMID:25191275

  20. [Leopard syndrome with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and cerebral arteriovenous malformation. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Cabañas, A; Baduí, E; Estañol, B; Aguilar, F; González, N; López, J

    1985-01-01

    We report a case of a 27-year-old woman with Leopard syndrome in which we observed the association of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with arteriovenous cerebral shunt. This association has not been reported previously in the literature.

  1. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the Sphynx cat: a retrospective evaluation of clinical presentation and heritable etiology.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Sarah J; Stern, Joshua A; Meurs, Kathryn M

    2012-04-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is an inherited disease in some feline breeds including the Maine Coon and Ragdoll. In these breeds, distinct causative genetic mutations have been identified. The two breeds appear to have slightly different clinical presentations, including age of diagnosis. The observation that these two breeds may have different clinical presentations, as well as different genetic mutations, suggests that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a diverse disease in the cat. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is poorly described in the Sphynx. The objective of this study was to phenotypically characterize Sphynx hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and to evaluate for a familial etiology. Records of 18 affected cats (11 female, seven male) were evaluated. Age of affected cats ranged from 0.5 to 7 years (median, 2 years). Four affected cats were from a single family and included an affected cat in each of four generations (three females, one male). Further studies are warranted to evaluate for a causative mutation and better classify the phenotypic expression.

  2. A new era in clinical genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Matthew; Pavlovic, Aleksandra; DeGoma, Emil; Salisbury, Heidi; Brown, Colleen; Ashley, Euan A

    2009-12-01

    Building on seminal studies of the last 20 years, genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has become a clinical reality in the form of targeted exonic sequencing of known disease-causing genes. This has been driven primarily by the decreasing cost of sequencing, but the high profile of genome-wide association studies, the launch of direct-to-consumer genetic testing, and new legislative protection have also played important roles. In the clinical management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, genetic testing is primarily used for family screening. An increasing role is recognized, however, in diagnostic settings: in the differential diagnosis of HCM; in the differentiation of HCM from hypertensive or athlete's heart; and more rarely in preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Aside from diagnostic clarification and family screening, use of the genetic test for guiding therapy remains controversial, with data currently too limited to derive a reliable mutation risk prediction from within the phenotypic noise of different modifying genomes. Meanwhile, the power of genetic testing derives from the confidence with which a mutation can be called present or absent in a given individual. This confidence contrasts with our more limited ability to judge the significance of mutations for which co-segregation has not been demonstrated. These variants of "unknown" significance represent the greatest challenge to the wider adoption of genetic testing in HCM. Looking forward, next-generation sequencing technologies promise to revolutionize the current approach as whole genome sequencing will soon be available for the cost of today's targeted panel. In summary, our future will be characterized not by lack of genetic information but by our ability to effectively parse it.

  3. The genetic basis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cats and humans.

    PubMed

    Kittleson, Mark D; Meurs, Kathryn M; Harris, Samantha P

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in genes that encode for muscle sarcomeric proteins have been identified in humans and two breeds of domestic cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This article reviews the history, genetics, and pathogenesis of HCM in the two species in order to give veterinarians a perspective on the genetics of HCM. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in people is a genetic disease that has been called a disease of the sarcomere because the preponderance of mutations identified that cause HCM are in genes that encode for sarcomeric proteins (Maron and Maron, 2013). Sarcomeres are the basic contractile units of muscle and thus sarcomeric proteins are responsible for the strength, speed, and extent of muscle contraction. In people with HCM, the two most common genes affected by HCM mutations are the myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7), the gene that encodes for the motor protein β-myosin heavy chain (the sarcomeric protein that splits ATP to generate force), and the cardiac myosin binding protein-C gene (MYBPC3), a gene that encodes for the closely related structural and regulatory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C). To date, the two mutations linked to HCM in domestic cats (one each in Maine Coon and Ragdoll breeds) also occur in MYBPC3 (Meurs et al., 2005, 2007). This is a review of the genetics of HCM in both humans and domestic cats that focuses on the aspects of human genetics that are germane to veterinarians and on all aspects of feline HCM genetics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Thallium-201 imaging in a patient with mid-ventricular hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Wakasugi, S.; Shibata, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Fudemoto, Y.; Hasegawa, Y.; Nakano, S.

    1988-10-01

    Findings specific to mid-ventricular hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy were obtained in a patient by means of /sup 201/Tl planar myocardial scintigraphy. Namely, a myocardial band-like image dividing the left ventricle into two chambers was clearly shown. This was identified as hypertrophic muscle with sphincter-like muscular stenosis at the mid portion of the left ventricle.

  5. Marked left ventricular hypertrophy mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with steroid therapy for congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Scirè, Giuseppe; D'Anella, Giorgio; Cristofori, Laura; Mazzuca, Valentina; Cianfarani, Stefano

    2007-06-01

    We describe a child treated with high-dose steroid therapy for congenital adrenal hyperplasia who showed marked left ventricular hypertrophy mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with steroid therapy for congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Cardiomyopathy reversed completely when an appropriate steroid therapeutic regimen was established.

  6. [The thickness/radius ratio (t/r) in patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Guadalajara, J F; Valenzuela, F; Martínez Sánchez, C; Huerta, D

    1990-01-01

    We studied 17 patients with cardiomyopathy (10 hypertrophic and 7 dilated). With two-dimensional echocardiography, we obtained a short axis view at the level of papillary muscle. We calculated the ratio between thickness (h), of ventricular wall and cavity's radius (r) in diastole and systole (h/r ratio). Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has a high h/r ratio in diastole (inappropriate hypertrophy), hypercontractility and low and systolic wall stress. Dilated cardiomyopathy has a low diastolic h/r ratio (inadequate hypertrophy) with low contractility and elevated end-systolic, wall stress. We discuss the mechanisms and consequences of different patterns of hypertrophy on the ventricular performance.

  7. Progress with genetic cardiomyopathies: screening, counseling, and testing in dilated, hypertrophic, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Ray E; Cowan, Jason; Morales, Ana; Siegfried, Jill D

    2009-05-01

    This review focuses on the genetic cardiomyopathies: principally dilated cardiomyopathy, with salient features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy, regarding genetic etiology, genetic testing, and genetic counseling. Enormous progress has recently been made in identifying genetic causes for each cardiomyopathy, and key phenotype and genotype information is reviewed. Clinical genetic testing is rapidly emerging with a principal rationale of identifying at-risk asymptomatic or disease-free relatives. Knowledge of a disease-causing mutation can guide clinical surveillance for disease onset, thereby enhancing preventive and treatment interventions. Genetic counseling is also indicated for patients and their family members regarding the symptoms of their cardiomyopathy, its inheritance pattern, family screening recommendations, and genetic testing options and possible results.

  8. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy and coronary fistulae: a case report. One genotype, three phenotypes?

    PubMed

    Delgado, Anne; Moreira, Davide; Rodrigues, Bruno; Correia, Emanuel; Gama, Pedro; Cabral, Costa; Marinho, António; Santos, Oliveira

    2013-11-01

    The authors present a rare case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy and coronary artery-left ventricular fistulae in a 42-year-old woman presenting with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography, transthoracic echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance revealed the structural abnormalities of the left ventricle and the coronary tree. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy--state of the art in 2007.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Silvia; Costa, Susana; Monteiro, Pedro; Gonçalves, Lino; Providência, Luís A

    2008-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary disease of the sarcomere, with considerable genetic heterogeneity and variability in phenotypic expression, whose main complication is sudden cardiac death (SCD). Genetic aspects of HCM, its molecular pathophysiology and genotype-phenotype relationships are the subject of this review, which is aimed at better understanding of practical management in this patient population. As HCM is a genetic disease whose initial manifestation can be sudden death, it is essential to establish the diagnosis at an early stage, to proceed with risk stratification and implementation of SCD prevention strategies, and to promote genetic counseling of patients and screening of their families. Detection of pathological mutations through progressive sequencing of the genes most commonly involved is the most efficient way to diagnose HCM, even in the absence of clinical evidence of the disease. Identification of individuals at high risk of SCD is a major challenge in the management of this population, since SCD can be prevented by use of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. The selection of patients for prophylactic implantation of these devices, particularly those who have only one major risk factor, is currently the subject of controversy.

  10. Hemolytic anemia in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Toru; Kitaoka, Hiroaki; Terauchi, Yasunobu; Tamura, Shinjiro; Okawa, Makoto; Yamasaki, Naohito; Yabe, Toshikazu; Doi, Yoshinori L

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman was referred for further evaluation and treatment of normocytic and normochromic anemia with hemoglobin level of 8.6 g/dL. A peripheral blood smear showed fragmented erythrocytes. The patient was then referred to the department of cardiology because of systolic murmur, ECG abnormality, and red cell fragmentation. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with particularly increased interventricular septal thickness of 24 mm and a hyperkinetic wall motion, resulting in marked obstruction to left ventricular outflow tract (pressure gradient of 200 mmHg). Mitral regurgitation due to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflets was also seen. The cause of anemia was thought to be mechanical intravascular hemolysis due to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and mitral regurgitation. She was treated with atenolol and the class Ia antiarrhythmic drug cibenzoline to relieve the outflow tract obstruction, and the pressure gradient was reduced to 70 mmHg. After 3 months of treatment, her hemoglobin level had increased to 11.4 g/dL without additional treatment for anemia.

  11. The Ups and Downs of Genetic Diagnosis of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Juan; Reguero, Julián R; Coto, Eliecer

    2016-01-01

    Massive DNA sequencing, also known as next-generation sequencing, has revolutionized genetic diagnosis. This technology has reduced the effort and cost needed to analyze several genes simultaneously and has made genetic evaluation available to a larger number of patients. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, genetic analysis has increased from the 3 main genes implicated in the disease (MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2) to sequencing of more than 20 related genes. Despite the advantages of acquiring this additional information, many patients show variants of uncertain significance (mainly amino acid changes), which may also be present in at least 1 healthy control undergoing genome sequencing. This will be a dead-end situation unless the variant can be demonstrated to be associated with the disease in the patient's family. In the absence of clear evidence that these variants are truly pathogenic, they cannot be used for reliable genetic counselling in family members. Massive sequencing also enables identification of new candidate genes, but again, the problem of variants of uncertain significance limits the success of these assessments.

  12. Exercise heart rates in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong-Chang; Dimaano, Veronica L; Kembro, Jackelyn M; Hilser, Alex; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, David; Pozios, Iraklis; Tomas, Miguel S; Yalcin, Hulya; Dolores-Cerna, Ketty; Mormontoy, Wilfredo; Aon, Miguel A; Cameron, Duke; Bluemke, David A; Stewart, Kerry J; Russell, Stuart D; Cordova, Jorge G; Abraham, Theodore P; Abraham, M Roselle

    2015-04-15

    The exercise heart rate (HR) profile and its relation to cardiac function and arrhythmias were investigated in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Chronotropic response (CR) and heart rate recovery (HRR) were computed during and after treadmill exercise testing in 273 patients with HC and 95 age-matched healthy controls. Patients with HC had higher prevalence of chronotropic incompetence and lower HRR1-5min compared with controls. Exercise capacity, diastolic function (assessed by E/e') and left atrial volume index were associated with HRR1min and CR in HC. Septal myectomy was associated with reduction in chronotropic incompetence but did not affect HRR1min. In conclusion, impaired CR and HRR1min are associated with advanced disease and do not appear to be independent clinical markers indicating high-risk status in HC. Improving CR by titrating doses of negative chronotropic agents, myectomy, and atrial pacing may be useful to increase exercise capacity in patients with HC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Perioperative management for patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy undergoing noncardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Okuyama, A; Goda, Y; Kawahigashi, H; Takita, K; Okuyama, M; Kubota, M

    1992-01-01

    We had two patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy for noncardiac surgeries. Case 1: A 74-year-old man for right nephrectomy received epidural lidocaine and nitrous oxide combined with 0.2-0.6% isoflurane. During the operation, heart rate and blood pressure were relatively unstable, but he woke up promptly after the operation. Early on the morning of the 2nd post-operative day, he was found dead on his bed. Case 2: A 52-year-old man for gastrectomy was anesthetized with nitrous oxide and halothane with continuous propranolol infusion. Through the operative period, heart rate and blood pressure were stable and postoperative course was uneventful. In these two patients, preoperative Holter ECG showed ventricular tachycardia, which may increase the risk of a sudden death. These cases demonstrate that general anesthesia with nitrous oxide combined with halothane, can be administered with a low risk in patients with HCM for noncardiac surgery and that postoperative intensive care unit monitoring is necessary for these patients for several days to prevent a sudden death.

  14. Diastolic filling in a physical model of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schovanec, Joseph; Samaee, Milad; Lai, Hong Kuan; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited heart disease that affects as much as one in 500 individuals, and is the most common cause of sudden death in young athletes. The myocardium becomes abnormally thick in HCM and deforms the internal geometry of the left ventricle (LV). Previous studies have shown that a vortex is formed during diastolic filling, and further that the dilated LV morphology seen in systolic heart failure results in altering the filling vortex from elliptical to spherical shape. We have also previously shown that increasing LV wall stiffness decreases the filling vortex circulation. However, alterations to intraventricular filling fluid dynamics due to an obstructive LV morphology and locally elevated wall stiffness (in the hypertrophied region) have not been previously examined from a mechanistic standpoint. We conducted an experimental study using an idealized HCM physical model and compared the intraventricular flow fields obtained from 2D PIV to a baseline LV physical model with lower wall stiffness and anatomical geometry. The obstruction in the HCM model leads to earlier breakdown of the filling vortex as compared to the anatomical LV. Intraventricular filling in both models under increased heart rates will be discussed.

  15. Vps34 regulates myofibril proteostasis to prevent hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hirotaka; Eguchi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Junko; Kuba, Keiji; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Goto, Akiteru; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi; Imai, Yumiko; Suzuki, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common heart disease with a prevalence of 1 in 500 in the general population. Several mutations in genes encoding cardiac proteins have been found in HCM patients, but these changes do not predict occurrence or prognosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying HCM remain largely elusive. Here we show that cardiac expression of vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34) is reduced in a subset of HCM patients. In a mouse model, muscle-specific loss of Vps34 led to HCM-like manifestations and sudden death. Vps34-deficient hearts exhibited abnormal histopathologies, including myofibrillar disarray and aggregates containing αB-crystallin (CryAB). These features result from a block in the ESCRT-mediated proteolysis that normally degrades K63-polyubiquitinated CryAB. CryAB deposition was also found in myocardial specimens from a subset of HCM patients whose hearts showed decreased Vps34. Our results identify disruption of the previously unknown Vps34-CryAB axis as a potentially novel etiology of HCM. PMID:28097232

  16. Types of Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Cardiomyopathy The types of cardiomyopathy include: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy Dilated ... cardiomyopathy Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy Unclassified ... Cardiomyopathy Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is very common and can affect ...

  17. Fixed subaortic stenosis associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: report of a rare familial occurrence.

    PubMed

    Conte, M R; Bongioanni, S; Dall'Orto, G; Nicastro, C; Bonfiglio, G; Morello, M; Mangiardi, L; Brusca, A

    1998-01-01

    Fixed subaortic stenosis is considered to be an acquired condition. It is often associated with congenital heart disease, creating a turbulence in the left ventricle outflow tract. Familial forms of fixed subaortic stenosis are very unusual. We report a remarkable familial cluster in which fixed subaortic stenosis is associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Fourteen relatives of a patient affected with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and fixed subaortic stenosis underwent cardiological examination, electrocardiogram and echo-doppler study. Two of the proband's sisters showed an association between asymmetrical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and fixed subaortic stenosis. The brother presented a subaortic ridge and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. The other members of the family (another brother and the third-generation relatives) were unaffected. While the association between fixed subaortic stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has commonly been reported, there is little in the literature to suggest the family-related nature of this association. The familial occurrence of this association reveals genetic transmission, with a recessive autosomal pattern of inheritance. This finding goes against the usual autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Familial studies of FSS are needed in order to gain a better understanding of the genetic background of these patients.

  18. Successful management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei).

    PubMed

    Fredholm, Daniel V; Jones, Ashley E; Hall, Natalie H; Russell, Kathleen; Heard, Darryl J

    2015-03-01

    A 3-yr-old, intact male Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) was examined for a 1-wk history of intermittent lethargy and tachypnea. An echocardiogram revealed concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricular free wall and interventricular septum. These findings were compared to measurements from healthy Matschie's tree kangaroos, supporting a diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. At the time of publication, the patient has been managed for over 11.5 yr, using a combination of enalapril, furosemide, diltiazem, and diet modifications. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in tree kangaroos exhibiting signs of cardiovascular or respiratory distress. This case represents the first report of antemortem diagnosis and successful management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Matschie's tree kangaroo.

  19. Clinical significance of giant negative T waves in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonso, F.; Nihoyannopoulos, P.; Stewart, J.; Dickie, S.; Lemery, R.; McKenna, W.J. )

    1990-04-01

    To assess the clinical significance of giant negative T waves in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from Western nations, clinical, echocardiographic, radionuclide and 48 h electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring findings were compared in 27 patients with and 56 patients without giant negative T waves. Patients with giant negative T waves were older at diagnosis (43 +/- 15 versus 32 +/- 14 years, p less than 0.005), had greater ECG voltage (SV1 + RV5 = 57 +/- 20 versus 37 +/- 18 mm, p less than 0.001) and had a more vertical frontal plane axis (38.4 +/- 34 versus 13.4 +/- 45 degrees, p less than 0.05). Left ventricular wall thickness on two-dimensional echocardiography was similar at the mitral valve level (mean 16.5 +/- 4 versus 16.6 +/- 3 cm), but was greater at the papillary muscle level (mean 20.7 +/- 5 versus 17.6 +/- 3 mm, p less than 0.01) and apex (mean 23.3 +/- 5 versus 17.3 +/- 3 mm, p less than 0.001) in patients with giant negative T waves. Fewer patients with giant negative T waves had asymmetric septal hypertrophy (12 (44%) of 27 versus 36 (64%) of 56, p = 0.08) or systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (4 (14%) of 27 versus 25 (45%) of 56, p less than 0.01), whereas left ventricular end-diastolic (44.1 +/- 6 versus 39.6 +/- 5 mm, p = 0.01) and end-systolic dimensions (27.8 +/- 4 versus 24 +/- 6 mm, p less than 0.05) were greater in this group. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia was seen on ECG monitoring in 21% of patients in both groups.

  20. Abnormal Mitral Valve Dimensions in Pediatric Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Daryl; Benson, Lee; Windram, Jonathan; Wong, Derek; Dragulescu, Andreea; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Mertens, Luc; Friedberg, Mark; Al Nafisi, Bahiyah; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) show structural abnormalities other than isolated wall thickening. Recently, adult HCM patients have been found to have longer mitral valve leaflets than control subjects. The aim of the current study was to assess whether children and adolescents with HCM have similar measureable differences in mitral valve leaflet dimensions when compared to a healthy control group. Clinical and echocardiographic data from 46 children with myocardial hypertrophy and a phenotype and/or genotype consistent with sarcomeric HCM were reviewed. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies were evaluated. The anterior and posterior mitral valve leaflet lengths and myocardial structure were compared to 20 healthy controls. The anterior mitral valve was longer in the HCM group than in the control group (28.4 ± 4.9 vs. 25.2 ± 3.6 mm in control patients, p = 0.013) as was the posterior mitral valve leaflet (16.3 ± 3.0 vs. 13.1 ± 2.3 mm for controls <0.0001). There was no correlation between the resting left ventricular outflow tract gradient and anterior mitral valve leaflet length, nor was the anterior mitral valve leaflet longer in those with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve compared to those without (28.9 ± 6.1 vs. 28.1 ± 4.5 mm, p = 0.61). Children and adolescents with HCM have abnormally long mitral valve leaflets when compared with healthy control subjects. These abnormalities do not appear to result in, or be due to, obstruction to left ventricular outflow. The mechanism of this mitral valve elongation is not clear but appears to be independent of hemodynamic disturbances.

  1. [Septal alcohol ablation in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    López-Aburto, Gustavo; Palacios-Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Cantú-Ramírez, Samuel; Galván-García, Eduardo; Tolosa-Dzul, Gonzalo; Morán-Benavente, Armando; Ontiveros-Martínez, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    to know the clinical and hemodynamic course in septal obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (SOHC) after alcohol ablation. this was an observational, longitudinal study, including 21 patients with SOHC with functional class of the New York Heart Association (CF-NYHA) refractory to treatment and/or = 30 mm Hg gradient at rest or = 60 mm Hg provoked, or have systolic anterior motion or mitral incompetence (MI) > grade II by echocardiography. average age was 50 ± 16 years, males 38.1 %, females 61.9 %; symptoms: angina 42.9 %, dyspnea 85.7 %, syncope 23.8 %. Pre-ablation CF-NYHA was III and IV in 61.9 %; after a year follow-up all of them were class I-II. Pre-ablation, after and one year later, interventricle septum measures were 22.7 ± 4.9 and 20.7 ± 3.1 mm; left ventricular ejection fraction was 65.5 ± 7 %, 62.2 % ± 6.5 % and 68.7 ± 6.2 %; the output gradient of the left ventricle were 106.9 ± 29.9, 44.6 ± 24.3 and 22.0 ± 5.7 mm Hg. Pre-ablation MI grade-III and IV were 33.3 % and 47.6 %; after a year it was grade-0, 52.4 %, grade-I 28.6 %, grade-II, 19 %. There were no hospital mortality. the alcohol septal ablation in SOHC patients had a high success treatment with a low complication rate.

  2. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Genetics, Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Marian, Ali J; Braunwald, Eugene

    2017-09-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic disorder that is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy unexplained by secondary causes and a nondilated left ventricle with preserved or increased ejection fraction. It is commonly asymmetrical with the most severe hypertrophy involving the basal interventricular septum. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is present at rest in about one third of the patients and can be provoked in another third. The histological features of HCM include myocyte hypertrophy and disarray, as well as interstitial fibrosis. The hypertrophy is also frequently associated with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. In the majority of patients, HCM has a relatively benign course. However, HCM is also an important cause of sudden cardiac death, particularly in adolescents and young adults. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, syncope, a family history of sudden cardiac death, and severe cardiac hypertrophy are major risk factors for sudden cardiac death. This complication can usually be averted by implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator in appropriate high-risk patients. Atrial fibrillation is also a common complication and is not well tolerated. Mutations in over a dozen genes encoding sarcomere-associated proteins cause HCM. MYH7 and MYBPC3, encoding β-myosin heavy chain and myosin-binding protein C, respectively, are the 2 most common genes involved, together accounting for ≈50% of the HCM families. In ≈40% of HCM patients, the causal genes remain to be identified. Mutations in genes responsible for storage diseases also cause a phenotype resembling HCM (genocopy or phenocopy). The routine applications of genetic testing and preclinical identification of family members represents an important advance. The genetic discoveries have enhanced understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of HCM and have stimulated efforts designed to identify new therapeutic agents. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphism in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B; Peric, S.; Ross, D.

    1994-09-01

    An insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) gene is a useful predictor of human plasma ACE levels. ACE levels tend to be lowest in subjects with ACE genotype DD and intermediate in subjects with ACE genotype ID. Angiotensin II (Ang II) as a product of ACE is a cardiac growth factor and produces a marked hypertrophy of the chick myocyte in cell culture. Rat experiments also suggest that a small dose of ACE inhibitor that does not affect the afterload results in prevention or regression of cardiac hypertrophy. In order to study the relationship of ACE and the severity of hypertrophy, the ACE genotype has been determined in 28 patients with a clinical diagnosis of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) and 51 normal subjects. The respective frequencies of I and D alleles were: 0.52 and 0.48 (in FHC patients) and 0.44 and 0.56 (in the normal controls). There was no significant difference in the allele frequencies between FHC and normal subjects ({chi}{sup 2}=0.023, p>0.05). The II, ID, and DD genotypes were present in 7, 15, and 6 FHC patients, respectively. The averages of maximal thickness of the interventricular septum measured by echocardiography or at autopsy were 18 {plus_minus}3, 19{plus_minus}4, and 19{plus_minus}3 mm in II, ID and DD genotypes, respectively. The ACE gene polymorphism did not correlate with the severity of left ventricular hypertrophy in FHC patients (r{sub s}=0.231, p>0.05). These results do not necessarily exclude the possible effect of Ang II on the hypertrophy since the latter may be produced through the action of chymase in the human ventricles. However, ACE gene polymorphism is not a useful predictor of the severity of myocardial hypertrophy in FHC patients.

  4. Altered patterns of cardiac intercellular junction distribution in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, R.; Severs, N. J.; Gourdie, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the distribution pattern of intercellular junctions (the mechanically coupling desmosomes and the electrically coupling gap junctions) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) hearts showing myofibre disarray. DESIGN: Samples from six necropsied hearts were studied, representing the interventricular septum and the free walls of the left and right ventricles. Immunohistochemical labelling of desmoplakin was used as a marker for desmosomes, and of connexin43 as a marker for gap junctions, in single and double stainings. The slides were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS: Marked disorganisation of intercalated discs was observed in areas featuring myofibre disarray. Besides overall derangement, localised abnormalities in desmosome organisation were evident, which included: (1) the formation of abnormally enlarged megadiscs; (2) the presence of intersecting disc structures; and (3) aberrant side to side desmosomal connections. Gap junctional abnormalities included: (1) random distribution of gap junctions over the surface of myocytes, rather than localisation to intercalated discs; (2) abundant side to side gap junction connections between adjacent myocytes; and (3) formation of abnormally shaped gap junctions. Circles of myocytes continuously interconnected by gap junctions were also observed. Regions of the diseased hearts lacking myofibre disarray, and control hearts of normal patients and patients with other cardiac diseases, did not show these alterations. CONCLUSIONS: The disorganisation of the intercellular junctions associated with myofibre disarray in HCM may play an important role in the pathophysiological manifestations of the disease. The remodelling of gap junction distribution may underlie the formation of an arrhythmogenic substrate, thereby contributing to the generation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias associated with HCM. Images PMID:8944586

  5. Clinical Characteristics and Prognosis of End-stage Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yan; Yang, Kun-Qi; Yang, Yan-Kun; Liu, Ya-Xin; Tian, Tao; Song, Lei; Jiang, Xiong-Jing; Zhou, Xian-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background: End-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is complicated by substantial adverse events. However, few studies have focused on electrocardiographic features and their prognostic values in HCM. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical manifestations and prognostic value of electrocardiography in patients with end-stage HCM. Methods: End-stage HCM patients were enrolled from a total of 1844 consecutive HCM patients from April 2002 to November 2013 at Fuwai Hospital. Clinical data, including medical history, electrocardiography, and echocardiography, were analyzed. Cox hazards regression analysis was used to assess the risk factors for cardiovascular mortality. Results: End-stage HCM was identified in 99 (5.4%) patients, averaged at 52 ± 16 years old at entry. Atrial fibrillation was observed in 53 patients and mural thrombus in 19 patients. During 3.9 ± 3.0 years of follow-up, embolic stroke, refractory heart failure, and death or transplantation were observed in 20, 39, and 51 patients, respectively. The incidence of annual mortality was 13.2%. Multivariate Cox hazards regression analysis identified New York Heart Association Class (NYHA) III/IV at entry (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–3.80; P = 0.036), left bundle branch block (LBBB) (HR: 2.80; 95% CI: 1.47–5.31; P = 0.002), and an abnormal Q wave (HR: 2.21; 95% CI: 1.16–4.23; P = 0.016) as independent predictors of cardiovascular death, in accordance with all-cause death and heart failure-related death. Conclusions: LBBB and an abnormal Q wave are risk factors of cardiovascular mortality in end-stage HCM and provide new evidence for early intervention. Susceptibility of end-stage HCM patients to mural thrombus and embolic events warrants further attention. PMID:26021505

  6. Genetics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy after 20 years: clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Maron, Martin S; Semsarian, Christopher

    2012-08-21

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common familial heart disease with vast genetic heterogeneity, demonstrated over the past 20 years. Mutations in 11 or more genes encoding proteins of the cardiac sarcomere (>1,400 variants) are responsible for (or associated with) HCM. Explosive progress achieved in understanding the rapidly evolving science underlying HCM genomics has resulted in fee-for-service testing, making genetic information widely available. The power of HCM mutational analysis, albeit a more limited role than initially envisioned, lies most prominently in screening family members at risk for developing disease and excluding unaffected relatives, which is information not achievable otherwise. Genetic testing also allows expansion of the broad HCM disease spectrum and diagnosis of HCM phenocopies with different natural history and treatment options, but is not a reliable strategy for predicting prognosis. Interfacing a heterogeneous disease such as HCM with the vast genetic variability of the human genome, and high frequency of novel mutations, has created unforeseen difficulties in translating complex science (and language) into the clinical arena. Indeed, proband diagnostic testing is often expressed on a probabilistic scale, which is frequently incompatible with clinical decision making. Major challenges rest with making reliable distinctions between pathogenic mutations and benign variants, and those judged to be of uncertain significance. Genotyping in HCM can be a powerful tool for family screening and diagnosis. However, wider adoption and future success of genetic testing in the practicing cardiovascular community depends on a standardized approach to mutation interpretation, and bridging the communication gap between basic scientists and clinicians.

  7. A myomesin mutation associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy deteriorates dimerisation properties.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Romy; Perrot, Andreas; Keller, Sandro; Behlke, Joachim; Michalewska-Włudarczyk, Aleksandra; Wycisk, Anna; Tendera, Michal; Morano, Ingo; Ozcelik, Cemil

    2011-02-18

    Myomesin plays an important structural and functional role in the M-band of striated muscles. The C-terminal domain 13 of myomesin dimerises and forms antiparallel strands which cross-link neighboring Myosin filaments and titin in the M-line of the sarcomeres. These interactions stabilise the contractile apparatus during striated muscle contraction. Since myomesin is an important component of the M-band we screened the myomesin gene for genetic variants in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We identified the missense mutation V1490I in domain 12 of myomesin in a family with inherited HCM. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiments, circular dichroism spectra, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of myomesin fragments were carried out to investigate the effects of the mutation V1490I on structure and function of myomesin domains 11-13 and 12-13. Both the wild type and mutated myomesin domains My11-13 revealed similar secondary structures and formed stable dimers. Mutated myomesin domains My11-13 and My12-13 dimers revealed a reduced thermal stability and a significantly decreased dimerisation affinity, showing disturbed functional properties of V1490I mutated myomesin. However, monomeric myomesin domains My11-12, i.e. without dimerisation domain 13 showed no difference in thermal stability between wild type and V1490I mutated myomesin. In conclusion, the V1490I mutation associated with HCM lead to myomesin proteins with abnormal functional properties which affect dimerisation properties of myomesin domain 13. These effects may contribute to the pathogenesis of HCM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nonfamilial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Prevalence, Natural History, and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Burns, Charlotte; Bagnall, Richard D; Lam, Lien; Yeates, Laura; Sarina, Tanya; Puranik, Rajesh; Briffa, Tom; Atherton, John J; Driscoll, Tim; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Yield of causative variants in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is increased in some probands, suggesting different clinical subgroups of disease occur. We hypothesized that a negative family history and no sarcomere mutations represent a nonfamilial subgroup of HCM. We sought to determine the prevalence, natural history, and potential clinical implications of this nonfamilial subgroup of HCM. Four hundred and thirteen unrelated probands with HCM seen in a specialized HCM center between 2002 and 2015 and genetic testing performed were included in this retrospective cohort study. There were 251 (61%) probands with no reported family history of HCM, including 166 (40% of total) probands with no sarcomere mutation, that is, nonfamilial HCM. Quantified family pedigree data revealed no difference in mean number of first-degree relatives screened between nonfamilial and sarcomere-positive groups. Adjusted predictors of nonfamilial status were older age (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.06; P=0.0001), male sex (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-3.45; P=0.02), hypertension (odds ratio, 2.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.57-5.00; P=0.0005), and nonasymmetric septal morphology (odds ratio, 3.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-7.08; P=0.001). They had a less severe clinical course with greater event-free survival from major cardiac events (P=0.04) compared with sarcomere-positive HCM probands. Genotype prediction scores showed good performance in identifying genotype-positive patients (area under the curve, 0.71-0.75) and, in combination with pedigree characteristics, were further improved. Approximately 40% of HCM probands have a nonfamilial subtype, with later onset and less severe clinical course. We propose a revised clinical pathway for management, highlighting the role of genetic testing, a detailed pedigree, and refined clinical surveillance recommendations for family members. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Social determinants of health in the setting of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Johnson, Renee; Sarina, Tanya; Yeates, Laura; Burns, Charlotte; Gray, Belinda; Ball, Kylie; Semsarian, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Social determinants of health play an important role in explaining poor health outcomes across many chronic disease states. The impact of the social gradient in the setting of an inherited heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), has not been investigated. This study sought to profile the socioeconomic status of patients attending a specialized multidisciplinary clinic and to determine the impact on clinical factors, psychosocial wellbeing and adherence to medical advice. Patients with HCM and at-risk relatives attending a specialized multidisciplinary clinic in Sydney Australia between 2011 and 2013 were included. Clinical, socioeconomic, geographic remoteness and adherence data were available. A broader clinic and registry-based group completed a survey including psychological wellbeing, health-related quality of life, Morisky Medication Adherence Scale and individual-level socioeconomic information. Over a 3-year period, 486 patients were seen in the specialized clinic. There was an over-representation of patients from socioeconomically advantaged and the least geographically remote areas. Socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with comorbidities, poor psychological wellbeing and health-related quality of life, lower understanding of HCM and more complex clinical management issues such as NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. Approximately 10% of patients were non-adherent to medical advice, and poor medication adherence was seen in 30% of HCM patients with associated factors being younger age, minority ethnicity, anxiety and poor mental quality of life. Of all the patients attending a specialized cardiac genetic clinic, there is an overrepresentation of patients from very advantaged and major metropolitan areas and suggests that those most in need of a multidisciplinary approach to care are not accessing it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical features and outcomes of childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: results from a national population-based study.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Alan W; Daubeney, Piers E F; Chondros, Patty; Carlin, John B; Colan, Steven D; Cheung, Michael; Davis, Andrew M; Chow, C W; Weintraub, Robert G

    2005-08-30

    Population-based studies have provided insight into the natural history of adult hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but comparable information for affected children is lacking. All Australian children who presented with primary cardiomyopathy at 0 to 10 years of age between January 1, 1987, and December 31, 1996, were enrolled in a longitudinal cohort study. A single cardiologist reviewed serial cardiac investigations on each subject. A total of 80 subjects with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were identified. An underlying syndromal, genetic, or metabolic condition was identified in 46 subjects (57.5%). There were no cases of sudden death at presentation. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was present in 32 subjects (40%); right ventricular outflow obstruction was present in 10 (12.5%). Freedom from death or transplantation was 83% (95% CI, 73 to 90) 5 years after presentation and 76% (95% CI, 62 to 86) 10 years after presentation. By proportional-hazards regression analysis, risk factors for death or transplantation included concentric left ventricular hypertrophy, age at presentation <1 year, lower initial fractional shortening Z score, and increasing left ventricular posterior wall thickness relative to body surface area. At the latest follow-up, 54 of 65 surviving subjects had no symptoms, and 46 were receiving no regular medication. Syndromal, genetic, and metabolic causes predominate in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Ventricular outflow tract obstruction is common. The clinical status of long-term survivors is good. This population-based study identifies children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who are at risk of adverse events.

  11. Relationship between Regional Fat Distribution and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmi, Valeria; Maresca, Luciano; Lanzillo, Chiara; Marinoni, Giorgia Michela; D’Adamo, Monica; Di Roma, Mauro; Preziosi, Paolo; Bellia, Alfonso; Calò, Leonardo; Sbraccia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common genetic heart disease, is characterized by heterogeneous phenotypic expression. Body mass index has been associated with LV mass and heart failure symptoms in HCM. The aim of our study was to investigate whether regional (trunk, appendicular, epicardial) fat distribution and extent could be related to hypertrophy severity and pattern in HCM. Methods Cardiovascular magnetic resonance was performed in 32 subjects with echocardiography-based diagnosis of HCM (22M/10F, 57.2±12.6 years) characterized by predominant hypertrophy at the interventricular septum (IVS). Regional fat distribution was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Gender differences were detected in maximum IVS thickness (M: 18.3±3.8 mm vs. F: 14.3±4 mm, p = 0.012), right ventricle (RV) systolic function (M: 61.3±6.7%; F: 67.5±6.3%, p = 0.048), indexed RV end-diastolic (M: 64.8±16.3 ml/m2; F: 50.7±15.5 ml/m2, p = 0.04) and end-systolic volumes (M: 24.3±8.3 ml/m2; F: 16.7±7.4 ml/m2, p = 0.04). After adjusting for age and gender, maximum IVS thickness was associated with truncal fat (Tr-FAT) (β = 0.43, p = 0.02), but not with either appendicular or epicardial fat. Epicardial fat resulted independently associated with NT-proBNP levels (β = 0.63, p = 0.04). Late Gadolinium Enhancement-positive subjects displayed greater maximum IVS thickness (p = 0.02), LV mass index (p = 0.015) and NT-proBNP levels (p = 0.04), but no associations with fat amount or distribution were observed. Conclusion Truncal, but not appendicular or epicardial fat amount, seems to be related with maximum IVS thickness, the hallmark feature in our cohort of HCM patients. Further prospective researches are needed to assess a potential causative effect of central adiposity on HCM phenotype. PMID:27388274

  12. DDDR pacing for symptomatic patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Achterberg, H.J.; Scheffer, M.G.; van Mechelen, R.; Kofflard, M.J.M.; ten Cate, F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a primary cardiac disorder with a heterogeneous expression. When medical therapy fails in patients with symptomatic HOCM, three additional therapeutic strategies exist: ventricular septal myectomy, alcohol-induced percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) of the first septal branch of the anterior descending artery and pacemaker implantation. In this paper we present the results of seven patients in whom a dual-chamber pacemaker was implanted to reduce the gradient in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) and to relieve their symptoms. Methods In patients with drug refractory symptomatic HOCM, not eligible for surgery, pacemaker therapy was recommended. Symptomatic HOCM was defined as symptoms of angina and dyspnoea, functional class NYHA 3-4 and a resting LVOT gradient during Doppler echocardiography of more than 2.75 m/s (30 mmHg). In these patients, a dual-chamber pacemaker was implanted with a right ventricular lead positioned in the right ventricular apex and an atrial lead positioned in the right atrial appendage. In all patients the AV setting was programmed between 50 and 100 ms, using Doppler echocardiography to determine the optimal filling and to ensure ventricular capture. Results A statistically significant reduction of the LVOT gradient was observed in all patients. The pre-implantation gradient in the LVOT measured by Doppler echocardiography varied from 3-5.8 m/s with a mean of 4.7±1.1 m/s. The post-implantation gradient varied from 1.4-2.6 m/s with a mean of 1.9±0.4 m/s (p<0.001). Symptomatic improvement was present in all patients. NYHA functional class went from 3-4 (mean 3.1±0.5) pre-implantation to 1-2 mean (1.3±0.4) after implantation (p<0.001). During a mean follow-up of 2.3±1.1 years, the improvement in functional class was maintained. Conclusion Our preliminary results demonstrate that dual-chamber pacing is an effective and safe treatment for

  13. Clinical Utility of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by substantial genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, leading to considerable diversity in clinical course including the most common cause of sudden death in young people and a determinant of heart failure symptoms in patients of any age. Traditionally, two-dimensional echocardiography has been the most reliable method for establishing a clinical diagnosis of HCM. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), with its high spatial resolution and tomographic imaging capability, has emerged as a technique particularly well suited to characterize the diverse phenotypic expression of this complex disease. For example, CMR is often superior to echocardiography for HCM diagnosis, by identifying areas of segmental hypertrophy (ie., anterolateral wall or apex) not reliably visualized by echocardiography (or underestimated in terms of extent). High-risk HCM patient subgroups identified with CMR include those with thin-walled scarred LV apical aneurysms (which prior to CMR imaging in HCM remained largely undetected), end-stage systolic dysfunction, and massive LV hypertrophy. CMR observations also suggest that the cardiomyopathic process in HCM is more diffuse than previously regarded, extending beyond the LV myocardium to include thickening of the right ventricular wall as well as substantial morphologic diversity with regard to papillary muscles and mitral valve. These findings have implications for management strategies in patients undergoing invasive septal reduction therapy. Among HCM family members, CMR has identified unique phenotypic markers of affected genetic status in the absence of LV hypertrophy including: myocardial crypts, elongated mitral valve leaflets and late gadolinium enhancement. The unique capability of contrast-enhanced CMR with late gadolinium enhancement to identify myocardial fibrosis has raised the expectation that this may represent a novel marker, which may enhance risk stratification. At

  14. Left Atrial Mechanical Function and Global Strain in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeonyee E.; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Kim, Yong-Jin; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Zo, Joo-Hee; Sohn, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia and is associated with adverse outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Although left atrial (LA) remodeling and dysfunction are known to associate with the development of atrial fibrillation in HCM, the changes of the LA in HCM patients remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the changes in LA size and mechanical function in HCM patients compared to control subjects and to determine the characteristics of HCM associated with LA remodeling and dysfunction. Methods Seventy-nine HCM patients (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 76% were men) were compared to 79 age- and sex-matched controls (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 76% were men) and 20 young healthy controls (mean age, 33 ± 5 years; 45% were men). The LA diameter, volume, and mechanical function, including global strain (ε), were evaluated by 2D-speckle tracking echocardiography. The phenotype of HCM, maximal left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, LV mass, and presence and extent of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) were evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Results HCM patients showed increased LA volume index, impaired reservoir function, and decreased LA ε compared to the control subjects. When we divided the HCM group according to a maximal LA volume index (LAVImax) of 38.7 ml/m2 or LA ε of 21%, no significant differences in the HCM phenotype and maximal LV wall thickness were observed for patients with LAVImax >38.7 ml/m2 or LA ε ≤21%. Conversely, the LV mass index was significantly higher both in patients with maximal LA volume index >38.7 ml/m2 and with LA ε ≤21% and was independently associated with LAVImax and LA ε. Although the LGE extent was increased in patients with LA ε ≤21%, it was not independently associated with either LAVImax or LA ε. Conclusions HCM patients showed progressed LA remodeling and dysfunction; the determinant of LA remodeling and dysfunction was LV mass index rather than LV myocardial fibrosis

  15. Anesthetic Management Guided by Transthoracic Echocardiography During Cesarean Delivery Complicated by Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    DesRoches, Jaclyn M; McKeen, Dolores Madeline; Warren, Andrew; Allen, Victoria M; George, Ronald B; Kells, Catherine; Shukla, Romesh

    2016-03-15

    We describe the management of a parturient woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who developed a symptomatic accelerated idioventricular rhythm who required an urgent cesarean delivery at 32 weeks. Transthoracic echocardiography helped guide anesthetic management, including epidural dosing, fluid management, and phenylephrine infusion rates. This case demonstrates the application of transthoracic echocardiography to guide anesthetic management in a parturient woman at risk for cardiovascular compromise.

  16. [Right ventricular involvement in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A case report and brief review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Comella, Alessandro; Magnacca, Massimo; Gistri, Roberto; Lombardi, Massimo; Neglia, Danilo; Poddighe, Rosa; Pesola, Antonio

    2004-02-01

    A clinical case of non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with involvement of the right ventricle is reported. The patient was a 42-year-old male with symptoms suggesting an effort angina of recent onset. The diagnosis was established by echocardiography, which showed asymmetric hypertrophy of the interventricular septum (20 mm), hypertrophy of the right ventricular free wall, and severe hypertrophy of the septal papillary muscle of the tricuspid valve. The patient underwent a complete diagnostic evaluation, including exercise stress test, Holter monitoring, magnetic resonance, myocardial tomoscintigraphy and complete hemodynamic assessment. Medical treatment with atenolol 50 mg day was started; at 1-year follow-up the patient's clinical conditions are good, with decrease of anginal episodes. The literature review elicits the paucity of information about this condition, despite a frequent involvement of both ventricles in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. The case reported shows two atypical aspects: a) the involvement of the right ventricle in non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is anecdotal; b) this pattern of hypertrophy (right ventricular free wall/septal papillary muscle) has never been previously reported. Right ventricular involvement in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy must be carefully investigated, because it may be more frequent than conventionally deemed.

  17. Missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy-chain gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Shoichi; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Hirayama, Kenji; Sakurai, Hisanao

    1995-09-11

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy occurs as an autosomal dominant familial disorder or as a sporadic disease without familial involvement. We describe a missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene, a G to T transversion (741 Gly{r_arrow}Trp) identified by direct sequencing of exon 20 in four individuals affected with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Three individuals with sporadic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, whose parents are clinically and genetically unaffected, had sequence variations of exon 34 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion, 1658 Asp{r_arrow}Asp, resulting in FokI site polymorphism), of intron 33 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a G to A and an A to T transversion), and also of intron 14 of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion in a patient with Noonan syndrome). Including our case, 30 missense mutations of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene in 49 families have been reported thus far worldwide. Almost all are located in the region of the gene coding for the globular head of the molecule, and only one mutation was found in both Caucasian and Japanese families. Missense mutations of the {Beta}-cardiac MHC gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may therefore differ according to race. 29 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Three patients presenting with severe macrosomia and congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Marie; Benbrik, Nadir; Romefort, Bénédicte; Colombel, Agnès; Bézieau, Stéphane; Isidor, Bertrand

    2017-03-24

    Macrosomia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are two features often associated in neonates of diabetic mothers. We report the cases of three patients with severe macrosomia and critical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy without severely unbalanced maternal diabetes. Only three patients with those two features and no uncontrolled maternal diabetes have been previously reported. The first patient was a 39-week-old girl, the second patient was a 39-week-old girl, and the third patient was a 41-week-old boy. The two French girls and the French boy had severe macrosomia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, leading to the death of the boy. The outcome of the two girls was favorable, with a standardization of growth curves and ventricular hypertrophy. Their mothers presented with high body mass index but no severe documented maternal diabetes; glycemic imbalance was only suspected on postnatal analyses. There was no hydramnios during pregnancy and no other environmental factor, especially toxic exposure. Their parents are from Mayotte, Guadeloupe, and Guinea-Conakry. The usual genetics causes, Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, and chromosomal copy number variation, were also excluded. This report suggests the implication of other factors in addition to glycemic disorders, including genetic factors, in the occurrence of macrosomia and severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in neonates. These three original observations indicate that gynecologists and neonatologists should pay attention to neonates from mothers with a high body mass index and when maternal diabetes is not documented.

  19. Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy Masked by Tako-Tsubo Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Daralammori, Y.; El Garhy, M.; Gayed, M. R.; Farah, A.; Lauer, B.; Secknus, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Left ventricular outflow obstruction might be part of the pathophysiological mechanism of Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy. This obstruction can be masked by Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy and diagnosed only by followup. Case Presentation. A 70-year-old female presented with Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy and masked obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at presentation. Conclusion. Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy typically presents like an acute MI and is characterized by severe, but transient, regional left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Prompt evaluation of the coronary status is, therefore, mandatory. The prognosis under medical treatment of heart failure symptoms and watchful waiting is favourable. Previous studies showed that LVOT obstruction might be part of the pathophysiological mechanism of TCM. This paper supports this theory. However, TCM may also mask any preexisting LVOT obstruction. PMID:24826256

  20. A new 4D trajectory-based approach unveils abnormal LV revolution dynamics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Andrea; Piras, Paolo; Re, Federica; Gabriele, Stefano; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Torromeo, Concetta; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Giura, Geltrude; Evangelista, Antonietta; Dominici, Tania; Varano, Valerio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of left ventricular shape changes during cardiac revolution may be a new step in clinical cardiology to ease early diagnosis and treatment. To quantify these changes, only point registration was adopted and neither Generalized Procrustes Analysis nor Principal Component Analysis were applied as we did previously to study a group of healthy subjects. Here, we extend to patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the original approach and preliminarily include genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals to explore the potential that incumbent pathology might also be detected. Using 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, we recorded left ventricular shape of 48 healthy subjects, 24 patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 3 genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals. We then applied Generalized Procrustes Analysis and Principal Component Analysis and inter-individual differences were cleaned by Parallel Transport performed on the tangent space, along the horizontal geodesic, between the per-subject consensuses and the grand mean. Endocardial and epicardial layers were evaluated separately, different from many ecocardiographic applications. Under a common Principal Component Analysis, we then evaluated left ventricle morphological changes (at both layers) explained by first Principal Component scores. Trajectories' shape and orientation were investigated and contrasted. Logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to compare these morphometric indicators with traditional 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters. Geometric morphometrics indicators performed better than 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters in recognizing pathology both in systole and diastole. Genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals clustered with patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy during diastole, suggesting that incumbent pathology may indeed be foreseen by these methods. Left

  1. A New 4D Trajectory-Based Approach Unveils Abnormal LV Revolution Dynamics in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Madeo, Andrea; Piras, Paolo; Re, Federica; Gabriele, Stefano; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Torromeo, Concetta; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Giura, Geltrude; Evangelista, Antonietta; Dominici, Tania; Varano, Valerio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of left ventricular shape changes during cardiac revolution may be a new step in clinical cardiology to ease early diagnosis and treatment. To quantify these changes, only point registration was adopted and neither Generalized Procrustes Analysis nor Principal Component Analysis were applied as we did previously to study a group of healthy subjects. Here, we extend to patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the original approach and preliminarily include genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals to explore the potential that incumbent pathology might also be detected. Using 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, we recorded left ventricular shape of 48 healthy subjects, 24 patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 3 genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals. We then applied Generalized Procrustes Analysis and Principal Component Analysis and inter-individual differences were cleaned by Parallel Transport performed on the tangent space, along the horizontal geodesic, between the per-subject consensuses and the grand mean. Endocardial and epicardial layers were evaluated separately, different from many ecocardiographic applications. Under a common Principal Component Analysis, we then evaluated left ventricle morphological changes (at both layers) explained by first Principal Component scores. Trajectories’ shape and orientation were investigated and contrasted. Logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to compare these morphometric indicators with traditional 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters. Geometric morphometrics indicators performed better than 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters in recognizing pathology both in systole and diastole. Genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals clustered with patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy during diastole, suggesting that incumbent pathology may indeed be foreseen by these methods

  2. [Sigmoid septum: A variant of the ventricular hypertrophy or of the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy?].

    PubMed

    Gentille-Lorente, Delicia; Salvadó-Usach, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Sigmoid septum and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting with left ventricular hypertrophy and, although they appear to be different entities, often involve problems in the differential diagnosis. This study was carried out to assess the prevalence and characteristics of the echocardiographic sigmoid septum and its differential findings regarding hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Descriptive, observational and prospective study. A total of 1,770 patients were studied by echocardiography. Sigmoid septum (focal and isolated hypertrophy of the basal interventricular septum≥13mm in men and ≥12mm in women, exceeding ≥50% of the median septum thickness) was classified as «Type 1» (≤14mm) and «Type 2» (≥15mm). There were 59 cases of sigmoid septum (prevalence of 3.3%): 26 (1.5%) patients with type 1 (50% male) and 33 (1.9%) patients with type 2 (72.7% male); there were 25 (1.4%) cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (76% male). The group with type 2 sigmoid septum differed from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in: was older (73±10.5years; P<.0001), with more hypertension (84.8%; P<.0001), lower glomerular filtering (73.3±21.4ml/min; P=.007), lower repolarization abnormalities (18.2%; P=.004) and Cornell index (in men, 22.2±11mm; P=.041), more diastolic dysfunction (75%; P=.0089) and in ventricular morphology and fibrosis location in magnetic resonance. Regarding the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, patients with type 2 sigmoid septum are older and generally hypertensive; otherwise, often they have no clear differences in their clinical, electrocardiographic or echocardiographic characteristics. Therefore, cardiac resonance is helpful in the differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiple Gene Variants in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in the Era of Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Burns, Charlotte; Bagnall, Richard D; Lam, Lien; Semsarian, Christopher; Ingles, Jodie

    2017-08-01

    Multiple likely pathogenic/pathogenic (LP/P; ≥2) variants in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were described 10 years ago with a prevalence of 5%. We sought to re-examine the significance of multiple rare variants in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the setting of comprehensive and targeted panels. Of 758 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy probands, we included 382 with ≥45 cardiomyopathy genes screened. There were 224 (59%) with ≥1 rare variant (allele frequency ≤0.02%). Variants were analyzed using varying sized gene panels to represent comprehensive or targeted testing. Based on a 45-gene panel, 127 (33%) had a LP/P variant, 139 (36%) had variants of uncertain significance, and 66 (17%) had multiple rare variants. A targeted 8-gene panel yielded 125 (32%) LP/P variants, 52 (14%) variants of uncertain significance, and 14 (4%) had multiple rare variants. No proband had 2 LP/P variants. Including affected family members (total n=412), cluster-adjusted analyses identified a phenotype effect, with younger age (odds ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.98; P=0.004) and family history of sudden cardiac death (odds ratio, 3.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-9.9; P=0.02) significantly more likely in multiple versus single variant patients when considering an 8-gene panel but not larger panels. Those with multiple variants had worse event-free survival from all-cause death, cardiac transplantation, and cardiac arrest (log-rank P=0.008). No proband had multiple LP/P variants in contrast to previous reports. However, multiple rare variants regardless of classification were seen in 4% and contributed to earlier disease onset and cardiac events. Our findings support a cumulative variant hypothesis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Evolution of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) from idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (IHCM) vs. inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi): a rare case of sudden death in an 8-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Schmidt, Peter; Kandolf, Reinhard; Madea, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    In rare cases, the diagnosis of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in children was established postmortem. Our case report deals with the sudden and unexpected death of an 8-year-old boy. The postmortem examination revealed non-obstructive hypertrophy with irregular arrangement of muscular fibers, dilatation of the ventricles, endocardial fibrosis, microfocal vacuolization with enlarged hyperchromatic nuclei, and signs of inflammation with interstitial fibrosis. We present an evolution from idiopathic cardiomyopathy to DCM. To some extent, there were morphologic signs of an inflammatory process that first led us to suspect a specific inflammatory DCM.

  5. Ablation of hypertrophic septum using radiofrequency energy: an alternative for gradient reduction in patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Riedlbauchová, Lucie; Janoušek, Jan; Veselka, Josef

    2013-06-01

    Alcohol septal ablation and surgical myectomy represent accepted therapeutic options for treatment of symptomatic patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Long-term experience with radiofrequency ablation of arrhythmogenic substrates raised a question if this technique might be effective for left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradient reduction. We report on a 63-year-old patient with recurrence of symptoms 1 year after alcohol septal ablation (ASA) leading originally to a significant reduction of both symptoms and gradient. Due to a new increase of gradient in the LVOT up to 200 mm Hg with corresponding worsening of symptoms and due to refusal of surgical myectomy by the patient, endocardial radiofrequency ablation of the septal hypertrophy (ERASH) was indicated. Radiofrequency ablation was performed in the LVOT using irrigated-tip ablation catheter; the target site was identified using intracardiac echocardiography and electroanatomical CARTO mapping. ERASH caused an immediate gradient reduction due to hypokinesis of the ablated septum. At 2-month follow-up exam, significant clinical improvement was observed, together with persistent gradient reduction assessed with Doppler echocardiography. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance revealed persistent septal hypokinesis and slight thinning of the ablated region. Septal ablation using radiofrequency energy may be a promising alternative or adjunct to the treatment of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Intracardiac echocardiography and electroanatomical CARTO mapping enable exact lesion placement and preservation of atrioventricular conduction.

  6. Renin-angiotensin system gene polymorphisms as potential modifiers of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rani, Bindu; Kumar, Amit; Bahl, Ajay; Sharma, Rajni; Prasad, Rishikesh; Khullar, Madhu

    2017-03-01

    The renin-angiotensin (RAS) pathway has an important role in the etiology of heart failure and given the importance of RAS as a therapeutic target in various cardiomyopathies, genetic polymorphisms in the RAS genes may modulate the risk and severity of disease in cardiomyopathy patients. In the present study, we examined the association of RAS pathway gene polymorphisms, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), and angiotensin receptor type 1 (AGTR1) with risk and disease severity in Asian Indian idiopathic cardiomyopathy patients. The case-control study was conducted in 400 cardiomyopathy patients diagnosed with HCM, DCM, or restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) and 235 healthy controls. Genotyping of patients and controls was done by PCR-RFLP assays. Left ventricular wall thickness and left ventricular ejection fraction were measured by means of M-mode echocardiography. We observed significantly higher prevalence of ACE DD and AGTR1 1166CC genotypes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients. Also, 235TT genotype of AGT (M235T) was significantly associated with enhanced risk of the disease phenotype in HCM, DCM, and RCM.

  7. Myocardial stunning in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: recovery predicted by single photon emission computed tomographic thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, D.G.; Clements, I.P.; Callahan, M.J.

    1989-05-01

    A young woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization presented with chest pain and features of a large left ventricular aneurysm. The initial diagnosis was myocardial ischemia with either an evolving or an ancient myocardial infarction. Subsequently, verapamil therapy was associated with complete resolution of the extensive left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, normalization of left ventricular ejection fraction and a minimal myocardial infarction. Normal thallium uptake on single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy early in the hospital course predicted myocardial viability in the region of the aneurysm. Thus, orally administered verapamil may reverse spontaneous extensive myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and possibly limit the extent of myocardial infarction in such circumstances.

  8. Microvascular permeability changes might explain cardiac tamponade after alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jen-Te; Hsiao, Ju-Feng; Chang, Jung-Jung; Chung, Chang-Min; Chang, Shih-Tai; Pan, Kuo-Li

    2014-04-01

    Various sequelae of alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy have been reported. Of note, some cases of cardiac tamponade after alcohol septal ablation cannot be well explained. We describe the case of a 78-year-old woman with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in whom cardiac tamponade developed one hour after alcohol septal ablation, probably unrelated to mechanical trauma. At that time, we noted a substantial difference in the red blood cell-to-white blood cell ratio between the pericardial effusion (1,957.4) and the peripheral blood (728.3). In addition to presenting the patient's case, we speculate that a possible mechanism for acute tamponade--alcohol-induced changes in microvascular permeability--is a reasonable explanation for cases of alcohol septal ablation that are complicated by otherwise-unexplainable massive pericardial effusions.

  9. Left Atrial trajectory impairment in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy disclosed by Geometric Morphometrics and Parallel Transport

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Paolo; Torromeo, Concetta; Re, Federica; Evangelista, Antonietta; Gabriele, Stefano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Madeo, Andrea; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Varano, Valerio; Uguccioni, Massimo; Puddu, Paolo E.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of full Left Atrium (LA) deformation and whole LA deformational trajectory in time has been poorly investigated and, to the best of our knowledge, seldom discussed in patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Therefore, we considered 22 patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 46 healthy subjects, investigated them by three–dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, and studied the derived landmark clouds via Geometric Morphometrics with Parallel Transport. Trajectory shape and trajectory size were different in Controls versus HCM and their classification powers had high AUC (Area Under the Receiving Operator Characteristic Curve) and accuracy. The two trajectories were much different at the transition between LA conduit and booster pump functions. Full shape and deformation analyses with trajectory analysis enabled a straightforward perception of pathophysiological consequences of HCM condition on LA functioning. It might be worthwhile to apply these techniques to look for novel pathophysiological approaches that may better define atrio–ventricular interaction. PMID:27713503

  10. Left Atrial trajectory impairment in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy disclosed by Geometric Morphometrics and Parallel Transport.

    PubMed

    Piras, Paolo; Torromeo, Concetta; Re, Federica; Evangelista, Antonietta; Gabriele, Stefano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Madeo, Andrea; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Varano, Valerio; Uguccioni, Massimo; Puddu, Paolo E

    2016-10-07

    The analysis of full Left Atrium (LA) deformation and whole LA deformational trajectory in time has been poorly investigated and, to the best of our knowledge, seldom discussed in patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Therefore, we considered 22 patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 46 healthy subjects, investigated them by three-dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, and studied the derived landmark clouds via Geometric Morphometrics with Parallel Transport. Trajectory shape and trajectory size were different in Controls versus HCM and their classification powers had high AUC (Area Under the Receiving Operator Characteristic Curve) and accuracy. The two trajectories were much different at the transition between LA conduit and booster pump functions. Full shape and deformation analyses with trajectory analysis enabled a straightforward perception of pathophysiological consequences of HCM condition on LA functioning. It might be worthwhile to apply these techniques to look for novel pathophysiological approaches that may better define atrio-ventricular interaction.

  11. The Mitral Valve in Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Test in Context.

    PubMed

    Sherrid, Mark V; Balaram, Sandhya; Kim, Bette; Axel, Leon; Swistel, Daniel G

    2016-04-19

    Mitral valve abnormalities were not part of modern pathological and clinical descriptions of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the 1950s, which focused on left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and myocyte fiber disarray. Although systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve was discovered as the cause of LV outflow tract obstruction in the M-mode echocardiography era, in the 1990s structural abnormalities of the mitral valve became appreciated as contributing to SAM pathophysiology. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mitral malformations have been identified at all levels. They occur in the leaflets, usually elongating them, and also in the submitral apparatus, with a wide array of malformations of the papillary muscles and chordae, that can be detected by transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography and by cardiac magnetic resonance. Because they participate fundamentally in the predisposition to SAM, they have increasingly been repaired surgically. This review critically assesses imaging and measurement of mitral abnormalities and discusses their surgical relief.

  12. The myosin mesa and a possible unifying hypothesis for the molecular basis of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.

    2015-01-01

    No matter how many times one explores the structure of the myosin molecule, there is always something new to discover. Here, I describe the myosin mesa, a structural feature of the motor domain that has the characteristics of a binding domain for another protein, possibly myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C). Interestingly, many well-known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) mutations lie along this surface and may affect the putative interactions proposed here. A potential unifying hypothesis for the molecular basis of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is discussed here. It involves increased power output of the cardiac muscle as a result of HCM mutations causing the release of inhibition by myosin binding protein C. PMID:25619247

  13. Left Atrial trajectory impairment in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy disclosed by Geometric Morphometrics and Parallel Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piras, Paolo; Torromeo, Concetta; Re, Federica; Evangelista, Antonietta; Gabriele, Stefano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Madeo, Andrea; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Varano, Valerio; Uguccioni, Massimo; Puddu, Paolo E.

    2016-10-01

    The analysis of full Left Atrium (LA) deformation and whole LA deformational trajectory in time has been poorly investigated and, to the best of our knowledge, seldom discussed in patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Therefore, we considered 22 patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 46 healthy subjects, investigated them by three-dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, and studied the derived landmark clouds via Geometric Morphometrics with Parallel Transport. Trajectory shape and trajectory size were different in Controls versus HCM and their classification powers had high AUC (Area Under the Receiving Operator Characteristic Curve) and accuracy. The two trajectories were much different at the transition between LA conduit and booster pump functions. Full shape and deformation analyses with trajectory analysis enabled a straightforward perception of pathophysiological consequences of HCM condition on LA functioning. It might be worthwhile to apply these techniques to look for novel pathophysiological approaches that may better define atrio-ventricular interaction.

  14. An autopsy report of acute myocardial infarction with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy-like heart.

    PubMed

    Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Okada, Hideshi; Morishita, Kentaro; Imai, Hajime; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Nawa, Takahide; Suzuki, Kodai; Ikeshoji, Haruka; Kato, Hisaaki; Yoshida, Takahiro; Yoshida, Shozo; Shirai, Kunihiro; Toyoda, Izumi; Hara, Akira; Ogura, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    An 84-year-old woman, who was followed up as hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) in a local hospital, was transferred to our center because of anterior chest pain and diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction (MI). Coronary angiography showed total occlusion of the mid-left anterior descending, and flow was restored after endovascular thrombectomy. An autopsy was performed after she died on hospital day 6. At autopsy, there was no significant stenosis in this vessel and the absence of plaque rupture was confirmed. Likewise, it was unclear asymmetric hypertrophy at autopsy, it could not deny that a sigmoid deformity of the basal septum occurs in elderly patients and can mimic the asymmetric septal hypertrophy of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. MI was thought to be caused by coronary spasm or squeezing in HOCM-like heart. Therefore, it may be necessary antithrombosis therapy in HOCM-like patients with no history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

  15. [Functional regulation of genome with peptide bioregulators by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (by patients and relatives)].

    PubMed

    Dzhokhadze, T A; Buadze, T Zh; Gaĭozishvili, M N; Rogava, M A; Lazhava, T A

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a comparative study of the functional genome indicators using lymphocyte cultures of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and their first relatives. Studies conducted both in intact cultures and cultures exposed to the influence of peptide - bioregulators Epithalon, Vilon and Livagen. Last (Livagen) tested at separate and joint application with cobalt chloride salt. As indicated according to the results of the analysis, the cells of the individuals with HCM and their first relatives were characterized by higher frequency of spontaneous quantitative - structural disorders in comparison with the cells of healthy individuals. The findings suggest a different effect of bioregulators. The most effective protective action in relation normalization of functional parameters of the genome shows Epithalon for lowering the level of chromosomal instability in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and relatives of patients with HCM. On the basis of identified protective action Epithalon concludes prospects of its application in the development of preventive measures for individuals at increased risk of morbidity HCM.

  16. The myosin mesa and a possible unifying hypothesis for the molecular basis of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Spudich, James A

    2015-02-01

    No matter how many times one explores the structure of the myosin molecule, there is always something new to discover. Here, I describe the myosin mesa, a structural feature of the motor domain that has the characteristics of a binding domain for another protein, possibly myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C). Interestingly, many well-known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) mutations lie along this surface and may affect the putative interactions proposed here. A potential unifying hypothesis for the molecular basis of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is discussed here. It involves increased power output of the cardiac muscle as a result of HCM mutations causing the release of inhibition by myosin binding protein C.

  17. The diagnosis of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Piva e Mattos, Beatriz; Torres, Marco Antonio Rodrigues; Rebelatto, Taiane Francieli; Loreto, Melina Silva de; Scolari, Fernando Luís

    2012-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a prevalent genetic disease characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy, presenting dynamic obstruction of outflow tract with subaortic gradient happening at rest in 30% of the cases. It is attributed to the intricate interaction between the anterior mitral leaflet, the interventricular septum and altered flow vectors generated in left ventricle along with changes in outflow tract geometry. Mitral regurgitation in varying degrees is found with or without association with structural deformities of the valve apparatus. The exercise echocardiogram evidences latent obstruction easily induced by exercise in 60 to 75% of non-obstructive forms. The determination of the gradient under this condition must be considered in routine investigation of patients with mild or no obstruction at rest. The evaluation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy incorporates methods based on the ultrasound image, which, along with MRI, allow recognizing ventricular obstruction generating mechanisms, thus facilitating the diagnosis and management of obstructive and latent obstructive forms.

  18. All That Glitters is not Gold: Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mimicking Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanadoss, Umashankar; Kulkarni, Abhishek; Balakrishnan, Shobana; Shree, Nidhi; Harjai, Kishore; Jagasia, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is characterized by the idiopathic hypertrophy of the left ventricle (and occasionally right ventricle). HCM is an autosomal dominant disease, with variable penetration. In Asian population, apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is relatively common (25%). However, this is relatively rare in Caucasian population (0.2%). Patients with HCM, often presents with typical exertional chest pain and shortness of breath. Apical HCM patients tend to have milder symptoms. However, the clinical presentation and electrocardiographic features of Apical HCM often mimic acute coronary syndrome and high index of suspicion is warranted in differentiating this condition. Patients with apical HCM have relatively better prognosis when compare to the other varieties. Here, we are presenting a patient who presented with typical exertional chest pain whose electrocardiographic changes are concerning for acute ischemic changes.

  19. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM): How Flow Analysis May Drive Medical Management and Surgical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Theodore P.

    2011-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited heart disease and occurs in 1 in 500 persons worldwide regardless of race, age and gender. It is the most common cause of sudden death in the young and also causes heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias. The primary anatomic abnormality is thickening of certain walls, or sometimes global thickening of the left or right ventricle. The patterns of thickening along with increased ventricular stiffness lead to suboptimal ventricular filling and inefficient ejection of blood from the ventricle. Treatment for HCM can be medical or surgical. The choice of therapy is driven by the presence and severity of outflow obstruction. Flow analysis could provide sophisticated information about outflow and inflow ventricular dynamics. These flow dynamics features may enable better medical choices and provide information that would allow superior surgical planning. Associate Professor of Medicine & Director, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic

  20. Differentiation of infiltrative cardiomyopathy from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Toru; Baba, Yuichi; Hirota, Takayoshi; Tanioka, Katsutoshi; Yamasaki, Naohito; Yamanaka, Shigeo; Iiyama, Tatsuo; Kumagai, Naoko; Furuno, Takashi; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Kitaoka, Hiroaki

    2015-06-16

    Because infiltrative cardiomyopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) share clinical and hemodynamic features of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and abnormal diastolic function, it is often difficult to distinguish these entities. We investigated the potential role of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) for differentiation of infiltrative cardiomyopathy from HCM. The study group consisted of 46 consecutive patients with infiltrative cardiomyopathies or HCM in whom sarcomere protein gene mutations were identified at Kochi Medical School Hospital; of these, there were 11 patients with infiltrative cardiomyopathy (cardiac amyloidosis in 8 patients and Fabry disease in 3 patients) and 35 HCM patients. Serum hs-cTnT level was significantly higher in patients who had infiltrative cardiomyopathy than in those who had HCM (0.083 ± 0.057 ng/ml versus 0.027 ± 0.034 ng/ml, p < 0.001), whereas brain natriuretic peptide levels did not differ between the two groups. In two age-matched the 2 cohorts (patients evaluated at > 40 years at age), hs-cTnT level, maximum LV wall thickness, posterior wall thickness, peak early (E) transmitral filling velocity, peak early diastolic (Ea) velocity of tissue Doppler imaging at the lateral corner and E/Ea ratios at both the septal and lateral corners were significantly different between the two groups. As for diagnostic accuracy to differentiate the two groups by using receiver operating characteristic analysis, hs-cTnT was the highest value of area under the curve (0.939) and E/Ea (lateral) was second highest value (0.914). Serum hs-cTnT is a helpful diagnostic indicator for accurate differentiation between infiltrative cardiomyopathy and HCM.

  1. Sequential Atrioventricular Pacing in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: An 18-year Experience.

    PubMed

    Jurado Román, Alfonso; Montero Cabezas, José M; Rubio Alonso, Belén; García Tejada, Julio; Hernández Hernández, Felipe; Albarrán González-Trevilla, Agustín; Velázquez Martín, María T; Coma Samartín, Raúl; Rodríguez García, Jesús; Tascón Pérez, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    Controversy persists regarding the role of sequential atrioventricular pacing in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and disabling symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pacing on symptoms, dynamic gradient, and left ventricular function in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. From 1991 to 2009, dual-chamber pacemakers were implanted in 82 patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and disabling symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Sequential pacing was performed with a short atrioventricular delay. Clinical and echocardiographic parameters were measured before and immediately after implantation and after a long follow-up (median, 8.5 years [range, 1-18 years]). The New York Heart Association functional class was immediately reduced after pacemaker implantation in 95% of patients (P < .0001), and this improvement was maintained until the final follow-up in 89% (P = .016). The gradient was significantly reduced after implantation (94.5 ± 36.5 vs 46.4 ± 26.7mmHg; P < .0001) and at final follow-up (94.5 ± 36.5 vs 35.9 ± 24.0mmHg; P < .0001). Mitral regurgitation permanently improved in 52% of the patients (P < .0001). There were no differences in ventricular thickness or diameters, ejection fraction, or diastolic function. Sequential pacing in selected patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy improves functional class and reduces dynamic gradient and mitral regurgitation immediately after pacemaker implantation and at final follow-up. Prolonged ventricular pacing has no negative effects on systolic or diastolic function in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Lack of reliable clinical predictors to identify obstructive sleep apnea in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nerbass, Flávia B.; Pedrosa, Rodrigo P.; Genta, Pedro R.; Antunes, Murillo O.; Arteaga-Fernández, Edmundo; Drager, Luciano F.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnea is common among patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and may contribute to poor cardiovascular outcomes. However, obstructive sleep apnea is largely unrecognized in this population. We sought to identify the clinical predictors of obstructive sleep apnea among patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. METHODS: Consecutive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were recruited from a tertiary University Hospital and were evaluated using validated sleep questionnaires (Berlin and Epworth) and overnight portable monitoring. Ninety patients (males, 51%; age, 46±15 years; body mass index, 26.6±4.9 kg/m2) were included, and obstructive sleep apnea (respiratory disturbance index ≥15 events/h) was present in 37 patients (41%). RESULTS: Compared with the patients without obstructive sleep apnea, patients with obstructive sleep apnea were older and had higher body mass index, larger waist circumference, larger neck circumference, and higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation. Excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth scale) was low and similar in the patients with and without obstructive sleep apnea, respectively. The only predictors of obstructive sleep apnea (using a logistic regression analysis) were age ≥45 years (odds ratio [OR], 4.46; 95% confidence interval [CI 95%], 1.47–13.54; p = 0.008) and the presence of atrial fibrillation [OR, 5.37; CI 95%, 1.43–20.12; p = 0.013]. CONCLUSION: Consistent clinical predictors of obstructive sleep apnea are lacking for patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which suggests that objective sleep evaluations should be considered in this population, particularly among elderly patients with atrial fibrillation. PMID:23917665

  3. Fatal infantile mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and optic atrophy associated with a homozygous OPA1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Ronen; Saada, Ann; Flannery, Padraig J; Burté, Florence; Soiferman, Devorah; Khayat, Morad; Eisner, Verónica; Vladovski, Eugene; Taylor, Robert W; Bindoff, Laurence A; Shaag, Avraham; Mandel, Hanna; Schuler-Furman, Ora; Shalev, Stavit A; Elpeleg, Orly; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Infantile-onset encephalopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation defects are genetically heterogeneous with defects involving both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Objective To identify the causative genetic defect in two sisters presenting with lethal infantile encephalopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and optic atrophy. Methods We describe a comprehensive clinical, biochemical and molecular genetic investigation of two affected siblings from a consanguineous family. Molecular genetic analysis was done by a combined approach involving genome-wide autozygosity mapping and next-generation exome sequencing. Biochemical analysis was done by enzymatic analysis and Western blot. Evidence for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability was investigated using long-range and real-time PCR assays. Mitochondrial cristae morphology was assessed with transmission electron microscopy. Results Both affected sisters presented with a similar cluster of neurodevelopmental deficits marked by failure to thrive, generalised neuromuscular weakness and optic atrophy. The disease progression was ultimately fatal with severe encephalopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities were globally decreased in skeletal muscle biopsies. They were found to be homozygous for a novel c.1601T>G (p.Leu534Arg) mutation in the OPA1 gene, which resulted in a marked loss of steady-state levels of the native OPA1 protein. We observed severe mtDNA depletion in DNA extracted from the patients’ muscle biopsies. Mitochondrial morphology was consistent with abnormal mitochondrial membrane fusion. Conclusions We have established, for the first time, a causal link between a pathogenic homozygous OPA1 mutation and human disease. The fatal multisystemic manifestations observed further extend the complex phenotype associated with pathogenic OPA1 mutations, in particular the previously unreported association

  4. Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianyi; Liu, Xiaosun; Zhang, Qing; Hong, Yanyun; Song, Bin; Teng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Standard therapy has not been established for thyroid cancer when a thyroidectomy is contraindicated due to systemic disease. Herein, we reported a patient who had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and papillary thyroid carcinoma treated by radiofrequency ablation because of inability to tolerate a thyroidectomy. Radiofrequency ablation can be used to treat thyroid cancer when surgery is not feasible, although the long-term outcome needs further observation. PMID:27390548

  5. Burden of Recurrent and Ancestral Mutations in Families With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ross, Samantha Barratt; Bagnall, Richard D; Ingles, Jodie; Van Tintelen, J Peter; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetically heterogeneous myocardial disease with >1000 causal variants identified. Nonunique variants account for disease in many families. We sought to characterize nonunique variants in Australian families and determine whether they arise from common ancestral mutations or recurrent mutation events. Genetic test results of 467 index patients from apparently unrelated families with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were evaluated. Causal variants were found in 185 of 467 (40%) families. Nonunique variants accounted for 122 of 185 (66%) families. The most common single genetic cause of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the recurrent MYBPC3 (myosin-binding protein-C) variant c.1504C>T, p.Arg502Trp, which was found in 13 of 185 (7%) families with a causal variant identified. Thirteen variants in MYBPC3 and MYH7 (myosin heavy chain 7) were each identified >3 times and accounted for 78 of 185 (42%) hypertrophic cardiomyopathy families with a causal variant. Haplotype analysis of these 13 variants was performed on 126 individuals from 70 Australian families, and 11 variants arose through recurrent mutation events. Two variants, MYBPC3 c.1928-2A>G and MYH7 c.2681A>G, p.Glu894Gly, were found on 1 haplotype in 6 families each, supportive of a single mutation event inherited from a common ancestor. The majority of families with a causal variant identified have a nonunique variant. Discovery of the genetic origins of human disease forms a fundamental basis for improved understanding of disease pathogenesis and phenotype development. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Vagal enhancement linking abnormal blood pressure response and subendocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Sugihara, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    An abnormal blood pressure response to exercise has been reported to be associated with left ventricular subendocardial ischemia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We report a case of HCM with an abnormal blood pressure response and subendocardial ischemia, in which the analysis of heart rate variability revealed exercise-induced vagal enhancement. The present case highlights the possible mechanism linking abnormal blood pressure response and left ventricular subendocardial ischemia in patients with HCM.

  7. [Detection and quantification of myocardial fibrosis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Pujadas, Sandra; Carreras, Francesc; Arrastio, Xabier; Leta, Rubén; Vila, Montserrat; Subirana, María Teresa; Bayés-Genís, Antoni; Pons-Lladó, Guillem

    2007-01-01

    Severity of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been associated with the amount of myocardial fibrosis in autopsy studies. Cardio-vascular magnetic resonance allows, by means of the delayed contrast-enhancement technique, an in vivo detection of focal myocardial fibrosis. Our aim was to study myocardial fibrosis in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by means of contrast-enhance cardio-vascular magnetic resonance. 43 patients (30 males; mean age 47 [18] years) were studied by cardio-vascular magnetic resonance. In all patients left ventricular function and mass was analyzed. Total mass of myocardial fibrosis, as identified by delayed contrast-enhancement, was also calculated. In 63% of patients some degree of myocardial delayed contrast-enhancement was observed, total mass of myocardial fibrosis ranging between 1 and 59 g (mean: 17 g). There was a positive correlation between the amount of myocardial fibrosis and the degree of hypertrophy. Maximal wall thickness was higher in patients with myocardial fibrosis (23 [7] vs 18 [4] mm, respectively, P=.04). Familial cases were also more prevalent among this group (48% vs 13%, respectively), as well as conventional clinical risk factors. Myocardial fibrosis as detected by contrast-enhanced cardio-vascular magnetic resonance is highly prevalent in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients, particularly in familial cases with severe hypertrophy and associated risk factors.

  8. Benazepril and subclinical feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A prospective, blinded, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Di Fruscia, Rocky

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Twenty-one cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were enrolled in this study to determine if the administration of benazepril (0.5 mg/kg body weight [BW], PO, q24h) to cats with subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy improves cardiac diastolic function and reverses left ventricular hypertrophy when compared with diltiazem controlled delivery (CD) (10 mg/kg BW, PO, q24h). Cats were evaluated at day 0 and after 3 and 6 months of therapy. In the benazepril group (n = 11), the diastolic transmitral flow of the E and A waves ratio (E/A ratio) increased significantly between 0 and 6 months (P = 0.009) and the thickness of the left ventricular free wall in systole (LVFWs) decreased significantly between 0 and 3 months (P = 0.04). In the diltiazem CD group (n = 5), none of the parameters varied significantly throughout the study. There was no difference between the benazepril and the diltiazem CD group throughout the study. Therefore, the variations observed for the E/A ratio and the LVFWs may have been incidental. Further studies will be needed to establish the role of benazepril in subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cat. PMID:16734369

  9. Assessment of chest pain in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy.

    PubMed Central

    Pitcher, D; Wainwright, R; Maisey, M; Curry, P; Sowton, E

    1980-01-01

    Exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy was performed in 23 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Eighteen patients presented with chest pain which was a persistent symptom in 11. Selective coronary arteriography was performed in 16 patients and showed normal coronary arteries in 15 and insignificant luminal irregularities in one patient. Eighteen patients had abnormal scintigrams. Three had an abnormal distribution of tracer entirely attributable to asymmetric septal hypertrophy, whereas 15 had discrete tracer uptake defects which could not be explained solely by myocardial hypertrophy. In this latter group of patients three scintigraphic patterns were identified: (1) in 10 patients defects were seen in scintigrams immediately after exercise but not in delayed images obtained four to six hours later. Eight of these patients had chest pain. (2) Four patients had uptake defects seen in both initial and delayed images. One patient had chest pain. (3) In three patients, one of whom had chest pain, tracer defects were seen only in delayed images and were not apparent in the initial scintigrams. Chest pain occurred in eight out of 10 patients with scintigraphic evidence of myocardial ischaemia but was present in only three out of 13 patients with non-ischaemic scintigrams. The value of exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging as a diagnostic technique in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy appears limited. Scintigraphic evidence of regional myocardial ischaemia in the absence of significant coronary artery disease, however, contributes to an understanding of the mechanism of angina production in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Images PMID:7193039

  10. Short term reduction of left ventricular mass in primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by octreotide injections.

    PubMed Central

    Günal, A. I.; Işik, A.; Celiker, H.; Eren, O.; Celebi, H.; Günal, S. Y.; Lüleci, C.

    1996-01-01

    Growth factors have been shown to be associated with primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Octreotide, a long acting somatostatin analogue, can prevent the stimulating effect of growth factors and decrease the left ventricular mass in patients with acromegaly. In the light of these results, three patients with primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were treated with subcutaneous octreotide (50 micrograms three times a day during the first week and 100 micrograms twice a day for the following three weeks). Initially, two patients were in New York Heart Association class II in and one was in class III. At the end of a four week treatment session all were in class I. There were significant decreases in left ventricular posterior wall thickness, interventricular septum thickness, and left ventricular mass in all three patients. Both left ventricular end diastolic and end systolic diameters had increased in all of the patients at the end of the fourth week. Two of three patients showed improved diastolic filling: their hyperdynamic systolic performance returned to normal. No side effects were observed during octreotide treatment. The considerable improvement obtained with the short term octreotide treatment in patients with primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy seems promising. PMID:8944587

  11. [Relationship between the level of maternal glycated hemoglobin and fetal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Karla Lucía; Oseguera-Torres, Luis Fernando; Ávalos-Nuño, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder commonly associated with pregnancy. It is shown that as the management of diabetes during pregnancy is optimized, decreases the frequency and severity of fetal and neonatal complications. The aim of this paper is to identify the relation between the level of maternal glycated hemoglobin and fetal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. An analitytic cross-sectional study was conducted. It included patients with single pregnancy of 28-37 weeks diagnosed with gestational or preconception diabetes mellitus. A fetal echocardiogram were performed, likewise measuring of glycated hemoglobin. 104 diabetic pregnant patients were included in the study, 83 patients in the group with normal glycated hemoglobin and 21 in the group with altered glycated hemoglobin. Of the 104 patients, 12 had fetal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; 5 of the group with normal glycated hemoglobin and 7 with altered glycated hemoglobin. There is a clear association previously reported between the level maternal metabolic control and the presence of fetal and neonatal complications. A positive correlation between the values of high maternal glycated hemoglobin and increased thickness of the fetal ventricular septum was observed. Fetal echocardiographic assessment is recommended for all pregnant women with gestational and pre-pregnancy diabetes mellitus in order to early detection of fetal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  12. Mitochondrial ND5 12338T>C variant is associated with maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Chinese pedigree.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong; Song, Yanrui; Gu, Shulian; He, Xiangyu; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Shen, Yaoyao; Wu, Bifeng; Wang, Wei; Li, Shishi; Jiang, Pingping; Lu, Jianhua; Huang, Wendong; Yan, Qingfeng

    2012-09-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a primary disorder characterized by asymmetric thickening of the septum and left ventricular wall, which affects 1 in 500 individuals in the general population. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA have been found to be one of the most important causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Here we report the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of a Han Chinese family with a likely maternally transmitted hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Four (2 men/2 women) of 5 matrilineal relatives in this 3-generation family exhibited the variable severity and age at onset of 44 to 79 years old. Sequence analysis of the entire mitochondrial DNA in this pedigree identified the known homoplasmic ND5 12338T>C variant. This mitochondrial DNA haplogroup belongs to the Eastern Asian F2a. The 12338T>C variant, highly evolutionarily conserved, resulted in the replacement of the translation initiating methionine with a threonine, shortening the ND5 polypeptide by 2 amino acids. The occurrence of ND5 12338T>C variant exclusively in maternal members of this Chinese family suggested that the 12338T>C variant is associated with maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Our findings will provide theoretical basis for genetic counseling of maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  13. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in childhood: studies of the clinical picture and course].

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, A A; Sieverding, L; Barth, H; Steil, E; Apitz, J

    1986-07-01

    30 children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a mean age of 4.9 +/- 4.4 years, 11 infants and 19 children, were followed up for an average of 6.6 +/- 5.6 years. Apart from a systolic murmur in nearly all patients, only a few had symptoms. 7 patients from 5 families had a positive family history. The ECG often showed left ventricular hypertrophy, twice a deep Q wave, and no cases of giant T wave. A subaortic pressure gradient greater than or equal to 40 mm Hg was measured in 6 children, a secondary cardiomyopathy was excluded by biopsy in 8. Associated lesions were coarctation (n = 2) and patent ductus arteriosus (n = 2). 7 children died: 1 infant in congestive heart failure, 3 children suddenly, and 3 postoperatively. The annual mortality rate was 3.5%. Also in childhood, beta-blocker therapy may not prevent sudden cardiac death, nor may operation prevent late complications. In spite of the lack of pressure gradients, the children did not fulfil the criteria of hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy.

  14. "Sawfish" systolic narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery: an angiographic sign of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Brugada, P; Bär, F W; de Zwaan, C; Roy, D; Green, M; Wellens, H J

    1982-10-01

    The morphologic characteristics at coronary arteriography of systolic narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) were evaluated in 14 patients. Six patients had systolic narrowing of the LAD not associated with other cardiac abnormalities (group A) and eight patients had systolic narrowing of the LAD associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (group B). Patients in group A showed a smooth and progressive constriction of the vessel up to the point of maximal stenosis, giving it a "rat-tail" appearance. There was no systolic narrowing of septal branches or of other epicardial vessels in this group. In patients of group B, systolic narrowing of the LAD had a "saw-fish" appearance. Seven patients had systolic narrowing of the septal branches, and five had systolic narrowing of other epicardial vessels. These data indicate that systolic narrowing of the LAD in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy differs angiographically from systolic narrowing due to an intramural course of a part of the vessel (as in group A patients). We postulate that in patients with hypertropic cardiomyopathy, fiber hypertrophy and disarray in the vicinity of the coronary vessels is responsible for the morphology and the widespread distribution of systolic narrowing.

  15. Cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain defects in two families with non-compaction cardiomyopathy: linking non-compaction to hypertrophic, restrictive, and dilated cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Hoedemaekers, Yvonne M; Caliskan, Kadir; Majoor-Krakauer, Danielle; van de Laar, Ingrid; Michels, Michelle; Witsenburg, Maarten; ten Cate, Folkert J; Simoons, Maarten L; Dooijes, Dennis

    2007-11-01

    Cardiomyopathies are classified according to distinct morphological characteristics. They occur relatively frequent and are an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Isolated ventricular non-compaction or non-compaction cardiomyopathy (NCCM) is characterized by an excessively thickened endocardial layer with deep intertrabecular recesses, reminiscent of the myocardium during early embryogenesis. Aims Autosomal-dominant as well as X-linked inheritance for NCCM has been described and several loci have been associated with the disease. Nevertheless, a major genetic cause for familial NCCM remains to be identified. Methods and Results We describe, in two separate autosomal-dominant NCCM families, the identification of mutations in the sarcomeric cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7), known to be associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), restricted cardiomyopathy (RCM), and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Conclusion These results confirm the genetic heterogeneity of NCCM and suggest that the molecular classification of cardiomyopathies includes an MYH7-associated spectrum of NCCM with HCM, RCM, and DCM.

  16. Myocardial edema in Takotsubo syndrome mimicking apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: An insight into diagnosis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Izgi, Cemil; Ray, Sanjoy; Nyktari, Evangelia; Alpendurada, Francisco; Lyon, Alexander R; Rathore, Sudhir; Baksi, Arun John

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial edema is one of the characteristic features in the pathogenesis of Takotsubo syndrome. We report a middle aged man who presented with typical clinical and echocardiographic features of apical variant of Takotsubo syndrome. However, a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study performed 10 days after presentation did not show any apical 'ballooning' but revealed features of an apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy on cine images. Tissue characterization with T2 weighted images proved severe edema as the cause of significantly increased apical wall thickness. A follow-up cardiovascular magnetic resonance study was performed 5 months later which showed that edema, wall thickening and the appearance of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy all resolved, confirming Takotsubo syndrome as the cause of the initial appearance. As the affected myocardium most commonly involves the apical segments, an edema induced increase in apical wall thickness may lead to appearances of an apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy rather than apical ballooning in the acute to subacute phase of Takotsubo syndrome.

  17. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Green, Eric M.; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L.; Evanchik, Marc J.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D.; Rodriguez, Hector M.; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Spudich, James A.; McDowell, Robert S.; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  18. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Green, Eric M; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L; Evanchik, Marc J; Gorham, Joshua M; Harrison, Brooke C; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D; Rodriguez, Hector M; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A; Spudich, James A; McDowell, Robert S; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E

    2016-02-05

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM.

  19. Identification of Fabry Disease in a Tertiary Referral Cohort of Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Maron, Martin S; Xin, Winnie; Sims, Katherine B; Butler, Rita; Haas, Tammy S; Rowin, Ethan J; Desnick, Robert J; Maron, Barry J

    2017-09-21

    Fabry Disease is a X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficient activity of α-galactosidase A due to mutations in the GLA gene, which may be associated with increased left ventricular wall thickness, and mimic the morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Management strategies for these two diseases diverge, with Fabry disease-specific treatment utilizing recombinant α-galactosidase A enzyme replacement therapy. We studied a prospectively assembled consecutive cohort of 585 patients (71% male) from two hypertrophic cardiomyopathy tertiary referral centers by screening for low α-galactosidase A activity in dried blood spots. Male patients with low α -Gal A activity levels and all females were tested for mutations in the GLA gene. In 585 patients previously diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, we identified two unrelated patients (0.34%), both with the GLA mutation encoding P.N215S the most common mutation causing later-onset Fabry disease phenotype. These patients were both asymptomatic, a male age 53 years and a female aged 69 yearsand demonstrated a mild cardiac phenotype with symmetric distribution of left ventricular hypertrophy..Following family screening, a total of 27 new Fabry disease patients ages 2-81 years were identified in the two families, including 12individuals who are now receiving enzyme replacement therapy. These observations support consideration for routine prospective screening for Fabry disease in all patients without a definitive etiology for left ventriclar hypertrophy. This strategy would likely result, through cascade family testing, in the earlier identification of new Fabry disease-affected males and female heterozygotes who may benefit from monitoring and/or enzyme replacement therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Myocardial metabolic, hemodynamic, and electrocardiographic significance of reversible thallium-201 abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, R.O. 3d.; Dilsizian, V.; O'Gara, P.T.; Udelson, J.E.; Schenke, W.H.; Quyyumi, A.; Fananapazir, L.; Bonow, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Exercise-induced abnormalities during thallium-201 scintigraphy that normalize at rest frequently occur in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, it is not known whether these abnormalities are indicative of myocardial ischemia. Fifty patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy underwent exercise {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy and, during the same week, measurement of myocardial lactate metabolism and hemodynamics during pacing stress. Thirty-seven patients (74%) had one or more {sup 201}Tl abnormalities that completely normalized after 3 hours of rest; 26 had regional myocardial {sup 201}Tl defects, and 26 had apparent left ventricular cavity dilatation with exercise, with 15 having coexistence of these abnormal findings. Of the 37 patients with reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, 27 (73%) had metabolic evidence of myocardial ischemia during rapid atrial pacing compared with four of 13 patients (31%) with normal {sup 201}Tl scans (p less than 0.01). Eleven patients had apparent cavity dilatation as their only {sup 201}Tl abnormality; their mean postpacing left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly higher than that of the 13 patients with normal {sup 201}Tl studies (33 +/- 5 versus 21 +/- 10 mm Hg, p less than 0.001). There was no correlation between the angiographic presence of systolic septal or epicardial coronary arterial compression and the presence or distribution of {sup 201}Tl abnormalities. Patients with ischemic ST segment responses to exercise had an 80% prevalence rate of reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities and a 70% prevalence rate of pacing-induced ischemia. However, 69% of patients with nonischemic ST segment responses had reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, and 55% had pacing-induced ischemia. Reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities during exercise stress are markers of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most likely identify relatively underperfused myocardium.

  1. High sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Konno, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Kenshi; Fujino, Noboru; Nagata, Yoji; Hodatsu, Akihiko; Masuta, Eiichi; Sakata, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial scarring can be assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement and by endomyocardial biopsy. However, accuracy of late gadolinium enhancement for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens remains unknown in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We investigated whether late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart reflects microscopic myocardial scarring in the small biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Twenty-one consecutive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who were examined both by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and by endomyocardial biopsy were retrospectively studied. The right interventricular septum was the target site for endomyocardial biopsy in all patients. Late gadolinium enhancement in the ventricular septum had an excellent sensitivity (100%) with a low specificity (40%) for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens. The sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart remained 100% with a specificity of 27% for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens. Quantitative assessments of fibrosis revealed that the extent of late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart was the only independent variable related to the microscopic collagen fraction in biopsied specimens (β  =  0.59, 95% confident interval: 0.15 - 1.0, p  =  0.012). Although there was a compromise in the specificity, the sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement was excellent for prediction of microscopic myocardial scarring in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the severity of late gadolinium enhancement was independently associated with the quantitative collagen fraction in biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. These findings indicate that late gadolinium enhancement can reflect both the presence and the extent of microscopic myocardial scarring in the small biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  2. High Sensitivity of Late Gadolinium Enhancement for Predicting Microscopic Myocardial Scarring in Biopsied Specimens in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Kenshi; Fujino, Noboru; Nagata, Yoji; Hodatsu, Akihiko; Masuta, Eiichi; Sakata, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    Background Myocardial scarring can be assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement and by endomyocardial biopsy. However, accuracy of late gadolinium enhancement for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens remains unknown in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We investigated whether late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart reflects microscopic myocardial scarring in the small biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results Twenty-one consecutive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who were examined both by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and by endomyocardial biopsy were retrospectively studied. The right interventricular septum was the target site for endomyocardial biopsy in all patients. Late gadolinium enhancement in the ventricular septum had an excellent sensitivity (100%) with a low specificity (40%) for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens. The sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart remained 100% with a specificity of 27% for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens. Quantitative assessments of fibrosis revealed that the extent of late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart was the only independent variable related to the microscopic collagen fraction in biopsied specimens (β  =  0.59, 95% confident interval: 0.15 – 1.0, p  =  0.012). Conclusions Although there was a compromise in the specificity, the sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement was excellent for prediction of microscopic myocardial scarring in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the severity of late gadolinium enhancement was independently associated with the quantitative collagen fraction in biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. These findings indicate that late gadolinium enhancement can reflect both the presence and the extent of microscopic myocardial scarring in the small biopsied specimens in

  3. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy due to Mitochondrial Disease: Prenatal Diagnosis, Management, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    García-Díaz, Lutgardo; Coserria, Félix; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    A case of prenatally diagnosed fetal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is reported. The mother was referred to our department at 37 weeks' gestation because of suspected congenital heart disease. Prenatal echocardiography showed biventricular hypertrophy and pericardial effusion, without additional abnormalities. Postnatal echocardiography confirmed prenatal diagnosis. Neonatal EKG showed biventricular hypertrophy and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Skeletal muscle biopsy was consistent with mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation defect involving a combined defect of respiratory complexes I and IV. Echocardiographic followup during the first year of life showed progressive regression of hypertrophy and evolution to left ventricular myocardial noncompaction. PMID:23346437

  4. Visualization of myocardial perfusion after percutaneous myocardial septal ablation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using superharmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Folkert J; Bouakaz, Ayache; Krenning, Boudewijn; Vletter, Wim; de Jong, Nico

    2003-04-01

    Harmonic imaging is used for detection of ultrasound contrast agents in myocardial perfusion studies. However, harmonic imaging has limitations because of the presence of tissue harmonics, which results in less specificity and sensitivity, thus, lower contrast-to-tissue ratio. We describe a clinical example using superharmonic imaging. This technique detects the third, fourth, and fifth harmonics. These harmonics are not created in tissue, resulting, hence, in a high contrast-to-tissue ratio. After myocardial alcohol ablation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy areas of nontreated and treated myocardium, normal and low flow could be visualized with superharmonic imaging.

  5. Phaeochromocytoma and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: apparent suppression of symptoms and noradrenaline secretion by calcium-channel blockade.

    PubMed

    Serfas, D; Shoback, D M; Lorell, B H

    1983-09-24

    A 44-year-old woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a noradrenaline-secreting phaeochromocytoma is described. She experienced as great improvement in cardiovascular symptoms during double-blind treatment with the calcium-channel blocker nifedipine compared with the placebo period. Symptom relief on nifedipine therapy was associated with a pronounced decline in elevated urinary noradrenaline levels. This observation suggests that calcium-channel blockers interfere with the release of noradrenaline from phaeochromocytoma tissue and thus may be beneficial in patients with phaeochromocytoma.

  6. Trileaflet Mitral Valve with Three Papillary Muscles Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Novel Case.

    PubMed

    Rosanio, Salvatore; Simonsen, Cameron J; Starwalt, John; Keylani, Abdul M; Vitarelli, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Congenital mitral valve (MV) malformations are uncommon, except for MV prolapse. Despite their infrequency, most of them are well-known and defined entities, such as congenital MV stenosis with two papillary muscles, parachute MV, supravalvular mitral ring, hypoplastic MV, isolated cleft in the anterior and/or posterior leaflets, and double-orifice MV. A trileaflet MV with three separate papillary muscles with concordant atrioventricular and ventricle-arterial connections is exceptionally rare. To the best of the authors' knowledge, it has been reported only once in association with subaortic valvular stenosis. We hereby describe a novel case associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy After a Single Dose of Dexamethasone in a Preterm Infant.

    PubMed

    Kale, Yusuf; Aydemir, Ozge; Ceylan, Ozben; Bas, Ahmet Yagmur; Demirel, Nihal

    2015-08-01

    Dexamethasone is widely used in preterm infants with severe pulmonary disease. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a transient side effect observed after multiple doses of dexamethasone. We report a preterm infant with myocardial hypertrophy after a single dose of dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg) used to treat laryngeal edema secondary to prolonged intubation. A benign course was observed without left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and with recovery within 4 weeks. Myocardial effects of dexamethasone may be independent of dose and duration of treatment. The risk/benefit ratio must be carefully considered before using even a single dose of dexamethasone in preterm infants.

  8. Radiofrequency ablation of fast ventricular tachycardia causing an ICD storm in an infant with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ergul, Yakup; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Bilici, Meki; Ozturk, Erkut; Haydin, Sertaç; Guzeltas, Alper

    2017-07-27

    An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) storm involves very frequent arrhythmia episodes and ICD shocks, and it is associated with poor short-term and long-term prognosis. Radiofrequency catheter ablation can be used as an effective rescue treatment for patients with an ICD storm. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an infant with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting with an ICD storm and undergoing successful radiofrequency catheter ablation salvage treatment for the fast left posterior fascicular ventricular tachycardia. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Long-Term Survival Following Cardiac Arrest Without Implantable Defibrillator Protection in a Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patient

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Mustafa; Ucar, Ozgul; Canbay, Alper; Cetin, Zehra Guven; Cicekcioglu, Hulya; Diker, Erdem

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young people. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the optimal therapy in patients with HCM, both for primary or secondary prevention of sudden death. Left ventricular systolic function in HCM is usually normal. However, in few patients, HCM has been reported to progress to a state that is characterized by left ventricular dilation and systolic dysfunction, resembling dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Although arrhythmias are common in HCM, advanced or complete atrioventricular block (AV) is very rare. This case report describes a HCM patient who progressed to DCM with advanced AV block and survived 31 years following cardiac arrest without ICD protection. PMID:28352382

  10. Pathomorphological variants of midventricular obstruction of interventricular septum during hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, V D; Nepomnyashchikh, L M

    2004-06-01

    Postmortem contrast cardiac ventriculography, coronarography, volume-mass and planimetric cardiometry, as well as echocardiography and pathomorphological data correlation technique were employed for examination of the hearts from patients died from hypertrophy cardiomyopathy (n=100). The following variants of midventricular hypertrophy of the interventricular septum (midventricular obstruction) were established: midleft ventricular, midright ventricular, midproximal, midmaximal. Isolated distal apex hypertrophy and apical hypertrophy were also documented. These variants and forms of cardiac pathology are determined by peculiar changes in geometrical structure of the septum and left ventricle. Multiplanar variability and mobility of interventricular septum combined with peculiar catenary shape promote specific abnormalities of intracardiac hemodynamics determining dissociation between the echocardiographic and pathomorphological diagnostic data and underlying the leading elements of patho- and thanatogenesis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  11. Nonobstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Out of the Shadows: Known from the Beginning but Largely Ignored … Until Now.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Rowin, Ethan J; Maron, Martin S; Braunwald, Eugene

    2017-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was first recognized as a disease of obstruction to left ventricular outflow, hence, its early names and acronyms such as idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic obstruction. The nonobstructive subset of patients, incapable of developing mechanical impedance to left ventricular outflow at rest or with physiologic exercise, was initially recognized by the Braunwald group at the National Institutes of Health >50 years ago in the preimaging era, and is now recognized as comprising about one-third of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients. Nevertheless, until recently, and for 25 years, this substantial patient subset has been largely ignored and incompletely understood in terms of its clinical significance and consequences. However, the newfound interest in nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with recent cohort data permits more robust clarity of this subset, as well as the overall disease spectrum. As a group, patients with nonobstructive disease experience a largely stable clinical course at relatively low risk for progressive heart failure symptoms to New York Heart Association class III/IV in (90%). On the other hand, there is a small but important subgroup of 10% at risk for developing drug-refractory advanced heart failure sufficient to justify consideration for heart transplant as the only definitive treatment option. This recognition closes a significant gap in understanding the natural history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, also underscoring that the disease is not uniformly grim but instead consistent with extended longevity, thereby providing many patients with a measure of reassurance.

  12. Furthering the link between the sarcomere and primary cardiomyopathies: restrictive cardiomyopathy associated with multiple mutations in genes previously associated with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Caleshu, Colleen; Sakhuja, Rahul; Nussbaum, Robert L; Schiller, Nelson B; Ursell, Philip C; Eng, Celeste; De Marco, Teresa; McGlothlin, Dana; Burchard, Esteban González; Rame, J Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    Mutations in genes that encode components of the sarcomere are well established as the cause of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere genes, however, are increasingly being associated with other cardiomyopathies. One phenotype more recently recognized as a disease of the sarcomere is restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). We report on two patients with RCM associated with multiple mutations in sarcomere genes not previously associated with RCM. Patient 1 presented with NYHA Class III/IV heart failure at 22 years of age. She was diagnosed with RCM and advanced heart failure requiring heart transplantation. Sequencing of sarcomere genes revealed previously reported homozygous p.Glu143Lys mutations in MYL3, and a novel heterozygous p.Gly57Glu mutation in MYL2. The patient's mother is a double heterozygote for these mutations, with no evidence of cardiomyopathy. Patient 2 presented at 35 years of age with volume overload while hospitalized for oophorectomy. She was diagnosed with RCM and is being evaluated for heart transplantation. Sarcomere gene sequencing identified homozygous p.Asn279His mutations in TPM1. The patient's parents are consanguineous and confirmed heterozygotes. Her father was diagnosed with HCM at 42 years of age. This is the first report of mutations in TPM1, MYL3, and MYL2 associated with primary, non-hypertrophied RCM. The association of more sarcomere genes with RCM provides further evidence that mutations in the various sarcomere genes can cause different cardiomyopathy phenotypes. These cases also contribute to the growing body of evidence that multiple mutations have an additive effect on the severity of cardiomyopathies. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Nrf2 deficiency prevents reductive stress-induced hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sankaranarayanan; Muthusamy, Vasanthi R.; Whitehead, Kevin J.; Wang, Li; Gomes, Aldrin V.; Litwin, Sheldon E.; Kensler, Thomas W.; Abel, E. Dale; Hoidal, John R.; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Mutant protein aggregation (PA) cardiomyopathy (MPAC) is characterized by reductive stress (RS), PA (of chaperones and cytoskeletal components), and ventricular dysfunction in transgenic mice expressing human mutant CryAB (hmCryAB). Sustained activation of nuclear erythroid-2 like factor-2 (Nrf2) causes RS, which contributes to proteotoxic cardiac disease. The goals of this pre-clinical study were to (i) investigate whether disrupting Nrf2-antioxidant signalling prevents RS and rescues redox homeostasis in hearts expressing the mutant chaperone and (ii) elucidate mechanisms that could delay proteotoxic cardiac disease. Methods and results Non-transgenic (NTG), transgenic (TG) with MPAC and MPAC-TG:Nrf2-deficient (Nrf2-def) mice were used in this study. The effects of Nrf2 diminution (Nrf2±) on RS mediated MPAC in TG mice were assessed at 6–7 and 10 months of age. The diminution of Nrf2 prevented RS and prolonged the survival of TG mice (∼50 weeks) by an additional 20–25 weeks. The TG:Nrf2-def mice did not exhibit cardiac hypertrophy at even 60 weeks, while the MPAC-TG mice developed pathological hypertrophy and heart failure starting at 24–28 weeks of age. Aggregation of cardiac proteins was significantly reduced in TG:Nrf2-def when compared with TG mice at 7 months. Preventing RS and maintaining redox homeostasis in the TG:Nrf2-def mice ameliorated PA, leading to decreased ubiquitination of proteins. Conclusion Nrf2 deficiency rescues redox homeostasis, which reduces aggregation of mutant proteins, thereby delaying the proteotoxic pathological cardiac remodelling caused by RS and toxic protein aggregates. PMID:23761402

  14. Color-coded Doppler imaging of systolic flow patterns in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tencate, F J; Mayala, A P; Vletter, W B; Roelandt, J

    1985-01-01

    We studied 11 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by color Doppler echocardiography (Group I: 6 patients with outflow obstruction, and Group II: 5 patients without outflow obstruction) to assess systolic structure and function as observed by cross-sectional echocardiography in relation to the flow dynamics. The structure and function included systolic anterior motion of mitral valve (SAM), midsystolic aortic valve closure (AoC), systolic cavity obliteration and the presence and timing of mitral incompetence. Their occurrence and timing was related to presence of aortic systolic flow and presence of turbulence. While all patients in Group I had SAM and turbulence, none of the patients in Group II had SAM nor turbulence. Early mitral incompetence appearing before SAM and turbulence, occurred in all patients of Group I and in none of Group II. Midsystolic aortic valve closure was only present in Group I and blood flow was unilaterally directed so that only 60% of aortic cross-sectional area showed blood flow. We conclude that mitral incompetence in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in early systole is common when outflow gradient is present and is independent of mitral incompetence of mid- and late systole. During SAM, turbulence in the subaortic area and mid and late mitral incompetence occurred simultaneously. The midsystolic aortic valve closure was related to the unilaterally directed blood flow through the aortic cross-sectional area.

  15. Predictors of outcome after alcohol septal ablation therapy in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Su Min; Lakkis, Nasser M; Franklin, Jennifer; Spencer, William H; Nagueh, Sherif F

    2004-02-24

    Alcohol septal ablation (ASA) therapy results in clinical and hemodynamic improvement in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. However, a subset remains symptomatic afterward, requiring additional procedures. We sought to examine the determinants of an unsatisfactory outcome, defined as unchanged symptoms with <50% reduction of baseline left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradient. Of 173 consecutive hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy patients who underwent ASA, 39 had an unsatisfactory outcome after the first procedure. Patients with an unsatisfactory outcome had a higher baseline LVOT gradient, fewer septal arteries injected with ethanol, lower peak creatine kinase (CK), smaller septal area opacified by contrast echocardiography, and higher residual gradient in the catheterization laboratory after ASA (all P<0.05). Symptoms, septal thickness, mitral regurgitation severity, and ventricular function were not determinants of outcome. On multiple logistic regression, LVOT gradient reduction after ASA in the catheterization laboratory to > or =25 mm Hg (OR, 5.5; P=0.01) and peak CK <1300 U/L (OR, 2.5; P=0.04) were the independent predictors of an unsatisfactory outcome. The residual LVOT gradient in the catheterization laboratory and peak CK leak after ASA are the independent predictors of ASA outcome.

  16. Homeostatic Left Heart integration and disintegration links atrio-ventricular covariation's dyshomeostasis in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Piras, Paolo; Torromeo, Concetta; Evangelista, Antonietta; Gabriele, Stefano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Madeo, Andrea; Schiariti, Michele; Varano, Valerio; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2017-07-24

    Left ventricle and left atrium are and have been practically always analyzed separately in common clinically and non-clinically oriented cardiovascular investigations. Both classic and speckle tracking echocardiographic data contributed to the knowledge about deformational impairments occurring in systo-diastolic differences. Recently new trajectory based approaches allowed a greater awareness about the entire left ventricle or left atrium revolution and on their deficiencies that take place in presence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, surprisingly, the concomitant function of the two left heart chambers has not been analyzed for their geometrical/mechanical relationship. For the first time we study here, by acquiring left ventricle and left atrial geometries on the same heartbeat, the trajectory attributes of the entire left heart treated as a whole shape and the shape covariation of its two subunits. We contrasted healthy subjects with patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We found impaired left heart trajectory mainly in terms of orientation and size. More importantly, we found profound differences in the direction of morphological covariation of left ventricle and left atrium. These findings open to new perspectives in pathophysiological evaluation of different diseases by allowing the appreciation of concomitant functioning of both left heart whole geometry and of its two chambers.

  17. Effects of verapamil on left ventricular diastolic filling in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, E.M.; Rocchini, A.P.; Spicer, R.L.; Juni, J.; Snider, R.; Crowley, D.C.; Rosenthal, A.

    1988-02-15

    The effects of oral verapamil on resting left ventricular (LV) diastolic filling were examined in 10 children and adolescents with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Measurements of diastolic filling were made from gated technetium-99m radionuclide angiograms with postbeat rejection of data outside a 5% RR-interval window. LV time-activity curves were generated and the rapid-filling phase fit with a 3 degrees polynomial to calculate the peak filling rate and the time from end-systole to the point of peak filling. All patients had a radionuclide angiogram performed before and after 0.25 to 3 years of oral verapamil therapy. Verapamil did not change the LV ejection fraction but increased the peak filling rate (3.24 +/- 0.15 to 4.62 +/- 1.05 end-diastolic volume/s,p less than 0.01) and reduced the time to peak filling (217 +/- 57 to 168 +/- 63 ms, p less than 0.01). An increase in exercise endurance as measured by exercise treadmill test and subjective symptomatic improvement were also seen after verapamil therapy. Thus, in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, symptomatic improvement and LV diastolic filling parameters improved with long-term oral verapamil.

  18. Supraventricular tachycardia in a patient with Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hayano, M; Imamura, Y; Tsuruta, M; Inoue, J; Nakashima, H; Fukuyama, K; Eguchi, Y; Tsuji, S; Matsuo, S; Yano, K

    1988-03-01

    Electrophysiologic study of a 55-year-old patient with Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is reported. The patient had a history of recurrent attacks of tachyarrhythmia and his electrocardiogram showed a short P-R interval (0.10 sec) with narrow QRS complex and left ventricular hypertrophy with giant negative T waves. His cineangiogram showed severe apical hypertrophy. An electrophysiologic study was performed. The results of programmed atrial pacing show the existence of the dual A-V nodal pathways. The A-H interval at rapid atrial pacing increased maximally by 103 msec. Atrial stimulation could depolarize parts of the atrium without altering the supraventricular tachycardia. These findings suggested that preferential rapidly conducting A-V nodal and intranodal reentry are the responsible mechanisms in this reciprocating tachycardia. We conclude that the short P-R interval was due to intranodal reentry through the dual A-V nodal pathways. To our knowledge, a case of Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has not been previously described in the literature.

  19. Clinical Profile and Prognosis of Left Ventricular Apical Aneurysm in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Wang, Lin-Ping; Yang, Yan-Kun; Tian, Tao; Yang, Kun-Qi; Sun, Xin; Jiang, Yong; Liu, Ya-Xin; Zhou, Xian-Liang; Li, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with left ventricular apical aneurysm is a unique entity with diverse manifestations and varied prognoses among races. This study evaluated the prevalence, clinical characteristics and outcomes of apical aneurysm in Chinese patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Consecutive patients with apical aneurysm were recruited from 1,844 patients with HCM treated at our hospital from 2002-2013. Basic clinical data and follow-up data were collected and analyzed. Apical aneurysm was identified in 24 patients (1.3%) (mean age: 52 ± 14 years). We identified an hourglass-shaped (71%) or distally hypertrophic (29%) left ventricle and found mural thrombi and nonsustained and sustained ventricular tachycardia in 11 (46%), 4 (17%) and 9 (38%) patients, respectively. During follow-up (5.0 ± 3.4 years [range: 1-14 years]), following were the clinical adverse events experienced by 14 patients (58%) (annual rate: 11.7%): sudden cardiac death (n = 4), appropriate discharge of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (n = 4), progressive heart failure (n = 4) or heart failure-related death (n = 1) and stroke (n = 4). The 4 patients who underwent aneurysmectomy had no adverse events. Patients with SCD had a lower ejection fraction (P = 0.004) and a larger left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (P < 0.001) than nonoperated survivors. Apical aneurysm is not rare in patients with HCM and it confers an extremely poor prognosis. Early aggressive therapies should be considered for this entity and prophylactic aneurysmectomy may be an option. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The clinical features, outcomes and genetic characteristics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients with severe right ventricular hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiying; Fan, Chaomei; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Xiuling; Zhao, Xing; Wang, Fengqi; Zhu, Hongguang; Lin, Aiqing; Wu, Xia; Li, Yishi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Severe right ventricular hypertrophy (SRVH) is a rare phenotype in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) for which limited information is available. This study was undertaken to investigate the clinical, prognostic and genetic characteristics of HCM patients with SRVH. Methods HCM with SRVH was defined as HCM with a maximum right ventricular wall thickness ≥10 mm. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was performed in HCM patients with SRVH. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to identify risk factors for cardiac death and events in HCM with SRVH. Patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (ApHCM) were selected as a comparison group. The clinical features and outcomes of 34 HCM patients with SRVH and 273 ApHCM patients were compared. Results Compared with the ApHCM group, the HCM with SRVH group included younger patients and a higher proportion of female patients and also displayed higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models identified 2 independent predictors of cardiovascular death in HCM patients with SRVH, a New York Heart Association class ≥III (hazard ratio [HR] = 8.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.43-52.87, p = 0.019) and an age at the time of HCM diagnosis ≤18 (HR = 5.5, 95% CI: 1.24-28.36, p = 0.026). Among the 11 HCM patients with SRVH who underwent WGS, 10 (90.9%) were identified as carriers of at least one specific sarcomere gene mutation. MYH7 and TTN mutations were the most common sarcomere mutations noted in this study. Two or more HCM-related gene mutations were observed in 9 (82%) patients, and mutations in either other cardiomyopathy-related genes or ion-channel disease-related genes were found in 8 (73%) patients. Conclusions HCM patients with SRVH were characterized by poor clinical outcomes and the presentation of multiple gene mutations. PMID:28323875

  1. Association between ventricular filling patterns and the extent of late enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    De Zan, M; Carrascosa, P; Deviggiano, A; Capunay, C; Rodríguez-Granillo, G A

    To explore the relationship between ventricular filling curves and the extent of late enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We retrospectively included consecutive patients with suspected and/or confirmed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a control group of patients matched for age and sex who underwent cardiac MRI with evaluation of late enhancement. Among other determinations, we evaluated the following parameters on cine sequences: peak filling rate, time to the first peak filling rate, and filling rate normalized to the filling volume. Late enhancement was observed in 29 (73%) of the 40 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The normalized peak filling rate was significantly lower in patients with late enhancement (4.9 ± 1.6 in those with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy positive for late enhancement vs. 5.8 ± 2.2 in those with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy negative for late enhancement vs. 6.3 ± 1.5 in controls, p = 0.008) and the time to peak filling was longer in patients with late enhancement (540.6 ± 89.7 ms vs. 505.5 ± 99.3 ms in those with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy negative for late enhancement vs. 486.9 ± 86.3 ms in controls, p = 0.02). When the population was stratified into three groups in function of the normalized peak filling rate, significant differences were observed among groups for age (p = 0.002), mean wall thickness (p = 0.036), and myocardial mass (p = 0.046) and atrial dimensions, whereas no significant differences with respect to late enhancement were seen. In patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, we found a significant association between ventricular filling patterns and age, wall thicknesses, and atrial dimensions, but not with the extent of late enhancement. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy as a Cause of Sudden Cardiac Death in the Young: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ullal, Aditya J; Abdelfattah, Ramy S; Ashley, Euan A; Froelicher, Victor F

    2016-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death is often linked with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in young athletes, but with a divergence of study results. We performed a meta-analysis to compare the prevalence of sudden cardiac deaths associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy vs sudden cardiac deaths associated with structurally normal hearts. A structured search of MEDLINE was conducted for studies published from 1990 through 2014. Retrospective cohort studies, patient registries, and autopsy series examining sudden cardiac death etiology in young individuals (age ≤35 years) were included. A random-effects model was applied to generate pooled summary estimates of the percentage of sudden cardiac deaths with structurally normal hearts at postmortem vs those caused by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Heterogeneity was assessed using I(2). Subgroup analyses were conducted based on study location, patient age groups, and population types. Thirty-four studies were included, representing a combined sample of 4605 subjects. The overall pooled percentage of sudden cardiac deaths caused by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was 10.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.0%-12.6%; I(2) = 87.2%), while sudden cardiac deaths with structurally normal hearts at death were more common (P <.001) at 26.7% (95% CI, 21.0%-32.3%; I(2) = 95.3%). In nonathlete subjects, the pooled percentage of sudden cardiac deaths associated with structurally normal hearts (30.7%; 95% CI, 23.0%-38.4%; I(2) = 96.3%) were significantly more common (P <.001) than sudden cardiac death caused by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (7.8%; 95% CI, 5.8%-9.9%; I(2) = 80.1%). Among athletes, there was no significant difference between summary estimates of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and structurally normal hearts (P = .57), except in Europe where structurally normal hearts were more common (P = .01). Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is not a more common finding at death than structurally normal hearts in young subjects with sudden cardiac death

  3. Genetic variation in exon 5 of troponin - I gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy cases.

    PubMed

    Annapurna, S D; Reena, T R; Nallari, Pratibha; Calambur, Narasimhan

    2007-05-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of heart muscle disorders and are classified as 1) Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) 2) Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) 3) Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) and 4) Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) as per WHO classification, of which HCM and DCM are common. HCM is a complex but relatively common form of inherited heart muscle disease with prevalence of 1 in 500 individuals and is commonly associated with sarcomeric gene mutations. Cardiac muscle troponin I (TNNI-3) is one such sarcomeric protein and is a subunit of the thin filament-associated troponin-tropomyosin complex involved in calcium regulation of skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction. Mutations in this gene were found to be associated with a history of sudden cardiac death in HCM patients. Therefore the present study aims to identify for mutations associated with troponin I gene in a set of HCM patients from Indian population. Mutational analyses of 92 HCM cases were carried out following PCR based SSCP analysis. The study revealed band pattern variation in 3 cases from a group of 92 HCM patients. This band pattern variation, on sequencing revealed base changes, one at nt 2560 with G>T transversion in exon-5 region with a wobble and others at nt 2479 and nt 2478 with G>C and C>G transversions in the intronic region upstream of the exon 5 on sequencing. Further analysis showed that one of the probands showed apical form of hypertrophy, two others showing asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Two of these probands showed family history of the condition. Hence, the study supports earlier reports of involvement of TNNI-3 in the causation of apical and asymmetrical forms of hypertrophy.

  4. Genetic variation in exon 5 of troponin - I gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy cases

    PubMed Central

    Annapurna, S. D.; Reena, T. R.; Nallari, Pratibha; Calambur, Narasimhan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of heart muscle disorders and are classified as 1) Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) 2) Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) 3) Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) and 4) Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) as per WHO classification, of which HCM and DCM are common. HCM is a complex but relatively common form of inherited heart muscle disease with prevalence of 1 in 500 individuals and is commonly associated with sarcomeric gene mutations. Cardiac muscle troponin I (TNNI-3) is one such sarcomeric protein and is a subunit of the thin filament-associated troponin-tropomyosin complex involved in calcium regulation of skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction. Mutations in this gene were found to be associated with a history of sudden cardiac death in HCM patients. AIM: Therefore the present study aims to identify for mutations associated with troponin I gene in a set of HCM patients from Indian population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mutational analyses of 92 HCM cases were carried out following PCR based SSCP analysis. RESULTS: The study revealed band pattern variation in 3 cases from a group of 92 HCM patients. This band pattern variation, on sequencing revealed base changes, one at nt 2560 with G>T transversion in exon-5 region with a wobble and others at nt 2479 and nt 2478 with G>C and C>G transversions in the intronic region upstream of the exon 5 on sequencing. Further analysis showed that one of the probands showed apical form of hypertrophy, two others showing asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Two of these probands showed family history of the condition. CONCLUSIONS: Hence, the study supports earlier reports of involvement of TNNI-3 in the causation of apical and asymmetrical forms of hypertrophy. PMID:21957345

  5. [Mode of splitting of the second heart sound in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, N; Oki, T; Sakai, H; Asai, M; Ohshima, C; Kusaka, Y; Tominaga, T; Murao, A; Niki, T; Mori, H

    1983-06-01

    Mode of the splitting of the second heart sound ( IIs ) and left ventricular systolic time intervals (STIs) in patients (pts) with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were compared with those in hypertension (HT) with the global hypertrophy of the left ventricular wall. Forty-seven pts with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy [non-obstructive type (HCM, 30 pts), obstructive type (HOCM, 17 pts)] and 21 pts with HT were studied. The pts with HCM were classified as septal hypertrophic type (19 pts) and apical hypertrophic type (11 pts) on the basis of the echocardiographic findings. The pts with HOCM were classified as resting type (13 pts) and latent type (provoked by amyl nitrite: 4 pts) on the basis of the obstructive sign at rest. Mode of the splitting of the IIs : a) The pts with HCM showed a wide splitting of the IIs . The mean split interval during held expiration (IIA-IIP) was 41.0 +/- 9.9 msec. Twenty pts (67%) showed abnormal respiratory splitting. The mean IIA-IIP interval in septal hypertrophic type (45.3 +/- 9.0 msec) was significantly wider than that in apical hypertrophic type (33.6 +/- 6.7 msec) (p less than 0.05). There was a positive correlation between IIA-IIP interval and the thickness of the upper portion of the interventricular septum (r = 0.63). b) Nine out of 13 pts with resting type of HOCM showed a paradoxical (reversed) splitting with a mean IIA-IIP interval of -23.8 +/- 24.4 msec. On the other hand, pts with latent type showed a wide splitting similar to HCM with a mean IIA-IIP interval of 35.0 +/- 7.1 msec. c) The pts with HT showed a single IIs or physiological splitting. The mean IIA-IIP interval was 14.5 +/- 9.3 msec, which was significantly decreased than that of normals or the pts with HCM (p less than 0.01). Left ventricular systolic time intervals: a) The pts with an either type of HCM showed a short corrected left ventricular electromechanical systole [(Q-IIA)c] due to the shortening of the corrected left ventricular ejection time (LVETc). b) The

  6. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... thickness, problems with blood flow, or leaky heart valves ( mitral valve regurgitation ) may include: Echocardiography ECG 24-hour Holter ... You may need surgery to repair the heart's mitral valve if it is leaking. Watch this video about: ...

  7. Isolated papillary muscle hypertrophy: A gap in our knowledge of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Catarina; Delgado, Carlos; Vázquez, María; Trinidad, Carmen; Vilar, Manuel

    2014-06-01

    Increased thickness of left ventricular walls is the predominant characteristic and one of the diagnostic criteria of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This case illustrates an uncommon but important finding of isolated hypertrophy of the papillary muscles (PMs), observed in a young woman in whom an abnormal electrocardiogram was initially detected. During the investigation isolated PM hypertrophy was identified. The structural characteristics of the PMs have received scant attention in this setting and there is little information in the literature on this entity, whose real prevalence and clinical significance remain to be determined. The available information relates solitary PM hypertrophy with an early form or a different pattern of HCM. In this case PM hypertrophy was only detected due to the finding of an abnormal electrocardiogram, which prompted further diagnostic tests and a search for possible etiologies. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in daily practice: an introduction on diagnosis, prognosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    van der Lee, C.; Kofflard, M. J.; Geleijnse, M.L.; ten Cate, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a complex, inherited cardiac disease that has been subject to intense investigation since it was first described in 1957. Over the past 40 years, understanding has evolved regarding the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of HCM. Analyses of HCM populations from nonreferral centres have refined the insights into the natural history and the occurrence of sudden cardiac death, which is the most devastating component of its natural history. Therapeutic strategies are diverse and may vary during the course of the disease. Optimal therapy depends on symptoms, haemodynamic findings and the presence of risk factors for sudden cardiac death. At present, invasive therapy for patients with obstructive HCM and drug-refractory symptoms includes surgery or percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation. This report summarises the diagnostic criteria, clinical course and therapeutic management of HCM. Attention is also paid to certain issues of special interest in this disease. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696443

  9. Narrative review: harnessing molecular genetics for the diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Libin; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seidman, Christine E

    2010-04-20

    Unexplained cardiac hypertrophy, the diagnostic criterion for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), occurs in 1 in 500 adults. Insights into the genetic cause and molecular pathophysiology of HCM are reshaping clinical paradigms for diagnosis and treatment of this common myocardial disorder. Human genetic studies have established that dominant mutations in the proteins that make up the contractile apparatus (the sarcomere) cause HCM. With the current availability of clinical gene-based diagnostics, pathogenic mutations in affected patients can be defined, which can suggest a clinical course and allow definitive preclinical identification of family members at risk for HCM. Genetic discoveries have also fostered mechanistic investigations in model organisms that are engineered to carry human HCM mutations. Novel therapeutic targets have emerged from these fundamental studies and are currently under clinical assessment in humans. The combination of contemporary gene-based diagnosis with new strategies to attenuate disease development and progression is changing the natural history of lifelong cardiac symptoms, arrhythmias, and heart failure from HCM.

  10. A substitution mutation in the myosin binding protein C gene in ragdoll hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Meurs, Kathryn M; Norgard, Michelle M; Ederer, Martina M; Hendrix, Kristina P; Kittleson, Mark D

    2007-08-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary myocardial disease with a prevalence of 1 in 500 in human beings. Causative mutations have been identified in several sarcomeric genes, including the cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) gene. Heritable HCM also exists in a large-animal model, the cat, and we have previously reported a mutation in the MYBPC3 gene in the Maine coon breed. We now report a separate mutation in the MYBPC3 gene in ragdoll cats with HCM. The mutation changes a conserved arginine to tryptophan and appears to alter the protein structure. The ragdoll is not related to the Maine coon and the mutation identified is in a domain different from that of the previously identified feline mutation. The identification of two separate mutations within this gene in unrelated breeds suggests that these mutations occurred independently rather than being passed on from a common founder.

  11. Feline Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Spontaneous Large Animal Model of Human HCM

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Lisa M.; Rush, John E.; Stern, Joshua A.; Huggins, Gordon S.; Maron, Martin S.

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common disease in pet cats, affecting 10-15% of the pet cat population. The similarity to human HCM, the rapid progression of disease, and the defined and readily determined endpoints of feline HCM make it an excellent natural model that is genotypically and phenotypically similar to human HCM. The Maine Coon and Ragdoll cats are particularly valuable models of HCM because of myosin binding protein-C mutations and even higher disease incidence compared to the overall feline population. The cat overcomes many of the limitations of rodent HCM models, and can provide enhanced translation of information from in vitro and induced small animal models to human clinical trials. Physicians and veterinarians working together in a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach can accelerate the discovery of more effective treatments for this and other cardiovascular diseases affecting human and veterinary patients. PMID:28868097

  12. MicroRNAs Based Therapy of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: The Road Traveled So Far

    PubMed Central

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Raposo, Luís R.; Fernandes, Alexandra R.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by variable expressivity, age penetrance, and a high heterogeneity. The transcriptional profile (miRNAs, mRNAs), epigenetic modifications, and posttranslational modifications seem to be highly relevant for the onset of the disease. miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs with 22 nucleotides, have been implicated in the regulation of cardiomyocyte function, being differentially expressed in several heart diseases, including HCM. Moreover, a different miRNA expression profile in the various stages of HCM development is also observed. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the profile of miRNAs characteristic of asymptomatic to overt HCM patients, discussing alongside their potential use for diagnosis and therapy. Indeed, the stability and specificity of miRNAs make them suitable targets for use as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis and as therapeutical targets. PMID:26504850

  13. A novel mitochondrial ATP8 gene mutation in a patient with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jonckheere, An I; Hogeveen, Marije; Nijtmans, Leo; van den Brand, Mariel; Janssen, Antoon; Diepstra, Heleen; van den Brandt, Frans; van den Heuvel, Bert; Hol, Frans; Hofste, Tom; Kapusta, Livia; Dillmann, U; Shamdeen, M; Smeitink, J; Smeitink, J; Rodenburg, Richard

    2009-01-01

    To identify the biochemical and molecular genetic defect in a 16-year-old patient presenting with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy suspected for a mitochondrial disorder. Measurement of the mitochondrial energy-generating system (MEGS) capacity in muscle and enzyme analysis in muscle and fibroblasts were performed. Relevant parts of the mitochondrial DNA were analysed by sequencing. A homoplasmic nonsense mutation m.8529G→A (p.Trp55X) was found in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene in the patient’s fibroblasts and muscle tissue. Reduced complex V activity was measured in the patient’s fibroblasts and muscle tissue, and was confirmed in cybrid clones containing patient-derived mitochondrial DNA We describe the first pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene, resulting in an improper assembly and reduced activity of the complex V holoenzyme. PMID:21686774

  14. High left ventricular outflow tract gradient: Aortic stenosis, obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or both?

    PubMed

    Almeida, Inês; Caetano, Francisca; Trigo, Joana; Mota, Paula; Marques, António Leitão

    2015-05-01

    The authors report the case of a patient diagnosed with both hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and aortic stenosis. Due to clinical deterioration, additional investigation was performed, and a high left ventricular outflow tract gradient was identified. Correct identification of the condition causing the symptoms was challenging, and involved several imaging techniques, the contribution of transesophageal echocardiography being crucial. The final diagnosis of severe aortic stenosis led to successful valve replacement surgery. The presence of these two conditions in the same patient has been documented, although it is uncommon. This association poses particular diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, which are discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiac CT angiography in the emergency room: Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting as acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michael C; Kerut, Edmund K; Mckinnie, James; Davis, Michael; Hinton, Christine

    2017-03-07

    A 59-year-old male presented to the emergency room with symptoms of chest tightness and palpitations. Following conversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm, he had deep symmetrical T-wave changes on his electrocardiogram. Symptoms resolved almost immediately, and his initial troponin was negative. He underwent cardiac CT angiography utilizing an emergency room triage protocol which resulted in a diagnosis of nonobstructive coronary artery disease and apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Following a hospital stay of less than 24 hours, he was discharged to outpatient follow-up on medical management and has remained asymptomatic over 6 months. This case presentation illustrates an example of the diversity of pathology that presents in emergency rooms with symptoms consistent with acute coronary syndrome.

  16. Molecular genetics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: towards individualized management of the disease.

    PubMed

    Charron, Philippe; Komajda, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disease, affecting one person per 500 in the general population, and is clinically defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy. Although recognized as the most common cause of sudden death in the young (especially in athletes), the cardiac expression of the disease is highly variable with respect to age at onset, degree of symptoms and risk of cardiac death. As a consequence, therapeutic strategies are diverse and must be adapted to the specific features of an individual. Recently, the molecular bases of the disease have been unraveled with the identification of a large number of mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins. This review focuses on the impact of the molecular data on the understanding of the disease, and considers the emerging issues regarding the impact of molecular testing on the management of patients (or relatives) in clinical practice.

  17. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: an Update

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Diogo Costa Leandro; Assunção, Fernanda Boldrini; dos Santos, Alair Agusto Sarmet Moreira Damas; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiovascular disease and represents the main cause of sudden death in young patients. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) are noninvasive imaging methods with high sensitivity and specificity, useful for the establishment of diagnosis and prognosis of HCM, and for the screening of patients with subclinical phenotypes. The improvement of image analysis by CMR and CCT offers the potential to promote interventions aiming at stopping the natural course of the disease. This study aims to describe the role of RCM and CCT in the diagnosis and prognosis of HCM, and how these methods can be used in the management of these patients. PMID:27305111

  18. Feline Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Spontaneous Large Animal Model of Human HCM.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lisa M; Rush, John E; Stern, Joshua A; Huggins, Gordon S; Maron, Martin S

    2017-08-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common disease in pet cats, affecting 10-15% of the pet cat population. The similarity to human HCM, the rapid progression of disease, and the defined and readily determined endpoints of feline HCM make it an excellent natural model that is genotypically and phenotypically similar to human HCM. The Maine Coon and Ragdoll cats are particularly valuable models of HCM because of myosin binding protein-C mutations and even higher disease incidence compared to the overall feline population. The cat overcomes many of the limitations of rodent HCM models, and can provide enhanced translation of information from in vitro and induced small animal models to human clinical trials. Physicians and veterinarians working together in a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach can accelerate the discovery of more effective treatments for this and other cardiovascular diseases affecting human and veterinary patients.

  19. Mutation analysis of the phospholamban gene in 315 South Africans with dilated, hypertrophic, peripartum and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Maryam; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Kraus, Sarah; Sliwa, Karen; Seidman, Christine E.; Burke, Michael A.; Crotti, Lia; Schwartz, Peter J.; Mayosi, Bongani M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure in Sub-Saharan Africa, accounting for up to 30% of adult heart failure hospitalisations. This high prevalence poses a challenge in societies without access to resources and interventions essential for disease management. Over 80 genes have been implicated as a cause of cardiomyopathy. Mutations in the phospholamban (PLN) gene are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and severe heart failure. In Africa, the prevalence of PLN mutations in cardiomyopathy patients is unknown. Our aim was to screen 315 patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 111), DCM (n = 95), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 40) and peripartum cardiomyopathy (n = 69) for disease-causing PLN mutations by high resolution melt analysis and DNA sequencing. We detected the previously reported PLN c.25C > T (p.R9C) mutation in a South African family with severe autosomal dominant DCM. Haplotype analysis revealed that this mutation occurred against a different haplotype background to that of the original North American family and was therefore unlikely to have been inherited from a common ancestor. No other mutations in PLN were detected (mutation prevalence = 0.2%). We conclude that PLN is a rare cause of cardiomyopathy in African patients. The PLN p.R9C mutation is not well-tolerated, emphasising the importance of this gene in cardiac function. PMID:26917049

  20. Mutation analysis of the phospholamban gene in 315 South Africans with dilated, hypertrophic, peripartum and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Fish, Maryam; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Kraus, Sarah; Sliwa, Karen; Seidman, Christine E; Burke, Michael A; Crotti, Lia; Schwartz, Peter J; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2016-02-26

    Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure in Sub-Saharan Africa, accounting for up to 30% of adult heart failure hospitalisations. This high prevalence poses a challenge in societies without access to resources and interventions essential for disease management. Over 80 genes have been implicated as a cause of cardiomyopathy. Mutations in the phospholamban (PLN) gene are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and severe heart failure. In Africa, the prevalence of PLN mutations in cardiomyopathy patients is unknown. Our aim was to screen 315 patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 111), DCM (n = 95), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 40) and peripartum cardiomyopathy (n = 69) for disease-causing PLN mutations by high resolution melt analysis and DNA sequencing. We detected the previously reported PLN c.25C > T (p.R9C) mutation in a South African family with severe autosomal dominant DCM. Haplotype analysis revealed that this mutation occurred against a different haplotype background to that of the original North American family and was therefore unlikely to have been inherited from a common ancestor. No other mutations in PLN were detected (mutation prevalence = 0.2%). We conclude that PLN is a rare cause of cardiomyopathy in African patients. The PLN p.R9C mutation is not well-tolerated, emphasising the importance of this gene in cardiac function.

  1. Pathogenesis of depression- and anxiety-like behavior in an animal model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dossat, Amanda M; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos A; Koutnik, Andrew P; Leitner, Stefano; Ruiz, Edda L; Griffin, Brittany; Rosenberg, Jens T; Grant, Samuel C; Fincham, Francis D; Pinto, Jose R; Kabbaj, Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular dysfunction is highly comorbid with mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression. However, the mechanisms linking cardiovascular dysfunction with the core behavioral features of mood disorder remain poorly understood. In this study, we used mice bearing a knock-in sarcomeric mutation, which is exhibited in human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), to investigate the influence of HCM over the development of anxiety and depression. We employed behavioral, MRI, and biochemical techniques in young (3-4 mo) and aged adult (7-8 mo) female mice to examine the effects of HCM on the development of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. We focused on females because in both humans and rodents, they experience a 2-fold increase in mood disorder prevalence vs. males. Our results showed that young and aged HCM mice displayed echocardiographic characteristics of the heart disease condition, yet only aged HCM females displayed anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. Electrocardiographic parameters of sympathetic nervous system activation were increased in aged HCM females vs. controls and correlated with mood disorder-related symptoms. In addition, when compared with controls, aged HCM females exhibited adrenal gland hypertrophy, reduced volume in mood-related brain regions, and reduced hippocampal signaling proteins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its downstream targets vs. controls. In conclusion, prolonged systemic HCM stress can lead to development of mood disorders, possibly through inducing structural and functional brain changes, and thus, mood disorders in patients with heart disease should not be considered solely a psychologic or situational condition.-Dossat, A. M., Sanchez-Gonzalez, M. A., Koutnik, A. P., Leitner, S., Ruiz, E. L., Griffin, B., Rosenberg, J. T., Grant, S. C., Fincham, F. D., Pinto, J. R. Kabbaj, M. Pathogenesis of depression- and anxiety-like behavior in an animal model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. © FASEB.

  2. Results of ventricular septal myectomy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (from Nationwide Inpatient Sample [1998-2010]).

    PubMed

    Panaich, Sidakpal S; Badheka, Apurva O; Chothani, Ankit; Mehta, Kathan; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Singh, Vikas; Savani, Ghanshyambhai T; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nilay; Bhalara, Vipulkumar; Grover, Peeyush; Shah, Neeraj; Elder, Mahir; Mohamad, Tamam; Kaki, Amir; Kondur, Ashok; Brown, Michael; Grines, Cindy; Schreiber, Theodore

    2014-11-01

    Ventricular septal myomectomy (VSM) is the primary modality for left ventricular outflow tract gradient reduction in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with refractory symptoms. Comprehensive postprocedural data for VSM from a large multicenter registry are sparse. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate postprocedural mortality, complications, length of stay (LOS), and cost of hospitalization after VSM and to further appraise the multivariate predictors of these outcomes. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample was queried from 1998 through 2010 using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, procedure codes 37.33 for VSM and 425.1 for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The severity of co-morbidities was defined using the Charlson co-morbidity index. Hierarchical mixed-effects models were generated to identify independent multivariate predictors of in-hospital mortality, procedural complications, LOS, and cost of hospitalization. The overall mortality was 5.9%. Almost 9% (8.7%) of patients had postprocedural complete heart block requiring pacemakers. Increasing Charlson co-morbidity index was associated with a higher rate of complications and mortality (odds ratio 2.41, 95% confidence interval 1.17 to 4.98, p = 0.02). The mean cost of hospitalization was $41,715 ± $1,611, while the average LOS was 8.89 ± 0.35 days. Occurrence of any postoperative complication was associated with increased cost of hospitalization (+$33,870, p <0.001) and LOS (+6.08 days, p <0.001). In conclusion, the postoperative mortality rate for VSM was 5.9%; cardiac complications were most common, specifically complete heart block. Age and increasing severity of co-morbidities were predictive of poorer outcomes, while a higher burden of postoperative complications was associated with a higher cost of hospitalization and LOS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Shortening baroreflex delay in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients – an unknown effect of β-blockers

    PubMed Central

    Katarzynska-Szymanska, Agnieszka; Ochotny, Romuald; Oko-Sarnowska, Zofia; Wachowiak-Baszynska, Hanna; Krauze, Tomasz; Piskorski, Jaroslaw; Gwizdala, Adrian; Mitkowski, Przemyslaw; Guzik, Przemyslaw

    2013-01-01

    Aims Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and impaired diastolic and systolic function. Abnormal sympathetic–parasympathetic balance is a potential stimulus for left ventricular hypertrophy in HCM patients. β-Blockers are routinely used in HCM for their strong negative inotropic effect; however, these drugs also influence the sympathetic–parasympathetic balance. This study aimed to determine the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system and the autonomic effects of β-blockers in HCM patients treated or untreated with β-blockers. Methods Among 51 HCM outpatients (18–70 years old; 29 men) there were 19 individuals with no medication and 32 subjects treated with a β-blocker. Fourteen age- and gender-matched (23–70 years old; nine men) healthy volunteers were enrolled in the control group. Continuous, non-invasive finger blood pressure was recorded during supine rest for 30 min. Autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system was measured by heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex function (cross-correlation sequence method). Results The mean pulse interval, time domain and spectral measures of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity were comparable between HCM patients, treated or not with β-blockers, and the control group. However, the delay of the baroreflex was significantly longer in HCM patients who were not treated with β-blockers [2.0 (1.6–2.3) s] in comparison with HCM patients receiving β-blockers [1.4 (1.1–1.8) s; P = 0.0072] or control subjects [1.2 (0.8–1.8) s; P = 0.0025]. This delay did not differ between HCM patients treated with β-blockers and the control group. Conclusions Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy not treated with β-blockers is accompanied by prolonged baroreflex delay. The use of β-blockers normalizes this delay. PMID:23126403

  4. Shortening baroreflex delay in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients -- an unknown effect of β-blockers.

    PubMed

    Katarzynska-Szymanska, Agnieszka; Ochotny, Romuald; Oko-Sarnowska, Zofia; Wachowiak-Baszynska, Hanna; Krauze, Tomasz; Piskorski, Jaroslaw; Gwizdala, Adrian; Mitkowski, Przemyslaw; Guzik, Przemyslaw

    2013-06-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and impaired diastolic and systolic function. Abnormal sympathetic-parasympathetic balance is a potential stimulus for left ventricular hypertrophy in HCM patients. β-Blockers are routinely used in HCM for their strong negative inotropic effect; however, these drugs also influence the sympathetic-parasympathetic balance. This study aimed to determine the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system and the autonomic effects of β-blockers in HCM patients treated or untreated with β-blockers. Among 51 HCM outpatients (18-70 years old; 29 men) there were 19 individuals with no medication and 32 subjects treated with a β-blocker. Fourteen age- and gender-matched (23-70 years old; nine men) healthy volunteers were enrolled in the control group. Continuous, non-invasive finger blood pressure was recorded during supine rest for 30 min. Autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system was measured by heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex function (cross-correlation sequence method). The mean pulse interval, time domain and spectral measures of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity were comparable between HCM patients, treated or not with β-blockers, and the control group. However, the delay of the baroreflex was significantly longer in HCM patients who were not treated with β-blockers [2.0 (1.6-2.3) s] in comparison with HCM patients receiving β-blockers [1.4 (1.1-1.8) s; P = 0.0072] or control subjects [1.2 (0.8-1.8) s; P = 0.0025]. This delay did not differ between HCM patients treated with β-blockers and the control group. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy not treated with β-blockers is accompanied by prolonged baroreflex delay. The use of β-blockers normalizes this delay. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Expression Profiling of Cardiac Genes in Human Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Insight Into the Pathogenesis of Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Do-Sun; Roberts, Robert; Marian, Ali J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The goal of this study was to identify genes upregulated in the heart in human patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). BACKGROUND Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic disease caused by mutations in contractile sarcomeric proteins. The molecular basis of diverse clinical and pathologic phenotypes in HCM remains unknown. METHODS We performed polymerase chain reaction-select complementary DNA subtraction between normal hearts and hearts with HCM and screened subtracted libraries by Southern blotting. We sequenced the differentially expressed clones and performed Northern blotting to detect increased expression levels. RESULTS We screened 288 independent clones, and 76 clones had less than twofold increase in the signal intensity and were considered upregulated. Sequence analysis identified 36 genes including those encoding the markers of pressure overload-induced (“secondary”) cardiac hypertrophy, cytoskeletal proteins, protein synthesis, redox system, ion channels and those with unknown function. Northern blotting confirmed increased expression of skeletal muscle alpha-actin (ACTA1), myosin light chain 2a (MLC2a), GTP-binding protein Gs-alpha subunit (GNAS1), NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDUFB10), voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), four-and-a-half LIM domain protein 1 (FHL1) (also known as SLIM1), sarcosin (SARCOSIN) and heat shock 70kD protein 8 (HSPA8) by less than twofold. Expression levels of ACTA1, MLC2a and GNAS1 were increased in six additional and FHL1 in four additional hearts with HCM. CONCLUSIONS A diverse array of genes is upregulated in the heart in human patients with HCM, which could account for the diversity of clinical and pathologic phenotypes. Markers of secondary hypertrophy are also upregulated, suggesting commonality of pathways involved in HCM and the acquired forms of cardiac hypertrophy. Elucidation of the role of differentially expressed genes in HCM could provide for new therapeutic targets. PMID

  6. [Physiopathology of mitral mechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Groupe de travail "Cardiomyopathies et insuffisance cardiaque" de la Société Française de Cardiologie].

    PubMed

    Hagège, A; Desnos, M; Komajda, M; Dubourg, O; Isnard, R; Guicheney, P; Schwartz, K; Lévine, R A

    1994-10-01

    Ventricular hypertrophy, the only indisputable phenotypical marker of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, is the basis of the physiopathology and treatment of the disease. Mitral valve abnormalities are usually considered to be secondary to the hypertrophy but the genesis of systolic anterior motion by the Venturi effect has been questioned by many clinical and experimental observations. Abnormalities of the mitral valve apparatus may in themselves (elongation of the valves, antero-internal malposition of the mitral papillary muscles and/or hyperlaxicity of antero-internal corhdae tendinae) create systolic anterior motion or subaortic obstruction in the absence of septal hypertrophy and/or increased subaortic flow velocities. Anatomo-clinical studies have confirmed this hypothesis: a high prevalence of mitral valve disease (increased valvular surface and length) has been found in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The recognition of these abnormalities is of value from the therapeutic (mitral valvuloplasty) diagnostic (in borderline cases) and genetic (when the primary nature of the abnormalities is confirmed) points of view.

  7. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy from A to Z: Genetics, Pathophysiology, Imaging, and Management.

    PubMed

    Baxi, Ameya Jagdish; Restrepo, Carlos S; Vargas, Daniel; Marmol-Velez, Alejandro; Ocazionez, Daniel; Murillo, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a heterogeneous group of diseases related to sarcomere gene mutations exhibiting heterogeneous phenotypes with an autosomal dominant mendelian pattern of inheritance. The disorder is characterized by diverse phenotypic expressions and variable natural progression, which may range from dyspnea and/or syncope to sudden cardiac death. It is found across all racial groups and is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy in the absence of another systemic or cardiac disease. The management of HCM is based on a thorough understanding of the underlying morphology, pathophysiology, and clinical course. Imaging findings of HCM mirror the variable expressivity and penetrance heterogeneity, with the added advantage of diagnosis even in cases where a specific mutation may not yet be found. The diagnostic information obtained from imaging varies depending on the specific stage of HCM-phenotype manifestation, including the prehypertrophic, hypertrophic, and later stages of adverse remodeling into the burned-out phase of overt heart failure. However, subtle or obvious, these imaging findings become critical components in diagnosis, management, and follow-up of HCM patients. Although diagnosis of HCM traditionally relies on clinical assessment and transthoracic echocardiography, recent studies have demonstrated increased utility of multidetector computed tomography (CT) and particularly cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in diagnosis, phenotype differentiation, therapeutic planning, and prognostication. In this article, we provide an overview of the genetics, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations of HCM, with the spectrum of imaging findings at MR imaging and CT and their contribution in diagnosis, risk stratification, and therapy. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  8. Virtual Cardiac Surgery Using CFD: Application to Septal Myectomy in Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Vijay; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore

    2011-11-01

    Obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is characterized by ventricular wall thickening, diastolic dysfunction, and dynamic outflow tract obstruction, all of which strongly influence the vortex dynamics and pressure distribution in the left ventricle (LV). Severe cases of HCM are usually managed through septal myectomy where the surgeon resects the hypertrophic mass. Surgeons currently try to remove as much tissue as possible in order to optimize the post surgical result. However, excessive debulking increases the chance of ventricular septal defects, bundle branch block or complete heart block, and aneurysmal septal thinning. On the other hand, insufficient tissue removal also leads to unsatisfactory outcomes in terms of reduction of outflow tract pressure gradient. Knowing how much muscle to remove and where to remove it from could reduce the likelihood of complications and suboptimal outcomes. In the present study, we employ an immersed boundary solver to model the effect of septal myectomy for ventricles with HOCM and demonstrate the potential of such an approach for surgical planning. Computational resources were provided by the National Institute of Computational Science under Tergrid grant number TG-CTS100002.

  9. Papillary muscle insertion directly into the anterior mitral leaflet in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, its identification and cause of outflow obstruction by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and its surgical management.

    PubMed

    Rowin, Ethan J; Maron, Barry J; Lesser, John R; Rastegar, Hassan; Maron, Martin S

    2013-06-01

    This case presents an uncommon but important mechanism of muscular left ventricular outflow obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy due to anomalous and direct papillary muscle insertion into the anterior mitral leaflet, a finding reliably identified clinically by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. The identification of this left ventricular outflow tract morphology is important before invasive ventricular septal reduction therapy because it dictates a specific surgical strategy. These findings further support the role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in the early evaluation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients.

  10. Quantitative analysis of sup 123 I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K.; Bunko, H.; Taki, J.; Shimizu, M.; Muramori, A.; Hisada, K. )

    1990-06-01

    Myocardial scintigraphy with 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and thallium-201 (201Tl) was performed in 29 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) using whole-body scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Nonhypertensive patients were classified into three groups according to the septal thickness determined by ultrasonography; group 1 (wall thickness less than 16 mm, n = 5), group 2 (from 16 to 20 mm, n = 12) and group 3 (greater than 20 mm, n = 4). The regional myocardial uptakes of both 201Tl and 123I-MIBG (percent of injected dose/cm3 myocardium) were higher in the more hypertrophic septa. However, when regional MIBG uptake at 3 hours was divided by the 201Tl uptake to calculate the MIBG uptake per unit of blood flow, the hypertrophic septa showed lower mean values--0.39 +/- 0.23 and 0.50 +/- 0.10 in groups 3 and 2, respectively (p less than 0.1 compared with 0.69 +/- 0.20 in group 1). The regional MIBG clearance rate in the septum was significantly higher in group 3 compared with group 1 (13.4 +/- 8.0%/hr versus 1.5 +/- 6.2%/hr, p less than 0.05). The uptake and 123I-MIBG clearance rate in the lateral wall showed a similar tendency. Myocardial uptake determined by whole-body scintigraphy was slightly increased in group 2 (3.5 +/- 0.6%, p less than 0.05) compared with group 1 (2.7 +/- 0.8%); however, it was lower in group 3 (2.7 +/- 0.4%). Myocardial 123I-MIBG distribution demonstrated various patterns in comparison with 201Tl distribution, suggesting that flow-independent changes in sympathetic innervation or activity may exist in patients with HCM.

  11. Effects of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy mutations on power output by human β-cardiac myosin.

    PubMed

    Spudich, James A; Aksel, Tural; Bartholomew, Sadie R; Nag, Suman; Kawana, Masataka; Yu, Elizabeth Choe; Sarkar, Saswata S; Sung, Jongmin; Sommese, Ruth F; Sutton, Shirley; Cho, Carol; Adhikari, Arjun S; Taylor, Rebecca; Liu, Chao; Trivedi, Darshan; Ruppel, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most frequently occurring inherited cardiovascular disease, with a prevalence of more than one in 500 individuals worldwide. Genetically acquired dilated cardiomyopathy is a related disease that is less prevalent. Both are caused by mutations in the genes encoding the fundamental force-generating protein machinery of the cardiac muscle sarcomere, including human β-cardiac myosin, the motor protein that powers ventricular contraction. Despite numerous studies, most performed with non-human or non-cardiac myosin, there is no clear consensus about the mechanism of action of these mutations on the function of human β-cardiac myosin. We are using a recombinantly expressed human β-cardiac myosin motor domain along with conventional and new methodologies to characterize the forces and velocities of the mutant myosins compared with wild type. Our studies are extending beyond myosin interactions with pure actin filaments to include the interaction of myosin with regulated actin filaments containing tropomyosin and troponin, the roles of regulatory light chain phosphorylation on the functions of the system, and the possible roles of myosin binding protein-C and titin, important regulatory components of both cardiac and skeletal muscles.

  12. Metabolic crosstalk between the heart and liver impacts familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Magida, Jason A; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2014-04-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is largely caused by dominant mutations in genes encoding cardiac sarcomeric proteins, and it is etiologically distinct from secondary cardiomyopathies resulting from pressure/volume overload and neurohormonal or inflammatory stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that decreased left ventricular contractile function in male, but not female, HCM mice is associated with reduced fatty acid translocase (CD36) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. As a result, the levels of myocardial ATP and triglyceride (TG) content are reduced, while the levels of oleic acid and TG in circulating very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs) and liver are increased. With time, these metabolic changes culminate in enhanced glucose production in male HCM mice. Remarkably, restoration of ventricular TG and ATP deficits via AMPK agonism as well as inhibition of gluconeogenesis improves ventricular architecture and function. These data underscore the importance of the systemic effects of a primary genetic heart disease to other organs and provide insight into potentially novel therapeutic interventions for HCM.

  13. Cardiotrophin-1 plasma levels are associated with the severity of hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Monserrat, Lorenzo; López, Begoña; González, Arantxa; Hermida, Manuel; Fernández, Xusto; Ortiz, Martín; Barriales-Villa, Roberto; Castro-Beiras, Alfonso; Díez, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Aims Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) is a cytokine that induces hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes and is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in hypertensive patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether plasma CT-1 is associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Methods and results The study was performed in 124 patients with HCM. All patients underwent a full clinical evaluation and an echocardiogram. Left ventricular hypertrophy was evaluated by the measurement of the maximal LV wall thickness and the Spirito's LVH score. Plasma CT-1 was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with controls, patients with HCM exhibited higher (P < 0.001) plasma CT-1 levels. Significant correlations were found between CT-1 and maximal LV wall thickness (r = 0.284, P = 0.001) and the Spirito's LVH score (r = 0.287, P = 0.006) in HCM patients. In addition, the levels of CT-1 were higher (P = 0.02) in patients with severe LVH (maximal LV wall thickness ≥30 mm) than in patients with mild or moderate LVH (maximal LV wall thickness <30 mm). Conclusions These findings show that plasma CT-1 is associated with the severity of LVH in patients with HCM. Further studies are required to ascertain whether CT-1 is a diagnostic biomarker of this cardiomyopathy. PMID:21059734

  14. The Role of Cardiac MRI in the Diagnosis and Risk Stratification of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common genetic cardiomyopathy, is a disease characterised by substantial heterogeneity. Although the majority of patients with HCM remain asymptomatic with near-normal longevity, a small, but important, subset remain at risk for a wide range of clinical outcomes including sudden death. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), with its high spatial resolution and tomographic imaging capability, has emerged as an imaging modality particularly well suited to characterise the phenotypic expression of HCM. CMR helps in the diagnosis of HCM by identifying areas of hypertrophy not well visualised by echocardiography, providing more accurate wall thickness measurements and differentiating HCM from other causes of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. CMR has led to the identification of novel subgroups of patients with HCM, including those with LV apical aneurysms (a subgroup at increased risk for ventricular arrhythmias and thromboembolic stroke), as well as abnormalities that contribute to LV outflow obstruction. Additionally, contrast-enhanced CMR with late-gadolinium enhancement (LGE) has recognised patients with extensive LGE (≥15 % LV myocardium) as individuals who may be at increased risk of sudden death, independent of other high-risk features, with implications on management strategies including consideration for primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy. These observations justify an expanded role of CMR in the routine clinical assessment of patients with HCM. PMID:28116085

  15. Ile90Met, a novel mutation in the cardiac troponin T gene for familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Chinese pedigree.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wei, Meng; Su, Bin; Hua, Xue-Wei; Zhang, Guo-Wei; Xue, Xiao-Pei; Pan, Cun-Ming; Liu, Rong; Sheng, Yan; Lu, Zhi-Gang; Jin, Li-Ren; Song, Huai-Dong

    2008-10-01

    To identify the disease-causing gene for a large multi-generational Chinese family affected by familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHCM), genome-wide screening was carried out in a Chinese family with FHCM using micro-satellite markers, and linkage analysis was performed using the MLINK program. The disease locus was mapped to 1q32 in this family. Screening for a mutation in the cardiac troponin T (cTnT) gene was performed by a PCR and sequencing was done with an ABI Prism 3700 sequencer. A novel C-->G transition located in the ninth exon of the cTnT gene, leading to a predicted amino acid residue change from Ile to Met at codon 90, was identified in all individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The results presented here strongly suggest that Ile90Met, a novel mutation in the cTnT gene, is causative agent of HCM in this family.

  16. Obstetric hemorrhage in a case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator: Anaesthesia and intensive care management.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Bhat, Ravindra R; Kavitha, Jayaram; Kundra, Pankaj; Parida, Satyen

    2016-01-01

    The physiological changes occurring during pregnancy and labor may reveal or exacerbate the symptoms of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). The addition of obstetric hemorrhage to this presents a unique challenge to the anesthesiologists and intensivists managing these patients in the operation theatres and the Intensive Care Units. Here we present a case of HOCM with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator in situ and postpartum hemorrhagic shock.

  17. Cell-Intrinsic Functional Effects of the α-Cardiac Myosin Arg-403-Gln Mutation in Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chuan, Peiying; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Ashley, Euan A.; Spudich, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Human familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common Mendelian cardiovascular disease worldwide. Among the most severe presentations of the disease are those in families heterozygous for the mutation R403Q in β-cardiac myosin. Mice heterozygous for this mutation in the α-cardiac myosin isoform display typical familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy pathology. Here, we study cardiomyocytes from heterozygous 403/+ mice. The effects of the R403Q mutation on force-generating capabilities and dynamics of cardiomyocytes were investigated using a dual carbon nanofiber technique to measure single-cell parameters. We demonstrate the Frank-Starling effect at the single cardiomyocyte level by showing that cell stretch causes an increase in amplitude of contraction. Mutant 403/+ cardiomyocytes exhibit higher end-diastolic and end-systolic stiffness than +/+ cardiomyocytes, whereas active force generation capabilities remain unchanged. Additionally, 403/+ cardiomyocytes show slowed relaxation dynamics. These phenotypes are consistent with increased end-diastolic and end-systolic chamber elastance, as well as diastolic dysfunction seen at the level of the whole heart. Our results show that these functional effects of the R403Q mutation are cell-intrinsic, a property that may be a general phenomenon in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:22735528

  18. Increased Postnatal Cardiac Hyperplasia Precedes Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy in a Model of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Emily T.; Grimes, Adrian C.; de Lange, Willem J.; Armstrong, Annie E.; Ralphe, J. Carter

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) occurs in ~0.5% of the population and is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in young adults. Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy has been the accepted mechanism for cardiac enlargement in HCM, but the early signaling responsible for initiating hypertrophy is poorly understood. Mutations in cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) are among the most common HCM-causing mutations. Ablation of Mybpc3 in an HCM mouse model (cMyBP-C−/−) rapidly leads to cardiomegaly by postnatal day (PND) 9, though hearts are indistinguishable from wild-type (WT) at birth. This model provides a unique opportunity to explore early processes involved in the dramatic postnatal transition to hypertrophy. Methods and Results: We performed microarray analysis, echocardiography, qPCR, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and isolated cardiomyocyte measurements to characterize the perinatal cMyBP-C−/− phenotype before and after overt hypertrophy. cMyBP-C−/− hearts showed elevated cell cycling at PND1 that transitioned to hypertrophy by PND9. An expanded time course revealed that increased cardiomyocyte cycling was associated with elevated heart weight to body weight ratios prior to cellular hypertrophy, suggesting that cell cycling resulted in cardiomyocyte proliferation. Animals heterozygous for the cMyBP-C deletion trended in the direction of the homozygous null, yet did not show increased heart size by PND9. Conclusions: Results indicate that altered regulation of the cell cycling pathway and elevated proliferation precedes hypertrophy in the cMyBP-C−/− HCM model, and suggests that increased cardiomyocyte number contributes to increased heart size in cMyBP-C−/− mice. This pre-hypertrophic period may reflect a unique time during which the commitment to HCM is determined and disease severity is influenced. PMID:28659827

  19. Assessment of myocardial damage in dilated-phase hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by using indium-111-antimyosin Fab myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, T.; Nagata, S.; Uehara, T.; Hayashida, K.; Mitani, I.; Kumita, S. )

    1991-07-01

    For the detection of myocardial cell damage, an 111In-antimyosin Fab study was carried out on seven patients (Group A) in the dilated phase of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, seven patients (Group B) with dilated cardiomyopathy, and eight control patients (Group C). Imaging was done 48 hr after intravenous injection of 74 MBq of 111In-antimyosin Fab. Myocardial antimyosin uptake was visually graded as 0, +1, +2 or +3. A score of +2 or +3 was considered positive. The heart/lung ratio of antimyosin uptake (antimyosin index) also was determined. Antimyosin uptake was positive in seven (100%), nine (90%) and no (0%) patients in Groups A, B, and C, respectively. The antimyosin index in Groups A and B was 2.46 {plus minus} 0.49 and 2.04 {plus minus} 0.24, respectively, findings were significantly higher than that in Group C (1.51 {plus minus} 0.13) (p less than 0.01). Positive biopsy findings were noted in only two patients in Group A. Thus, antimyosin uptake was increased in dilated phase hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy, which suggests ongoing necrotic changes in these patients.

  20. Familial hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with the GLA E66Q mutation and zebra body.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Sakamoto, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Yoshihisa, Akiomi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-Ichi; Kiko, Yuichirou; Nakano, Hajime; Hayashi, Takeharu; Kimura, Akinori; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-05-10

    Fabry disease is caused by mutations in the α-galactosidase A (GLA) gene, which is located in X-chromosome coding for the lysosomal enzyme of GLA. Among many gene mutations, E66Q mutation is under discussion for its pathogenicity because there is no clinical report showing pathological evidence of Fabry disease with E66Q mutation. A 65-year-old Japanese female was referred to our hospital for chest discomfort on effort. Transthoracic echocardiography showed severe left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy with LV outflow obstruction. Maximum LV outflow pressure gradient was 87 mmHg, and Valsalva maneuver increased the pressure gradient up to 98 mmHg. According to medical interview, one of her younger sister and a nephew died suddenly at age 42 and 36, respectively. Another younger sister also presented LV hypertrophy with outflow obstruction. Maximum LV outflow pressure gradient was 100 mmHg, and the E66Q mutation was detected similar to the case. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens presented vacuolation of cardiomyocytes, in which zebra bodies were detected by electron microscopic examination. Although the enzymatic activity of GLA was within normal range, the c. 196G>C nucleotide change, which lead to the E66Q mutation of GLA gene, was detected. We initially diagnosed her as cardiac Fabry disease based on the findings of zebra body. However, immunostaining showed few deposition of globotriaosylceramide in left ventricular myocardium, and gene mutations in the disease genes for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), MYBPC3 and MYH6, were detected. Although the pathogenicity of the E66Q mutation cannot be ruled out, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) was more reasonable to explain the pathophysiology in the case. This is the confusable case of HOCM with Fabry disease with the GLA E66Q mutation. We have to take into consideration the possibility that some patients with the E66Q mutation may have similar histological findings of Fabry disease, and should be examed the

  1. The molecular phenotype of human cardiac myosin associated with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Adam M.; Briceno, Natalia; Messer, Andrew E.; Gallon, Clare E.; Jalilzadeh, Shapour; Garcia, Edwin; Kikonda-Kanda, Gaelle; Goddard, Jennifer; Harding, Sian E.; Watkins, Hugh; Esteban, M. Tomé; Tsang, Victor T.; McKenna, William J.; Marston, Steven B.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Aim The aim of the study was to compare the functional and structural properties of the motor protein, myosin, and isolated myocyte contractility in heart muscle excised from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients by surgical myectomy with explanted failing heart and non-failing donor heart muscle. Methods Myosin was isolated and studied using an in vitro motility assay. The distribution of myosin light chain-1 isoforms was measured by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation was measured by sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein stain. Results The fraction of actin filaments moving when powered by myectomy myosin was 21% less than with donor myosin (P = 0.006), whereas the sliding speed was not different (0.310 ± 0.034 for myectomy myosin vs. 0.305 ± 0.019 µm/s for donor myosin in six paired experiments). Failing heart myosin showed 18% reduced motility. One myectomy myosin sample produced a consistently higher sliding speed than donor heart myosin and was identified with a disease-causing heavy chain mutation (V606M). In myectomy myosin, the level of atrial light chain-1 relative to ventricular light chain-1 was 20 ± 5% compared with 11 ± 5% in donor heart myosin and the level of myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation was decreased by 30–45%. Isolated cardiomyocytes showed reduced contraction amplitude (1.61 ± 0.25 vs. 3.58 ± 0.40%) and reduced relaxation rates compared with donor myocytes (TT50% = 0.32 ± 0.09 vs. 0.17 ± 0.02 s). Conclusion Contractility in myectomy samples resembles the hypocontractile phenotype found in end-stage failing heart muscle irrespective of the primary stimulus, and this phenotype is not a direct effect of the hypertrophy-inducing mutation. The presence of a myosin heavy chain mutation causing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be predicted from a simple functional assay. PMID:18411228

  2. Genetics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: advances and pitfalls in molecular diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Fernandes, Alexandra R

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary disease of the cardiac muscle that occurs mainly due to mutations (>1,400 variants) in genes encoding for the cardiac sarcomere. HCM, the most common familial form of cardiomyopathy, affecting one in every 500 people in the general population, is typically inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, and presents variable expressivity and age-related penetrance. Due to the morphological and pathological heterogeneity of the disease, the appearance and progression of symptoms is not straightforward. Most HCM patients are asymptomatic, but up to 25% develop significant symptoms, including chest pain and sudden cardiac death. Sudden cardiac death is a dramatic event, since it occurs without warning and mainly in younger people, including trained athletes. Molecular diagnosis of HCM is of the outmost importance, since it may allow detection of subjects carrying mutations on HCM-associated genes before development of clinical symptoms of HCM. However, due to the genetic heterogeneity of HCM, molecular diagnosis is difficult. Currently, there are mainly four techniques used for molecular diagnosis of HCM, including Sanger sequencing, high resolution melting, mutation detection using DNA arrays, and next-generation sequencing techniques. Application of these methods has proven successful for identification of mutations on HCM-related genes. This review summarizes the features of these technologies, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. Furthermore, current therapeutics for HCM patients are correlated with clinically observed phenotypes and are based on the alleviation of symptoms. This is mainly due to insufficient knowledge on the mechanisms involved in the onset of HCM. Tissue engineering alongside regenerative medicine coupled with nanotherapeutics may allow fulfillment of those gaps, together with screening of novel therapeutic drugs and target delivery systems.

  3. Cardiac Troponin and Tropomyosin: Structural and Cellular Perspectives to Unveil the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Mayra de A.; de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited myopathies affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle and are commonly associated with genetic dysfunctions, leading to the production of anomalous proteins. In cardiomyopathies, mutations frequently occur in sarcomeric genes, but the cause-effect scenario between genetic alterations and pathological processes remains elusive. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was the first cardiac disease associated with a genetic background. Since the discovery of the first mutation in the β-myosin heavy chain, more than 1400 new mutations in 11 sarcomeric genes have been reported, awarding HCM the title of the “disease of the sarcomere.” The most common macroscopic phenotypes are left ventricle and interventricular septal thickening, but because the clinical profile of this disease is quite heterogeneous, these phenotypes are not suitable for an accurate diagnosis. The development of genomic approaches for clinical investigation allows for diagnostic progress and understanding at the molecular level. Meanwhile, the lack of accurate in vivo models to better comprehend the cellular events triggered by this pathology has become a challenge. Notwithstanding, the imbalance of Ca2+ concentrations, altered signaling pathways, induction of apoptotic factors, and heart remodeling leading to abnormal anatomy have already been reported. Of note, a misbalance of signaling biomolecules, such as kinases and tumor suppressors (e.g., Akt and p53), seems to participate in apoptotic and fibrotic events. In HCM, structural and cellular information about defective sarcomeric proteins and their altered interactome is emerging but still represents a bottleneck for developing new concepts in basic research and for future therapeutic interventions. This review focuses on the structural and cellular alterations triggered by HCM-causing mutations in troponin and tropomyosin proteins and how structural biology can aid in the discovery of new platforms for therapeutics. We highlight the

  4. Relation of QRS duration to mortality in a community-based cohort with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bongioanni, Sergio; Bianchi, Francesca; Migliardi, Alessandro; Gnavi, Roberto; Pron, Paolo Giay; Casetta, Marzia; Conte, Maria Rosa

    2007-08-01

    A prolonged QRS duration on the standard electrocardiogram is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death in cardiomyopathies of different origin. However, the relation between QRS duration and prognosis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) remains undefined. We assessed the relation between QRS duration and cardiovascular death in 241 consecutive patients with HC. The study cohort was divided into 2 groups according to QRS duration: <120 and > or =120 ms. Of the 241 patients, 191 (79%) had a QRS duration <120 ms and 50 (21%) a QRS duration > or =120 ms. During a mean follow-up of 7.9 +/- 5.1 years, 35 patients died of cardiovascular causes related to HC. Of these 35 patients, 13 (6%) had a QRS duration <120 ms and 22 (43%) had a QRS duration > or =120 ms (p <0.01). Risk of cardiovascular death was significantly higher in patients with a QRS duration > or =120 ms than in those with a QRS duration <120 ms (relative risk 5.2, p <0.0001). At 8-year follow-up, cumulative risks of HC-related death were 7.1% in patients with a QRS duration <120 ms and 55% in those with a QRS duration > or =120 ms. Multivariate analysis confirmed that a QRS duration > or =120 ms was independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death (hazard ratio 3.2, p = 0.007). New York Heart Association functional class III/IV was the only other clinical variable significantly and independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death. In conclusion, in patients with HC, QRS duration on standard electrocardiogram is directly related to cardiovascular mortality, and a QRS duration > or =120 ms is a strong and independent predictor of prognosis.

  5. Right Ventricular and Right Atrial Involvement Can Predict Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Doesch, Christina; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Rudic, Boris; Tueluemen, Erol; Budjan, Johannes; Haubenreisser, Holger; Henzler, Thomas; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Borggrefe, Martin; Papavassiliu, Theano

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with clinical deterioration, stroke and disability in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluated cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived determinants for the occurrence of AF in patients with HCM. 98 Patients with HCM and 30 healthy controls underwent CMR and were followed-up for 6 ± 3 years. 19 (19.4%) patients presented with AF at initial diagnosis, 19 (19.4%) developed AF during follow-up and 60 (61.2%) remained in sinus rhythm (SR). Compared to healthy controls, patients with HCM who remained in SR presented with significantly increased left ventricular mass, an elevated left ventricular remodeling index, enlarged left atrial volumes and reduced septal mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE) compared to healthy controls. Whereas HCM patients who presented with AF at initial diagnosis and those who developed AF during follow-up additionally presented with reduced tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) and right atrial (RA) dilatation. Receiver-operator curve analysis indicated good predictive performance of TAPSE, RA diameter and septal MAPSE (AUC 0.73, 0.69 and 0.71, respectively) to detect patients at risk of developing AF. Reduced MAPSE measurements and enlarged LA volumes seems to be a common feature in patients with HCM, whereas reduced TAPSE and RA dilatation only seem to be altered in patients with history of AF and those developing AF. Therefore, they could serve as easy determinable markers of AF in patients with HCM.

  6. A Delta-Sarcoglycan Gene Polymorphism as a Risk Factor for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Garduño, Martín H.; Pérez-Martínez, Ramón A.; Ruiz, Victor M.; Herrera-Tepatlán, Esteban; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Jiménez-Vaca, Ana L.; Minauro-Sanmiguel, Fernando; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The C allele of c.−94C>G polymorphism of the delta-sarcoglycan gene was associated as a risk factor for coronary spasm in Japanese patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim: We evaluated whether the c.−94C>G polymorphism can be a risk factor for HCM in Mexican patients. Methods: The polymorphism was genotyped and the risk was estimated in 35 HCM patients and 145 healthy unrelated individuals. Data of this polymorphism reported in Mexican Amerindian populations were included. Results: The C allele frequency in HCM patients was higher with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.37, and the risk for the CC genotype increased to 5.0. The analysis with Mexican Amerindian populations showed that the C allele frequency was significantly higher in HCM patients with an OR of 2.96 and for CC genotype the risk increased to 7.60. Conclusions: The C allele of the c.−94C>G polymorphism is a risk factor for HCM, which is increased by the Amerindian component and can play an important role in the etiology and progression of disease in Mexican patients. PMID:22524166

  7. High resolution melting: improvements in the genetic diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Portuguese cohort

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a complex myocardial disorder with a recognized genetic heterogeneity. The elevated number of genes and mutations involved in HCM limits a gene-based diagnosis that should be considered of most importance for basic research and clinical medicine. Methodology In this report, we evaluated High Resolution Melting (HRM) robustness, regarding HCM genetic testing, by means of analyzing 28 HCM-associated genes, including the most frequent 4 HCM-associated sarcomere genes, as well as 24 genes with lower reported HCM-phenotype association. We analyzed 80 Portuguese individuals with clinical phenotype of HCM allowing simultaneously a better characterization of this disease in the Portuguese population. Results HRM technology allowed us to identify 60 mutated alleles in 72 HCM patients: 49 missense mutations, 3 nonsense mutations, one 1-bp deletion, one 5-bp deletion, one in frame 3-bp deletion, one insertion/deletion, 3 splice mutations, one 5'UTR mutation in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, CSRP3, MYH6 and MYL2 genes. Significantly 22 are novel gene mutations. Conclusions HRM was proven to be a technique with high sensitivity and a low false positive ratio allowing a rapid, innovative and low cost genotyping of HCM. In a short return, HRM as a gene scanning technique could be a cost-effective gene-based diagnosis for an accurate HCM genetic diagnosis and hopefully providing new insights into genotype/phenotype correlations. PMID:22429680

  8. Clinical meaning of isolated increase of QRS voltages in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy versus athlete's heart.

    PubMed

    Calore, Chiara; Zorzi, Alessandro; Corrado, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Recent consensus documents have provided modern criteria for interpretation of the athlete's ECG, which are based on a better definition of physiological versus abnormal ECG changes. The aim of these modern criteria is to lower the traditionally high number of false positives and to reduce unnecessary and expensive investigations, maintaining the sensitivity for identification of cardiac diseases at risk of sudden cardiac death during sports such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This article reviews the published studies regarding the ECG changes associated with HCM ("pathologic hypertrophy") and athlete's heart ("physiologic hypertrophy"), with particular reference to the prevalence and clinical significance of the ECG pattern of isolated increase of QRS voltages. Taken together the results of the available studies show that ECG provides good accuracy for differentiating HCM from athlete's heart and allows to preserve the ECG power for detection of athletes with HCM. Patients with either completely normal ECGs or showing isolated QRS voltage criteria for LV hypertrophy have a less severe HCM phenotype, which is associated with a lower arrhythmic risk. These scientific data support the current recommendation that further cardiovascular tests including echocardiography are not systematically indicated in trained athletes showing an isolated increase of QRS voltages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Familial screening and genetic counselling in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the Rotterdam experience

    PubMed Central

    Michels, M.; Hoedemaekers, Y.M.; Kofflard, M.J.; Frohn-Mulder, I.; Dooijes, D.; Majoor-Krakauer, D.; Ten Cate, F.J.

    2007-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease characterised by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) (i.e. LVH in the absence of another cardiac or systemic disease that could produce a similar degree of hypertrophy), electrical instability and sudden death (SD). Germline mutations in genes encoding for sarcomere proteins are found in more than half of the cases of unexplained LVH. The autosomal dominant inherited forms of HCM are characterised by incomplete penetrance and variability in clinical and echocardiographic features, prognosis and therapeutic modalities. The identification of the genetic defect in one of the HCM genes allows accurate presymptomatic detection of mutation carriers in a family. Cardiac evaluation of at-risk relatives enables early diagnosis and identification of those patients at high risk for SD, which can be the first manifestation of the disease in asymptomatic persons. In this article we present our experience with genetic testing and cardiac screening in our HCM population and give an overview of the current literature available on this subject. (Neth Heart J 2007;15:184-9.17612681) PMID:17612681

  10. Coronary flow reserve in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: relation with microvascular dysfunction and pathophysiological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kofflard, M.J.; Michels, M.; Krams, R.; Kliffen, M.; Geleijnse, M.L.; Ten Cate, F.J.; Serruys, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background. The decrease in coronary flow reserve (CFR) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) predisposes to myocardial ischaemia, systolic dysfunction and cardiac death. In this study we investigate to which extent haemodynamic, echocardiographic, and histological parameters contribute to the reduction of CFR. Methods. In ten HCM patients (mean age 44±14 years) and eight heart transplant (HTX) patients (mean age 51±6 years) CFR was calculated in the left anterior descending coronary artery. In all subjects haemodynamic, echocardiographic and histological parameters were assessed. The relationship between these variables and CFR was determined using linear regression analysis. Results. CFR was reduced in HCM compared with HTX patients (1.6±0.7 vs. 2.7±0.8, p<0.01). An increase in septal thickness (p<0.005), indexed left ventricular (LV) mass (p<0.005), LV end-diastolic pressure (p<0.001), LV outflow tract gradient (p<0.05) and a decrease in arteriolar lumen size (p<0.05) were all related to a reduction in CFR. Conclusion. In HCM patients haemodynamic (LV end-diastolic pressure, LV outflow tract gradient), echocardiographic (indexed LV mass) and histological (% luminal area of the arterioles) changes are responsible for a decrease in CFR. (Neth Heart J 2007;15:209-15.17612685) PMID:17612685

  11. Left ventricular emptying dynamics in patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy and concentric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Peters, J; Bhargava, V; Johnson, A; Mangiardi, L; Slutsky, R

    1982-12-01

    We studied the dynamics of left ventricular (LV) emptying in 8 patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH), 6 patients with concentric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CHC), and 6 normal controls. Four patients with ASH had resting systolic gradients greater than 20 mmHg, all had significant post premature ventricular contraction (PVC) systolic pressure gradients. LV volume (V) was obtained by frame-by-frame analysis of cineangiograms. End-diastolic volume was similar for all groups; end-systolic volume was significantly less in ASH and CHC patients than in normals. Maximum dV/dt was similar in ASH and CHC, and significantly greater than normals. Total systolic contraction time (SCT), i.e., time from peak volume to last cine frame at minimum volume, was similar for all groups, but the time required to eject 90% of stroke volume (90%T), as a fraction of SCT, was shorter for ASH (0.52 +/- 0.07) and CHC patients (0.51 +/- 0.05) than normals (0.67 +/- 0.07) (p less than 0.05 vs myopathy groups). In the sinus beat following a PVC, however, this ratio decreased significantly in normals and CHC patients, but did not change in ASH patients. We conclude that ASH and CHC have similar exaggerated systolic LV ejection dynamics in the basal state; the failure of ASH patients with post-PVC systolic outflow gradient to reduce 90% T/SCT post PVC may reflect obstruction to LV emptying.

  12. Usefulness of Genetic Testing in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: an Analysis Using Real-World Data.

    PubMed

    Alejandra Restrepo-Cordoba, M; Campuzano, Oscar; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Cobo-Marcos, Marta; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Gámez, José M; Dominguez, Fernando; Gonzalez-Lopez, Esther; Padron-Barthe, Laura; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Alonso-Pulpon, Luis; Brugada, Ramon; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2017-02-01

    This study sought to determine the usefulness of genetic testing to predict evolution in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and to assess the role of genetic testing in clinical practice. Genetic results of 100 HCM patients tested for mutations in ≥10 HCM-causing genes were evaluated. Patients were classified as with poor (group A) or favourable (group B) clinical course. Forty-five pathogenic mutations (PM) were identified in 28 patients (56 %) from group A and in 23 (46 %) from group B (p = 0.317). Only 40 patients (40 %) exhibited PM that had been previously reported and only 15 (15 %) had PM reported in ≥10 individuals. PM associated with poor prognosis were identified in just five patients from group A (10 %). Genetic findings are not useful to predict prognosis in most HCM patients. By contrast, real-world data reinforce the usefulness of genetic testing to provide genetic counselling and to enable cascade genetic screening.

  13. Alteration of Time Intervals in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy During an Exercise Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Zagatina, Angela; Zhuravskaya, Nadezhda; Tyurina, Tatyana V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is often associated with diastolic dysfunction. Theoretically, a more marked alteration of diastolic function is revealed during exercise. Methods and Results We studied 84 persons: 1) 25 patients with HCM, 2) 25 patients with essential arterial hypertension (AH) and 3) 34 healthy controls. Each person performed a treadmill echocardiography. Before and after work, the following parameters were measured: the time interval between the QRS complex and the onset of mitral early diastolic filling velocity (TE), the interval between the QRS complex and the onset of peak early tissue mitral annular velocity (Te’), the isovolumetric relaxation time over the difference of TE and Te’ ratio (IVRT/(TE-Te’)), and changes of the time parameters during the stress test. In comparison with hypertensive and control groups, HCM patients at rest showed a significantly longer TE (448 ± 55 vs. 423 ± 33 vs. 417 ± 24 ms, P < 0.04) and Te’ (446 ± 48 vs. 403 ± 44 vs. 416 ± 38 ms, P < 0.003). After stress the HCM group had a longer Te’ (355 ± 59 vs. 299 ± 40 vs. 292 ± 30 ms, P < 0.000004) and a higher IVRT/(TE-Te’) ratio (3.1 ± 1.5 vs. 0.9 ± 2.4 vs. 1.7 ± 1.2, P < 0.002). Conclusions HCM patients show an alteration in the time parameters not only compared to healthy persons but to hypertensive patients as well.

  14. Investigation of Pathogenic Genes in Chinese sporadic Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients by Whole Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Li, Zhongshan; Ren, Xianguo; Dong, Ming; Li, Jinxin; Shi, Xingjuan; Zhang, Yu; Xie, Wei; Sun, Zhongsheng; Liu, Xiangdong; Dai, Qiming

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiovascular disease with high heterogeneity. Limited knowledge concerning the genetic background of nearly 40% HCM cases indicates there is a clear need for further investigation to explore the genetic pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we undertook a whole exome sequencing (WES) approach to identify novel candidate genes and mutations associated with HCM. The cohort consisted of 74 unrelated patients with sporadic HCM (sHCM) previously determined to be negative for mutations in eight sarcomere genes. The results showed that 7 of 74 patients (9.5%) had damaging mutations in 43 known HCM disease genes. Furthermore, after analysis combining the Transmission and De novo Association (TADA) program and the ToppGene program, 10 putative genes gained priority. A thorough review of public databases and related literature revealed that there is strong supporting evidence for most of the genes playing roles in various aspects of heart development. Findings from recent studies suggest that the putative and known disease genes converge on three functional pathways: sarcomere function, calcium signaling and metabolism pathway. This study illustrates the benefit of WES, in combination with rare variant analysis tools, in providing valuable insight into the genetic etiology of a heterogeneous sporadic disease. PMID:26573135

  15. Obtaining insurance after DNA diagnostics: a survey among hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Christiaans, Imke; Kok, Tjitske M; van Langen, Irene M; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J; Wilde, Arthur A M; Smets, Ellen M A

    2010-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with increased mortality. Disclosure of DNA test results may have social implications such as low access to insurance. In The Netherlands, insurance companies are restricted in the use of genetic information of their clients by the Medical Examination Act. A cross-sectional survey was used to assess the frequency and type of problems encountered by HCM mutation carriers applying for insurance, and associations with carriers' characteristics. The response rate was 86% (228/264). A total of 66 carriers (29%) applied for insurance of whom 39 reported problems (59%) during an average follow-up of 3 years since the DNA test result. More problems were encountered by carriers with manifest disease (P<0.001) and carriers with symptoms of HCM (P=0.049). Carriers identified after predictive DNA testing less frequently experienced problems (P=0.002). Three carriers without manifest HCM reported problems (5% of applicants). Frequently reported problems were higher premium (72%), grant access to medical records (62%), and complete rejection (33%). In conclusion, HCM mutation carriers frequently encounter problems when applying for insurances, often in the case of manifest disease, but the risk assessment of insurance companies is largely justified. Still, 5% of carriers encounter potentially unjustified problems, indicating the necessity to monitor the application of the existing laws and regulations by insurance companies and to educate counselees on the implications of these laws and regulations.

  16. Effect of Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction on Left Atrial Mechanics in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynne K.; Chan, Raymond H.; Carasso, Shemy; Durand, Miranda; Misurka, Jimmy; Crean, Andrew M.; Ralph-Edwards, Anthony; Gruner, Christiane; Woo, Anna; Lesser, John R.; Maron, Barry J.; Maron, Martin S.; Rakowski, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) volumes are known to be increased in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and are a predictor of adverse outcome. In addition, LA function is impaired and is presumed to be due to left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction as a result of hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. In the current study, we assess the incremental effect of outflow tract obstruction (and concomitant mitral regurgitation) on LA function as assessed by LA strain. Patients with HCM (50 obstructive, 50 nonobstructive) were compared to 50 normal controls. A subset of obstructive patients who had undergone septal myectomy was also studied. Utilising feature-tracking software applied to cardiovascular magnetic resonance images, LA volumes and functional parameters were calculated. LA volumes were significantly elevated and LA ejection fraction and strain were significantly reduced in patients with HCM compared with controls and were significantly more affected in patients with obstruction. LA volumes and function were significantly improved after septal myectomy. LVOT obstruction and mitral regurgitation appear to further impair LA mechanics. Septal myectomy results in a significant reduction in LA volumes, paralleled by an improvement in function. PMID:26788503

  17. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a rare cause of vascular dementia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Ben Hamouda, Ibtissem; Tougourti, Mohamed Néjib; Hamza, Mohsen

    2002-07-01

    Herein, we report a case of a 51 year old man who experienced three ischemic cerebral infarcts in a time of few months. The patient consulted after the third accident. Neurological presentation included pseudobulbar syndrome with a mild cognitive deficit, aphasia, left hemiparesia, hemiasomatognosia and homonymous lateral hemianopsia. Cerebral tomodensitometry and magnetic resonance imaging evidenced large infarcts images involving right middle cerebral artery territory and bilateral borderline zones in the junction of the territories of the middle and posterior cerebral arteries. Ambulatory 24 hours ECG recording (Holter) revealed two hits of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. Transoesophageal echocardiography conveyed to the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and displayed the presence of a left auricular thrombus. Anticoagulant therapy and rehabilitation allowed a substantial recovering of the patient's cognitive functions and wasting of the intracardiac thrombus. The clinical features observed in our patient meet the recommended DSM IV diagnosis criteria of vascular dementia, an exceptional complication of HCM. The clinical findings, neuroimagery investigation results, and the chronological link between cerebral attacks and cognitive function deterioration argue for a demential syndrome of vascular origin resulting from multiple embolic infarcts involving medium sized arteries (multi-infarct dementia). The authors emphasize the rarity of such observation. HCM must be considered as a potential cause of embolic stroke and likewise a multi-infarct dementia.

  18. Multiple Sclerosis Presents with Psychotic Symptoms and Coexists with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Muhammed Emin; İnce, Bahri; Karadeli, Hasan Hüseyin; Asil, Talip

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Psychiatric symptoms are not infrequent during MS, yet onset of MS with psychosis is rarely encountered. A 27-year-old Caucasian male was admitted due to numbness in his right arm and difficulty in walking. His clinical and laboratorial exams lead to the MS diagnosis. Nine months earlier, he also developed psychotic disorder, not otherwise specified (PD-NOS). His sudden onset of PD-NOS, his rapid and complete response to antipsychotics, and a relatively short interval between psychiatric and neurological signs indicate a high likelihood that PD-NOS was a manifestation of underlying MS. He also suffers from hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). The patient's neurological complaints were recovered with methylprednisolone (1 g/day, i.v.) given for five days. Glatiramer acetate (1 × 1 tb.s.c.) was prescribed for consolidation and, after nine months of his admission, the patient fully recovered from neurological and psychiatric complaints. Interestingly, very recent studies indicate specific alpha-actinin antibodies in MS and alpha-actinin mutations cause HOCM. Thus, concurrence of MS with HOCM can be even a new syndrome, if further genetic studies prove. PMID:25197588

  19. Independent origin of identical [beta] cardiac myosin heavy-chain mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, H. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA St. George's Hospital Medical School, London ); Thierfelder, L.; Anan, R.; Jarcho, J.; Seidman, C.E. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Matsumori, Akira ); McKenna, W. ); Seidman, J.G. Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Boston, MA )

    1993-12-01

    The origins of the [beta] cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MHC) gene missense mutations that cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) in 14 families have been evaluated. Of eight different mutations, four were present in single families, while four occurred in two or more families. To investigate the origins of the four shared mutations, the authors defined the [beta] cardiac MHC haplotypes of each of the mutation-bearing chromosomes by determining the alleles present at three intragenic polymorphic loci. Two of the mutations (Arg453Cys and Val606Met) have arisen independently in each of three families, being found on different chromosomal backgrounds. A third mutation (Gly584Arg) is associated with identical haplotypes in two families with Portuguese ancestors, suggesting a founder effect. Haplotype analysis was uninformative for the fourth mutation (Arg403Gln). Thus, FHC-causing mutations have arisen independently in at least 12 of the 14 families studied, suggesting that the majority have arisen relatively recently as new mutations. This finding predicts the prevalence of disease-causing [beta] cardiac MHC mutations to be comparable in all population groups. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Anaphylaxis and cardiac surgery for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy: a case report and review of anaesthetic management.

    PubMed

    Yee, Kevin Fu Hong; Wasowicz, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe clinical management in a situation where patient has experienced anaphylaxis while undergoing surgical septal myectomy for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). A 40-yr-old female was scheduled to undergo surgical septal myectomy for the treatment of HOCM. After induction, the patient developed refractory hypotension that did not respond to escalating doses of vasopressors and volume therapy. Although a clinical examination led to the diagnosis of anaphylaxis, epinephrine, which is the usual treatment of choice, failed to improve the patient's haemodynamics. A transesophageal echocardiography revealed a worsening of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) after epinephrine administration. In the end, the rapid institution of a cardiopulmonary bypass was required as a rescue therapy instead of to save a patient. The anaesthetic goals in a patient in HOCM are to maintain preload and afterload and to avoid stimulation of inotropy and chronotropy to leading to left ventricular outflow obstruction. In a patient with anaphylaxis, maintaining these haemodynamic goals becomes much more difficult since the pathophysiology and usual treatment of choice will worsen LVOTO. Special consideration for the need to have extracorporeal life support to treat refractory hypotension in surgical patients with HOCM may be warranted.

  1. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Rohini V Bhat; Hegde, Harihar V; Santhosh, MCB; Roopa, S; Deshpande, Shrinivas S; Rao, P Raghavendra

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis) and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk. PMID:23716772

  2. Myosin-binding Protein C Compound Heterozygous Variant Effect on the Phenotypic Expression of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rafael, Julianny Freitas; Cruz Filho, Fernando Eugênio dos Santos; de Carvalho, Antônio Carlos Campos; Gottlieb, Ilan; Cazelli, José Guilherme; Siciliano, Ana Paula; Dias, Glauber Monteiro

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. It is the major cause of sudden cardiac death in young high-level athletes. Studies have demonstrated a poorer prognosis when associated with specific mutations. The association between HCM genotype and phenotype has been the subject of several studies since the discovery of the genetic nature of the disease. This study shows the effect of a MYBPC3 compound variant on the phenotypic HCM expression. A family in which a young man had a clinical diagnosis of HCM underwent clinical and genetic investigations. The coding regions of the MYH7, MYBPC3 and TNNT2 genes were sequenced and analyzed. The proband present a malignant manifestation of the disease, and is the only one to express HCM in his family. The genetic analysis through direct sequencing of the three main genes related to this disease identified a compound heterozygous variant (p.E542Q and p.D610H) in MYBPC3. A family analysis indicated that the p.E542Q and p.D610H alleles have paternal and maternal origin, respectively. No family member carrier of one of the variant alleles manifested clinical signs of HCM. We suggest that the MYBPC3-biallelic heterozygous expression of p.E542Q and p.D610H may cause the severe disease phenotype seen in the proband. PMID:28538763

  3. The importance of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ozyilmaz, Sinem; Akgul, Ozgur; Uyarel, Huseyin; Pusuroglu, Hamdi; Gul, Mehmet; Satilmisoglu, Muhammet Hulusi; Bolat, Ismail; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Uçar, Hakan; Yildirim, Aydin; Bakir, Ihsan

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the predictive value of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in many cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this study was to assess whether NLR is associated with echocardiographic or electrocardiographic parameters, or with predicted five-year risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD), in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This prospective observational study included 74 controls and 97 HCM patients. Three years of follow-up results for HCM patients were evaluated. NLR was significantly higher in patients with fragmented QRS, ventricular tachycardia, and presyncope than in those without (p=0.031, 0.030, and 0.020, respectively). NLR was significantly higher in patients whose predicted five-year risk of SCD was more than 6% and whose corrected QT interval was greater than 440 ms (p=0.022 and 0.001, respectively). It was also significantly higher in patients whose left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was <60% than in those with LVEF >60% (p=0.017). NLR was significantly higher in patients with HCM compared to the control group. A high NLR is associated with a higher five-year risk of SCD in patients with HCM. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Speckle tracking echocardiography to assess regional ventricular function in patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Saccheri, María Cristina; Cianciulli, Tomás Francisco; Morita, Luis Alberto; Méndez, Ricardo José; Beck, Martín Alejandro; Guerra, Juan Enrique; Cozzarin, Alberto; Puente, Luciana Jimena; Balletti, Lorena Romina; Lax, Jorge Alberto

    2017-01-01

    AIM To explore regional systolic strain of midwall and endocardial segments using speckle tracking echocardiography in patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). METHODS We prospectively assessed 20 patients (mean age 53 ± 16 years, range: 18-81 years, 10 were male), with apical HCM. We measured global longitudinal peak systolic strain (GLPSS) in the midwall and endocardium of the left ventricle. RESULTS The diastolic thickness of the 4 apical segments was 16.25 ± 2.75 mm. All patients had a normal global systolic function with a fractional shortening of 50% ± 8%. In spite of supernormal left ventricular (LV) systolic function, midwall GLPSS was decreased in all patients, more in the apical (-7.3% ± -8.8%) than in basal segments (-15.5% ± -6.93%), while endocardial GLPPS was significantly greater and reached normal values (apical: -22.8% ± -7.8%, basal: -17.9% ± -7.5%). CONCLUSION This study shows that two-dimensional strain was decreased mainly confined to the mesocardium, while endocardium myocardial deformation was preserved in HCM and allowed to identify subclinical LV dysfunction. This transmural heterogeneity in systolic strain had not been previously described in HCM and could be explained by the distribution of myofibrillar disarray in deep myocardial areas. The clinical application of this novel finding may help further understanding of the pathophysiology of HCM. PMID:28515855

  5. Coronary flow reserve in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: relation with microvascular dysfunction and pathophysiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kofflard, M J; Michels, M; Krams, R; Kliffen, M; Geleijnse, M L; Ten Cate, F J; Serruys, P W

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND.: The decrease in coronary flow reserve (CFR) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) predisposes to myocardial ischaemia, systolic dysfunction and cardiac death. In this study we investigate to which extent haemodynamic, echocardiographic, and histological parameters contribute to the reduction of CFR. METHODS.: In ten HCM patients (mean age 44+/-14 years) and eight heart transplant (HTX) patients (mean age 51+/-6 years) CFR was calculated in the left anterior descending coronary artery. In all subjects haemodynamic, echocardiographic and histological parameters were assessed. The relationship between these variables and CFR was determined using linear regression analysis. RESULTS.: CFR was reduced in HCM compared with HTX patients (1.6+/-0.7 vs. 2.7+/-0.8, p<0.01). An increase in septal thickness (p<0.005), indexed left ventricular (LV) mass (p<0.005), LV end-diastolic pressure (p<0.001), LV outflow tract gradient (p<0.05) and a decrease in arteriolar lumen size (p<0.05) were all related to a reduction in CFR. CONCLUSION.: In HCM patients haemodynamic (LV end-diastolic pressure, LV outflow tract gradient), echocardiographic (indexed LV mass) and histological (% luminal area of the arterioles) changes are responsible for a decrease in CFR. (Neth Heart J 2007;15:209-15.).

  6. [Association between delayed enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and arrhythmia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    WANG, Jing; KONG, Xiang-quan; XU, Hai-bo; ZHOU, Guo-feng; LIU, Fang; SHI, Hao-jun; LIU, Ding-xi

    2010-09-01

    to observe the association between myocardial fibrosis, detected by delayed-enhancement (DE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arrhythmia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). forty-eight untreated HCM patients who underwent Cine MR, DE-MRI, 24 h ambulatory Holter electrocardiogram and ECG examinations were recruited. Extent of myocardial fibrosis (fibrosis mass/total LV mass) was assessed using DE imaging. Association between arrhythmias including premature ventricular complexes (PVCS ≥ 200), supra-ventricular tachycardia (SVT), non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT), atrio-ventricular block (AVB) and intra-ventricular block (IVB) detected by Holter monitoring and ECG with regard to delayed enhancement (DE) on contrast enhanced CMR was analyzed. myocardial fibrosis was detected in 35 patients. Incidence of arrhythmia was significantly higher in patients with DE than in patients without DE (P < 0.05). Extent of myocardial fibrosis was significantly associated with the QRS duration (r = 0.33, P < 0.001). myocardial fibrosis detected by DE-CMR was associated with arrhythmia in patients with HCM. DE-CMR might be helpful to detect high-risk HCM patients prone to arrhythmia.

  7. Successful electrical cardioversion in a massive concentric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Altay, Servet; Altug Cakmak, Huseyin; Ozcan, Serhan; Ilhan, Erkan; Erer, Betul

    2012-05-01

    A 59-year-old man with a known history of nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to our clinic with weakness, palpitation, and exertional dyspnea. Electrocardiogram showed atrial fibrillation with high ventricular rate (120 beats per minute), intraventricular conduction delay, and left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy with ST-segment depression and inverted T waves. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed massive LV concentric hypertrophy. Although there was no gradient increase in the LV outflow tract, marked turbulent flow was seen in midventricular region by colored Doppler echocardiography. On the fourth day of admission, transesophageal echocardiography was done and showed no thrombus in the left atrium. Electrical cardioversion with 100 J was applied to the patient, and atrial fibrillation was returned to sinus rhythm. His control Doppler echocardiogram revealed peak systolic resting gradient of 54 mm Hg, with an increase to 84 mm Hg at Valsalva maneuver at the LV outflow. Cardiac magnetic resonance showed concentric LV hypertrophy with a 35-mm thickness in diastole, mild scar tissue in LV anterior wall midapical segments, and right ventricle wall thickness with a 10 mm in diastole. There was no bradycardia or tachycardia in 24-hour Holter and exercise electrocardiographic testing.

  8. Phenotypes and echocardiographic characteristics of a European population of domestic shorthair cats with idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Brizard, D; Amberger, C; Hartnack, S; Doherr, M; Lombard, C

    2009-11-01

    111 Domestic Shorthair cats with idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were reviewed retrospectively. Two-dimensional echocardiography was used to classify cases in 6 established phenotypes. Hypertrophy was diffuse in 61 % of cats and involved major portions of the ventricular septum and the left ventricular free wall (phenotype D). In the remaining cats, distribution of hypertrophy was more segmental and was identified on the papillary muscles exclusively (phenotype A, 6 %), on the anterior and basal portion of the ventricular septum (phenotype B, 12 %), on the entire septum (phenotype C, 14 %), or on the left ventricular free wall (phenotype E, 7 %). Echocardiographic characteristics and clinical findings were determined for each phenotype to study the correlation between distribution of hypertrophy and clinical implications. 31 cats demonstrated systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, 75 % of them belonged to phenotype C of hypertrophy. Left ventricular-outflow turbulences were identified more frequently with patterns of hypertrophy involving the ventricular septum (65.5 %), while prevalence of mitral regurgitation was higher when hypertrophy included the papillary muscles (phenotypes A and E, 85 % and 87 %, respectively). Left atrial dilatation occurred more frequently when hypertrophy was diffuse or confined to the left ventricular free wall (61 % of cats with phenotype D or E) rather than to the ventricular septum (31 % of cats with phenotype B or C).

  9. Mutations in COA6 cause cytochrome c oxidase deficiency and neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Baertling, Fabian; A M van den Brand, Mariel; Hertecant, Jozef L; Al-Shamsi, Aisha; P van den Heuvel, Lambert; Distelmaier, Felix; Mayatepek, Ertan; Smeitink, Jan A; Nijtmans, Leo G J; Rodenburg, Richard J T

    2015-01-01

    COA6/C1ORF31 is involved in cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) biogenesis. We present a new pathogenic COA6 variant detected in a patient with neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and isolated complex IV deficiency. For the first time, clinical details about a COA6-deficient patient are given and patient fibroblasts are functionally characterized: COA6 protein is undetectable and steady-state levels of complex IV and several of its subunits are reduced. The monomeric COX1 assembly intermediate accumulates. Using pulse-chase experiments, we demonstrate an increased turnover of mitochondrial encoded complex IV subunits. Although monomeric complex IV is decreased in patient fibroblasts, the CI/CIII2 /CIVn -supercomplexes remain unaffected. Copper supplementation shows a partial rescue of complex IV deficiency in patient fibroblasts. We conclude that COA6 is required for complex IV subunit stability. Furthermore, the proposed role in the copper delivery pathway to complex IV subunits is substantiated and a therapeutic lead for COA6-deficient patients is provided.

  10. A randomized study assessing the effect of diet in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, L M; Rush, J E; Cunningham, S M; Bulmer, B J

    2014-01-01

    Diet might influence progression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). To investigate whether diet composition could alter clinical, biochemical, or echocardiographic variables in cats with HCM. Twenty-nine cats with HCM (International Small Animal Cardiac Health Council stage 1b) examined at a university teaching hospital. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial. After physical examination, echocardiogram, and blood collection, cats were randomized to 1 of 3 diets, which varied in carbohydrate and fat content and ingredients. Measurements were repeated after 6 months. There were no significant differences among the 3 groups at baseline. After 6 months, there were no significant changes in the primary endpoints, left ventricular free wall (Group A, P = .760; Group B, P = .475; Group C, P = .066) or interventricular septal thickness in diastole (Group A, P = .528; Group B, P = .221; Group C, P = .097). Group A had significant increases in BUN (P = .008) and cholesterol (P = .021), while Group B had significant increases in BUN (P = .008), cholesterol (P = .007), and triglycerides (P = .005), and significant decreases in NT-proBNP (P = .013) and hs-troponin I (P = .043). Group C had significant decreases in body weight (P = .021), left atrial dimension (P = .035), interventricular septal thickness in systole (P = .038), and liver enzymes (P = .034-.038). These data suggest that diet might influence some clinical, biochemical, and echocardiographic variables in cats with HCM. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. Attitudes, knowledge and consequences of uncertain genetic findings in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Burns, Charlotte; Yeates, Laura; Spinks, Catherine; Semsarian, Christopher; Ingles, Jodie

    2017-06-01

    With the surge of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies making almost all genetic tests more affordable and available, cardiac genetic testing now routinely encompasses a large number of genes within a panel setting. The additional sensitivity of this practice is limited and has the potential to inflict a spectrum of uncertainty. We sought to explore attitudes, preferences, recall and psychological consequences of informative and uninformative genetic results amongst probands diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We conducted semi-structured interviews and analysed the qualitative data using a framework analysis process. In general, we found probands were more concerned with their clinical diagnosis than gene result and in some, recall and understanding of genetic diagnosis was poor. Several participants expected genetic testing would alleviate uncertainty, often holding an altruistic view of participation in testing, removing their sense of self and failing to appreciate fully the familial implications. With the key utility of HCM genetic testing and counselling being for greater risk prediction for at-risk relatives, effective communication within the family is critical. While communication appeared adequate, further questioning found it was often vague, failing to translate into meaningful action by relatives. Based on these findings, a framework of key outcomes to assist multidisciplinary teams in genetic counselling of probands receiving an HCM gene result was developed.

  12. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: present and future, with translation into contemporary cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Ommen, Steve R; Semsarian, Christopher; Spirito, Paolo; Olivotto, Iacopo; Maron, Martin S

    2014-07-08

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common inherited heart disease with diverse phenotypic and genetic expression, clinical presentation, and natural history. HCM has been recognized for 55 years, but recently substantial advances in diagnosis and treatment options have evolved, as well as increased recognition of the disease in clinical practice. Nevertheless, most genetically and clinically affected individuals probably remain undiagnosed, largely free from disease-related complications, although HCM may progress along 1 or more of its major disease pathways (i.e., arrhythmic sudden death risk; progressive heart failure [HF] due to dynamic left ventricular [LV] outflow obstruction or due to systolic dysfunction in the absence of obstruction; or atrial fibrillation with risk of stroke). Effective treatments are available for each adverse HCM complication, including implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) for sudden death prevention, heart transplantation for end-stage failure, surgical myectomy (or selectively, alcohol septal ablation) to alleviate HF symptoms by abolishing outflow obstruction, and catheter-based procedures to control atrial fibrillation. These and other strategies have now resulted in a low disease-related mortality rate of <1%/year. Therefore, HCM has emerged from an era of misunderstanding, stigma, and pessimism, experiencing vast changes in its clinical profile, and acquiring an effective and diverse management armamentarium. These advances have changed its natural history, with prevention of sudden death and reversal of HF, thereby restoring quality of life with extended (if not normal) longevity for most patients, and transforming HCM into a contemporary treatable cardiovascular disease.

  13. Echocardiography as a Screening Test for Myocardial Scarring in Children with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nield, Lynne; Dragulescu, Andreea; Benson, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is burdened with morbidity and mortality including tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. These complications are attributed in part to the formation of proarrhythmic scars in the myocardium. The presence of extensive LGE is a risk factor for adverse outcomes in HCM. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) is the standard for the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial scars. However, echocardiography represents an attractive screening tool for myocardial scarring. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of echocardiography to detect myocardial scars to the standard of cMRI-LGE. Methods. The cMRI studies and echocardiograms from 56 consecutive children with HCM were independently evaluated for the presence of cMRI-LGE and echocardiographic evidence of scarring by expert readers. Results. Echocardiography had a high sensitivity (93%) and negative predictive value (94%) in comparison to LGE. The false positive rate was high, leading to a low specificity (37%) and a low positive predictive value (35%). Conclusions. Given the poor specificity and positive predictive value, echocardiography is not a suitable screening test for the presence of myocardial scarring in children with HCM. However, children without echocardiographic evidence of myocardial scarring may not need to undergo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to “rule in” LGE. PMID:27974896

  14. Computational Modeling of Blood Flow and Valve Dynamics in Hearts with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xudong; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore; Pinheiro, Aurelio

    2010-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiovascular disease manifested by the thickening of the ventricular wall and often leads to a partial obstruction to the blood flow out of the left ventricle. HCM is recognized as one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in athletes. In a heart with HCM, the hypertrophy usually narrows the blood flow pathway to the aorta and produces a low pressure zone between the mitral valve and the hypertrophy during systole. This low pressure can suck the mitral valve leaflet back and completely block the blood flow into the aorta. In the current study, a sharp interface immersed boundary method flow solver is employed to study the hemodynamics and valve dynamics inside a heart with HCM. The three-dimensional motion and configuration of the left ventricle including mitral valve leaflets and aortic valves are reconstructed based on echo-cardio data sets. The mechanisms of aortic obstruction associated with HCM are investigated. The long term objective of this study is to develop a computational tool to aid in the assessment and surgical management of HCM.

  15. RNA‑seq profiling of mRNA associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chang-Wei; Liu, Jia-Ji; Li, Jin-Hua; Li, Jing-Wei; Dai, Jiang; Lai, Yong-Qiang

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) pathogenesis can be investigated by determining the differences between healthy and disease states at the molecular level. In the present study, large‑scale transcriptome sequencing was performed to compare mRNA expression in patients with HCM and control groups using an Illumina sequencing platform. Compared with the genome background, 257 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in which 62 genes were downregulated and 195 genes were upregulated. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to validate the expression pattern of certain mRNAs. Gene ontology enrichment and KEGG analysis of mRNAs was conducted to identify the biological modules and pathological pathways associated with the DEGs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time study to investigate the differences in mRNA between patients with HCM and normal controls at the transcriptome level. The results of the study will contributed to the understanding of the important molecular mechanisms involved in HCM and aid the selection of key genes to investigate in the future.

  16. Importance and feasibility of creating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy centers in developing countries: the experience in India.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J

    2015-07-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is a relatively common genetic heart disease responsible for mortality and morbidity at all ages. Using contemporary treatment advances, such as implantable defibrillators, surgical myectomy, heart transplant, and modern defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, it is now possible to reduce HC-related mortality considerably to 0.5% per year, less than expected in the general US adult population. However, in much of the developing world, HC has not yet become a priority given the many other cardiac conditions, such as coronary artery disease and systemic hypertension, so prevalent in the most populous countries such as China and India. Management of HC is best achieved in dedicated centers within institutions, such as previously demonstrated in the United States, Canada, some European countries, and Australia. This model has recently been introduced for the first time in India at the Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research in Kochi, Kerala, in which a robust program focused on HC has emerged. This novel initiative, created despite the many obstacles in the Indian health care system, is an important step forward and is reported here detail. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intraoperative Diagnosis of Anderson-Fabry Disease in Patients With Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Undergoing Surgical Myectomy.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Franco; Iascone, Maria; Maurizi, Niccolò; Pezzoli, Laura; Binaco, Irene; Biagini, Elena; Fibbi, Maria Laura; Olivotto, Iacopo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Fruntelata, Ana; Dorobantu, Lucian; Rapezzi, Claudio; Ferrazzi, Paolo

    2017-08-09

    Diagnostic screening for Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy (AFC) is performed in the presence of specific clinical red flags in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) older than 25 years. However, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) has been traditionally considered an exclusion criteria for AFC. To examine a series of patients diagnosed with HCM and severe basal LVOTO undergoing myectomy in whom the diagnosis of AFC was suspected by the cardiac surgeon intraoperatively and confirmed by histological and genetic examinations. This retrospective analysis of patients undergoing surgical septal reduction strategies was conducted in 3 European tertiary referral centers for HCM from July 2013 to December 2016. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of obstructive HCM referred for surgical management of LVOTO were observed for at least 18 months after the procedure (mean [SD] follow-up, 33 [14] months). Etiology of patients with HCM who underwent surgical myectomy. From 2013, 235 consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of HCM underwent septal myectomy. The cardiac surgeon suspected a storage disease in 3 patients (1.3%) while inspecting their heart samples extracted from myectomy. The mean (SD) age at diagnosis for these 3 patients was 42 (4) years; all were male. None of the 3 patients presented with extracardiac features suggestive of AFC. All patients showed asymmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy, with maximal left ventricular thickness in the basal septum (19-31 mm), severe basal LVOTO (70-120 mm Hg), and left atrial dilatation (44-57 mm). Only 1 patient presented with late gadolinium enhancement on cardiovascular magnetic resonance at the right ventricle insertion site. The mean (SD) age at surgical procedure was 63 (5) years. On tactile sensation, the surgeon felt a spongy consistency of the surgical samples, different from the usual stony-elastic consistency typical of classic HCM, and this prompted histological examinations. Histology

  18. Comparison of contrast-enhanced MRI with iodine-123 BMIPP for detection of myocardial damage in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Amano, Yasuo; Kumita, Shinichiro; Takayama, Morimasa; Kumazaki, Tatuso

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare contrast-enhanced MRI with dual-radionuclide SPECT for the detection of myocardial damage associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Twenty-three patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were examined. Delayed hyperenhancement of the damaged myocardium was observed using contrast-enhanced MRI, and regional wall thickness and left ventricular ejection fraction were measured using cine balanced steady-state free precession MRI. Dual-radionuclide SPECT using technetium-99m sestamibi and iodine-123 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) was performed at rest. In the abnormal myocardial segments, agreement between the contrast-enhanced MRI and 123I BMIPP SPECT was assessed. The relationships between the regional and global cardiac abnormalities and the delayed hyperenhancement on MRI and decreased uptake of 123I BMIPP were also evaluated. In 368 left ventricular segments, 57 segments showed delayed hyperenhancement on MRI, 43 segments showed decreased uptake of 123I BMIPP, and seven showed decreased uptake of (99m)Tc sestamibi. The delayed hyperenhancement and decreased uptake of 123I BMIPP were frequently observed in the interventricular septal wall (p < 0.0001); however, the agreement between the methods in detecting myocardial abnormalities was fair (kappa = 0.38). The abnormal septal walls were significantly thicker than those without apparent abnormalities (p = 0.031). There was an inverse correlation between the number of enhancing segments and the ejection fraction (r = -0.53). In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, contrast-enhanced MRI was valuable for the detection of extensive myocardial damage.

  19. Time and age dependent decrease of NT-proBNP after septal myectomy in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hao; Wu, Xi; Wang, Shuiyun; Tang, Bing; Zhu, Changsheng; Chen, Haibo; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wu, Rong; Yu, Qinjun; Huang, Xiaohong

    2017-08-28

    NT-proBNP level is a predictive factor in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients, in which left ventricular outflow tract obstruction contributes to an increased NT-proBNP level. However, studies regarding the influence of septal myectomy on NT-proBNP level in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy are lacking. One hundred and eighty-two patients who underwent septal myectomy in Fuwai Hospital from May 2011 to March 2016 and were included in the present study. Preoperative and follow-up NT-proBNP was retrospectively collected. Correlation analysis was performed to determine the factors affecting preoperative NT-proBNP and postoperative decrease. The cohort had a median age of 46.2 [IQR: 36.5-53.1] years, and 106 (58.2%) patients were male. NT-proBNP decreased to 816.5 [IQR: 400.3-1661.8] pg/mL from preoperative 1732.4 [IQR: 819-3296.5] pg/mL (p<0.001). Baseline NT-proBNP was correlated with gender (p<0.001), maximum septal thickness (p<0.001), and resting pressure gradient (p=0.006). The extent of NT-proBNP decrease was positively correlated with age (p<0.001), baseline NT-proBNP (p<0.001), follow-up time (p=0.020), and enlargement of the ascending aorta (p=0.019). NT-proBNP exhibited a persistent decrease after myectomy. Myectomy significantly reduced NT-proBNP level in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy patients, in which a time-dependent manner of decrease indicated myocardial remodeling of the heart after myectomy.

  20. Circulating concentrations of a marker of type I collagen metabolism are associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation status in ragdoll cats.

    PubMed

    Borgeat, K; Dudhia, J; Luis Fuentes, V; Connolly, D J

    2015-06-01

    Human carriers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated sarcomeric mutations have abnormal collagen metabolism before overt left ventricular hypertrophy is detectable. This study investigated whether differences in collagen biomarkers were present in blood samples of ragdoll cats positive for the MYBPC3:R820W mutation compared with negative controls. Cats were recruited for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy screening using echocardiography and genotyping. Circulating markers of collagen turnover (C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen [CITP; type I collagen degradation] and N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen [type III collagen synthesis]) and cardiac biomarkers (N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin I) were measured. Correlation between concentrations of collagen biomarkers and echocardiographic variables was analysed, and collagen biomarker concentrations were compared between MYBPC3 mutation positive and negative cats, without left ventricular hypertrophy. Linear regression analyses showed that genotype was independently associated with CITP concentration. CITP was higher in mutation carriers (25 · 4 µg/L, interquartile range 16 · 0-29 · 2 µg/L) than non-carriers (14 · 6 µg/L, interquartile range 9 · 38-19 · 2 µg/L; P = 0 · 024). Circulating CITP was higher in MYBPC3-positive ragdoll cats than negative controls and may indicate altered collagen metabolism. Further studies are necessary to determine whether alterations in circulating collagen biomarker concentration relate to an early stage of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  1. Exercise in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A review of current evidence, national guideline recommendations and a proposal for a new direction to fitness.

    PubMed

    Hindieh, Waseem; Adler, Arnon; Weissler-Snir, Adaya; Fourey, Dana; Harris, Sarah; Rakowski, Harry

    2017-04-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a common genetic disorder with a prevalence of 1:500 in the general population. Amongst a varied spectrum of clinical presentations, the most feared complication of this cardiac disorder is sudden cardiac death. Although only a minority of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who suffer sudden cardiac death or resuscitated cardiac arrest do so during exercise, strenuous physical activity is regarded as an important trigger for these tragic outcomes. Furthermore, during exercise, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may develop augmentation of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, myocardial ischemia, diastolic dysfunction and/or inappropriate vasodilation in non-exercising vascular beds. This in turn may lead to exertional dyspnea, chest pain or syncope. Accordingly, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are disqualified from competitive sports and in many cases are recommended to avoid strenuous physical activity of any kind. Nevertheless, avoidance of physical activity comes with a price. The positive effects of regular exercise have been extensively reported to convey a wide range of benefits including reduced cardiovascular events, weight reduction and improved wellbeing. Therefore, finding the right exercise level that will offer some of the benefits of physical activity without increasing the risk of sudden cardiac death is of utmost importance. In this review, we discuss the current evidence for and against exercise in this patient population and review national guideline recommendations. We also propose alternative fitness strategies including a novel fitness program implemented by our hypertrophic cardiomyopathy center which may be of particular usefulness for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Relation Between Temperature Extremes and Symptom Exacerbation in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bois, John P; Adams, Jonathon C; Kumar, Gautam; Ommen, Steve R; Nishimura, Rick A; Klarich, Kyle W

    2016-03-15

    Warm temperatures induce peripheral vasodilation, decrease afterload, and may concurrently increase the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradient. We aimed to assess the impact of subjective ambient temperature on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) symptoms and determine whether they were associated with LVOT gradient, patient quality of life (QOL), and risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). We identified consecutive patients with HC presenting to a tertiary referral center. Of the 173 patients in the study, 143 (83%) had HC symptoms, with ambient temperature change worsening symptoms for 72 patients (50%). Symptom exacerbation occurred only with heat for 57 (79%), whereas symptoms were exacerbated with cold only or with cold and heat equally for 15 (21%). Patients affected by any temperature exacerbation more commonly were women (p = 0.009), had a lower QOL (p = 0.04), had a family history of HC (p = 0.007), or underwent myectomy (p = 0.01). A greater proportion of patients with heat-only exacerbation had a family history of HC (p = 0.005) and SCD (p = 0.05). The presence of an LVOT gradient either at rest or with provocation was similar in all groups. In conclusion, although no appreciable difference in LVOT gradients were observed between patient groups, approximately half of the patients with HC reporting symptoms at baseline noted worsening of symptoms with temperature changes, with >75% describing heat-induced symptom exacerbation. Furthermore, affected patients more frequently were women, underwent surgical intervention and device implantation, and had an overall lower QOL.

  3. Prognostic significance of radionuclide-assessed diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Chikamori, T.; Dickie, S.; Poloniecki, J.D.; Myers, M.J.; Lavender, J.P.; McKenna, W.J. )

    1990-02-15

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), technetium-99m gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography, acquired in list mode, was performed in 161 patients. Five diastolic indexes were calculated. During 3.0 +/- 1.9 years, 13 patients had disease-related deaths. With univariate analysis, these patients were younger (29 +/- 20 vs 42 +/- 16 years; p less than 0.05), had a higher incidence of syncope (p less than 0.025), dyspnea (p less than 0.001), reduced peak filling rate (2.9 +/- 0.9 vs 3.4 +/- 1.0 end-diastolic volume/s; p = 0.09) with increased relative filling volume during the rapid filling period (80 +/- 7 vs 75 +/- 12%; p = 0.06) and decreased atrial contribution (17 +/- 7 vs 22 +/- 11%; p = 0.07). Stepwise discriminant analysis revealed that young age at diagnosis, syncope at diagnosis, reduced peak ejection rate, positive family history, reduced peak filling rate, increased relative filling volume by peak filling rate and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy were the most statistically significant (p = 0.0001) predictors of disease-related death (sensitivity 92%, specificity 76%, accuracy 77%, positive predictive value 25%). Discriminant analysis excluding the diastolic indexes, however, showed similar predictability (sensitivity 92%, specificity 76%, accuracy 78%, positive predictive value 26%). To obtain more homogeneous groups for analysis, patients were classified as survivors or electrically unstable, including sudden death, out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia during 48-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, and heart failure death or cardiac transplant.

  4. Physical activity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: prevalence of inactivity and perceived barriers

    PubMed Central

    Sweeting, Joanna; Ingles, Jodie; Timperio, Anna; Patterson, Jillian; Ball, Kylie; Semsarian, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of physical inactivity and perceived barriers to physical activity among individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and to determine potential demographic, clinical and health-related factors influencing likelihood of meeting physical activity guidelines. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of consecutive patients (n=198) with HCM attending a specialist HCM centre from July 2014 to November 2015. The primary outcome measure was physical activity (minutes per day), as measured by self-report (International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)) and objective means (ActiGraph accelerometer). For both, participants were classified as meeting guidelines if they did at least 150 min per week of physical activity. Quality of life (Short Form-36 V.2, SF-36v2), barriers to exercise and clinical–demographic data were also collected. Results In total, 54.8% of participants did not meet physical activity recommendations based on IPAQ, and 12.7% did not meet guidelines based on accelerometer data. The most commonly identified barriers to exercise were ‘pain interferes with my exercise’ (33%) and ‘I have an injury/disability that stops me’ (29%). Independent factors associated with meeting guidelines included older age (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.85, p=0.002), higher education level (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.08 to 4.93, p=0.03), better physical quality of life (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.09, p=0.05) and more reported barriers (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.91, p=0.01). Conclusions More than half of the patients with HCM did not meet minimum physical activity recommendations. Several barriers to exercise among individuals with HCM exist, and provide the basis for targeted interventions to promote physical activity and improve overall health in patients with HCM. PMID:27547438

  5. Biophysical properties of human β-cardiac myosin with converter mutations that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kawana, Masataka; Sarkar, Saswata S.; Sutton, Shirley; Ruppel, Kathleen M.; Spudich, James A.

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) affects 1 in 500 individuals and is an important cause of arrhythmias and heart failure. Clinically, HCM is characterized as causing hypercontractility, and therapies are aimed toward controlling the hyperactive physiology. Mutations in the β-cardiac myosin comprise ~40% of genetic mutations associated with HCM, and the converter domain of myosin is a hotspot for HCM-causing mutations; however, the underlying primary effects of these mutations on myosin’s biomechanical function remain elusive. We hypothesize that these mutations affect the biomechanical properties of myosin, such as increasing its intrinsic force and/or its duty ratio and therefore the ensemble force of the sarcomere. Using recombinant human β-cardiac myosin, we characterize the molecular effects of three severe HCM-causing converter domain mutations: R719W, R723G, and G741R. Contrary to our hypothesis, the intrinsic forces of R719W and R723G mutant myosins are decreased compared to wild type and unchanged for G741R. Actin and regulated thin filament gliding velocities are ~15% faster for R719W and R723G myosins, whereas there is no change in velocity for G741R. Adenosine triphosphatase activities and the load-dependent velocity change profiles of all three mutant proteins are very similar to those of wild type. These results indicate that the net biomechanical properties of human β-cardiac myosin carrying these converter domain mutations are very similar to those of wild type or are even slightly hypocontractile, leading us to consider an alternative mechanism for the clinically observed hypercontractility. Future work includes how these mutations affect protein interactions within the sarcomere that increase the availability of myosin heads participating in force production. PMID:28246639

  6. Pathogenesis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by myozenin 2 mutations is independent of calcineurin activity

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Alessandra; Chen, Suet Nee; Lombardi, Raffaella; Rodriguez, Gabriela; Marian, Ali J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims The role of calcineurin protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B) in the pathogenesis of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) remains unsettled. We determined potential involvement of calcineurin in the pathogenesis of HCM caused by mutations in myozenin 2 (MYOZ2), an inhibitor of calcineurin. Methods and results We generated multiple lines of transgenic mice expressing either Flag-tagged wild-type (WT) (MYOZ2WT) or mutant MYOZ2S48P and MYOZ2I246M, identified in families with HCM, in the heart. To mimic the human genotype, we generated bigenic mice expressing WT and mutant MYOZ2 in the background of hemizygous endogenous MYOZ2 (Myoz2+/−). Transgene proteins constituted 15–48% of the total MYOZ2 protein in the heart. Mutant MYOZ2 mice showed molecular, cellular, and gross cardiac hypertrophy, preserved systolic function, and interstitial fibrosis. Immunofluorescence staining showed co-localization of WT and mutant MYOZ2 proteins with α-actinin at the Z disks. Electron microscopy showed disrupted and mal-aligned Z disks in the mutant mice. Cardiac calcineurin activity, determined by quantifying Rcan1.4 mRNA and protein levels, luciferase activity in triple transgenic Myoz2+/−:NFATc-Luc:MYOZ2I246M and Myoz2+/−:NFATc-Luc:MYOZ2WT mice, and NFATc transcriptional activity assay, was unchanged in the mutant transgenic mice. However, levels of phospho-ERK1/2 and JNK54/46 were altered in the transgenic mice. Likewise, lentiviral-mediated expression of the MYOZ2I246M did not affect RCAN1.4 and calcineurin (PPP3CB) protein levels. Conclusions Thus, the cardiac phenotype in HCM caused by MYOZ2 mutations might be independent of calcineurin activity in the heart. Z disk abnormalities might provide the stimulus for the induction of cardiac hypertrophy caused by MYOZ2 mutations. PMID:22987565

  7. Prevalence and clinical correlates of right ventricular dysfunction in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Knowles, Joshua W; Pavlovic, Aleksandra; Perez, Marco; Magavern, Emma; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Haddad, Francois; Ashley, Euan A

    2014-01-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is a disease that mainly affects the left ventricle (LV), however recent studies have suggested that it can also be associated with right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of RV dysfunction in patients with HC and its relation with LV function and outcome. A total of 324 consecutive patients with HC who received care at Stanford Hospital from 1999 to 2012 were included in the study. A group of 99 prospectively recruited age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers were used as controls. RV function was quantified using the RV fractional area change, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), and RV myocardial performance index (RVMPI). Compared with the controls, the patients with HC had a higher RVMPI (0.51 ± 0.18 vs 0.25 ± 0.06, p <0.001) and lower TAPSE (20 ± 3 vs 24 ± 4, p <0.001). RV dysfunction based on an RVMPI >0.4 and TAPSE <16 mm was found in 71% and 11% of the HC and control groups, respectively. Worst LV function and greater pulmonary pressures were independent correlates of RV dysfunction. At an average follow-up of 3.7 ± 2.3 years, 17 patients had died and 4 had undergone heart transplantation. LV ejection fraction <50% and TAPSE <16 mm were independent correlates of outcome (hazard ratio 3.98, 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 13.04, p = 0.02; and hazard ratio 3.66, 95% confidence interval 1.38 to 9.69, p = 0.009, respectively). In conclusion, RV dysfunction based on the RVMPI is common in patients with HC and more frequently observed in patients with LV dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. RV dysfunction based on the TAPSE was independently associated with an increased likelihood of death or transplantation.

  8. Significance of positive or negative thallium-201 scintigraphy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    von Dohlen, T.W.; Prisant, L.M.; Frank, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Myocardial ischemia, fibrosis and infarction may occur in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) in the absence of epicardial coronary artery disease. To determine their prevalence and relation with common characteristics, stress thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed in 28 patients. Eleven (39%) had positive scans despite normal epicardial coronary arteries (7 patients) or a pretest risk of coronary disease less than or equal to 5% (4 patients). There was no relation between thallium defects and age, sex, chest pain or outflow tract gradients at rest. However, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly lower in those with perfusion abnormalities compared with those without (64 +/- 15 vs 75 +/- 11%, respectively, p less than 0.05). Also, the mean ventricular septal thickness was greater in patients with positive scans (27 +/- 7 vs 21 +/- 6 mm, p less than 0.05), and there was a nonparametric relation between increasing septal thickness and the frequency of positive scans (p less than 0.025). Seven of 11 patients with positive scans had ventricular tachycardia compared with none among those who had negative scans (p less than 0.001), and 5 of these 11 patients had conduction system disease requiring permanent pacemaker insertion compared with 1 of 17 with negative scans (p less than 0.025). It is concluded that thallium perfusion abnormalities are common in patients with HC in the absence of epicardial coronary disease, and are strongly associated with potentially lethal arrhythmias. Thallium scintigraphy appears to identify a subset of patients with HC at increased risk for sudden death, who therefore require closer follow-up.

  9. Additional value of screening for minor genes and copy number variants in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Mademont-Soler, Irene; Mates, Jesus; Yotti, Raquel; Espinosa, Maria Angeles; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Fernandez-Avila, Ana Isabel; Coll, Monica; Méndez, Irene; Iglesias, Anna; Del Olmo, Bernat; Riuró, Helena; Cuenca, Sofía; Allegue, Catarina; Campuzano, Oscar; Picó, Ferran; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Álvarez, Patricia; Castillo, Sergio; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Gonzalez-Lopez, Esther; Padron-Barthe, Laura; Díaz de Bustamante, Aranzazu; Darnaude, María Teresa; González-Hevia, José Ignacio; Brugada, Josep; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Brugada, Ramon

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most prevalent inherited heart disease. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is the preferred genetic test, but the diagnostic value of screening for minor and candidate genes, and the role of copy number variants (CNVs) deserves further evaluation. Three hundred and eighty-seven consecutive unrelated patients with HCM were screened for genetic variants in the 5 most frequent genes (MYBPC3, MYH7, TNNT2, TNNI3 and TPM1) using Sanger sequencing (N = 84) or NGS (N = 303). In the NGS cohort we analyzed 20 additional minor or candidate genes, and applied a proprietary bioinformatics algorithm for detecting CNVs. Additionally, the rate and classification of TTN variants in HCM were compared with 427 patients without structural heart disease. The percentage of patients with pathogenic/likely pathogenic (P/LP) variants in the main genes was 33.3%, without significant differences between the Sanger sequencing and NGS cohorts. The screening for 20 additional genes revealed LP variants in ACTC1, MYL2, MYL3, TNNC1, GLA and PRKAG2 in 12 patients. This approach resulted in more inconclusive tests (36.0% vs. 9.6%, p<0.001), mostly due to variants of unknown significance (VUS) in TTN. The detection rate of rare variants in TTN was not significantly different to that found in the group of patients without structural heart disease. In the NGS cohort, 4 patients (1.3%) had pathogenic CNVs: 2 deletions in MYBPC3 and 2 deletions involving the complete coding region of PLN. A small percentage of HCM cases without point mutations in the 5 main genes are explained by P/LP variants in minor or candidate genes and CNVs. Screening for variants in TTN in HCM patients drastically increases the number of inconclusive tests, and shows a rate of VUS that is similar to patients without structural heart disease, suggesting that this gene should not be analyzed for clinical purposes in HCM.

  10. Biophysical properties of human β-cardiac myosin with converter mutations that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kawana, Masataka; Sarkar, Saswata S; Sutton, Shirley; Ruppel, Kathleen M; Spudich, James A

    2017-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) affects 1 in 500 individuals and is an important cause of arrhythmias and heart failure. Clinically, HCM is characterized as causing hypercontractility, and therapies are aimed toward controlling the hyperactive physiology. Mutations in the β-cardiac myosin comprise ~40% of genetic mutations associated with HCM, and the converter domain of myosin is a hotspot for HCM-causing mutations; however, the underlying primary effects of these mutations on myosin's biomechanical function remain elusive. We hypothesize that these mutations affect the biomechanical properties of myosin, such as increasing its intrinsic force and/or its duty ratio and therefore the ensemble force of the sarcomere. Using recombinant human β-cardiac myosin, we characterize the molecular effects of three severe HCM-causing converter domain mutations: R719W, R723G, and G741R. Contrary to our hypothesis, the intrinsic forces of R719W and R723G mutant myosins are decreased compared to wild type and unchanged for G741R. Actin and regulated thin filament gliding velocities are ~15% faster for R719W and R723G myosins, whereas there is no change in velocity for G741R. Adenosine triphosphatase activities and the load-dependent velocity change profiles of all three mutant proteins are very similar to those of wild type. These results indicate that the net biomechanical properties of human β-cardiac myosin carrying these converter domain mutations are very similar to those of wild type or are even slightly hypocontractile, leading us to consider an alternative mechanism for the clinically observed hypercontractility. Future work includes how these mutations affect protein interactions within the sarcomere that increase the availability of myosin heads participating in force production.

  11. Diltiazem Treatment for Preclinical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutation Carriers: A Pilot Randomized Trial to Modify Disease Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; Lakdawala, Neal K.; Cirino, Allison L.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Sparks, Elizabeth; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Antman, Elliott M.; Semsarian, Christopher; González, Arantxa; López, Begoña; Diez, Javier; Orav, E. John; Colan, Steven D.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by sarcomere mutations and characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) with increased risk of heart failure and sudden death. HCM typically cannot be diagnosed early in life, although subtle phenotypes are present. Animal studies indicate alterations in intracellular calcium handling before LVH develops. Furthermore, early treatment with diltiazem appeared to attenuate disease emergence. Objectives To assess the safety, feasibility, and effect of diltiazem as disease-modifying therapy for at-risk HCM mutation carriers. Methods In a pilot, double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 38 sarcomere mutation carriers without LVH (mean age 15.8 years) to therapy with diltiazem 360 mg/day (or 5 mg/kg/day) or placebo. Treatment duration ranged from 12 to 42 months (median 25 months). Study procedures included electrocardiography, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and serum biomarker measurement. Results Diltiazem was not associated with serious adverse events. Heart rate and blood pressure did not differ significantly between groups. However, mean left ventricular end diastolic diameter improved towards normal in the diltiazem group but decreased further in controls (change in z-scores, +0.6 vs. −0.5; P<0.001). Mean LV thickness-to-dimension ratio was stable in the diltiazem group, but increased in controls (−0.02 vs. +0.15; P=0.04). Among MYBPC3 mutation carriers, LV wall thickness and mass, diastolic filling, and cardiac troponin I levels improved in those taking diltiazem compared with controls. Four participants developed overt HCM, two in each treatment group. Conclusions Preclinical administration of diltiazem is safe and may improve early LV remodeling in HCM. This novel strategy merits further exploration. PMID:25543971

  12. Myocardial Extracellular Volume Is not Associated With Malignant Ventricular Arrhythmias in High-risk Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Mirelis, Jesús G; Sánchez-González, Javier; Zorio, Esther; Ripoll-Vera, Tomas; Salguero-Bodes, Rafael; Filgueiras-Rama, David; González-López, Esther; Gallego-Delgado, María; Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Soleto, María Jesús; Núñez, Juana; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Sanz, Javier; Fuster, Valentín; García-Pavía, Pablo; Ibáñez, Borja

    2017-03-21

    Myocardial interstitial fibrosis, a hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), has been proposed as an arrhythmic substrate. Fibrosis is associated with increased extracellular volume (ECV), which can be quantified by computed tomography (CT). We aimed to analyze the association between CT-determined ECV and malignant ventricular arrhythmias. A retrospective case-control observational study was conducted in HCM patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, undergoing a CT-protocol with continuous iodine contrast infusion to determine equilibrium ECV. Left ventricular septal and lateral CT-determined ECV was compared between prespecified cases (malignant arrhythmia any time before CT scan) and controls (no prior malignant arrhythmias) and among ECV tertiles. A total of 78 implantable cardioverter-defibrillator HCM patients were included; 24 were women, with a mean age of 52.1 ± 15.6 years. Mean ECV ± standard deviation in the septal left ventricular wall and was 29.8% ± 6.3% in cases (n = 24) vs 31.9% ± 8.5% in controls (n = 54); P = .282. Mean ECV in the lateral wall was 24.5% ± 6.8% in cases vs 28.2% ± 7.4% in controls; P = .043. On comparison of the entire population according to septal ECV tertiles, no significant differences were found in the number of patients receiving appropriate shocks. Conversely, we found a trend (P = .056) for a higher number of patients receiving appropriate shocks in the lateral ECV lowest tertile. Extracellular volume was not increased in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator HCM patients with malignant ventricular arrhythmias vs those without arrhythmias. Our findings do not support the use of ECV (a surrogate of diffuse fibrosis) as a predictor of arrhythmias in high-risk HCM patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of regional left ventricular asynchrony in obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Schwammenthal, E; Wichter, T; Joachimsen, K; Auffermann, W; Peters, P E; Breithardt, G

    1994-03-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging was used to analyze global and regional left ventricular function in seven patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) and 10 normal subjects. In patients with HC a 38% higher left ventricular mass index (106.4 +/- 20.2 gm/m2 vs 77.0 +/- 16.1 gm/m2, p < 0.005) associated with a lower end-diastolic volume index (44.9 +/- 8.9 ml/m2 vs 58.3 +/- 9.0 ml/m2, p < 0.005) resulted in an 85% higher mass-to-volume ratio (2.4 +/- 0.52 vs 1.3 +/- 0.57, p < 0.0005). Stroke volume did not differ significantly, whereas ejection fraction was higher (80.4% +/- 6.5% vs 65.4% +/- 7.2%, p < 0.0005) in patients with HC. Although early diastolic filling fraction was smaller in patients with HC (61.0% +/- 22.8% vs 68.4% +/- 14.6%), the difference did not reach significance because of substantial variability. In patients with HC (in contrast to normal subjects) the time to maximal wall thickening was shorter (p < 0.025) in the hypertrophied basal region of the ventricle (223 +/- 42 msec) than in the apical region (267 +/- 35 msec), reflecting asynchrony between these regions. Additionally, in patients with HC the standard deviation of the time to maximal wall thickening in the basal region was significantly higher when compared with that of normal subjects (40.0 +/- 24 msec vs 16.9 +/- 17 msec, p < 0.0005), reflecting asynchrony even within one region. Thus magnetic resonance imaging can detect regional left ventricular asynchrony, an important cause of impaired diastolic function, in patients with HC and normal global systolic function.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Characteristic systolic waveform of left ventricular longitudinal strain rate in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazunori; Kaga, Sanae; Mikami, Taisei; Masauzi, Nobuo; Abe, Ayumu; Nakabachi, Masahiro; Yokoyama, Shinobu; Nishino, Hisao; Ichikawa, Ayako; Nishida, Mutsumi; Murai, Daisuke; Hayashi, Taichi; Shimizu, Chikara; Iwano, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-18

    We analyzed the waveform of systolic strain and strain-rate curves to find a characteristic left ventricular (LV) myocardial contraction pattern in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and evaluated the utility of these parameters for the differentiation of HCM and LV hypertrophy secondary to hypertension (HT). From global strain and strain-rate curves in the longitudinal and circumferential directions, the time from mitral valve closure to the peak strains (T-LS and T-CS, respectively) and the peak systolic strain rates (T-LSSR and T-CSSR, respectively) were measured in 34 patients with HCM, 30 patients with HT, and 25 control subjects. The systolic strain-rate waveform was classified into 3 patterns ("V", "W", and "√" pattern). In the HCM group, T-LS was prolonged, but T-LSSR was shortened; consequently, T-LSSR/T-LS ratio was distinctly lower than in the HT and control groups. The "√" pattern of longitudinal strain-rate waveform was more frequently seen in the HCM group (74 %) than in the control (4 %) and HT (20 %) groups. Similar but less distinct results were obtained in the circumferential direction. To differentiate HCM from HT, the sensitivity and specificity of the T-LSSR/T-LS ratio <0.34 and the "√"-shaped longitudinal strain-rate waveform were 85 and 63 %, and 74 and 80 %, respectively. In conclusion, in patients with HCM, a reduced T-LSSR/T-LS ratio and a characteristic "√"-shaped waveform of LV systolic strain rate was seen, especially in the longitudinal direction. The timing and waveform analyses of systolic strain rate may be useful to distinguish between HCM and HT.

  15. Prevalence and clinical correlates of QT prolongation in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jonathan N.; Grifoni, Camilla; Bos, J. Martijn; Saber-Ayad, Maha; Ommen, Steve R.; Nistri, Stefano; Cecchi, Franco; Olivotto, Iacopo; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Congenital or acquired QT prolongation is a risk factor for life-threatening arrhythmias. In patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the QT interval may be intrinsically prolonged. However, the prevalence, cause, and significance of QT prolongation among patients with HCM are unknown. Methods and results After exclusion of patients on QT-prolonging drugs, a blinded, retrospective analysis of electrocardiograms, echocardiograms, and genotype status in 479 unrelated patients with HCM [201 females, age at diagnosis 41 ± 18 years, maximal left ventricular wall thickness (MLVWT) 22 ± 6 mm] from two independent centres was performed. The mean QTc was 440 ± 28 ms. The QTc exceeded 480 ms in 13% of patients. Age, gender, family history of HCM or sudden cardiac arrest, and genotype status had no association with QTc. Patients with a QTc over 480 ms were more symptomatic at diagnosis (P < 0.001), had a higher MLVWT (P = 0.03), were more obstructive (P < 0.001), and were more likely to have undergone septal reduction therapy (P = 0.02). There was a weak but significant direct linear relationship between QTc and peak outflow gradient (r2 = 0.05, P < 0.0001). Conclusions Compared with <1 in 200 otherwise healthy adults, QT prolongation (QTc > 480 ms) was present in 1 out of 8 patients with HCM. The QTc was partly reflective of the degree of cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. Because of its pro-arrhythmic potential and its potential relevance to management and risk stratification, routine QTc assessment should be performed in patients with HCM, particularly when concomitant use of QT-prolonging medications is considered. PMID:21345853

  16. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: functional variance among individual cardiomyocytes as a trigger of FHC-phenotype development

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Bernhard; Seebohm, Benjamin; Tripathi, Snigdha; Montag, Judith; Kraft, Theresia

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is the most frequent inherited cardiac disease. It has been related to numerous mutations in many sarcomeric and even some non-sarcomeric proteins. So far, however, no common mechanism has been identified by which the many different mutations in different sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric proteins trigger development of the FHC phenotype. Here we show for different MYH7 mutations variance in force pCa-relations from normal to highly abnormal as a feature common to all mutations we studied, while direct functional effects of the different FHC-mutations, e.g., on force generation, ATPase or calcium sensitivity of the contractile system, can be quite different. The functional variation among individual M. soleus fibers of FHC-patients is accompanied by large variation in mutant vs. wildtype β-MyHC-mRNA. Preliminary results show a similar variation in mutant vs. wildtype β-MyHC-mRNA among individual cardiomyocytes. We discuss our previously proposed concept as to how different mutations in the β-MyHC and possibly other sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric proteins may initiate an FHC-phenotype by functional variation among individual cardiomyocytes that results in structural distortions within the myocardium, leading to cellular and myofibrillar disarray. In addition, distortions can activate stretch-sensitive signaling in cardiomyocytes and non-myocyte cells which is known to induce cardiac remodeling with interstitial fibrosis and hypertrophy. Such a mechanism will have major implications for therapeutic strategies to prevent FHC-development, e.g., by reducing functional imbalances among individual cardiomyocytes or by inhibition of their triggering of signaling paths initiating remodeling. Targeting increased or decreased contractile function would require selective targeting of mutant or wildtype protein to reduce functional imbalances. PMID:25346696

  17. Factors Influencing the Phenotypic Expression of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Genetic Carriers.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Romero-Puche, Antonio José; García-Molina Sáez, Esperanza; Sabater-Molina, María; López-Ayala, José María; Muñoz-Esparza, Carmen; López-Cuenca, David; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Castro-García, Francisco José; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan Ramón

    2017-07-04

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disorder with variable expression. It is mainly caused by mutations in sarcomeric genes but the phenotype could be modulated by other factors. The aim of this study was to determine whether factors such as sex, systemic hypertension, or physical activity are modifiers of disease severity and to establish their role in age-related penetrance of HCM. We evaluated 272 individuals (mean age 49 ± 17 years, 57% males) from 72 families with causative mutations. The relationship between sex, hypertension, physical activity, and left ventricular hypertrophy was studied. The proportion of affected individuals increased with age. Men developed the disease 12.5 years earlier than women (adjusted median, 95%CI, -17.52 to -6.48; P < .001). Hypertensive patients were diagnosed with HCM later (10.8 years of delay) than normotensive patients (adjusted median, 95%CI, 6.28-17.09; P < .001). Individuals who performed physical activity were diagnosed with HCM significantly earlier (7.3 years, adjusted median, 95%CI, -14.49 to -1.51; P = .016). Sex, hypertension, and the degree of physical activity were not significantly associated with the severity of left ventricular hypertrophy. Adjusted survival both free from sudden death and from the combined event were not influenced by any of the exploratory variables. Men and athletes who are carriers of sarcomeric mutations are diagnosed earlier than women and sedentary individuals. Hypertensive carriers of sarcomeric mutations have a delayed diagnosis. Sex, hypertension, and physical activity are not associated with disease severity in carriers of HCM causative mutations. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. All rights reserved.

  18. Usefulness of Electrocardiographic Voltage to Determine Myocardial Fibrosis in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Konno, Tetsuo; Nagata, Yoji; Teramoto, Ryota; Fujino, Noboru; Nomura, Akihiro; Tada, Hayato; Sakata, Kenji; Furusho, Hiroshi; Takamura, Masayuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2016-02-01

    Classic electrocardiographic (ECG) voltage indexes have been applied to screen for left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). However, it is unclear whether low ECG voltage reflects deteriorated electrical forces because of replacement of the myocardium by fibrotic tissues in HC. We investigated correlations between classic ECG voltage indexes (Cornell, total QRS voltage, and Sokolow-Lyon) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) parameters focusing on the impact of low ECG voltage on the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) and myocardial fibrosis in HC. We studied 108 consecutive patients with HC who underwent CMR imaging with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Nineteen patients with complete right or left bundle branch block were excluded, leaving 89 patients for analysis (age 61.0 ± 13.9 years; 58 men). Of the 3 voltage indexes, the total QRS voltage and Sokolow-Lyon indexes were positively correlated with LVEF. For discriminating patients with end-stage HC (LVEF <50%) from patients with HC and preserved LVEF (≥ 50%), receiver-operating characteristic analysis revealed an excellent area under the curve of 0.87 for the total QRS voltage index and 0.90 for the Sokolow-Lyon index, whereas the area under the curve for the Cornell index was only 0.54 (p <0.01). Moreover, these 2 voltage indexes were negatively correlated with the extent of LGE-determined myocardial fibrosis when adjusted by the LV maximal wall thickness. In conclusion, low ECG voltage indexes may reflect increased myocardial fibrosis in patients with HC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: assessment with thallium-201 emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    O'Gara, P.T.; Bonow, R.O.; Maron, B.J.; Damske, B.A.; Van Lingen, A.; Bacharach, S.L.; Larson, S.M.; Epstein, S.E.

    1987-12-01

    Myocardial ischemia may play a critical role in the symptomatic presentation and natural history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). To assess the relative prevalence and functional significance of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients comprising the broad clinical spectrum of HCM, we studied 72 patients (ages 12 to 69 years, mean 40) using thallium-201 emission computed tomography. Imaging was performed immediately after maximal exercise and again after a 3 hr delay. Regional perfusion defects were identified in 41 of the 72 patients (57%). Fixed or only partially reversible defects were evident in 17 patients, 14 of whom (82%) had left ventricular ejection fractions of less than 50% at rest. Twenty-four patients demonstrated perfusion defects during exercise that completely reversed at rest; all had normal or hyperdynamic left ventricular systolic function (ejection fraction greater than or equal to 50%). Perfusion abnormalities were present in all regions of the left ventricle. However, the fixed defects were observed predominantly in segments of the left ventricular wall that were of normal or only mildly increased (15 to 20 mm) thickness; in contrast, a substantial proportion (41%) of the completely reversible defects occurred in areas of moderate-to-marked wall thickness (greater than or equal to 20 mm, p less than .001). Neither a history of chest pain nor its provocation with treadmill exercise was predictive of an abnormal thallium study, since regional perfusion defects were present in 10 of 18 (56%) completely asymptomatic patients, compared with 31 of 54 (58%) symptomatic patients. These data indicate that myocardial perfusion abnormalities occur commonly among patients with HCM. Fixed or only partially reversible defects suggestive of myocardial scar and/or severe ischemia occur primarily in patients with impaired systolic performance.

  20. Verapamil prevents silent myocardial perfusion abnormalities during exercise in asymptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Udelson, J.E.; Bonow, R.O.; O'Gara, P.T.; Maron, B.J.; Van Lingen, A.; Bacharach, S.L.; Epstein, S.E.

    1989-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that reversible 201Tl perfusion defects, compatible with silent myocardial ischemia, commonly develop during exercise in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). To determine whether this represents a dynamic process that may be modified favorably by medical therapy, we studied 29 asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients with HCM, aged 12-55 years (mean, 28), with exercise 201Tl emission computed tomography under control conditions and again after 1 week of oral verapamil (mean dosage, 453 mg/day). Treadmill time increased slightly during verapamil (21.0 +/- 3.6 to 21.9 +/- 2.7 minutes, p less than 0.005), but peak heart rate-blood pressure product was unchanged (26.3 +/- 6.0 X 10(3)) compared with 25.0 +/- 6.4 X 10(3). Two midventricular short-axis images per study were divided into five regions each, and each of these 10 regions was then analyzed on a 0-2 scale by three observers blinded with regard to the patients' therapy. Average regional scores of 1.5 or less were considered to represent perfusion defects, and a change in regional score of 0.5 or more was considered to constitute a significant change. During control studies, 15 patients (52%) developed perfusion defects with exercise (average, 3.7 regions per patient). In 14 of these patients, all perfusion defects completely reversed after 3 hours of rest; one patient had fixed defects. After administration of verapamil, exercise perfusion scores improved in 10 of the 14 patients (71%) with reversible defects; there was overall improvement in 34 of 50 (68%) regions with initially reversible perfusion defects.

  1. Genetic counseling and cardiac care in predictively tested hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers: the patients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Christiaans, Imke; van Langen, Irene M; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J; Wilde, Arthur A M; Smets, Ellen M A

    2009-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be disclosed by telephone or mail. Proven mutation carriers detected by predictive DNA testing are advised to undergo regular cardiac follow-up according to international guidelines. We evaluated the opinion of 143 predictively tested HCM mutation carriers on received cardiogenetic care using questionnaires (response rate 86%). Predictive genetic counseling and DNA testing were evaluated on four domains: information provision, satisfaction with counseling, social pressure in DNA testing and regret of DNA testing. Opinions on cardiac follow-up were assessed pertaining to communication, nervous anticipation, reassurance, and general disadvantages. Genetic counseling was valued positively and only four carriers would rather not have known that they were a mutation carrier. A majority received their DNA test result by mail or telephone, and almost all were satisfied. Only 76% of carriers received regular cardiac follow-up. Those who did, had a positive attitude regarding the cardiac visits. General disadvantages of the visits were valued as low, especially by older carriers, men and carriers with manifest HCM. We conclude that our adapted Huntington guidelines are well accepted and that cardiogenetic care is generally appreciated by predictively tested HCM mutation carriers. To better understand the cause of the substantial portion of mutation carriers not receiving regular cardiac follow-up, although recommended in international guidelines, further research is needed.

  2. Implantable Cardioverter-defibrillator Therapy for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Usefulness in Primary and Secondary Prevention.

    PubMed

    Sarrias, Axel; Galve, Enrique; Sabaté, Xavier; Moya, Àngel; Anguera, Ignacio; Núñez, Elaine; Villuendas, Roger; Alcalde, Óscar; García-Dorado, David

    2015-06-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a frequent cause of sudden death. Clinical practice guidelines indicate defibrillator implantation for primary prevention in patients with 1 or more risk factors and for secondary prevention in patients with a history of aborted sudden death or sustained ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of the present study was to analyze the follow-up of patients who received an implantable defibrillator following the current guidelines in nonreferral centers for this disease. This retrospective observational study included all patients who underwent defibrillator implantation between January 1996 and December 2012 in 3 centers in the province of Barcelona. The study included 69 patients (mean age [standard deviation], 44.8 [17] years; 79.3% men), 48 in primary prevention and 21 in secondary prevention. The mean number of risk factors per patient was 1.8 in the primary prevention group and 0.5 in the secondary prevention group (P=.029). The median follow-up duration was 40.5 months. The appropriate therapy rate was 32.7/100 patient-years in secondary prevention and 1.7/100 patient-years in primary prevention (P<.001). Overall mortality was 10.1%. Implant-related complications were experienced by 8.7% of patients, and 13% had inappropriate defibrillator discharges. In patients with a defibrillator for primary prevention, the appropriate therapy rate is extremely low, indicating the low predictive power of the current risk stratification criteria. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Formin Homology 2 Domain Containing 3 (FHOD3) Variants Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Eric C.; Hebl, Virginia Bartleson; Wolf, Matthew J.; Greytak, Sarah R.; Orr, Nicole; Draper, Isabelle; Calvino, Jenna E.; Kapur, Navin K.; Maron, Martin S.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Ommen, Steve R.; Bos, J. Martijn; Ackerman, Michael J.; Huggins, Gordon S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Incomplete penetrance and variable expression of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is well appreciated. Common genetic polymorphisms variants that may affect HCM penetrance and expression have been predicted but are not well established. Methods and Results We performed a case-control genome wide association (GWA) study to identify common HCM-associated genetic polymorphisms and then asked whether such common variants were more represented in HCM or could explain the heterogeneity of HCM phenotypes. We identified an intronic FHOD3 variant (rs516514) associated with HCM (OR = 2.45 (95% CI 1.76–3.41), p=1.25 × 10−7) and validated this finding in an independent cohort. Next, we tested FHOD3-V1151I (rs2303510), a non-synonymous variant in partial linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs516514, and we detected an even stronger association with HCM (p=1.76 × 10−9). While HCM patients were more likely to carry these FHOD3 alleles subjects homozygous for FHOD3-1151I had similar HCM phenotypes as carriers of the V1151 allele. FHOD3 expression is increased in the setting of HCM and both alleles of FHOD3-V1151I were detected in HCM myectomy tissue. Previously FHOD3 was found to be required for formation of the sarcomere and here we demonstrate that its fly homolog fhos is required for normal adult heart systolic contraction. Conclusions Here we demonstrate the association of a common non-synonymous FHOD3 genetic variant with HCM. This discovery further strengthens the potential role of gene mutations and polymorphisms that alter the amino acid sequence of sarcomere proteins and HCM. PMID:23255317

  4. Intracoronary electrocardiogram during alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy predicts myocardial injury size.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jing; Qu, Xiaolong; Huang, Haiyun; Zhang, Shanwen; Zhao, Weibo; He, Guoxiang; Song, Zhiyuan; Hu, Houyuan

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol septal ablation (ASA) has been used widely to treat patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). During the routine ASA procedure, it is difficult to detect the septal injury in real-time. The aim of the present study is to assess myocardial injury during ASA by recording intracoronary electrocardiogram (IC-ECG). From 2012 to 2015, 31 HOCM patients were treated with ASA, and IC-ECG was recorded in 21 patients successfully before and after ethanol injection. The elevation of ST-segment on IC-ECG after ethanol injection was expressed as its ratio to the level before injection or the absolute increasing value. Blood samples were collected before and after ASA for measuring changes in cardiac biomarkers. The ratio value of ST-segment elevation was positively correlated with both the amount of ethanol injected (r = 0.645, P = 0.001) and the myocardial injury size (creatine kinase-MB area under the curve (AUC) of CK-MB) (r = 0.466, P = 0.017). The absolute increment of ST-segment was also positively associated with both the amount of ethanol (r = 0.665, P = 0.001) and AUC of CK-MB (0.685, P = 0.001). However, there was no statistical correlation between the reduction of left ventricular outflow tract gradient and ST-segment elevation. Additionally no severe ASA procedure-related complications were observed in our patients. In conclusion, myocardial injury induced by ethanol injection can be assessed immediately by ST-segment elevation on IC-ECG. This study is the first to show that IC-ECG is a useful method for predicting myocardial injury during ASA in real-time.

  5. Prognostic role of stress echocardiography in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: The International Stress Echo Registry.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, Quirino; Olivotto, Iacopo; Gardini, Chiara; Mori, Fabio; Peteiro, Jesus; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Fernandez, Xusto; Cortigiani, Lauro; Rigo, Fausto; Lopes, Luis Rocha; Cruz, Ines; Cotrim, Carlos; Losi, Mariangela; Betocchi, Sandro; Beleslin, Branko; Tesic, Milorad; Dikic, Ana Djordjevic; Lazzeroni, Ettore; Lazzeroni, Davide; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio

    2016-09-15

    Stress echo (SE) may have a role in the outcome in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The aim was to assess the prognostic value of SE in a retrospective multicenter study in HCM. We enrolled 706 HCM patients. The employed stress was exercise (n=608) and/or vasodilator (n=146, dipyridamole in 98 and adenosine in 48). We defined SE positivity according to clinical/hemodynamic criteria including: symptoms (all stress modalities), exercise-induced hypotension (failure to increase or fall >20mmHg, exercise) and exercise-induced left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (left ventricular outflow tract obstruction >50mmHg); and ischemic criteria, such as new wall motion abnormalities (new wall motion abnormality) and/or reduction of coronary flow reserve velocity (CFVR≤2.0) on left anterior descending coronary artery with vasodilator stress assessed in 116 patients. All patients completed the clinical follow-up. Positive SE showed more frequently CFVR reduction, exercise-induced hypotension, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, and symptoms (38, 23, 20 and 15% respectively), but new wall motion abnormality only in 6%. During a median follow-up of 49months 180 events were observed, including 40 deaths. Clinical/hemodynamic criteria did not predict outcome (X2 0.599, p=0.598), whereas ischemia-related SE criteria (X2: 111.120, p<0.0001) was significantly related to outcome. Similarly, mortality was predicted with SE ischemic-criteria (X2 16.645, p<0.0001). SE has an important prognostic significance in HCM patients, with ischemia-related end-points showing greater predictive accuracy than hemodynamic endpoints. New wall motion abnormalities and impairment of CFVR should be specifically included in SE protocols for HCM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Perturbed Length–Dependent Activation in Human Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy With Missense Sarcomeric Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Vasco; Wijnker, Paul J.M.; Nijenkamp, Louise L.A.M.; Kuster, Diederik W.D.; Najafi, Aref; Witjas-Paalberends, E. Rosalie; Regan, Jessica A.; Boontje, Nicky; ten Cate, Folkert J.; Germans, Tjeerd; Carrier, Lucie; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon A.; Zaremba, Ruud; Foster, D. Brian; Murphy, Anne M.; Poggesi, Corrado; dos Remedios, Cris; Stienen, Ger J.M.; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Michels, Michelle; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2013-01-01

    Rationale High-myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity has been proposed as trigger of disease pathogenesis in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) based on in vitro and transgenic mice studies. However, myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity depends on protein phosphorylation and muscle length, and at present, data in human are scarce. Objective To investigate whether high-myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity and perturbed length-dependent activation are characteristics for human HCM with mutations in thick- and thin-filament proteins. Methods and Results Cardiac samples from patients with HCM harboring mutations in genes encoding thick (MYH7, MYBPC3) and thin (TNNT2, TNNI3, TPM1) filament proteins were compared with sarcomere mutation-negative HCM and nonfailing donors. Cardiomyocyte force measurements showed higher myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity in all HCM samples and low phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA)-targets compared with donors. After exogenous PKA treatment, myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity was either similar (MYBPC3mut, TPM1mut, sarcomere mutation-negative HCM), higher (MYH7mut, TNNT2mut), or even significantly lower (TNNI3mut) compared with donors. Length-dependent activation was significantly smaller in all HCM than in donor samples. PKA treatment increased phosphorylation of PKA-targets in HCM myocardium and normalized length-dependent activation to donor values in sarcomere mutation-negative HCM and HCM with truncating MYBPC3 mutations, but not in HCM with missense mutations. Replacement of mutant by wild-type troponin in TNNT2mut and TNNI3mut corrected length-dependent activation to donor values. Conclusions High-myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity is a common characteristic of human HCM and partly reflects hypophosphorylation of PKA-targets compared with donors. Length-dependent sarcomere activation is perturbed by missense mutations, possibly via post-translational modifications other than PKA-hypophosphorylation or altered protein–protein interactions, and represents a

  7. Exercise restrictions trigger psychological difficulty in active and athletic adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Luiten, Rebecca C; Ormond, Kelly; Post, Lisa; Asif, Irfan M; Wheeler, Matthew T; Caleshu, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined the extent and nature of the psychological difficulty experienced by athletic adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), correlates of that difficulty and coping mechanisms. Methods A survey assessed athletic history and psychological impact of exercise restrictions. LASSO penalised linear regression identified factors associated with psychological difficulty. Semistructured interviews provided deeper insight into the nature and origins of psychological difficulty. Results 54 individuals (33% female, mean age 55.9) completed the survey. The majority were recreational athletes at the time of restriction (67%). There was a drop in athleticism after diagnosis, including time spent exercising (p=0.04) and identification as an athlete (p=0.0005). Most respondents (54%) found it stressful and/or difficult to adjust to exercise restrictions. Greater psychological morbidity was associated with history of elite or competitive athletics, athletic identity and decrease in time spent exercising. 16 individuals (44% female, mean age 52.4) were interviewed. Long-term effects included weight gain and uncertainty about exercising safely. The role of exercise in interviewees' lives contracted significantly after restriction, from multiple functions (eg, social, stress relief, fitness) to solely health maintenance. Interviewees reported a unique form of social support: having family and friends participate with them in lower intensity exercise. Lack of understanding from family or friends and avoiding exercise completely were detrimental to coping. Conclusions Athletic adults with HCM experience multifaceted, lasting difficulty adjusting to exercise recommendations. These data can guide clinicians in identifying patients at highest risk for distress and in helping to bolster coping and adaptation. PMID:27843566

  8. Genetic testing in the management of relatives of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tomašov, P; Minárik, M; Zemánek, D; Čadová, P; Homolová, S; Čurilka, K; Pěnička, M; Benešová, L; Belšánová, B; Gregor, P; Veselka, J

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common genetic cardiac disease with vast genetic heterogeneity. First-degree relatives of patients with HCM are at 50% risk of inheriting the disease-causing mutation. Genetic testing is helpful in identifying the relatives harbouring the mutations. When genetic testing is not available, relatives need to be examined regularly. We tested a cohort of 99 unrelated patients with HCM for mutations in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNI3 and TNNT2 genes. In families with identified pathogenic mutation, we performed genetic and clinical examination in relatives to study the influence of genetic testing on the management of the relatives and to study the usefulness of echocardiographic criteria for distinguishing relatives with positive and negative genotype. We identified 38 genetic variants in 47 patients (47 %). Fifteen of these variants in 21 patients (21 %) were pathogenic mutations. We performed genetic testing in 52 relatives (18 of them (35 %) yielding positive results). Genetic testing of one HCM patient allowed us to omit 2.45-5.15 future cardiologic examinations of the relatives. None of the studied echocardiographic criteria were significantly different between the relatives with positive and negative genotypes, with the exception of a combined echocardiographic score (genotype positive vs. genotype negative, 3.316 vs. -0.489, P = 0.01). As a conclusion, our study of HCM patients and their relatives confirmed the role of genetic testing in the management of the relatives and found only limited benefit of the proposed echocardiographic parameters in identifying disease-causing mutation carriers.

  9. Clinical and genetic diagnosis of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Results in pediatric cardiology.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Bárbara; Gomes, Inês; Loureiro, Petra; Trigo, Conceição; Ferreira Pinto, Fátima

    2017-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is most often of autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable expression. The main purpose of family screening is to identify relatives with unrecognized HCM and to monitor those at risk for disease, in order to minimize complications and to assess risk of sudden cardiac death. The ESC and ACCF/AHA guidelines on the diagnosis and management of HCM recommend the screening of child relatives from the age of 10-12 years. We studied the outcome of clinical screening and genetic testing of child probands and relatives (<18 years of age) from families with HCM and assessed the age-related penetrance of HCM during the follow-up of these young relatives. Twenty patients from ten families were included between 2004 and 2013, consisting of three probands and 17 first-degree relatives (80% male; median age 10 years). Fourteen child relatives were mutation carriers (70%; median age eight years). Seven (50%) of the 14 mutation carriers were diagnosed with HCM at initial assessment. At-risk child relatives were defined as those with a positive mutation but a negative phenotype at enrollment. After 3.5±0.8 years of follow-up, two of the phenotype-negative mutation carriers developed HCM at 10 and 15 years of age (28% penetrance rate). The penetrance of HCM in phenotype-negative child relatives was 28% after 3.5 years of follow-up. This underlines the need for long-term monitoring of mutation carriers irrespective of the presence of a positive phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Phenotypic expression in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Francisca; Botelho, Ana; Trigo, Joana; Silva, Joana; Almeida, Inês; Venâncio, Margarida; Pais, João; Sanches, Conceição; Leitão Marques, António

    2014-05-01

    The prognostic value of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for risk stratification of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients is the subject of disagreement. We set out to examine the association between clinical and morphological variables, risk factors for sudden cardiac death and LGE in HCM patients. From a population of 78 patients with HCM, we studied 53 who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance. They were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of LGE. Ventricular arrhythmias and morbidity and mortality during follow-up were analyzed. Patients with LGE were younger at the time of diagnosis (p=0.046) and more often had a family history of sudden death (p=0.008) and known coronary artery disease (p=0.086). On echocardiography they had greater maximum wall thickness (p=0.007) and left atrial area (p=0.037) and volume (p=0.035), and more often presented a restrictive pattern of diastolic dysfunction (p=0.011) with a higher E/É ratio (p=0.003) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (p=0.038). Cardiac magnetic resonance supported the association between LGE and previous echocardiographic findings: greater left atrial area (p=0.029) and maximum wall thickness (p<0.001) and lower left ventricular ejection fraction (p=0.056). Patients with LGE more often had an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) (p=0.015). At follow-up, no differences were found in the frequency of ventricular arrhythmias, appropriate ICD therapies or mortality. The presence of LGE emerges as a risk marker, associated with the classical predictors of sudden cardiac death in this population. However, larger studies are required to confirm its independent association with clinical events. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness and safety beyond 10 years of percutaneous transluminal septal ablation in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    de la Torre Hernandez, José M; Masotti Centol, Monica; Lerena Saenz, Piedad; Sánchez Recalde, Ángel; Gimeno de Carlos, Federico; Piñón Esteban, Pablo; Fernandez Rodriguez, Diego; Sitges Carreño, Marta; Sabate Tenas, Manel; Zueco Gil, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous transluminal septal ablation is an alternative treatment in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. However, due to the relatively new introduction of this technique, there is no information on its very long term results (>10 years). The present study included consecutive patients treated in 5 centers between 1998 and 2003. We analyzed clinical, hemodynamic, and echocardiographic data at baseline and follow-up. A total of 45 patients were included; there were 31 (69%) women, the mean age was 62.4 (14) years, and 39 patients (86.6%) showed functional class III or IV. Septal thickness was 21.8 (3.5) mm, the peak resting gradient on echocardiography was 77 (39) mmHg, and mitral regurgitation was at least moderate in 22 patients (48.8%). During hospitalization, permanent pacemaker implantation was required in 3 patients and ventricular perforation (by pacing lead) occurred in 1 patient, requiring surgery. After a follow-up of 12.3 years (11.0-13.5 years), 2 patients (4.4%) died from cardiac causes (heart failure and posttransplantation), 3 patients required an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (1 for primary prevention and 2 due to sustained ventricular tachycardia after cardiac surgery), and 2 underwent cardiac surgery (due to endocarditis and mitral regurgitation). In the last clinical review, functional class was I-II in 39 patients (86.6%) (P<.0001), the peak resting gradient was 16 (23) mmHg (P<.0001), and mitral regurgitation was absent or mild in 34 patients (75.5%) (P<.03). The results of this study suggest that septal ablation is safe and effective in the very long term. The procedure was not associated with a significant incidence of sudden death or symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular and Functional Characterization of Novel Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Susceptibility Mutations in TNNC1- Encoded Troponin C

    PubMed Central

    Landstrom, Andrew P.; Parvatiyar, Michelle S.; Pinto, Jose R.; Marquardt, Michelle L.; Bos, J. Martijn; Tester, David J.; Ommen, Steve R.; Potter, James D.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common primary cardiac disorder defined by a hypertrophied left ventricle, is one of the main causes of sudden death in young athletes and has been associated with mutations in most sarcomeric proteins (tropomyosin, Troponin T and I, and actin, etc.). Many of these mutations appear to affect the functional properties of cardiac troponin C (cTnC), i.e., by increasing the Ca2+-sensitivity of contraction, a hallmark of HCM, and surprisingly, prior to this report, cTnC had not been classified as a HCM susceptibility gene. In this study, we show that mutations occurring in the human cTnC (HcTnC) gene (TNNC1) have the same prevalence (~0.4%) as well established HCM-susceptibility genes that encode other sarcomeric proteins. Comprehensive open reading frame/splice site mutation analysis of TNNC1 performed on 1025 unrelated HCM patients over the last 10 years revealed novel missense mutations in TNNC1: A8V, C84Y, E134D, and D145E. Functional studies with these recombinant HcTnC HCM mutations showed increased Ca2+ sensitivity of force development (A8V, C84Y and D145E) and force recovery (A8V and D145E). These results are consistent with the HCM functional phenotypes seen with other sarcomeric HCM mutations (E134D showed no changes in these parameters). This is the largest cohort analysis of TNNC1 in HCM that details the discovery of at least three novel HCM-associated mutations and more strongly links TNNC1 to HCM along with functional evidence that supports a central role for its involvement in the disease. These types of studies may help to further define TNNC1 as an HCM-susceptibility gene that has already been established for the other members of the Troponin complex. PMID:18572189

  13. Myocardial collagen deposition and inflammatory cell infiltration in cats with pre-clinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Khor, K H; Campbell, F E; Owen, H; Shiels, I A; Mills, P C

    2015-02-01

    The histological features of feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) have been well documented, but there are no reports describing the histological features in mild pre-clinical disease, since cats are rarely screened for the disease in the early stages before clinical signs are apparent. Histological changes at the early stage of the disease in pre-clinical cats could contribute to an improved understanding of disease aetiology or progression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the histological features of HCM in the left ventricular (LV) myocardium of cats diagnosed with pre-clinical HCM. Clinically healthy cats with normal (n = 11) and pre-clinical HCM (n = 6) were identified on the basis of echocardiography; LV free wall dimensions (LVFWd) and/or interventricular septal wall (IVSd) dimensions during diastole of 6-7 mm were defined as HCM, while equivalent dimensions <5.5 mm were defined as normal. LV myocardial sections were assessed and collagen content and inflammatory cell infiltrates were quantified objectively. Multifocal areas of inflammatory cell infiltration, predominantly lymphocytes, were observed frequently in the left myocardium of cats with pre-clinical HCM. Tissue from cats with pre-clinical HCM also had a higher number of neutrophils and a greater collagen content than the myocardium of normal cats. The myocardium variably demonstrated other features characteristic of HCM, including arteriolar mural hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis and, to a lesser extent, myocardial fibre disarray and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. These results suggest that an inflammatory process could contribute to increased collagen content and the myocardial fibrosis known to be associated with HCM. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A cardiac myosin binding protein C mutation in the Maine Coon cat with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Meurs, Kathryn M; Sanchez, Ximena; David, Ryan M; Bowles, Neil E; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Reiser, Peter J; Kittleson, Judith A; Munro, Marcia J; Dryburgh, Keith; Macdonald, Kristin A; Kittleson, Mark D

    2005-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and is a familial disease in at least 60% of cases. Causative mutations have been identified in several sarcomeric genes, including the myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) gene. Although numerous causative mutations have been identified, the pathogenetic process is still poorly understood. A large animal model of familial HCM in the cat has been identified and may be used for additional study. As the first spontaneous large animal model of this familial disease, feline familial HCM provides a valuable model for investigators to evaluate pathophysiologic processes and therapeutic (pharmacologic or genetic) manipulations. The MYBPC3 gene was chosen as a candidate gene in this model after identifying a reduction in the protein in myocardium from affected cats in comparison to control cats (P<0.001). DNA sequencing was performed and sequence alterations were evaluated for evidence that they changed the amino acid produced, that the amino acid was conserved and that the protein structure was altered. We identified a single base pair change (G to C) in the feline MYBPC3 gene in affected cats that computationally alters the protein conformation of this gene and results in sarcomeric disorganization. We have identified a causative mutation in the feline MYBPC3 gene that results in the development of familial HCM. This is the first report of a spontaneous mutation causing HCM in a non-human species. It should provide a valuable model for evaluating pathophysiologic processes and therapeutic manipulations.

  15. The influence of aortoseptal angulation on provocable left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Critoph, Christopher Howell; Pantazis, Antonios; Tome Esteban, Maria Teresa; Salazar-Mendiguchía, Joel; Pagourelias, Efstathios D; Moon, James C; Elliott, Perry Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Aortoseptal angulation (AoSA) can predict provocable left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) in patients with symptomatic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Lack of a standardised measurement technique in HCM without the need for complex three-dimensional (3D) imaging limits its usefulness in routine clinical practice. This study aimed to validate a simple measurement of AoSA using 2D echocardiography and cardiac MR (CMR) imaging as a predictor of LVOTO. Methods We retrospectively assessed 160 patients with non-obstructive HCM, referred for exercise stress echocardiography. AoSA was measured using resting 2D echocardiography in all patients, and CMR in 29. Twenty-five controls with normal echocardiograms were used for comparison. Results Patients with HCM had a reduced AoSA compared with controls (113°±12 vs 126°±6), p<0.0001. Sixty (38%) patients had provocable LVOTO, with smaller angles than non-obstructive patients (108°±12 vs 116°±12, p<0.0001). AoSA, degree of mitral valvular regurgitation and incomplete systolic anterior motion (SAM) were associated with peak left ventricular outflow tract gradient (r=0.508, p<0.0001). An angle ≤100° had 27% sensitivity, 91% specificity and 59% positive predictive value for predicting provocable LVOTO. When combined with SAM, specificity was 99% and positive predictive value 88%. Intraclass correlation coefficient of AoSA measured by two observers was 0.901 (p<0.0001). Bland-Altman analysis of echocardiographic AoSA showed good agreement with the CMR-derived angle. Conclusions Measurement of AoSA using echocardiography in HCM is easy, reproducible and comparable to CMR. Patients with provocable LVOTO have reduced angles compared with non-obstructive patients. AoSA is highly specific for provocable LVOTO and should prompt further evaluation in symptomatic patients without resting obstruction. PMID:25371813

  16. Comparison of Maximal Wall Thickness in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Differs Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Transthoracic Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Bois, John P; Geske, Jeffrey B; Foley, Thomas A; Ommen, Steve R; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2017-02-15

    Left ventricular (LV) wall thickness is a prognostic marker in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). LV wall thickness ≥30 mm (massive hypertrophy) is independently associated with sudden cardiac death. Presence of massive hypertrophy is used to guide decision making for cardiac defibrillator implantation. We sought to determine whether measurements of maximal LV wall thickness differ between cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Consecutive patients were studied who had HC without previous septal ablation or myectomy and underwent both cardiac MRI and TTE at a single tertiary referral center. Reported maximal LV wall thickness was compared between the imaging techniques. Patients with ≥1 technique reporting massive hypertrophy received subset analysis. In total, 618 patients were evaluated from January 1, 2003, to December 21, 2012 (mean [SD] age, 53 [15] years; 381 men [62%]). In 75 patients (12%), reported maximal LV wall thickness was identical between MRI and TTE. Median difference in reported maximal LV wall thickness between the techniques was 3 mm (maximum difference, 17 mm). Of the 63 patients with ≥1 technique measuring maximal LV wall thickness ≥30 mm, 44 patients (70%) had discrepant classification regarding massive hypertrophy. MRI identified 52 patients (83%) with massive hypertrophy; TTE, 30 patients (48%). Although guidelines recommend MRI or TTE imaging to assess cardiac anatomy in HC, this study shows discrepancy between the techniques for maximal reported LV wall thickness assessment. In conclusion, because this measure clinically affects prognosis and therapeutic decision making, efforts to resolve these discrepancies are critical.

  17. Outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients with and without atrial fibrillation: a survival meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Masri, Ahmad; Kanj, Mohamed; Thamilarasan, Maran; Wazni, Oussama; Smedira, Nicholas G.; Lever, Harry M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent occurrence in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). It is associated with worsening symptoms, cardiovascular events, and mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies reporting on mortality in patient with HCM and AF. Methods We searched PubMed, Medline, Embase, Ovid and Cochrane for studies which reported cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with HCM and AF. Outcome was a composite of cardiac mortality and/or all-cause mortality. Mantel Haenszel odds ratio (OR) or hazard ratio (HR) were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis for the prespecified outcome. Heterogeneity was assessed using I2 statistics. Results Six studies met the inclusion criteria. There were 6,858 patients; 1,314 (19%) had history of AF. During a mean follow up that ranged between 4 and 8 years, 405 (30.8%) patients with AF died as compared to 1,011 (18.2%) patients without AF (OR =2.49, 95% CI: 1.85–3.35, P<0.00001, I2=57%). Results persisted with inclusion of studies only reporting specifically on cardiac mortality (OR =2.80, 95% CI: 1.79–4.39, P<0.00001, I2=56%). Also, the mortality difference persisted after exclusion of deaths secondary to stroke in both groups (2 studies, 1,398 patients, OR =2.57, 95% CI: 1.57–4.20, P=0.0002, I2=31%). In three studies (5,857 patients); the presence of AF was associated with a pooled HR of 1.66 (95% CI: 1.29–2.13, P<0.0001, I2=41%). Conclusion Patients with HCM who develop AF have higher risk of mortality and cardiac deaths as compared to HCM patients without AF. PMID:28164011

  18. Significance of sarcomere gene mutations analysis in the end-stage phase of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Elena; Olivotto, Iacopo; Iascone, Maria; Parodi, Maria I; Girolami, Francesca; Frisso, Giulia; Autore, Camillo; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Cecconi, Massimiliano; Maron, Barry J; Maron, Martin S; Rosmini, Stefania; Formisano, Francesco; Musumeci, Beatrice; Cecchi, Franco; Iacovoni, Attilio; Haas, Tammy S; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria L; Ferrazzi, Paolo; Salvatore, Francesco; Spirito, Paolo; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2014-09-01

    End-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (ES-HC) has an ominous prognosis. Whether genotype can influence ES-HC occurrence is unresolved. We assessed the spectrum and clinical correlates of HC-associated mutations in a large multicenter cohort with end-stage ES-HC. Sequencing analysis of 8 sarcomere genes (MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNI3, TNNT2, TPM1, MYL2, MYL3, and ACTC1) and 2 metabolic genes (PRKAG2 and LAMP2) was performed in 156 ES-HC patients with left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) <50%. A comparison among mutated and negative ES-HC patients and a reference cohort of 181 HC patients with preserved LVEF was performed. Overall, 131 mutations (36 novel) were identified in 104 ES-HC patients (67%) predominantly affecting MYH7 and MYBPC3 (80%). Complex genotypes with double or triple mutations were present in 13% compared with 5% of the reference cohort (p = 0.013). The distribution of mutations was otherwise indistinguishable in the 2 groups. Among ES-HC patients, those presenting at first evaluation before the age of 20 had a 30% prevalence of complex genotypes compared with 19% and 21% in the subgroups aged 20 to 59 and ≥60 years (p = 0.003). MYBPC3 mutation carriers with ES-HC were older than patients with MYH7, other single mutations, or multiple mutations (median 41 vs 16, 26, and 28 years, p ≤0.001). Outcome of ES-HC patients was severe irrespective of genotype. In conclusion, the ES phase of HC is associated with a variable genetic substrate, not distinguishable from that of patients with HC and preserved EF, except for a higher frequency of complex genotypes with double or triple mutations of sarcomere genes.

  19. Extended myectomy in the treatment of patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kołsut, Piotr; Różański, Jacek; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Kłopotowski, Mariusz; Kumor, Magda; Kowalski, Mirosław; Kopyłowska, Natalia; Kuriata, Jarosław; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Partial resection of the septal muscle is a well-established and effective method of surgical treatment for patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). The procedure is characterized by a low operative mortality rate and long-term clinical improvement that has been confirmed in numerous publications. Mitral insufficiency in patients with HOCM is mostly functional due to the effect of systolic anterior motion (SAM). Aim To present the early results of surgical treatment provided to HOCM patients and to compare the effectiveness of two surgical procedures: isolated myectomy and myectomy combined with mitral valve replacement. Material and methods The study analyzed a group of 49 patients (20 women) with HOCM who underwent surgical treatment between 2012 and 2015. Isolated myectomy was performed in 67.25% (n = 33) of patients, myectomy combined with mitral valve replacement in 30.61% (n = 15), and 1 (2.04%) patient underwent myectomy combined with mitral valvuloplasty (papillary muscle repositioning). Results A greater reduction of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradient was observed in the population with concomitant mitral valve replacement in comparison to patients after isolated myectomy; the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.020). No significant correlation was observed between residual SAM and the grade of mitral regurgitation (p = 0.699) or between residual SAM and the LVOT gradient (p = 0.280). Conclusions Surgical myectomy is a well-established, effective method of reducing increased LVOT gradients in patients with HOCM. Additional mitral valve replacement may be associated with greater reductions of the LVOT gradient in the early postoperative period. Valve replacement should be considered in patients with concomitant mitral valve degeneration and patients with narrowed left ventricular cavities. PMID:28096824

  20. Plasma level of big endothelin-1 predicts the prognosis in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilu; Tang, Yida; Zou, Yubao; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Ling; Tian, Tao; Wang, Jizheng; Bao, Jingru; Hui, Rutai; Kang, Lianming; Song, Lei; Wang, Ji

    2017-09-15

    Cardiac remodeling is one of major pathological process in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Endothelin-1 has been linked to cardiac remodeling. Big endothelin-1 is the precursor of endothelin-1. A total of 245 patients with HCM were enrolled from 1999 to 2011 and partitioned to low, middle and high level groups according to their plasma big endothelin-1 levels. At baseline, significant associations were found between high level of big endothelin-1 and left atrium size, heart function and atrial fibrillation. Big endothelin-1 was positively correlated with N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide (r=0.291, p<0.001) and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on magnetic resonance imaging (r=0.222, p=0.016). During a follow-up of 3 (range, 2-5) years, big endothelin-1 level was positively associated with the risks of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death and progression to NYHA class 3 or 4 (p=0.020, 0.044 and 0.032, respectively). The rate of above events in the highest tertile were 18.1%, 15.7%, 24.2%, respectively. After adjusting for multiple factors related to survival and cardiac function, the significance remained in the association of big endothelin-1 with the risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR)=4.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-22.88; p=0.041) and progression to NYHA class 3 or 4 (HR=4.10, 95%CI 1.32-12.75, p=0.015). Our study showed that high level of plasma big endothelin-1 predicted prognosis for patients with HCM and it can be added to the marker panel in stratifying HCM patients for giving treatment priority to those at high risk. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. A Transgenic Rabbit Model for Human Troponin I-based Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sanbe, Atsushi; James, Jeanne; Tuzcu, Volkan; Nas, Selman; Martin, Lisa; Gulick, James; Osinska, Hanna; Sakthivel, Sadayappan; Klevitsky, Raisa; Ginsburg, Kenneth S.; Bers, Donald M.; Zinman, Bruce; Lakatta, Edward G.; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Background Transgenic (TG) and gene-targeted models have focused on the mouse. Fundamental differences between the mouse and human exist in Ca2+ handling during contraction/relaxation and in alterations in Ca2+ flux during heart failure, with the rabbit more accurately reflecting the human system. Methods and Results Cardiac troponin I (cTnI) mutations can cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. An inhibitory domain mutation, arginine146→glycine (cTnI146Gly) was modeled using TG expression in the rabbit ventricle. cTnI146Gly levels exceeding 40% of total cTnI were perinatal lethal, while replacement levels of 15–25% were well tolerated. cTnI146Gly expression led to a leftward shift in the force-pCa2+ curves with cardiomyocyte disarray, fibrosis and altered connexin43 organization. In isolated cTnI146Gly myocytes, twitch relaxation amplitudes were smaller compared to normal cells but [Ca]i transients and SR Ca2+ load were not different. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of the QTmax intervals was used to evaluate the cardiac repolarization phase and showed a significantly higher scaling exponent in the TG animals. Conclusions Expression of modest amounts of cTnI146Gly led to subtle defects without severely affecting cardiac function. Aberrant connexin organization, subtle morphological deficits as well as an altered fractal pattern of the repolarization phase of TG rabbits, in the absence of entropy or other ECG abnormalities, may indicate an early developing pathology before the onset of more obvious repolarization abnormalities or major alterations in cardiac mechanics. PMID:15867176

  2. Physical activity and other health behaviors in adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Reineck, Elizabeth; Rolston, Brice; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Salberg, Lisa; Baty, Linda; Kumar, Suwen; Wheeler, Matthew T; Ashley, Euan; Saberi, Sara; Day, Sharlene M

    2013-04-01

    The clinical expression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is undoubtedly influenced by modifying genetic and environmental factors. Lifestyle practices such as tobacco and alcohol use, poor nutritional intake, and physical inactivity are strongly associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and increased mortality in the general population. Before addressing the direct effect of such modifiable factors on the natural history of HC, it is critical to define their prevalence in this population. A voluntary survey, drawing questions in part from the 2007 to 2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), was posted on the HC Association website and administered to patients with HC at the University of Michigan. Propensity score matching to NHANES participants was used. Dichotomous and continuous health behaviors were analyzed using logistic and linear regression, respectively, and adjusted for body mass index and propensity score quintile. Compared to the matched NHANES participants, the patients with HC reported significantly less alcohol and tobacco use but also less time engaged in physical activity at work and for leisure. Time spent participating in vigorous or moderate activity was a strong predictor of self-reported exercise capacity. The body mass index was greater in the HC cohort than in the NHANES cohort. Exercise restrictions negatively affected emotional well-being in most surveyed subjects. In conclusion, patients with HC are less active than the general United States population. The well-established relation of inactivity, obesity, and cardiovascular mortality might be exaggerated in patients with HC. More data are needed on exercise in those with HC to strike a balance between acute risks and the long-term health benefits of exercise.

  3. Mechanical Dispersion by Strain Echocardiography: A Novel Tool to Diagnose Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Frédéric; Matelot, David; Daudin, Magalie; Kervio, Gaelle; Mabo, Philippe; Carré, François; Donal, Erwan

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that global longitudinal strain (GLS) is altered in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in comparison with athletes. Nevertheless, these results rely on studies comparing sedentary patients with HCM with healthy athletes. The aims of this study were to confirm these findings in an appropriate group of athletes with HCM and to study the additive value of novel parameters (i.e., mechanical dispersion and exercise GLS). Thirty-six athletes with HCM were prospectively included and were compared with 36 sedentary patients with HCM, 36 healthy athletes, and 36 sedentary control subjects of similar age. Athlete groups had similar training duration and HCM groups similar maximal wall thickness. All underwent echocardiography at rest and during submaximal exercise. GLS was assessed; the SD of time to maximal myocardial shortening of longitudinal strain was calculated as a parameter of mechanical dispersion. The HCM sedentary group showed the lowest resting and exercise GLS. Resting GLS was not different between athletes with HCM and the two control groups, but exercise GLS enabled the differentiation of athletes with HCM from healthy athletes. Mechanical dispersion was higher in both HCM groups compared with both control groups at rest and during exercise. Receiver operating characteristic analysis in the athlete groups demonstrated that resting mechanical dispersion (area under the curve = 0.949 ± 0.023) had better ability to identify HCM compared with GLS at rest (area under the curve = 0.644 ± 0.069) (P < .001) or during exercise (area under the curve = 0.706 ± 0.066) (P < .005). In athletes, normal resting GLS does not rule out the diagnosis of HCM. Mechanical dispersion of longitudinal strain seems to be a promising tool for the diagnosis of HCM in athletes. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Body size and metabolic differences in Maine Coon cats with and without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lisa M; Rush, John E; Meurs, Kathryn M; Bulmer, Barret J; Cunningham, Suzanne M

    2013-02-01

    An interplay between growth, glucose regulation and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) may exist, but has not been studied in detail. The purpose of this study was to characterize morphometric features, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose metabolism in Maine Coon cats with HCM. Body weight, body condition score (BCS), head length and width, and abdominal circumference were measured in Maine Coon cats >2 years of age. Echocardiography and thoracic radiography (for measurement of humerus length, and fourth and twelfth vertebrae length) were also performed. Blood was collected for biochemistry profile, DNA testing, insulin and IGF-1. Sixteen of 63 cats had HCM [myosin binding protein C (MYBPC)+, n = 3 and MYBPC-, n = 13] and 47/63 were echocardiographically normal (MYBPC+, n = 17 and MYBPC-, n = 30). There were no significant differences in any measured parameter between MYBPC+ and MYBPC- cats. Cats with HCM were significantly older (P <0.001), heavier (P = 0.006), more obese (P = 0.008), and had longer humeri (P = 0.02) compared with the HCM- group. Cats with HCM also had higher serum glucose (P = 0.01), homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) and IGF-1 (P = 0.01) concentrations, were from smaller litters (P = 0.04), and were larger at 6 months (P = 0.02) and at 1 year of age (P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis revealed that age (P <0.001), BCS (P = 0.03) and HOMA (P = 0.047) remained significantly associated with HCM. These results support the hypothesis that early growth and nutrition, larger body size and obesity may be environmental modifiers of genetic predisposition to HCM. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the effects of early nutrition on the phenotypic expression of HCM.

  5. Impaired cardiac mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and enhanced mitochondrial oxidative stress in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Liselotte B; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen; Hansen, Christina N; Leifsson, Pall S; Yokota, Takashi

    2015-05-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are important players in the development of various cardiovascular diseases, but their roles in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) remain unknown. We examined whether mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity was impaired with enhanced mitochondrial oxidative stress in HCM. Cardiac and skeletal muscles were obtained from 9 domestic cats with spontaneously occurring HCM with preserved left ventricular systolic function and from 15 age-matched control cats. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacities with nonfatty acid and fatty acid substrates in permeabilized fibers and isolated mitochondria were assessed using high-resolution respirometry. ROS release originating from isolated mitochondria was assessed by spectrofluorometry. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were also measured as a marker of oxidative damage. Mitochondrial ADP-stimulated state 3 respiration with complex I-linked nonfatty acid substrates and with fatty acid substrates, respectively, was significantly lower in the hearts of HCM cats compared with control cats. Mitochondrial ROS release during state 3 with complex I-linked substrates and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in the heart were significantly increased in cats with HCM. In contrast, there were no significant differences in mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity, mitochondrial ROS release, and oxidative damage in skeletal muscle between groups. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity with both nonfatty acid substrates and fatty acid substrates was impaired with increased mitochondrial ROS release in the feline HCM heart. These findings provide new insights into the pathophysiology of HCM and support the hypothesis that restoration of the redox state in the mitochondria is beneficial in the treatment of HCM. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Alcohol septal ablation for obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: outcomes in young, middle-aged, and elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Robert A; Townsend, Jacob C; Patel, Chetan A; Wolf, Bethany J; Todoran, Thomas M; Powers, Eric R; Steinberg, Daniel H; Fernandes, Valerian L; Nielsen, Christopher D

    2013-11-01

    We compared the efficacy and safety of alcohol septal ablation (ASA) for obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in young, middle-aged, and elderly patients. Intersociety guidelines suggest based on limited evidence that young patients with medically refractory symptoms of obstructive HCM should undergo surgical myectomy while elderly patients may be more appropriate for ASA. Data for 360 patients undergoing 389 ASAs were prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed according to age. Young (<45 years), middle-aged (45-64 years), and elderly (≥65 years) patients comprised 28, 40, and 32% of the study population, respectively. Young patients had thicker left ventricular septal walls at baseline, and elderly patients had more comorbidity and dyspnea. Resting, mean left ventricular outflow tract gradients (LVOTGs) were similar across the age groups at baseline (62, 66, and 68 mm Hg, respectively; P = NS for all comparisons). LVOTGs and dyspnea were significantly and similarly improved in all age groups immediately after ASA and through 12 months of follow-up (P < 0.001 for before and after comparisons; P = NS for intergroup comparisons). Complication rates were similar for young and middle-aged patients but higher for elderly patients (9.1 and 6.3% vs. 20.8%, respectively; P ≤ 0.016 for elderly vs. others). Mortality rates for young and middle-aged patients were lower than for elderly patients, but the differences were not statistically significant. Patients undergoing ASA had significant and similar improvements in LVOTGs and symptoms regardless of age. Procedural complications were increased in elderly patients, who had numerically but not statistically significantly higher mortality rates. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A cost-effectiveness model of genetic testing for the evaluation of families with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; McGaughran, Julie; Scuffham, Paul A; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    Traditional management of families with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) involves periodic lifetime clinical screening of family members, an approach that does not identify all gene carriers owing to incomplete penetrance and significant clinical heterogeneity. Limitations in availability and cost have meant genetic testing is not part of routine clinical management for many HCM families. To determine the cost-effectiveness of the addition of genetic testing to HCM family management, compared with clinical screening alone. A probabilistic Markov decision model was used to determine cost per quality-adjusted life-year and cost for each life-year gained when genetic testing is included in the management of Australian families with HCM, compared with the conventional approach of periodic clinical screening alone. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $A785 (£510 or €587) per quality-adjusted life-year gained, and $A12 720 (£8261 or €9509) per additional life-year gained making genetic testing a very cost-effective strategy. Sensitivity analyses showed that the cost of proband genetic testing was an important variable. As the cost of proband genetic testing decreased, the ICER decreased and was cost saving when the cost fell below $A248 (£161 or €185). In addition, the mutation identification rate was also important in reducing the overall ICER, although even at the upper limits, the ICER still fell well within accepted willingness to pay bounds. The addition of genetic testing to the management of HCM families is cost-effective in comparison with the conventional approach of regular clinical screening. This has important implications for the evaluation of families with HCM, and suggests that all should have access to specialised cardiac genetic clinics that can offer genetic testing.

  8. Changes in left atrial deformation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Evaluation by vector velocity imaging.

    PubMed

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Hassan, Hesham; Nazmy, Ahmed; Faheem, Naglaa; Saadan, Haythem; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) represents a generalized myopathic process affecting both ventricular and atrial myocardium. We assessed the global and regional left atrial (LA) function and its relation to left ventricular (LV) mechanics and clinical status in patients with HCM using Vector Velocity Imaging (VVI). VVI of the LA and LV was acquired from apical four- and two-chamber views of 108 HCM patients (age 40 ± 19years, 56.5% men) and 33 healthy subjects, all had normal LV systolic function. The LA subendocardium was traced to obtain atrial volumes, ejection fraction, velocities, and strain (ϵ)/strain rate (SR) measurements. Left atrial reservoir (ϵsys,SRsys) and conduit (early diastolic SRe) function were significantly reduced in HCM compared to controls (P < .0001). Left atrial deformation directly correlated to LVϵsys, SRsys and negatively correlated to age, NYHA class, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradient, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), LA volume index and severity of mitral regurge (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characterist was constructed to explore the cutoff value of LA deformation in differentiation of LA dysfunction; ϵsys < 40% was 75% sensitive, 50% specific, SRsys < 1.7s(- 1) was 70% sensitive, 61% specific, SRe> - 1.8s(- 1) was 81% sensitive and 30% specific, SRa> - 1.5s(- 1) was 73% sensitive and 40% specific. By multivariate analysis global LVϵsys and LV septal thickness are independent predictors for LAϵsys, while end systolic diameter is the only independent predictor for SRsys, P < .001. Left atrial reservoir and conduit function as measured by VVI were significantly impaired while contractile function was preserved among HCM patients. Left atrial deformation was greatly influenced by LV mechanics and correlated to severity of phenotype.

  9. Merits and pitfalls of genetic testing in a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy clinic.

    PubMed

    Arad, Michael; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Haron-Khun, Shiraz; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seidman, Christine E; Arbustini, Eloisa; Glikson, Michael; Freimark, Dov

    2014-11-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a familial disease with autosomal dominant inheritance and age-dependent penetrance, caused primarily by mutations of sarcomere genes. Because the clinical variability of HCM is related to its genetic heterogeneity, genetic studies may improve the diagnosis and prognostic evaluation in HCM. To analyze the impact of genetic diagnosis on the clinical management of HCM. Genetic studies were performed for either research or clinical reasons. Once the disease-causing mutation was identified, the management plan was reevaluated. Family members were invited to receive genetic counseling and encouraged to be tested for the mutation. Ten mutations in sarcomere protein genes were identified in 9 probands: 2 novel and 8 previously described. Advanced heart failure or sudden death in a young person prompted the genetic study in 8 of the 9 families. Of 98 relatives available for genotyping, only 53 (54%) agreed to be tested. The compliance was higher in families with sudden death and lower in what appeared to be sporadic HCM or elderly-onset disease. Among the healthy we identified 9 carriers and 19 non-carriers. In 6 individuals the test result resolved an uncertainty about "possible HCM." In several cases the genetic result was also used for family planning and played a role in decisions on cardioverter-defibrillator implantation. Recurrence of a same mutation in different families created an opportunity to apply the information from the literature for risk stratification of individual patients. We suggest that the clinical context determines the indication for genetic testing and interpretation of the results.

  10. Morphological and Electrical Characteristics in Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Quantitative Analysis of 864 Korean Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Hwan; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, Dae Hee; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan; Kim, You-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although several studies have reported the morphological and electrical characteristics in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), comparison between asymmetric and apical HCM has not been investigated in a reasonably sized cohort. Materials and Methods Echocardiography and electrocardiography were quantitatively analyzed in patients with HCM in a Korean tertiary referral center. Results Of 864 patients (mean age 55.4±14.2 years, 68.9% men), 255 (29.5%) patients had apical HCM, 553 (64.0%) patients asymmetric HCM, and 56 (6.4%) patients mixed type HCM. In echocardiographic evaluations, about three quarters of patients (75.8%) had left atrial enlargement. Left ventricular (LV) dilatations and systolic dysfunction were observed in 6.1% and 2.4%, respectively. QRS widening, PR prolongation, and pathologic Q wave are frequent in patients with asymmetric HCM, while LV strain is frequent in patient with apical HCM. The prevalence of J-point elevations (9.4% in inferior, 2.2% in lateral leads) were substantially higher than that in general population. Giant negative T wave was observed in 15.0% of total patients (32.2% in apical, 6.2% in asymmetric, 25% in mixed type). There was no significant correlation between the thickness of the apical wall and the amplitude of T wave inversion (r=-0.005, p=0.71). Conclusion In a large cohort of HCM including apical type, repolarization abnormalities, including early repolarization and QT prolongation as well as LV strain, were significantly observed. T wave inversion was not appropriate for screening of HCM and not correlated with apical wall thickness. PMID:26446631

  11. Usefulness of 14-Day Holter for Detection of Nonsustained Ventricular Tachycardia in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Weissler-Snir, Adaya; Chan, Raymond H; Adler, Arnon; Care, Melanie; Chauhan, Vijay; Gollob, Michael H; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Fourey, Dana; Hindieh, Waseem; Rakowski, Harry; Spears, Danna A

    2016-10-15

    Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT), defined as ≥3 consecutive ventricular beats at ≥120 beats/min lasting <30 seconds, is an independent predictor of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Current guidelines recommend 24- to 48-hour Holter monitoring as part of SCD risk stratification. We sought to assess the difference in diagnostic yield of 14-day Holter monitoring compared to 24-48 hours for the detection of NSVT and to assess the prevalence and characteristics of NSVT in patients with HC with prolonged monitoring. We retrospectively analyzed the 14-day Holter monitors of 77 patients with HC from May 2014 to March 2016. Number of episodes and maximal length and rate on each day were recorded. NSVT was detected in 75.3% of patients during 14-day Holter monitoring. The median number of runs was 2 (range 0 to 26 runs). The median number of beats of the longest run was 10.5 (range 3 to 68 beats) with a mean maximum rate of 159.5 ± 20.8.4 beats/min (range 102 to 203 beats/min). First episodes of NSVT were detected throughout the 14 days, with only 22.5% and 44.8% of the episodes captured within the first 24 and 48 hours of monitoring, respectively. In conclusion, prolonged Holter monitoring revealed ≥1 episode of NSVT in 75% of patients with HC of which <50% were detected within the first 48 hours. Hence, prolonged Holter monitoring may be superior for SCD risk stratification in HC. However, the high prevalence of NSVT in this population may limit its utility in evaluating the risk for SCD of the individual patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of apical subtype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kebed, Kalie Y; Al Adham, Raed I; Bishu, Kalkidan; Askew, J Wells; Klarich, Kyle W; Araoz, Philip A; Foley, Thomas A; Glockner, James F; Nishimura, Rick A; Anavekar, Nandan S

    2014-09-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is an uncommon variant of HC. We sought to characterize cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings among apical HC patients. This was a retrospective review of consecutive patients with a diagnosis of apical HC who underwent cardiac MRI examinations at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) from August 1999 to October 2011. Clinical and demographic data at the time of cardiac MRI study were abstracted. Cardiac MRI study and 2-dimensional echocardiograms performed within 6 months of the cardiac MRI were reviewed; 96 patients with apical HC underwent cardiac MRI examinations. LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 130.7 ± 39.1 ml and 44.2 ± 20.9 ml, respectively. Maximum LV thickness was 19 ± 5 mm. Hypertrophy extended beyond the apex into other segments in 57 (59.4%) patients. Obstructive physiology was seen in 12 (12.5%) and was more common in the mixed apical phenotype than the pure apical (19.3 vs 2.6%, p = 0.02). Apical pouches were noted in 39 (40.6%) patients. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was present in 70 (74.5%) patients. LGE was associated with severe symptoms and increased maximal LV wall thickness. In conclusion, cardiac MRI is well suited for studying the apical form of HC because of difficulty imaging the cardiac apex with standard echocardiography. Cardiac MRI is uniquely suited to delineate the presence or absence of an apical pouch and abnormal myocardial LGE that may have implications in the natural history of apical HM. In particular, the presence of abnormal LGE is associated with clinical symptoms and increased wall thickness.

  13. Slowed atrial and atrioventricular conduction and depressed HRV in a murine model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wei-Wen; Baumert, Mathias; Neo, Melissa; Kuklik, Pawel; Ganesan, Anand N; Lau, Dennis H; Tsoutsman, Tatiana; Semsarian, Christopher; Sanders, Prashanthan; Saint, David A

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common heritable cardiac disorder with diverse clinical outcomes including sudden death, heart failure, and stroke. Depressed heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of cardiac autonomic regulation, has been shown to predict mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. Cardiac autonomic remodelling in animal models of HCM are not well characterised. This study analysed Gly203Ser cardiac troponin-I transgenic (TG) male mice previously demonstrated to develop hallmarks of HCM by age 21 weeks. 33 mice aged 30 and 50 weeks underwent continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) recording for 30 min under anaesthesia. TG mice demonstrated prolonged P-wave duration (P < 0.001) and PR intervals (P < 0.001) compared to controls. Additionally, TG mice demonstrated depressed standard deviation of RR intervals (SDRR; P < 0.01), coefficient of variation of RR intervals (CVRR; P < 0.001) and standard deviation of heart rate (SDHR; P < 0.001) compared to controls. Additionally, total power was significantly reduced in TG mice (P < 0.05). No significant age-related difference in either strain was observed in ECG or HRV parameters. Mice with HCM developed slowed atrial and atrioventricular conduction and depressed HRV. These changes were conserved with increasing age. This finding may be indicative of atrial and ventricular hypertrophy or dysfunction, and perhaps an indication of worse clinical outcome in heart failure progression in HCM patients. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of the flanking nucleotide sequences of sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy substitution mutations.

    PubMed

    Meurs, Kathryn M; Mealey, Katrina L

    2008-07-03

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a familial myocardial disease with a prevalence of 1 in 500. More than 400 causative mutations have been identified in 13 sarcomeric and myofilament related genes, 350 of these are substitution mutations within eight sarcomeric genes. Within a population, examples of recurring identical disease causing mutations that appear to have arisen independently have been noted as well as those that appear to have been inherited from a common ancestor. The large number of novel HCM mutations could suggest a mechanism of increased mutability within the sarcomeric genes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the most commonly reported HCM genes, beta myosin heavy chain (MYH7), myosin binding protein C, troponin I, troponin T, cardiac regulatory myosin light chain, cardiac essential myosin light chain, alpha tropomyosin and cardiac alpha-actin for sequence patterns surrounding the substitution mutations that may suggest a mechanism of increased mutability. The mutations as well as the 10 flanking nucleotides were evaluated for frequency of di-, tri- and tetranucleotides containing the mutation as well as for the presence of certain tri- and tetranculeotide motifs. The most common substitutions were guanine (G) to adenine (A) and cytosine (C) to thymidine (T). The CG dinucleotide had a significantly higher relative mutability than any other dinucleotide (p<0.05). The relative mutability of each possible trinucleotide and tetranucleotide sequence containing the mutation was calculated; none were at a statistically higher frequency than the others. The large number of G to A and C to T mutations as well as the relative mutability of CG may suggest that deamination of methylated CpG is an important mechanism for mutation development in at least some of these cardiac genes.

  15. Recent Advances in the Molecular Genetics of Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in South Asian Descendants

    PubMed Central

    Kraker, Jessica; Viswanathan, Shiv Kumar; Knöll, Ralph; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2016-01-01

    The South Asian population, numbered at 1.8 billion, is estimated to comprise around 20% of the global population and 1% of the American population, and has one of the highest rates of cardiovascular disease. While South Asians show increased classical risk factors for developing heart failure, the role of population-specific genetic risk factors has not yet been examined for this group. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is one of the major cardiac genetic disorders among South Asians, leading to contractile dysfunction, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. This disease displays autosomal dominant inheritance, and it is associated with a large number of variants in both sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric proteins. The South Asians, a population with large ethnic diversity, potentially carries region-specific polymorphisms. There is high variability in disease penetrance and phenotypic expression of variants associated with HCM. Thus, extensive studies are required to decipher pathogenicity and the physiological mechanisms of these variants, as well as the contribution of modifier genes and environmental factors to disease phenotypes. Conducting genotype-phenotype correlation studies will lead to improved understanding of HCM and, consequently, improved treatment options for this high-risk population. The objective of this review is to report the history of cardiovascular disease and HCM in South Asians, present previously published pathogenic variants, and introduce current efforts to study HCM using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, next-generation sequencing, and gene editing technologies. The authors ultimately hope that this review will stimulate further research, drive novel discoveries, and contribute to the development of personalized medicine with the aim of expanding therapeutic strategies for HCM. PMID:27840609

  16. MicroRNA transcriptome profiling in cardiac tissue of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients with MYBPC3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Diederik W D; Mulders, Joyce; Ten Cate, Folkert J; Michels, Michelle; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G; da Costa Martins, Paula A; van der Velden, Jolanda; Oudejans, Cees B M

    2013-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is predominantly caused by mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins. One of the most frequent affected genes is MYBPC3, which encodes the thick filament protein cardiac myosin binding protein C. Despite the prevalence of HCM, disease pathology and clinical outcome of sarcomeric mutations are largely unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs (miRNAs) could play a role in the disease process. To determine which miRNAs were changed in expression, miRNA arrays were performed on heart tissue from HCM patients with a MYBPC3 mutation (n=6) and compared with hearts of non-failing donors (n=6). 532 out of 664 analyzed miRNAs were expressed in at least one heart sample. 13 miRNAs were differentially expressed in HCM compared with donors (at p<0.01, fold change ≥ 2). The genomic context of these differentially expressed miRNAs revealed that miR-204 (fold change 2.4 in HCM vs. donor) was located in an intron of the TRPM3 gene, encoding an aspecific cation channel involved in calcium entry. RT-PCR analysis revealed a trend towards TRPM3 upregulation in HCM compared with donor myocardium (fold change 2.3, p=0.078). In silico identification of mRNA targets of differentially expressed miRNAs showed a large proportion of genes involved in cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac beta-adrenergic receptor signaling and we showed reduced phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I in the HCM myocardium when compared with donor. HCM patients with MYBPC3 mutations have a specific miRNA expression profile. Downstream mRNA targets reveal possible involvement in cardiac signaling pathways.

  17. Atrial Fibrillation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Is the Extent of Septal Hypertrophy Important?

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Min; Im, Sung Il; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Chol; Park, Seung-Jung; Kim, June Soo; On, Young Keun

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiac disease associated with a high incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF). Recent studies have suggested that interventricular septum thickness may influence the risk stratification of patients with AF. We evaluated the effects of septal hypertrophy on morbidity and mortality in patients with HCM. Patients were followed for a median of 6.1 years and were divided into two groups according to the extent of septal hypertrophy. A total of 1,360 HCM patients were enrolled: 482 (33%) apical or apicoseptal, 415 (28%) asymmetric septal, 388 (27%) basal septal, 38 (2.6%) concentric, and 37 (2.5%) diffuse and mixed type. Ninety-two all-cause deaths and 21 cardiac deaths occurred. The total event rates were significantly higher for patients with HCM with more extensive septal hypertrophy (group A) compared to those with HCM ± focal septal hypertrophy (group B), regardless of type (p<0.001). Arrhythmias occurred in 502 patients, with a significantly higher incidence in group A than in group B (p<0.001). Among patients with arrhythmias, the incidence of AF was significantly higher in group A than group B (p<0.001). In univariate Cox analysis, a greater extent of septal hypertrophy (p<0.001), E/E´ ratio (p = 0.011), and mitral regurgitation grade (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with developing AF. In multivariate Cox analyses, a greater extent of septal hypertrophy [odds ratio (OR) 5.44 (2.29-12.92), p<0.001] in patients with HCM was significantly associated with developing AF. In conclusion, a greater extent of septal hypertrophy is an independent predictor of progression to AF in patients with HCM.

  18. Magnesium status and the effect of magnesium supplementation in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, L M; Brown, D J; Smith, F W; Rush, J E

    1997-01-01

    Magnesium deficiency has been associated with the development of cardiovascular disease in several species. Cats may be predisposed to alterations in magnesium status because of recent changes in the composition of commercial feline diets. The purposes of this study were 1) to examine the dietary history of cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), 2) to study magnesium status of cats with HCM compared to normal cats, and 3) to determine the effects of magnesium supplementation in cats with HCM. In part 1 of the study, diets of 65 cats with HCM were examined retrospectively. Forty of the 45 cats for which diets could be determined (89%) ate a diet designed to be magnesium-restricted and/or to produce an acidic urine. In part 2 of the study, 10 cats with HCM were compared to 10 healthy control cats for serum creatinine and magnesium; urine creatinine and magnesium, urine specific gravity and pH, and fractional excretion of magnesium. Urine creatinine and specific gravity were higher in control cats than in cats with HCM. No other differences were found between the 2 groups. In part 3, cats with HCM were supplemented with either 210 mg magnesium chloride (n = 15) or 210 mg lactose (n = 15) for 12 wk. No differences between the 2 groups were found for changes in either magnesium status or echocardiographic parameters. However, the 30 cats with HCM, as a group, did show significant improvements in measures of cardiac hypertrophy over the 12-week period. This was likely the result of treatment with other medications, rather than the magnesium supplementation. The results of this study suggest that cats with HCM are likely to be fed magnesium-restricted diets, but that they do not appear to have altered magnesium status compared to healthy controls. PMID:9243004

  19. Differentiating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from athlete's heart: An electrocardiographic and echocardiographic approach.

    PubMed

    Grazioli, Gonzalo; Usín, Domingo; Trucco, Emilce; Sanz, Maria; Montserrat, Silvia; Vidal, Bàrbara; Gutierrez, Josep; Canal, Ramon; Brugada, Josep; Mont, Lluis; Sitges, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) vs athlete's heart is challenging in individuals with mild-moderate left-ventricular hypertrophy. This study aimed to assess ECG and echocardiographic parameters proposed for the differential diagnosis of HCM. The study included 75 men in three groups: control (n=30), "gray zone" athletes with interventricular septum (IVS) measuring 13-15mm (n=25) and HCM patients with IVS of 13-18mm (n=20). The most significant differences were found in relative septal thickness (RST), calculated as the ratio of 2 x IVS to left ventricle end-diastolic diameter (LV-EDD) (0.37, 0.51, 0.71, respectively; p<0.01) and in spatial QRS-T angle as visually estimated (9.8, 33.6, 66.2, respectively; p<0.01). The capacity for differential HCM diagnosis of each of the 5 criteria was assessed using the area under the curve (AUC), as follows: LV-EDD<54 (0.60), family history (0.61), T-wave inversion (TWI) (0.67), spatial QRS-T angle>45 (0.75) and RST>0.54 (0.92). Pearson correlation between spatial QRS-T angle>45 and TWI was 0.76 (p 0.01). The combination of spatial QRS-T angle>45 and RST>0.54 for diagnosis of HCM had an AUC of 0.79. The best diagnostic criteria for HCM was RST>0.54. The spatial QRS-T angle>45 did not add sensitivity if TWI was present. No additional improvement in differential diagnosis was obtained by combining parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inappropriate Shock Due to T-Wave Oversensing by a Subcutaneous ICD after Alcohol Septal Ablation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, Vincent F; Liebregts, Max; Luermans, Justin G L M; Balt, Jippe C

    2016-03-01

    A 53-year-old female patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) was admitted for alcohol septal ablation (ASA). A subcutaneous internal cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) was implanted for primary prevention. After ASA, the patient developed a right bundle branch block, and the S-ICD delivered a total of five inappropriate shocks due to T-wave oversensing (TWOS). TWOS is a relatively frequent cause of inappropriate shocks in S-ICD patients. After invasive treatment for HOCM, there is a risk of developing intraventricular conduction delay and subsequent changes in QRS and T-wave morphology. This should be taken into consideration when ICD indication is evaluated in HOCM patients.

  1. Apical aneurysm and myocardial bridging in a patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: association or consequence of the myocardial bridging?

    PubMed

    Foucault, Anthony; Hilpert, Loic; Hédoire, Francois; Saloux, Eric; Gomes, Sophie; Pellissier, Arnaud; Scanu, Patrice; Champ-Rigot, Laure; Milliez, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The identification of high-risk patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD) remains a challenging issue, since major risk factors sometimes lack specificity. We report the case of a patient with HC and association of apical aneurysm and myocardial bridging who had been initially not implanted because she had only one major risk factor. She subsequently experienced a sustained ventricular tachycardia that finally motivated the implantation. We conclude that it is never an easy decision to implant a preventive implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). Nevertheless, additional criteria for a better selection of patients who would benefit from an ICD implant are certainly useful.

  2. The Role of Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein C3 in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Progress and Novel Therapeutic Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Iman A; Krishnamoorthy, Navaneethakrishnan T; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Da'as, Sahar I

    2017-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common autosomal dominant genetic cardiovascular disorder marked by genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Mutations in the gene encodes the cardiac myosin-binding protein C, cMYBPC3 is amongst the various sarcomeric genes that are associated with HCM. These mutations produce mutated mRNAs and truncated cMyBP-C proteins. In this review, we will discuss the implications and molecular mechanisms involved in MYBPC3 different mutations. Further, we will highlight the novel targets that can be developed into potential therapeutics for the treatment of HMC. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1650-1659, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Physiological left ventricular hypertrophy or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an elite adolescent athlete: role of detraining in resolving the clinical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Basavarajaiah, S; Wilson, M; Junagde, S; Jackson, G; Whyte, G; Sharma, S

    2006-01-01

    The differentiation of physiological left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) can prove challenging for even the most experienced cardiologists. The case is presented of a 17 year old elite swimmer who had electrocardiographic and echocardiographic features that were highly suggestive of HCM. However, indices of diastolic function were normal and cardiopulmonary exercise testing revealed high peak oxygen consumption in keeping with physiological LVH. To resolve the diagnostic dilemma, the patient underwent detraining for eight weeks, after which, there was complete resolution of the changes seen on electrocardiogram and echocardiogram, indicating physiological LVH rather than HCM. PMID:16864569

  4. Possible acute and chronic synergistic effect of dual chamber pacing and disopyramide in obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Shintaro; Minami, Yuichiro; Kajimoto, Katsuya; Yashiro, Bun; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Kawana, Masatoshi; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2010-01-01

    It remains unclear whether the combination of dual-chamber (DDD) pacing and disopyramide can achieve prolonged left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradient reduction and symptom relief in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). In an HCM patient with a severe LVOT gradient, the combination of DDD pacing and disopyramide achieved marked improvement of gradient in the catheter laboratory and also after medium-term follow-up. The patient's severe dyspnoea was alleviated during the follow-up period. This combination might enable physicians to treat and manage elderly symptomatic obstructive HCM patients with a severe LVOT gradient more effectively and less invasively.

  5. Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Effects of acute and chronic verapamil treatment on left ventricular systolic and diastolic function.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D M; Raff, G L; Ports, T A; Brundage, B H; Parmley, W W; Chatterjee, K

    1984-01-01

    Changes in left ventricular systolic and diastolic function and outflow gradient were evaluated in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy after intravenous acute treatment with verapamil (15 patients) and after six months of oral chronic treatment (11 patients). All patients had severe symptoms despite beta blockade, and the condition of all but two improved appreciably after chronic treatment with verapamil. Resting left ventricular outflow tract gradient decreased in six of 15 patients after intravenous verapamil, and in five of 11 patients after long term treatment, but there was no change in provocable gradients nor any correlation between changes in gradient and improvement in symptoms. Left ventricular ejection rate did not change after intravenous or oral treatment. End systolic pressure/end systolic volume index remained unchanged after oral verapamil treatment. Whereas left ventricular total stroke volume index and end diastolic volume index increased without any significant change in left ventricular end diastolic pressure, indicating improved left ventricular diastolic function. In some patients the left ventricular diastolic pressure-volume curve shifted downwards or to the right or both. These findings suggest that improvement in symptoms with verapamil in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is unlikely to be related to changes in left ventricular outflow gradient or in systolic function and may be related to improved diastolic function. PMID:6539120

  6. ENerGetIcs in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: traNslation between MRI, PET and cardiac myofilament function (ENGINE study).

    PubMed

    Güçlü, A; Germans, T; Witjas-Paalberends, E R; Stienen, G J M; Brouwer, W P; Harms, H J; Marcus, J T; Vonk, A B A; Stooker, W; Yilmaz, A; Klein, P; Ten Berg, J M; Kluin, J; Asselbergs, F W; Lammertsma, A A; Knaapen, P; van Rossum, A C; van der Velden, J

    2013-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant heart disease mostly due to mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins. HCM is characterised by asymmetric hypertrophy of the left ventricle (LV) in the absence of another cardiac or systemic disease. At present it lacks specific treatment to prevent or reverse cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy in mutation carriers and HCM patients. Previous studies have indicated that sarcomere mutations increase energetic costs of cardiac contraction and cause myocardial dysfunction and hypertrophy. By using a translational approach, we aim to determine to what extent disturbances of myocardial energy metabolism underlie disease progression in HCM. Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) patients and aortic valve stenosis (AVS) patients will undergo a positron emission tomography (PET) with acetate and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) with tissue tagging before and 4 months after myectomy surgery or aortic valve replacement + septal biopsy. Myectomy tissue or septal biopsy will be used to determine efficiency of sarcomere contraction in-vitro, and results will be compared with in-vivo cardiac performance. Healthy subjects and non-hypertrophic HCM mutation carriers will serve as a control group. Our study will reveal whether perturbations in cardiac energetics deteriorate during disease progression in HCM and whether these changes are attributed to cardiac remodelling or the presence of a sarcomere mutation per se. In-vitro studies in hypertrophied cardiac muscle from HOCM and AVS patients will establish whether sarcomere mutations increase ATP consumption of sarcomeres in human myocardium. Our follow-up imaging study in HOCM and AVS patients will reveal whether impaired cardiac energetics are restored by cardiac surgery.

  7. Tricuspid annular motion velocity as a differentiation index of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shuji; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Nishio, Susumu; Hotchi, Junko; Bando, Mika; Takagawa, Yuriko; Saijo, Yoshihito; Hirata, Yukina; Sata, Masataka

    2015-06-01

    Hypertensive heart disease (HHD) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are the most frequently encountered entities presenting left ventricular hypertrophy in routine echocardiographic examination, and their differentiation is sometimes difficult. Abnormalities in right ventricular (RV) myocardium have been reported frequently in patients with HCM more than in those with HHD. We therefore hypothesized that tricuspid annular motion (TAM) velocity determined by pulsed tissue Doppler echocardiography can be used to detect RV dysfunction in HCM and discriminate these etiologies. TAM velocities were compared among clinically stable patients with 60 HCM and 60 HHD patients as well as 60 age-matched healthy controls. Peak systolic, early diastolic (TAM-e'), and atrial systolic velocities were measured. RV myocardial performance index was measured by tissue Doppler method. To more accurately differentiate HCM from HHD, electrocardiographic findings and brain natriuretic peptide levels, which can both be examined simply and noninvasively, were investigated in addition to echocardiography. RV wall thickness of the HCM group was greater than the HHD group (p=0.092), while there was no significant difference in RV myocardial performance index between the HCM and HHD groups (p=0.606). TAM-e' was significantly lower in the HCM group than in HHD and control groups (p=0.001). To differentiate HCM from HHD, TAM-e' was a powerful predictor as per multivariate logistic regression analysis (hazard ratio, 0.665; p<0.001) of parameters other than those of left ventricular parameters, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.686 and the best cut-off value was ≤8.0cm/s (62% sensitivity, 65% specificity). Multivariate logistic analysis revealed that electrocardiographic ST-T changes were the next most effective marker for differentiating HCM after TAM-e'. When TAM-e' and ST-T changes were combined, the AUC increased to 0.748. TAM-e' is a potentially

  8. Cardiac magnetic field map topology quantified by Kullback-Leibler entropy identifies patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirdewan, A.; Gapelyuk, A.; Fischer, R.; Koch, L.; Schütt, H.; Zacharzowsky, U.; Dietz, R.; Thierfelder, L.; Wessel, N.

    2007-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common primary inherited cardiac muscle disorder, defined clinically by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy. The detection of affected patients remains challenging. Genetic testing is limited because only in 50%-60% of all HCM diagnoses an underlying mutation can be found. Furthermore, the disease has a varied clinical course and outcome, with many patients having little or no discernible cardiovascular symptoms, whereas others develop profound exercise limitation and recurrent arrhythmias or sudden cardiac death. Therefore prospective screening of HCM family members is strongly recommended. According to the current guidelines this includes serial echocardiographic and electrocardiographic examinations. In this study we investigated the capability of cardiac magnetic field mapping (CMFM) to detect patients suffering from HCM. We introduce for the first time a combined diagnostic approach based on map topology quantification using Kullback-Leibler (KL) entropy and regional magnetic field strength parameters. The cardiac magnetic field was recorded over the anterior chest wall using a multichannel-LT-SQUID system. CMFM was calculated based on a regular 36 point grid. We analyzed CMFM in patients with confirmed diagnosis of HCM (HCM, n =33, 43.8±13 years, 13 women, 20 men), a control group of healthy subjects (NORMAL, n =57, 39.6±8.9 years; 22 women and 35 men), and patients with confirmed cardiac hypertrophy due to arterial hypertension (HYP, n =42, 49.7±7.9 years, 15 women and 27 men). A subgroup analysis was performed between HCM patients suffering from the obstructive (HOCM, n =19) and nonobstructive (HNCM, n =14) form of the disease. KL entropy based map topology quantification alone identified HCM patients with a sensitivity of 78.8% and specificity of 86.9% (overall classification rate 84.8%). The combination of the KL parameters with a regional field strength parameter improved the overall

  9. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain prevents development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chen-Ching; Muthu, Priya; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Liang, Jingsheng; Huang, Wenrui; Irving, Thomas C.; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M.; Hare, Joshua M.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) of cardiac myosin is known to play a beneficial role in heart disease, but the idea of a phosphorylation-mediated reversal of a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype is novel. Our previous studies on transgenic (Tg) HCM-RLC mice revealed that the D166V (Aspartate166 →Valine) mutation-induced changes in heart morphology and function coincided with largely reduced RLC phosphorylation in situ. We hypothesized that the introduction of a constitutively phosphorylated Serine15 (S15D) into the hearts of D166V mice would prevent the development of a deleterious HCM phenotype. In support of this notion, MLCK-induced phosphorylation of D166V-mutated hearts was found to rescue some of their abnormal contractile properties. Tg-S15D-D166V mice were generated with the human cardiac RLC-S15D-D166V construct substituted for mouse cardiac RLC and were subjected to functional, structural, and morphological assessments. The results were compared with Tg-WT and Tg-D166V mice expressing the human ventricular RLC-WT or its D166V mutant, respectively. Echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic studies demonstrated significant improvements of intact heart function in S15D-D166V mice compared with D166V, with the systolic and diastolic indices reaching those monitored in WT mice. A largely reduced maximal tension and abnormally high myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity observed in D166V-mutated hearts were reversed in S15D-D166V mice. Low-angle X-ray diffraction study revealed that altered myofilament structures present in HCM-D166V mice were mitigated in S15D-D166V rescue mice. Our collective results suggest that expression of pseudophosphorylated RLC in the hearts of HCM mice is sufficient to prevent the development of the pathological HCM phenotype. PMID:26124132

  10. Downregulation of GSTK1 Is a Common Mechanism Underlying Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sasagawa, Shota; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Murakami, Soichiro; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Okamoto, Ryuji; Ito, Masaaki; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and is associated with a number of potential outcomes, including impaired diastolic function, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. Various etiologies have been described for HCM, including pressure overload and mutations in sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric genes. However, the molecular pathogenesis of HCM remains incompletely understood. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify dysregulated genes common to five mouse HCM models of differing etiology: (i) mutation of myosin heavy chain 6, (ii) mutation of tropomyosin 1, (iii) expressing human phospholamban on a null background, (iv) knockout of frataxin, and (v) transverse aortic constriction. Gene-by-gene comparison identified five genes dysregulated in all five HCM models. Glutathione S-transferase kappa 1 (Gstk1) was significantly downregulated in the five models, whereas myosin heavy chain 7 (Myh7), connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf), periostin (Postn), and reticulon 4 (Rtn4) were significantly upregulated. Gene ontology comparison revealed that 51 cellular processes were significantly enriched in genes dysregulated in each transcriptome dataset. Among them, six processes (oxidative stress, aging, contraction, developmental process, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation) were related to four of the five genes dysregulated in all HCM models. GSTK1 was related to oxidative stress only, whereas the other four genes were related to all six cell processes except MYH7 for oxidative stress. Gene–gene functional interaction network analysis suggested correlative expression of GSTK1, MYH7, and actin alpha 2 (ACTA2). To investigate the implications of Gstk1 downregulation for cardiac function, we knocked out gstk1 in zebrafish using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 system. We found that expression of the zebrafish homologs of MYH7, ACTA2, and actin alpha 1

  11. Myocardial Structural Alteration and Systolic Dysfunction in Preclinical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Yiu, Kai Hang; Atsma, Douwe E.; Delgado, Victoria; Ng, Arnold C. T.; Witkowski, Tomasz G.; Ewe, See Hooi; Auger, Dominique; Holman, Eduard R.; van Mil, Anneke M.; Breuning, Martijn H.; Tse, Hung Fat; Bax, Jeroen J.; Schalij, Martin J.; Marsan, Nina Ajmone

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the presence of myocardial structural alterations and subtle myocardial dysfunction during familial screening in asymptomatic mutation carriers without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype. Methods and Findings Sixteen HCM families with pathogenic mutation were studied and 46 patients with phenotype expression (Mut+/Phen+) and 47 patients without phenotype expression (Mut+/Phen−) were observed. Twenty-five control subjects, matched with the Mut+/Phen− group, were recruited for comparison. Echocardiography was performed to evaluate conventional parameters, myocardial structural alteration by calibrated integrated backscatter (cIBS) and global and segmental longitudinal strain by speckle tracking analysis. All 3 groups had similar left ventricular dimensions and ejection fraction. Basal anteroseptal cIBS was the highest in Mut+/Phen+ patients (−14.0±4.6 dB, p<0.01) and was higher in Mut+/Phen− patients as compared to controls (−17.0±2.3 vs. −22.6±2.9 dB, p<0.01) suggesting significant myocardial structural alterations. Global and basal anteroseptal longitudinal strains (−8.4±4.0%, p<0.01) were the most impaired in Mut+/Phen+ patients as compared to the other 2 groups. Although global longitudinal strain was similar between Mut+/Phen− group and controls, basal anteroseptal strain was lower in Mut+/Phen− patients (−14.1±3.8%, p<0.01) as compared to controls (−19.9±2.9%, p<0.01), suggesting a subclinical segmental systolic dysfunction. A combination of >−19.0 dB basal anteroseptal cIBS or >−18.0% basal anteroseptal longitudinal strain had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 72% in differentiating Mut+/Phen− group from controls. Conclusion The use of cIBS and segmental longitudinal strain can differentiate HCM Mut+/Phen− patients from controls with important clinical implications for the family screening and follow-up of these patients. PMID:22574137

  12. Exercise speckle-tracking strain imaging demonstrates impaired right ventricular contractile reserve in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Antonello; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Baldini, Luca; Verrengia, Marina; Carbone, Andreina; Di Palma, Enza; Vastarella, Rossella; Masarone, Daniele; Tagliamonte, Gianluigi; Riegler, Lucia; Calabrò, Raffaele; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Bossone, Eduardo; Pacileo, Giuseppe

    2017-01-15

    To analyse right ventricular (RV) systolic function in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) at rest and during exercise, and its possible correlation with left ventricular(LV) morphology and function. Standard echo, exercise stress echo, and RV 2D speckle-tracking strain (2DSE) were performed in 45 patients with HCM and in 45 age- and sex-comparable healthy controls. RV global longitudinal strain (GLS) was calculated by averaging local strains along the entire right ventricle. LV mass index and IVS wall thickness were significantly increased in HCM, while LV ejection fraction, RV diameters, RV tissue Doppler systolic peak and the RV end-systolic pressure-area relationship at rest were comparable between the two groups. Conversely, all transmitral Doppler indexes were significantly impaired in HCM. In addition, RV GLS and regional peak myocardial RV strains were significantly reduced in patients with HCM (all P<0.001). During physical effort, LV ejection fraction was comparable between the two groups. Conversely, LV E/Em ratio was significantly increased in HCM. Increase in TAPSE and RV tissue Doppler Sm peak velocity during effort were similar between the two groups. Conversely, increases of RV end-systolic pressure-area, regional and global RV strain were significantly lower in HCM patients (RV lateral strain: 10.3±3.5% of increase in HCM vs 20.5±4.5% in controls; p<0.0001). Multivariable analysis detected independent associations of RV lateral strain at peak stress with LV IVS thickness, maximal workload during exercise, and LV E/Em ratio during effort (all p<0.0001). An RV lateral 2DSE cut-off point of -14% differentiated controls and HCM with an 86%sensitivity and a 92% specificity. RV contractile reserve for HCM is impaired and this suggests that the lower resting values of RV in HCM may represent early subclinical myocardial damage, closely associated with exercise capacity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clozapine in a patient with treatment-resistant schizophrenia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Asiel Yair Adan; Foster, Jessica J.; Plymen, Carla M.; Shergill, Sukhi

    2016-01-01

    Background There is currently limited experience in the initiation and maintenance of clozapine for treatment-resistant psychosis in adults with established structural heart disease. These complex patients require close supervision and liaison between colleagues. Here we present the successful experience of treating one such patient within our service and describe a monitoring plan to ensure that these treatments can be provided both safely and effectively. Case presentation A 36-year-old man with treatment-resistant schizophrenia and known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was admitted to a specialist unit for a trial of clozapine. His psychiatric illness was characterised by multimodal hallucinations and delusions combined with low mood and poor motivation. The diagnosis of HCM was made 3 years previously following a routine electrocardiogram (ECG), and he had remained asymptomatic throughout this time; there were concerns about the risk of initiating clozapine given his pre-existing cardiac condition. Baseline investigations were performed as per local guidelines prior to commencing clozapine; these were within normal limits other than a mildly raised troponin level of 54 ng/L (normal <16 ng/L), which was attributed to the HCM. In addition, baseline transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) was performed which showed no change in the structural heart disease in comparison with previous TTEs. Clozapine was started at 12.5 mg daily and up-titrated to 150 mg twice daily over 14 days as per our institute’s guidelines. The patient was monitored with regular testing of troponins, inflammatory markers and ECG. On day 18, the troponin level increased to 1371 ng/L. Creatine kinase and inflammatory markers remained stable. No changes in ECG or TTE were noted and the patient remained clinically asymptomatic. Cardiology opinion was sought and reported that the finding of an isolated elevated troponin was likely to reflect a ‘troponin leak’ in the context of increased

  14. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain prevents development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Chen-Ching; Muthu, Priya; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Liang, Jingsheng; Huang, Wenrui; Irving, Thomas C.; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M.; Hare, Joshua M.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-06-29

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) of cardiac myosin is known to play a beneficial role in heart disease, but the idea of a phosphorylation-mediated reversal of a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype is novel. Our previous studies on transgenic (Tg) HCM-RLC mice revealed that the D166V (Aspartate166 →Valine) mutation-induced changes in heart morphology and function coincided with largely reduced RLC phosphorylation in situ. In this paper, we hypothesized that the introduction of a constitutively phosphorylated Serine15 (S15D) into the hearts of D166V mice would prevent the development of a deleterious HCM phenotype. In support of this notion, MLCK-induced phosphorylation of D166V-mutated hearts was found to rescue some of their abnormal contractile properties. Tg-S15D-D166V mice were generated with the human cardiac RLC-S15D-D166V construct substituted for mouse cardiac RLC and were subjected to functional, structural, and morphological assessments. The results were compared with Tg-WT and Tg-D166V mice expressing the human ventricular RLC-WT or its D166V mutant, respectively. Echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic studies demonstrated significant improvements of intact heart function in S15D-D166V mice compared with D166V, with the systolic and diastolic indices reaching those monitored in WT mice. A largely reduced maximal tension and abnormally high myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity observed in D166V-mutated hearts were reversed in S15D-D166V mice. Low-angle X-ray diffraction study revealed that altered myofilament structures present in HCM-D166V mice were mitigated in S15D-D166V rescue mice. Finally, our collective results suggest that expression of pseudophosphorylated RLC in the hearts of HCM mice is sufficient to prevent the development of the pathological HCM phenotype.

  15. Assessment of asynchronous relaxation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, S.; Tamaki, N.; Senda, M.; Yonekura, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Nohara, R.; Tamaki, S.; Kambara, H.; Kawai, C.; Torizuka, K.

    1984-01-01

    This study is undertaken to assess cardiac performance in relation to left ventricular(LV) asynchronous wall motion. Multigated blood-pool study was performed in 67 cases, including 14 normals(N), 16 with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy(HCM), and 37 with ischemic heart disease (IHD). IHD was further divided into 2 groups: IHD(I)(EF greater than or equal to 50%), and IHD(II)(EF < 50%). Regional (pixel-by-pixel) volume curve was simulated by second order harmonics of Fourier series. Then, functional images of the following indexes were made: EF, TES(time to end-systole), PER(Peak ejection rate), TPE(Time to PER), PFR(peak filling rate), and TPF(time to PFR). The left ventricular phase distribution histograms of TES, TPE, and TPF were made to calculate the standard deviation(SD) as an asynchronous parameter of each phase. TES(SD) was higher in IHD(II)(11.3 +- 5.2 deg) than N(4.8 +- 2.5 deg). TPF(SD) was higher in HCM(11.7 +- 9.7 deg) and IHD(15.1 +- 11.3 deg) than N(5.3 +- 3.7 deg), suggesting asynchronous relaxation. In the study of global LV performance, LVEF was not significantly different in HCM(64 +- 9%) and IHD(I)(58 +- 5%) from N(60 +- 6%). However, PFR was lower in IHD(I)(2.3 +- 0.6 EDV/sec) and IHD(II) (1.6 +- 0.5 EDV/sec) than N(3.3 + 1.0 EDV/sec). PFR/PER was lower in HCM(0.7 +- 0.2), IHD(I)(0.8 +- 0.2), and IHD(II)(0.7 +- 0.3) than N(1.0 +- 0.2). Besides, TPF(SD) was inversely correlated with LVEF(r=-0.43), PFR (r=-0.45), and PFR/PER(r=-0.51). Thus, asynchronous relaxation is often seen in HCM and IHD, and it may be related to the disturbance of LV filling.

  16. Coronary microvascular ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy - a pixel-wise quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance perfusion study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microvascular dysfunction in HCM has been associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Advances in quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) perfusion imaging now allow myocardial blood flow to be quantified at the pixel level. We applied these techniques to investigate the spectrum of microvascular dysfunction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and to explore its relationship with fibrosis and wall thickness. Methods CMR perfusion imaging was undertaken during adenosine-induced hyperemia and again at rest in 35 patients together with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was quantified on a pixel-by-pixel basis from CMR perfusion images using a Fermi-constrained deconvolution algorithm. Regions-of-interest (ROI) in hypoperfused and hyperemic myocardium were identified from the MBF pixel maps. The myocardium was also divided into 16 AHA segments. Results Resting MBF was significantly higher in the endocardium than in the epicardium (mean ± SD: 1.25 ± 0.35 ml/g/min versus 1.20 ± 0.35 ml/g/min, P < 0.001), a pattern that reversed with stress (2.00 ± 0.76 ml/g/min versus 2.36 ± 0.83 ml/g/min, P < 0.001). ROI analysis revealed 11 (31%) patients with stress MBF lower than resting values (1.05 ± 0.39 ml/g/min versus 1.22 ± 0.36 ml/g/min, P = 0.021). There was a significant negative association between hyperemic MBF and wall thickness (β = −0.047 ml/g/min per mm, 95% CI: −0.057 to −0.038, P < 0.001) and a significantly lower probability of fibrosis in a segment with increasing hyperemic MBF (odds ratio per ml/g/min: 0.086, 95% CI: 0.078 to 0.095, P = 0.003). Conclusions Pixel-wise quantitative CMR perfusion imaging identifies a subgroup of patients with HCM that have localised severe microvascular dysfunction which may give rise to myocardial ischemia. PMID:25160568

  17. Clinical features, spectrum of causal genetic mutations and outcome of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in South Africans

    PubMed Central

    Ntusi, Ntobeko AB; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Badri, Motasim; Mayosi, Bongani M; Badri, Motasim; Gumedze, Freedom

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Little is known about the clinical characteristics, spectrum of causal genetic mutations and outcome of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in Africans. The objective of this study was to delineate the clinical and genetic features and outcome of HCM in African patients. Methods Information on clinical presentation, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic findings, and outcome of cases with HCM was collected from the Cardiac Clinic at Groote Schuur Hospital over a mean duration of follow up of 9.1 ± 3.4 years. Genomic DNA was screened for mutations in 15 genes that cause HCM, i.e. cardiac myosinbinding protein C (MYBPC3), cardiac β-myosin heavy chain (MYH7), cardiac troponin T2 (TNNT2), cardiac troponin I (TNNI3), regulatory light chain of myosin (MYL2), essential light chain of myosin (MYL3), tropomyosin 1 (TPM1), phospholamban (PLN), α-actin (ACTC1), cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3 (CSRP3), AMP-activated protein kinase (PRKAG2), α-galactosidase (GLA), four-and-a-half LIM domains 1 (FHL1), lamin A/C (LMNA) and lysosomeassociated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2). Survival and its predictors were analysed using the Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression methods, respectively. Results Forty-three consecutive patients [mean age 38.5 ± 14.3 years; 25 (58.1%) male; and 13 (30.2%) black African] were prospectively enrolled in the study from January 1996 to December 2012. Clinical presentation was similar to that reported in other studies. The South African founder mutations that cause HCM were not found in the 42 probands. Ten of 35 index cases (28.6%) tested for mutations in 15 genes had disease-causing mutations in MYH7 (six cases or 60%) and MYBPC3 (four cases or 40%). No disease-causing mutation was found in the other 13 genes screened. The annual mortality rate was 2.9% per annum and overall survival was 74% at 10 years, which was similar to the general South African population. Cox’s proportional hazards regression showed

  18. Additional value of screening for minor genes and copy number variants in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yotti, Raquel; Espinosa, Maria Angeles; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Fernandez-Avila, Ana Isabel; Coll, Monica; Méndez, Irene; Iglesias, Anna; del Olmo, Bernat; Riuró, Helena; Cuenca, Sofía; Allegue, Catarina; Campuzano, Oscar; Picó, Ferran; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Álvarez, Patricia; Castillo, Sergio; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Gonzalez-Lopez, Esther; Padron-Barthe, Laura; Díaz de Bustamante, Aranzazu; Darnaude, María Teresa; González-Hevia, José Ignacio; Brugada, Josep; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Brugada, Ramon

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most prevalent inherited heart disease. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is the preferred genetic test, but the diagnostic value of screening for minor and candidate genes, and the role of copy number variants (CNVs) deserves further evaluation. Methods Three hundred and eighty-seven consecutive unrelated patients with HCM were screened for genetic variants in the 5 most frequent genes (MYBPC3, MYH7, TNNT2, TNNI3 and TPM1) using Sanger sequencing (N = 84) or NGS (N = 303). In the NGS cohort we analyzed 20 additional minor or candidate genes, and applied a proprietary bioinformatics algorithm for detecting CNVs. Additionally, the rate and classification of TTN variants in HCM were compared with 427 patients without structural heart disease. Results The percentage of patients with pathogenic/likely pathogenic (P/LP) variants in the main genes was 33.3%, without significant differences between the Sanger sequencing and NGS cohorts. The screening for 20 additional genes revealed LP variants in ACTC1, MYL2, MYL3, TNNC1, GLA and PRKAG2 in 12 patients. This approach resulted in more inconclusive tests (36.0% vs. 9.6%, p<0.001), mostly due to variants of unknown significance (VUS) in TTN. The detection rate of rare variants in TTN was not significantly different to that found in the group of patients without structural heart disease. In the NGS cohort, 4 patients (1.3%) had pathogenic CNVs: 2 deletions in MYBPC3 and 2 deletions involving the complete coding region of PLN. Conclusions A small percentage of HCM cases without point mutations in the 5 main genes are explained by P/LP variants in minor or candidate genes and CNVs. Screening for variants in TTN in HCM patients drastically increases the number of inconclusive tests, and shows a rate of VUS that is similar to patients without structural heart disease, suggesting that this gene should not be analyzed for clinical purposes in HCM. PMID:28771489

  19. Changes in coronary sinus pH during dipyridamole stress in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, P. M.; Rosano, G. M.; Gill, J. S.; Poole-Wilson, P. A.; Kaski, J. C.; McKenna, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The presence of angina pectoris and myocardial scarring in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) suggests that myocardial ischemia is a factor in the pathophysiology of the disease. The clinical evaluation of ischaemia is problematic in HCM as baseline electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequent and thallium-201 perfusion abnormalities correlate poorly with anginal symptoms. Coronary sinus pH measurement using a catheter mounted pH electrode is a validated sensitive technique for the detection of myocardial ischaemia. METHODS AND RESULTS: 11 patients with HCM and chest pain (eight men; mean (SD) (range) age 36 (11) (19-53) years) and six controls (two men; mean (SD) (range) age 49 (11) (31-62) years) with atypical pain and normal coronary angiograms were studied. Eight patients with HCM had baseline ST segment depression of > or = 1 mm and four had reversible perfusion defects during stress 201TI scintigraphy. A catheter mounted hydrogen ion sensitive electrode was introduced into the coronary sinus and pH monitored continuously during dipyridamole infusion (0.56 mg/kg over four min). The maximal change in coronary sinus pH during dipyridamole stress was greater in patients with HCM than in controls (0.082 (0.083) (0 to -0.275) v 0.005 (0.006) (0 to -0.012), P = 0.02). In six patients (four men; mean (SD) (range) age 29 (9) (19-40 years) the development of chest pain was associated with a gradual decline in coronary sinus pH (mean 0.123 (0.089)), peaking at 442 (106) s. There were no relations among left ventricular dimensions, maximal wall thickness, and maximum pH change. In patients with HCM there was a correlation between maximum pH change and maximum heart rate during dipyridamole infusion (r = 0.70, P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: This study provides further evidence that chest pain in patients with HCM is caused by myocardial ischaemia. The role of myocardial ischaemia in the pathophysiology of the disease remains to be determined but

  20. [Exercise echocardiography in different types of hypertension classified by left ventricular geometry; comparison with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Asai, M; Oki, T; Kawahara, K; Takemura, H; Fukuda, N; Sakai, H; Tominaga, T; Murao, A; Ohshima, C; Niki, T

    1983-06-01

    We investigated left ventricular (LV) function in 40 patients (pts) with hypertension (HT), 16 pts with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), 3 pts with ASH and HT and in 27 control subjects by M-mode echocardiography using supine exercise (50 watts, 3 minutes). The hypertensive subjects were echocardiographically divided into three subsets; the normal LV (17 cases), the hypertrophied LV (17 cases) and the dilated LV (6 cases). Similarly, pts with HCM were echocardiographically and cineangiographically divided into three subsets; ASH (asymmetric septal hypertrophy, 6 cases), APH (predominant apical hypertrophy, 6 cases) and DFH (diffuse left ventricular hypertrophy, 4 cases). Changes of left ventricular dimension Controls and HT: Stroke volume was increased during exercise in the controls, normal LV and hypertrophied LV groups by decreasing LV end-systolic dimension ( LVDs ), but it was increased in dilated LV group by increasing LV end-diastolic dimension ( LVDd ) (Frank-Starling mechanism). LVDd was increased transiently in the controls and normal LV group during recovery, but its grade and duration were more pronounced in the latter. LVDd did not change significantly in hypertrophied and the dilated LV groups. HCM: LVDd and LVDs did not change significantly during exercise in all 3 groups. LVDd was increased transiently during recovery in ASH group, but not in the other groups. Changes of peak velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (VCF) and the ratio of peak systolic blood pressure to LV end-systolic volume (PSP/ LVVs ). Controls and HT: Peak VCF was increased during exercise most markedly in the normal LV group, but it was not increased in the dilated LV group. PSP/ LVVs was increased significantly during exercise in the controls, the normal and hypertrophied LV groups, but not in the dilated LV group. HCM: Peak VCF showed a significant increase during exercise in ASH group, but not in the other two groups. Changes of the D/S ratio. The ratio of systolic to

  1. Fragmented QRS as a predictor of arrhythmic events in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Femenía, Francisco; Arce, Maurico; Van Grieken, Jorge; Trucco, Emilce; Mont, Luis; Abello, Mauricio; Merino, José L; Rivero-Ayerza, Máximo; Gorenek, Bulent; Rodriguez, Carlos; Hopman, Wilma M; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to determine whether fragmented QRS (fQRS) in the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) at implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implant can predict arrhythmic events using appropriate therapy delivered by the ICD as a surrogate. Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a genetic disorder associated with life-threatening arrhythmias frequently requiring an ICD. Seeking a noninvasive method of risk stratification remains a challenge. This paper is a retrospective, multicenter study of patients with HOCM and ICD. Surface 12-lead ECGs were analyzed. Appropriate therapy was validated by a blinded Core Lab. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. A p value of <0.05 was considered significant. We included 102 patients from 13 centers. Mean age at implant was 41.16 ± 18.25 years, 52% were male. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 61.56 ± 9.46% and two thirds had heart failure according to the New York Heart Association class I. Secondary prophylaxis ICD implantation was the indication for implant in 40.2% of cases. About half received a single-chamber ICD. fQRS was present at the time of diagnosis in 21 and in 54% at ICD implant. At a mean follow-up of 47.8 ± 39.3 months, 41 patients (40.2%) presented with appropriate therapy. In a multivariate logistic regression, predictors of appropriate therapy included fQRS at implant (odds ratio [OR], 16.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.6-74.0; p = 0.0003), history of combined ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation/sudden death (OR, 14.3; 95% CI, 3.2-69.3; p = 0.001) and history of syncope (OR, 5.5; 95% CI, 1.5-20.4; p = 0.009). Ten deaths (9.8%) occurred during the follow-up. fQRS in the lateral location increased the risk of appropriate therapy (p < 0.0001). fQRS predicts arrhythmic events in patients with HOCM and should be considered in a model of risk stratification.

  2. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain prevents development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Chen-Ching; Muthu, Priya; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; ...

    2015-06-29

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) of cardiac myosin is known to play a beneficial role in heart disease, but the idea of a phosphorylation-mediated reversal of a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype is novel. Our previous studies on transgenic (Tg) HCM-RLC mice revealed that the D166V (Aspartate166 →Valine) mutation-induced changes in heart morphology and function coincided with largely reduced RLC phosphorylation in situ. In this paper, we hypothesized that the introduction of a constitutively phosphorylated Serine15 (S15D) into the hearts of D166V mice would prevent the development of a deleterious HCM phenotype. In supportmore » of this notion, MLCK-induced phosphorylation of D166V-mutated hearts was found to rescue some of their abnormal contractile properties. Tg-S15D-D166V mice were generated with the human cardiac RLC-S15D-D166V construct substituted for mouse cardiac RLC and were subjected to functional, structural, and morphological assessments. The results were compared with Tg-WT and Tg-D166V mice expressing the human ventricular RLC-WT or its D166V mutant, respectively. Echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic studies demonstrated significant improvements of intact heart function in S15D-D166V mice compared with D166V, with the systolic and diastolic indices reaching those monitored in WT mice. A largely reduced maximal tension and abnormally high myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity observed in D166V-mutated hearts were reversed in S15D-D166V mice. Low-angle X-ray diffraction study revealed that altered myofilament structures present in HCM-D166V mice were mitigated in S15D-D166V rescue mice. Finally, our collective results suggest that expression of pseudophosphorylated RLC in the hearts of HCM mice is sufficient to prevent the development of the pathological HCM phenotype.« less

  3. Targeted next-generation sequencing helps to decipher the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cecconi, Massimiliano; Parodi, Maria I.; Formisano, Francesco; Spirito, Paolo; Autore, Camillo; Musumeci, Maria B.; Favale, Stefano; Forleo, Cinzia; Rapezzi, Claudio; Biagini, Elena; Davì, Sabrina; Canepa, Elisabetta; Pennese, Loredana; Castagnetta, Mauro; Degiorgio, Dario; Coviello, Domenico A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is mainly associated with myosin, heavy chain 7 (MYH7) and myosin binding protein C, cardiac (MYBPC3) mutations. In order to better explain the clinical and genetic heterogeneity in HCM patients, in this study, we implemented a target-next generation sequencing (NGS) assay. An Ion AmpliSeq™ Custom Panel for the enrichment of 19 genes, of which 9 of these did not encode thick/intermediate and thin myofilament (TTm) proteins and, among them, 3 responsible of HCM phenocopy, was created. Ninety-two DNA samples were analyzed by the Ion Personal Genome Machine: 73 DNA samples (training set), previously genotyped in some of the genes by Sanger sequencing, were used to optimize the NGS strategy, whereas 19 DNA samples (discovery set) allowed the evaluation of NGS performance. In the training set, we identified 72 out of 73 expected mutations and 15 additional mutations: the molecular diagnosis was achieved in one patient with a previously wild-type status and the pre-excitation syndrome was explained in another. In the discovery set, we identified 20 mutations, 5 of which were in genes encoding non-TTm proteins, increasing the diagnostic yield by approximately 20%: a single mutation in genes encoding non-TTm proteins was identified in 2 out of 3 borderline HCM patients, whereas co-occuring mutations in genes encoding TTm and galactosidase alpha (GLA) altered proteins were characterized in a male with HCM and multiorgan dysfunction. Our combined targeted NGS-Sanger sequencing-based strategy allowed the molecular diagnosis of HCM with greater efficiency than using the conventional (Sanger) sequencing alone. Mutant alleles encoding non-TTm proteins may aid in the complete understanding of the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of HCM: co-occuring mutations of genes encoding TTm and non-TTm proteins could explain the wide variability of the HCM phenotype, whereas mutations in genes encoding only the non-TTm proteins are identifiable in

  4. Perioperative outcomes of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Ashwat; Khanna, Ashish; Randhawa, Mandeep Singh; Cywinski, Jacek; Saager, Leif; Thamilarasan, Maran; Lever, Harry M; Desai, Milind Y

    2016-10-15

    Due to their unique pathophysiological profile, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) undergoing non-cardiac surgery require additional attention to perioperative management. We sought to compare perioperative outcomes of patients with HCM undergoing non-cardiac surgery with a matched group patients without HCM. This observational cohort study conducted at a tertiary care centre included patients with HCM (n=92, age 67 years, 54% men) undergoing intermediate-risk and high-risk non-cardiac surgeries between 1/2007 and 12/2013 (excluding <18 years, prior septal myectomy/alcohol ablation, low-risk surgery) who were 1:2 matched (based on age, gender, type and time of non-cardiac surgery) with patients without HCM (n=184, median age 65 years, 53% men). A composite endpoint (30-day postoperative death, myocardial infarction, stroke, in-hospital decompensated congestive heart failure (CHF) and rehospitalisation within 30 days) and postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) were recorded. There was a significantly lower incidence of intraoperative hypotension/tachycardia in patients with HCM versus those without HCM (p<0.001). At 30 days postoperatively, 42 (15%) patients had composite events. Rates of 30-day death, MI or stroke were very low in patients with HCM (5%). However, a significantly higher proportion of patients with HCM met the composite endpoint versus patients without HCM (20 (22%) vs 22 (12%), p=0.03), driven by decompensated CHF. On logistic regression, HCM, high-risk non-cardiac surgery, high anaesthesia risk score and intraoperative duration of hypotension were independently associated with 30-day composite events (p<0.05). Patients with HCM undergoing high-risk and intermediate-risk non-cardiac surgeries have a low perioperative event rate, at an experienced centre. However, they have a higher risk of composite events versus matched patients without HCM. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  5. Coronary vasodilation is impaired in both hypertrophied and nonhypertrophied myocardium of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A study with nitrogen-13 ammonia and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Camici, P.; Chiriatti, G.; Lorenzoni, R.; Bellina, R.C.; Gistri, R.; Italiani, G.; Parodi, O.; Salvadori, P.A.; Nista, N.; Papi, L. )

    1991-03-15

    To assess regional coronary reserve in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, regional myocardial blood flow was measured in 23 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 12 control subjects by means of nitrogen-13 ammonia and dynamic positron emission tomography. In patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at baseline study, regional myocardial blood flow was 1.14 +/- 0.43 ml/min per g in the hypertrophied (20 +/- 3 mm) interventricular septum and 0.90 +/- 0.35 ml/min per g (p less than 0.05 versus septal flow) in the nonhypertrophied (10 +/- 2 mm) left ventricular free wall. These were not statistically different from the corresponding values in control subjects (1.04 +/- 0.25 and 0.91 +/- 0.21 ml/min per g, respectively, p = NS). After pharmacologically induced coronary vasodilation (dipyridamole, 0.56 mg/kg intravenously over 4 min), regional myocardial blood flow in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy increased significantly less than in control subjects both in the septum (1.63 +/- 0.58 versus 2.99 +/- 1.06 ml/min per g, p less than 0.001) and in the free wall (1.47 +/- 0.58 versus 2.44 +/- 0.82 ml/min per g, p less than 0.001). In addition, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who had a history of chest pain had more pronounced impairment of coronary vasodilator reserve than did those without a history of chest pain. After dipyridamole, coronary resistance in the septum decreased by 38% in patients without a history of chest pain, but decreased by only 14% in those with such a history (p less than 0.05). Coronary resistance in the free wall decreased by 45% in patients without and by 27% in those with a history of chest pain (p = 0.06).

  6. [Clinical and gene mutation analysis of three children with late-onset glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Luo, J H; Qiu, W J; Fang, D; Ye, J; Han, L S; Zhang, H W; Yu, Y G; Liang, L L; Gu, X F

    2017-06-02

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and laboratory features of three children with late-onset type Ⅱ glycogen storage disease(GSD) who presented with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and to analyze the effect of five mutations identified on the acid-α-glucosidase (GAA) activity and stability. Method: Three cases of children with muscle weakness were included in this study.GAA activity was analyzed in Dried Blood Spot of the patients.DNA was extracted from peripheral blood in all the patients and their parents and subjected to polymerase chain reaction and directly sequencing of GAA gene.Five mutant pcDNA3.1-myc-his-GAA expression plasmids(p.G478R, p.P361L, p.P266S, p.Q323X, p.R672Q) were constructed and transient instantaneously transfected into 293T cells to analyze the enzyme activity and stability of GAA. Result: All the three children had the onset of disease at 3 years or 1.5 years of age.They presented with developmental delay, muscle weakness and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.GAA activity of 3 patients was 2.65, 3.55 and 1.51 pmol(punch·h)(8.00-98.02)respectively. Genetic analysis found 5 mutations (p.G478R, p. P361L, p. P266S, p. Q323X, p. R672Q), and all of these 3 cases had clinical manifestations and were diagnosed as late-onset type Ⅱ glycogen storage disease.Five mutant pcDNA3.1-myc-his-GAA expression plasmids were transfected into 293T cells.Five mutant enzyme activities were found to be only 9.9%-22.5% of the wild-type enzyme activity and the protein expression of the five mutants was 32.0%-63.9% compared with the wild type. Conclusion: This study reports 3 children with late-onset GSD Ⅱ accompanied by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and compensatory stage of cardiac function in addition to limb muscle weakness.Five pathogenic mutations were identified, and these 5 mutations result in decreased GAA activity and GAA expression by in vitro functional analysis.

  7. Cardiopulmonary responses and prognosis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a potential role for comprehensive noninvasive hemodynamic assessment.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Haddad, Francois; Knowles, Joshua W; Caleshu, Colleen; Pavlovic, Aleksandra; Homburger, Julian; Shmargad, Yael; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Magavern, Emma; Wong, Myo; Perez, Marco; Schnittger, Ingela; Myers, Jonathan; Froelicher, Victor; Ashley, Euan A

    2015-05-01

    This study sought to discover the key determinants of exercise capacity, maximal oxygen consumption (oxygen uptake [Vo2]), and ventilatory efficiency (ventilation/carbon dioxide output [VE/Vco2] slope) and assess the prognostic potential of metabolic exercise testing in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The intrinsic mechanisms leading to reduced functional tolerance in HCM are unclear. The study sample included 156 HCM patients consecutively enrolled from January 1, 2007 to January 1, 2012 with a complete clinical assessment, including rest and stress echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) with impedance cardiography. Patients were also followed for the composite outcome of cardiac-related death, heart transplant, and functional deterioration leading to septal reduction therapy (myectomy or septal alcohol ablation). Abnormalities in CPET responses were frequent, with 39% (n = 61) of the sample showing a reduced exercise tolerance (Vo2 max <80% of predicted) and 19% (n = 30) characterized by impaired ventilatory efficiency (VE/Vco2 slope >34). The variables most strongly associated with exercise capacity (expressed in metabolic equivalents), were peak cardiac index (r = 0.51, p < 0.001), age (r = -0.25, p < 0.01), male sex (r = 0.24, p = 0.02), and indexed right ventricular end-diastolic area (r = 0.31, p = 0.002), resulting in an R(2) of 0.51, p < 0.001. Peak cardiac index was the main predictor of peak Vo2 (r = 0.61, p < 0.001). The variables most strongly related to VE/VCO2 slope were E/E' (r = 0.23, p = 0.021) and indexed left atrial volume index (LAVI) (r = 0.34, p = 0.005) (model R(2) = 0.15). The composite endpoint occurred in 21 (13%) patients. In an exploratory analysis, 3 variables were independently associated with the composite outcome (mean follow-up 27 ± 11 months): peak Vo2 <80% of predicted (hazard ratio: 4.11; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46 to 11.59; p = 0.008), VE/Vco2 slope >34 (hazard ratio: 3.14; 95

  8. Myosin-binding Protein C Compound Heterozygous Variant Effect on the Phenotypic Expression of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Julianny Freitas; Cruz, Fernando Eugênio Dos Santos; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos Campos de; Gottlieb, Ilan; Cazelli, José Guilherme; Siciliano, Ana Paula; Dias, Glauber Monteiro

    2017-04-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. It is the major cause of sudden cardiac death in young high-level athletes. Studies have demonstrated a poorer prognosis when associated with specific mutations. The association between HCM genotype and phenotype has been the subject of several studies since the discovery of the genetic nature of the disease. This study shows the effect of a MYBPC3 compound variant on the phenotypic HCM expression. A family in which a young man had a clinical diagnosis of HCM underwent clinical and genetic investigations. The coding regions of the MYH7, MYBPC3 and TNNT2 genes were sequenced and analyzed. The proband present a malignant manifestation of the disease, and is the only one to express HCM in his family. The genetic analysis through direct sequencing of the three main genes related to this disease identified a compound heterozygous variant (p.E542Q and p.D610H) in MYBPC3. A family analysis indicated that the p.E542Q and p.D610H alleles have paternal and maternal origin, respectively. No family member carrier of one of the variant alleles manifested clinical signs of HCM. We suggest that the MYBPC3-biallelic heterozygous expression of p.E542Q and p.D610H may cause the severe disease phenotype seen in the proband. Resumo A cardiomiopatia hipertrófica (CMH) é uma doença autossômica dominante causada por mutações em genes que codificam as proteínas dos sarcômeros. É a principal causa de morte súbita cardíaca em atletas jovens de alto nível. Estudos têm demonstrado um pior prognóstico associado a mutações específicas. A associação entre genótipo e fenótipo em CMH tem sido objeto de diversos estudos desde a descoberta da origem genética dessa doença. Este trabalho apresenta o efeito de uma mutação composta em MYBPC3 na expressão fenotípica da CMH. Uma família na qual um jovem tem o diagnóstico clínico de CMH foi

  9. [Atrial fibrillation in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: clinical characteristics and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Cui, H; Wang, J J; Xiao, M H; Lu, J; Zheng, X X; Guo, Y; Wang, S Y; Huang, X H

    2017-03-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical characteristics and risk factors for atrial fibrillation(AF)in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy(OHCM). Methods: Patients with OHCM hospitalized in Fuwai Hospital from March 2011 to January 2016 were enrolled in the present study. Each patient underwent examinations including transthoracic echocardiography, body surface electrocardiograph or dynamic electrocardiogram (Holter). Cardiac troponin I (cTNI) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP)levels were tested and clinical profiles were collected.The subjects were divided into two groups (the AF group and non-AF group). Risk factors for AF in patients with OHCM were assessed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 309 patients were evaluated in the study. Among them, 17.5%( 54/309) patients were with AF.Age[(51.2±10.1)years vs (43.1 ± 14.4)years], New York Heart Association class(NYHA class)(2.8±0.5 vs 2.6±0.6), disease duration[6.0(4.0, 10.0)years vs 3.0(1.0, 6.0)years], left atrial (LA) dimension[(45.1±7.0)mm vs(42.6 ± 7.4)mm]and NT-pro-BNP levels[2 007(1 565, 3 199)pmol/L vs 1 509(729, 2 921)pmol/L]in the AF group were significantly higher than those in the non-AF group (all P<0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that advanced age(OR=1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.08, P<0.01), higher NYHA class(OR=2.00, 95% CI 1.08-3.70, P<0.05)and longer disease duration(OR=1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.15, P<0.05)were independent risk factors for AF in patients with OHCM, in which advanced age(OR=1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.09, P<0.01), higher NYHA class(OR=3.39, 95% CI 1.53-7.54, P<0.01), LA dimension(OR=1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12, P<0.05)and longer clinical course(OR=1.12, 95% CI 1.04-1.20, P<0.01)were associated with AF in male patients, and advanced age (OR=1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.09, P<0.05)and longer disease duration(OR=1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.28, P<0.01)were associated with AF in female patients when stratified by gender. Conclusion

  10. Does quality of life outweigh the cardiovascular risks of stimulant medication in a child with ADHD and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Senderey, Emily; Sousa, John; Stavitsky, Mark

    2017-10-04

    A 10-year-old girl with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The stimulant medications used to control her ADHD pose possibly fatal risks to her cardiovascular health, so stimulant medication is stopped. Due to very poor quality of life off of medication, alternative therapies are used without improvement. The patient's caretakers decide that the benefits of stimulant medication outweigh the risks to the patient. The healthcare team clears the patient to be put back on stimulant medication with a signed waiver of liability by her caretakers. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Screening mutations in myosin binding protein C3 gene in a cohort of patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background MyBPC3 mutations are amongst the most frequent causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, however, its prevalence varies between populations. They have been associated with mild and late onset disease expression. Our objectives were to establish the prevalence of MyBPC3 mutations and determine their associated clinical characteristics in our patients. Methods Screening by Single Strand Conformation Polymorphisms (SSCP) and sequencing of the fragments with abnormal motility of the MyBPC3 gene in 130 unrelated consecutive HCM index cases. Genotype-Phenotype correlation studies were done in positive families. Results 16 mutations were found in 20 index cases (15%): 5 novel [D75N, V471E, Q327fs, IVS6+5G>A (homozygous), and IVS11-9G>A] and 11 previously described [A216T, R495W, R502Q (2 families), E542Q (3 families), T957S, R1022P (2 families), E1179K, K504del, K600fs, P955fs and IVS29+5G>A]. Maximum wall thickness and age at time of diagnosis were similar to patients with MYH7 mutations [25(7) vs. 27(8), p = 0.16], [46(16) vs. 44(19), p = 0.9]. Conclusions Mutations in MyBPC3 are present in 15% of our hypertrophic cardiomyopathy families. Severe hypertrophy and early expression are compatible with the presence of MyBPC3 mutations. The genetic diagnosis not only allows avoiding clinical follow up of non carriers but it opens new possibilities that includes: to take preventive clinical decisions in mutation carriers than have not developed the disease yet, the establishment of genotype-phenotype relationship, and to establish a genetic diagnosis routine in patients with familial HCM. PMID:20433692

  12. Combined effects of low-dose spironolactone and captopril therapy in a rat model of genetic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    de Resende, Micheline Monteiro; Kriegel, Alison Jessica; Greene, Andrew Seth

    2006-12-01

    For several years, the severe side effects associated with the use of high doses of the aldosterone antagonist, spironolactone, limited its clinical use. Studies have recently shown efficacy and minimal side effects of low-dose spironolactone combined with standard therapy in the treatment of heart failure and hypertensive patients. The authors evaluated the effects of low-dose spironolactone alone or in combination with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors on the progression of left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling in a congenic rat model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The congenic SS-16/Mcwi rats developed severe cardiac hypertrophy despite being normotensive even on high-salt diet. SS-16/Mcwi and SS/Mcwi rats were fed a low-salt (0.4% NaCl) diet and were treated with vehicle (CON), spironolactone (20 mg/kg/d subcutaneously), captopril (100 mg/kg/d drinking water), or both spironolactone and captopril for 4 weeks. Blood pressure, plasma peptides, cardiac fibrosis, and echocardiography measurements were evaluated. Spironolactone at a low dose had no effect on blood pressure, cardiac hypertrophy, and fibrosis in either strain. However, in combination with captopril, spironolactone decreased the cardiac hypertrophy more than captopril treatment alone. In the SS-16/Mcwi rats, the combined therapy significantly preserved the cardiac index when compared with control. These data indicate that the addition of low-dose spironolactone to captopril treatment was more effective in preventing the progression of heart hypertrophy and ventricular dysfunction in the SS-16/Mcwi than captopril alone. This study suggests that combined spironolactone and captopril therapy may be useful in the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  13. Left ventricular chamber dilatation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: related variables and prognosis in patients with medical and surgical therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, C.; Jenni, R.; Vassalli, G.; Turina, M.; Hess, O. M.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--To determine the incidence and prognosis of left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction in 139 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy during long term follow up. METHODS--Left ventricular chamber dilatation and systolic dysfunction (both together referred to as left ventricular chamber dilatation) were determined echocardiographically. Chamber dilatation was defined as an increase in the left ventricular end diastolic diameter of > 2% per year combined with a decrease in midventricular systolic fractional shortening of > 2% per year of follow up [10.3 (SD 6) years]. The predictive value for left ventricular chamber dilatation of clinical, invasive, and echocardiographic variables and its prognosis were assessed. RESULTS--In 119 of 139 individuals (86%), left ventricular chamber size and systolic function remained stable (group 1), and in 20/139 patients (14%) left ventricular chamber dilatation occurred during follow up (group 2). At baseline examination, symptoms such as dyspnoea and syncope occurred less often in group 1 than in group 2; New York Heart Association classification was lower in group 1 than in group 2 (P = 0.001). Left ventricular mass index relative to sex specific normal values was increased by 18% in group 1 and by 41% in group 2 (P = 0.04). Cumulative survival rates were slightly although not significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2. Event-free survival was significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2 (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS--(1) The development of left ventricular chamber dilatation and systolic dysfunction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy occurs in approximately 1.5% of the patients per year. (2) Factors associated with left ventricular dilatation are dyspnoea, syncope, a higher functional classification, and a higher degree of left ventricular hypertrophy. (3) Patients with chamber dilatation have a worse prognosis than those without, particularly regarding quality of life. PMID:8562235

  14. Efficacy and safety of alcohol septal ablation in patients over 65 years old with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cheddadi, Laila; Lairez, Olivier; Lhermusier, Thibault; Campelo-Parada, Francisco; Galinier, Michel; Carrié, Didier; Boudou, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    The performance of alcohol septal ablation (ASA) in elderly symptomatic patients with drug-refractory obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is still to be confirmed. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of ASA in patients under and over 65 years old. Fifty-one consecutive patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardio-myopathy who underwent ASA were retrospectively included and reviewed for in-hospital major acute cardiac events and follow-up. Twenty-eight patients were over 65 years old. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction at rest, use of diuretic and average dose of diuretic were higher in patients over 65 years old. There was no difference in hospital stay between patients under and over 65 years old. Among patients over 65 years old, 2 (7%) died before being discharged. Major acute cardiac events were more frequent in patients over 65 years old in comparison with younger patients (43% versus 9%, respectively, P=0.007). The average follow-up duration was 16±15 months. There was no difference between patients under and over 65 years old regarding the efficacy of the procedure with a decrease of the New York Heart Association class of 1.3±0.6 and 1.4±0.7 (P=0.510) and the maximum left ventricular outflow tract gradient of 86±57 and 81±36 mmHg (P=0.733), respectively. Elderly patients have the same benefits as younger patients after ASA but have more complications including mortality events.

  15. Single-molecule mechanics of R403Q cardiac myosin isolated from the mouse model of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tyska, M J; Hayes, E; Giewat, M; Seidman, C E; Seidman, J G; Warshaw, D M

    2000-04-14

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is an inherited cardiac disease that can result in sudden death in the absence of any overt symptoms. Many of the cases documented to date have been linked with missense mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene. Here we present data detailing the functional impact of one of the most deadly mutations, R403Q, on myosin motor function. Experiments were performed on whole cardiac myosin purified from a mouse model of FHC to eliminate potential uncertainties associated with protein expression systems. The R403Q mutant myosin demonstrated 2.3-fold higher actin-activated ATPase activity, 2.2-fold greater average force generation, and 1.6-fold faster actin filament sliding in the motility assay. The force- and displacement-generating capacities of both the normal and mutant myosin were also characterized at the single molecule level in the laser trap assay. Both control and mutant generated similar unitary forces ( approximately 1 pN) and displacements ( approximately 7 nm) without any differences in event durations. On the basis of the distribution of mean unitary displacements, this mutation may possibly perturb the mechanical coordination between the 2 heads of cardiac myosin. Any of these observations could, alone or possibly in combination, result in abnormal power output and potentially a stimulus for the hypertrophic response.

  16. Microarray analysis of active cardiac remodeling genes in a familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mouse model rescued by a phospholamban knockout

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sudarsan; Pena, James R.; Jegga, Anil G.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Wolska, Beata M.

    2013-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a disease characterized by ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and aberrant systolic and/or diastolic function. Our laboratories have previously developed two mouse models that affect cardiac performance. One mouse model encodes an FHC-associated mutation in α-tropomyosin: Glu → Gly at amino acid 180, designated as Tm180. These mice display a phenotype that is characteristic of FHC, including severe cardiac hypertrophy with fibrosis and impaired physiological performance. The other model was a gene knockout of phospholamban (PLN KO), a regulator of calcium uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes; these hearts exhibit hypercontractility with no pathological abnormalities. Previous work in our laboratories shows that when mice were genetically crossed between the PLN KO and Tm180, the progeny (PLN KO/Tm180) display a rescued hypertrophic phenotype with improved morphology and cardiac function. To understand the changes in gene expression that occur in these models undergoing cardiac remodeling (Tm180, PLN KO, PLN KO/Tm180, and nontransgenic control mice), we conducted microarray analyses of left ventricular tissue at 4 and 12 mo of age. Expression profiling reveals that 1,187 genes changed expression in direct response to the three genetic models. With these 1,187 genes, 11 clusters emerged showing normalization of transcript expression in the PLN KO/Tm180 hearts. In addition, 62 transcripts are highly involved in suppression of the hypertrophic phenotype. Confirmation of the microarray analysis was conducted by quantitative RT-PCR. These results provide insight into genes that alter expression during cardiac remodeling and are active during modulation of the cardiomyopathic phenotype. PMID:23800848

  17. Gene expression patterns in transgenic mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in myosin regulatory light chain☆

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenrui; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Zhiqun; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Narasimhan, Giri; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2017-01-01

    Using microarray and bioinformatics, we examined the gene expression profiles in transgenic mouse hearts expressing mutations in the myosin regulatory light chain shown to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We focused on two malignant RLC-mutations, Arginine 58→Glutamine (R58Q) and Aspartic Acid 166 → Valine (D166V), and one benign, Lysine 104 → Glutamic Acid (K104E)-mutation. Datasets of differentially expressed genes for each of three mutants were compared to those observed in wild-type (WT) hearts. The changes in the mutant vs. WT samples were shown as fold-change (FC), with stringency FC ≥ 2. Based on the gene profiles, we have identified the major signaling pathways that underlie the R58Q-, D166V- and K104E-HCM phenotypes. The correlations between different genotypes were also studied using network-based algorithms. Genes with strong correlations were clustered into one group and the central gene networks were identified for each HCM mutant. The overall gene expression patterns in all mutants were distinct from the WT profiles. Both malignant mutations shared certain classes of genes that were up or downregulated, but most similarities were noted between D166V and K104E mice, with R58Q hearts showing a distinct gene expression pattern. Our data suggest that all three HCM mice lead to cardiomyopathy in a mutation-specific manner and thus develop HCM through diverse mechanisms. PMID:26906074

  18. A lethal course of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Noonan syndrome due to a novel germline mutation in the KRAS gene: case study

    PubMed Central

    Nosan, Gregor; Bertok, Sara; Vesel, Samo; Yntema, Helger G.; Paro-Panjan, Darja

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a relatively common and heterogeneous genetic disorder, including congenital heart defect in more than half of the cases. If the defect is not large, life expectancy is normal. Here we report on a case of an infant with Noonan syndrome and rapidly progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with lethal outcome, in whom we identified a novel mutation in the KRAS gene. This heterozygous unclassified missense variant in exon 3: c.179G>T (p.Gly60Val) might be associated with a lethal form of Noonan syndrome. The malignant clinical course of the disease and the lethal outcome in an infant only a few months old might be connected to RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway hyperactivation, consequently promoting cell growth and proliferation, leading to rapidly progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Further biochemical and functional studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:24382853

  19. Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in combination with anomalous insertion of papillary muscle directly into anterior mitral leaflet and "sawfish" systolic narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Taşdemir, O; Küçükaksu, D S; Kural, T; Bayazit, K

    1994-01-01

    This report describes an unusual case of subaortic stenosis in which hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy was found in combination with both anomalous insertion of papillary muscle directly into the anterior mitral leaflet and "sawfish" systolic narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Definitive diagnosis was made on operation. We freed the left anterior descending coronary artery by incising the muscular bridge, resected both papillary muscles, and replaced the mitral valve.

  20. Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in combination with anomalous insertion of papillary muscle directly into anterior mitral leaflet and "sawfish" systolic narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery.

    PubMed Central

    Taşdemir, O; Küçükaksu, D S; Kural, T; Bayazit, K

    1994-01-01

    This report describes an unusual case of subaortic stenosis in which hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy was found in combination with both anomalous insertion of papillary muscle directly into the anterior mitral leaflet and "sawfish" systolic narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Definitive diagnosis was made on operation. We freed the left anterior descending coronary artery by incising the muscular bridge, resected both papillary muscles, and replaced the mitral valve. Images PMID:7888810

  1. Hypertrophic and Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Four Decades of Basic Research on Muscle Lead to Potential Therapeutic Approaches to These Devastating Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of technologies to obtain the complete sequence of the human genome in a cost-effective manner, this decade and those to come will see an exponential increase in our understanding of the underlying genetics that lead to human disease. And where we have a deep understanding of the biochemical and biophysical basis of the machineries and pathways involved in those genetic changes, there are great hopes for the development of modern therapeutics that specifically target the actual machinery and pathways altered by individual mutations. Prime examples of such a genetic disease are those classes of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy that result from single amino-acid substitutions in one of several of the proteins that make up the cardiac sarcomere or from the truncation of myosin binding protein C. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy alone affects ∼1 in 500 individuals, and it is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young adults. Here I describe approaches to understand the molecular basis of the alterations in power output that result from these mutations. Small molecules binding to the mutant sarcomeric protein complex should be able to mitigate the effects of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy mutations at their sources, leading to possible new therapeutic approaches for these genetic diseases. PMID:24655499

  2. Hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy: four decades of basic research on muscle lead to potential therapeutic approaches to these devastating genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Spudich, James A

    2014-03-18

    With the advent of technologies to obtain the complete sequence of the human genome in a cost-effective manner, this decade and those to come will see an exponential increase in our understanding of the underlying genetics that lead to human disease. And where we have a deep understanding of the biochemical and biophysical basis of the machineries and pathways involved in those genetic changes, there are great hopes for the development of modern therapeutics that specifically target the actual machinery and pathways altered by individual mutations. Prime examples of such a genetic disease are those classes of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy that result from single amino-acid substitutions in one of several of the proteins that make up the cardiac sarcomere or from the truncation of myosin binding protein C. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy alone affects ∼1 in 500 individuals, and it is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young adults. Here I describe approaches to understand the molecular basis of the alterations in power output that result from these mutations. Small molecules binding to the mutant sarcomeric protein complex should be able to mitigate the effects of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy mutations at their sources, leading to possible new therapeutic approaches for these genetic diseases.

  3. Gene-specific increase in the energetic cost of contraction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by thick filament mutations.

    PubMed

    Witjas-Paalberends, E Rosalie; Güçlü, Ahmet; Germans, Tjeerd; Knaapen, Paul; Harms, Hendrik J; Vermeer, Alexa M C; Christiaans, Imke; Wilde, Arthur A M; Dos Remedios, Cris; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; van Rossum, Albert C; Stienen, Ger J M; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; Schinkel, Arend F; Michels, Michelle; Ho, Carolyn Y; Poggesi, Corrado; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2014-07-15

    Disease mechanisms regarding hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are largely unknown and disease onset varies. Sarcomere mutations might induce energy depletion for which until now there is no direct evidence at sarcomere level in human HCM. This study investigated if mutations in genes encoding myosin-binding protein C (MYBPC3) and myosin heavy chain (MYH7) underlie changes in the energetic cost of contraction in the development of human HCM disease. Energetic cost of contraction was studied in vitro by measurements of force development and ATPase activity in cardiac muscle strips from 26 manifest HCM patients (11 MYBPC3mut, 9 MYH7mut, and 6 sarcomere mutation-negative, HCMsmn). In addition, in vivo, the ratio between external work (EW) and myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) to obtain myocardial external efficiency (MEE) was determined in 28 pre-hypertrophic mutation carriers (14 MYBPC3mut and 14 MYH7mut) and 14 healthy controls using [(11)C]-acetate positron emission tomography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. Tension cost (TC), i.e. ATPase activity during force development, was higher in MYBPC3mut and MYH7mut compared with HCMsmn at saturating [Ca(2+)]. TC was also significantly higher in MYH7mut at submaximal, more physiological [Ca(2+)]. EW was significantly lower in both mutation carrier groups, while MVO2 did not differ. MEE was significantly lower in both mutation carrier groups compared with controls, showing the lowest efficiency in MYH7 mutation carriers. We provide direct evidence that sarcomere mutations perturb the energetic cost of cardiac contraction. Gene-specific severity of cardiac abnormalities may underlie differences in disease onset and suggests that early initiation of metabolic treatment may be beneficial, in particular, in MYH7 mutation carriers. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Complex phenotype linked to a mutation in exon 11 of the lamin A/C gene: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrioventricular block, severe dyslipidemia and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Ana Rita G; Santos Gonçalves, Inês; Veiga, Fátima; Mendes Pedro, Mónica; Pinto, Fausto J; Brito, Dulce

    2017-09-01

    The lamin A/C (LMNA) gene encodes lamins A and C, which have an important role in nuclear cohesion and chromatin organization. Mutations in this gene usually lead to the so-called laminopathies, the primary cardiac manifestations of which are dilated cardiomyopathy and intracardiac conduction defects. Some mutations, associated with lipodystrophy but not cardiomyopathy, have been linked to metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and severe dyslipidemia. Herein we describe a new phenotype associated with a mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrioventricular block, severe dyslipidemia and diabetes. A 64-year-old woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene (c.1718C>T, Ser573Leu) presented with severe symptomatic ventricular hypertrophy and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. She underwent septal alcohol ablation, followed by Morrow myectomy. The patient was also diagnosed with severe dyslipidemia, diabetes and obesity, and fulfilled diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome. No other characteristics of LMNA mutation-related phenotypes were identified. The development of type III atrioventricular block with no apparent cause, and mildly depressed systolic function, prompted referral for cardiac resynchronization therapy. In conclusion, the association between LMNA mutations and different phenotypes is complex and not fully understood, and can present with a broad spectrum of severity. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Treating a Structural Heart Disease Using a Non-structural Approach: Role of Cardiac Pacing in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Bernard Benjamin P.; Fadreguilan, Erdie C.; Chua, Jeffrey M.; Ho, James; Medrano, Ana Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiovascular disease characterized by a thickened non-dilated ventricle in the absence of another cardiac or systemic condition. Its most important hemodynamic consequence is left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction. The primary management strategy of this condition is surgical septal myectomy, but an acceptable alternative treatment in patients who are not suitable for (or who refuse) surgery is alcohol septal ablation (ASA). However, in patients with unfavorable coronary anatomy which precludes ASA (i.e. absence of major septal perforator branch of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery), another reasonable option is dual chamber pacemaker implantation to decrease LVOT outflow gradient. A 77-year-old female, known hypertensive, diabetic with a history of coronary artery disease, presented with 1-week history of worsening chest pain and shortness of breath. She was admitted as a case of acute coronary syndrome and pneumonia. On workup, 2DED revealed hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) with a demonstrated systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve with a peak instantaneous gradient of 194 mm Hg across the basal LV cavity. The patient refused surgical myectomy, and ASA was the preferred treatment option. On coronary angiography, there was an incidental finding of absent major septal perforator branch of the LAD coronary artery, rendering her unsuitable for septal ablation. She was referred to electrophysiology for evaluation. She underwent dual chamber pacemaker implantation and documented significant decrease in the peak instantaneous gradient from 194 to 37 mm Hg, with complete obliteration of SAM and improvement in overall wall motion. She remained stable and asymptomatic after pacemaker insertion until her recent outpatient follow-up (1 year after implantation). We present a case of HCM with congenitally absent major septal perforator branch coronary artery treated with

  6. Investigations into the Sarcomeric Protein and Ca2+-Regulation Abnormalities Underlying Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Cats (Felix catus)

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Andrew E.; Chan, Jasmine; Daley, Alex; Copeland, O'Neal; Marston, Steven B.; Connolly, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common single gene inherited cardiomyopathy. In cats (Felix catus) HCM is even more prevalent and affects 16% of the outbred population and up to 26% in pedigree breeds such as Maine Coon and Ragdoll. Homozygous MYBPC3 mutations have been identified in these breeds but the mutations in other cats are unknown. At the clinical and physiological level feline HCM is closely analogous to human HCM but little is known about the primary causative mechanism. Most identified HCM causing mutations are in the genes coding for proteins of the sarcomere. We therefore investigated contractile and regulatory proteins in left ventricular tissue from 25 cats, 18 diagnosed with HCM, including a Ragdoll cat with a homozygous MYBPC3 R820W, and 7 non-HCM cats in comparison with human HCM (from septal myectomy) and donor heart tissue. Myofibrillar protein expression was normal except that we observed 20–44% MyBP-C haploinsufficiency in 5 of the HCM cats. Troponin extracted from 8 HCM and 5 non-HCM cat hearts was incorporated into thin filaments and studied by in vitro motility assay. All HCM cat hearts had a higher (2.06 ± 0.13 fold) Ca2+-sensitivity than non-HCM cats and, in all the HCM cats, Ca2+-sensitivity was not modulated by troponin I phosphorylation. We were able to restore modulation of Ca2+-sensitivity by replacing troponin T with wild-type protein or by adding 100 μM Epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG). These fundamental regulatory characteristics closely mimic those seen in human HCM indicating a common molecular mechanism that is independent of the causative mutation. Thus, the HCM cat is a potentially useful large animal model. PMID:28642712

  7. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Myosin Mutation R453C Alters ATP Binding and Hydrolysis of Human Cardiac β-Myosin*

    PubMed Central

    Bloemink, Marieke; Deacon, John; Langer, Stephen; Vera, Carlos; Combs, Ariana; Leinwand, Leslie; Geeves, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation R453C results in one of the more severe forms of the myopathy. Arg-453 is found in a conserved surface loop of the upper 50-kDa domain of the myosin motor domain and lies between the nucleotide binding pocket and the actin binding site. It connects to the cardiomyopathy loop via a long α-helix, helix O, and to Switch-2 via the fifth strand of the central β-sheet. The mutation is, therefore, in a position to perturb a wide range of myosin molecular activities. We report here the first detailed biochemical kinetic analysis of the motor domain of the human β-cardiac myosin carrying the R453C mutation. A recent report of the same mutation (Sommese, R. F., Sung, J., Nag, S., Sutton, S., Deacon, J. C., Choe, E., Leinwand, L. A., Ruppel, K., and Spudich, J. A. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 12607–12612) found reduced ATPase and in vitro motility but increased force production using an optical trap. Surprisingly, our results show that the mutation alters few biochemical kinetic parameters significantly. The exceptions are the rate constants for ATP binding to the motor domain (reduced by 35%) and the ATP hydrolysis step/recovery stroke (slowed 3-fold), which could be the rate-limiting step for the ATPase cycle. Effects of the mutation on the recovery stroke are consistent with a perturbation of Switch-2 closure, which is required for the recovery stroke and the subsequent ATP hydrolysis. PMID:24344137

  8. [P1208fs mutation in the cardiac myosin binding protein C is associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Chinese pedigree].

    PubMed

    Li, J; Liu, L W; Na, L S; Zuo, L; Qi, W; Liu, Y; Shao, H; Ma, Z L; Wang, L F

    2016-04-24

    To identify the potential mutations in a Chinese pedigree with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and to analyze the genotype-phenotype relationship in this pedigree. Clinical history and physical examinations, electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography (UCG), cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) data were obtained from 10 members of a three-generation Chinese family with HCM. A total of 96 genes related to hereditary cardiomyopathy were detected by exon and boarding intron analyses in the proband using second-generation sequencing. Mutations identified in the proband were confirmed by bi-directional Sanger sequencing in the rest 9 family members and 300 healthy controls. Three mutations, including MYBPC3-P1208fs, ANK2-H556R and ANK2-P1974H, were identified in this pedigree. MYBPC3-P1208fs gene mutation was detected in 3 family members (proband, his mother and son), while this mutation was not detected in the rest family members. HCM was diagnosed in the proband and his mother by ECG, UCG and CMR. Son of the proband demonstrated early phenotype of HCM: although UCG and CMR were normal, ECG showed sinus bradycardia and paroxysmal supraventricular arrhythmias as well as ST segment changes. The onset age of HCM diagnosis of the proband and his mother was 42 and 50 years old, presented with palpitation and chest pain, and myocardial fibrosis sign in CMR. Furthermore, we found that left ventricular myocardial fibrosis is related to ECG changes (increasing r wave, ST segment change) in the proband and his mother. No HCM phenotype was evidenced in the 7 family members carrying ANK2-H556R and ANK2-P1974H mutations. Our results show that MYBPC3-P1208fs gene mutation is associated HCM phenotype in this Chinses pedigree. This mutation is associated with myocardial fibrosis and ST changes in HCM phenotype in this pedigree while ANK2-H556R and ANK2-P1974H mutations are not related to HCM phenotype in this family.

  9. Investigations into the Sarcomeric Protein and Ca(2+)-Regulation Abnormalities Underlying Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Cats (Felix catus).

    PubMed

    Messer, Andrew E; Chan, Jasmine; Daley, Alex; Copeland, O'Neal; Marston, Steven B; Connolly, David J

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common single gene inherited cardiomyopathy. In cats (Felix catus) HCM is even more prevalent and affects 16% of the outbred population and up to 26% in pedigree breeds such as Maine Coon and Ragdoll. Homozygous MYBPC3 mutations have been identified in these breeds but the mutations in other cats are unknown. At the clinical and physiological level feline HCM is closely analogous to human HCM but little is known about the primary causative mechanism. Most identified HCM causing mutations are in the genes coding for proteins of the sarcomere. We therefore investigated contractile and regulatory proteins in left ventricular tissue from 25 cats, 18 diagnosed with HCM, including a Ragdoll cat with a homozygous MYBPC3 R820W, and 7 non-HCM cats in comparison with human HCM (from septal myectomy) and donor heart tissue. Myofibrillar protein expression was normal except that we observed 20-44% MyBP-C haploinsufficiency in 5 of the HCM cats. Troponin extracted from 8 HCM and 5 non-HCM cat hearts was incorporated into thin filaments and studied by in vitro motility assay. All HCM cat hearts had a higher (2.06 ± 0.13 fold) Ca(2+)-sensitivity than non-HCM cats and, in all the HCM cats, Ca(2+)-sensitivity was not modulated by troponin I phosphorylation. We were able to restore modulation of Ca(2+)-sensitivity by replacing troponin T with wild-type protein or by adding 100 μM Epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG). These fundamental regulatory characteristics closely mimic those seen in human HCM indicating a common molecular mechanism that is independent of the causative mutation. Thus, the HCM cat is a potentially useful large animal model.

  10. The flexibility of two tropomyosin mutants, D175N and E180G, that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaochuan; Suphamungmee, Worawit; Janco, Miro; Geeves, Michael A.; Marston, Steven B.; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Well-known tropomyosin mutants, D175N and E180G are linked to cardiomyopathies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural mechanics of D175N and E180G tropomyosins have been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D175N and E180G mutations increase both local and global tropomyosin flexibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In muscle, this increased flexibility will enhance myosin interactions on actin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extra myosin interaction can alter cardiac Ca{sup 2+}-switching, leading to dysfunction. -- Abstract: Point mutations targeting muscle thin filament proteins are the cause of a number of cardiomyopathies. In many cases, biological effects of the mutations are well-documented, whereas their structural and mechanical impact on filament assembly and regulatory function is lacking. In order to elucidate molecular defects leading to cardiac dysfunction, we have examined the structural mechanics of two tropomyosin mutants, E180G and D175N, which are associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Tropomyosin is an {alpha}-helical coiled-coil dimer which polymerizes end-to-end to create an elongated superhelix that wraps around F-actin filaments of muscle and non-muscle cells, thus modulating the binding of other actin-binding proteins. Here, we study how flexibility changes in the E180G and D175N mutants might affect tropomyosin binding and regulatory motion on F-actin. Electron microscopy and Molecular Dynamics simulations show that E180G and D175N mutations cause an increase in bending flexibility of tropomyosin both locally and globally. This excess flexibility is likely to increase accessibility of the myosin-binding sites on F-actin, thus destabilizing the low-Ca{sup 2+} relaxed-state of cardiac muscle. The resulting imbalance in the on-off switching mechanism of the mutants will shift the regulatory equilibrium towards Ca{sup 2+}-activation of cardiac muscle, as is observed in affected

  11. Effects of nicotine administration in a mouse model of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, α-tropomyosin D175N

    PubMed Central

    Gaffin, Robert D.; Chowdhury, Shamim A. K.; Alves, Marco S. L.; Dias, Fernando A. L.; Ribeiro, Cibele T. D.; Fogaca, Rosalvo T. H.; Wieczorek, David F.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of nicotine (NIC) on normal hearts are fairly well established, yet its effects on hearts displaying familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have not been tested. We studied both the acute and chronic effects of NIC on a transgenic (TG) mouse model of FHC caused by a mutation in α-tropomyosin (Tm; i.e., α-Tm D175N TG, or Tm175). For acute effects, intravenously injected NIC increased heart rate, left ventricular (LV) pressure, and the maximal rate of LV pressure increase (+dP/dt) in non-TG (NTG) and Tm175 mice; however, Tm175 showed a significantly smaller increase in the maximal rate of LV pressure decrease (−dP/dt) compared with NTGs. Western blots revealed phosphorylation of phospholamban Ser16 and Thr17 residue increased in NTG mice following NIC injection but not in Tm175 mice. In contrast, phosphorylation of troponin I at serine residues 23 and 24 increased equally in both NTG and Tm175. Thus the attenuated increase in relaxation in Tm175 mice following acute NIC appears to result primarily from attenuated phospholamban phosphorylation. Chronic NIC administration (equivalent to smoking 2 packs of cigarettes/day for 4 mo) also increased +dP/dt in NTG and Tm175 mice compared with chronic saline. However, chronic NIC had little effect on heart rate, LV pressure, −dP/dt, LV wall and chamber dimensions, or collagen content for either group of mice. PMID:21743000

  12. Cardiac symptoms before sudden cardiac death caused by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a nationwide study among the young in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Lynge, Thomas Hadberg; Risgaard, Bjarke; Jabbari, Reza; Glinge, Charlotte; Bundgaard, Henning; Maron, Barry; Haunsø, Stig; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2016-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a frequent cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) among the young (SCDY). The aim of this study was to characterize symptoms before SCDY due to HCM. Through review of all death certificates, we identified all SCDs in Danes aged 1-35 years in 2000-2009. Nationwide we included all deaths (n = 8756) and identified 431 autopsied SCDYs. All available records from hospitals and general practitioners were retrieved. To compare symptoms, we included a control groups consisting of traffic accident victims (n = 74). In the 10-year study period, 431 autopsied SCDY cases were reviewed and 38 cases (9%) were included, of which 22 (58%) had morphologic findings diagnostic of HCM and 16 (42%) had findings suggestive, but not diagnostic, of HCM ('possible HCM'). Cardiac symptoms >1 h prior to death were reported in 21 (55%) of cases, and 16 (42%) sought medical attention. One (1%) control had cardiac symptoms before death. Consequently, a significantly higher proportion of cases had cardiac symptoms before death and cases more often sought medical attention than controls (P < 0.001). In conclusion, this nationwide study demonstrates a high frequency of cardiac symptoms prior to death in SCDY cases who died of HCM, as 55% had cardiac symptoms and nearly half of the cases sought medical attention. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Molecular consequences of the R453C hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation on human β-cardiac myosin motor function

    PubMed Central

    Sommese, Ruth F.; Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Sutton, Shirley; Deacon, John C.; Choe, Elizabeth; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Ruppel, Kathleen; Spudich, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is among the most frequently occurring inherited cardiac disorders. HCM is caused by mutations in the genes encoding the fundamental force-generating machinery of the cardiac muscle, including β-cardiac myosin. Here, we present a biomechanical analysis of the HCM-causing mutation, R453C, in the context of human β-cardiac myosin. We found that this mutation causes a ∼30% decrease in the maximum ATPase of the human β-cardiac subfragment 1, the motor domain of myosin, and a similar percent decrease in the in vitro velocity. The major change in the R453C human β-cardiac subfragment 1 is a 50% increase in the intrinsic force of the motor compared with wild type, with no appreciable change in the stroke size, as observed with a dual-beam optical trap. These results predict that the overall force of the ensemble of myosin molecules in the muscle should be higher in the R453C mutant compared with wild type. Loaded in vitro motility assay confirms that the net force in the ensemble is indeed increased. Overall, this study suggests that the R453C mutation should result in a hypercontractile state in the heart muscle. PMID:23798412

  14. Impediments to DNA testing and cascade screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Long QT syndrome: a qualitative study of patient experiences.

    PubMed

    Smart, Andrew

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports data from a qualitative study of patient experiences of DNA testing and cascade screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and long QT syndrome, cardiac conditions that place sufferers at risk of sudden death. The paper particularly focuses on potential impediments to testing and screening. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of 27 people in the UK who had undergone testing. In the context of the uncertainties that can characterize experiences of these disorders, the majority of participants in this sample embraced testing and screening as a way of providing health information for themselves or their relatives (particularly children). There was nevertheless evidence of ambivalence about the value and impact of the DNA test information which could influence participants' dispositions toward testing, and play into dilemmas about family communication. Other concerns arose in relation to communicating about these disorders, decisions to involve elderly relatives and pressures relating to family responsibility. The evidence of ambivalence provides insight into why some people may be resistant to testing, screening and sharing information. The findings about communication processes indicate potential areas of concern for the cascading process.

  15. Kinetics of a single cross-bridge in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy heart muscle measured by reverse Kretschmann fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettikolla, Prasad; Calander, Nils; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Borejdo, Julian

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a serious heart disease that often leads to a sudden cardiac death of young athletes. It is believed that the alteration of the kinetics of interaction between actin and myosin causes FHC by making the heart to pump blood inefficiently. We set out to check this hypothesis ex vivo. During contraction of heart muscle, a myosin cross-bridge imparts periodic force impulses to actin. The impulses are analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of fluorescently labeled actin. To minimize observation volume and background fluorescence, we carry out FCS measurements in surface plasmon coupled emission mode in a reverse Kretschmann configuration. Fluorescence is a result of near-field coupling of fluorophores excited in the vicinity of the metal-coated surface of a coverslip with the surface plasmons propagating in the metal. Surface plasmons decouple on opposite sides of the metal film and emit in a directional manner as far-field p-polarized radiation. We show that the rate of changes of orientation is significantly faster in contracting cardiac myofibrils of transgenic mice than wild type. These results are consistent with the fact that mutated heart muscle myosin translates actin faster in in vitro motility assays.

  16. Short-limb dwarfism and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with paternal isodisomy 14: 45,XYidic(14)(p11)

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, C.A.; Moore, C.M.; Kaye, C.I.

    1996-11-11

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) has been shown to result in specific disorders either due to imprinting and/or homozygosity of mutant alleles. Here we present the findings in a child with paternal UPD14. Ultrasound evaluation was performed at 30 weeks of gestation because of abnormally large uterine size. Pertinent ultrasound findings included polyhydramnios, short limbs, abnormal position of hands, small thorax, and nonvisualization of the fetal stomach. Postnatally the infant was found to have a low birth weight, short birth length, contractures, short limbs, and a small thorax with upslanting ribs. Assisted ventilation and gastrostomy were required. At age 6 months, the infant required hospitalization for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy which responded to Atenolol{reg_sign}. Initial cytogenetic studies demonstrated an apparently balanced de novo Robertsonian translocation involving chromosomes 14 and a karyotype designation of 45,XY,t(14q14q). No indication of mosaicism for trisomy 14 was observed in metaphase spreads prepared from peripheral blood lymphocytes or skin-derived fibroblasts. C-band and fluorescence in situ hybridization results demonstrated that the chromosome was dicentric. DNA analyses showed paternal uniparental isodisomy for chromosome 14. Based on the cytogenetic and DNA results a final karyotype designation of 45,XY,idic(14)(p11) was assigned to this infant with paternal isodisomy of chromosome 14. 41 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A Pregnancy with Severe Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy after Surgery for an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Takashi; Ejiri, Kentaro; Hayata, Kei; Ito, Hiroshi; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is cardiac hypertrophy of ventricular myocardium with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We report a pregnancy with HOCM after defibrillator implantation surgery. The patient was a 33-year-old nulligravida and was categorized as New York Heart Association class II. Her brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level was 724.6 pg/dL at preconception. She received careful pregnancy management. However, because frequent uterine contractions were observed at 25 weeks and 6 days of pregnancy, she was hospitalized, and magnesium sulfate was started as a tocolytic agent. At 27 weeks and 5 days of pregnancy, she had respiratory discomfort and orthopnea with a sudden decrease in peripheral oxygen saturation. Cardiac ultrasonography showed a worsened condition of HOCM and her BNP level was 1418.0 pg/mL. We performed an emergent cesarean section and she delivered a boy weighing 999 g. The Apgar score was 8 and 9 points at 1 and 5 minutes, respectively. The mother's heart failure quickly improved after birth and she was discharged at 10 days postoperatively. Fluctuations in circulatory dynamics during pregnancy may sometimes exacerbate heart disease. Therefore, the risks should be fully explained and careful assessment of cardiac function should be performed during pregnancy in patients with severe HOCM. PMID:27830098

  18. Homozygous mutation of MYBPC3 associated with severe infantile hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at high frequency among the Amish.

    PubMed

    Zahka, K; Kalidas, K; Simpson, M A; Cross, H; Keller, B B; Galambos, C; Gurtz, K; Patton, M A; Crosby, A H

    2008-10-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death among young and apparently healthy people. Autosomal dominant mutations within genes encoding sarcomeric proteins have been identified. An autosomal recessive form of HCM has been discovered in a group of Amish children that is associated with poor prognosis and death within the first year of life. Affected patients experienced progressive cardiac failure despite maximal medical treatment. Postmortem histology showed myofibre disarray and myocyte loss consistent with refractory clinical deterioration in affected infants. To conduct a genome-wide screen for linkage and try to identify an autozygous region which cosegregates with the infant cardiac phenotype An autozygous region of chromosome 11 which cosegregates with the infant cardiac phenotype was identified. This region contained the MYBPC3 gene, which has previously been associated with autosomal dominant adult-onset HCM. Sequence analysis of the MYBPC3 gene identified a splice site mutation in intron 30 which was homozygous in all affected infants. All surviving patients with the homozygous MYBPC3 gene mutations (3330+2T>G) underwent an orthotopic heart transplantation. Homozygous mutations in the MYBPC3 gene have been identified as the cause of severe infantile HCM among the Amish population.

  19. Facilitated Cross-Bridge Interactions with Thin Filaments by Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutations in α-Tropomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Brunet, Nicolas M.; Grubich, Justin R.; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A.; Asbury, Thomas M.; Compton, Lisa A.; Mihajlović, Goran; Miller, Victor F.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2011-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a disease of cardiac sarcomeres. To identify molecular mechanisms underlying FHC pathology, functional and structural differences in three FHC-related mutations in recombinant α-Tm (V95A, D175N, and E180G) were characterized using both conventional and modified in vitro motility assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Mutant Tm's exhibited reduced α-helical structure and increased unordered structure. When thin filaments were fully occupied by regulatory proteins, little or no motion was detected at pCa 9, and maximum speed (pCa 5) was similar for all tropomyosins. Ca2+-responsiveness of filament sliding speed was increased either by increased pCa50 (V95A), reduced cooperativity n (D175N), or both (E180G). When temperature was increased, thin filaments with E180G exhibited dysregulation at temperatures ~10°C lower, and much closer to body temperature, than WT. When HMM density was reduced, thin filaments with D175N required fewer motors to initiate sliding or achieve maximum sliding speed. PMID:22187526

  20. Evaluation of a motion artifacts removal approach on breath-hold cine-magnetic resonance images of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancur, Julián.; Simon, Antoine; Schnell, Frédéric; Donal, Erwan; Hernández, Alfredo; Garreau, Mireille

    2013-11-01

    The acquisition of ECG-gated cine magnetic resonance images of the heart is routinely performed in apnea in order to suppress the motion artifacts caused by breathing. However, many factors including the 2D nature of the acquisition and the use of di erent beats to acquire the multiple-view cine images, cause this kind of artifacts to appear. This paper presents the qualitative evaluation of a method aiming to remove motion artifacts in multipleview cine images acquired on patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy diagnosis. The approach uses iconic registration to reduce for in-plane artifacts in long-axis-view image stacks and in-plane and out-of-plane motion artifacts in sort-axis-view image stack. Four similarity measures were evaluated: the normalized correlation, the normalized mutual information, the sum of absolute voxel di erences and the Slomka metric proposed by Slomka et al. The qualitative evaluation assessed the misalignment of di erent anatomical structures of the left ventricle as follows: the misalignment of the interventricular septum and the lateral wall for short-axis-view acquisitions and the misalignment between the short-axis-view image and long-axis-view images. Results showed the correction using the normalized correlation as the most appropriated with an 80% of success.

  1. Impact of Cryoballoon Ablation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-related Heart Failure due to Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation. A Comparative Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Maagh, Petra; Plehn, Gunnar; Christoph, Arnd; Oernek, Ahmet; Meissner, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) represents a turning point in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Pulmonary Vein Isolation (PVI) with Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation (RFCA) is accepted to be successful in restoring sinus rhythm (SR) in HCM patients. The efficacy of cryoballoon (CB) therapy in HCM patients has not been studied so far. Methods: 166 patients with AF underwent PVI with CB technology in our single center between 1/2012 and 12/2015. To evaluate the efficacy of the CB therapy in HCM patients, we compared their clinical outcome with those in “Non-HCM” AF patients in a 3 and 6 months follow-up. Results: Out of 166 AF patients (65.7% paroxysmal AF, PAF), 4 patients had HCM and PAF (young males < 50 years). During the blanking period, 26 patients (15.8%) suffered from AF recurrence (11.0% PAF), including all HCM patients. The 6 months follow up of “Non-HCM” AF patients showed acceptable results (80% stable SR), whereas the HCM patients remained AF. In Conclusion: Even if the CB provides advantages, the single device cannot be recommended in HCM patients because of early AF recurrences. Anyway, because of the specific hemodynamic changes in HCM patients with AF, ablation should be sought in an early state of its occurrence, then, however, preferably with RFCA. PMID:27647995

  2. Rest perfusion abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: correlation with myocardial fibrosis and risk factors for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Chiribiri, A; Leuzzi, S; Conte, M R; Bongioanni, S; Bratis, K; Olivotti, L; De Rosa, C; Lardone, E; Di Donna, P; Villa, A D M; Cesarani, F; Nagel, E; Gaita, F; Bonamini, R

    2015-05-01

    To measure the prevalence of abnormal rest perfusion in a population of consecutive patients with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) referred for cardiovascular MRI (CMR), and to assess any associations between abnormal rest perfusion and the presence, pattern, and severity of myocardial scar and the presence of risk factors for sudden death. Eighty consecutive patients with known HCM referred for CMR underwent functional imaging, rest first-pass perfusion, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Thirty percent of the patients had abnormal rest perfusion, all of them corresponding to areas of mid-myocardial LGE and to a higher degree of segmental hypertrophy. Rest perfusion abnormalities correlated with more extensive and confluent LGE. The subgroup of patients with myocardial fibrosis and rest perfusion abnormalities (fibrosis+/perfusion+) had more than twice the incidence of episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia on Holter monitoring in comparison to patients with myocardial fibrosis and normal rest perfusion (fibrosis+/perfusion-) and patients with no fibrosis and normal rest perfusion (fibrosis-/perfusion-). First-pass perfusion CMR identifies abnormal rest perfusion in a significant proportion of patients with HCM. These abnormalities are associated with the presence and distribution of myocardial scar and the degree of hypertrophy. Rest perfusion abnormalities identify patients with increased incidence of episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia on Holter monitoring, independently from the presence of myocardial fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. RAF1 variants causing biventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in two preterm infants: further phenotypic delineation and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Danielle; Patrick-Esteve, Jessica; Surcouf, Jeffrey W; Rivera, Dana; Castellanos, Bianca; Desai, Pooja; Lilje, Christian; Lacassie, Yves; Marble, Michael; Zambrano, Regina

    2017-08-03

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by distinctive facial features, short neck, short stature, congenital heart defects, pectus deformities, and variable developmental delays. NS is genetically heterogeneous as pathogenic variants in several genes involved in the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway have been associated with a NS phenotype. Overall, 50% of patients harbor pathogenic variants in PTPN11, whereas 3-17% of patients have variants in RAF1. We present two premature neonates with progressive biventricular hypertrophy found to have RAF1 variants in the CR2 domain. Molecular testing in patient 1 revealed a missense variant of a highly conserved residue c.782 C>G (p.P261R). This variant has been reported once with fatal outcome. Patient 2 also had a missense variant in a highly conserved neighboring residue c.770 C>T (p.S257L). This variant has been previously reported, most recently associated with the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Both our patients had prenatal findings of polyhydramnios, short long bones, hydrops fetalis, and cardiac anomalies with progressive biventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Both patients had a lethal outcome. Our findings further support the pathogenicity and lethality of p.P261R, and the need to monitor for pulmonary arterial hypertension in p.S257L. In addition, the second patient was presented with progressive hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. This could be related to the NS phenotype. More cases with this association are needed to confirm this finding.

  4. Screening Mutations of MYBPC3 in 114 Unrelated Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy by Targeted Capture and Next-generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuxia; Jiang, Tengyong; Piao, Chunmei; Li, Xiaoyan; Guo, Jun; Zheng, Shuai; Zhang, Xiaoping; Cai, Tao; Du, Jie

    2015-06-19

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a major cause of sudden cardiac death. Mutations in the MYBPC3 gene represent the cause of HCM in ~35% of patients with HCM. However, genetic testing in clinic setting has been limited due to the cost and relatively time-consuming by Sanger sequencing. Here, we developed a HCM Molecular Diagnostic Kit enabling ultra-low-cost targeted gene resequencing in a large cohort and investigated the mutation spectrum of MYBPC3. In a cohort of 114 patients with HCM, a total of 20 different mutations (8 novel and 12 known mutations) of MYBPC3 were identified from 25 patients (21.9%). We demonstrated that the power of targeted resequencing in a cohort of HCM patients, and found that MYBPC3 is a common HCM-causing gene in Chinese patients. Phenotype-genotype analyses showed that the patients with double mutations (n = 2) or premature termination codon mutations (n = 12) showed more severe manifestations, compared with patients with missense mutations (n = 11). Particularly, we identified a recurrent truncation mutation (p.Y842X) in four unrelated cases (4/25, 16%), who showed severe phenotypes, and suggest that the p.Y842X is a frequent mutation in Chinese HCM patients with severe phenotypes.

  5. Assessment of left ventricular longitudinal function in cats with subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    SUGIMOTO, Keisuke; FUJII, Yoko; SUNAHARA, Hiroshi; AOKI, Takuma

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in cats is characterized by concentric left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and both diastolic and systolic dysfunction. Although impaired cardiac function detected by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) in cats with HCM was previously reported, reference ranges of TDI in normal cats and cats with HCM have been reported as widely variable. Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) was useful for assessment of cardiac function in human patients with HCM, but clinical utility was not known in cats. The aim of this study was to assess global and segmental LV myocardial function using STE in cats with HCM whose TDI variables were within the reference range. A total of 35 cats of different breeds were enrolled in this study. The HCM group (n=22) was cats diagnosed as HCM without left atrial enlargement and with normal TDI measurements. HCM cats were further divided into a segmental hypertrophy (S-HCM) group and a diffuse hypertrophy (D-HCM) group. The control group consisted of 13 clinically healthy cats. No cats in any group showed any clinical symptoms. Conventional echocardiography, TDI, and global and segmental STE indices were evaluated and compared between groups. Only the longitudinal strain rate during early diastole was significantly decreased in both HCM groups, even in all segments including those without hypertrophy in S-HCM group. This study suggests that STE parameters are the more sensitive variables compared with conventional TDI parameters to detect early myocardial diastolic dysfunction in cats with HCM. PMID:25877405

  6. Assessment of left ventricular longitudinal function in cats with subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Keisuke; Fujii, Yoko; Sunahara, Hiroshi; Aoki, Takuma

    2015-09-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in cats is characterized by concentric left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and both diastolic and systolic dysfunction. Although impaired cardiac function detected by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) in cats with HCM was previously reported, reference ranges of TDI in normal cats and cats with HCM have been reported as widely variable. Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) was useful for assessment of cardiac function in human patients with HCM, but clinical utility was not known in cats. The aim of this study was to assess global and segmental LV myocardial function using STE in cats with HCM whose TDI variables were within the reference range. A total of 35 cats of different breeds were enrolled in this study. The HCM group (n=22) was cats diagnosed as HCM without left atrial enlargement and with normal TDI measurements. HCM cats were further divided into a segmental hypertrophy (S-HCM) group and a diffuse hypertrophy (D-HCM) group. The control group consisted of 13 clinically healthy cats. No cats in any group showed any clinical symptoms. Conventional echocardiography, TDI, and global and segmental STE indices were evaluated and compared between groups. Only the longitudinal strain rate during early diastole was significantly decreased in both HCM groups, even in all segments including those without hypertrophy in S-HCM group. This study suggests that STE parameters are the more sensitive variables compared with conventional TDI parameters to detect early myocardial diastolic dysfunction in cats with HCM.

  7. Rapidly Progressive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in an Infant with Noonan syndrome with multiple Lentigines. Palliative Treatment with a Rapamycin Analog

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Lauriol, Jessica; Thul, Josef; Behnke-Hall, Kachina; Logeswaran, Tushiha; Schänzer, Anne; Böğürcü, Nuray; Garvalov, Boyan K.; Zenker, Martin; Gelb, Bruce D.; von Gerlach, Susanne; Kandolf, Reinhard; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Schranz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) frequently manifests with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recently, it was demonstrated that mTOR inhibition reverses HCM in NSML mice. We report for the first time on the effects of treatment with a rapamycin analog in an infant with LS and a malignant form of HCM. In the boy, progressive HCM was diagnosed during the first week of life and diagnosis of NSML was established at age 20 weeks by showing a heterozygous Q510E mutation in the PTPN11 gene. Immunoblotting with antibodies against pERK, pAkt, and pS6RP in fibroblasts demonstrated reduced RAS/MAPK and enhanced Akt/mTOR pathway activities. Because of the patient’s critical condition, everolimus therapy was started at age 24 weeks and continued until heart transplantation at age 36 weeks. Prior to surgery, heart failure improved from NYHA stage IV to II and brain natriuretic peptide values decreased from 9600 to <1000 pg/ml, but no reversal of cardiac hypertrophy was observed. Examination of the explanted heart revealed severe hypertrophy and myofiber disarray with extensive perivascular fibrosis. These findings provide evidence that Akt/mTOR activity is enhanced in NSML with HCM and suggest that rapamycin treatment could be principally feasible for infantile NSML. But the preliminary experiences made in this single patient indicate that therapy should start early to prevent irreversible cardiac remodelling. PMID:25708222

  8. Decreased coronary vasodilatory capacity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy determined by split-dose thallium-dipyridamole myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, Y.; Yamaguchi, R.; Ogata, M.; Kihara, K.; Toshima, H. )

    1990-05-01

    Split-dose thallium-dipyridamole myocardial scintigraphy was performed in patients with nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) who had angiographically normal coronary arteries. The dipyridamole-induced increases in thallium-201 uptake, calculated to evaluate coronary vasodilatory capacity, were significantly lower in 30 patients with HC than in 13 control subjects (177 +/- 58 vs 281 +/- 46%) and the reductions were observed in both the septal and lateral segments. The reductions of the septal segment in HC patients were significantly greater than those in 10 hypertensive patients with comparable degrees of septal hypertrophy. Of patients with HC, 16 had increases in thallium uptake well below the normal range. Compared with those having normal increases, these patients had significantly lower exercise duration (11 vs 15 minutes), with 33% having ST depression develop at a workload less than or equal to 80 watts. These data indicate that approximately one-half of patients with HC have impaired coronary vasodilatory capacity that could be an important pathophysiologic abnormality of HC resulting in the development of myocardial ischemia and the impairment of cardiac performance during exercise.

  9. Mutations in GTPBP3 cause a mitochondrial translation defect associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kopajtich, Robert; Nicholls, Thomas J; Rorbach, Joanna; Metodiev, Metodi D; Freisinger, Peter; Mandel, Hanna; Vanlander, Arnaud; Ghezzi, Daniele; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Taylor, Robert W; Marquard, Klaus; Murayama, Kei; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Mayr, Johannes A; Pearce, Sarah F; Powell, Christopher A; Saada, Ann; Ohtake, Akira; Invernizzi, Federica; Lamantea, Eleonora; Sommerville, Ewen W; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F; Crushell, Ellen; Okazaki, Yasushi; Kohda, Masakazu; Kishita, Yoshihito; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Assouline, Zahra; Rio, Marlène; Feillet, François; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédict; Chretien, Dominique; Munnich, Arnold; Menten, Björn; Sante, Tom; Smet, Joél; Régal, Luc; Lorber, Abraham; Khoury, Asaad; Zeviani, Massimo; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Bertini, Enrico S; Van Coster, Rudy; Klopstock, Thomas; Rötig, Agnès; Haack, Tobias B; Minczuk, Michal; Prokisch, Holger

    2014-12-04

    Respiratory chain deficiencies exhibit a wide variety of clinical phenotypes resulting from defective mitochondrial energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. These defects can be caused by either mutations in the mtDNA or mutations in nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins. The underlying pathomechanisms can affect numerous pathways involved in mitochondrial physiology. By whole-exome and candidate gene sequencing, we identified 11 individuals from 9 families carrying compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations in GTPBP3, encoding the mitochondrial GTP-binding protein 3. Affected individuals from eight out of nine families presented with combined respiratory chain complex deficiencies in skeletal muscle. Mutations in GTPBP3 are associated with a severe mitochondrial translation defect, consistent with the predicted function of the protein in catalyzing the formation of 5-taurinomethyluridine (τm(5)U) in the anticodon wobble position of five mitochondrial tRNAs. All case subjects presented with lactic acidosis and nine developed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. In contrast to individuals with mutations in MTO1, the protein product of which is predicted to participate in the generation of the same modification, most individuals with GTPBP3 mutations developed neurological symptoms and MRI involvement of thalamus, putamen, and brainstem resembling Leigh syndrome. Our study of a mitochondrial translation disorder points toward the importance of posttranscriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs for proper mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Myocardial contractile and metabolic properties of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by cardiac troponin I gene mutations: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Wang, Longhui; Liu, Qian; Luo, Qingming

    2012-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is an inherited disease that is caused by sarcomeric protein gene mutations. The mechanism by which these mutant proteins cause disease is uncertain. Experimentally, cardiac troponin I (CTnI) gene mutations mainly alter myocardial performance via increases in the Ca(2+) sensitivity of cardiac contractility. In this study, we used an integrated simulation that links electrophysiology, contractile activity and energy metabolism of the myocardium to investigate alterations in myocardial contractile function and energy metabolism regulation as a result of increased Ca(2+) sensitivity in CTnI mutations. Simulation results reproduced the following typical features of FHC: (1) slower relaxation (diastolic dysfunction) caused by prolonged [Ca(2+)](i) and force transients; (2) higher energy consumption with the increase in Ca(2+) sensitivity; and (3) reduced fatty acid oxidation and enhanced glucose utilization in hypertrophied heart metabolism. Furthermore, the simulation indicated that in conditions of high energy consumption (that is, more than an 18.3% increase in total energy consumption), the myocardial energetic metabolic network switched from a net consumer to a net producer of lactate, resulting in a low coupling of glucose oxidation to glycolysis, which is a common feature of hypertrophied hearts. This study provides a novel systematic myocardial contractile and metabolic analysis to help elucidate the pathogenesis of FHC and suggests that the alterations in resting heart energy supply and demand could contribute to disease progression.

  11. A mutation in the {beta}-myosin rod associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has an unexpected molecular phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Armel, Thomas Z.; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2010-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common, autosomal dominant disorder primarily characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in youth. HCM is caused by mutations in several sarcomeric proteins, with mutations in MYH7, encoding {beta}-MyHC, being the most common. While many mutations in the globular head region of the protein have been reported and studied, analysis of HCM-causing mutations in the {beta}-MyHC rod domain has not yet been reported. To address this question, we performed an array of biochemical and biophysical assays to determine how the HCM-causing E1356K mutation affects the structure, stability, and function of the {beta}-MyHC rod. Surprisingly, the E1356K mutation appears to thermodynamically destabilize the protein, rather than alter the charge profile know to be essential for muscle filament assembly. This thermodynamic instability appears to be responsible for the decreased ability of the protein to form filaments and may be responsible for the HCM phenotype seen in patients.

  12. Screening Mutations of MYBPC3 in 114 Unrelated Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy by Targeted Capture and Next-generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuxia; Jiang, Tengyong; Piao, Chunmei; Li, Xiaoyan; Guo, Jun; Zheng, Shuai; Zhang, Xiaoping; Cai, Tao; Du, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a major cause of sudden cardiac death. Mutations in the MYBPC3 gene represent the cause of HCM in ~35% of patients with HCM. However, genetic testing in clinic setting has been limited due to the cost and relatively time-consuming by Sanger sequencing. Here, we developed a HCM Molecular Diagnostic Kit enabling ultra-low-cost targeted gene resequencing in a large cohort and investigated the mutation spectrum of MYBPC3. In a cohort of 114 patients with HCM, a total of 20 different mutations (8 novel and 12 known mutations) of MYBPC3 were identified from 25 patients (21.9%). We demonstrated that the power of targeted resequencing in a cohort of HCM patients, and found that MYBPC3 is a common HCM-causing gene in Chinese patients. Phenotype-genotype analyses showed that the patients with double mutations (n = 2) or premature termination codon mutations (n = 12) showed more severe manifestations, compared with patients with missense mutations (n = 11). Particularly, we identified a recurrent truncation mutation (p.Y842X) in four unrelated cases (4/25, 16%), who showed severe phenotypes, and suggest that the p.Y842X is a frequent mutation in Chinese HCM patients with severe phenotypes. PMID:26090888

  13. Left ventricular wall thickness in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a comparison between cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Corona-Villalobos, Celia P; Sorensen, Lars L; Pozios, Iraklis; Chu, Linda; Eng, John; Abraham, Maria Roselle; Abraham, Theodore P; Kamel, Ihab R; Zimmerman, Stefan L

    2016-06-01

    We assessed whether cardiac MRI (CMR) and echocardiography (echo) have significant differences measuring left ventricular (LV) wall thickness (WT) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) as performed in the clinical routine. Retrospectively identified, clinically diagnosed HCM patients with interventricular-septal (IVS) pattern hypertrophy who underwent CMR and echo within the same day were included. Left Ventricular WT was measured by CMR in two planes and compared to both echo and contrast echo (cecho). 72 subjects, mean age 50.7 ± 16.2 years, 68 % males. Interventricular septal WT by echo and CMR planes showed good to excellent correlation. However, measurements of the postero-lateral wall showed poor correlation. Bland-Altman plots showed greater maximal IVS WT by echo compared to CMR measurement [SAX = 1.7 mm (-5.8, 9.3); LVOT = 1.1 mm (-5.6, 7.8)]. Differences were smaller between cecho and CMR [SAX = 0.8 mm (-9.2, 10.8); LVOT = -0.2 mm (-10.0, 9.6)]. Severity of WT by quartiles showed greater differences between echo and SAX CMR WT compared to cecho. Echocardiography typically measures greater WT than CMR, with the largest differences in moderate to severe hypertrophy. Contrast echocardiography more closely approximates CMR measurements of WT. These findings have potential clinical implications for risk stratification of subjects with HCM.

  14. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or ... tissue. Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have ...

  15. Use of serum creatine kinase MM isoforms for predicting the progression of left ventricular dilation in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hina, K; Kusachi, S; Iwasaki, K; Takaishi, A; Yamamoto, K; Tominaga, Y; Kita, T; Tsuji, T

    1997-04-01

    Serum creatine kinase (CK) isoforms were examined to detect the progression of left ventricular (LV) enlargement with reduced motion, resembling dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Changes in LV indices were determined annually by echocardiography in 51 patients until serum measurements (first follow-up period, 6.5 +/- 2.2 years). Serum creatine isoforms (CKMM1, CKMM2 and CKMM3) were measured with high-voltage electrophoresis in 35 of these patients from 1991 to 1992, and the data for these latter patients are reported here. Serum total CK, CKMB, lactate dehydrogenase and its isoenzyme LDH1 were also measured. The changes in LV indices were further monitored until January, 1995 (second follow-up). During the 2 follow-up periods, the patients in the on-going group showed a reduction in the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) to < 55% with LV end-diastolic dimension (LVDd) < 55 mm, and those in the DCM-like group showed a reduction in LVEF to < 55% and an increase in LVDd to > 55 mm. During the first follow-up period, LVEF and LVDd remained at > or = 55% and < 55 mm, respectively, in 26 patients (nonprogressive-disease group), while 3 patients entered the on-going group and 6 entered the DCM-like group. The CKMM3/CKMM1 ratios in the on-going and DCM-like groups were significantly higher than those in the control and nonprogressive-disease groups. The CKMM3/CKMM1 ratio was significantly correlated with the annual rate of change for the LV end-systolic dimension (LVDs), LVDd, and LVEF, with the closest correlation observed for the annual change in LVDs. Moreover, 5 patients in the nonprogressive-disease group with elevation of the CKMM3/CKMM1 ratio to > + 2SD above the mean for the controls had an elevated annual change in LVDs within +/- 1SD of the mean in the DCM-like group. These results indicate that the ratio of CKMM3 to CKMM1 can be used to predict the progression of LV enlargement in HCM.

  16. An ultrasound speckle tracking (two-dimensional strain) analysis of myocardial deformation in professional soccer players compared with healthy subjects and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Richand, Viviane; Lafitte, Stéphane; Reant, Patricia; Serri, Karim; Lafitte, Marianne; Brette, Stephanie; Kerouani, Akem; Chalabi, Hakim; Dos Santos, Pierre; Douard, Herve; Roudaut, Raymond

    2007-07-01

    Deformation analysis using 2-dimensional strain echocardiography can detect early systolic function abnormalities in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy. This study was designed to characterize global and regional myocardial deformation using 2-dimensional strain in professional soccer players (PSPs) compared with control subjects and patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Twenty nine PSPs, 26 patients with HC, and 17 controls were investigated at rest using transthoracic echocardiography with 2-dimensional strain analysis. Radial and transverse strains were significantly higher in PSPs compared with controls, whereas longitudinal strain was lower. Compared with patients with HC, athletes had higher values for transverse, radial, and circumferential strains. In pathologic hypertrophic segments, longitudinal strain was lower in patients with HC than in PSPs. In conclusion, 2-dimensional strain can identify specific patterns of myocardial deformation in PSPs, controls, and patients with HC. It has the potential to become a routinely used method for the differentiation of athlete's heart and HC.

  17. [Analysis of cardiac troponin C gene TNNC1 c. G175C mutation in a Chinese pedigree with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and the correlation between genotype and phenotype].

    PubMed

    Xing, X B; Liu, F S; Wang, F; Song, L; Zhao, W N; Liu, J; Zhang, K C; Zhu, Y Z; Shang, X F; Li, R; Liang, Y

    2016-12-24

    Objective: To investigate the genotype-phenotype correlation in Chinese familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM )focusing on the cardiac troponin C gene TNNC1 c. G175C mutation. Methods: All family members of a Chinese pedigree with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy admitted in Third People's Hospital of Qingdao in February 2005 and 200 healthy volunteers were included in this study. The coding exons of 30 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated genes were identified by whole exons amplification and high-throughput sequencing in the proband, and the identified mutation were further detected through bi-directional Sanger sequencing in all family members and 200 healthy volunteers. Pedigree analysis included clinical manifestation, physical examination, ECG and echocardiogram. Results: A missense mutation c. G175C was identified in the TNNC1 gene in 2 family members, which resulted in a glutamic acid (E) to glutamine (Q) exchange at amino acid residue 59. A mutation c. A1319G was identified in the MYLK2 gene in 1 family member, which resulted in a lysine (K) to arginine (R) exchange at amino acid residue 440. These mutations were absent in 200 healthy controls. The proband carried the two kinds of mutations and expressed various clinical manifestations of heart failure and had history of ventricular tachycardia, paraxial atrial fibrillation, pacemaker implantation, electrocardiogram showed right bundle branch block and echocardiography examination evidenced thickened interventricular septum (23.3 mm) and apex and reduced wall motion of these segments. The daughter of the proband carried the TNNC1 c. G175C mutation and was also diagnosed with asymptomatic HCM by echocardiography with thickened interventricular septum (19 mm) and apex (15 mm). Conclusion: The novel missense mutation of TNNC1 c. G175C might be the disease-causing gene mutation in this Chinese pedigree with familiar HCM.

  18. Effects of lifestyle changes and high-dose β-blocker therapy on exercise capacity in children, adolescents, and young adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bratt, Ewa-Lena; Östman-Smith, Ingegerd

    2015-03-01

    The use of β-blocker therapy in asymptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is controversial. This study evaluates the effect of lifestyle changes and high-dose β-blocker therapy on their exercise capacity. A total of 29 consecutive newly diagnosed asymptomatic patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, median age 15 years (range 7-25), were recruited. In all, 16 patients with risk factors for sudden death were treated with propranolol if no contraindications, or equivalent doses of metoprolol; 13 with no risk factors were randomised to metoprolol or no active treatment. Thus, there were three treatment groups, non-selective β-blockade (n=10, propranolol 4.0-11.6 mg/kg/day), selective β-blockade (n=9, metoprolol 2.7-5.9 mg/kg/day), and randomised controls (n=10). All were given recommendations for lifestyle modifications, and reduced energetic exercise significantly (p=0.002). Before study entry, and after 1 year, all underwent bicycle exercise tests with a ramp protocol. There were no differences in exercise capacity between the groups at entry, or follow-up, when median exercise capacity in the groups were virtually identical (2.4, 2.3, and 2.3 watt/kg and 55, 55, and 55 watt/(height in metre) 2 in control, selective, and non-selective groups, respectively. Maximum heart rate decreased in the selective (-29%, p=0.04) and non-selective (-24%, p=0.002) groups. No patient developed a pathological blood-pressure response to exercise because of β-blocker therapy. Boys were more frequently risk-factor positive than girls (75% versus 33%, p=0.048) and had higher physical activity scores than girls at study-entry (p=0.011). Neither selective nor non-selective β-blockade causes significant reductions in exercise capacity in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy above that induced by lifestyle changes.

  19. Outcome of patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy after percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation and septal myectomy surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, J. X.; Shiota, T.; Lever, H. M.; Kapadia, S. R.; Sitges, M.; Rubin, D. N.; Bauer, F.; Greenberg, N. L.; Agler, D. A.; Drinko, J. K.; Martin, M.; Tuzcu, E. M.; Smedira, N. G.; Lytle, B.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to evaluate follow-up results in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) who underwent either percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) or septal myectomy. BACKGROUND: Controversy exists with regard to these two forms of treatment for patients with HOCM. METHODS: Of 51 patients with HOCM treated, 25 were treated by PTSMA and 26 patients via myectomy. Two-dimensional echocardiograms were performed before both procedures, immediately afterwards and at a three-month follow-up. The New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was obtained before the procedures and at follow-up. RESULTS: Interventricular septal thickness was significantly reduced at follow-up in both groups (2.3 +/- 0.4 cm vs. 1.9 +/- 0.4 cm for septal ablation and 2.4 +/- 0.6 cm vs. 1.7 +/- 0.2 cm for myectomy, both p < 0.001). Estimated by continuous-wave Doppler, the resting pressure gradient (PG) across the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) significantly decreased immediately after the procedures in both groups (64 +/- 39 mm Hg vs. 28 +/- 29 mm Hg for PTSMA, 62 +/- 43 mm Hg vs. 7 +/- 7 mm Hg for myectomy, both p < 0.0001). At three-month follow-up, the resting PG remained lower in the PTSMA and myectomy groups (24 +/- 19 mm Hg and 11 +/- 6 mm Hg, respectively, vs. those before procedures, both p < 0.0001). The NYHA functional class was also significantly improved in both groups (3.5 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.7 for PTSMA, 3.3 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.7 for myectomy, both p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Both myectomy and PTSMA reduce LVOT obstruction and significantly improve NYHA functional class in patients with HOCM. However, there are benefits and drawbacks for each therapeutic method that must be counterbalanced when deciding on treatment for LVOT obstruction.

  20. Creatine kinase adenosine triphosphate and phosphocreatine energy supply in a single kindred of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Abraham, M Roselle; Bottomley, Paul A; Dimaano, Veronica Lea; Pinheiro, Aurelio; Steinberg, Angela; Traill, Thomas A; Abraham, Theodore P; Weiss, Robert G

    2013-09-15

    A lethal and extensively characterized familial form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is due to a point mutation (Arg403Gln) in the cardiac β-myosin heavy chain gene. Although this is associated with abnormal energy metabolism and progression to heart failure in an animal model, in vivo cardiac energetics have not been characterized in patients with this mutation. Noninvasive phosphorus saturation transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to measure the adenosine triphosphate supplied by the creatine kinase (CK) reaction and phosphocreatine, the heart's primary energy reserve, in 9 of 10 patients from a single kindred with HC caused by the Arg403GIn mutation and 17 age-matched healthy controls. Systolic and diastolic function was assessed by echocardiography in all 10 patients with HC. The patients with HC had impairment of diastolic function and mild systolic dysfunction, when assessed using global systolic longitudinal strain. Myocardial phosphocreatine was significantly decreased by 24% in patients (7.1 ± 2.3 μmol/g) compared with the controls (9.4 ± 1.2 μmol/g; p = 0.003). The pseudo-first-order CK rate-constant was 26% lower (0.28 ± 0.15 vs 0.38 ± 0.07 s⁻¹, p = 0.035) and the forward CK flux was 44% lower (2.0 ± 1.4 vs 3.6 ± 0.9 μmol/g/s, p = 0.001) than in the controls. The contractile abnormalities did not correlate with the metabolic indexes. In conclusion, myocardial phosphocreatine and CK-ATP delivery are significantly reduced in patients with HC caused by the Arg403Gln mutation, akin to previous results from mice with the same mutation. A lack of a relation between energetic and contractile abnormalities suggests the former result from the sarcomeric mutation and not a late consequence of mechanical dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. MYBPC3 mutations are associated with a reduced super-relaxed state in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    McNamara, James W; Li, Amy; Lal, Sean; Bos, J Martijn; Harris, Samantha P; van der Velden, Jolanda; Ackerman, Michael J; Cooke, Roger; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G

    2017-01-01

    The "super-relaxed state" (SRX) of myosin represents a 'reserve' of motors in the heart. Myosin heads in the SRX are bound to the thick filament and have a very low ATPase rate. Changes in the SRX are likely to modulate cardiac contractility. We previously demonstrated that the SRX is significantly reduced in mouse cardiomyocytes lacking cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C). Here, we report the effect of mutations in the cMyBP-C gene (MYBPC3) using samples from human patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Left ventricular (LV) samples from 11 HCM patients were obtained following myectomy surgery to relieve LV outflow tract obstruction. HCM samples were genotyped as either MYBPC3 mutation positive (MYBPC3mut) or negative (HCMsmn) and were compared to eight non-failing donor hearts. Compared to donors, only MYBPC3mut samples display a significantly diminished SRX, characterised by a decrease in both the number of myosin heads in the SRX and the lifetime of ATP turnover. These changes were not observed in HCMsmn samples. There was a positive correlation (p < 0.01) between the expression of cMyBP-C and the proportion of myosin heads in the SRX state, suggesting cMyBP-C modulates and maintains the SRX. Phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain in MYBPC3mut samples was significantly decreased compared to the other groups, suggesting a potential mechanism to compensate for the diminished SRX. We conclude that by altering both contractility and sarcomeric energy requirements, a reduced SRX may be an important disease mechanism in patients with MYBPC3 mutations.

  2. Tissue Doppler imaging during exercise stress echocardiography demonstrates a mechanism for impaired exercise performance in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Matthew Eric; Sachdeva, Ritu; Gillespie, Scott E; Morrow, Gemma; Border, William

    2016-11-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is associated with decreased exercise tolerance in children, presumably due to diastolic dysfunction. Modern imaging techniques to assess myocardial function during active exercise have not been applied to this population. We hypothesized that impaired contractile reserve, as assessed by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) and strain, contributes to reduced exercise capacity in affected individuals. Children (<18 years) with HCM and healthy age- and sex-matched controls were prospectively enrolled. Resting echocardiograms and staged upright cycle ergometry with simultaneous echocardiograms were performed. During exercise, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradients and color Doppler maps of apical four-chamber and parasternal short-axis views were obtained. Post processing of images was performed to obtain TDI velocities, and measurements of strain were attempted. Exercise parameters and staged TDI values were compared. The study population consisted of 58 subjects (22 with HCM and 36 controls). Patients with HCM had significantly higher peak LVOT gradients compared to controls at baseline and at each exercise stage. TDI revealed that diastolic function, as assessed by E' velocities at septal and lateral mitral annuli, normalized with exercise in HCM patients. Further, systolic function (S' velocity) of HCM patients at rest was normal but failed to augment normally at peak exercise. Children with HCM have decreased TDI velocities at rest. With exercise, they may increase their E' velocities but fail to augment S' velocities, demonstrating decreased contractile reserve. In the patient with suspected HCM but equivocal findings, exercise TDI assessment may complement the diagnostic evaluation. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Resequencing the whole MYH7 gene (including the intronic, promoter, and 3' UTR sequences) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Coto, Eliecer; Reguero, Julián R; Palacín, María; Gómez, Juan; Alonso, Belén; Iglesias, Sara; Martín, María; Tavira, Beatriz; Díaz-Molina, Beatriz; Morales, Carlos; Morís, César; Rodríguez-Lambert, José L; Corao, Ana I; Díaz, Marta; Alvarez, Victoria

    2012-09-01

    MYH7 mutations are found in ~20% of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients. Currently, mutational analysis is based on the sequencing of the coding exons and a few exon-flanking intronic nucleotides, resulting in omission of single-exon deletions and mutations in internal intronic, promoter, and 3' UTR regions. We amplified and sequenced large MYH7 fragments in 60 HCM patients without previously identified sarcomere mutations. Lack of aberrant PCR fragments excluded single-exon deletions in the patients. Instead, we identified several new rare intronic variants. An intron 26 single nucleotide insertion (-5 insC) was predicted to affect pre-mRNA splicing, but allele frequencies did not differ between patients and controls (n = 150). We found several rare promoter variants in the patients compared to controls, some of which were in binding sites for transcription factors and could thus affect gene expression. Only one rare 3' UTR variant (c.*29T>C) found in the patients was absent among the controls. This nucleotide change would not affect the binding of known microRNAs. Therefore, MYH7 mutations outside the coding exon sequences would be rarely found among HCM patients. However, changes in the promoter region could be linked to the risk of developing HCM. Further research to define the functional effect of these variants on gene expression is necessary to confirm the role of the MYH7 promoter in cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-Term Outcome of Alcohol Septal Ablation for Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in the Young and the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Liebregts, Max; Steggerda, Robbert C; Vriesendorp, Pieter A; van Velzen, Hannah; Schinkel, Arend F L; Willems, Rik; van Cleemput, Johan; van den Berg, Maarten P; Michels, Michelle; ten Berg, Jurriën M

    2016-03-14

    The aim of this study was to compare outcomes of alcohol septal ablation (ASA) in young and elderly patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association guidelines reserve ASA for elderly patients and patients with serious comorbidities. Information on long-term age-specific outcomes after ASA is scarce. This cohort study included 217 HCM patients (age 54 ± 12 years) who underwent ASA because of symptomatic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. Patients were divided into young (age ≤55 years) and elderly (age >55 years) groups and matched by age in a 1:1 fashion to nonobstructive HCM patients. Atrioventricular block following ASA was more common in elderly patients (43% vs. 21%; p = 0.001), resulting in pacemaker implantation in 13% and 5%, respectively (p = 0.06). Residual left ventricular outflow tract gradient, post-procedural New York Heart Association functional class, and necessity for additional septal reduction therapy was comparable between age groups. During a follow-up of 7.6 ± 4.6 years, 54 patients died. The 5- and 10-year survival following ASA was 95% and 90% in patients age ≤55 years and 93% and 82% in patients age >55 years, which was comparable to their control groups. The annual adverse arrhythmic event rate following ASA was 0.7%/year in young patients and 1.4%/year in elderly patients, which was comparable to their control groups. ASA is similarly effective for reduction of symptoms in young and elderly patients; however, younger patients have a lower risk of procedure-related atrioventricular conduction disturbances. The long-term mortality rate and risk of adverse arrhythmic events following ASA are low, both in young and elderly patients, and are comparable to age-matched nonobstructive HCM patients. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. CCN2 plays a key role in extracellular matrix gene expression in severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tsoutsman, Tatiana; Wang, Xiaoyu; Garchow, Kendra; Riser, Bruce; Twigg, Stephen; Semsarian, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited primary myocardial disorder. HCM is characterized by interstitial fibrosis and excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Fibrosis in HCM has been associated with impaired cardiac function and heart failure, and has been considered a key substrate for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. The molecular triggers underpinning ECM production are not well established. We have previously developed a double-mutant mouse model of HCM that recapitulates the phenotype seen in humans with multiple mutations, including earlier onset of the disease, progression to a dilated phenotype, severe heart failure and premature mortality. The present study investigated the expression of ECM-encoding genes in severe HCM and heart failure. Significant upregulation of structural Fn1, regulatory Mmp14, Timp1, Serpin3A, SerpinE1, SerpineE2, Tgfβ1, and Tgfβ2; and matricellular Ccn2, Postn, Spp1, Thbs1, Thbs4, and Tnc was evident from the early, pre-phenotype stage. Non-myocytes expressed ECM genes at higher levels than cardiomyocytes in normal and diseased hearts. Synchronous increase of secreted CCN2 and TIMP1 plasma levels and decrease of MMP3 levels were observed in end-stage disease. CCN2 protein expression was increased from early disease in double-mutant hearts and played an important role in ECM responses. It was a powerful modulator of ECM regulatory (Timp1 and SerpinE1) and matricellular protein-encoding (Spp1, Thbs1, Thbs4 and Tnc) gene expression in cardiomyocytes when added exogenously in vitro. Modulation of CCN2 (CTGF, connective tissue growth factor) and associated early ECM changes may represent a new therapeutic target in the treatment and prevention of heart failure in HCM.

  6. Association of Noninvasively Measured Left Ventricular Mechanics With In Vitro Muscle Contractile Performance: A Prospective Study in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Ashwat; Sweet, Wendy; Popovic, Zoran B.; Smedira, Nicholas G.; Thamilarasan, Maran; Lytle, Bruce W.; Tan, Carmela; Starling, Randall C.; Lever, Harry M.; Moravec, Christine S.; Desai, Milind Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary myopathic process in which regional left ventricular dysfunction may exist without overt global left ventricular dysfunction. In obstructive HCM patients who underwent surgical myectomy (SM), we sought to determine if there is a significant association between echocardiographic longitudinal strain, histopathology, and in vitro myocardial performance (resting tension and developed tension) of the surgical specimen. Methods and Results HCM patients (n=122, 54±14 years, 54% men) undergoing SM were prospectively recruited. Longitudinal systolic strain and diastolic strain rates were measured at that basal septum (partially removed at SM) by using velocity vector imaging on preoperative echocardiography. Semiquantitative histopathologic grading of myocyte disarray and fibrosis and in vitro measurements of resting tension and developed tension were made in septal tissue obtained at SM. Mean basal septal systolic strain and diastolic strain rate were −8.3±5% and 0.62±0.4/s, while mild or greater degree of myocyte disarray and interstitial fibrosis were present in 85% and 87%, respectively. Mean resting tension and developed tension were 2.8±1 and 1.4±0.8 g/mm2. On regression analysis, basal septal systolic strain, diastolic strain rate, disarray, and fibrosis were associated with developed tension (β=0.19, 0.20, −0.33, and −0.40, respectively, all P<0.01) and resting tension (β=0.21, 0.22, −0.25, and −0.28, respectively, all P<0.01). Conclusion In obstructive HCM patients who underwent SM, left ventricular mechanics (echocardiographic longitudinal systolic strain and diastolic strain rates), assessed at the basal septum (myocardium removed during myectomy) and histopathologic findings characteristic for HCM (disarray and fibrosis) were significantly associated with in vitro myocardial resting and developed contractile performance. PMID:25389286

  7. Screening patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy for Fabry disease using a filter-paper test: the FOCUS study.

    PubMed

    Hagège, Albert A; Caudron, Eric; Damy, Thibaud; Roudaut, Raymond; Millaire, Alain; Etchecopar-Chevreuil, Caroline; Tran, Thi-Chien; Jabbour, Firas; Boucly, Catherine; Prognon, Patrice; Charron, Philippe; Germain, Dominique P

    2011-01-01

    Patients with Fabry disease (FD) show left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) of sarcomeric origin and might benefit, if detected early, from specific enzyme replacement therapy. The prevalence of FD in patients with LVH of 13 mm or greater, screened using the leucocyte alpha-galactosidase A (α-gal A) activity test, a technique that is difficult to apply routinely, ranged from 0% to 6%. To screen systematically for FD in patients with a diagnosis of HCM (LVH ≥15 mm) in primary cardiology practice, a validated, physician-friendly α-gal A assay was used on dried blood spots using a filter paper test. A cohort of 392 adults (278 men) followed for HCM were screened for FD. A standard blood test was used for confirmation in nine men in whom the α-gal A result was 40% or less. Four men (1.5%; 1.8% of men ≥40 years vs 0% <40 years; all with α-gal A <30%), but no women, were diagnosed with FD. Index cases presented with diffuse but asymmetric LVH, with severe obstruction in one case and frequent high-grade atrioventricular conduction block necessitating a pacemaker in three cases. Family screening identified eight additional cases. Genotyping was performed successfully on DNA extracted from the filter papers. In male patients diagnosed as having HCM, pure FD cardiac variants are not exceptional and can be specifically identified using a simple filter-paper test. The sensitivity of this test is low in female patients.

  8. Recognition of regional hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using thallium-201 emission-computed tomography: comparison with two-dimensional echocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Kadota, K.; Nohara, R.; Tamaki, S.; Kambara, H.; Yoshida, A.; Murakami, T.; Osakada, G.; Kawai, C.; Tamaki, N.

    1984-04-01

    The configuration of the hypertrophied myocardium was evaluated by thallium-201 emission-computed tomography and 2-dimensional (2-D) sector scan in 10 patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), 10 with nonobstructive HC with giant negative T waves and 10 with concentric left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging was reconstructed into multiple 12-mm-thick slices in 3 planes. The thickness ratio of the ventricular septum and the LV posterior wall in the short-axis plane and the ratio of the ventricular septum and the apical wall in the long-axis plane were analyzed. In the patients with obstructive HC the ventricular septal wall thickness index was increased, and the ratio of septal to posterior wall thickness index (1.45 +/- 0.23) was greater than that in the patients with nonobstructive HC with giant negative T waves or in those with concentric LV hypertrophy (1.03 +/- 0.20 and 0.98 +/- 0.11, respectively; p less than 0.01 for each). In the patients with nonobstructive HC with giant negative T waves, increased apical wall thickness with apical cavity obliteration was characteristic, and the ratio of ventricular septal to apical wall thickness index (0.66 +/- 0.14) was less than that in the patients with obstructive HC or in those with concentric LV hypertrophy (1.46 +/- 0.38 and 1.04 +/- 0.09, respectively; p less than 0.001 for each). In contrast, technically satisfactory 2-D sector scanning (83%) demonstrated various configurations of the hypertrophied ventricularseptum, but could not detect apical hypertrophy in 4 of the 10 patients with nonobstructive HC with giant negative T waves whose LV cineangiograms demonstrated apical hypertrophy. Thus, thallium-201 emission-computed tomography is useful in evaluating the characteristics of LV hypertrophy and assists 2-D sector scan, especially in patients with apical hypertrophy in HC.

  9. Long-term clinical follow-up of patients undergoing percutaneous alcohol septal reduction for symptomatic obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fortunato de Cano, Silvia; Nicolas Cano, Manuel; de Ribamar Costa, José; Alves Pinheiro, Jairo; Bellio de Mattos Barretto, Rodrigo; Costa de Souza Le Bihan, David; Abizaid, Alexandre; Sousa, Amanda; Eduardo Sousa, J

    2016-11-15

    Alcohol septal ablation (ASA) is an alternative treatment for symptomatic hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) patients refractory to pharmacological therapy. We sought to evaluate the immediate and long-term incidence of death and changes in life quality in a consecutive cohort submitted to ASA. Between October 1998 and December 2013, a total of 56 patients (mean age 53.2 ± 15.5) with symptomatic refractory HOCM were treated with ASA and followed during 15 years (mean 8 ± 4 years). There were 7 (12.5%) deaths, 2 (3.6%) being of cardiac cause. The Kaplan-Meier survival probability estimate was 96.4% at 1 year, 87.7 at 5 years and 81.0% at 12 years post-ASA. Significant improvement was observed in life quality assessed by DASI index and NYHA functional class as well as in the left ventricle outflow tract (LVOT) gradient reduction (from 92.8 ± 3.3 mm Hg to 9.37 ± 6.7 mm Hg, P < 0.001) and septum thickness (from 23.9 ± 0.6 mm to 12.9 ± 1.0 mm, P < 0.001). Only one patient (1.7%) required permanent pacemaker immediately after ASA. During follow-up, one patient had a repeated ASA, three patients underwent myectomy and other four required ICD/pacemaker. In the multivariate model only post-ASA LVOT residual gradient and left ventricle mass were associated with worse prognosis. In this long-term clinical follow-up without losses, ASA was effective in improving quality of life and NYHA functional class, with relatively low mortality and very low need for immediate permanent pacemaker implantation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Myocardial perfusion abnormality in the area of ventricular septum-free wall junction and cardiovascular events in nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaimoto, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Kuribayashi, Toshiro; Yamano, Michiyo; Miki, Shigeyuki; Kamitani, Tadaaki; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2012-10-01

    Myocardial perfusion abnormality in the left ventricle is known to be prognostic in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Magnetic resonance imaging and necropsy studies on HCM hearts revealed myocardial lesions predominating in the area of ventricular septum-free wall junction. We assessed perfusion abnormality in this area and correlated it with the prognosis of HCM patients. We performed exercise Tc-99m tetrofosmin myocardial scintigraphy in 55 patients with nonobstructive HCM. Perfusion abnormalities were semiquantified using a 5-point scoring system in small areas of anterior junctions of basal, mid, and apical short axis views in addition to a conventional 17-segment model. All patients were prospectively followed for sudden death, cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure or stroke associated with atrial fibrillation. Cardiovascular events occurred in 10 patients during an average follow-up period of 5.7 years. Stress and rest scores from anterior junction, and conventional summed stress score were significantly higher in patients with cardiovascular events than without (all P < 0.05). Anterior junction stress score of >2 produced a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 98% for cardiovascular events and was an independent predictor (hazard ratio 8.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.61-43.5; P = 0.01), with rest scores producing similar values, which were higher than summed stress score of >8 (5.68; 1.23-26.3; P = 0.03). The absence of myocardial perfusion abnormality in the narrow area of anterior junction differentiated HCM patients with low-risk.

  11. Tissue Doppler imaging and plasma N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide for the identification of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Doroteia; Madeira, Hugo; Almeida, Augusto; Brito, Dulce

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is able to identify mutation carriers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) before the development of the clinical phenotype. However, data are scarce and have sometimes been controversial. We performed a systematic study that included conventional echocardiography, TDI, and plasma NT-probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) measurement to evaluate the parameters that could identify HC mutation carriers. A total of 138 genotyped subjects were included and divided into 3 groups: group 1, those with HC (n = 62); group 2, mutation carriers (first-degree relatives with a positive genotype but negative phenotype; n = 34); and group 3, controls (first-degree relatives with a negative genotype and phenotype; n = 42). An echocardiographic study, including TDI, was performed on all subjects, and a TDI-derived index (global function index) was also determined. The age-adjusted mean differences in the echocardiographic and TDI parameters and NT-proBNP levels were compared among the 3 groups. Compared with the HC group, the carriers had significantly higher mean E' velocities, lower mean E/E' ratio, higher mean S' velocities, and lower mean global function index and NT-proBNP values. The carriers and controls did not differ significantly either in the echocardiographic parameters studied or in the NT-proBNP levels. In conclusion, the echocardiographic and TDI parameters and NT-proBNP levels cannot be used to identify the HC mutation carrier state and therefore do not appear to be reliable for the purpose of making a preclinical diagnosis of the disease.

  12. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Sarcomere Contractility Acutely Relieves Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction in Feline Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Joshua A.; Markova, Svetlana; Ueda, Yu; Kim, Jae B.; Pascoe, Peter J.; Evanchik, Marc J.; Green, Eric M.; Harris, Samantha P.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of the heart muscle characterized by otherwise unexplained thickening of the left ventricle. Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction is present in approximately two-thirds of patients and substantially increases the risk of disease complications. Invasive treatment with septal myectomy or alcohol septal ablation can improve symptoms and functional status, but currently available drugs for reducing obstruction have pleiotropic effects and variable therapeutic responses. New medical treatments with more targeted pharmacology are needed, but the lack of preclinical animal models for HCM with LVOT obstruction has limited their development. HCM is a common cause of heart failure in cats, and a subset exhibit systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leading to LVOT obstruction. MYK-461 is a recently-described, mechanistically novel small molecule that acts at the sarcomere to specifically inhibit contractility that has been proposed as a treatment for HCM. Here, we use MYK-461 to test whether direct reduction in contractility is sufficient to relieve LVOT obstruction in feline HCM. We evaluated mixed-breed cats in a research colony derived from a Maine Coon/mixed-breed founder with naturally-occurring HCM. By echocardiography, we identified five cats that developed systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve and LVOT obstruction both at rest and under anesthesia when provoked with an adrenergic agonist. An IV MYK-461 infusion and echocardiography protocol was developed to serially assess contractility and LVOT gradient at multiple MYK-461 concentrations. Treatment with MYK-461 reduced contractility, eliminated systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve and relieved LVOT pressure gradients in an exposure-dependent manner. Our findings provide proof of principle that acute reduction in contractility with MYK-461 is sufficient to relieve LVOT obstruction. Further, these studies suggest that feline

  13. Impact of the papillary muscles on cardiac magnetic resonance image analysis of important left ventricular parameters in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gommans, D H F; Bakker, J; Cramer, G E; Verheugt, F W A; Brouwer, M A; Kofflard, M J M

    2016-05-01

    The use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) analysis has increased in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Quantification of left ventricular (LV) measures will be affected by the inclusion or exclusion of the papillary muscles as part of the LV mass, but the magnitude of effect and potential consequences are unknown. We performed Cine-CMR in (1) clinical HCM patients (n = 55) and (2) subclinical HCM mutation carriers without hypertrophy (n = 14). Absolute and relative differences in LV ejection fraction (EF) and mass were assessed between algorithms with and without inclusion of the papillary muscles. Papillary muscle mass in group 1 was 6.6 ± 2.5 g/m(2) and inclusion of the papillary muscles resulted in significant relative increases in LVEF of 4.5 ± 1.8 % and in LV mass of 8.7 ± 2.6 %. For group 2 these figures were 4.0 ± 0.9 g/m(2), 3.8 ± 1.0 % and 9.5 ± 1.8 %, respectively. With a coefficient of variation of 4 %, this 9 % difference in LV mass during CMR follow-up will be considered a change, while in fact the exact same mass may have been assessed according to two different algorithms. In clinical HCM patients, CMR quantification of important LV measures is significantly affected by inclusion or exclusion of the papillary muscles. In relative terms, the difference was similar in subjects without hypertrophy. This underscores a general need for a uniform approach in CMR image analysis.

  14. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Sarcomere Contractility Acutely Relieves Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction in Feline Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Stern, Joshua A; Markova, Svetlana; Ueda, Yu; Kim, Jae B; Pascoe, Peter J; Evanchik, Marc J; Green, Eric M; Harris, Samantha P

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of the heart muscle characterized by otherwise unexplained thickening of the left ventricle. Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction is present in approximately two-thirds of patients and substantially increases the risk of disease complications. Invasive treatment with septal myectomy or alcohol septal ablation can improve symptoms and functional status, but currently available drugs for reducing obstruction have pleiotropic effects and variable therapeutic responses. New medical treatments with more targeted pharmacology are needed, but the lack of preclinical animal models for HCM with LVOT obstruction has limited their development. HCM is a common cause of heart failure in cats, and a subset exhibit systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leading to LVOT obstruction. MYK-461 is a recently-described, mechanistically novel small molecule that acts at the sarcomere to specifically inhibit contractility that has been proposed as a treatment for HCM. Here, we use MYK-461 to test whether direct reduction in contractility is sufficient to relieve LVOT obstruction in feline HCM. We evaluated mixed-breed cats in a research colony derived from a Maine Coon/mixed-breed founder with naturally-occurring HCM. By echocardiography, we identified five cats that developed systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve and LVOT obstruction both at rest and under anesthesia when provoked with an adrenergic agonist. An IV MYK-461 infusion and echocardiography protocol was developed to serially assess contractility and LVOT gradient at multiple MYK-461 concentrations. Treatment with MYK-461 reduced contractility, eliminated systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve and relieved LVOT pressure gradients in an exposure-dependent manner. Our findings provide proof of principle that acute reduction in contractility with MYK-461 is sufficient to relieve LVOT obstruction. Further, these studies suggest that feline

  15. T1 Measurements Identify Extracellular Volume Expansion in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Sarcomere Mutation Carriers With and Without Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Neilan, Tomas G.; Shah, Ravi V.; Chen, Yucheng; Heydari, Bobak; Cirino, Allison L.; Lakdawala, Neal K.; Orav, E. John; González, Arantxa; López, Begoña; Díez, Javier; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Myocardial fibrosis is a hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and a potential substrate for arrhythmias and heart failure. Sarcomere mutations appear to induce profibrotic changes before left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) develops. To further evaluate these processes, we used cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) with T1 measurements on a genotyped HCM population to quantify myocardial extracellular volume (ECV). Methods and Results Sarcomere mutation carriers with LVH (G+/LVH+, n = 37) and without LVH (G+/LVH−, n = 29); HCM patients without mutations (sarcomere-negative HCM, n = 11); and healthy controls (n = 11) underwent contrast CMR, measuring T1 times pre- and post-gadolinium infusion. Concurrent echocardiography and serum biomarkers of collagen synthesis, hemodynamic stress, and myocardial injury were also available in a subset. Compared to controls, ECV was increased in patients with overt HCM, as well as G+/LVH− mutation carriers (ECV= 0.36±0.01, 0.33±0.01, 0.27±0.01 in G+/LVH+, G+/LVH−, controls, respectively, P≤0.001 for all comparisons). ECV correlated with NT-proBNP levels (r = 0.58, P<0.001) and global E’ velocity (r = −0.48, P<0.001). Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was present in >60% of overt HCM patients but absent from G+/LVH− subjects. Both ECV and LGE were more extensive in sarcomeric HCM than sarcomere-negative HCM. Conclusions Myocardial ECV is increased in HCM sarcomere mutation carriers even in the absence of LVH. These data provide additional support that fibrotic remodeling is triggered early in disease pathogenesis. Quantifying ECV may help characterize the development myocardial fibrosis in HCM and ultimately assist in developing novel disease-modifying therapy, targeting interstitial fibrosis. PMID:23549607

  16. Mechanical dispersion and global longitudinal strain by speckle tracking echocardiography: Predictors of appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Candan, Ozkan; Gecmen, Cetin; Bayam, Emrah; Guner, Ahmet; Celik, Mehmet; Doğan, Cem

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we investigated whether mechanical dispersion which reflects electrical abnormality and other echocardiographic and clinic parameters predict appropriate ICD shock in patients undergone ICD implantation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Sixty-three patients who received ICD implantation for primary or secondary prevention were included in the study. Patients' clinical, electrocardiographic, 2D classic, and speckle tracking echocardiographic data were collected. Mechanical dispersion was defined as the standard deviation of time to peak negative strain in 18 left ventricular segments. Appropriate ICD therapy was defined as cardioversion or defibrillation due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. Patients were divided into two groups as occurrence or the absence of appropriate ICD therapy. A total of 17 (26.9%) patients were observed to have an appropriate ICD therapy during follow-up periods. In patients who performed appropriate ICD therapy, a larger left atrial volume index, higher sudden cardiac death (SCD)-Risk Score, longer mechanical dispersion, and decreased global longitudinal peak strain (GLPS) were observed. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, including (GLPS, mechanical dispersion, LAVi, and SCD-Risk Score) was used to determine independent predictors of occurrence of appropriate ICD therapy during the follow-up. Mechanical dispersion, GLPS, and SCD-Risk Score were found to be independent predictors of occurrence of appropriate ICD therapy. Mechanical dispersion, GLPS, and SCD-Risk Score were found to be predictive for appropriate ICD therapy in patients receiving ICD implantation. Readily measurable mechanical dispersion and GLPS could be helpful to distinguish patients at high risk who could optimally benefit from ICD therapy. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Diffuse interstitial fibrosis assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance is associated with dispersion of ventricular repolarization in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, David; Corona-Villalobos, Celia P; Pozios, Iraklis; Gonzales, Jorge; Soleimanifard, Yalda; Sivalokanathan, Sanjay; Montoya-Cerrillo, Diego; Vakrou, Styliani; Kamel, Ihab; Mormontoy-Laurel, Wilfredo; Dolores-Cerna, Ketty; Suarez, Jacsel; Perez-Melo, Sergio; Bluemke, David A; Abraham, Theodore P; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Abraham, M Roselle

    2017-06-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by myocyte hypertrophy, disarray, fibrosis, and increased risk for ventricular arrhythmias. Increased QT dispersion has been reported in patients with HCM, but the underlying mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. In this study, we examined the relationship between diffuse interstitial fibrosis, replacement fibrosis, QTc dispersion and ventricular arrhythmias in patients with HCM. We hypothesized that fibrosis would slow impulse propagation and increase dispersion of ventricular repolarization, resulting in increased QTc dispersion on surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and ventricular arrhythmias. ECG and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) image analyses were performed retrospectively in 112 patients with a clinical diagnosis of HCM. Replacement fibrosis was assessed by measuring late gadolinium (Gd) enhancement (LGE), using a semi-automated threshold technique. Diffuse interstitial fibrosis was assessed by measuring T1 relaxation times after Gd administration, using the Look-Locker sequence. QTc dispersion was measured digitally in the septal/anterior (V1-V4), inferior (II, III, and aVF), and lateral (I, aVL, V5, and V6) lead groups on surface ECG. All patients had evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy. LGE was evident in 70 (63%) patients; the median T1 relaxation time was 411±38 ms. An inverse correlation was observed between T1 relaxation time and QTc dispersion in leads V1-V4 (p<0.001). Patients with HCM who developed sustained ventricular tachycardia had slightly higher probability of increased QTc dispersion in leads V1-V4 (odds ratio, 1.011 [1.004-1.0178, p=0.003). We found no correlation between presence and percentage of LGE and QTc dispersion. Diffuse interstitial fibrosis is associated with increased dispersion of ventricular repolarization in leads, reflecting electrical activity in the hypertrophied septum. Interstitial fibrosis combined with ion channel/gap junction remodeling in the septum

  18. Tissue Doppler imaging and gradient echo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in normal cats and cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Kristin A; Kittleson, Mark D; Garcia-Nolen, Tanya; Larson, Richard F; Wisner, Erik R

    2006-01-01

    Cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) often develop diastolic dysfunction, which can lead to development of left congestive heart failure. Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) echocardiography has emerged as a useful, noninvasive method for assessing diastolic function in cats. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) has been performed in cats and accurately quantifies left ventricular (LV) mass in normal cats. However, assessment of cardiac function in cats by cMRI has not been performed. Six normal Domestic Shorthair cats and 7 Maine Coon cats with moderate to severe HCM were sedated, and TDI of the lateral mitral annulus was performed. Peak early diastolic velocity (Em) was measured from 5 nonconsecutive beats. Cats were anesthetized with propofol and electrocardiogram-gated gradient echo cMRI was performed during apnea after hyperventilation. Short-axis images of the LV extending from the mitral annulus to the apex were obtained throughout the cardiac cycle. LV mass at end systole and LV volumes throughout the cardiac cycle were quantified according to Simpson's rule. To assess the possible influence of propofol on diastolic function, TDI was performed on the 7 cats with HCM while sedated and then while anesthetized with propofol. Em was significantly lower in cats with HCM than normal cats (6.7 +/- 1.3 cm/s versus 11.6 +/- 1.9 cm/s, P < .001, respectively). There was no difference in the cMRI indices of diastolic function in normal and HCM cats. Propofol did not reduce diastolic function (Em) in cats with HCM but mildly reduced systolic myocardial velocity (S) in Maine Coon cats with HCM that were anesthetized with propofol (P = .87 and P = .03, respectively).

  19. Fabry Disease in Families With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Clinical Manifestations in the Classic and Later-Onset Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Adalsteinsdottir, Berglind; Palsson, Runolfur; Desnick, Robert J; Gardarsdottir, Marianna; Teekakirikul, Polakit; Maron, Martin; Appelbaum, Evan; Neisius, Ulf; Maron, Barry J; Burke, Michael A; Chen, Brenden; Pagant, Silvere; Madsen, Christoffer V; Danielsen, Ragnar; Arngrimsson, Reynir; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seidman, Christine E; Gunnarsson, Gunnar Th

    2017-08-01

    The screening of Icelandic patients clinically diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy resulted in identification of 8 individuals from 2 families with X-linked Fabry disease (FD) caused by GLA(α-galactosidase A gene) mutations encoding p.D322E (family A) or p.I232T (family B). Familial screening of at-risk relatives identified mutations in 16 family A members (8 men and 8 heterozygotes) and 25 family B members (10 men and 15 heterozygotes). Clinical assessments, α-galactosidase A (α-GalA) activities, glycosphingolipid substrate levels, and in vitro mutation expression were used to categorize p.D322E as a classic FD mutation and p.I232T as a later-onset FD mutation. In vitro expression revealed that p.D322E and p.I232T had α-GalA activities of 1.4% and 14.9% of the mean wild-type activity, respectively. Family A men had markedly decreased α-GalA activity and childhood-onset classic manifestations, except for angiokeratoma and cornea verticillata. Family B men had residual α-GalA activity and developed FD manifestations in adulthood. Despite these differences, all family A and family B men >30 years of age had left ventricular hypertrophy, which was mainly asymmetrical, and had similar late gadolinium enhancement patterns. Ischemic stroke and severe white matter lesions were more frequent among family A men, but neither family A nor family B men had overt renal disease. Family A and family B heterozygotes had less severe or no clinical manifestations. Men with classic or later-onset FD caused by GLA missense mutations developed prominent and similar cardiovascular disease at similar ages, despite markedly different α-GalA activities. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Novel insights on the relationship between T-tubular defects and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Crocini, C.; Ferrantini, C.; Scardigli, M.; Coppini, R.; Mazzoni, L.; Lazzeri, E.; Pioner, J.M.; Scellini, B.; Guo, A.; Song, L.S.; Yan, P.; Loew, L.M.; Tardiff, J.; Tesi, C.; Vanzi, F.; Cerbai, E.; Pavone, F.S.; Sacconi, L.; Poggesi, C.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities of cardiomyocyte Ca2 + homeostasis and excitation–contraction (E–C) coupling are early events in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and concomitant determinants of the diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmias typical of the disease. T-tubule remodelling has been reported to occur in HCM but little is known about its role in the E–C coupling alterations of HCM. Here, the role of T-tubule remodelling in the electro-mechanical dysfunction associated to HCM is investigated in the Δ160E cTnT mouse model that expresses a clinically-relevant HCM mutation. Contractile function of intact ventricular trabeculae is assessed in Δ160E mice and wild-type siblings. As compared with wild-type, Δ160E trabeculae show prolonged kinetics of force development and relaxation, blunted force-frequency response with reduced active tension at high stimulation frequency, and increased occurrence of spontaneous contractions. Consistently, prolonged Ca2 + transient in terms of rise and duration are also observed in Δ160E trabeculae and isolated cardiomyocytes. Confocal imaging in cells isolated from Δ160E mice reveals significant, though modest, remodelling of T-tubular architecture. A two-photon random access microscope is employed to dissect the spatio-temporal relationship between T-tubular electrical activity and local Ca2 + release in isolated cardiomyocytes. In Δ160E cardiomyocytes, a significant number of T-tubules (> 20%) fails to propagate action potentials, with consequent delay of local Ca2 + release. At variance with wild-type, we also observe significantly increased variability of local Ca2 + transient rise as well as higher Ca2 +-spark frequency. Although T-tubule structural remodelling in Δ160E myocytes is modest, T-tubule functional defects determine non-homogeneous Ca2 + release and delayed myofilament activation that significantly contribute to mechanical dysfunction. PMID:26714042

  1. Registration of dynamic multiview 2D ultrasound and late gadolinium enhanced images of the heart: Application to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy characterization.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Julián; Simon, Antoine; Halbert, Edgar; Tavard, François; Carré, François; Hernández, Alfredo; Donal, Erwan; Schnell, Frédéric; Garreau, Mireille

    2016-02-01

    Describing and analyzing heart multiphysics requires the acquisition and fusion of multisensor cardiac images. Multisensor image fusion enables a combined analysis of these heterogeneous modalities. We propose to register intra-patient multiview 2D+t ultrasound (US) images with multiview late gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images acquired during cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in order to fuse mechanical and tissue state information. The proposed procedure registers both US and LGE to cine MRI. The correction of slice misalignment and the rigid registration of multiview LGE and cine MRI are studied, to select the most appropriate similarity measure. It showed that mutual information performs the best for LGE slice misalignment correction and for LGE and cine registration. Concerning US registration, dynamic endocardial contours resulting from speckle tracking echocardiography were exploited in a geometry-based dynamic registration. We propose the use of an adapted dynamic time warping procedure to synchronize cardiac dynamics in multiview US and cine MRI. The registration of US and LGE MRI was evaluated on a dataset of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A visual assessment of 330 left ventricular regions from US images of 28 patients resulted in 92.7% of regions successfully aligned with cardiac structures in LGE. Successfully-aligned regions were then used to evaluate the abilities of strain indicators to predict the presence of fibrosis. Longitudinal peak-strain and peak-delay of aligned left ventricular regions were computed from corresponding regional strain curves from US. The Mann-Withney test proved that the expected values of these indicators change between the populations of regions with and without fibrosis (p < 0.01). ROC curves otherwise proved that the presence of fibrosis is one factor amongst others which modifies longitudinal peak-strain and peak-delay.

  2. The structural and functional effects of the familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-linked cardiac troponin C mutation, L29Q.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ian M; Sevrieva, Ivanka; Li, Monica X; Irving, Malcolm; Sun, Yin-Biao; Sykes, Brian D

    2015-10-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is characterized by severe abnormal cardiac muscle growth. The traditional view of disease progression in FHC is that an increase in the Ca(2+)-sensitivity of cardiac muscle contraction ultimately leads to pathogenic myocardial remodeling, though recent studies suggest this may be an oversimplification. For example, FHC may be developed through altered signaling that prevents downstream regulation of contraction. The mutation L29Q, found in the Ca(2+)-binding regulatory protein in heart muscle, cardiac troponin C (cTnC), has been linked to cardiac hypertrophy. However, reports on the functional effects of this mutation are conflicting, and our goal was to combine in vitro and in situ structural and functional data to elucidate its mechanism of action. We used nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism to solve the structure and characterize the backbone dynamics and stability of the regulatory domain of cTnC with the L29Q mutation. The overall structure and dynamics of cTnC were unperturbed, although a slight rearrangement of site 1, an increase in backbone flexibility, and a small decrease in protein stability were observed. The structure and function of cTnC was also assessed in demembranated ventricular trabeculae using fluorescence for in situ structure. L29Q reduced the cooperativity of the Ca(2+)-dependent structural change in cTnC in trabeculae under basal conditions and abolished the effect of force-generating myosin cross-bridges on this structural change. These effects could contribute to the pathogenesis of this mutation.

  3. Erythrocyte creatine as a marker of intravascular hemolysis due to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Toru; Okumiya, Toshika; Baba, Yuichi; Hirota, Takayoshi; Tanioka, Katsutoshi; Yamasaki, Naohito; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Doi, Yoshinori L; Kitaoka, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Erythrocyte creatine, a marker of erythrocyte age that increases with shortening of erythrocyte survival, has been reported to be a quantitative and reliable marker for intravascular hemolysis. We hypothesized that hemolysis could also occur due to intraventricular obstruction in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The purpose of this study was to examine the presence of subclinical hemolysis and the relation between intravascular hemolysis and intraventricular pressure gradient (IVPG). We measured erythrocyte creatine in 92 HCM patients. Twelve patients had left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO), 4 had midventricular obstruction (MVO), and the remaining 76 were non-obstructive. Erythrocyte creatine levels ranged from 0.92 to 4.36μmol/g hemoglobin. Higher levels of erythrocyte creatine were associated with higher IVPG (r=0.437, p<0.001). If erythrocyte creatine levels are high (≥1.8μmol/g hemoglobin), subclinical hemolysis is considered to be present. Half of LVOTO patients and no MVO patients showed high erythrocyte creatine levels. Although non-obstructive patients did not show significant intraventricular obstruction at rest, some showed high erythrocyte creatine levels. When LVOT-PG was measured during the strain phase of the Valsalva maneuver in 20 non-obstructive patients, 7 of those 20 patients showed LVOTO. In the 20 patients, there was no relation between erythrocyte creatine levels and LVOT-PG before the Valsalva maneuver (r=0.125, p=0.600), whereas there was a significant correlation between erythrocyte creatine and LVOT-PG provoked by the Valsalva maneuver (r=0.695, p=0.001). There is biochemical evidence of subclinical hemolysis in patients with HCM, and this hemolysis seems to be associated with LVOTO provoked by daily physical activities. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The prognostic value of standardized reference values for speckle-tracking global longitudinal strain in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hartlage, Gregory R; Kim, Jonathan H; Strickland, Patrick T; Cheng, Alan C; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Pernetz, Maria A; Clements, Stephen D; Williams, B Robinson

    2015-03-01

    Speckle-tracking left ventricular global longitudinal strain (GLS) assessment may provide substantial prognostic information for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients. Reference values for GLS have been recently published. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of standardized reference values for GLS in HCM patients. An analysis of HCM clinic patients who underwent GLS was performed. GLS was defined as normal (more negative or equal to -16%) and abnormal (less negative than -16%) based on recently published reference values. Patients were followed for a composite of events including heart failure hospitalization, sustained ventricular arrhythmia, and all-cause death. The power of GLS to predict outcomes was assessed relative to traditional clinical and echocardiographic variables present in HCM. 79 HCM patients were followed for a median of 22 months (interquartile range 9-30 months) after imaging. During follow-up, 15 patients (19%) met the primary outcome. Abnormal GLS was the only echocardiographic variable independently predictive of the primary outcome [multivariate Hazard ratio 5.05 (95% confidence interval 1.09-23.4, p = 0.038)]. When combined with traditional clinical variables, abnormal GLS remained independently predictive of the primary outcome [multivariate Hazard ratio 5.31 (95 % confidence interval 1.18-24, p = 0.030)]. In a model including the strongest clinical and echocardiographic predictors of the primary outcome, abnormal GLS demonstrated significant incremental benefit for risk stratification [net reclassification improvement 0.75 (95 % confidence interval 0.21-1.23, p < 0.0001)]. Abnormal GLS is an independent predictor of adverse outcomes in HCM patients. Standardized use of GLS may provide significant incremental value over traditional variables for risk stratification.

  5. Myocardial triglyceride content in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: comparison between hypertensive heart disease and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sai, Eiryu; Shimada, Kazunori; Yokoyama, Takayuki; Hiki, Makoto; Sato, Shuji; Hamasaki, Nozomi; Maruyama, Masaki; Morimoto, Ryoko; Miyazaki, Tetsuro; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Tamura, Yoshifumi; Aoki, Shigeki; Watada, Hirotaka; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) enables the assessment of myocardial triglyceride (TG) content, which is reported to be associated with cardiac dysfunction and morphology accompanied by metabolic disorder and cardiac hemodynamic status. The clinical usefulness of myocardial TG content measurements in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) has not been fully investigated. We examined whether myocardial TG content assessed by (1)H-MRS was useful for diagnosis in patients with LVH. To quantify myocardial TG content, we conducted (1)H-MRS in 35 subjects with LVH. Left ventricular function was measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were assigned to a hypertensive heart disease (HHD, n = 10) or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, n = 25) group based on the histology and/or late gadolinium enhancement pattern. The myocardial TG content was significantly higher in the HHD group than in the HCM group (2.14 ± 1.29 vs. 1.09 ± 0.72 %, P < 0.001). Myocardial TG content were significantly and negatively correlated with LV mass (r = -0.41, P < 0.04) and stroke volume (r = -0.64, P < 0.05) in the HCM group and HHD group, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, LV mass volume and diagnosis of HCM or HHD were independent factors of the myocardial TG content. The results suggest that myocardial metabolism may differ between HCM and HHD patients and that measurement of myocardial TG content by (1)H-MRS may be useful for evaluating the myocardial metabolic features of LVH.

  6. Effects of flecainide on left ventricular pressure gradient and symptoms in obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a comparison of flecainide and disopyramide.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Shintaro; Minami, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2015-09-01

    It remains unclear whether flecainide, a Class I antiarrhythmic drug, improves left ventricular pressure gradient (LVPG) or symptoms in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Our study evaluated the long-term efficacy of flecainide, compared to disopyramide, when administered orally, on LVPG and symptoms in obstructive HCM patients. Among 164 obstructive HCM patients, 15 were administered oral flecainide therapy and 33 administered oral disopyramide therapy. LVPG declined from 79.8 ± 36.6 to 39.2 ± 36.7 mmHg (p = 0.003) after flecainide therapy and from 74.5 ± 26.4 to 31.4 ± 24.8 mmHg (p < 0.001) after disopyramide therapy. The percent reduction in LVPG was -47.9 ± 43.2 % in patients treated with flecainide, comparable to the results for those treated with disopyramide (-57.1 ± 33.0 %; p = 0.425). We found no significant differences in improvement in NYHA functional class between patients treated with flecainide and those treated with disopyramide (p = 0.331). Patients treated with flecainide exhibited no significant adverse side effects, and there was no need for myectomy or alcohol septal ablation to reduce LVPG and symptoms. Improvements in LVPG and symptoms were similar in patients treated with flecainide and patients treated with disopyramide, suggesting that flecainide is a potentially useful alternative for symptomatic obstructive HCM patients, particularly those with disopyramide-induced vagolytic side effects, narrow angle glaucoma, or prostatic hyperplasia and pre-existing urination difficulties. Our data must be viewed with caution, however, in view of the small number of study patients. Flecainide therapy will require further proof of safety before it can be routinely recommended in patients with symptomatic obstructive HCM.

  7. Outcome of patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy after percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation and septal myectomy surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, J. X.; Shiota, T.; Lever, H. M.; Kapadia, S. R.; Sitges, M.; Rubin, D. N.; Bauer, F.; Greenberg, N. L.; Agler, D. A.; Drinko, J. K.; hide

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to evaluate follow-up results in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) who underwent either percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) or septal myectomy. BACKGROUND: Controversy exists with regard to these two forms of treatment for patients with HOCM. METHODS: Of 51 patients with HOCM treated, 25 were treated by PTSMA and 26 patients via myectomy. Two-dimensional echocardiograms were performed before both procedures, immediately afterwards and at a three-month follow-up. The New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was obtained before the procedures and at follow-up. RESULTS: Interventricular septal thickness was significantly reduced at follow-up in both groups (2.3 +/- 0.4 cm vs. 1.9 +/- 0.4 cm for septal ablation and 2.4 +/- 0.6 cm vs. 1.7 +/- 0.2 cm for myectomy, both p < 0.001). Estimated by continuous-wave Doppler, the resting pressure gradient (PG) across the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) significantly decreased immediately after the procedures in both groups (64 +/- 39 mm Hg vs. 28 +/- 29 mm Hg for PTSMA, 62 +/- 43 mm Hg vs. 7 +/- 7 mm Hg for myectomy, both p < 0.0001). At three-month follow-up, the resting PG remained lower in the PTSMA and myectomy groups (24 +/- 19 mm Hg and 11 +/- 6 mm Hg, respectively, vs. those before procedures, both p < 0.0001). The NYHA functional class was also significantly improved in both groups (3.5 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.7 for PTSMA, 3.3 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.7 for myectomy, both p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Both myectomy and PTSMA reduce LVOT obstruction and significantly improve NYHA functional class in patients with HOCM. However, there are benefits and drawbacks for each therapeutic method that must be counterbalanced when deciding on treatment for LVOT obstruction.

  8. Histological and Histometric Characterization of Myocardial Fibrosis in End-Stage Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Clinical-Pathological Study of 30 Explanted Hearts.

    PubMed

    Galati, Giuseppe; Leone, Ornella; Pasquale, Ferdinando; Olivotto, Iacopo; Biagini, Elena; Grigioni, Francesco; Pilato, Emanuele; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Corti, Barbara; Foà, Alberto; Agostini, Valentina; Cecchi, Franco; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    Although noninvasively detected myocardial fibrosis (MF) has clinical implications in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the extent, type, and distribution of ventricular MF have never been extensively pathologically characterized. We assessed the overall amount, apex-to-base, circumferential, epicardial-endocardial distribution, pattern, and type of MF in 30 transplanted hearts of end-stage, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Visual and morphometric histological analyses at basal, midventricular, and apical levels were performed. Overall MF ranged from 23.1% to 55.9% (mean=37.3±8.4%). Prevalent types of MF were as follows: replacement in 53.3%, interstitial-perimyocyte in 13.3%, and mixed in 33.3%. Considering left ventricular base-to-apex distribution, MF was 31.9%, 43%, and 46.2% at basal, midventricular, and apical level, respectively (P<0.001). Circumferential distributions (mean percentage of MF within the section) were as follows: anterior 11.9%, anterolateral 15.8%, inferolateral 7.0%, inferior 24.3%, anteroseptal 11%, midseptal 10.7%, and posteroseptal 11.4%; circumferential distributions for anterior and inferior right ventricular walls were 3.4% and 4.5%, respectively. Epicardial-endocardial distributions were as follows: trabecular 26.1% and subendocardial 20.2%, midwall 33.4%, and subepicardial 20.3%. Main patterns identified were as follows: midwall in 33.3% of the hearts, transmural in 23.3%, midwall-subepicardial in 23.3%, and midwall-subendocardial in 20%. In end-stage, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients undergoing transplantation, more than one-third of the left ventricular myocardium was replaced by fibrosis, mainly of replacement type. MF preferentially involved the left ventricular apex and the midwall. Inferior and anterior walls and septum were maximally involved, whereas inferolateral and right ventricular were usually spared. These observations reflect the complex pathophysiology of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and may provide clues for the timely

  9. Alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in a patient with a chronic total occlusion of the right coronary artery: “beware of collateral damage”

    PubMed Central

    de Hemptinne, Quentin; Picard, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol septal ablation (ASA) is an effective semi-invasive alternative to surgical myectomy in selected patients for the management of severely symptomatic and drug-refractory hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). One contraindication of this procedure is the presence of collateral flow originating from the target septal perforator to a remote myocardial territory. In such circumstances, ethanol injection could cause remote non-target myocardial necrosis in the collateralized territory. Percutaneous revascularization of the collateralized vessel prior to ASA might cope with this contraindication by restoring normal antegrade flow in the occluded artery. We report a case that illustrates the feasibility and efficacy of such strategy. PMID:28164017

  10. Cardiac-Specific Over-Expression of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (ErbB2) Induces Pro-Survival Pathways and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xin; Belmonte, Frances; Kang, Byunghak; Bedja, Djahida; Pin, Scott; Tsuchiya, Noriko; Gabrielson, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence shows that ErbB2 signaling has a critical role in cardiomyocyte physiology, based mainly on findings that blocking ErbB2 for cancer therapy is toxic to cardiac cells. However, consequences of high levels of ErbB2 activity in the heart have not been previously explored. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated consequences of cardiac-restricted over-expression of ErbB2 in two novel lines of transgenic mice. Both lines develop striking concentric cardiac hypertrophy, without heart failure or decreased life span. ErbB2 transgenic mice display electrocardiographic characteristics similar to those found in patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, with susceptibility to adrenergic-induced arrhythmias. The hypertrophic hearts, which are 2–3 times larger than those of control littermates, express increased atrial natriuretic peptide and β-myosin heavy chain mRNA, consistent with a hypertrophic phenotype. Cardiomyocytes in these hearts are significantly larger than wild type cardiomyocytes, with enlarged nuclei and distinctive myocardial disarray. Interestingly, the over-expression of ErbB2 induces a concurrent up-regulation of multiple proteins associated with this signaling pathway, including EGFR, ErbB3, ErbB4, PI3K subunits p110 and p85, bcl-2 and multiple protective heat shock proteins. Additionally, ErbB2 up-regulation leads to an anti-apoptotic shift in the ratio of bcl-xS/xL in the heart. Finally, ErbB2 over-expression results in increased activation of the translation machinery involving S6, 4E-BP1 and eIF4E. The dependence of this hypertrophic phenotype on ErbB family signaling is confirmed by reduction in heart mass and cardiomyocyte size, and inactivation of pro-hypertrophic signaling in transgenic animals treated with the ErbB1/2 inhibitor, lapatinib. Conclusions/Significance These studies are the first to demonstrate that increased ErbB2 over-expression in the heart can activate protective signaling pathways and induce a

  11. Obstructive Form of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Gradient: Novel Methods of Provocation, Monitoring of Biomarkers, and Recent Advances in the Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrow, Pawel Petkow; Rajtar-Salwa, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic (latent or/and labile) obstruction of left ventricular outflow (LVOT) was recognized from the earliest clinical descriptions of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and has proved to be a complex phenomenon, as well as arguably the most audible (“visible”) pathophysiological hallmark of this heterogeneous disease. The aim of the current review is focused on two novel issues in a subgroup of obstructive HCM. Firstly, the important methodological problem in HCM is the examination of a subgroup of patients with nonobstructive hypertrophy in resting conditions and hard, but possible provoking obstruction. Recently, investigators have proposed physiological stress test (with double combined stimuli) to disclose such type of patients. The upright exercise is described in the ESC guideline on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from 2014 and may appear as a candidate for gold standard provocation test. The second novel area of interest is associated with elevated level of signaling biomarkers: hypercoagulation, hemolysis, acquired von Willebrand 2A disease, and enhanced oxidative stress. The accelerated and turbulent flow within narrow LVOT may be responsible for these biochemical disturbances. The most recent advances in the treatment of obstructive HCM are related to nonpharmacological methods of LVOT gradient reduction. This report extensively discusses novel methods. PMID:27247935

  12. Decreased interactions of mutant muscle LIM protein (MLP) with N-RAP and alpha-actinin and their implication for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gehmlich, Katja; Geier, Christian; Osterziel, Karl Josef; Van der Ven, Peter F M; Fürst, Dieter O

    2004-08-01

    Previous work has shown that mutations in muscle LIM protein (MLP) can cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). In order to gain an insight into the molecular basis of the disease phenotype, we analysed the binding characteristics of wild-type MLP and of the (C58G) mutant MLP that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We show that MLP can form a ternary complex with two of its previously documented myofibrillar ligand proteins, N-RAP and alpha-actinin, which indicates the presence of distinct, non-overlapping binding sites. Our data also show that, in comparison to wild-type MLP, the capacity of the mutated MLP protein to bind both N-RAP and alpha-actinin is significantly decreased. In addition, this single point mutation prevents zinc coordination and proper folding of the second zinc-finger in the first LIM domain, which consequently renders the protein less stable and more susceptible to proteolysis. The molecular basis for HCM-causing mutations in the MLP gene might therefore be an alteration in the equilibrium of interactions of the ternary complex MLP-N-RAP-alpha-actinin. This assumption is supported by the previous observation that in the pathological situation accompanied by MLP down regulation, cardiomyocytes try to compensate for the decreased stability of MLP protein by increasing the expression of its ligand N-RAP, which might finally result in the development of myocyte disarray that is characteristic of this disease.

  13. Tissue Doppler Imaging Combined with Advanced 12-Lead ECG Analysis Might Improve Early Diagnosis of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Childhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Femlund, E.; Schlegel, T.; Liuba, P.

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of early diagnosis of childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is essential in lowering the risk of HCM complications. Standard echocardiography (ECHO) has shown to be less sensitive in this regard. In this study, we sought to assess whether spatial QRS-T angle deviation, which has shown to predict HCM in adults with high sensitivity, and myocardial Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) could be additional tools in early diagnosis of HCM in childhood. Methods: Children and adolescents with familial HCM (n=10, median age 16, range 5-27 years), and without obvious hypertrophy but with heredity for HCM (n=12, median age 16, range 4-25 years, HCM or sudden death with autopsy-verified HCM in greater than or equal to 1 first-degree relative, HCM-risk) were additionally investigated with TDI and advanced 12-lead ECG analysis using Cardiax(Registered trademark) (IMED Co Ltd, Budapest, Hungary and Houston). Spatial QRS-T angle (SA) was derived from Kors regression-related transformation. Healthy age-matched controls (n=21) were also studied. All participants underwent thorough clinical examination. Results: Spatial QRS-T angle (Figure/ Panel A) and septal E/Ea ratio (Figure/Panel B) were most increased in HCM group as compared to the HCM-risk and control groups (p less than 0.05). Of note, these 2 variables showed a trend toward higher levels in HCM-risk group than in control group (p=0.05 for E/Ea and 0.06 for QRS/T by ANOVA). In a logistic regression model, increased SA and septal E/Ea ratio appeared to significantly predict both the disease (Chi-square in HCM group: 9 and 5, respectively, p less than 0.05 for both) and the risk for HCM (Chi-square in HCM-risk group: 5 and 4 respectively, p less than 0.05 for both), with further increased predictability level when these 2 variables were combined (Chi-square 10 in HCM group, and 7 in HCM-risk group, p less than 0.01 for both). Conclusions: In this small material, Tissue Doppler Imaging and spatial mean QRS-T angle

  14. Young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but not subjects at risk, show decreased myocardial perfusion reserve quantified with CMR.

    PubMed

    Gyllenhammar, Tom; Fernlund, Eva; Jablonowski, Robert; Jögi, Jonas; Engblom, Henrik; Liuba, Petru; Arheden, Håkan; Carlsson, Marcus

    2014-12-01

    To determine if myocardial perfusion (MP) during hyperaemia is decreased in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Also, to determine if an MP decrease is associated with diastolic dysfunction, and to investigate if young subjects at risk of HCM show differences in MP compared with controls. This study included 10 HCM patients (age 22.3 ± 6.4 years), 14 subjects at risk for HCM 'HCM risk' (age 18.9 ± 3.8 years), and 12 controls (age 22.8 ± 4.5 years). HCM patients were examined at rest and during hyperaemia (adenosine 140 µg/kg/min) with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and echocardiography. MP was calculated as the ratio of coronary sinus flow and left ventricular mass (LVM) from CMR. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed using late gadolinium enhancement. Diastolic function was quantified with both echocardiography and CMR. At rest, MP (mL/min/g) was similar in the control, HCM risk, and HCM patients (0.8 ± 0.1, 1.0 ± 0.1, and 0.9 ± 0.1, respectively, P = ns). During adenosine, MP was lower in HCM patients (2.5 ± 0.4, P < 0.05) compared with both HCM risk (5.0 ± 0.5) and controls (3.9 ± 0.3). Subjects at HCM risk showed no significant difference in MP during adenosine compared with controls. One HCM patient showed mild diastolic dysfunction. Neither controls nor HCM risk individuals showed any sign of myocardial fibrosis, whereas 7/10 HCM patients had fibrosis (5 ± 1% of the total LVM). Young individuals with HCM, but not those at risk, show decreased MP during hyperaemia compared with controls even in the absence of diastolic dysfunction or LV outflow obstruction. These results may suggest that microvascular disease contributes to the decreased MP in the investigated population. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Assessment of intravascular and extravascular mechanisms of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by myocardial contrast echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Osama I I; Knaapen, Paul; Geleijnse, Marcel L; Dijkmans, Pieter A; Anwar, Ashraf M; Nemes, Attila; Michels, Michelle; Vletter, Wim B; Lammertsma, Adriaan A

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To assess mechanisms of myocardial perfusion impairment in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Methods Fourteen patients with obstructive HCM (mean (SD) age 53 (10) years, 11 men) underwent intravenous adenosine myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE), positron emission tomography (PET) and cardiac catheterisation. Fourteen healthy volunteers (mean age 31 (4) years, 11 men) served as controls. Relative myocardial blood volume (rBV), exchange flow velocity (β), myocardial blood flow (MBF), MBF reserve (MFR) and endocardial‐to‐subepicardial (endo‐to‐epi) MBF ratio were measured from the steady state and contrast replenishment time–intensity curves. Results Patients with HCM had lower rest MBF (for LVRPP‐corrected)—mean (SD) (0.92 (0.12) vs 1.13 (0.25) ml/min/g, p<0.01)—and hyperaemic MBF—(2.56 (0.49) vs 4.34 (0.78) ml/min/g, p<0.01) than controls. Resting rBV was lower in patients with HCM (0.094 (0.016) vs 0.138 (0.014) ml/ml), and during hyperaemia (0.104 (0.018) ml/ml vs 0.185 (0.024) ml/ml) (all p<0.001) than in controls. β tended to be higher in HCM at rest (9.4 (4.6) vs 7.7 (4.2) ml/min) and during hyperaemia (25.8 (6.4) vs 23.1 (6.2) ml/min) than in controls. Septal endo‐to‐epi MBF decreased during hyperaemia (0.86 (0.15) to 0.64 (0.18), p<0.01). rBV was inversely correlated with left ventricular (LV) mass index (p<0.05). Both hyperaemic and endo‐to‐epi MBF were inversely correlated with LV end‐diastolic pressure, LV mass index, and LV outflow tract pressure gradient (all p<0.05). MCE‐derived MBF correlated well with PET at rest (r = 0.84) and hyperaemia (r = 0.87) (all p<0.001). Conclusions In patients with HCM, LV end‐diastolic pressure, LV outflow tract pressure gradient, and LV mass index are independent predictors of rBV and hyperaemic MBF. PMID:17488767

  16. Upright treadmill vs. semi-supine bicycle exercise echocardiography to provoke obstruction in symptomatic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Reant, Patricia; Dufour, Maxence; Peyrou, Jerome; Reynaud, Amelie; Rooryck, Caroline; Dijos, Marina; Vincent, Cecile; Cornolle, Claire; Roudaut, Raymond; Lafitte, Stephane

    2017-02-17

    Recent findings regarding hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) haemodynamics emphasized the relationship between symptoms, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO), and the preload condition as the venous return level. As various types of exercises have different effects on peripheral vascular beds, this study sought to compare upright treadmill exercise echocardiography (EE) to semi-supine bicycle EE in maximum provoked LVOTO in HCM patients. Semi-supine bicycle and upright treadmill EE were prospectively performed in HCM patients with New York Heart Association functional Class II. Maximal LVOT gradient at rest in the supine and standing position, and during Valsalva manoeuvre, LVOT gradients of both semi-supine bicycle and treadmill exercise at peak and post-exercise, maximal exercise levels, and blood pressure adaptation were recorded. One patient was excluded for not sufficient image quality during treadmill. We studied 22/23 patients (mean age: 54.9 ± 12.3 yrs; 55% male). The supine position at rest displayed a mean maximal LVOT gradient of 46.1 ± 44.8 mmHg, which increased to 51.6 ± 41.2 mmHg during Valsalva (P = 0.066), and to 55.1 ± 37.8 mmHg in the standing position (P = 0.053). Mean maximal peak exercise LVOT gradient with semi-supine bicycle was significantly lower than in treadmill EE (54.6 ± 38.2 mmHg vs. 87.5 ± 42.1 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.01). Among these patients, 41% exhibited LVOT gradient ≥ 30 mmHg at rest. Moreover, 41% exhibited LVOT gradient ≥ 50 mmHg during Valsalva, 55% in resting standing position, 41% at peak semi-supine bicycle exercise, 91% at peak treadmill exercise, and 95% in standing position during treadmill recovery period. This pilot study may suggest treadmill's greater value compared to semi-supine bicycle EE for determining maximum LVOT gradient in HCM.

  17. Relation of highly sensitive cardiac troponin T in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to left ventricular mass and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Gilbert; Bakker, Jeannette; Gommans, Frank; Brouwer, Marc; Kurvers, Maurice; Fouraux, Michael; Verheugt, Freek; Kofflard, Marcel

    2014-04-01

    Elevated cardiac troponin can be seen in patients with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and in asymptomatic subjects with a high a priori risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) troponin can be detected as well, but little is known about the contribution of LV mass, on the one hand, and the long-term risk of CVD, on the other. In an observational single-center study of 62 patients with HC, without a history of CVD, we assessed the Framingham Heart 10-year risk score (FH10yrs), LV mass index (LVMI) using magnetic resonance imaging, and highly sensitive cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT). Hs-cTnT (>3 ng/L) was detectable in 74% of patients (46 of 62). Hs-cTnT was elevated in 26% (16 of 62) of patients (ninety-ninth percentile reference limit of 14 ng/L or more). From 3 to 14 ng/L, patients were older, more often had hypertension, and the FH10yrs was higher. Hs-cTnT correlated positively with LVMI (p<0.001) and maximal wall thickness (p<0.001). In addition, LVMI and hypertension were independently associated with increasing hs-cTnT concentrations in linear regression. Using multivariate binary logistic regression, both LVMI and FH10yrs were independently associated with detectable hs-cTnT levels. In contrast, only LVMI was associated with elevated hs-cTnT levels. In conclusion, hs-cTnT was detectable in 3 quarters and elevated in a quarter of our patients with HC. Although detectable hs-cTnT is associated with both LV mass and CVD risk, elevated hs-cTnT relates to LV mass only. This indicates that hypertrophy more than the risk of CVD seems the most important drive for hs-cTnT to occur in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of alcohol dosage on long-term outcomes after alcohol septal ablation in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Liebregts, Max; Vriesendorp, Pieter A; Steggerda, Robbert C; Schinkel, Arend F L; Balt, Jippe C; Ten Cate, Folkert J; Michels, Michelle; Ten Berg, Jurriën M

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study is to assess the long-term effects of alcohol dosage in alcohol septal ablation (ASA) on mortality and adverse arrhythmic events (AAE). ASA can be performed to reduce left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). However, the effect of alcohol dosage on long-term outcomes is unknown. This retrospective cohort study includes 296 HCM patients (age 60 ± 22 years, 58% male) who underwent ASA because of symptomatic LVOT obstruction. Twenty-nine patients (9.8%) were excluded because the alcohol dosage could not be retrieved. Primary endpoints were all-cause mortality and AAE. During 6.3 ± 3.7 years of follow-up, all-cause mortality and AAE rates were similar in patients who received ≤2.0 mL (n = 142) and >2.0 mL (n = 121) alcohol during ASA. Age was the only independent predictor of mortality (HR 1.1 95% CI 1.0-1.1, P < 0.001). Predictors of AAE were maximum CK-MB >240 U/L (HR 3.3 95% CI 1.5-7.2, P = 0.003), and sudden cardiac death survivor (HR 5.9 95% CI 1.7-20.3, P = 0.004). There was a mild to moderate correlation between CK-MB levels and amount of alcohol (Spearman's ρ 0.39, P < 0.001), cross-sectional area of the target septal branch ostium/ostia (Spearman's ρ 0.19, P = 0.003), and maximum ventricular wall thickness (Spearman's ρ 0.17, P = 0.006). Alcohol dosage appears not to have a long-term effect on mortality and AAE. A larger infarct size created by ASA increases the risk of AAE, and extended monitoring of these patients is advised. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Subendocardial motion in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: assessment from long- and short-axis views by pulsed tissue Doppler imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabata, T.; Oki, T.; Yamada, H.; Abe, M.; Onose, Y.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is a recently developed technique that allows the instantaneous measurement of intrinsic regional myocardial motion velocity. Pulsed TDI is capable of separately assessing left ventricular (LV) regional motion velocity caused by circumferential and longitudinal fiber contraction. This particular feature of function is still controversial in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). METHODS: To better characterize intrinsic circumferential and longitudinal LV systolic myocardial function in HC, we used pulsed TDI to measure short- and long-axis LV motion velocities, respectively. The subendocardial motion velocity patterns at the middle of the LV posterior wall (PW) and ventricular septum (IVS) in LV parasternal and apical long-axis views were recorded by pulsed TDI in 19 patients with nonobstructive HC and in 21 normal controls (NC). RESULTS: Peak short- and long-axis systolic subendocardial velocities in both the LV PW and IVS were significantly smaller in the HC group than in the NC group, and the time to peak velocity was significantly delayed. Furthermore, peak PW systolic velocity was significantly greater along the long axis than along the short axis in the NC group (8.8 +/- 1.5 cm/s vs 8.2 +/- 1.4 cm/s, P <.05), whereas the opposite was observed in the HC group (6.1 +/- 1.2 cm/s vs 7.5 +/- 1.0 cm/s, P <.0001). No significant differences were found in either group between the long- and short-axis IVS velocities (HC: 5.9 +/- 1.4 cm/s vs 5.5 +/- 1.3 cm/s; NC: 7.8 +/-