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Sample records for mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number

  1. Prospective Universal Application of Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Genotyping To Characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates for Fast Identification of Clustered and Orphan Cases▿

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Rodriguez, Noelia; Martínez-Lirola, Miguel; Sánchez, M. Luisa; Herranz, Marta; Peñafiel, Teresa; Bonillo, Magdalena del Carmen; Gonzalez-Rivera, Milagros; Martínez, Juan; Cabezas, Teresa; Diez-García, Luis Felipe; Bouza, Emilio; García de Viedma, Darío

    2009-01-01

    The use of molecular tools for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in epidemiological surveys in order to identify clustered and orphan strains requires faster response times than those offered by the reference method, IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) genotyping. A method based on PCR, the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) genotyping technique, is an option for fast fingerprinting of M. tuberculosis, although precise evaluations of correlation between MIRU-VNTR and RFLP findings in population-based studies in different contexts are required before the methods are switched. In this study, we evaluated MIRU-VNTR genotyping (with a set of 15 loci [MIRU-15]) in parallel to RFLP genotyping in a 39-month universal population-based study in a challenging setting with a high proportion of immigrants. For 81.9% (281/343) of the M. tuberculosis isolates, both RFLP and MIRU-VNTR types were obtained. The percentages of clustered cases were 39.9% (112/281) and 43.1% (121/281) for RFLP and MIRU-15 analyses, and the numbers of clusters identified were 42 and 45, respectively. For 85.4% of the cases, the RFLP and MIRU-15 results were concordant, identifying the same cases as clustered and orphan (kappa, 0.7). However, for the remaining 14.6% of the cases, discrepancies were observed: 16 of the cases clustered by RFLP analysis were identified as orphan by MIRU-15 analysis, and 25 cases identified as orphan by RFLP analysis were clustered by MIRU-15 analysis. When discrepant cases showing subtle genotypic differences were tolerated, the discrepancies fell from 14.6% to 8.6%. Epidemiological links were found for 83.8% of the cases clustered by both RFLP and MIRU-15 analyses, whereas for the cases clustered by RFLP or MIRU-VNTR analysis alone, links were identified for only 30.8% or 38.9% of the cases, respectively. The latter group of cases mainly comprised isolates that could also have been clustered

  2. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium intracellulare Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis, Mycobacteria Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Typing, and Multilocus Sequence Typing: Molecular Characterization and Comparison of Each Typing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Semi; Lim, Nara; Kwon, Seungjik; Shim, Taesun; Park, Misun; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Seonghan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mycobacterium intracellulare is the major causative agent of nontuberculous mycobacteria-related pulmonary infections. The strain typing of M. intracellulare is important for the treatment and control of its infections. We compared the discrimination capacity and effective value of four different molecular typing methods. Methods Antibiotic susceptibility testing, hsp65 and rpoB sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mycobacteria interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR), and VNTR assay targeting 44 M. intracellulare isolates obtained from patients with pulmonary infections were performed. Results All the antibiotic susceptibility patterns had no association with the molecular and sequence types tested in this study; however, the molecular and sequence types were related with each other. PFGE gave best results for discriminatory capacity, followed by VNTR, MLST, and MIRU-VNTR. Conclusion The high discriminatory power of PFGE, VNTR, and MLST is enough for differentiating between reinfection and relapse, as well as for other molecular epidemiological usages. The MLST could be regarded as a representative classification method, because it showed the clearest relation with the sequence types. PMID:25180144

  3. Drug-resistant tuberculosis can be predicted by Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit locus

    PubMed Central

    Yu-feng, Wen; Chao, Jiang; Xian-feng, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether MIRU-VNTR (Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit-Variable Number of Tandem Repeat) is associated with drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The purpose of this study was to explore the ability of 24 MIRU loci to predict the drug resistance of Isoniazid (INH), Rifampicin (RFP), Streptomycin (SM), Ethambutol (EMB) and Pyrazinamide (PZA). We collected the drug resistance and MIRU loci information of 109 strains of M. tuberculosis from an open database. The results of multivariate logistic regression showed that the VNTR polymorphism of MTUB04 was related to INH resistance [odds ratio (OR) = 2.82, P = 0.00], RFP resistance (OR = 1.91, P = 0.02), SM resistance (OR = 1.98, P = 0.01) and EMB resistance (OR = 1.95, P = 0.03). MIRU40 was associated with INH resistance (OR = 2.22, P = 0.00). MTUB21 was connected with INH resistance (OR = 1.63, P = 0.02) and SM resistance (OR = 1.69, P = 0.01). MIRU26 was correlated with SM resistance (OR = 1.52, P = 0.04). MIRU39 was associated with EMB resistance (OR = 4.07, P = 0.02). The prediction power of MIRU loci were 0.84, 0.70, 0.85, and 0.74 respectively for INH (predicted by MTUB04, MIRU20, and MTUB21), RFP (predicted by MTUB04), SM (predicted by MTUB21 and MIRU26) and EMB (MTUB04 and MIRU39) through ROC analysis. Our results showed that MIRU loci were related to anti-tuberculosis drug and could predict the drug resistance of tuberculosis. PMID:25759689

  4. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing and mutational profile for multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis surveillance in Portugal: a 3-year period overview.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carla; Perdigão, João; Jordão, Luísa; Portugal, Isabel

    2014-12-01

    Multidrug tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) cases constitute a serious health problem in Portugal, of which the majority of isolates belong to the Lisboa family and the Q1 cluster, highly related to the Lisboa family. Here we sought to investigate the molecular basis of resistant TB as well as to determine the prevalence of specific drug resistance mutations and their association with MDR-TB and/or XDR-TB. In total, 74 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Lisbon Health Region were genotyped by 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR), and the mutational profile associated with first- and second-line drug resistance was studied. Seven new mutations were found, whilst the remaining 28 mutations had been previously associated with drug resistance. None of the mutations was specifically associated with MDR-TB. The mutational patterns observed among isolates belonging to Lisboa3 and Q1 clusters were also observed in isolates with unique MIRU-VNTR patterns but closely related to these strains. Such data suggest that the genotyping technique employed discriminates isolates with the same mutational profile. To establish the most adequate genotyping technique, the discriminatory power of three different MIRU-VNTR sets was analysed. The 15-loci MIRU-VNTR set showed adequate discriminatory power, comparable with the 24-loci set, allowing clustering of 60% and 86% of the MDR-TB and XDR-TB isolates, respectively, the majority of which belonged to the Lisboa3 and Q1 clusters. From an epidemiological standpoint, this study suggests combined mutational and genotyping analysis as a valuable tool for drug resistance surveillance.

  5. Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit Can Predict Drug Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xian-feng; Jiang, Chao; Zhang, Min; Xia, Dan; Chu, Li-li; Wen, Yu-feng; Zhu, Ming; Jiang, Yue-gen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit (MIRU) was supposed to be associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), but whether the association exists actually in local strains in China was still unknown. This research was conducted to explore that association and the predictability of MIRU to drug resistance of Tuberculosis (TB). Methods: The clinical isolates were collected and the susceptibility test were conducted with Lowenstein–Jensen (LJ) medium for five anti-TB drug. Based on PCR of MIRU-VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeat) genotyping, we tested the number of the repeat unite of MIRU. Then, we used logistic regression to evaluate the association between 15 MIRU and drug resistance. In addition, we explored the most suitable MIRU locus of identified MIRU loci for drug resistance by multivariate logistic regression. Results: Of the 102 strains, one isolate was resistant to rifampicin and one isolate was resistant to streptomycin. Among these fifteen MIRU, there was a association between MIRU loci polymorphism and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance, ETRB (P = 0.03, OR = 0.19, 95% CI 0.05–0.81) and ETRC (P = 0.01, OR = 0.14, 95% CI 0.03–0.64) were negatively related to isoniazid resistance; MIRU20 (P = 0.05, OR = 2.87, 95% CI 1.01–8.12) was positively associated with ethambutol resistance; and QUB11a (P = 0.02, OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.65–0.96) was a negative association factor of p-aminosalicylic acid resistance. Conclusion: Our research showed that MIRU loci may predict drug resistance of tuberculosis in China. However, the mechanism still needs further exploration. PMID:27047485

  6. High-Throughput Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit–Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Genotyping for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bidault, Floriane; Mosnier, Amandine; Bablishvili, Nino; Tukvadze, Nestani; Somphavong, Silaphet; Paboriboune, Phimpha; Ocheretina, Oksana; Pape, Jean William; Paranhos-Baccala, Glaucia; Berland, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis (TB) represents a major public health concern. Understanding the transmission routes of the disease is a key factor for its control and for the implementation of efficient interventions. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) marker typing is a well-described method for lineage identification and transmission tracking. However, the conventional manual genotyping technique is cumbersome and time-consuming and entails many risks for errors, thus hindering its implementation and dissemination. We describe here a new approach using the QIAxcel system, an automated high-throughput capillary electrophoresis system that also carries out allele calling. This automated method was assessed on 1,824 amplicons from 82 TB isolates and tested with sets of markers of 15 or 24 loci. Overall allele-calling concordance between the methods from 140 to 1,317 bp was 98.9%. DNA concentrations and repeatability and reproducibility performances showed no biases in allele calling. Furthermore, turnaround time using this automated system was reduced by 81% compared to the conventional manual agarose gel method. In sum, this new automated method facilitates MIRU-VNTR genotyping and provides reliable results. Therefore, it is well suited for field genotyping. The implementation of this method will help to achieve accurate and cost-effective epidemiological studies, especially in countries with a high prevalence of TB, where the high number of strains complicates the surveillance of circulating lineages and requires efficient interventions to be carried out in an urgent manner. PMID:25428144

  7. The use of variable-number tandem-repeat mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing to identify laboratory cross-contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Jou; Jou, Ruwen; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Yang, Mei-Lin; Chen, Hung-Mo

    2005-05-01

    A retrospective study including 515 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 215 patients was conducted to investigate possible laboratory contamination with M. tuberculosis over a 1-year period in a university hospital. All cultures underwent variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) typing. Cultures suspected of being contaminated in the VNTR analysis and possible sources of contamination underwent mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU) typing further. Overall, 8 (3.7%) cases of 215 patients were considered possible false-positives. Five (2.3%) cultures might be contaminated during initial batching processing, and 1 (0.5%) and 4 (1.9%) cultures of them were further classified as presumed and possible cases, respectively, of cross-contamination on clinical grounds. Three (1.4%) cultures might be contaminated by cultures that had been processed in species identification procedures in the same laminar-flow hood. The 2-step strategy using VNTR and MIRU analyses in combination in this study appears to be a valuable means for the study of false-positive cultures.

  8. Proposal of a Consensus Set of Hypervariable Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit–Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Loci for Subtyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Allix-Béguec, Caroline; Wahl, Céline; Hanekom, Madeleine; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Drobniewski, Francis; Maeda, Shinji; Campos-Herrero, Isolina; Mokrousov, Igor; Niemann, Stefan; Kontsevaya, Irina; Rastogi, Nalin; Samper, Sofia; Sng, Li-Hwei; Warren, Robin M.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains represent targets of special importance for molecular surveillance of tuberculosis (TB), especially because they are associated with spread of multidrug resistance in some world regions. Standard 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing lacks resolution power for accurately discriminating closely related clones that often compose Beijing strain populations. Therefore, we evaluated a set of 7 additional, hypervariable MIRU-VNTR loci for better resolution and tracing of such strains, using a collection of 535 Beijing isolates from six world regions where these strains are known to be prevalent. The typeability and interlaboratory reproducibility of these hypervariable loci were lower than those of the 24 standard loci. Three loci (2163a, 3155, and 3336) were excluded because of their redundant variability and/or more frequent noninterpretable results compared to the 4 other markers. The use of the remaining 4-locus set (1982, 3232, 3820, and 4120) increased the number of types by 52% (from 223 to 340) and reduced the clustering rate from 58.3 to 36.6%, when combined with the use of the standard 24-locus set. Known major clonal complexes/24-locus-based clusters were all subdivided, although the degree of subdivision varied depending on the complex. Only five single-locus variations were detected among the hypervariable loci of an additional panel of 92 isolates, representing 15 years of clonal spread of a single Beijing strain in a geographically restricted setting. On this calibrated basis, we propose this 4-locus set as a consensus for subtyping Beijing clonal complexes and clusters, after standard typing. PMID:24172154

  9. Assessment of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-QUB markers to further discriminate the Beijing genotype in a population-based study of the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, Japan.

    PubMed

    Millet, Julie; Miyagi-Shiohira, Chika; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Sola, Christophe; Rastogi, Nalin

    2007-11-01

    The present investigation focused on genetic diversity and drug resistance of 101 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated between July 2003 and February 2005 in the Okinawa prefecture, Ryukyu Islands, Japan. A high rate of clustering (87%, eight clusters, 2 to 69 strains/cluster) was observed upon spoligotyping; most of it was due to the lower discriminatory power of this method for the Beijing lineage (n = 72; 71.3% of the isolates). The remaining diversity was limited to seven clusters (two to five isolates/cluster), with the following distribution of major lineages: ill-defined T (n = 13; 12.8%), ancestral East African-Indian (n = 6; 5.9%), Haarlem (n = 4; 4%), Latin American-Mediterranean (n = 2; 2%), X1 (n = 1; 1%), and a total absence of the central Asian clade. Three remaining strains could not be classified on the basis of their spoligotype pattern and were labeled "unknown." Subtyping with mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRUs) in association with additional QUB minisatellites was performed to discriminate among the Beijing strains. Based on an "in-house" spoligotyping/MIRU database (n = 694 Beijing strains), eight highly discriminative MIRU loci for Beijing strains were selected (loci numbered 10, 16, 23, 26, 27, 31, 39, and 40). The highest discriminatory power (h) observed in our sample (n = 72; M-26, 0.385; M-10, 0.38; M-31, 0.255; M-16, 0.238) was too low, and 73.6% of the Beijing strains from Okinawa remained clustered. Typing of Beijing strains with additional QUB loci (with the exception of "one-copy" QUB-1451) resulted in higher discriminatory powers: QUB-11b, 0.68; QUB-11a, 0.656; QUB-26, 0.644; QUB-18, 0.553; QUB-4156, 0.5; and QUB-1895, 0.453. A definitive algorithm on the use of QUB markers to subtype Beijing isolates in expanded studies would shed light on their hypervariability, which may sometimes blur recognition between epidemiologically linked Beijing isolates. The total absence of multiple drug resistance among Beijing

  10. Nontuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Sheng; Hu, Fei-Shu; Yu, Hai-Ying; Xu, Kai-Jin; Zheng, Bei-Wen; Ji, Zhong-Kang; Li, Jun-Jie; Deng, Mei; Hu, Hai-Yang; Sheng, Ji-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteomyelitis caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can have severe consequences and a poor prognosis. Physicians therefore need to be alert to this condition, especially in immunocompromised patients. Although the pathogenesis of NTM osteomyelitis is still unclear, studies in immunodeficient individuals have revealed close relationships between NTM osteomyelitis and defects associated with the interleukin-12–interferon-γ–tumor necrosis factor-α axis, as well as human immunodeficiency virus infection, various immunosuppressive conditions, and diabetes mellitus. Culture and species identification from tissue biopsies or surgical debridement tissue play crucial roles in diagnosing NTM osteomyelitis. Suitable imaging examinations are also important. Adequate surgical debridement and the choice of appropriate, combined antibiotics for long-term anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy, based on in vitro drug susceptibility tests, are the main therapies for these bone infections. Bacillus Calmette–Guerin vaccination might have limited prophylactic value. The use of multiple drugs and long duration of treatment mean that the therapeutic process needs to be monitored closely to detect potential side effects. Adequate duration of anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy together with regular monitoring with blood and imaging tests are key factors determining the recovery outcome in patients with NTM osteomyelitis. PMID:25915177

  11. Nontuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Hu, Fei-Shu; Yu, Hai-Ying; Xu, Kai-Jin; Zheng, Bei-Wen; Ji, Zhong-Kang; Li, Jun-Jie; Deng, Mei; Hu, Hai-Yang; Sheng, Ji-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Osteomyelitis caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can have severe consequences and a poor prognosis. Physicians therefore need to be alert to this condition, especially in immunocompromised patients. Although the pathogenesis of NTM osteomyelitis is still unclear, studies in immunodeficient individuals have revealed close relationships between NTM osteomyelitis and defects associated with the interleukin-12-interferon-γ-tumor necrosis factor-α axis, as well as human immunodeficiency virus infection, various immunosuppressive conditions, and diabetes mellitus. Culture and species identification from tissue biopsies or surgical debridement tissue play crucial roles in diagnosing NTM osteomyelitis. Suitable imaging examinations are also important. Adequate surgical debridement and the choice of appropriate, combined antibiotics for long-term anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy, based on in vitro drug susceptibility tests, are the main therapies for these bone infections. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination might have limited prophylactic value. The use of multiple drugs and long duration of treatment mean that the therapeutic process needs to be monitored closely to detect potential side effects. Adequate duration of anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy together with regular monitoring with blood and imaging tests are key factors determining the recovery outcome in patients with NTM osteomyelitis.

  12. Phosphorylation regulates mycobacterial proteasome.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Tripti; Han, Jaeil; Baun, Heather; Nyayapathy, Seeta; Brown, Jacob T; Dial, Rebekah L; Moltalvo, Juan A; Kim, Min-Seon; Yang, Seung Hwan; Ronning, Donald R; Husson, Robert N; Suh, Joowon; Kang, Choong-Min

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a proteasome system that is required for the microbe to resist elimination by the host immune system. Despite the importance of the proteasome in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms by which proteasome activity is controlled remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the α-subunit (PrcA) of the M. tuberculosis proteasome is phosphorylated by the PknB kinase at three threonine residues (T84, T202, and T178) in a sequential manner. Furthermore, the proteasome with phosphorylated PrcA enhances the degradation of Ino1, a known proteasomal substrate, suggesting that PknB regulates the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Previous studies showed that depletion of the proteasome and the proteasome-associated proteins decreases resistance to reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) but increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we show that PknA phosphorylation of unprocessed proteasome β-subunit (pre-PrcB) and α-subunit reduces the assembly of the proteasome complex and thereby enhances the mycobacterial resistance to H2O2 and that H2O2 stress diminishes the formation of the proteasome complex in a PknA-dependent manner. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of the M. tuberculosis proteasome not only modulates proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but also affects the proteasome complex formation contributing to the survival of M. tuberculosis under oxidative stress conditions.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Single Outpatient Clinic in Panama City Exhibit Wide Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Almengor, Pedro; Domínguez, Amada; Vega, Silvio; Goodridge, Amador

    2014-01-01

    Understanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis biodiversity and transmission is significant for tuberculosis control. This short report aimed to determine the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates from an outpatient clinic in Panama City. A total of 62 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped by 12 loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Forty-five (72.6%) of the isolates showed unique MIRU-VNTR genotypes, and 13 (21%) of the isolates were grouped into four clusters. Four isolates showed polyclonal MIRU-VNTR genotypes. The MIRU-VNTR Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index reached 0.988. The Spoligotyping analysis revealed 16 M. tuberculosis families, including Latin American-Mediterranean, Harlem, and Beijing. These findings suggest a wide genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates at one outpatient clinic. A detailed molecular epidemiology survey is now warranted, especially following second massive immigration for local Panama Canal expansion activities. PMID:24865686

  14. Characterization of IS6110 insertions in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Turcios, L; Casart, Y; Florez, I; de Waard, J; Salazar, L

    2009-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with identical IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns are considered to be clonally related. The presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region, one preferential locus for the integration of IS6110, was evaluated in 125 M. tuberculosis isolates. Five isolates had IS6110 inserted in this region, and two consisted of a mix of isogenic strains that putatively have evolved during a single infection. Strains from the same isolate had identical spoligo and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat profiles, but had slight variations in IS6110 RFLP patterns, due to the presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region. Duplication of the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region was found in one isogenic strain.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from single outpatient clinic in Panama City exhibit wide genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Almengor, Pedro; Domínguez, Amada; Vega, Silvio; Goodridge, Amador

    2014-08-01

    Understanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis biodiversity and transmission is significant for tuberculosis control. This short report aimed to determine the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates from an outpatient clinic in Panama City. A total of 62 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped by 12 loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Forty-five (72.6%) of the isolates showed unique MIRU-VNTR genotypes, and 13 (21%) of the isolates were grouped into four clusters. Four isolates showed polyclonal MIRU-VNTR genotypes. The MIRU-VNTR Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index reached 0.988. The Spoligotyping analysis revealed 16 M. tuberculosis families, including Latin American-Mediterranean, Harlem, and Beijing. These findings suggest a wide genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates at one outpatient clinic. A detailed molecular epidemiology survey is now warranted, especially following second massive immigration for local Panama Canal expansion activities.

  16. Highly structured genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis population in Djibouti.

    PubMed

    Godreuil, S; Renaud, F; Choisy, M; Depina, J J; Garnotel, E; Morillon, M; Van de Perre, P; Bañuls, A L

    2010-07-01

    Djibouti is an East African country with a high tuberculosis incidence. This study was conducted over a 2-month period in Djibouti, during which 62 consecutive patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) were included. Genetic characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit variable-number tandem-repeat typing and spoligotyping, was performed. The genetic and phylogenetic analysis revealed only three major families (Central Asian, East African Indian and T). The high diversity and linkage disequilibrium within each family suggest a long period of clonal evolution. A Bayesian approach shows that the phylogenetic structure observed in our sample of 62 isolates is very likely to be representative of the phylogenetic structure of the M. tuberculosis population in the total number of TB cases.

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium bovis Isolates with the Same Spoligotyping Profile as Isolates from Animals†

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Beatriz; Aranaz, Alicia; Juan, Lucía de; Álvarez, Julio; Bezos, Javier; Mateos, Ana; Gómez-Mampaso, Enrique; Domínguez, Lucas

    2006-01-01

    PCR-based characterization techniques have been adopted in most laboratories for Mycobacterium bovis typing. We report a molecular characterization of human multidrug-resistant M. bovis isolates and three bovine isolates that share the spoligotyping profile. The analysis of the direct repeat region showed that both groups differed in the presence of spacers not included in the current membrane. They were also distinguished by two out of the nine mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit variable-number tandem repeat loci tested, indicating that the human infection was not acquired from the cattle from which isolates were obtained. These results highlight that a combination of techniques is required for appropriate discrimination, even for those spoligotypes that have a low frequency. PMID:16954286

  18. Ascertaining in vivo virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages in patients in Mbeya, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Olaru, I D; Rachow, A; Lange, C; Ntinginya, N E; Reither, K; Hoelscher, M; Vollrath, O; Niemann, S

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the degree of immunodeficiency indicated by the number of circulating CD4+ T-cells and Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages identified by spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats genotyping in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals with pulmonary tuberculosis from Mbeya, Tanzania. Of M. tuberculosis strains from 129 patients, respectively 55 (42.6%) and 37 (28.7%) belonged to Latin American Mediterranean and Delhi/Central-Asian lineages, while 37 (28.7%) patients were infected with other strains. There was no difference in the distribution of M. tuberculosis lineages among patients with early or advanced stages of HIV infection (P = 0.785), indicating that the virulence of strains from these lineages may not be substantially different in vivo.

  19. A database for animal tuberculosis (mycoDB.es) within the context of the Spanish national programme for eradication of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Campos, Sabrina; González, Sergio; de Juan, Lucía; Romero, Beatriz; Bezos, Javier; Casal, Carmen; Álvarez, Julio; Fernández-de-Mera, Isabel G; Castellanos, Elena; Mateos, Ana; Sáez-Llorente, José L; Domínguez, Lucas; Aranaz, Alicia

    2012-06-01

    Spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analysis are the international standard techniques for molecular typing of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. To enable the exploitation of molecular typing data for epidemiological purposes, the creation of large databases is indispensable. Here we describe mycoDB.es, a database for animal tuberculosis which forms part of the Spanish national programme for eradication of bovine tuberculosis. This database has been created as an epidemiological tool at national level and contains spoligotype patterns of 17,273 isolates clustered in 401 different spoligotypes of Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium caprae and M. tuberculosis. The database offers an overview of the present spoligotypes, to a lower extent also of MIRU-VNTR types, affected animal species and furthermore of the spatial distribution of these genotypes.

  20. Mycobacterial endocarditis: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Shi-Min, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective A systematic analysis was made in view of the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and main outcomes of mycobacterial endocarditis. Methods The data source of the present study was based on a comprehensive literature search in MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google search engine for publications on mycobacterial endocarditis published between 2000 and 2013. Results The rapidly growing mycobacteria become the predominant pathogens with Mycobacterium chelonae being the most common. This condition has changed significantly in terms of epidemiology since the 21st century, with more broad patient age range, longer latency, prevailed mitral valve infections and better prognosis. Conclusion Mycobacterial endocarditis is rare and the causative pathogens are predominantly the rapidly growing mycobacteria. Amikacin, ciprofloxacin and clarithromycin are the most frequently used targeted antimicrobial agents but often show poor responses. Patients with deep infections may warrant a surgical operation or line withdrawal. With periodic multidrug therapy guided by drug susceptibility testing, and surgical managements, patients may achieve good therapeutic results. PMID:25859873

  1. Recent transmission of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a prison population in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Reis, Ana Julia; David, Simone Maria Martini de; Nunes, Luciana de Souza; Valim, Andreia Rosane de Moura; Possuelo, Lia Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional, retrospective study, characterized by classical and molecular epidemiology, involving M. tuberculosis isolates from a regional prison in southern Brazil. Between January of 2011 and August of 2014, 379 prisoners underwent sputum smear microscopy and culture; 53 (13.9%) were diagnosed with active tuberculosis. Of those, 8 (22.9%) presented with isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis. Strain genotyping was carried out by 15-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem-repeat analysis; 68.6% of the patients were distributed into five clusters, and 87.5% of the resistant cases were in the same cluster. The frequency of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases and the rate of recent transmission were high. Our data suggest the need to implement an effective tuberculosis control program within the prison system. RESUMO Estudo transversal, retrospectivo, com isolados de M. tuberculosis de pacientes de um presídio regional no sul do Brasil, caracterizado através de epidemiologia clássica e molecular. Entre janeiro de 2011 e agosto de 2014, 379 detentos foram submetidos a baciloscopia e cultura, sendo 53 (13,9%) diagnosticados com tuberculose ativa. Desses, 8 (22,9%) apresentavam tuberculose resistente a isoniazida. A genotipagem das cepas foi realizada por 15-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeat analysis; 68,6% dos pacientes estavam distribuídos em cinco clusters, e 87,5% dos casos resistentes estavam em um mesmo cluster. Verificou-se uma frequência elevada de casos de resistência e alta taxa de transmissão recente. Estes dados sugerem a necessidade da implantação de um programa efetivo de controle da tuberculose no sistema prisional.

  2. Mycobacterial manipulation of vacuolar sorting.

    PubMed

    Philips, Jennifer A

    2008-12-01

    Approximately one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the World Health Organization estimates 1.6 million deaths were caused by M. tuberculosis in 2005. The enormous worldwide burden of disease underscores the proficiency by which M. tuberculosis is able to evade eradication by the host, subverting innate and adaptive defences. At the cellular level, mycobacteria are able to modulate macrophage defences by altering phagosome maturation. This review focuses on the bacterial proteins and lipids that are important in establishing the mycobacterial replicative niche. While there is a detailed molecular description of the vacuole and an increasing number of bacterial effectors have been implicated in creating this compartment, exactly how they intersect host cell processes remains ill-defined. However, the emerging picture is that an array of lipid and protein effectors collaborate to create and maintain the mycobacterial phagosome.

  3. Interspersal Technique and Behavioral Momentum for Reading Word Lists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Matthew K.; Ardoin, Scott P.; Parker, David C.; Hodgson, Jennifer; Klingbeil, David A.; Scholin, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Academic tasks that include easy responses increase the probability that less preferred and/or more challenging tasks will be performed. The current study applied the process of arranging easier stimuli within reading word lists with behavioral momentum and an interspersal technique. We hypothesized that the behavioral momentum condition, which…

  4. Additive Effects From Interspersed Adjunct Questions In Prose Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagaria, Sabato D.; Di Vesta, Francis J.

    A total of 150 undergraduate students randomly assigned to five experimental groups studied ten paragraphs with questions interspersed at different locations in the text. Performance on incidental items was significantly lower (p < .05) in the question before (QB) than in the question after (QA), question before and after (QBA), and the…

  5. Therapy of environmental mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Fabroni, Caterina; Buggiani, Gionata; Lotti, Torello

    2008-01-01

    Environmental mycobacteria are the causative factors of an increasing number of infections worldwide. Cutaneous infections as a result of environmental mycobacteria are often misdiagnosed, and their treatment is difficult because these agents can show in vivo and in vitro multidrug resistance. The most common environmental mycobacteria that can cause cutaneous infections are Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium marinum. All mycobacteria are characterized by low pathogenicity and they can contaminate affected or traumatized skin only in immunocompetent subjects (mainly in fishermen, swimming-pool attendants, and aquarium owners) whereas medical and esthetic procedures are at risk for the infections because of the quick-growing mycobacteria. Immunocompromised subjects can instead easily develop environmental mycobacterial infections of differing degrees of severity.

  6. Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium africanum, United States, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aditya; Bloss, Emily; Heilig, Charles M; Click, Eleanor S

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium africanum is endemic to West Africa and causes tuberculosis (TB). We reviewed reported cases of TB in the United States during 2004-2013 that had lineage assigned by genotype (spoligotype and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit variable number tandem repeats). M. africanum caused 315 (0.4%) of 73,290 TB cases with lineage assigned by genotype. TB caused by M. africanum was associated more with persons from West Africa (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 253.8, 95% CI 59.9-1,076.1) and US-born black persons (aOR 5.7, 95% CI 1.2-25.9) than with US-born white persons. TB caused by M. africanum did not show differences in clinical characteristics when compared with TB caused by M. tuberculosis. Clustered cases defined as >2 cases in a county with identical 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit genotypes, were less likely for M. africanum (aOR 0.1, 95% CI 0.1-0.4), which suggests that M. africanum is not commonly transmitted in the United States.

  7. Body piercing complicated by atypical mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Ferringer, Tammie; Pride, Howard; Tyler, William

    2008-01-01

    Body piercing is a growing trend, especially in young people, but the literature on complications of piercing consists mostly of case reports involving ear piercing. Previous reported complications of piercing include contact dermatitis, keloids, traumatic tearing, viral transmission, and bacterial infections. We report two patients who presented with atypical mycobacterial infections of body piercing sites. It is important to recognize the association of piercing and mycobacterial infections so that tissue can be obtained for histopathologic examination and appropriate culture.

  8. Biosynthesis of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Vitor; Maranha, Ana; Alarico, Susana; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterial pathogenesis is closely associated with a unique cell envelope rich in complex carbohydrates and unique lipids, among which are the mycolic acids. Mycobacteria also synthesize unique intracellular polymethylated polysaccharides (PMPSs), namely methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLPs), which are acylated with short-chain fatty acids, and methylmannose polysaccharides (MMPs). Since PMPSs modulate the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids in vitro, the possibility of a similar role in vivo and the regulation of mycolic acids assembly have been anticipated. Unlike MGLPs, MMPs have been identified in M. smegmatis and other fast-growing mycobacteria but not in M. tuberculosis, implying an essential role for MGLPs in this pathogen and turning the biosynthetic enzymes into attractive drug targets. The genome of M. tuberculosis was decoded 14 years ago but only recently has the identity of the genes involved in MGLPs biosynthesis been investigated. Two gene clusters (Rv1208-Rv1213 and Rv3030-Rv3037c) containing a few genes considered to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, have initially been proposed to coordinate MGLPs biosynthesis. Among these genes, only the product of Rv1208 for the first step in the MGLPs pathway has, so far, been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure been determined. However, recent results indicate that at least three additional clusters may be involved in this pathway. The functional assignment of authentic roles to some of these M. tuberculosis H37Rv genes sheds new light on the intricacy of MGLPs biogenesis and renewed interest on their biological role.

  9. Cellular inhibitors of long interspersed element 1 and Alu retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Wiegand, Heather L; Hulme, Amy E; Garcia-Perez, José L; O'Shea, K Sue; Moran, John V; Cullen, Bryan R

    2006-06-06

    Long interspersed element (LINE) 1 retrotransposons are major genomic parasites that represent approximately 17% of the human genome. The LINE-1 ORF2 protein is also responsible for the mobility of Alu elements, which constitute a further approximately 11% of genomic DNA. Representative members of each element class remain mobile, and deleterious retrotransposition events can induce spontaneous genetic diseases. Here, we demonstrate that APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B, two members of the APOBEC3 family of human innate antiretroviral resistance factors, can enter the nucleus, where LINE-1 and Alu reverse transcription occurs, and specifically inhibit both LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposition. These data suggest that the APOBEC3 protein family may have evolved, at least in part, to defend the integrity of the human genome against endogenous retrotransposons.

  10. Searches among mycobacterial cultures for antileprosy vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, C C; van Landingham, R; Walker, L L

    1980-01-01

    All mycobacteria species share some antigens, so there may be cultivable mycobacterial cultures that can provide vaccine protection against leprosy. Vaccine protection against Mycobacterium leprae infections in mice has been demonstrated for M. leprae itself, as living or heat-killed suspensions, and for Mycobacterium bovis (BCG), as living suspensions. Results are reported here with 17 other cultures. The mycobacterial suspensions were injected intradermally, and the mice were challenged in the footpad with infectious suspensions of M. leprae. In two experiments the mice were also challenged by footpad injections of 10(7) heat-killed M. leprae so the footpad enlargment could be measured. That some mycobacterial suspensions were immunogenic for some of their own antigens was suggested by reactions at the vaccine site and enlargement of the regional lymph nodes. Some mycobacterial suspensions also stimulated footpad enlargement on challenge by homologous suspensions or by challenge with M. leprae suspensions. Consistent protection against infectious challenge with M. leprae was observed only with BCG and M. leprae, however. PMID:7000701

  11. Identification of mycobacterial lectins from genomic data.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, M

    2013-04-01

    Sixty-four sequences containing lectin domains with homologs of known three-dimensional structure were identified through a search of mycobacterial genomes. They appear to belong to the β-prism II, the C-type, the Microcystis virdis (MV), and the β-trefoil lectin folds. The first three always occur in conjunction with the LysM, the PI-PLC, and the β-grasp domains, respectively while mycobacterial β-trefoil lectins are unaccompanied by any other domain. Thirty heparin binding hemagglutinins (HBHA), already annotated, have also been included in the study although they have no homologs of known three-dimensional structure. The biological role of HBHA has been well characterized. A comparison between the sequences of the lectin from pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria provides insights into the carbohydrate binding region of the molecule, but the structure of the molecule is yet to be determined. A reasonable picture of the structural features of other mycobacterial proteins containing one or the other of the four lectin domains can be gleaned through the examination of homologs proteins, although the structure of none of them is available. Their biological role is also yet to be elucidated. The work presented here is among the first steps towards exploring the almost unexplored area of the structural biology of mycobacterial lectins.

  12. Type I interferon controls propagation of long interspersed element-1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiujing; Carbone, Christopher J; Katlinskaya, Yuliya V; Zheng, Hui; Zheng, Ke; Luo, Mengcheng; Wang, P Jeremy; Greenberg, Roger A; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2015-04-17

    Type I interferons (IFN) including IFNα and IFNβ are critical for the cellular defense against viruses. Here we report that increased levels of IFNβ were found in testes from mice deficient in MOV10L1, a germ cell-specific RNA helicase that plays a key role in limiting the propagation of retrotransposons including Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1). Additional experiments revealed that activation of LINE-1 retrotransposons increases the expression of IFNβ and of IFN-stimulated genes. Conversely, pretreatment of cells with IFN suppressed the replication of LINE-1. Furthermore, the efficacy of LINE-1 replication was increased in isogenic cell lines harboring inactivating mutations in diverse elements of the IFN signaling pathway. Knockdown of the IFN receptor chain IFNAR1 also stimulated LINE-1 propagation in vitro. Finally, a greater accumulation of LINE-1 was found in mice that lack IFNAR1 compared with wild type mice. We propose that LINE-1-induced IFN plays an important role in restricting LINE-1 propagation and discuss the putative role of IFN in preserving the genome stability.

  13. Mycobacterial signaling through toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Joyoti; Shin, Dong-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2012-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have helped to decipher molecular networks dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, in mycobacteria-infected macrophages. Stimulation of TLRs by mycobacteria and their antigenic components rapidly induces intracellular signaling cascades involved in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, which play important roles in orchestrating proinflammatory responses and innate defense through generation of a variety of antimicrobial effector molecules. Recent studies have provided evidence that mycobacterial TLR-signaling cross talks with other intracellular antimicrobial innate pathways, the autophagy process and functional vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling. In this article we describe recent advances in the recognition, responses, and regulation of mycobacterial signaling through TLRs. PMID:23189273

  14. Metabolomics: Applications and Promise in Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Banoei, Mohammad Mehdi; Winston, Brent W.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, the study of mycobacterial diseases was trapped in culture-based technology that is more than a century old. The use of nucleic acid amplification is changing this, and powerful new technologies are on the horizon. Metabolomics, which is the study of sets of metabolites of both the bacteria and host, is being used to clarify mechanisms of disease, and can identify changes leading to better diagnosis, treatment, and prognostication of mycobacterial diseases. Metabolomic profiles are arrays of biochemical products of genes in their environment. These complex patterns are biomarkers that can allow a more complete understanding of cell function, dysfunction, and perturbation than genomics or proteomics. Metabolomics could herald sweeping advances in personalized medicine and clinical trial design, but the challenges in metabolomics are also great. Measured metabolite concentrations vary with the timing within a condition, the intrinsic biology, the instruments, and the sample preparation. Metabolism profoundly changes with age, sex, variations in gut microbial flora, and lifestyle. Validation of biomarkers is complicated by measurement accuracy, selectivity, linearity, reproducibility, robustness, and limits of detection. The statistical challenges include analysis, interpretation, and description of the vast amount of data generated. Despite these drawbacks, metabolomics provides great opportunity and the potential to understand and manage mycobacterial diseases. PMID:26196272

  15. Recurrent nontuberculous mycobacterial endophthalmitis: a diagnostic conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, Nandini; Yeaney, Gabrielle; Chung, Mina; Hindman, Holly B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report a case of recurrent nontuberculous mycobacterial endophthalmitis in the context of neurotrophic keratopathy secondary to herpes zoster ophthalmicus that had an atypical presentation and complex course, and highlights the challenges of causative organism identification and therapeutic interventions in this condition. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted to determine the visual outcomes of the patient. Results A 68-year-old pseudophakic male with long-standing neurotrophic keratopathy and perforated descemetocele managed with cyanoacrylate glue and a contact bandage lens in the left eye, began experiencing recurrent episodes of endophthalmitis after undergoing a penetrating keratoplasty. Several therapeutic procedures including an anterior chamber washout, two pars plana vitrectomies, explantation of the posterior chamber intraocular lens and capsular bag, and multiple intravitreal antimicrobial injections, were performed to which he has ultimately responded favorably, with no signs of infection to date and stable visual acuity. The causative organism of his recurrent infections was initially identified as Mycobacterium abscessus through biochemical testing and 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene sequencing; however, repeat polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the 65 kDa heat shock protein (hsp65) gene for experimental purposes confirmed the accurate identification of the organism to be Mycobacterium chelonae. Given the greater reliability of PCR and sequencing of the hsp65 gene over traditional biochemical tests and culture techniques, M. chelonae was likely the infectious agent all along, and the organism was originally misidentified on the basis of less accurate tests. Conclusion Recurrent atypical mycobacterial endophthalmitis requires expedient identification and management to prevent poor visual outcomes. Standard biochemical testing can identify the causative organism but is limited by the inability to distinguish

  16. Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit–Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat (MIRU-VNTR) Genotyping of Mycobacterium intracellulare for Strain Comparison with Establishment of a PCR-Based Database

    PubMed Central

    Iakhiaeva, Elena; McNulty, Steven; Brown Elliott, Barbara A.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Williams, Myra D.; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Wilson, Rebecca W.; Turenne, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Strain comparison is important to population genetics and to evaluate relapses in patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease, but the “gold standard” of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is time-consuming and complex. We used variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR) for fingerprinting of respiratory isolates of M. intracellulare from patients with underlying bronchiectasis, to establish a nonsequence-based database for population analysis. Different genotypes identified by PFGE underwent species identification using a 16S rRNA gene multiplex PCR. Genotypes of M. intracellulare were confirmed by internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequencing and characterized using seven VNTR primers. The pattern of VNTR amplicon sizes and repeat number defined each specific VNTR type. Forty-two VNTR types were identified among 84 genotypes. PFGE revealed most isolates with the same VNTR type to be clonal or exhibit similar grouping of bands. Repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) showed minimal pattern diversity between VNTR types compared to PFGE. Fingerprinting of relapse isolates from 31 treated patients using VNTR combined with 16S multiplex PCR unambiguously and reliably distinguished different genotypes from the same patient, with results comparable to those of PFGE. VNTR for strain comparison is easier and faster than PFGE, is as accurate as PFGE, and does not require sequencing. Starting with a collection of 167 M. intracellulare isolates, VNTR distinguished M. intracellulare into 42 clonal groups. Comparison of isolates from different geographic areas, habitats, and clinical settings is now possible. PMID:23175249

  17. First report of MIRU-VNTR genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates from Egypt.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, A; Fayed, A; Youssef, H; El-Sayed, A; Zschöck, M

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease, an economically important disease in ruminants worldwide. It was first isolated in Egypt in 2005. Since then, the pathogen has been detected in different Egyptian provinces. In order to trace the source of infection, genotyping using simple methods of high discriminatory power such as mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) were carried out in different countries. Until now there is no published information about MIRU-VNTR genotyping of MAP isolates in Egypt. To address that point, 100 faecal samples were collected and cultivated from 3 different suspected dairy farms. Fourteen isolates belonging to one farm were identified as MAP and subjected to genotyping using 8 different MIRU-VNTR loci PCRs. Two different genotypes were recognized based on size polymorphism observed in one locus (VNTR-7) that was confirmed by sequencing. Our work provides a preliminary basis of constructing a MIRU-VNTR genotyping database of MAP in Egypt.

  18. Isolation of Mycobacterium bovis from Free-Ranging Wildlife in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yunho; Ryoo, Soyoon; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Kim, Narae; Lee, Hang; Park, So-Young; Song, Woong-Seog; Kim, Jong-Taek; Lee, Hee Soo; Myung Kim, Jae

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate Mycobacterium bovis infection in wild boar ( Sus scrofa ) in South Korea. During 2012-15, we attempted to isolate M. bovis from 847 wild animals, mainly Korean water deer ( Hydropotes inermis argyropus), raccoon dogs ( Nyctereutes procyonoides ), and wild boar, from 11 regions in South Korea. We isolated M. bovis from three of 118 wild boar (2.5%) captured in Gyeonggi Province, where bovine tuberculosis (bTB) outbreaks have also occurred in livestock. Spoligotypes and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeats types of these M. bovis isolates (SB0140 and SB1040, 4-2-3-3-7-5-5-4-4-3-4-3 and 5-2-3-3-7-5-5-4-3-10-5-2; MIRU4, MIRU16, MIRU27, MIRU31, ETR-A, ETR-B, ETR-C, QUB11b, QUB26, QUB3336, VNTR2401, and VNTR3171) have also been identified from farmed livestock such as cattle ( Bos taurus coreanae), Formosan sika deer ( Cervus nippon taiouanus), and American elk ( Cervus canadensis ) in the country. In South Korea, bTB appears to be endemic in livestock, and there are numerous opportunities for contact between wild boar and livestock due to high population densities and broad activity ranges. Our results support the hypothesis that M. bovis is transmitted between domestic and wild animals.

  19. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Mycobacterium marinum: New Insights into Host and Environmental Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Broutin, Vincent; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Aubry, Alexandra; Keck, Nicolas; Choisy, Marc; Bernardet, Jean-François; Michel, Christian; Raymond, Jean-Christophe; Libert, Cédric; Barnaud, Antoine; Stragier, Pieter; Portaels, Françoise; Terru, Dominique; Belon, Claudine; Dereure, Olivier; Gutierrez, Cristina; Boschiroli, Maria-Laura; Van De Perre, Philippe; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum causes a systemic tuberculosis-like disease in fish and skin infections in humans that can spread to deeper structures, resulting in tenosynovitis, arthritis, and osteomyelitis. However, little information is available concerning (i) the intraspecific genetic diversity of M. marinum isolated from humans and animals; (ii) M. marinum genotype circulation in the different ecosystems, and (iii) the link between M. marinum genetic diversity and hosts (humans and fish). Here, we conducted a genetic study on 89 M. marinum isolates from humans (n = 68) and fish (n = 21) by using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. The results show that the M. marinum population is genetically structured not only according to the host but also according to the ecosystem as well as to tissue tropism in humans. This suggests the existence of different genetic pools in the function of the biological and ecological compartments. Moreover, the presence of only certain M. marinum genotypes in humans suggests a different zoonotic potential of the M. marinum genotypes. Considering that the infection is linked to aquarium activity, a significant genetic difference was also detected when the human tissue tropism of M. marinum was taken into consideration, with a higher genetic polymorphism in strains isolated from patients with cutaneous forms than from individuals with deeper-structure infection. It appears that only few genotypes can produce deeper infections in humans, suggesting that the immune system might play a filtering role. PMID:22952269

  20. First insight into the genetic population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Diab, Hassan Mahmoud; Nakajima, Chie; Kotb, Saber A; Mokhtar, Alaa; Khder, Nagwa F M; Abdelaal, Ahmed S A; Hegazy, Azza; Poudel, Ajay; Shah, Yogendra; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates from Egypt. A total of 230 MTB isolates were analysed using spoligotyping, large sequence polymorphism (LSPs), mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The majority of isolates (93.0%) belonged to lineage 4, including 44.3, 13.4 and 10.8% of the ill-defined T clade, LAM and Haarlem families, respectively, and lineage 3 was identified in 7.0% of the isolates. MIRU-VNTRs typing allowed efficient discrimination of the spoligotype-defined clusters, including spoligo-international types (SIT) 53, 34, and 4, into 56 patterns, including 13 clusters and 43 unique patterns. A new SNP at position 311614 was identified in all six isolates to form the biggest MIRU-VNTR cluster, which suggested a recent clonal expansion. This SNP could possibly be used as a genetic marker for robust discriminations of Egyptian MTB isolates belonging to SIT53. The combination of spoligotyping, 12 MIRU-VNTRs loci and MLST provided insight into the genetic diversity and transmission dynamics of the Egyptian MTB genotypes and could be a key to implementation of effective control measures by public health authorities.

  1. Standardised PCR-based molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Allix-Béguec, C; Supply, P; Wanlin, M; Bifani, P; Fauville-Dufaux, M

    2008-05-01

    A population-based molecular epidemiology investigation has been undertaken to evaluate tuberculosis transmission and control in the Brussels-Capital Region (Belgium). All tuberculosis cases reported from January 2003 to December 2004 were investigated. In total, 536 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates (89% of culture-positive samples) were genotyped by the newly standardised 24 loci-based mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem-repeat typing, spoligotyping and IS6110 fingerprinting. Of all the patients, 30% were grouped based on strain clusters, suggesting a transmission index of 20%. An unsuspected outbreak entailing > or = 23 patients was evidenced by molecular typing analysis and confirmed by contact tracing. Foreign-born status accounted for 79% of the studied patients, including 37.9% illegal immigrants and asylum seekers. Among foreign-born patients, asylum seekers and illegal immigrants were significantly less abundant in strain clusters than settled residents. Tuberculosis in the Brussels-Capital Region is a bi-faceted problem, comprising both persisting recent transmission and "imported diseases". Molecular epidemiology based on real-time genotyping techniques has proven invaluable in better understanding tuberculosis transmission. However, it will most efficiently contribute to tuberculosis control when implemented in an integrated public health system.

  2. High incidence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis infection in a zoo population of bongo antelopes (Tragelaphus eurycerus).

    PubMed

    Moravkova, Monika; Mrlik, Vojtech; Parmova, Ilona; Kriz, Petr; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (Mah) infection was diagnosed in 5 captive bongo antelopes (Tragelaphus eurycerus) originating from a collection in a zoological garden. The animals suffered from emaciation. Postmortem examination revealed nodular lesions in the lungs of all 5 examined animals. Acid-fast bacilli were observed in the lungs of 4 animals. Culture and polymerase chain reaction identification based on IS901 negativity and IS1245 positivity confirmed Mah infection in the lungs of all 5 antelopes. In 3 animals, Mah was also isolated from other organs (liver, spleen, and kidney). Molecular analysis of these isolates using IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism and/or mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat revealed that the studied antelopes were infected by 1 identical genotype. Furthermore, in 2 antelopes, other genotypes were also detected. This shows the possibility of either genetic modifications occurring during infection or polyclonal infection. Culture examination of environmental samples from the enclosures holding the bongos revealed Mah in mulch bark, peat, and soil. Genotyping of these environmental isolates determined several genotypes with 1 dominant genotype that was identical to the dominant genotype detected in antelopes.

  3. Correlations between major risk factors and closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates grouped by three current enotyping procedures: a population-based study in northeast Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Molina-Salinas, Gloria María; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Padilla-Rivas, Gerardo Raymundo; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Torres-de-la-Cruz, Víctor Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Yazmin Berenice; Ortega-García, Jorge Luis; Garza-Treviño, Elsa Nancy; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Becerril-Montes, Pola; Said-Fernández/, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) patients related to a chain of recent TB transmissions were investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates (120) were genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 (R), spacer oligotyping (S) and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (M) methods. The MTB isolates were clustered and the clusters were grouped according to the similarities of their genotypes. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients between the groups of MTB isolates with similar genotypes and those patient characteristics indicating a risk for a pulmonary TB (PTB) chain transmission were ana- lysed. The isolates showing similar genotypes were distributed as follows: SMR (5%), SM (12.5%), SR (1.67%), MR (0%), S (46.67%), M (5%) and R (0%). The remaining 35 cases were orphans. SMR exhibited a significant correlation (p < 0.05) with visits to clinics, municipalities and comorbidities (primarily diabetes mellitus). S correlated with drug consumption and M with comorbidities. SMR is needed to identify a social network in metropolitan areas for PTB transmission and S and M are able to detect risk factors as secondary components of a transmission chain of TB. PMID:25317710

  4. Isolation of Mycobacterium caprae (Lechtal genotype) from red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Italy.

    PubMed

    Chiari, Mario; Zanoni, M; Alborali, L G; Zanardi, G; Avisani, D; Tagliabue, S; Gaffuri, A; Pacciarini, M L; Boniotti, M B

    2014-04-01

    During tuberculosis (TB) surveillance, 53 hunted red deer (Cervus elaphus) were collected to determine whether TB was present in free-ranging animals from an Italian alpine area. Samples (lungs, liver, intestine, and lymph nodes) were cultured and analyzed by real-time PCR assay carried out directly on tissue. Mycobacterium caprae was isolated from small granulomatous, tuberculosis-like lesions in the liver of a 12-yr-old female. Identification of suspect colonies was done by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the gyrb gene, and genotyping was performed by spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit variable number tandem repeat analysis. The isolated strain was genetically identical to strains isolated in the study area in 2001 from dairy cows imported from Austria and in 2010 from an indigenous cow. The genotype, called "Lechtal," is the most frequently detected in the TB outbreaks in Austria and Germany. The possibility that red deer act as a maintenance host of M. caprae between TB outbreaks could be not excluded. Despite the high red deer population density, the detection of only one infected red deer could suggest that the wildlife management measures applied in the study area (prohibition of artificial feeding and secure removal of offal from hunted animals) may reduce the risk of TB spreading.

  5. Comparison between RFLP and MIRU-VNTR Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains Isolated in Stockholm 2009 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Jerker; Hoffner, Sven; Berggren, Ingela; Bruchfeld, Judith; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Pennhag, Alexandra; Groenheit, Ramona

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to analyze the difference between methods for genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates. We collected genotyping results from Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units - Variable Numbers of Tandem Repeat (MIRU-VNTR) in a geographically limited area (Stockholm) during a period of three years. The number and proportion of isolates belonging to clusters was reduced by 45 and 35% respectively when combining the two methods compared with using RFLP or MIRU-VNTR only. The mean size of the clusters was smaller when combining methods and smaller with RFLP compared to MIRU-VNTR. In clusters with confirmed epidemiological links RFLP coincided slightly better than MIRU-VNTR but where there was a difference, the variation in MIRU-VNTR pattern was only in a single locus. In isolates with few IS6110 bands in RFLP, MIRU-VNTR differentiated the isolates more, dividing the RFLP clusters. Since MIRU-VNTR is faster and less labour-intensive it is the method of choice for routine genotyping. In most cases it will be sufficient for epidemiological purposes but true clustering might still be considered if there are epidemiological links and the MIRU-VNTR results differ in only one of its 24 loci. PMID:24733167

  6. Prospective genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fresh clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Bidovec-Stojkovič, Urška; Seme, Katja; Žolnir-Dovč, Manca; Supply, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Shorter time-to-result is key for improving molecular-guided epidemiological investigation of tuberculosis (TB) cases. We performed a prospective study to evaluate the use of standardized MIRU-VNTR (mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat) typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly on 79 fresh clinical samples from 26 TB patients consecutively enrolled over a 17-month period. Overall, complete 24-locus types were obtained for 18 out of the 26 (69.2%) patients and 14 of the 16 grade 3+ and grade 2+ samples (87.5%). The degree of completion of the genotypes obtained significantly correlated with smear microscopy grade both for 26 first samples (p = 0.0003) and for 53 follow-up samples (p = 0.002). For 20 of the 26 patients for whom complete or even incomplete M. tuberculosis isolate genotypes were obtained, typing applied to the clinical samples allowed the same unambiguous conclusions regarding case clustering or uniqueness as those that could have been drawn based on the corresponding cultured isolates. Standard 24 locus MIRU-VNTR typing of M. tuberculosis can be applied directly to fresh clinical samples, with typeability depending on the bacterial load in the sample.

  7. Multiple large clusters of tuberculosis in London: a cross-sectional analysis of molecular and spatial data.

    PubMed

    Smith, Catherine M; Maguire, Helen; Anderson, Charlotte; Macdonald, Neil; Hayward, Andrew C

    2017-01-01

    Large outbreaks of tuberculosis (TB) represent a particular threat to disease control because they reflect multiple instances of active transmission. The extent to which long chains of transmission contribute to high TB incidence in London is unknown. We aimed to estimate the contribution of large clusters to the burden of TB in London and identify risk factors. We identified TB patients resident in London notified between 2010 and 2014, and used 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat strain typing data to classify cases according to molecular cluster size. We used spatial scan statistics to test for spatial clustering and analysed risk factors through multinomial logistic regression. TB isolates from 7458 patients were included in the analysis. There were 20 large molecular clusters (with n>20 cases), comprising 795 (11%) of all cases; 18 (90%) large clusters exhibited significant spatial clustering. Cases in large clusters were more likely to be UK born (adjusted odds ratio 2.93, 95% CI 2.28-3.77), of black-Caribbean ethnicity (adjusted odds ratio 3.64, 95% CI 2.23-5.94) and have multiple social risk factors (adjusted odds ratio 3.75, 95% CI 1.96-7.16). Large clusters of cases contribute substantially to the burden of TB in London. Targeting interventions such as screening in deprived areas and social risk groups, including those of black ethnicities and born in the UK, should be a priority for reducing transmission.

  8. Tuberculosis in swine co-infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis and Mycobacterium bovis in a cluster from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Barandiaran, S; Pérez, A M; Gioffré, A K; Martínez Vivot, M; Cataldi, A A; Zumárraga, M J

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY In Argentina little is known about the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) infection in swine. We characterized the epidemiological dynamics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in a swine population of Argentina using molecular tools and spatial analysis techniques. Isolates (n = 196) obtained from TB-like lesions (n = 200) were characterized by polymerase chain reaction. The isolates were positive to either M. bovis (IS6110) (n = 160) or M. avium (IS1245) (n = 16) while the remaining 20 (10.2%) isolates were positive to both M. bovis and M. avium. The detection of both bacteria together suggests co-infection at the animal level. In addition, MAC-positive isolates (n = 36) were classified as M. avium subsp. avium (MAA) (n = 30) and M. avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) (n = 6), which resulted in five genotypes when they were typed using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit, variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR). One significant (P = 0.017) spatial clustering of genotypes was detected, in which the proportion of MAH isolates was larger than expected under the null hypothesis of even distribution of genotypes. These results show that in Argentina the proportion of TB cases in pigs caused by M. avium is larger than that reported in earlier studies. The proportion of M. bovis-MAC co-infections was also higher than in previous reports. These results provide valuable information on the epidemiology of MAC infection in swine in Argentina.

  9. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from a low-endemic setting in northwestern state of Paraná in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Noguti, Erika Noda; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; Malaspina, Ana Carolina; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Hirata, Rosário Dominguez Crespo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Mamizuka, Elsa Massae; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide information about the genetic diversity and prevalent genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a low-endemic setting in northwestern state of Paraná in Southern Brazil. We employed spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) techniques to genotype M. tuberculos isisolates from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). The 93 isolates analyzed by spoligotyping were divided into 36 different patterns, 30 of which were described in the SITVIT database. Latin American and Mediterranean, Haarlem and T families were responsible for 26.9%, 17.2% and 11.8% of TB cases, respectively. From the 84 isolates analyzed by MIRU-VNTR, 58 shared a unique pattern and the remaining 26 belonged to nine clusters. The MIRU loci 40, 23, 10 and 16 were the most discriminatory. A combination of MIRU-VNTR and spoligotyping resulted in 85.7% discriminatory power (Hunter-Gaston index = 0.995). Thus, combining spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing proved to be most useful for epidemiological study in this low-endemic setting in Southern Brazil. The current study demonstrated that there is significant diversity in circulating strains in the city of Maringá and the surrounding regions, with no single genotype of M. tuberculosis predominating.

  10. Diagnosis and Molecular Characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Dairy Cows in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Silva, J. A.; Abdulmawjood, A.; Bülte, M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was the serological, bacteriological and molecular diagnosis, as well as the molecular characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) in adult cows of five Colombian dairy herds. Serum samples were tested by an indirect absorbed enzyme–linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA-C). All fecal samples were tested by pooled culture. After that, fecal samples of Map positive pools were tested individually by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In one herd, slurry and tissue samples from one animal were also taken and tested by PCR and culture. Map isolates were analyzed by the Multilocus Short Sequence Repeat (MLSSR) and the Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units-Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (MIRU-VNTR) methods. ELISA produced positive results in 1.8% (6/329) of the animals and 40% (2/5) of the herds. Four fecal, two tissue, and two slurry samples from a herd were Map positive by culture and PCR. MLSSR and MIRU-VNTR revealed two different strain profiles among eight Map isolates recovered. This study reports the first molecular characterization of Map in one dairy herd in Colombia, the limitations for individual diagnosis of subclinical Map infections in cattle, and the usefulness of pooled fecal samples and environmental sampling for Map diagnosis. PMID:21785685

  11. Drug Targets in Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Muse, Wilson B.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:17970225

  12. [Buruli ulcer--Africa's latest mycobacterial scourge].

    PubMed

    Roupe, Gösta

    2003-11-06

    Buruliulcer is an extensive ulceration usually on the extremities. The ulcer can spread to subcutaneous fat, muscle and even bone causing osteomyelitis and death. It is the the third most common mycobacterial disease in humans after tuberculosis and leprosy. The bacterium grows in still standing water and infects children through small ulcerations in their skin. Mycobacterium ulcerans may also be transmitted by the bite of aquatic bugs (Naucordiae), which harbor the bacterium in their salivary glands. The disease affects poor people in rural, tropical areas where deforestation has led to flooding rivers, stagnant bodies of water and marsh. Benin, Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana in West Africa are seriously hit. Skin transplantation is the treatment of choice. Treatment with antibiotics has been disappointing.

  13. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease mimicking lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the features and clinical implications of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy (PCNB) in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease manifesting as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. Among a cohort of 388 patients with NTM pulmonary disease, 14 patients with clinically and radiologically suspected lung cancer were included in our study. Two chest radiologists evaluated CT features, including lesion type (nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation), morphologic features (margin, degree of enhancement, calcification), and presence of accompanying findings suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease (bronchiectasis with clustered centrilobular nodules or upper-lobe cavitary lesions) by consensus. Diagnostic procedures for microbiologic diagnosis of NTM disease and clinical outcome were reviewed. Incidence of NTM pulmonary disease presenting as solitary nodule/mass (n = 8) or mass-like consolidation (n = 6) was 3.6% (14 of 388). Most lesions were detected incidentally during routine health check-up or evaluation of other disease (11 of 14, 79%). Lesions typically showed poor contrast-enhancement (9 of 12) and internal calcification (6 of 14). No lesions had CT features suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease. All 4 lesions for which PET/CT imaging was performed showed strong fluorodeoxyglucose uptake simulating malignant lesions (mean, 4.9; range, 3.6–7.8). PCNB revealed mycobacterial histology in 6 of 11 specimens and positive culture results were obtained for 7 of 7 specimens. NTM pulmonary disease may present as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. CT features and PCNB are important to diagnose NTM disease mimicking lung cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:27367996

  14. Atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis and bursitis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Zor, Fatih; Kocaoğlu, Murat; Bulakbaşi, Nail

    2009-12-01

    Atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis of the wrist can easily be misdiagnosed as synovial chondromatosis. Both sonography and magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in depicting "rice bodies" within the distended tendon sheaths and bursae of atypical mycobacterial infection. An endemic place for Mycobacterium species and the occupation of the patient should raise the suspicion for the disease. Polymerase chain reaction of the distended tendon fluid is a sensitive, specific and rapid method in identification of the mycobacteria.

  15. PRESENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSP. PARATUBERCULOSIS IN ALPACAS (LAMA PACOS) INHABITING THE CHILEAN ALTIPLANO.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Miguel; Sevilla, Iker; Rios, Carolina; Crossley, Jorge; Tejeda, Carlos; Manning, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of paratuberculosis. The organism causes disease in both domestically managed and wild ruminant species. South American camelids have a long, shared history with indigenous people in the Andes. Over the last few decades, increasing numbers of alpacas were exported to numerous countries outside South America. No paratuberculosis surveillance has been reported for these source herds. In this study, individual fecal samples from 85 adult alpacas were collected from six separate herds in the Chilean Altiplano. A ParaTB mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture of each individual fecal sample, followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was used for confirmation. DNA extracts from a subset of confirmed MAP isolates were subjected to mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Fifteen alpaca were fecal culture test-positive. Five false-positive culture samples were negative on PCR analysis for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA), Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), and the 16 S rDNA gene. Three MAP isolates subset-tested belonged to the same MIRU-VNTR type, showing four repeats for TR292 (locus 1) in contrast to the three repeats typical of the MAP reference strain K10. The number of repeats found in the remaining loci was identical to that of the K10 strain. It is not known how nor when MAP was introduced into the alpaca population in the Chilean Altiplano. The most plausible hypothesis to explain the presence of MAP in these indigenous populations is transmission by contact with infected domestic small ruminant species that may on occasion share pastures or range with alpacas. Isolation of this mycobacterial pathogen from such a remote region suggests that MAP has found its way beyond the confines of intensively managed domestic agriculture premises.

  16. Task Interspersal and Performance of Matching Tasks by Preschoolers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavides, Christian A.; Poulson, Claire L.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of task interspersal on the performance of matching-to-sample tasks by three children with autism. A pre-baseline assessed each child's mastery level of a large body of matching stimuli. These matching tasks included matching identical and non-identical animals, numbers, letters, and shapes. Through this…

  17. Mycobacterial disease, immunosuppression, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F M

    1989-01-01

    The mycobacteria are an important group of acid-fast pathogens ranging from obligate intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium leprae to environmental species such as M. gordonae and M. fortuitum. The latter may behave as opportunistic human pathogens if the host defenses have been depleted in some manner. The number and severity of such infections have increased markedly with the emergence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. These nontuberculous mycobacteria tend to be less virulent for humans than M. tuberculosis, usually giving rise to self-limiting infections involving the cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of young children. However, the more virulent serovars of M. avium complex can colonize the bronchial and intestinal mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, becoming virtual members of the commensal gut microflora and thus giving rise to low levels of skin hypersensitivity to tuberculins prepared from M. avium and M. intracellulare. Systemic disease develops when the normal T-cell-mediated defenses become depleted as a result of old age, cancer chemotherapy, or infection with human immunodeficiency virus. As many as 50% of human immunodeficiency virus antibody-positive individuals develop mycobacterial infections at some time during their disease. Most isolates of M. avium complex from AIDS patients fall into serotypes 4 and 8. The presence of these drug-resistant mycobacteria in the lungs of the AIDS patient makes their effective clinical treatment virtually impossible. More effective chemotherapeutic, prophylactic, and immunotherapeutic reagents are urgently needed to treat this rapidly increasing patient population. PMID:2680057

  18. Inhibitors Selective for Mycobacterial Versus Human Proteasomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Sorio de Carvalho, L; Deng, H; Tao, H; Vogt, G; Wu, K; Schneider, J; Chidawanyika, T; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Many anti-infectives inhibit the synthesis of bacterial proteins, but none selectively inhibits their degradation. Most anti-infectives kill replicating pathogens, but few preferentially kill pathogens that have been forced into a non-replicating state by conditions in the host. To explore these alternative approaches we sought selective inhibitors of the proteasome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given that the proteasome structure is extensively conserved, it is not surprising that inhibitors of all chemical classes tested have blocked both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteasomes, and no inhibitor has proved substantially more potent on proteasomes of pathogens than of their hosts. Here we show that certain oxathiazol-2-one compounds kill non-replicating M.?tuberculosis and act as selective suicide-substrate inhibitors of the M.?tuberculosis proteasome by cyclocarbonylating its active site threonine. Major conformational changes protect the inhibitor-enzyme intermediate from hydrolysis, allowing formation of an oxazolidin-2-one and preventing regeneration of active protease. Residues outside the active site whose hydrogen bonds stabilize the critical loop before and after it moves are extensively non-conserved. This may account for the ability of oxathiazol-2-one compounds to inhibit the mycobacterial proteasome potently and irreversibly while largely sparing the human homologue.

  19. Mycobacterial Arthritis and Synovitis in Painted Reed Frogs (Hyperolius marmoratus).

    PubMed

    Barrows, M; Koeppel, K; Michel, A; Mitchell, E

    2017-02-20

    Several species of atypical mycobacteria have been isolated from wild and captive amphibians. In captive anurans, cutaneous and visceral mycobacteriosis are common and can result in significant mortality, particularly when animals are immunocompromised. Mycobacterial arthritis and synovitis are reported rarely in amphibians. We describe 20 cases in painted reed frogs (Hyperolius marmoratus), which presented with cachexia, limb paresis or paralysis or 'spindly leg syndrome'. Histopathology revealed multifocal histiocytic to granulomatous synovitis affecting appendicular, rib or spinal intervertebral joints. Periarticular granulomata, granulomatous cellulitis and skeletal muscle atrophy, necrosis and degeneration were also present. In one case, granulomatous spinal osteomyelitis was recorded. Ziehl-Neelsen stains showed large numbers of acid-fast bacteria in macrophages and histiocytes. The mycobacterial isolates obtained from culture were identified as members of the Mycobacterium chelonae complex (either M. chelonae or Mycobacteriumabscessus). This was confirmed by 5'-16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequencing. In 17 cases mycobacterial lesions were present only in the joints and skeleton, highlighting the importance of not ruling out mycobacterial infection on the basis of absence of cutaneous or visceral lesions.

  20. Development of IgG responses to mycobacterial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Pilkington, C; Costello, A M; Rook, G A; Stanford, J L

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies link mycobacterial and human heat shock protein antigens with autoimmune diseases. Little is known about the development of antibody responses to these antigens in children. IgG responses to mycobacterial antigens were studied in children living in the UK (an environment low in mycobacteria) who had not received BCG vaccination. Age curves of IgG response to sonicates from different species of mycobacteria were similar suggesting that the greater part of the developing IgG response is to the common antigens shared by all mycobacteria. The major part of the IgG response was to carbohydrate antigens: lipoarabinomannan is a mycobacterial cell wall carbohydrate and was confirmed as a major immunodominant antigen. Infants showed a marked early response to the mycobacterial 65 kilodalton (kDa) and 70 kDa heat shock proteins, but not to the human 65 kDa heat shock protein. The early IgG response to heat shock proteins may reflect cross reactivity to proteins released by a wide variety of bacteria (possibly from breakdown in the gut) or recognition of other immunodominant antigens with high levels of cross reactivity to self. PMID:8285775

  1. Mycobacterial infections in striped bass from Delaware Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ottinger, C.A.; Brown, J.J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Starliper, C.E.; Blazer, V.S.; Weyers, H.S.; Beauchamp, K.A.; Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Gauthier, David T.; Vogelbein, W.K.

    2007-01-01

    Eighty striped bass Morone saxatilis were obtained from Delaware Bay using commercial gill nets set adjacent to Woodland Beach (n = 70) and Bowers Beach (n = 10) in December 2003. Fish were examined for gross lesions. Total lengths (TLs) and eviscerated weights were determined to calculate condition factors (K). Portions of spleens were aseptically harvested for bacterial culture, and portions of spleens, kidneys (anterior and posterior), livers, and gonads were obtained for histological examination. The size distribution of the striped bass was relatively homogeneous; the mean TL was about 600 mm for all samples. Mean K exceeded 0.95 in all samples and was not significantly different (P > 0.05) among samples. Significant differences in mycobacterial infection prevalence (P ??? 0.05) were observed among samples; samples obtained at Woodland Beach (WB) on December 10 (53.8%, n = 13) and December 17 (7.1%, n = 42) exhibited the most striking differences in prevalence. Mycobacterial infection intensity ranged from 1 ?? 102 to 1 ?? 107 colony-forming units per gram of spleen. Acanthocephalan infection prevalence and intensity, non-acid-fast bacterial infection prevalence, and fish sex ratio were also significantly different among the samples (P ??? 0.05). Similar to the mycobacterial infections, differences in sex ratio, acanthocephalan infection, and non-acid-fast bacterial infection were observed between the WB samples taken on December 10 and 17. However, no significant associations (P > 0.05) were observed between sex ratio or these infections and mycobacterial infection. The differences in bacterial and parasite infection prevalence and intensity and fish sex ratio in some samples indicate that these fish had a different history and that the epizootiology of mycobacterial infection in striped bass from Delaware Bay may be relatively complex. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  2. Distinctive patterns of age-dependent hypomethylation in interspersed repetitive sequences.

    PubMed

    Jintaridth, Pornrutsami; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2010-04-01

    Interspersed repetitive sequences (IRSs) are a major contributor to genome size and may contribute to cellular functions. IRSs are subdivided according to size and functionally related structures into short interspersed elements, long interspersed elements (LINEs), DNA transposons, and LTR-retrotransposons. Many IRSs may produce RNA and regulate genes by a variety of mechanisms. The majority of DNA methylation occurs in IRSs and is believed to suppress IRS activities. Global hypomethylation, or the loss of genome-wide methylation, is a common epigenetic event not only in senescent cells but also in cancer cells. Loss of LINE-1 methylation has been characterized in many cancers. Here, we evaluated the methylation levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of LINE-1, Alu, and human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) in 177 samples obtained from volunteers between 20 and 88 yr of age. Age was negatively associated with methylation levels of Alu (r = -0.452, P < 10(-3)) and HERV-K (r = -0.326, P < 10(-3)) but not LINE-1 (r = 0.145, P = 0.055). Loss of methylation of Alu occurred during ages 34-68 yr, and loss of methylation of HERV-K occurred during ages 40-63 yr and again during ages 64-83 yr. Interestingly, methylation of Alu and LINE-1 are directly associated, particularly at ages 49 yr and older (r = 0.49, P < 10(-3)). Therefore, only some types of IRSs lose methylation at certain ages. Moreover, Alu and HERV-K become hypomethylated differently. Finally, there may be several mechanisms of global methylation. However, not all of these mechanisms are age-dependent. This finding may lead to a better understanding of not only the biological causes and consequences of genome-wide hypomethylation but also the role of IRSs in the aging process.

  3. Mermaid, a family of short interspersed repetitive elements, is useful for zebrafish genome mapping.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, N; Chevrette, M; Ekker, M; Kikuchi, Y; Hotta, Y; Okamoto, H

    1996-03-07

    A family of short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs), designated mermaid, is present in the genomes of fish, amphibian and primates, but absent in the mouse genome. We have demonstrated that the sequences of the mermaid family are highly polymorphic in the zebrafish genome as in the human genome. We have also shown that the mermaid sequence can be used to recover zebrafish specific DNA from zebrafish-mouse cell hybrids by using mermaid-specific oligonucleotides as PCR primers. Thus, the mermaid family serves as a valuable genetic tool for the zebrafish genome mapping.

  4. Mermaid: a family of short interspersed repetitive elements widespread in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, N; Chevrette, M; Ekker, M; Kikuchi, Y; Hotta, Y; Okamoto, H

    1996-03-07

    We have discovered a family of short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs) that are present in the genomes of fish, amphibian and primates. The family of the SINEs, designated mermaid, is distinctive in each species except for a conserved region of approximately 80 bp. Some members of the mermaid family were found in transposon-like repetitive elements, including Tcl-like elements which were also distributed in the genomes of fish and amphibian. This raises the possibility of horizontal transfer of the mermaid family between vertebrates via transposons.

  5. The fourth chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster: Interspersed euchromatic and heterochromatic domains

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fang-Lin; Cuaycong, Matthew H.; Craig, Carolyn A.; Wallrath, Lori L.; Locke, John; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2000-01-01

    The small fourth chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster (3.5% of the genome) presents a puzzle. Cytological analysis suggests that the bulk of the fourth, including the portion that appears banded in the polytene chromosomes, is heterochromatic; the banded region includes blocks of middle repetitious DNA associated with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). However, genetic screens indicate 50–75 genes in this region, a density similar to that in other euchromatic portions of the genome. Using a P element containing an hsp70-white gene and a copy of hsp26 (marked with a fragment of plant DNA designated pt), we have identified domains that allow for full expression of the white marker (R domains), and others that induce a variegating phenotype (V domains). In the former case, the hsp26-pt gene shows an accessibility and heat-shock-inducible activity similar to that seen in euchromatin, whereas in the latter case, accessibility and inducible expression are reduced to levels typical of heterochromatin. Mapping by in situ hybridization and by hybridization of flanking DNA sequences to a collection of cosmid and bacterial artificial chromosome clones shows that the R domains (euchromatin-like) and V domains (heterochromatin-like) are interspersed. Examination of the effect of genetic modifiers on the variegating transgenes shows some differences among these domains. The results suggest that heterochromatic and euchromatic domains are interspersed and closely associated within this 1.2-megabase region of the genome. PMID:10779561

  6. Sequence conservation in avian CR1: an interspersed repetitive DNA family evolving under functional constraints.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z Q; Ritzel, R G; Lin, C C; Hodgetts, R B

    1991-01-01

    CR1 is a short interspersed repetitive DNA element originally identified in the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus). However, unlike virtually all other such sequences described to date, CR1 is not confined to one or a few closely related species. It is probably a ubiquitous component of the avian genome, having been detected in representatives of nine orders encompassing a wide spectrum of the class Aves. This identification was made possible by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which revealed interspecific similarities not detected by conventional Southern analysis. DNA sequence comparisons between a CR1 element isolated from a sarus crane (Grus antigone) and those isolated from an emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) showed that two short highly conserved regions are present. These are included within two regions previously characterized in the CR1 units of domestic fowl. One of these behaves as a transcriptional silencer and the other is a binding site for a nuclear protein. Our observations suggest that CR1 has evolved under functional constraints and that interspersed repetitive sequences as a class may constitute a more significant component of the eukaryotic genome than is generally acknowledged. Images PMID:1829530

  7. Methylation Status of Alu and LINE-1 Interspersed Repetitive Sequences in Behcet's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Şahru; Kucukazman, Selma Ozbek; Karataş, Gülten Sungur; Ozturk, Mehmet Akif; Prombhul, Sasiprapa; Hirankarn, Nattiya

    2016-01-01

    Behcet's Disease (BD) is a multisystem chronic inflammatory disease. The pathology is believed to involve both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Hypomethylation leading to activation of interspersed repetitive sequences (IRSs) such as LINE-1 and Alu contributes to the pathologies of autoimmune diseases and cancer. Herein, the epigenetic changes of IRSs in BD were evaluated using combined bisulfite restriction analysis-interspersed repetitive sequences (COBRA-IRS). DNA from neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of BD patients with ocular involvement that were in active or inactive states and healthy controls were used to analyze LINE-1 and Alu methylation levels. For Alu sequences, significant differences were observed in the frequency of (u)C(u)C alleles between PBMCs of patients and controls (p = 0.03), and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.03). For neutrophils, the frequency of (u)C(u)C was significantly higher between patients and controls (p = 0.006) and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.002). The partial methylation ((u)C(m)C + (m)C(u)C) frequencies of Alu between inactive patients and control samples also differed (p = 0.02). No statistically significant differences for LINE-1 were detected. Thus, changes in the methylation level of IRS elements might contribute to the pathogenesis of BD. The role of Alu transcripts in BD should be investigated further.

  8. Enrichment of short interspersed transposable elements to embryonic stem cell-specific hypomethylated gene regions.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Hiroki; Yagi, Shintaro; Hirabayashi, Keiji; Sato, Shinya; Ohgane, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Shiota, Kunio

    2010-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have a distinctive epigenome, which includes their genome-wide DNA methylation modification status, as represented by the ESC-specific hypomethylation of tissue-dependent and differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs) of Pou5f1 and Nanog. Here, we conducted a genome-wide investigation of sequence characteristics associated with T-DMRs that were differentially methylated between ESCs and somatic cells, by focusing on transposable elements including short interspersed elements (SINEs), long interspersed elements (LINEs) and long terminal repeats (LTRs). We found that hypomethylated T-DMRs were predominantly present in SINE-rich/LINE-poor genomic loci. The enrichment for SINEs spread over 300 kb in cis and there existed SINE-rich genomic domains spreading continuously over 1 Mb, which contained multiple hypomethylated T-DMRs. The characterization of sequence information showed that the enriched SINEs were relatively CpG rich and belonged to specific subfamilies. A subset of the enriched SINEs were hypomethylated T-DMRs in ESCs at Dppa3 gene locus, although SINEs are overall methylated in both ESCs and the liver. In conclusion, we propose that SINE enrichment is the genomic property of regions harboring hypomethylated T-DMRs in ESCs, which is a novel aspect of the ESC-specific epigenomic information.

  9. Mycobacterial pseudotumor of the plantar fascia: how common is it?

    PubMed

    Sideras, Panagiotis A; Heiba, Sherif; Machac, Josef; Hechtman, Jaclyn; Vatti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumor (MSCP) is an extremely rare complication of mycobacterial infections. It has been reported to occur in various sites such as skin, lymph nodes, bone marrow, lungs, and spleen. This tumor-like lesion can be confused clinically as well as radiographically with dermatofibroma, nodular fasciitis, xanthogranuloma, and Kaposi's sarcoma. While this lesion is rare and has been previously reported to occur only in superficial skin, we emphasize its consideration and inclusion in the differential diagnoses when a deep soft tissue mass is complicated by symptoms of deep tissue infection secondary to abscess formation in immunocompromised hosts. Here, we present the clinical and radiologic findings of a case of MSCP involving the deep plantar sheaths.

  10. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Ocular Infections: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, Wajiha J.; Sheheitli, Huda; Abdul Fattah, Maamoun; Hamam, Rola N.

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous or atypical mycobacterial ocular infections have been increasing in prevalence over the past few decades. They are known to cause periocular, adnexal, ocular surface and intraocular infections and are often recalcitrant to medical therapy. These infections can potentially cause detrimental outcomes, in part due to a delay in diagnosis. We review 174 case reports and series on nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) ocular infections and discuss etiology, microbiology, risk factors, diagnosis, clinical presentation, and treatment of these infections. History of interventions, trauma, foreign bodies, implants, contact lenses, and steroids are linked to NTM ocular infections. Steroid use may prolong the duration of the infection and cause poorer visual outcomes. Early diagnosis and initiation of treatment with multiple antibiotics are necessary to achieve the best visual outcome. PMID:26106601

  11. Mycobacterial proteins--immune targets for antituberculous subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, N; Khuller, G K

    1999-12-01

    Cellular and humoral immunity induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has led to identification of newer vaccine candidates, but despite this, many questions concerning the protection against tuberculosis remain unanswered. Recent progress in this field has centered on T cell subset responses and cytokines that these cells secrete. There has been a steady progress in identification and characterization of several classes of major mycobacterial proteins which includes secretory/export proteins, cell wall associated proteins, heat shock proteins and cytoplasmic proteins. The protein antigens are now believed to represent the key protective immunity inducing antigens in the bacillus. In this review, various mycobacterial protein antigens of vaccination potential are compared for their efficacy in light of current immunological knowledge.

  12. Targeting drug tolerance in mycobacteria: a perspective from mycobacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad S; Richards, Jacob P; Ojha, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug chemotherapy for 6–9-months is one of the primary treatments in effective control of tuberculosis, although the mechanisms underlying the persistence of its etiological agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, against antibiotics remain unclear. Ever-mounting evidence indicates that the survival of many environmental and pathogenic microbial species against antibiotics is influenced by their ability to grow as surface-associated multicellular communities called biofilms. In recent years, several mycobacterial species, including M. tuberculosis, have been found to form drug-tolerant biofilms in vitro through genetically controlled mechanisms. In this review, the authors discuss the relevance of the in vitro mycobacterial biofilms in understanding the antibiotic recalcitrance of tuberculosis infections. PMID:23106280

  13. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection after Fractionated CO2 Laser Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Culton, Donna A.; Miller, Becky A.; Miller, Melissa B.; MacKuen, Courteney; Groben, Pamela; White, Becky; Cox, Gary M.; Stout, Jason E.

    2013-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are increasingly associated with cutaneous infections after cosmetic procedures. Fractionated CO2 resurfacing, a widely used technique for photorejuvenation, has been associated with a more favorable side effect profile than alternative procedures. We describe 2 cases of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection after treatment with a fractionated CO2 laser at a private clinic. Densely distributed erythematous papules and pustules developed within the treated area within 2 weeks of the laser procedure. Diagnosis was confirmed by histologic analysis and culture. Both infections responded to a 4-month course of a multidrug regimen. An environmental investigation of the clinic was performed, but no source of infection was found. The case isolates differed from each other and from isolates obtained from the clinic, suggesting that the infection was acquired by postprocedure exposure. Papules and pustules after fractionated CO2 resurfacing should raise the suspicion of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. PMID:23628077

  14. Vaccination Against Tuberculosis With Whole-Cell Mycobacterial Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Thomas J; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Henri Lambert, Paul; Sanicas, Melvin; Martin, Carlos; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Live attenuated and killed whole-cell vaccines (WCVs) offer promising vaccination strategies against tuberculosis. A number of WCV candidates, based on recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or related mycobacterial species are in various stages of preclinical or clinical development. In this review, we discuss the vaccine candidates and key factors shaping the development pathway for live and killed WCVs and provide an update on progress.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Zinc Metalloprotease-1 Assists Mycobacterial Dissemination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Mani H.; Medisetti, Raghavender; Ganji, Rakesh; Jakkala, Kiran; Sankati, Swetha; Chatti, Kiranam; Banerjee, Sharmistha

    2016-01-01

    Zinc metalloprotease-1 (Zmp1) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), the tuberculosis (TB) causing bacillus, is a virulence factor involved in inflammasome inactivation and phagosome maturation arrest. We earlier reported that Zmp1 was secreted under granuloma-like stress conditions, induced Th2 cytokine microenvironment and was highly immunogenic in TB patients as evident from high anti-Zmp1 antibody titers in their sera. In this study, we deciphered a new physiological role of Zmp1 in mycobacterial dissemination. Exogenous treatment of THP-1 cells with 500 nM and 1 μM of recombinant Zmp1 (rZmp1) resulted in necrotic cell death. Apart from inducing secretion of necrotic cytokines, TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1β, it also induced the release of chemotactic chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1β, and IL-8, suggesting its likely function in cell migration and mycobacterial dissemination. This was confirmed by Gap closure and Boyden chamber assays, where Zmp1 treated CHO or THP-1 cells showed ∼2 fold increased cell migration compared to the untreated cells. Additionally, Zebrafish-M. marinum based host–pathogen model was used to study mycobacterial dissemination in vivo. Td-Tomato labeled M. marinum (TdM. marinum) when injected with rZmp1 showed increased dissemination to tail region from the site of injection as compared to the untreated control fish in a dose-dependent manner. Summing up these observations along with the earlier reports, we propose that Zmp1, a multi-faceted protein, when released by mycobacteria in granuloma, may lead to necrotic cell damage and release of chemotactic chemokines by surrounding infected macrophages, attracting new immune cells, which in turn may lead to fresh cellular infections, thus assisting mycobacterial dissemination. PMID:27621726

  16. A comparison of the effects of interspersal and concurrent training sequences on acquisition, retention, and generalization of picture names.

    PubMed

    Rowan, V C; Pear, J J

    1985-01-01

    A comparison was made between an interspersal and a concurrent procedure in teaching picture names to three mentally handicapped children. During the interspersal procedure a picture thats name was being trained was alternated with pictures already known; during the concurrent procedure a picture thats name was being trained was alternated with other pictures thats names were unknown. An ABA design with counterbalancing (BAB) was used. The children learned naming responses more rapidly when trained by the interspersal procedure than by the concurrent procedure. Weekly retention tests on pictures learned to criterion during the week showed no consistent difference between the two procedures in percentage of learned picture names retained. Weekly generalization tests showed that picture names that were retained in both conditions tended to generalize equally to a different setting and tester, and to the objects depicted in the pictures.

  17. Morphine and Fentanyl Citrate Induce Retrotransposition of Long Interspersed Element-1.

    PubMed

    Okudaira, Noriyuki; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Nishio, Hajime; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The retroelement long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) comprises about 17% of the human genome. A single human cell has 80 to 100 copies of retrotransposition-competent L1, approximately 10% of which are 'hot' and actively 'jump' around the genome. Recent observations demonstrated that low-molecular weight compounds may induce L1 retrotransposition through unknown mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrated that the painkillers morphine and fentanyl citrate trigger L1 retrotransposition in neuronal cells without inducing DNA damage or up-regulating L1 mRNA expression. This effect was blocked by an antagonist of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Taken together, the data suggest that L1 retrotransposition due to morphine and fentanyl citrate is distinct from that triggered by DNA damage, requires TLR4, and is a novel type of genomic instability. Thus, we propose that L1 retrotransposition should be characterized as a component of the pharmacological activity of these analgesic agents.

  18. Use of variations in staphylococcal interspersed repeat units for molecular typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Katherine J; Oppenheim, Beryl A; Gossain, Savita; Gao, Fang; Hawkey, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcal interspersed repeat unit typing has previously been shown to have the ability to discriminate between epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in the United Kingdom. The current study illustrates its ability to distinguish between strains within an endemic setting thereby providing a rapid transportable typing method for the identification of transmission events.

  19. Elevated serum CA 19-9 levels in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Young; Jang, Sun Hee; Kim, Song Yee; Chung, Kyung Soo; Song, Joo Han; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Kang, Young Ae

    2016-01-01

    Increased serum CA 19-9 levels in patients with nonmalignant diseases have been investigated in previous reports. This study evaluates the clinical significance of serum CA 19-9 elevation in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease and pulmonary tuberculosis. The median CA 19-9 level was higher in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease than in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease: 13.80, tuberculosis: 5.85, p<0.001). A multivariate logistic regression analysis performed in this study showed that Mycobacterium abscessus (OR 9.97, 95% CI: 1.58, 62.80; p=0.014) and active phase of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease (OR 12.18, 95% CI: 1.07, 138.36, p=0.044) were found to be risk factors for serum CA 19-9 elevation in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. The serum CA 19-9 levels showed a tendency to decrease during successful treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease but not in pulmonary tuberculosis. These findings suggest that CA 19-9 may be a useful marker for monitoring therapeutic responses in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, although it is not pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease-specific marker.

  20. Chemotherapy of arthritis induced in rats by mycobacterial adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Newbould, B. B.

    1963-01-01

    Arthritis induced in rats by mycobacterial adjuvant has been used for the study of compounds of known value in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in man. The development of the arthritic syndrome in treated and control rats was followed by measuring the changes in foot thickness of both hind-feet with a micrometer. This method allowed the effect of anti-inflammatory compounds to be expressed quantitatively. Anti-inflammatory activity was readily observed in certain steroids, pyrazolidines, salicylates and sodium aurothiomalate. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine were inactive. The inhibition obtained by daily treatment with the steroid paramethasone disappeared when treatment was withdrawn. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:14066137

  1. Studies of transmission of mycobacterial infections in Chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, A.J.; Johnson, H.E.

    1962-01-01

    THE INCLUSION OF VISCERA AND CARCASSES OF TUBERCULOUS ADULT SALMON IN THE DIET OF JUVENILE SALMONIDS is considered to be the major source of mycobacterial infections in hatchery-reared fish (Wood and Ordal, 1958; Ross, Earp, and Wood, 1959). In considering additional modes of infection, we speculated about transovarian transmission or a mechanical process arising from contamination of the ova at the egg-taking stage with subsequent entry of the bacteria into the egg at the time of fertilization. This paper is a report on observations made during an experiment designed to test the latter theories.

  2. A Rhesus Macaque Model of Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Winthrop, Kevin; Rivera, Andrea; Engelmann, Flora; Rose, Sasha; Lewis, Anne; Ku, Jennifer; Bermudez, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to develop a nonhuman primate model of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected from three female rhesus macaques infected intrabronchially with escalating doses of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Immunity was determined by measuring cytokine levels, lymphocyte proliferation, and antigen-specific responses. Disease progression was monitored clinically and microbiologically with serial thoracic radiographs, computed tomography scans, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures. The animal subjected to the highest inoculum showed evidence of chronic pulmonary MAC disease. Therefore, rhesus macaques could provide a robust model in which to investigate host–pathogen interactions during MAC infection. PMID:26562499

  3. The Effect of an Interspersed Refuge on Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae), Their Natural Enemies, and Biological Control.

    PubMed

    Varenhorst, A J; O'Neal, M E

    2016-02-01

    Soybean production in the north central United States has relied heavily on the use of foliar and seed applied insecticides to manage Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae). An additional management strategy is the use soybean cultivars containing A. glycines resistance genes (Rag). Previous research has demonstrated that Rag cultivars are capable of preventing yield loss equivalent to the use of foliar and seed-applied insecticides.However, the presence of virulent biotypes in North America has raised concern for the durability of Rag genes. A resistance management program that includes a refuge for avirulent biotypes could limit the frequency at which virulent biotypes increase within North America. To what extent such a refuge reduces the effectiveness of aphid-resistant soybean is not clear. We conducted an experiment to determine whether a susceptible refuge mixed into resistant soybean (i.e., interspersed refuge or refuge-in-a-bag) affects the seasonal exposure of aphids, their natural enemies, biological control, and yield protection provided by aphid resistance. We compared three ratios of interspersed refuges (resistant: susceptible; 95:5, 90:10, 75:25) to plots grown with 100%susceptible or resistant soybean. We determined that an interspersed refuge of at least 25% susceptible seed would be necessary to effectively produce avirulent individuals. Interspersed refuges had negligible effects onyield and the natural enemy community. However, there was evidence that they increased the amount of biological control that occurred within a plot. We discuss the compatibility of interspersed refuges for A. glycines management and whether resistance management can prolong the durability of Rag genes.

  4. The population structure of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Sichuan in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuding; Feng, Qin; Tang, Ke; Zhang, Congcong; Sun, Honghu; Luo, Tao; Yang, Zhirong; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Sun, Qun

    2012-06-01

    China ranks second next to India among 22 high-burden countries despite decades' effort on tuberculosis (TB) control. The Sichuan province today contains the second-largest number of TB cases among Chinese provinces, where the prevalence of drug-resistant TB, especially MDR-TB, is much higher than the average level in eastern China. In this study, the population structure and the transmission characteristics of drug-resistant TB in Sichuan province were studied by spoligotyping and 24-locus Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem DNA repeats (MIRU-VNTR), applied to a total of 306 clinical isolates. Spoligotyping-based analysis showed that Beijing family represented 69.28% of all isolates and constituted the largest group (66.24%) of MDR-TB in Sichuan. The remaining isolates, accounting for 33.76% of MDR isolates, belonged to the ill-defined T family, Manu2, H3, LAM9, and other minor unassigned clades. The discriminatory power evaluated for spoligotyping was poor (HGI=0.595), but high for 24-locus MIRU-VNTRs (HGI=0.999). The number of the most discriminatory loci (h>0.6) was 12, including locus 424, 802, 960, 1644, 1955, 2163b, 2996, 3007, 3192, 3690, 4348 and 4052. It was concluded that 24-locus MIRU-VNTRs could be a more discriminatory tool for differentiating clinical isolates from Sichuan region. The small clustering size obtained from the current population structure analysis suggested that the high prevalence of drug-resistant TB in this region might be attributed partially to the acquired resistance due to inappropriate drug use rather than active transmission of drug-resistant TB (primary resistance).

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in a country with low tuberculosis incidence: role of immigration and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Fenner, Lukas; Gagneux, Sebastien; Helbling, Peter; Battegay, Manuel; Rieder, Hans L; Pfyffer, Gaby E; Zwahlen, Marcel; Furrer, Hansjakob; Siegrist, Hans H; Fehr, Jan; Dolina, Marisa; Calmy, Alexandra; Stucki, David; Jaton, Katia; Janssens, Jean-Paul; Stalder, Jesica Mazza; Bodmer, Thomas; Ninet, Beatrice; Böttger, Erik C; Egger, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    Immigrants from high-burden countries and HIV-coinfected individuals are risk groups for tuberculosis (TB) in countries with low TB incidence. Therefore, we studied their role in transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Switzerland. We included all TB patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort and a sample of patients from the national TB registry. We identified molecular clusters by spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analysis and used weighted logistic regression adjusted for age and sex to identify risk factors for clustering, taking sampling proportions into account. In total, we analyzed 520 TB cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2008; 401 were foreign born, and 113 were HIV coinfected. The Euro-American M. tuberculosis lineage dominated throughout the study period (378 strains; 72.7%), with no evidence for another lineage, such as the Beijing genotype, emerging. We identified 35 molecular clusters with 90 patients, indicating recent transmission; 31 clusters involved foreign-born patients, and 15 involved HIV-infected patients. Birth origin was not associated with clustering (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73 to 3.43; P = 0.25, comparing Swiss-born with foreign-born patients), but clustering was reduced in HIV-infected patients (aOR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.93; P = 0.030). Cavitary disease, male sex, and younger age were all associated with molecular clustering. In conclusion, most TB patients in Switzerland were foreign born, but transmission of M. tuberculosis was not more common among immigrants and was reduced in HIV-infected patients followed up in the national HIV cohort study. Continued access to health services and clinical follow-up will be essential to control TB in this population.

  6. Genomic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains in Cantabria (Spain), a Moderate TB Incidence Setting

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Molino Bernal, Inmaculada C.; Lillebaek, Troels; Pedersen, Mathias K.; Martinez-Martinez, Luis; Folkvardsen, Dorte B.; Agüero, Jesús; Rasmussen, E. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) control strategies are focused mainly on prevention, early diagnosis, compliance to treatment and contact tracing. The objectives of this study were to explore the frequency and risk factors of recent transmission of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in Cantabria in Northern Spain from 2012 through 2013 and to analyze their clonal complexity for better understanding of the transmission dynamics in a moderate TB incidence setting. Methods DNA from 85 out of 87 isolates from bacteriologically confirmed cases of MTBC infection were extracted directly from frozen stocks and genotyped using the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) method. The MIRU-VNTRplus database tool was used to identify clusters and lineages and to build a neighbor joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree. In addition, data were compared to the SITVIT2 database at the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results The rate of recent transmission was calculated to 24%. Clustering was associated with being Spanish-born. A high prevalence of isolates of the Euro-American lineage was found. In addition, MIRU-VNTR profiles of the studied isolates corresponded to previously found MIRU-VNTR types in other countries, including Spain, Belgium, Great Britain, USA, Croatia, South Africa and The Netherlands. Six of the strains analyzed represented clonal variants. Conclusion Transmission of MTBC is well controlled in Cantabria. The majority of TB patients were born in Spain. The population structure of MTBC in Cantabria has a low diversity of major clonal lineages with the Euro-American lineage predominating. PMID:27315243

  7. Genetic Diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Family Based on SNP and VNTR Typing Profiles in Asian Countries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yih-Yuan; Chang, Jia-Ru; Huang, Wei-Feng; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Su, Ih-Jen; Sun, Jun-Ren; Chiueh, Tzong-Shi; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Chen, Yao-Shen; Dou, Horng-Yunn

    2012-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) Beijing strain is highly virulent, drug resistant, and endemic over Asia. To explore the genetic diversity of this family in several different regions of eastern Asia, 338 Beijing strains collected in Taiwan (Republic of China) were analyzed by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing and compared with published MIRU-VNTR profiles and by the Hunter-Gaston diversity index (HGDI) of Beijing strains from Japan and South Korea. The results revealed that VNTR2163b (HGDI>0.6) and five other loci (VNTR424, VNTR4052, VNTR1955, VNTR4156 and VNTR 2996; HGDI>0.3) could be used to discriminate the Beijing strains in a given geographic region. Analysis based on the number of VNTR repeats showed three VNTRs (VNTR424, 3192, and 1955) to be phylogenetically informative loci. In addition, to determine the geographic variation of sequence types in MTB populations, we also compared sequence type (ST) data of our strains with published ST profiles of Beijing strains from Japan and Thailand. ST10, ST22, and ST19 were found to be prevalent in Taiwan (82%) and Thailand (92%). Furthermore, classification of Beijing sublineages as ancient or modern in Taiwan was found to depend on the repeat number of VNTR424. Finally, phylogenetic relationships of MTB isolates in Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan were revealed by a minimum spanning tree based on MIRU-VNTR genotyping. In this topology, the MIRU-VNTR genotypes of the respective clusters were tightly correlated to other genotypic characters. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that clonal evolution of these MTB lineages has occurred. PMID:22808061

  8. Genetic structure of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis population in cattle herds in Quebec as revealed by using a combination of multilocus genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Sohal, Jagdip Singh; Arsenault, Julie; Labrecque, Olivia; Fairbrother, Julie-Hélène; Roy, Jean-Philippe; Fecteau, Gilles; L'Homme, Yvan

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the etiological agent of paratuberculosis, a granulomatous enteritis affecting a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants worldwide. A variety of molecular typing tools are used to distinguish M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains, contributing to a better understanding of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis epidemiology. In the present study, PCR-based typing methods, including mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units/variable-number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and small sequence repeats (SSR) in addition to IS1311 PCR-restriction enzyme analysis (PCR-REA), were used to investigate the genetic heterogeneity of 200 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains from dairy herds located in the province of Quebec, Canada. The majority of strains were of the "cattle type," or type II, although 3 strains were of the "bison type." A total of 38 genotypes, including a novel one, were identified using a combination of 17 genetic markers, which generated a Simpson's index of genetic diversity of 0.876. Additional analyses revealed no differences in genetic diversity between environmental and individual strains. Of note, a spatial and spatiotemporal cluster was evidenced regarding the distribution of one of the most common genotypes. The population had an overall homogeneous genetic structure, although a few strains stemmed out of the consensus cluster, including the bison-type strains. The genetic structure of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis populations within most herds suggested intraherd dissemination and microevolution, although evidence of interherd contamination was also revealed. The level of genetic diversity obtained by combining MIRU-VNTR and SSR markers shows a promising avenue for molecular epidemiology investigations of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis transmission patterns.

  9. Population Structure among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Realpe, Teresa; Correa, Nidia; Rozo, Juan Carlos; Ferro, Beatriz Elena; Gomez, Verónica; Zapata, Elsa; Ribon, Wellman; Puerto, Gloria; Castro, Claudia; Nieto, Luisa María; Diaz, Maria Lilia; Rivera, Oriana; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Arbelaez, Maria Patricia; Robledo, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Background Phylogeographic composition of M. tuberculosis populations reveals associations between lineages and human populations that might have implications for the development of strategies to control the disease. In Latin America, lineage 4 or the Euro-American, is predominant with considerable variations among and within countries. In Colombia, although few studies from specific localities have revealed differences in M. tuberculosis populations, there are still areas of the country where this information is lacking, as is a comparison of Colombian isolates with those from the rest of the world. Principal Findings A total of 414 M. tuberculosis isolates from adult pulmonary tuberculosis cases from three Colombian states were studied. Isolates were genotyped using IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), spoligotyping, and 24-locus Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs). SIT42 (LAM9) and SIT62 (H1) represented 53.3% of isolates, followed by 8.21% SIT50 (H3), 5.07% SIT53 (T1), and 3.14% SIT727 (H1). Composite spoligotyping and 24-locus MIRU- VNTR minimum spanning tree analysis suggest a recent expansion of SIT42 and SIT62 evolved originally from SIT53 (T1). The proportion of Haarlem sublineage (44.3%) was significantly higher than that in neighboring countries. Associations were found between M. tuberculosis MDR and SIT45 (H1), as well as HIV-positive serology with SIT727 (H1) and SIT53 (T1). Conclusions This study showed the population structure of M. tuberculosis in several regions from Colombia with a dominance of the LAM and Haarlem sublineages, particularly in two major urban settings (Medellín and Cali). Dominant spoligotypes were LAM9 (SIT 42) and Haarlem (SIT62). The proportion of the Haarlem sublineage was higher in Colombia compared to that in neighboring countries, suggesting particular conditions of co-evolution with the corresponding human population that favor the success of this

  10. Genetic Lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Riyahi Zaniani, Fatemeh; Moghim, Sharareh; Mirhendi, Hossein; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Fazeli, Hossein; Salehi, Mahshid; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to identify the genetic lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Isfahan via the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable number tandem repeat typing method based on 15 loci. Forty-nine M. tuberculosis isolates were collected between 2013 and 2015 from Tuberculosis patients in Mollahadi Sabzevari Tuberculosis Center in Isfahan. All isolates were typed by 15-locus MIRU-VNTR typing. The highest percentage of isolates, 44.89 % (22/49), belonged to the Euro-American lineage, while the frequencies of the East-African-Indian, East-Asian, and Indo-Oceanic lineages were 28.57 % (14/49), 24.4 % (12/49), and 2.04 % (1/49), respectively. Among the 22 isolates of the Euro-American lineage, those belonging to the NEW-1 sub-lineage were most prevalent (24.4 %). Approximately, the same proportion of isolates belonging to the Delhi/CAS, Beijing, and NEW-1 sub-lineages were identified in Iranian and Afghan immigrant patients. The Delhi/CAS and Beijing sub-lineage isolates were prevalent among patients who had been previously treated for TB. Results showed that all of the 49 MIRU-VNTR patterns were unique and the clustering rate of the 15-locus MIRU-VNTR was 0.0 (minimum recent transmission). The results of this study show that the lineages of M. tuberculosis isolates in Isfahan are similar to those reported in the Eastern Mediterranean region (indicative of the epidemiological relationship between the countries in the region). The low clustering rate in our results reveals that transmission of tuberculosis in Isfahan is, in most cases, a reactivation of previous tuberculosis infection and the role of recently transmitted disease is minor.

  11. Synchronous Comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Epidemiology Strains by "MIRU-VNTR" and "MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping" Technique.

    PubMed

    Jafarian, Mehdi; Aghali-Merza, Muayed; Farnia, Parissa; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2010-07-01

    Molecular epidemiology analyses are frequently used in determining epidemiology of tuberculosis. Recently, Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit Variable Number Tandem Repeat (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping has become an important method, as it allows high-through put, discriminatory and reproducible analysis of clinical isolate. The purpose of this study is to compare techniques of "MIRU-VNTR" versus "MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping" together for study of genetic pattern of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) strains. Sixty M. tuberculosis (MTB) isolates were selected (30 susceptible, 30 multi-drug resistant) for this study. Thereafter, the "MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping" were performed to identify their genetic patterns. The frequency of unknown genetic pattern of MTB was compared using technique of "MIRU-VNTR" alone versus "MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping" together. The MIRU-VNTR allelic diversity at each of the loci was calculated by Hunter - Gaston Discriminatory Index (HGDI). Based on differentiation index of all strains 10, 16, 26, 31 and 40 loci were identified as the most distinctive (HGI ≥0.6) and 2, 4, 20 and 24 as the weakest distinctive locus (HGI ≤0.3). By using MIRU-VNTR technique 38% (n = 23) of isolates could not be typed, whereas by applying "MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping" together only 15% (n = 9) of isolates remained unknown (p = 0.004). For sensitive strains, the difference was significant (67% vs. 90%, p = 0.028), but only marginally significant for drug resistant strains (57% vs. 80%, p = 0.052). The discrimination power of 12-locus MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping was equal to that of MIRU-VNTR analysis. If appropriate loci are added to the standard MIRU analysis, MIRU-VNTR genotyping could be a valuable tool for strain typing and epidemiological research of M. tuberculosis. With this approach a more clear understanding about genetic pattern of MTB can be achieved.

  12. Identification and Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolated From Water and Soil Samples of a Metropolitan City

    PubMed Central

    Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Malekshahian, Donya; Farahbod, Amir Masoud; Seif, Shima; Rahideh, Snaz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potential role of environmental Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the epidemiology of TB remains unknown. We investigated the transmission of M tuberculosis from humans to the environment and the possible transmission of M tuberculosis from the environment to humans. METHODS: A total of 1,500 samples were collected from three counties of the Tehran, Iran metropolitan area from February 2012 to January 2014. A total of 700 water samples (47%) and 800 soil samples (53%) were collected. Spoligotyping and the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats typing method were performed on DNA extracted from single colonies. Genotypes of M tuberculosis strains isolated from the environment were compared with the genotypes obtained from 55 patients with confirmed pulmonary TB diagnosed during the study period in the same three counties. RESULTS: M tuberculosis was isolated from 11 of 800 soil samples (1%) and 71 of 700 water samples (10%). T family (56 of 82, 68%) followed by Delhi/CAS (11 of 82, 13.4%) were the most frequent M tuberculosis superfamilies in both water and soil samples. Overall, 27.7% of isolates in clusters were related. No related typing patterns were detected between soil, water, and clinical isolates. The most frequent superfamily of M tuberculosis in clinical isolates was Delhi/CAS (142, 30.3%) followed by NEW-1 (127, 27%). The bacilli in contaminated soil (36%) and damp water (8.4%) remained reculturable in some samples up to 9 months. CONCLUSIONS: Although the dominant M tuberculosis superfamilies in soil and water did not correspond to the dominant M tuberculosis family in patients, the presence of circulating genotypes of M tuberculosis in soil and water highlight the risk of transmission. PMID:25340935

  13. Avian mycobacteriosis in free-living raptors in Majorca Island, Spain.

    PubMed

    Millán, Javier; Negre, Nieves; Castellanos, Elena; de Juan, Lucía; Mateos, Ana; Parpal, Lluis; Aranaz, Alicia

    2010-02-01

    Avian mycobacteriosis is a chronic, infectious disease caused by different species of mycobacteria, usually belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex. From 2004 to 2007, 589 raptors brought dead or sick to a wildlife rehabilitation centre in Majorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) were necropsied. The birds belonged to 12 different species, chiefly common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) (n=297), scops owl (Otus scops) (n=109), barn owl (Tyto alba) (n=75), long-eared owl (Asio otus) (n=58), peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) (n=27), and booted eagle (Hieraaetus pennatus) (n=13). Gross lesions compatible with mycobacteriosis were observed in 14 birds (2.4%) found in several locations in Majorca. They were 12 kestrels (prevalence in this species, 4.0%), one long-eared owl (1.7%) and one scops owl (0.9%), all the birds presenting white-yellowish nodules from pinpoint size to 1 cm in diameter in diverse organs, mainly in the liver, spleen and intestine. Affected organs were subjected to bacteriology and molecular identification by polymerase chain reaction and, in all cases, infection with M. avium subspecies avium was confirmed. The observed prevalences are similar to those previously observed in Holland, although the actual prevalence detected in this study is likely to be higher than reported because only birds with gross lesions were subjected to culture. Further molecular characterization with a set of six mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat loci was used to sub-type the isolates in order to show the existence of possible epidemiological links. Six different genotypes were found, which points to infection from multiple foci. No temporal or geographical aggregation of the cases was observed to be associated with the presence of positive birds or with the different variable number tandem repeat allelic profiles. The most feasible origin might be water or food sources, although the reservoir of mycobacteria remains unknown.

  14. Tuberculosis drug-resistance in Lisbon, Portugal: a 6-year overview.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, J; Macedo, R; Silva, C; Pinto, C; Furtado, C; Brum, L; Portugal, I

    2011-09-01

    Multidrug-resistance and extensive drug-resistance pose a serious threat to tuberculosis management in Portugal. The country has high TB incidence rates in comparison with other European Union countries, with the Lisbon Health Region being one of the most affected. In the present study we have analysed a convenience sample of 3025 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates, recovered over a 6-year period (2001-2006) in the Lisbon Health Region, regarding drug-resistance both to first-line and second-line drugs. Moreover, 100 of these isolates were also genotyped by 12-loci Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit - Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (MIRU-VNTR) analysis. We have compared each year and observed the existence of 22 different resistance profiles, with MDR-TB rates ranging between 9.9% and 15.2% and XDR-TB rates, relative to the number of MDR-TB isolates, between 44.3% and 66.1% (excluding 1 year here considered as an outlier). A steady increase in the fraction of MDR-TB isolates resistant to all first-line drugs was also noticed. The genotyping analysis of MDR-TB isolates revealed six clusters, of which three (Lisboa3, Lisboa4 and Q1) were related to XDR-TB. Our results show that active transmission of MDR- and XDR-TB is taking place and that the high prevalence of observed XDR-TB is due to the continued transmission of particular genetic clusters. Enforcement of the implementation of genotyping in diagnostic routines would lead to early detection of resistant cases.

  15. Acquisition of second-line drug resistance and extensive drug resistance during recent transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rural China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Mathema, B; Zhao, Q; Chen, L; Lu, W; Wang, W; Kreiswirth, B; Xu, B

    2015-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is prevalent in countries with a high TB burden, like China. As little is known about the emergence and spread of second-line drug (SLD) -resistant TB, we investigate the emergence and transmission of SLD-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rural China. In a multi-centre population-based study, we described the bacterial population structure and the transmission characteristics of SLD-resistant TB using Spoligotyping in combination with genotyping based on 24-locus MIRU-VNTR (mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat) plus four highly variable loci for the Beijing family, in four rural Chinese regions with diverse geographic and socio-demographic characteristics. Transmission networks among genotypically clustered patients were constructed using social network analysis. Of 1332 M. tuberculosis patient isolates recovered, the Beijing family represented 74.8% of all isolates and an association with MDR and simultaneous resistance between first-line drugs and SLDs. The genotyping analysis revealed that 189 isolates shared MIRU-VNTR patterns in 78 clusters with clustering rate and recent transmission rate of 14.2% and 8.3%, respectively. Fifty-three SLD-resistant isolates were observed in 31 clusters, 30 of which contained the strains with different drug susceptibility profiles and genetic mutations. In conjunction with molecular data, socio-network analysis indicated a key role of Central Township in the transmission across a highly interconnected network where SLD resistance accumulation occurred during transmission. SLD-resistant M. tuberculosis has been spreading in rural China with Beijing family being the dominant strains. Primary transmission of SLD-resistant strains in the population highlights the importance of routine drug susceptibility testing and effective anti-tuberculosis regimens for drug-resistant TB.

  16. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium bovis Strains Isolated in Italy from 2000 to 2006 and Evaluation of Variable-Number Tandem Repeats for Geographically Optimized Genotyping▿

    PubMed Central

    Boniotti, M. Beatrice; Goria, Maria; Loda, Daniela; Garrone, Annalisa; Benedetto, Alessandro; Mondo, Alessandra; Tisato, Ernesto; Zanoni, Mariagrazia; Zoppi, Simona; Dondo, Alessandro; Tagliabue, Silvia; Bonora, Stefano; Zanardi, Giorgio; Pacciarini, M. Lodovica

    2009-01-01

    Spoligotyping and exact tandem repeat (ETR) analysis of Mycobacterium bovis and M. caprae isolated strains has been routinely carried out in Italy since 2000 to obtain a database of genetic profiles and support traditional epidemiological investigations. In this study, we characterized 1,503 M. bovis and 57 M. caprae isolates obtained from 2000 to 2006 in 747 cattle herds mainly located in northern Italy. We identified 81 spoligotypes and 113 ETR profiles, while the combination of spoligotyping/ETR analysis differentiated 228 genotypes, with genotypic diversity indices of 0.70 (spoligotyping), 0.94 (ETR-A to -E typing), and 0.97 (spoligotyping/ETR-A to -E typing), respectively. Despite the high degree of resolution obtained, the spoligotyping/ETR methods were not discriminative enough in the case of genotypes characterized by the combination of SB0120, the predominant spoligotype in Italy, with the most common ETR profiles. To obtain a more informative subset of typing loci, 24 mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) markers were evaluated by analyzing a panel of 100 epidemiologically unrelated SB0120 isolates. The panel was differentiated into 89 profiles with an overall genotypic diversity of 0.987 that could be also achieved by using a minimal group of 13 loci: ETR-A, -B, and -E; MIRU 26 and 40; and VNTR 2163a, 2163b, 3155, 1612, 4052, 1895, 3232, and 3336. The allelic diversity index and the stability of single loci was evaluated to provide the most discriminative genotyping method for locally prevalent strains. PMID:19144792

  17. Protocol for a population-based molecular epidemiology study of tuberculosis transmission in a high HIV-burden setting: the Botswana Kopanyo study

    PubMed Central

    Zetola, N M; Modongo, C; Moonan, P K; Click, E; Oeltmann, J E; Shepherd, J; Finlay, A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is transmitted from person to person via airborne droplet nuclei. At the community level, Mtb transmission depends on the exposure venue, infectiousness of the tuberculosis (TB) index case and the susceptibility of the index case's social network. People living with HIV infection are at high risk of TB, yet the factors associated with TB transmission within communities with high rates of TB and HIV are largely undocumented. The primary aim of the Kopanyo study is to better understand the demographic, clinical, social and geospatial factors associated with TB and multidrug-resistant TB transmission in 2 communities in Botswana, a country where 60% of all patients with TB are also infected with HIV. This manuscript describes the methods used in the Kopanyo study. Methods and analysis The study will be conducted in greater Gaborone, which has high rates of HIV and a mobile population; and in Ghanzi, a rural community with lower prevalence of HIV infection and home to the native San population. Kopanyo aims to enrol all persons diagnosed with TB during a 4-year study period. From each participant, sputum will be cultured, and for all Mtb isolates, molecular genotyping (24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats) will be performed. Patients with matching genotype results will be considered members of a genotype cluster, a proxy for recent transmission. Demographic, behavioural, clinical and social information will be collected by interview. Participant residence, work place, healthcare facilities visited and social gathering venues will be geocoded. We will assess relationships between these factors and cluster involvement to better plan interventions for reducing TB transmission. Ethics Ethical approval from the Independent Review Boards at the University of Pennsylvania, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Botswana Ministry of Health and University of Botswana has been

  18. A close-up on the epidemiology and transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Poland.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, T; Brzostek, A; van Belkum, A; Dziadek, J; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, E; Zwolska, Z

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) poses a serious challenge to the global control of the disease. The purpose of this study was to characterize MDR-TB patients from Poland and to determine the extent of MDR-TB disease attributable to recent transmission. The study included all 46 patients diagnosed with MDR-TB in Poland in 2004 and followed up for 6 years (until 2011). For each patient, sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and bacteriological data were collected by the review of medical and laboratory records. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from all patients were characterized using spoligotyping, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing, IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and sequencing analysis of drug resistance-associated loci (katG, mabA-inhA, rpoβ, rpsL, and embB). The majority of patients were male (86.9%), 40-64 years of age (60.8%), with a history of TB treatment (84.8%), and producing smear-positive sputa (86.9%). Twenty-two (47.8%) patients suffered from concomitant diseases and 28 (60.8%) were alcohol abusers. Treatment outcome assessment revealed that 8 (17.4%) patients were cured or completed therapy, while 15 (32.6%) died of TB, 11 (23.9%) defaulted, 8 (17.4%) failed, and 1 (2.2%) was transferred and lost to follow-up. Upon genotyping, 10 (21.7%) isolates were allocated in four clusters. These were further subdivided by mutational profiling. Overall, in 6 (13%) patients, MDR-TB was a result of recent transmission. For 4 (8.7%) of these patients, a direct epidemiological link was established. The study shows that the transmission of MDR-TB occurs at a low rate in Poland. Of urgent need is the implementation of a policy of enforced treatment of MDR-TB patients in Poland.

  19. Molecular characterization and second-line antituberculosis drug resistance patterns of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the northern region of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Said, Halima M; Kock, Marleen M; Ismail, Nazir A; Mphahlele, Matsie; Baba, Kamaldeen; Omar, Shaheed V; Osman, Ayman G; Hoosen, Anwar A; Ehlers, Marthie M

    2012-09-01

    Despite South Africa being one of the high-burden multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) countries, information regarding the population structure of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains is limited from many regions of South Africa. This study investigated the population structure and transmission patterns of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates in a high-burden setting of South Africa as well as the possible association of genotypes with drug resistance and demographic characteristics. A total of 336 consecutive MDR-TB isolates from four provinces of South Africa were genotyped using spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Drug susceptibility testing for ofloxacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin was performed using the agar proportion method. The results showed that 4.8% of MDR-TB isolates were resistant to ofloxacin, 2.7% were resistant to kanamycin, and 4.5% were resistant to capreomycin, while 7.1% were extensively drug resistant (XDR), and the remaining 83.6% were susceptible to all of the second-line drugs tested. Spoligotyping grouped 90.8% of the isolates into 25 clusters, while 9.2% isolates were unclustered. Ninety-one percent of the 336 isolates were assigned to 21 previously described shared types, with the Beijing family being the predominant genotype in the North-West and Limpopo Provinces, while the EAI1_SOM family was the predominant genotype in the Gauteng and Mpumalanga Provinces. No association was found between genotypes and specific drug resistance patterns or demographic information. The high level of diversity and the geographical distribution of the drug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates in this study suggest that the transmission of TB in the study settings is not caused by the clonal spread of a specific M. tuberculosis strain.

  20. Unusual horizontal transfer of a long interspersed nuclear element between distant vertebrate classes

    PubMed Central

    Kordis, Dusan; Gubensek, Franc

    1998-01-01

    We have shown previously by Southern blot analysis that Bov-B long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) are present in different Viperidae snake species. To address the question as to whether Bov-B LINEs really have been transmitted horizontally between vertebrate classes, the analysis has been extended to a larger number of vertebrate, invertebrate, and plant species. In this paper, the evolutionary origin of Bov-B LINEs is shown unequivocally to be in Squamata. The previously proposed horizontal transfer of Bov-B LINEs in vertebrates has been confirmed by their discontinuous phylogenetic distribution in Squamata (Serpentes and two lizard infra-orders) as well as in Ruminantia, by the high level of nucleotide identity, and by their phylogenetic relationships. The horizontal transfer of Bov-B LINEs from Squamata to the ancestor of Ruminantia is evident from the genetic distances and discontinuous phylogenetic distribution. The ancestor of Colubroidea snakes is a possible donor of Bov-B LINEs to Ruminantia. The timing of horizontal transfer has been estimated from the distribution of Bov-B LINEs in Ruminantia and the fossil data of Ruminantia to be 40–50 My ago. The phylogenetic relationships of Bov-B LINEs from the various Squamata species agrees with that of the species phylogeny, suggesting that Bov-B LINEs have been maintained stably by vertical transmission since the origin of Squamata in the Mesozoic era. PMID:9724768

  1. Tracking the past: interspersed repeats in an extinct Afrotherian mammal, Mammuthus primigenius.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fangqing; Qi, Ji; Schuster, Stephan C

    2009-08-01

    The woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) died out about several thousand years ago, yet recent paleogenomic studies have successfully recovered genetic information from both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of this extinct species. Mammoths belong to Afrotheria, a group of mammals exhibiting extreme morphological diversity and large genome sizes. In this study, we found that the mammoth genome contains a larger proportion of interspersed repeats than any other mammalian genome reported so far, in which the proliferation of the RTE family of retrotransposons (covering 12% of the genome) may be the main reason for an increased genome size. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RTEs in mammoth are closely related to the family BovB/RTE. The incongruence of the reconstructed RTE phylogeny indicates that RTEs in mammoth may be acquired through an ancient lateral gene transfer event. A recent proliferation of SINEs was also found in the probocidean lineage, whereas the Afrotherian-wide SINEs in mammoth have undergone a rather flat and stepwise expansion. Comparisons of the transposable elements (TEs) between mammoth and other mammals may shed light on the evolutionary history of TEs in various mammalian lineages.

  2. Whole-genome expression analysis of mammalian-wide interspersed repeat elements in human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Carnevali, Davide; Conti, Anastasia; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract With more than 500,000 copies, mammalian-wide interspersed repeats (MIRs), a sub-group of SINEs, represent ∼2.5% of the human genome and one of the most numerous family of potential targets for the RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcription machinery. Since MIR elements ceased to amplify ∼130 myr ago, previous studies primarily focused on their genomic impact, while the issue of their expression has not been extensively addressed. We applied a dedicated bioinformatic pipeline to ENCODE RNA-Seq datasets of seven human cell lines and, for the first time, we were able to define the Pol III-driven MIR transcriptome at single-locus resolution. While the majority of Pol III-transcribed MIR elements are cell-specific, we discovered a small set of ubiquitously transcribed MIRs mapping within Pol II-transcribed genes in antisense orientation that could influence the expression of the overlapping gene. We also identified novel Pol III-transcribed ncRNAs, deriving from transcription of annotated MIR fragments flanked by unique MIR-unrelated sequences, and confirmed the role of Pol III-specific internal promoter elements in MIR transcription. Besides demonstrating widespread transcription at these retrotranspositionally inactive elements in human cells, the ability to profile MIR expression at single-locus resolution will facilitate their study in different cell types and states including pathological alterations. PMID:28028040

  3. Gene conversion as a secondary mechanism of short interspersed element (SINE) evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, D.H.; Batzer, M.A.; Deininger, P.L. |

    1995-01-01

    The Alu repetitive family of short interspersed elements (SINEs) in primates can be subdivided into distinct subfamilies by specific diagnostic nucleotide changes. The older subfamilies are generally very abundant, while the younger subfamilies have fewer copies. Some of the youngest Alu elements are absent in the orthologous loci of nonhuman primates, indicative of recent retroposition events, the primary mode of SINE evolutions. PCR analysis of one young Alu subfamily (Sb2) member found in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene apparently revealed the presence of this element in the green monkey, orangutan, gorilla, and chimpanzee genomes, as well as the human genome. However, sequence analysis of these genomes revealed a highly mutated, older, primate-specific Alu element was present at this position in the nonhuman primates. Comparison of the flanking DNA sequences upstream of this Alu insertion corresponded to evolution expected for standard primate phylogeny, but comparison of the Alu repeat sequences revealed that the human element departed from this phylogeny. The change in the human sequence apparently occurred by a gene conversion event only within the Alu element itself, converting it from one of the oldest to one of the youngest Alu subfamilies. Although gene conversions of Alu elements are clearly very rare, this finding shows that such events can occur and contribute to specific cases of SINE subfamily evolution.

  4. Retrotransposon long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is activated during salamander limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Kuo, Dwight; Nathanson, Jason; Satoh, Akira; Pao, Gerald M; Yeo, Gene W; Bryant, Susan V; Voss, S Randal; Gardiner, David M; Hunter, Tony

    2012-09-01

    Salamanders possess an extraordinary capacity for tissue and organ regeneration when compared to mammals. In our effort to characterize the unique transcriptional fingerprint emerging during the early phase of salamander limb regeneration, we identified transcriptional activation of some germline-specific genes within the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells into a germline-like state. In this work, we focus on one of these genes, the long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon, which is usually active in germ cells and silent in most of the somatic tissues in other organisms. LINE-1 was found to be dramatically upregulated during regeneration. In addition, higher genomic LINE-1 content was also detected in the limb regenerate when compared to that before amputation indicating that LINE-1 retrotransposition is indeed active during regeneration. Active LINE-1 retrotransposition has been suggested to have a potentially deleterious impact on genomic integrity. Silencing of activated LINE-1 by small RNAs has been reported to be part of the machinery aiming to maintain genomic integrity. Indeed, we were able to identify putative LINE-1-related piRNAs in the limb blastema. Transposable element-related piRNAs have been identified frequently in the germline in other organisms. Thus, we present here a scenario in which a unique germline-like state is established during axolotl limb regeneration, and the re-activation of LINE-1 may serve as a marker for cellular dedifferentiation in the early-stage of limb regeneration.

  5. Ionising irradiation alters the dynamics of human long interspersed nuclear elements 1 (LINE1) retrotransposon.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Nakatani, Youko; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Shimizu, Nobuaki; Wada, Seiichi; Funayama, Tomoo; Mori, Takahisa; Islam, Salequl; Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Shinagawa, Masahiko; Ohtsuki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2012-09-01

    It is important to identify the mechanism by which ionising irradiation induces various genomic alterations in the progeny of surviving cells. Ionising irradiation activates mobile elements like retrotransposons, although the mechanism of its phenomena consisting of transcriptions and insertions of the products into new sites of the genome remains unclear. In this study, we analysed the effects of sparsely ionising X-rays and densely ionising carbon-ion beams on the activities of a family of active retrotransposons, long interspersed nuclear elements 1 (L1). We used the L1/reporter knock-in human glioma cell line, NP-2/L1RP-enhanced GFP (EGFP), that harbours full-length L1 tagged with EGFP retrotransposition detection cassette (L1RP-EGFP) in the chromosomal DNA. X-rays and carbon-ion beams similarly increased frequencies the transcription from L1RP-EGFP and its retrotransposition. Short-sized de novo L1RP-EGFP insertions with 5'-truncation were induced by X-rays, while full-length or long-sized insertions (>5 kb, containing ORF1 and ORF2) were found only in cell clones irradiated by the carbon-ion beams. These data suggest that X-rays and carbon-ion beams induce different length of de novo L1 insertions, respectively. Our findings thus highlight the necessity to investigate the mechanisms of mutations caused by transposable elements by ionising irradiation.

  6. Similarities between long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) reverse transcriptase and telomerase.

    PubMed

    Kopera, Huira C; Moldovan, John B; Morrish, Tammy A; Garcia-Perez, Jose Luis; Moran, John V

    2011-12-20

    Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposons encode two proteins (ORF1p and ORF2p) that contain activities required for conventional retrotransposition by a mechanism termed target-site primed reverse transcription. Previous experiments in XRCC4 or DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit-deficient CHO cell lines, which are defective for the nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair pathway, revealed an alternative endonuclease-independent (ENi) pathway for L1 retrotransposition. Interestingly, some ENi retrotransposition events in DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit-deficient cells are targeted to dysfunctional telomeres. Here we used an in vitro assay to detect L1 reverse transcriptase activity to demonstrate that wild-type or endonuclease-defective L1 ribonucleoprotein particles can use oligonucleotide adapters that mimic telomeric ends as primers to initiate the reverse transcription of L1 mRNA. Importantly, these ribonucleoprotein particles also contain a nuclease activity that can process the oligonucleotide adapters before the initiation of reverse transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that ORF1p is not strictly required for ENi retrotransposition at dysfunctional telomeres. Thus, these data further highlight similarities between the mechanism of ENi L1 retrotransposition and telomerase.

  7. Ultraviolet-induced transformation of keratinocytes: possible involvement of long interspersed element-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Gautam; Gupta, Nishma; Tiwari, Jyoti; Raman, Govindarajan

    2005-02-01

    The normal human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, was transformed using multiple doses of ultraviolet (UV)A+B (UVA, 150-200 mJ/cm(2) and UVB, 15-20 mJ/cm(2) x 6). Malignant transformation was confirmed by upregulation of Cyclin D1 (mRNA) and formation of colonies on soft agar. To identify the genes involved in this transformation process, we have done rapid amplification of polymorphic DNA using RNA from unexposed and multiple-exposed cells. Six percent PAGE showed several differentially regulated genes in exposed cells compared with unexposed cells. Total 19 genes were identified, cloned and sequenced. Three of these 19 cloned genes showed 99% homology at both DNA and protein levels to a stretch of 540 bp (180 aa) of long interspersed element (LINE)-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) open reading frame (ORF-2). Colonies from soft agar showed upregulation of this gene compared with non-colonized (lawn on soft agar) cells as detected by RT-PCR. This data implicates LINE-1 RT (ORF-2) in UV-induced malignancy and can possibly be used as a marker for the diagnosis of UV-induced skin cancer.

  8. Monitoring Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 Expression During Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bodak, Maxime; Ciaudo, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements-1 (LINE-1 or L1) are a class of transposable elements which account for almost 19 % of the mouse genome. This represents around 600,000 L1 fragments, among which it is estimated that 3000 intact copies still remain capable to retrotranspose and to generate deleterious mutation by insertion into genomic coding region. In differentiated cells, full length L1 are transcriptionally repressed by DNA methylation. However at the blastocyst stage, L1 elements are subject to a demethylation wave and able to be expressed and to be inserted into new genomic locations. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (mESCs) are pluripotent stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts. Mouse ESCs can be maintained undifferentiated under controlled culture conditions or induced into the three primary germ layers, therefore they represent a suitable model to follow mechanisms involved in L1 repression during the process of differentiation of mESCs. This protocol presents how to maintain culture of undifferentiated mESCs, induce their differentiation, and monitor L1 expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. L1 transcriptional levels are assessed by real-time qRT-PCR performed on total RNA extracts using specific L1 primers and translation levels are measured by Western blot analysis of L1 protein ORF1 using a specific L1 antibody.

  9. Long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE-1): potential triggers of systemic autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Crow, Mary K

    2010-02-01

    Recent advances have identified immune complexes containing nucleic acids as stimuli for toll-like receptors and inducers of type I interferon (IFN). While a similar mechanism may serve to amplify immune system activation and production of inflammatory mediators in vivo in the context of systemic autoimmune diseases, the initial triggers of autoimmunity have not been defined. In this review, we describe a category of potential inducers of autoimmunity, the endogenous retroelements, with a particular focus on long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE-1, L1). Increased expression of L1 transcripts or decreased degradation of L1 DNA or RNA could provide potent stimuli for an innate immune response, priming of the immune system, and induction of autoimmunity and inflammation. Genomic and genetic variations among individuals, sex-related differences in L1 regulation, and environmental triggers are among the potential mechanisms that might account for increased L1 expression. Induction of type I IFN by L1-enriched nucleic acids through TLR-independent pathways could represent a first step in the complex series of events leading to systemic autoimmune disease.

  10. Biallelic JAK1 mutations in immunodeficient patient with mycobacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Eletto, Davide; Burns, Siobhan O.; Angulo, Ivan; Plagnol, Vincent; Gilmour, Kimberly C.; Henriquez, Frances; Curtis, James; Gaspar, Miguel; Nowak, Karolin; Daza-Cajigal, Vanessa; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Doffinger, Rainer; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Nejentsev, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the immune system cause primary immunodeficiencies. Here, we study a patient with recurrent atypical mycobacterial infection and early-onset metastatic bladder carcinoma. Exome sequencing identified two homozygous missense germline mutations, P733L and P832S, in the JAK1 protein that mediates signalling from multiple cytokine receptors. Cells from this patient exhibit reduced JAK1 and STAT phosphorylation following cytokine stimulations, reduced induction of expression of interferon-regulated genes and dysregulated cytokine production; which are indicative of signalling defects in multiple immune response pathways including Interferon-γ production. Reconstitution experiments in the JAK1-deficient cells demonstrate that the impaired JAK1 function is mainly attributable to the effect of the P733L mutation. Further analyses of the mutant protein reveal a phosphorylation-independent role of JAK1 in signal transduction. These findings clarify JAK1 signalling mechanisms and demonstrate a critical function of JAK1 in protection against mycobacterial infection and possibly the immunological surveillance of cancer. PMID:28008925

  11. A PCR technique based on the Hip1 interspersed repetitive sequence distinguishes cyanobacterial species and strains.

    PubMed

    Smith, J K; Parry, J D; Day, J G; Smith, R J

    1998-10-01

    The use of primers based on the Hip1 sequence as a typing technique for cyanobacteria has been investigated. The discovery of short repetitive sequence structures in bacterial DNA during the last decade has led to the development of PCR-based methods for typing, i.e., distinguishing and identifying, bacterial species and strains. An octameric palindromic sequence known as Hip1 has been shown to be present in the chromosomal DNA of many species of cyanobacteria as a highly repetitious interspersed sequence. PCR primers were constructed that extended the Hip1 sequence at the 3' end by two bases. Five of the 16 possible extended primers were tested. Each of the five primers produced a different set of products when used to prime PCR from cyanobacterial genomic DNA. Each primer produced a distinct set of products for each of the 15 cyanobacterial species tested. The ability of Hip1-based PCR to resolve taxonomic differences was assessed by analysis of independent isolates of Anabaena flos-aquae and Nostoc ellipsosporum obtained from the CCAP (Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa, IFE, Cumbria, UK). A PCR-based RFLP analysis of products amplified from the 23S-16S rDNA intergenic region was used to characterize the isolates and to compare with the Hip1 typing data. The RFLP and Hip1 typing yielded similar results and both techniques were able to distinguish different strains. On the basis of these results it is suggested that the Hip1 PCR technique may assist in distinguishing cyanobacterial species and strains.

  12. Retrotransposition of long interspersed element 1 induced by methamphetamine or cocaine.

    PubMed

    Okudaira, Noriyuki; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Nishio, Hajime

    2014-09-12

    Long interspersed element 1 (L1) is a retroelement constituting ∼17% of the human genome. A single human cell has 80-100 copies of L1 capable of retrotransposition (L1-RTP), ∼10% of which are "hot L1" copies, meaning they are primed for "jumping" within the genome. Recent studies demonstrated induction of L1 activity by drugs of abuse or low molecular weight compounds, but little is known about the underlying mechanism. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism and effects of methamphetamine (METH) and cocaine on L1-RTP. Our results revealed that METH and cocaine induced L1-RTP in neuronal cell lines. This effect was found to be reverse transcriptase-dependent. However, METH and cocaine did not induce double-strand breaks. RNA interference experiments combined with add-back of siRNA-resistant cDNAs revealed that the induction of L1-RTP by METH or cocaine depends on the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). METH or cocaine recruited the L1-encoded open reading frame 1 (ORF1) to chromatin in a CREB-dependent manner. These data suggest that the cellular cascades underlying METH- and cocaine-induced L1-RTP are different from those behind L1-RTP triggered by DNA damage; CREB is involved in drug-induced L1-RTP. L1-RTP caused by drugs of abuse is a novel type of genomic instability, and analysis of this phenomenon might be a novel approach to studying substance-use disorders.

  13. AGG interspersions within the FMR1 CGG repeat: Mechanisms and models of triplet repeat instability

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, E.E.; Nelson, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome CGG repeat alleles are typically classified as normal, premutation, or full mutation based on the length of the repeat in the 5{prime} UTR of the FMR1 gene. The distinction between high-end normals and low-end premutation alleles, however, is not always clear since repeats of similar size differ markedly in their intergenerational stability. This fact suggest that differences in sequence content may play a key role in determining an allele`s predisposition to instability. It has been postulated that the loss of AGG interruptions within the CGG tract may trigger this instability. To test this model, we have developed a simple indirect method to determine the presence or absence of internal AGGs within the FMR1 CGG repeat tract. Analysis of 84 human X chromosomes for the presence of interrupting AGG trinucleotides revealed that most alleles possess two interspersed AGGs at a periodicity of 9 or 10 CGGs. The longest tract of uninterrupted CGG repeats is usually found at the 3{prime} end indicating that variation in the length of the repeat is polar. Alleles containing between 34 and 55 repeats, with documented unstable transmissions, were shown to have lost one or both AGG interruptions when compared to stable alleles of similar length. These comparisons define an instability threshold between 34 and 38 uninterrupted CGG repeats. Analysis of premutation alleles in fragile X syndrome carriers reveals that 70% of these alleles contain a single AGG interruption. Population studies confirm that such highly punctuated FMR1 CGG repeats are virtually static in terms of length variation. These data suggest that the loss of an AGG is an important mutational event in the generation of unstable alleles predisposed to the fragile X syndrome. Loss of AGG trinucleotides and polarized variability support Okazaki fragment slippage as a model for CGG repeat instability and hyperexpansion.

  14. Identification and characterisation of Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements in the olive tree (Olea europaea L.) genome.

    PubMed

    Barghini, Elena; Mascagni, Flavia; Natali, Lucia; Giordani, Tommaso; Cavallini, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements (SINEs) are nonautonomous retrotransposons in the genome of most eukaryotic species. While SINEs have been intensively investigated in humans and other animal systems, SINE identification has been carried out only in a limited number of plant species. This lack of information is apparent especially in non-model plants whose genome has not been sequenced yet. The aim of this work was to produce a specific bioinformatics pipeline for analysing second generation sequence reads of a non-model species and identifying SINEs. We have identified, for the first time, 227 putative SINEs of the olive tree (Olea europaea), that constitute one of the few sets of such sequences in dicotyledonous species. The identified SINEs ranged from 140 to 362 bp in length and were characterised with regard to the occurrence of the tRNA domain in their sequence. The majority of identified elements resulted in single copy or very lowly repeated, often in association with genic sequences. Analysis of sequence similarity allowed us to identify two major groups of SINEs showing different abundances in the olive tree genome, the former with sequence similarity to SINEs of Scrophulariaceae and Solanaceae and the latter to SINEs of Salicaceae. A comparison of sequence conservation between olive SINEs and LTR retrotransposon families suggested that SINE expansion in the genome occurred especially in very ancient times, before LTR retrotransposon expansion, and presumably before the separation of the rosids (to which Oleaceae belong) from the Asterids. Besides providing data on olive SINEs, our results demonstrate the suitability of the pipeline employed for SINE identification. Applying this pipeline will favour further structural and functional analyses on these relatively unknown elements to be performed also in other plant species, even in the absence of a reference genome, and will allow establishing general evolutionary patterns for this kind of repeats in

  15. Reprogramming of the HepG2 genome by long interspersed nuclear element-1.

    PubMed

    Bojang, Pasano; Roberts, Ruth A; Anderton, Mark J; Ramos, Kenneth S

    2013-08-01

    Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) is an autonomous, mobile element within the human genome that transposes via a "copy and paste" mechanism and relies upon L1-encoded endonuclease and reverse transcriptase (RT) activities to compromise genome integrity. L1 has been implicated in various forms of cancer, but its role in the regulation of the oncogenic phenotype is not understood. The present studies were conducted to evaluate mechanisms of genetic regulatory control in HepG2 cells by human L1, or a D702Y mutant deficient in RT activity, and their influence on cellular phenotype. Forced expression of synthetic L1 ORF1p and ORF2p was associated with formation of cytoplasmic foci and minor association with the nuclear compartment. While de novo L1 mobilizations were only identified in cells expressing wild type L1, and were absent in the D702Y mutant, changes in gene expression profiles involved RT dependent as well as RT independent mechanisms. Synthetic L1 altered the expression of 24 in silico predicted genetic targets; ten of which showed RT-dependence, ten RT-independence, and four reciprocal regulatory control by both wild type and RT mutant. Of five targets examined, only VCAM1 and PTPRB colocalized with newly retrotransposed wild type L1. Biological discretization to partition patterns of gene expression into unique frequencies identified adhesion, inflammation, and cellular metabolism as key processes targeted for molecular interference with disruption of epithelial-to-mesenchymal programming seen irrespective of the RT phenotype. These findings establish L1 as a key regulator of genome plasticity and EMT via mechanisms independent of RT activity.

  16. Long interspersed nuclear element-1 hypomethylation and oxidative stress: correlation and bladder cancer diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Patchsung, Maturada; Boonla, Chanchai; Amnattrakul, Passakorn; Dissayabutra, Thasinas; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Tosukhowong, Piyaratana

    2012-01-01

    Although, increased oxidative stress and hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) associate with bladder cancer (BCa) development, the relationship between these alterations is unknown. We evaluated the oxidative stress and hypomethylation of the LINE-1 in 61 BCa patients and 45 normal individuals. To measure the methylation levels and to differentiate the LINE-1 loci into hypermethylated, partially methylated and hypomethylated, peripheral blood cells, urinary exfoliated cells and cancerous tissues were evaluated by combined bisulfite restriction analysis PCR. The urinary total antioxidant status (TAS) and plasma protein carbonyl content were determined. The LINE-1 methylation levels and patterns, especially hypomethylated loci, in the blood and urine cells of the BCa patients were different from the levels and patterns in the healthy controls. The urinary TAS was decreased, whereas the plasma protein carbonyl content was increased in the BCa patients relative to the controls. A positive correlation between the methylation of LINE-1 in the blood-derived DNA and urinary TAS was found in both the BCa and control groups. The urinary hypomethylated LINE-1 loci and the plasma protein carbonyl content provided the best diagnostic potential for BCa prediction. Based on post-diagnostic samples, the combination test improved the diagnostic power to a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 96%. In conclusion, decreased LINE-1 methylation is associated with increased oxidative stress both in healthy and BCa subjects across the various tissue types, implying a dose-response association. Increases in the LINE-1 hypomethylation levels and the number of hypomethylated loci in both the blood- and urine-derived cells and increase in the oxidative stress were found in the BCa patients. The combination test of the urinary hypomethylated LINE-1 loci and the plasma protein carbonyl content may be useful for BCa screening and monitoring of treatment.

  17. Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 hypomethylation in folate-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shaoyan; Wang, Li; Guan, Yunqian; Shangguan, Shaofang; Du, Qingan; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Folate is thought to contribute to health and development by methylation regulation. Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1), which is regulated by methylation modification, plays an important role in sculpting the structure and function of genomes. Some studies have shown that folate concentration is related to LINE-1 methylation. However, the direct association between LINE-1 methylation and folate deficiency remains unclear. To explore whether folate deficiency directly induced LINE-1 hypomethylation and to analyze the relationship between folate concentration and the LINE-1 methylation level, mouse ESCs were treated with various concentrations of folate which was measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay, and the homocysteine content was detected by ELISA. LINE-1 methylation was examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry at various time points. Concurrently, cell proliferation and differentiation were observed. The result showed that the intracellular folate decreases under folate-deficient condition, conversely, homocysteine content increased gradually and there was a negatively correlated between them. Folate insufficiency induced LINE-1 hypomethylation at the lowest levels in folate-free group and moderate in folate-deficient group, compared with that in the folate-normal group at day 18. Moreover, LINE-1 methylation level was positively correlated with folate content, and negatively correlated with homocysteine content. At corresponding time points, proliferation and differentiation of mouse ESCs showed no alteration in all groups. Our data indicated that folate deficiency affected the homeostasis of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism, leading to reduced LINE-1 methylation in mouse ESCs. This study provides preliminary evidence of folate deficiency affecting early embryonic development.

  18. Polycaprolactone nanofiber interspersed collagen type-I scaffold for bone regeneration: a unique injectable osteogenic scaffold.

    PubMed

    Baylan, Nuray; Bhat, Samerna; Ditto, Maggie; Lawrence, Joseph G; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2013-08-01

    There is an increasing demand for an injectable cell coupled three-dimensional (3D) scaffold to be used as bone fracture augmentation material. To address this demand, a novel injectable osteogenic scaffold called PN-COL was developed using cells, a natural polymer (collagen type-I), and a synthetic polymer (polycaprolactone (PCL)). The injectable nanofibrous PN-COL is created by interspersing PCL nanofibers within pre-osteoblast cell embedded collagen type-I. This simple yet novel and powerful approach provides a great benefit as an injectable bone scaffold over other non-living bone fracture stabilization polymers, such as polymethylmethacrylate and calcium content resin-based materials. The advantages of injectability and the biomimicry of collagen was coupled with the structural support of PCL nanofibers, to create cell encapsulated injectable 3D bone scaffolds with intricate porous internal architecture and high osteoconductivity. The effects of PCL nanofiber inclusion within the cell encapsulated collagen matrix has been evaluated for scaffold size retention and osteocompatibility, as well as for MC3T3-E1 cells osteogenic activity. The structural analysis of novel bioactive material proved that the material is chemically stable enough in an aqueous solution for an extended period of time without using crosslinking reagents, but it is also viscous enough to be injected through a syringe needle. Data from long-term in vitro proliferation and differentiation data suggests that novel PN-COL scaffolds promote the osteoblast proliferation, phenotype expression, and formation of mineralized matrix. This study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of creating a structurally competent, injectable, cell embedded bone tissue scaffold. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the advantages of mimicking the hierarchical architecture of native bone with nano- and micro-size formation through introducing PCL nanofibers within macron-size collagen fibers and in

  19. Expect the Unexpected: Mycobacterial Infection in Post Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mohan M; Wade, Roshan N; Bava, Surendar S

    2017-01-01

    Orthopaedic Surgeons rarely encounter mycobacterial infections in Post Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) patients. We present series of two cases to create awareness among clinicians to expect the unexpected. Tuberculosis typical/ atypical is a hidden culprit in catch clinical situations when chronic infection is Suspected, but the lab investigations are negative in persistently symptomatic patients. In such situations clinicians should suspect atypical or complex mycobacterial infections and evaluate the patients accordingly. Clinical suspicion, evaluation, isolation and treatment of atypical or complex mycobacterial infections with sensitive chemotherapy, leads to complete resolution of infection and full functional rehabilitation.

  20. Are mouse models of human mycobacterial diseases relevant? Genetics says: ‘yes!’

    PubMed Central

    Apt, Alexander S

    2011-01-01

    Relevance and accuracy of experimental mouse models of tuberculosis (TB) are the subject of constant debate. This article briefly reviews genetic aspects of this problem and provides a few examples of mycobacterial diseases with similar or identical genetic control in mice and humans. The two species display more similarities than differences regarding both genetics of susceptibility/severity of mycobacterial diseases and the networks of protective and pathological immune reactions. In the opinion of the author, refined mouse models of mycobacterial diseases are extremely useful for modelling the corresponding human conditions, if genetic diversity is taken into account. PMID:21896006

  1. Total synthesis of mycobacterial arabinogalactan containing 92 monosaccharide units

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Xiong, De-Cai; Chen, Si-Cong; Wang, Yong-Shi; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrates are diverse bio-macromolecules with highly complex structures that are involved in numerous biological processes. Well-defined carbohydrates obtained by chemical synthesis are essential to the understanding of their functions. However, synthesis of carbohydrates is greatly hampered by its insufficient efficiency. So far, assembly of long carbohydrate chains remains one of the most challenging tasks for synthetic chemists. Here we describe a highly efficient assembly of a 92-mer polysaccharide by the preactivation-based one-pot glycosylation protocol. Several linear and branched oligosaccharide/polysaccharide fragments ranging from 5-mer to 31-mer in length have been rapidly constructed in one-pot manner, which enables the first total synthesis of a biologically important mycobacterial arabinogalactan through a highly convergent [31+31+30] coupling reaction. Our results show that the preactivation-based one-pot glycosylation protocol may provide access to the construction of long and complicated carbohydrate chains. PMID:28300074

  2. Total synthesis of mycobacterial arabinogalactan containing 92 monosaccharide units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong; Xiong, De-Cai; Chen, Si-Cong; Wang, Yong-Shi; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2017-03-01

    Carbohydrates are diverse bio-macromolecules with highly complex structures that are involved in numerous biological processes. Well-defined carbohydrates obtained by chemical synthesis are essential to the understanding of their functions. However, synthesis of carbohydrates is greatly hampered by its insufficient efficiency. So far, assembly of long carbohydrate chains remains one of the most challenging tasks for synthetic chemists. Here we describe a highly efficient assembly of a 92-mer polysaccharide by the preactivation-based one-pot glycosylation protocol. Several linear and branched oligosaccharide/polysaccharide fragments ranging from 5-mer to 31-mer in length have been rapidly constructed in one-pot manner, which enables the first total synthesis of a biologically important mycobacterial arabinogalactan through a highly convergent [31+31+30] coupling reaction. Our results show that the preactivation-based one-pot glycosylation protocol may provide access to the construction of long and complicated carbohydrate chains.

  3. Emergence of a unique group of necrotizing mycobacterial diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Dobos, K. M.; Quinn, F. D.; Ashford, D. A.; Horsburgh, C. R.; King, C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Although most diseases due to pathogenic mycobacteria are caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, several other mycobacterial diseases-caused by M. ulcerans (Buruli ulcer), M. marinum, and M. haemophilum-have begun to emerge. We review the emergence of diseases caused by these three pathogens in the United States and around the world in the last decade. We examine the pathophysiologic similarities of the diseases (all three cause necrotizing skin lesions) and common reservoirs of infection (stagnant or slow-flowing water). Examination of the histologic and pathogenic characteristics of these mycobacteria suggests differences in the modes of transmission and pathogenesis, though no singular mechanism for either characteristic has been definitively described for any of these mycobacteria. PMID:10341173

  4. New Targets and Inhibitors of Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism§

    PubMed Central

    Paritala, Hanumantharao; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress made in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:23808874

  5. Octanoylation of early intermediates of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Maranha, Ana; Moynihan, Patrick J.; Miranda, Vanessa; Correia Lourenço, Eva; Nunes-Costa, Daniela; Fraga, Joana S.; José Barbosa Pereira, Pedro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Ventura, M. Rita; Clarke, Anthony J.; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria synthesize unique intracellular methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLP) proposed to modulate fatty acid metabolism. In addition to the partial esterification of glucose or methylglucose units with short-chain fatty acids, octanoate was invariably detected on the MGLP reducing end. We have identified a novel sugar octanoyltransferase (OctT) that efficiently transfers octanoate to glucosylglycerate (GG) and diglucosylglycerate (DGG), the earliest intermediates in MGLP biosynthesis. Enzymatic studies, synthetic chemistry, NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry approaches suggest that, in contrast to the prevailing consensus, octanoate is not esterified to the primary hydroxyl group of glycerate but instead to the C6 OH of the second glucose in DGG. These observations raise important new questions about the MGLP reducing end architecture and about subsequent biosynthetic steps. Functional characterization of this unique octanoyltransferase, whose gene has been proposed to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, adds new insights into a vital mycobacterial pathway, which may inspire new drug discovery strategies. PMID:26324178

  6. Octanoylation of early intermediates of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Maranha, Ana; Moynihan, Patrick J; Miranda, Vanessa; Correia Lourenço, Eva; Nunes-Costa, Daniela; Fraga, Joana S; José Barbosa Pereira, Pedro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Ventura, M Rita; Clarke, Anthony J; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacteria synthesize unique intracellular methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLP) proposed to modulate fatty acid metabolism. In addition to the partial esterification of glucose or methylglucose units with short-chain fatty acids, octanoate was invariably detected on the MGLP reducing end. We have identified a novel sugar octanoyltransferase (OctT) that efficiently transfers octanoate to glucosylglycerate (GG) and diglucosylglycerate (DGG), the earliest intermediates in MGLP biosynthesis. Enzymatic studies, synthetic chemistry, NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry approaches suggest that, in contrast to the prevailing consensus, octanoate is not esterified to the primary hydroxyl group of glycerate but instead to the C6 OH of the second glucose in DGG. These observations raise important new questions about the MGLP reducing end architecture and about subsequent biosynthetic steps. Functional characterization of this unique octanoyltransferase, whose gene has been proposed to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, adds new insights into a vital mycobacterial pathway, which may inspire new drug discovery strategies.

  7. Biomarker Discovery in Subclinical Mycobacterial Infections of Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Janagama, Harish K.; Widdel, Andrea; Vulchanova, Lucy; Stabel, Judith R.; Waters, W. Ray; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2009-01-01

    Background Bovine tuberculosis is a highly prevalent infectious disease of cattle worldwide; however, infection in the United States is limited to 0.01% of dairy herds. Thus detection of bovine TB is confounded by high background infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The present study addresses variations in the circulating peptidome based on the pathogenesis of two biologically similar mycobacterial diseases of cattle. Methodology/Principal Findings We hypothesized that serum proteomes of animals in response to either M. bovis or M. paratuberculosis infection will display several commonalities and differences. Sera prospectively collected from animals experimentally infected with either M. bovis or M. paratuberculosis were analyzed using high-resolution proteomics approaches. iTRAQ, a liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry approach, was used to simultaneously identify and quantify peptides from multiple infections and contemporaneous uninfected control groups. Four comparisons were performed: 1) M. bovis infection versus uninfected controls, 2) M. bovis versus M. paratuberculosis infection, 3) early, and 4) advanced M. paratuberculosis infection versus uninfected controls. One hundred and ten differentially elevated proteins (P≤0.05) were identified. Vitamin D binding protein precursor (DBP), alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, alpha-1B glycoprotein, fetuin, and serine proteinase inhibitor were identified in both infections. Transthyretin, retinol binding proteins, and cathelicidin were identified exclusively in M. paratuberculosis infection, while the serum levels of alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor (AMBP) protein, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, fetuin, and alpha-1B glycoprotein were elevated exclusively in M. bovis infected animals. Conclusions/Significance The discovery of these biomarkers has significant impact on the elucidation of pathogenesis of two mycobacterial diseases at the cellular and the molecular level and can be applied in the

  8. General secretion signal for the mycobacterial type VII secretion pathway

    PubMed Central

    Daleke, Maria H.; Ummels, Roy; Bawono, Punto; Heringa, Jaap; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Luirink, Joen; Bitter, Wilbert

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterial pathogens use specialized type VII secretion (T7S) systems to transport crucial virulence factors across their unusual cell envelope into infected host cells. These virulence factors lack classical secretion signals and the mechanism of substrate recognition is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that the model T7S substrates PE25/PPE41, which form a heterodimer, are targeted to the T7S pathway ESX-5 by a signal located in the C terminus of PE25. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues within this C terminus resulted in the identification of a highly conserved motif, i.e., YxxxD/E, which is required for secretion. This motif was also essential for the secretion of LipY, another ESX-5 substrate. Pathogenic mycobacteria have several different T7S systems and we identified a PE protein that is secreted by the ESX-1 system, which allowed us to compare substrate recognition of these two T7S systems. Surprisingly, this ESX-1 substrate contained a C-terminal signal functionally equivalent to that of PE25. Exchange of these C-terminal secretion signals between the PE proteins restored secretion, but each PE protein remained secreted via its own ESX secretion system, indicating that an additional signal(s) provides system specificity. Remarkably, the YxxxD/E motif was also present in and required for efficient secretion of the ESX-1 substrates CFP-10 and EspB. Therefore, our data show that the YxxxD/E motif is a general secretion signal that is present in all known mycobacterial T7S substrates or substrate complexes. PMID:22733768

  9. Sex Steroids Regulate Expression of Genes Containing Long Interspersed Elements-1s in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongwatanakul, Saichon; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee; Tongsima, Sissades; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Boonyaratanakornkit, Viroj

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed elements-1s (LINE-1s) are dispersed all over the human genome. There is evidence that hypomethylation of LINE-1s and levels of sex steroids regulate gene expression leading to cancer development. Here, we compared mRNA levels of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 in breast cancer cells treated with various sex steroids from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), with the gene expression database using chi-square analysis (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo). We evaluated whether sex steroids influence expression of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1. Three sex steroids at various concentrations, 1 and 10 nM estradiol (E2), 10 nM progesterone (PG) and 10 nM androgen (AN), were assessed. In breast cancer cells treated with 1 or 10 nM E2, a significant percentage of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 were down-regulated. A highly significant percentage of E2-regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 was down-regulated in cells treated with 1 nM E2 for 3 hours (<3.70E-25; OR=1.91; 95% CI=2.16-1.69). Similarly, high percentages of PG or AN- regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 were also down-regulated in cells treated with 10 nM PG or 10 nM AN for 16 hr (p=9.53E-06; OR=1.65; 95% CI=2.06-1.32 and p=3.81E-14; OR=2.01; 95% CI=2.42-1.67). Interestingly, a significant percentage of AN-regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 was up-regulated in cells treated with 10 nM AN for 16 hr (p=4.03E-02; OR=1.40; 95% CI=1.95-1.01). These findings suggest that intragenic LINE-1s may play roles in sex steroid mediated gene expression in breast cancer cells, which could have significant implications for the development and progression of sex steroid-dependent cancers.

  10. Novel Mutation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Gene Presenting as Early Life Mycobacterial Bronchial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Maria J.; Kalra, Neelu; Horwitz, Alexandra; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) are a spectrum of inherited disorders characterized by localized or disseminated infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) deficiency was the first identified genetic disorder recognized as MSMD. Mutations in the genes encoding IFNGR1 can be recessive or dominant and cause complete or partial receptor deficiency. We present the case of a 2½-year-old boy with a history of recurrent wheezing, diagnosed with endobronchial mycobacterial infection. Immunological workup revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the IFNGR1 gene, a novel mutation predicted in silico to cause complete IFNGR1 deficiency. This case demonstrates that (a) Interferon-γ receptor deficiency can present resembling common disorders of the lung; (b) mycobacterial infections should be suspected when parenchymal lung disease, hilar lymphadenopathy, and endobronchial disease are present; and (c) high index of suspicion for immunodeficiency should be maintained in patients with disseminated nontubercular mycobacterial infection. PMID:27868075

  11. A genetic perspective on granulomatous diseases with an emphasis on mycobacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Un-In; Holland, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the genetic factors predisposing to mycobacterial infections has been a subject of intense research activities. Current knowledge of the genetic and immunological basis of susceptibility to mycobacteria largely comes from natural human and experimental models of Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. These observations support the central role of the IL-12/IFN-γ pathway in controlling mycobacterial infection. In this review, we discuss the knowledge that associates both simple and complex inheritance with susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. We place a special emphasis on monogenic disorders, since these clearly pinpoint pathway and can adduce mechanism. We also describe the clinical, immunological and pathological features that may steer clinical investigation in the appropriate directions. PMID:26733044

  12. Novel Mutation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Gene Presenting as Early Life Mycobacterial Bronchial Disease.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Maria J; Kalra, Neelu; Horwitz, Alexandra; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) are a spectrum of inherited disorders characterized by localized or disseminated infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) deficiency was the first identified genetic disorder recognized as MSMD. Mutations in the genes encoding IFNGR1 can be recessive or dominant and cause complete or partial receptor deficiency. We present the case of a 2½-year-old boy with a history of recurrent wheezing, diagnosed with endobronchial mycobacterial infection. Immunological workup revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the IFNGR1 gene, a novel mutation predicted in silico to cause complete IFNGR1 deficiency. This case demonstrates that (a) Interferon-γ receptor deficiency can present resembling common disorders of the lung; (b) mycobacterial infections should be suspected when parenchymal lung disease, hilar lymphadenopathy, and endobronchial disease are present; and (c) high index of suspicion for immunodeficiency should be maintained in patients with disseminated nontubercular mycobacterial infection.

  13. Regulation of phagocyte triglyceride by a STAT-ATG2 pathway controls mycobacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Péan, Claire B.; Schiebler, Mark; Tan, Sharon W. S.; Sharrock, Jessica A.; Kierdorf, Katrin; Brown, Karen P.; Maserumule, M. Charlotte; Menezes, Shinelle; Pilátová, Martina; Bronda, Kévin; Guermonprez, Pierre; Stramer, Brian M.; Andres Floto, R.; Dionne, Marc S.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a global threat to human health, yet the molecular mechanisms regulating immunity remain poorly understood. Cytokines can promote or inhibit mycobacterial survival inside macrophages and the underlying mechanisms represent potential targets for host-directed therapies. Here we show that cytokine-STAT signalling promotes mycobacterial survival within macrophages by deregulating lipid droplets via ATG2 repression. In Drosophila infected with Mycobacterium marinum, mycobacterium-induced STAT activity triggered by unpaired-family cytokines reduces Atg2 expression, permitting deregulation of lipid droplets. Increased Atg2 expression or reduced macrophage triglyceride biosynthesis, normalizes lipid deposition in infected phagocytes and reduces numbers of viable intracellular mycobacteria. In human macrophages, addition of IL-6 promotes mycobacterial survival and BCG-induced lipid accumulation by a similar, but probably not identical, mechanism. Our results reveal Atg2 regulation as a mechanism by which cytokines can control lipid droplet homeostasis and consequently resistance to mycobacterial infection in Drosophila. PMID:28262681

  14. Sulfatase-activated fluorophores for rapid discrimination of mycobacterial species and strains

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Kimberly E.; Williams, Monique; Carlson, Brian L.; Swarts, Benjamin M.; Warren, Robin M.; van Helden, Paul D.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2013-01-01

    Most current diagnostic tests for tuberculosis do not reveal the species or strain of pathogen causing pulmonary infection, which can lead to inappropriate treatment regimens and the spread of disease. Here, we report an assay for mycobacterial strain assignment based on genetically conserved mycobacterial sulfatases. We developed a sulfatase-activated probe, 7-hydroxy-9H-(1,3-dichloro-9,9-dimethylacridin-2-one)–sulfate, that detects enzyme activity in native protein gels, allowing the rapid detection of sulfatases in mycobacterial lysates. This assay revealed that mycobacterial strains have distinct sulfatase fingerprints that can be used to judge both the species and lineage. Our results demonstrate the potential of enzyme-activated probes for rapid pathogen discrimination for infectious diseases. PMID:23878250

  15. Over-Expression of the Mycobacterial Trehalose-Phosphate Phosphatase OtsB2 Results in a Defect in Macrophage Phagocytosis Associated with Increased Mycobacterial-Macrophage Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Wu, Mei; Shi, Yan; Javid, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (OtsB2) is involved in the OtsAB trehalose synthesis pathway to produce free trehalose and is strictly essential for mycobacterial growth. We wished to determine the effects of OtsB2 expression on mycobacterial phenotypes such as growth, phagocytosis and survival in macrophages. Mycobacterium bovis-bacillus calmette-guerin (BCG) over-expressing OtsB2 were able to better survive in stationary phase. Over-expression of OtsB2 led to a decrease in phagocytosis but not survival in THP-1 macrophage-like cells, and this was not due to a decrease in general macrophage phagocytic activity. Surprisingly, when we investigated macrophage–mycobacterial interactions by flow cytometry and atomic force microscopy, we discovered that BCG over-expressing OtsB2 have stronger binding to THP-1 cells than wild-type BCG. These results suggest that altering OtsB2 expression has implications for mycobacterial host–pathogen interactions. Macrophage–mycobacteria phagocytic interactions are complex and merit further study. PMID:27867377

  16. Defensins: The Case for Their Use against Mycobacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Haodi; Lv, Yue; Zhao, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Human tuberculosis remains a huge global public health problem with an estimated 1/3rd of the population being infected. Defensins are antibacterial cationic peptides produced by a number of cell types, most notably neutrophil granulocytes and epithelial cells. All three defensin types (α-, β-, and θ-defensins) have antibacterial activities, mainly through bacterial membrane permeabilization. Defensins are effective against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria including mycobacteria and are active both intra- and extracellularly. Mycobacterial resistance has never been demonstrated although the mprF gene encoding resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome. In addition to their antibacterial effect, defensins are chemoattractants for macrophages and neutrophils. There are many cases for their use for therapy or prophylaxis in tuberculosis as well. In conclusion, we propose that there is considerable scope and potential for exploring their use as therapeutic/prophylactic agents and more comprehensive survey of defensins from different species and their bioactivity is timely. PMID:27725944

  17. Epidemiology of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease and Tuberculosis, Hawaii, USA

    PubMed Central

    Frankland, Timothy B.; Daida, Yihe G.; Honda, Jennifer R.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Zelazny, Adrian; Honda, Stacey; Prevots, D. Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies found Hawaiians and Asian-Americans/Pacific Islanders to be independently at increased risk for nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease (NTMPD) and tuberculosis (TB). To better understand NTM infection and TB risk patterns in Hawaii, USA, we evaluated data on a cohort of patients in Hawaii for 2005–2013. Period prevalence of NTMPD was highest among Japanese, Chinese, and Vietnamese patients (>300/100,000 persons) and lowest among Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (50/100,000). Japanese patients were twice as likely as all other racial/ethnic groups to have Mycobacterium abscessus isolated (adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.2) but were not at increased risk for infection with other mycobacteria species. In contrast, incidence of TB was stable and was lowest among Japanese patients (no cases) and highest among Filipino, Korean, and Vietnamese patients (>50/100,000). Substantial differences exist in the epidemiology of NTMPD by race/ethnicity, suggesting behavioral and biologic factors that affect disease susceptibility. PMID:28221128

  18. Cholesterol Ester Oxidation by Mycobacterial Cytochrome P450*

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Daniel J.; Madrona, Yarrow; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacteria share a common cholesterol degradation pathway initiated by oxidation of the alkyl side chain by enzymes of cytochrome P450 (CYP) families 125 and 142. Structural and sequence comparisons of the two enzyme families revealed two insertions into the N-terminal region of the CYP125 family (residues 58–67 and 100–109 in the CYP125A1 sequence) that could potentially sterically block the oxidation of the longer cholesterol ester molecules. Catalytic assays revealed that only CYP142 enzymes are able to oxidize cholesteryl propionate, and although CYP125 enzymes could oxidize cholesteryl sulfate, they were much less efficient at doing so than the CYP142 enzymes. The crystal structure of CYP142A2 in complex with cholesteryl sulfate revealed a substrate tightly fit into a smaller active site than was previously observed for the complex of CYP125A1 with 4-cholesten-3-one. We propose that the larger CYP125 active site allows for multiple binding modes of cholesteryl sulfate, the majority of which trigger the P450 catalytic cycle, but in an uncoupled mode rather than one that oxidizes the sterol. In contrast, the more unhindered and compact CYP142 structure enables enzymes of this family to readily oxidize cholesteryl esters, thus providing an additional source of carbon for mycobacterial growth. PMID:25210044

  19. Structural insights into antibody recognition of mycobacterial polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Murase, Tomohiko; Zheng, Ruixiang Blake; Joe, Maju; Bai, Yu; Marcus, Sandra L; Lowary, Todd L; Ng, Kenneth K S

    2009-09-18

    Mycobacteria are major human pathogens responsible for such serious and widespread diseases as tuberculosis and leprosy. Among the evolutionary adaptations essential for pathogenicity in mycobacteria is a complex carbohydrate-rich cell-wall structure that contains as a major immunomodulatory molecule the polysaccharide lipoarabinomannan (LAM). We report here crystal structures of three fragments from the non-reducing termini of LAM in complex with a murine antibody Fab fragment (CS-35Fab). These structures reveal for the first time the three-dimensional structures of key components of LAM and the molecular basis of LAM recognition at between 1.8- and 2.0-A resolution. The antigen-binding site of CS-35Fab forms three binding pockets that show a high degree of complementarity to the reducing end, the branch point and one of the non-reducing ends of the Y-shaped hexasaccharide moiety found at most of the non-reducing termini of LAM. Structures of CS-35Fab bound to two additional tetrasaccharides confirm the general mode of binding seen in the hexasaccharide and indicate how different parts of LAM are recognized. Altogether, these structures provide a rational basis for understanding the overall architecture of LAM and identify the key elements of an epitope that may be exploited for the development of novel and more effective anti-mycobacterial vaccines. Moreover, this study represents the first high-resolution X-ray crystallographic investigation of oligofuranoside-protein recognition.

  20. Visualization of mycobacterial membrane dynamics in live cells

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacteria are endowed with a highly impermeable mycomembrane that confers intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. Several unique mycomembrane glycolipids have been isolated and structurally characterized, but the underlying organization and dynamics of glycolipids within the cell envelope remain poorly understood. We report here a study of mycomembrane dynamics that was enabled by trehalose–fluorophore conjugates capable of labeling trehalose glycolipids in live actinomycetes. We identified fluorescein–trehalose analogues that are metabolically incorporated into the trehalose mycolates of representative Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium, Nocardia, and Rhodococcus species. Using these probes, we studied the mobilities of labeled glycolipids by time-lapse microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments and found that mycomembrane fluidity varies widely across species and correlates with mycolic acid structure. Finally, we discovered that treatment of mycobacteria with ethambutol, a front-line tuberculosis (TB) drug, significantly increases mycomembrane fluidity. These findings enhance our understanding of mycobacterial cell envelope structure and dynamics and have implications for development of TB drug cocktails. PMID:28075574

  1. Ultrathin Carbon with Interspersed Graphene/Fullerene-like Nanostructures: A Durable Protective Overcoat for High Density Magnetic Storage

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Yeo, Reuben J.; Xu, Hai; Ping Loh, Kian; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2015-01-01

    One of the key issues for future hard disk drive technology is to design and develop ultrathin (<2 nm) overcoats with excellent wear- and corrosion protection and high thermal stability. Forming carbon overcoats (COCs) having interspersed nanostructures by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) process can be an effective approach to achieve the desired target. In this work, by employing a novel bi-level surface modification approach using FCVA, the formation of a high sp3 bonded ultrathin (~1.7 nm) amorphous carbon overcoat with interspersed graphene/fullerene-like nanostructures, grown on magnetic hard disk media, is reported. The in-depth spectroscopic and microscopic analyses by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy support the observed findings. Despite a reduction of ~37 % in COC thickness, the FCVA-processed thinner COC (~1.7 nm) shows promising functional performance in terms of lower coefficient of friction (~0.25), higher wear resistance, lower surface energy, excellent hydrophobicity and similar/better oxidation corrosion resistance than current commercial COCs of thickness ~2.7 nm. The surface and tribological properties of FCVA-deposited COC was further improved after deposition of lubricant layer. PMID:26109208

  2. Ultrathin Carbon with Interspersed Graphene/Fullerene-like Nanostructures: A Durable Protective Overcoat for High Density Magnetic Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Yeo, Reuben J.; Xu, Hai; Ping Loh, Kian; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2015-06-01

    One of the key issues for future hard disk drive technology is to design and develop ultrathin (<2 nm) overcoats with excellent wear- and corrosion protection and high thermal stability. Forming carbon overcoats (COCs) having interspersed nanostructures by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) process can be an effective approach to achieve the desired target. In this work, by employing a novel bi-level surface modification approach using FCVA, the formation of a high sp3 bonded ultrathin (~1.7 nm) amorphous carbon overcoat with interspersed graphene/fullerene-like nanostructures, grown on magnetic hard disk media, is reported. The in-depth spectroscopic and microscopic analyses by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy support the observed findings. Despite a reduction of ~37 % in COC thickness, the FCVA-processed thinner COC (~1.7 nm) shows promising functional performance in terms of lower coefficient of friction (~0.25), higher wear resistance, lower surface energy, excellent hydrophobicity and similar/better oxidation corrosion resistance than current commercial COCs of thickness ~2.7 nm. The surface and tribological properties of FCVA-deposited COC was further improved after deposition of lubricant layer.

  3. Ultrathin Carbon with Interspersed Graphene/Fullerene-like Nanostructures: A Durable Protective Overcoat for High Density Magnetic Storage.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Yeo, Reuben J; Xu, Hai; Ping Loh, Kian; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2015-06-25

    One of the key issues for future hard disk drive technology is to design and develop ultrathin (<2 nm) overcoats with excellent wear- and corrosion protection and high thermal stability. Forming carbon overcoats (COCs) having interspersed nanostructures by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) process can be an effective approach to achieve the desired target. In this work, by employing a novel bi-level surface modification approach using FCVA, the formation of a high sp(3) bonded ultrathin (~1.7 nm) amorphous carbon overcoat with interspersed graphene/fullerene-like nanostructures, grown on magnetic hard disk media, is reported. The in-depth spectroscopic and microscopic analyses by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy support the observed findings. Despite a reduction of ~37% in COC thickness, the FCVA-processed thinner COC (~1.7 nm) shows promising functional performance in terms of lower coefficient of friction (~0.25), higher wear resistance, lower surface energy, excellent hydrophobicity and similar/better oxidation corrosion resistance than current commercial COCs of thickness ~2.7 nm. The surface and tribological properties of FCVA-deposited COC was further improved after deposition of lubricant layer.

  4. Mycobacterial RNA polymerase forms unstable open promoter complexes that are stabilized by CarD

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elizabeth; Chen, James; Leon, Katherine; Darst, Seth A.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli has served as the archetypal organism on which the overwhelming majority of biochemical characterizations of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) have been focused; the properties of E. coli RNAP have been accepted as generally representative for all bacterial RNAPs. Here, we directly compare the initiation properties of a mycobacterial transcription system with E. coli RNAP on two different promoters. The detailed characterizations include abortive transcription assays, RNAP/promoter complex stability assays and DNAse I and KMnO4 footprinting. Based on footprinting, we find that promoter complexes formed by E. coli and mycobacterial RNAPs use very similar protein/DNA interactions and generate the same transcription bubbles. However, we find that the open promoter complexes formed by E. coli RNAP on the two promoters tested are highly stable and essentially irreversible (with lifetimes much greater than 1 h), while the open promoter complexes on the same two promoters formed by mycobacterial RNAP are very unstable (lifetimes of about 2 min or less) and readily reversible. We show here that CarD, an essential mycobacterial transcription activator that is not found in E. coli, stabilizes the mycobacterial RNAP/open promoter complexes considerably by preventing transcription bubble collapse. PMID:25510492

  5. Role of interleukin-12 family cytokines in the cellular response to mycobacterial disease.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia

    2010-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-12 is a multifunctional cytokine acting as a key regulator of cell-mediated immune responses through the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into type 1 helper T cells (Th1) producing interferon-gamma. As our knowledge of IL-12 family members is rapidly growing, it will be important to specify their involvement in the regulation of mycobacterial infection. This article is a review of the current knowledge regarding the functions of the IL-12 family cytokines in the immune host defense system against mycobacteria. Specifically, this review aims to describe recent scientific evidence concerning the protective role of some members of the IL-12 family cytokines for the control of mycobacterial infection, as well as to summarize knowledge of the potential use of the IL-12 family members as potent adjuvants in the prevention and treatment of mycobacterial infectious diseases. In addition, recent data supporting the importance of the IL-12 family members in mycobacterial diseases in relation to Th17 function are discussed. This examination will help to improve our understanding of the immune response to mycobacterial infection and also improve vaccine design and immunotherapeutic intervention against tuberculosis.

  6. Species distribution in human immunodeficiency virus-related mycobacterial infections: implications for selection of initial treatment.

    PubMed

    Montessori, V; Phillips, P; Montaner, J; Haley, L; Craib, K; Bessuille, E; Black, W

    1996-06-01

    Management of mycobacterial infection is species specific; however, treatment is prompted by positive smears or cultures, often several weeks before species identification. The objective of this study was to determine the species distribution of mycobacterial isolates from various body sites in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). All mycobacterial isolates recovered at St. Paul's Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) from April 1989 to March 1993 were reviewed. Among 357 HIV-positive patients with mycobacterial infections, 64% (96) of the sputum isolates were Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), 18% were Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and 17% were Mycobacterium kansasii. Lymph node involvement (25 patients) was due to either MAC (72%) or M. tuberculosis (24%). Two hundred ninety-eight episodes of mycobacteremia were due to MAC (98%), M. tuberculosis (1%), and M. kansasii (1%). Similarly, cultures of 84 bone marrow biopsy specimens (99%), 19 intestinal biopsy specimens (100%), and 30 stool specimens (97%) yielded predominantly MAC. These results have implications for initial therapy, particularly in areas where rapid methods for species identification are not readily available. Because of considerable geographic variation, development of guidelines for selection of initial therapy depends on regional determination of species distribution in HIV-related mycobacterial infections.

  7. Atypical mycobacterial cutaneous infections in Egyptians: a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    El-Khalawany, Mohamed A

    2014-04-01

    Atypical mycobacteria comprise an uncommon heterogenous non-tuberculous group of acid-fast bacteria that rarely involve skin. The pattern of atypical mycobacterial cutaneous infections (AMCI) has not been previously studied in Egypt. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics, pathological features and species profile of AMCI among Egyptian patients. A retrospective study included 46 cases, diagnosed with AMCI during the period 2002 to 2012. The study included 34 males (73.9%) and 12 females (26.9%). The average age of patients was 39 years while the average duration of lesions was 15 months. The lesions were mostly located on the extremities (91.3%) and there was predominance of single (65.2%) and nodular (41.4%) lesions. History of trauma was confirmed in 91.3%. Histologically, the granulomas were mostly superficial (67.4%) with predominance of nodular suppurative pattern (84.8%). Other significant histological findings included epidermal hypertrophy (100%), presence of large-sized multinucleated giant cells (87%) and intrafollicular neutrophilic abscesses (84.8%). The diagnosis was proved by direct smear in 6.5%, skin biopsy in 10.9%, tissue culture in 47.8% and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 34.8%. Isolated species included Mycobacterium marinum (84.8%), Mycobacterium fortuitum (10.9%) and Mycobacterium kansasii (4.3%). Although the results of this study recommend that the diagnosis of AMCI is based mainly on culture and PCR, other clinicopathological features such as history of trauma, acral location of the lesion and suppurative granulomatous reaction with intrafollicular abscesses could be helpful clues in suspecting AMCI.

  8. Ultrastructural morphologic changes in mycobacterial biofilm in different extreme condition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra; Sachan, Tarun Kumar; Sharma, Pragya; Rawat, Krishna Dutta

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the morphologic and ultrastructural features of biofilms of slow and fast-growing mycobacteria in different stress conditions, presence and absence of oleic acid albumin dextrose catalase (OADC) enrichment and at different temperatures: 30, 37 and 42 °C. Four hundred mycobacterial isolates were taken. The biomass of each biofilm was quantified using a modified microtiter plate assay method. Isolates were divided into those that formed fully established biofilms, moderately attached biofilms and weakly adherent biofilms by comparison with a known biofilm-forming strain. The large quantity of biofilm was produced by Mycobacterium smegmatis at temperature 37 and 42 °C as compared to 30 °C. Mycobacterium fortuitum and M. avium developed large amount of biofilm at 30 °C as compared to 37 and 42 °C. Mycobacterium tuberculosis developed strong biofilm at 37 °C and no biofilm at 30 and 42 °C in Sauton's media. The selected non-tuberculous mycobacteria and H37Rv developed strong biofilm in the presence of OADC enrichment in Sauton's medium. Microscopic examination of biofilms by scanning electron microscopy revealed that poorly adherent biofilm formers failed to colonize the entire surface of the microtiter well. While moderately adherent biofilm formers grew in uniform monolayers but failed to develop a mature three-dimensional structure. SEM analysis of an isolate representative of the group formed fully established biofilms with a textured, multi-layered, three-dimensional structure.

  9. Isolation by genetic labeling of a new mycobacterial plasmid, pJAZ38, from Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed Central

    Gavigan, J A; Aínsa, J A; Pérez, E; Otal, I; Martín, C

    1997-01-01

    In a two-step mating experiment with recipient strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis, the Mycobacterium fortuitum cryptic plasmid pJAZ38 was isolated. Plasmid pJAZ38 was genetically labeled by cointegration formation mediated by the kanamycin-resistant mycobacterial transposon Tn611. The region responsible for replication of pJAZ38 was located and sequenced. This region showed homology with the Mycobacterium avium plasmid pLR7 and the Mycobacterium scrofulaceum plasmid pMSC262, a family of plasmids which have been found to be widespread throughout the mycobacteria. Further experiments showed pJAZ38 to be stably inherited in the absence of selection pressure and compatible with the most commonly used mycobacterial replicon, pAL5000. In contrast to pLR7 and pMSC262, pJAZ38 was able to replicate in M. smegmatis mc(2)155, making it a useful tool for mycobacterial genetics. PMID:9209023

  10. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Antonio J; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-07-08

    The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis.

  11. Hyper-interspersed NANO/MEMS - Architecture design for new concepts in miniature robotics for space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoli, Salvatore

    1999-05-01

    Launch weight and volume requirements are substantially decreased by reduction of probe size in exploration mission systems, as mass and volume both scale as the third power of system size. Accordingly, the already quite developed MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) technology, that offers low cost, small, light weight, and increasingly reliable devices through durability and redundancy, is strongly attractive as a near-term technology for significantly reducing the cost to launch and operate space systems. It is shown that the final goal of MEMS technology, i.e. the merging through solid state microdcvices of the functions of sensing, computation, communication and actuation, can lead to a new, biomimetic kind of miniature robotics, particularly suitable for planetary exploration, through molecular mono- electronics/MEMS integration jointly with a hyper-interspersed architecture made up of autonomous units embodying sensors, information processors and actuators. The problem tackled here concerns the basic design of such miniature robots, from some μm to insect size, featuring finely structured intelligent autonomous parts as smart skins, sensory and manipulating members working on the analogue external reality and communicating with their inner molecular level nondiscrete pseudo-analogue information processing networks. The (mesoscopic network)/MEMS units are shown to embody a quantum mechanical/macroscopic world connection, in which the nondiscrete molecular devices allow the automaton parts to perform very complex, fast information processing operations as metaphores of bionic functions like learning, attention, and decision making under uncertain conditions, this last due to the stochasticity inherent in the quantum network. Flexible architectures instead of von Neumann type rigid architectures in addition to hyper-interspersion of autonomous units can be realized through such nano/MEMS devices, and the μm — cm size of the whole robots and their organs

  12. Specific detection of the cleavage activity of mycobacterial enzymes using a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Morten Leth; Harmsen, Charlotte; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes.We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of the QD-based DNA Nanosensor. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06326d

  13. Molecular immunity to mycobacteria: knowledge from the mutation and phenotype spectrum analysis of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hui-Qi; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.; McCormick, Joseph B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding molecular immunity against mycobacterial infection is critical for the development of effective strategies to control tuberculosis (TB), which is a major health issue in the developing world. Host immunogenetic studies represent an indispensable approach to understand the molecular mechanisms against mycobacterial infection. A superb paradigm is the identification of rare mutations causing Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD). Mutations in the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) receptor genes are highly specific (although not exclusive) for mycobacterial infection. Only dominant negative mutations of STAT1 have specific susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. Mutations in the interleukin-12 (IL-12) signaling genes have phenotypes with non-specificity. Current studies highlight a complex molecular network in antimycobacterial immunity, centered on IFN-γ signaling. PMID:21330176

  14. Synthesis of arabinose glycosyl sulfamides as potential inhibitors of mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Suthagar, Kajitha; Watson, Andrew J A; Wilkinson, Brendan L; Fairbanks, Antony J

    2015-09-18

    A series of arabinose glycosyl sulfamides with varying alkyl chain types and lengths were synthesised as mimics of decaprenolphosphoarabinose (DPA), and as potential inhibitors of mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Unprecedented conversion of the desired furanose to the thermodynamically more stable pyranose form occurred during final de-protection. Biological testing against Mycobacterium smegmatis revealed low to moderate anti-mycobacterial activity with marked dependence on alkyl chain length, which in the case of mono-substituted sulfamides was maximal for a C-10 chain.

  15. Enhanced mycobacterial diagnostics in liquid medium by microaerobic bubble flow in Portable Microbe Enrichment Unit.

    PubMed

    Hakalehto, Elias

    2013-06-01

    Portable Microbe Enrichment Unit (PMEU) method with microaerobic bubbling speeded up the growth of otherwise slowly starting and propagating Mycobacterium sp. Mycobacterium fortuitum growth was detected after 10-11h and Mycobacterium marinum produced clear growth in 4 days. A mycobacterial environmental isolate was verified in 2 days in the PMEU Spectrion(®) equipped with infrared sensors. In parallel static (without gas bubbling) cultures hardly any growth occurred. In conclusion, PMEU technology provided thus a rapid detection of environmental and clinical mycobacterial isolates. It would also help in the field diagnosis of antibiotic resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  16. The path of anti-tuberculosis drugs: from blood to lesions to mycobacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Dartois, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    For the successful treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, drugs need to penetrate complex lung lesions and permeate the mycobacterial cell wall in order to reach their intracellular targets. However, most currently used anti-tuberculosis drugs were introduced into clinical use without considering the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties that influence drug distribution, and this has contributed to the long duration and limited success of current therapies. In this Progress article, I describe new methods to quantify and image drug distribution in infected lung tissue and in mycobacterial cells, and I explore how this technology could be used to design optimized multidrug regimens. PMID:24487820

  17. Plasma-dependent chemotaxis of macrophages toward BCG cell walls and the mycobacterial glycolipid P3.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M T

    1977-01-01

    BCG cell walls, associated with oil droplets in the form of emulsions in saline, generate macrophage chemotactic activity from fresh guinea pig plasma. Serum and heat-inactivated plasma were inactive, suggesting involvement of complement or fibrinogen-derived chemotactic factors. Suspensions of cell walls and oil droplets each generated chemotactic activity from plasma, and the activity of the cell wall vaccine was due to the additive effects of these two components. A mycobacterial glycolipid (P3), which is a constituent of BCG cell walls, also had plasma-dependent chemotactic activity. The results suggest that macrophage chemotaxis may be an important part of the immunopotentiating activity of these mycobacterial products.

  18. Macrophage form, function, and phenotype in mycobacterial infection: lessons from tuberculosis and other diseases.

    PubMed

    McClean, Colleen M; Tobin, David M

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages play a central role in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Recent work has highlighted the importance of diverse macrophage types and phenotypes that depend on local environment and developmental origins. In this review, we highlight how distinct macrophage phenotypes may influence disease progression in tuberculosis. In addition, we draw on work investigating specialized macrophage populations important in cancer biology and atherosclerosis in order to suggest new areas of investigation relevant to mycobacterial pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the repertoire of macrophage phenotypes and behaviors during infection may provide opportunities for novel control of disease through modulation of macrophage form and function.

  19. Activation of human long interspersed nuclear element 1 retrotransposition by benzo(a)pyrene, an ubiquitous environmental carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Stribinskis, Vilius; Ramos, Kenneth S

    2006-03-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements [LINE-1 (L1)] are abundant retrotransposons in mammalian genomes that remain silent under most conditions. Cellular stress signals activate L1, but the molecular mechanisms controlling L1 activation remain unclear. Evidence is presented here that benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), an environmental hydrocarbon metabolized by mammalian cytochrome P450s to reactive carcinogenic intermediates, increases L1 retrotransposition in HeLa cells. Increased retrotransposition is mediated by up-regulation of L1 RNA levels, increased L1 cDNA synthesis, and stable genomic integration. Activation of L1 is dependent on the ability of BaP to cause DNA damage because it is absent in HeLa cells challenged with nongenotoxic hydrocarbon carcinogens. Thus, the mutations and genomic instability observed in human populations exposed to genotoxic environmental hydrocarbons may involve epigenetic activation of mobile elements dispersed throughout the human genome.

  20. A First Insight on the Population Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex as Studied by Spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTRs in Santiago, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Balcells, María Elvira; García, Patricia; Meza, Paulina; Peña, Carlos; Cifuentes, Marcela; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant public health problem worldwide, but the ecology of the prevalent mycobacterial strains, and their transmission, can vary depending on country and region. Chile is a country with low incidence of TB, that has a geographically isolated location in relation to the rest of South American countries due to the Andes Mountains, but recent migration from neighboring countries has changed this situation. We aimed to assess the genotypic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains in Santiago, Chile, and compare with reports from other Latin-American countries. We analyzed MTBC isolates from pulmonary tuberculosis cases collected between years 2008 and 2013 in Central Santiago, using two genotyping methods: spoligotyping and 12-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs). Data obtained were analyzed and compared to the SITVIT2 database. Mean age of the patients was 47.5 years and 61% were male; 11.6% were migrants. Of 103 strains (1 isolate/patient) included, there were 56 distinct spoligotype patterns. Of these, 16 strains (15.5%) corresponded to orphan strains in the SITVIT2 database, not previously reported. Latin American and Mediterranean (LAM) (34%) and T (33%) lineages were the most prevalent strains, followed by Haarlem lineage (16.5%). Beijing family was scarcely represented with only two cases (1.9%), one of them isolated from a Peruvian migrant. The most frequent clustered spoligotypes were SIT33/LAM3 (10.7%), SIT53/T1 (8.7%), SIT50/H3 (7.8%), and SIT37/T3 (6.8%). We conclude that LAM and T genotypes are the most prevalent genotypes of MTBC in Santiago, Chile, and together correspond to almost two thirds of analyzed strains, which is similar to strain distribution reported from other countries of Latin America. Nevertheless, the high proportion of SIT37/T3, which was rarely found in other Latin American countries, may underline a specific history or

  1. A first insight on the population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex as studied by spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTRs in Santiago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Balcells, María Elvira; García, Patricia; Meza, Paulina; Peña, Carlos; Cifuentes, Marcela; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant public health problem worldwide, but the ecology of the prevalent mycobacterial strains, and their transmission, can vary depending on country and region. Chile is a country with low incidence of TB, that has a geographically isolated location in relation to the rest of South American countries due to the Andes Mountains, but recent migration from neighboring countries has changed this situation. We aimed to assess the genotypic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains in Santiago, Chile, and compare with reports from other Latin-American countries. We analyzed MTBC isolates from pulmonary tuberculosis cases collected between years 2008 and 2013 in Central Santiago, using two genotyping methods: spoligotyping and 12-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs). Data obtained were analyzed and compared to the SITVIT2 database. Mean age of the patients was 47.5 years and 61% were male; 11.6% were migrants. Of 103 strains (1 isolate/patient) included, there were 56 distinct spoligotype patterns. Of these, 16 strains (15.5%) corresponded to orphan strains in the SITVIT2 database, not previously reported. Latin American and Mediterranean (LAM) (34%) and T (33%) lineages were the most prevalent strains, followed by Haarlem lineage (16.5%). Beijing family was scarcely represented with only two cases (1.9%), one of them isolated from a Peruvian migrant. The most frequent clustered spoligotypes were SIT33/LAM3 (10.7%), SIT53/T1 (8.7%), SIT50/H3 (7.8%), and SIT37/T3 (6.8%). We conclude that LAM and T genotypes are the most prevalent genotypes of MTBC in Santiago, Chile, and together correspond to almost two thirds of analyzed strains, which is similar to strain distribution reported from other countries of Latin America. Nevertheless, the high proportion of SIT37/T3, which was rarely found in other Latin American countries, may underline a specific history or

  2. Mycobacterial DNA Replication As a target For Antituberculosis Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Płocińska, Renata; Korycka-Machała, Małgorzata; Płociński, Przemysław; Dziadek, Jarosław

    2017-01-30

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), the causative agent of tuberculosis, is a leading infectious disease organism, causing millions of deaths each year. This serious pathogen has been greatly spread worldwide and recent years have observed an increase in the number of multi-drug resistant and totally drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains (WHO report, 2014). The danger of tuberculosis becoming an incurable disease has emphasized the need for the discovery of a new generation of antimicrobial agents. The development of novel alternative medical strategies, new drugs and the search for optimal drug targets are top priority areas of tuberculosis research. Key characteristics of mycobacteria include: slow growth, the ability to transform into a metabolically silent - latent state, intrinsic drug resistance and the relatively rapid development of acquired drug resistance. These factors make finding an ideal antituberculosis drug enormously challenging, even if it is designed to treat drug sensitive tuberculosis strains. A vast majority of canonical antibiotics including antituberculosis agents target bacterial cell wall biosynthesis or DNA/RNA processing. Novel therapeutic approaches are being tested to target mycobacterial cell division, two-component regulatory factors, lipid synthesis and the transition between the latent and actively growing states. This review discusses the choice of cellular targets for an antituberculosis therapy, describes putative drug targets evaluated in the recent literature and summarizes potential candidates under clinical and pre-clinical development. We focus on the key cellular process of DNA replication, as a prominent target for future antituberculosis therapy. We describe two main pathways: the biosynthesis of nucleic acids precursors - the nucleotides, and the synthesis of DNA molecules. We summarize data regarding replication associated proteins that are critical for nucleotide synthesis, initiation, unwinding and

  3. Novel nicotine analogues with potential anti-mycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Paresh T; Athmaram, Thimmasandra Narayanappa; Arunkumar, Gundaiah Ramesh

    2016-04-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second leading lethal infectious disease in the world after acquired immuno deficiency (AIDs). We have developed a series of twenty-five novel nicotine analogues with de-addiction property and tested them for their activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). In an effort to increase the specificity of action and directing nicotine analogues to target MTB, four promising compounds were further optimized via molecular docking studies against the Dihydrofolate reductase of MTB. After lead optimization, one nicotine analogue [3-(5-(3fluorophenyl)nicotinoyl)-1-methylpyrrolidin-2-one] exhibited minimum inhibitory concentration of 1 μg/mL (2.86 nM) against M. tuberculosis (H37Rv strain), a human pathogenic strain of clinically significant importance. Pharmacokinetic analysis of [3-(5-(3fluorophenyl)nicotinoyl)-1methylpyrrolidin-2-one] with lowest MIC value via oral route in Wistar rats revealed that at a dosage of 5 mg/kg body weight gave a maximum serum drug concentration (Cmax) of 2.86 μg/mL, Tmax of one hour and a half-life (T1/2) of more than 24 h and Volume of distribution (Vd) of 27.36 L. Whereas the parenteral (intra venous) route showed a Cmax of 3.37 μg/mL, Tmax of 0.05 h, T1/2 of 24 h and Vd equivalent to 23.18 L. The acute oral toxicity and repeated oral toxicity studies in female Wistar rats had an LD50>2000 mg/kg body weight. Our data suggests that nicotine derivatives developed in the present study has good metabolic stability with tunable pharmacokinetics (PK) with therapeutic potential to combat MTB. However, further in vivo studies for anti-tuberculosis activity and elucidation of mode of action could result in more promising novel drug for treating MTB. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report revealing the anti-mycobacterial potential of nicotine analogue at potential therapeutic concentrations.

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Meets the Cytosol: The Role of cGAS in Anti-mycobacterial Immunity.

    PubMed

    Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland

    2015-06-10

    The intracellular fate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a subject of long debate. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, three independent studies reveal the detection of cytosolic mycobacterial DNA by the nucleotidyltransferase cGAS, emphasizing the concept of cytosolic access by M. tuberculosis and its role in balancing immune-protection and immune-pathogenesis.

  5. Acanthamoeba Encephalitis: Isolation of Genotype T1 in Mycobacterial Liquid Culture Medium

    PubMed Central

    Azzam, Rula; Badenoch, Paul R.; Francis, Michelle J.; Fernandez, Charles; Adamson, Penelope J.; Dendle, Claire; Woolley, Ian; Robson, Jenny; Korman, Tony M.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Acanthamoeba encephalitis diagnosed from an antemortem brain biopsy specimen, where the organism was first isolated in mycobacterial liquid medium and first identified by using a sequence generated by a commercial panfungal sequencing assay. We correlate susceptibility results with clinical outcome. PMID:25502534

  6. Dissecting the membrane cholesterol requirement for mycobacterial entry into host cells.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopinath; Jafurulla, Md; Kumar, G Aditya; Raghunand, Tirumalai R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacteria are intracellular pathogens that can invade and survive within host macrophages, and are a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The molecular mechanism involved in the internalization of mycobacteria is poorly understood. In this work, we have explored the role of host membrane cholesterol in the entry of the avirulent surrogate mycobacterial strain Mycobacterium smegmatis into THP-1 macrophages. Our results show that depletion of host membrane cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin results in a significant reduction in the entry of M. smegmatis into host cells. More importantly, we show that the inhibition in the ability of M. smegmatis to enter host macrophages could be reversed upon replenishment of membrane cholesterol. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute the first report showing that membrane cholesterol replenishment can reverse the inhibition in the entry of mycobacteria into host cells. In addition, we demonstrate that cholesterol complexation using amphotericin B (without physical depletion) is sufficient to inhibit mycobacterial entry. Importantly, we observed a significant reduction in mycobacterial entry upon enrichment of host membrane cholesterol. Taken together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that an optimum host plasma membrane cholesterol is necessary for the entry of mycobacteria. These results assume relevance in the context of developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting cholesterol-mediated mycobacterial host cell entry.

  7. Mycobacterial antigen 85 complex (Ag85) as a target for ficolins and mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Świerzko, Anna S; Bartłomiejczyk, Marcin A; Brzostek, Anna; Łukasiewicz, Jolanta; Michalski, Mateusz; Dziadek, Jarosław; Cedzyński, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    The pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) able to activate complement via the lectin pathway are suspected to be involved in the interaction between pathogenic Mycobacteria and the host immune response. Recently, we have found strong interactions between 25 and 35kDa mycobacterial cell fractions and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. Here we demonstrate that two biologically important mycobacterial structures, mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and the antigen 85 (Ag85) complex, induce activation of the lectin pathway of complement. The strong interaction of recombinant MBL with purified ManLAM was confirmed, but no binding of recombinant ficolins (ficolin-1, -2, -3) with this structure was observed. Interestingly, all PRMs tested reacted with the mycobacterial antigen 85 (Ag85) complex. Based on the use of specific inhibitors (mannan for MBL, acetylated bovine serum albumin for ficolin-1 and -2, Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 lipopolysaccharide for ficolin-3), we concluded that carbohydrate-recognition (MBL) and fibrinogen-like domains (ficolins) were involved in these interactions. Our results indicate that the mycobacterial antigen 85 complex is a target for ficolins and MBL. Furthermore, those PRMs also bound to fibronectin and therefore might influence the Ag85 complex-dependent interaction of Mycobacterium with the extracellular matrix.

  8. Differential Immune Responses and Protective Effects in Avirulent Mycobacterial Strains Vaccinated BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Laicheng; Fu, Ruiling; Yuan, Xuefeng; Shi, Chunwei; Wang, Shuling; Lu, Xianyu; Ma, Zhao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Qin, Weiyan; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-07-01

    Screening live mycobacterial vaccine candidates is the important strategy to develop new vaccines against adult tuberculosis (TB). In this study, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of several avirulent mycobacterial strains including Mycobacterium smegmatis, M. vaccae, M. terrae, M. phlei, M. trivial, and M. tuberculosis H37Ra were compared with M. bovis BCG in BALB/c mice. Our results demonstrated that differential immune responses were induced in different mycobacterial species vaccinated mice. As BCG-vaccinated mice did, M. terrae immunization resulted in Th1-type responses in the lung, as well as splenocytes secreting IFN-γ against a highly conserved mycobacterial antigen Ag85A. M. smegmatis also induced the same splenocytes secreting IFN-γ as BCG and M. terrae did. In addition, M. terrae and M. smegmatis-immunized mice predominantly increased expression of IL-10 and TGF-β in the lung. Most importantly, mice vaccinated with H37Ra and M. vaccae could provide the same protection in the lung against virulent M. tuberculosis challenge as BCG. The result may have important implications in developing adult TB vaccine.

  9. [Alterations in recruitment and activation of Rab proteins during mycobacterial infection].

    PubMed

    Castaño, Diana; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    At the phagosome level, Mycobacterium spp. alters activation and recruitment of several "Ras gene from rat brain" proteins, commonly known as Rab. Mycobacterial phagosomes have a greater and sustained expression of Rab5, Rab11, Rab14 and Rab22a, and lowered or no expression of Rab7, Rab9 and Rab6. This correlates with increased fusion of the phagosomes with early and recycling endosomes acquiring some features of early phagosomes, allowing the bacteria to gain access to nutrients and preventing the activation of anti-mycobacterial mechanisms. The expression of constitutively active mutants of Rab from the early stage endosomes prevents the maturation of phagosomes containing latex beads or heat-inactivated mycobacteria. Silencing of these mutants by interference RNA or dominant negative forms induces the maturation of mycobacterial phagosomes. The mechanisms have not been established by which mycobacteria alter the expression of these GTPases and thereby shift the phagolysosomal maturation. The problem can be explained by alterations in the recruitment of proteins that interact with Rab, such as phosphoinositide 3-kinases and early endosomal antigen 1. Identifying the mechanisms used by Mycobacterium spp. to disrupt the cycle of Rab activation will be essential to understand the pathophysiology of mycobacterial infections and usefully to potential drug targets.

  10. Evidence of low prevalence of mycobacterial lymphadenitis in wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Poland.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Lucjan; Orłowska, Blanka; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Czopowicz, Michał; Welz, Mirosław; Anusz, Krzysztof; Kita, Jerzy

    2017-01-25

    Mycobacterium spp. and Rhodococcus equi are generally regarded as the main causes of lymphadenitis in pigs and wild boars. In Poland, mycobacterial submandibular lymphadenitis was first diagnosed in a wild boar in 2012 but Mycobacterium spp. infections are also present in the Polish population of European bison (Bison bonasus). The prevalence of lymphadenitis in Polish wild boars has been found to 8.4% (95% CI 6.2-11.3%) and it has been proved that R. equi is not an important cause of purulent lesions in these animals. The current study was carried out to assess the prevalence of mycobacterial lymphadenitis in the Polish wild boar population. Submandibular lymph nodes with purulent lesions collected from 38 wild boars in 2010/2011 and negative for R. equi were included. Calculations based on the hypergeometric approximation were used to determine the probability that at least one positive individual would be detected if the infection had been present at a prevalence greater than or equal to the design prevalence. All 38 samples were negative for Mycobacterium spp. [0% (95% CI 0, 9.2%)]. Epidemiological analysis showed that the true prevalence was 95% likely to be lower than 10%. In conclusion, mycobacterial lymphadenitis seems to occur rarely in wild boars in Poland. Due to the presence of Mycobacterium spp. infections in other wildlife, the surveillance of mycobacterial infections in wild animals in Poland remains an important issue.

  11. Laboratory diagnosis of mycobacterial infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehn, T E; Cammarata, R

    1986-01-01

    Disseminated mycobacterial infections are commonly seen in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, and laboratory culture is the best method for diagnosing these infections. In addition to conventional agar media, we used BACTEC 12A (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) broth medium for culture. More isolates of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were recovered from 12A broth than from Lowenstein-Jensen or Middlebrook 7H11 agar. Also, the average detection time of these mycobacteria was the earliest with 12A broth. Stool examination has been helpful in diagnosing mycobacterial disease in AIDS patients, and in this study both acid-fast stain and culture of fecal material was necessary for efficient detection of mycobacteria. Another sensitive and practical method for detecting mycobacterial infections in patients with AIDS is the Isolator lysis-centrifugation system (Du Pont Co., Wilmington, Del.) which offers the advantage of quantitating the degree of mycobacteremia. Laboratories should be alerted to the possibility of mixed mycobacterial infection in patients with AIDS, and positive cultures should be repeatedly examined to detect coinfection with a slower-growing mycobacterium such as M. tuberculosis as well as M. avium complex. PMID:3095369

  12. MicroRNA in innate immunity and autophagy during mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Kyung; Kim, Tae Sung; Basu, Joyoti; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2017-01-01

    The fine-tuning of innate immune responses is an important aspect of host defenses against mycobacteria. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs, play essential roles in regulating multiple biological pathways including innate host defenses against various infections. Accumulating evidence shows that many miRNAs regulate the complex interplay between mycobacterial survival strategies and host innate immune pathways. Recent studies have contributed to understanding the role of miRNAs, the levels of which can be modulated by mycobacterial infection, in tuning host autophagy to control bacterial survival and innate effector function. Despite considerable efforts devoted to miRNA profiling over the past decade, further work is needed to improve the selection of appropriate biomarkers for tuberculosis. Understanding the roles and mechanisms of miRNAs in regulating innate immune signaling and autophagy may provide insights into new therapeutic modalities for host-directed anti-mycobacterial therapies. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the recent literature regarding miRNA profiling in tuberculosis and the roles of miRNAs in modulating innate immune responses and autophagy defenses against mycobacterial infections.

  13. Primed Mycobacterial Uveitis (PMU): Histologic and Cytokine Characterization of a Model of Uveitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pepple, Kathryn L.; Rotkis, Lauren; Van Grol, Jennifer; Wilson, Leslie; Sandt, Angela; Lam, Deborah L.; Carlson, Eric; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the histologic features and cytokine profiles of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) and a primed mycobacterial uveitis (PMU) model in rats. Methods In Lewis rats, EAU was induced by immunization with interphotoreceptor binding protein peptide, and PMU was induced by immunization with a killed mycobacterial extract followed by intravitreal injection of the same extract. Clinical course, histology, and the cytokine profiles of the aqueous and vitreous were compared using multiplex bead fluorescence immunoassays. Results Primed mycobacterial uveitis generates inflammation 2 days after intravitreal injection and resolves spontaneously 14 days later. CD68+ lymphocytes are the predominant infiltrating cells and are found in the anterior chamber, surrounding the ciliary body and in the vitreous. In contrast to EAU, no choroidal infiltration or retinal destruction is noted. At the day of peak inflammation, C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10), IL-1β, IL-18, and leptin were induced in the aqueous of both models. Interleukin-6 was induced 2-fold in the aqueous of PMU but not EAU. Cytokines elevated in the aqueous of EAU exclusively include regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), lipopolysaccharide-induced CXC chemokine (LIX), growth-related oncogene/keratinocyte chemokine (GRO/KC), VEGF, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), and IL-17A. In the vitreous, CXCL10, GRO/KC, RANTES, and MIP-1α were elevated in both models. Interleukin-17A and IL-18 were elevated exclusively in EAU. Conclusions Primed mycobacterial uveitis generates an acute anterior and intermediate uveitis without retinal involvement. Primed mycobacterial uveitis has a distinct proinflammatory cytokine profile compared with EAU, suggesting PMU is a good complementary model for study of immune-mediated uveitis. CXCL10, a proinflammatory cytokine, was increased in the aqueous and

  14. The Chinese hamster Alu-equivalent sequence: a conserved highly repetitious, interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid sequence in mammals has a structure suggestive of a transposable element.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, S R; Toomey, T P; Leinwand, L; Jelinek, W R

    1981-01-01

    A consensus sequence has been determined for a major interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid repeat in the genome of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells). This sequence is extensively homologous to (i) the human Alu sequence (P. L. Deininger et al., J. Mol. Biol., in press), (ii) the mouse B1 interspersed repetitious sequence (Krayev et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1201-1215, 1980) (iii) an interspersed repetitious sequence from African green monkey deoxyribonucleic acid (Dhruva et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:4514-4518, 1980) and (iv) the CHO and mouse 4.5S ribonucleic acid (this report; F. Harada and N. Kato, Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1273-1285, 1980). Because the CHO consensus sequence shows significant homology to the human Alu sequence it is termed the CHO Alu-equivalent sequence. A conserved structure surrounding CHO Alu-equivalent family members can be recognized. It is similar to that surrounding the human Alu and the mouse B1 sequences, and is represented as follows: direct repeat-CHO-Alu-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. A composite interspersed repetitious sequence has been identified. Its structure is represented as follows: direct repeat-residue 47 to 107 of CHO-Alu-non-Alu repetitious sequence-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. Because the Alu flanking sequences resemble those that flank known transposable elements, we think it likely that the Alu sequence dispersed throughout the mammalian genome by transposition. Images PMID:9279371

  15. Short Interspersed Nuclear Element (SINE) Sequences in the Genome of the Human Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus Af293

    PubMed Central

    Kanhayuwa, Lakkhana; Coutts, Robert H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Novel families of short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) sequences in the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, clinical isolate Af293, were identified and categorised into tRNA-related and 5S rRNA-related SINEs. Eight predicted tRNA-related SINE families originating from different tRNAs, and nominated as AfuSINE2 sequences, contained target site duplications of short direct repeat sequences (4–14 bp) flanking the elements, an extended tRNA-unrelated region and typical features of RNA polymerase III promoter sequences. The elements ranged in size from 140–493 bp and were present in low copy number in the genome and five out of eight were actively transcribed. One putative tRNAArg-derived sequence, AfuSINE2-1a possessed a unique feature of repeated trinucleotide ACT residues at its 3’-terminus. This element was similar in sequence to the I-4_AO element found in A. oryzae and an I-1_AF long nuclear interspersed element-like sequence identified in A. fumigatus Af293. Families of 5S rRNA-related SINE sequences, nominated as AfuSINE3, were also identified and their 5'-5S rRNA-related regions show 50–65% and 60–75% similarity to respectively A. fumigatus 5S rRNAs and SINE3-1_AO found in A. oryzae. A. fumigatus Af293 contains five copies of AfuSINE3 sequences ranging in size from 259–343 bp and two out of five AfuSINE3 sequences were actively transcribed. Investigations on AfuSINE distribution in the fungal genome revealed that the elements are enriched in pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions and inserted within gene-rich regions. We also demonstrated that some, but not all, AfuSINE sequences are targeted by host RNA silencing mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrated that infection of the fungus with mycoviruses had no apparent effects on SINE activity. PMID:27736869

  16. Association of Nuclear Localization of a Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Protein in Breast Tumors with Poor Prognostic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Chris R.; Normart, Robin; Yang, Qifeng; Stevenson, Elizabeth; Haffty, Bruce G.; Ganesan, Shridar; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Levine, Arnold J.; Tang, Laura H.

    2010-01-01

    Within healthy human somatic cells, retrotransposition by long interspersed nuclear element-1 (also known as LINE-1 or L1) is thought to be held in check by a variety of mechanisms, including DNA methylation and RNAi. The expression of L1-ORF1 protein, which is rarely found in normal tissue, was assayed using antibodies with a variety of clinical cancer specimens and cancer cell lines. L1-ORF1p expression was detected in nearly all breast tumors that the authors examined, and the protein was also present in a high percentage of ileal carcinoids, bladder, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, as well as in a smaller percentage of prostate and colorectal tumors. Tumors generally demonstrated cytoplasmic L1-ORF1p; however, in several breast cancers, L1-ORF1p was nuclear. Patients with breast tumors displaying nuclear L1-ORF1p had a greater incidence of both local recurrence and distal metastases and also showed poorer overall survival when compared with patients with tumors displaying cytoplasmic L1-ORF1p. These data suggest that expression of L1-ORF1p is widespread in many cancers and that redistribution from cytoplasm to nucleus could be a poor prognostic indicator during breast cancer. High expression and nuclear localization of L1-ORF1p may result in a higher rate of L1 retrotransposition, which could increase genomic instability. PMID:20948976

  17. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) modulates long interspersed element-1 (L1) retrotransposition in human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Coufal, Nicole G; Garcia-Perez, Josè Luis; Peng, Grace E; Marchetto, Maria C N; Muotri, Alysson R; Mu, Yangling; Carson, Christian T; Macia, Angela; Moran, John V; Gage, Fred H

    2011-12-20

    Long interspersed element-1 (L1) retrotransposons compose ∼20% of the mammalian genome, and ongoing L1 retrotransposition events can impact genetic diversity by various mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that endogenous L1 retrotransposition can occur in the germ line and during early embryonic development. In addition, recent data indicate that engineered human L1s can undergo somatic retrotransposition in human neural progenitor cells and that an increase in human-specific L1 DNA content can be detected in the brains of normal controls, as well as in Rett syndrome patients. Here, we demonstrate an increase in the retrotransposition efficiency of engineered human L1s in cells that lack or contain severely reduced levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated, a serine/threonine kinase involved in DNA damage signaling and neurodegenerative disease. We demonstrate that the increase in L1 retrotransposition in ataxia telangiectasia mutated-deficient cells most likely occurs by conventional target-site primed reverse transcription and generate either longer, or perhaps more, L1 retrotransposition events per cell. Finally, we provide evidence suggesting an increase in human-specific L1 DNA copy number in postmortem brain tissue derived from ataxia telangiectasia patients compared with healthy controls. Together, these data suggest that cellular proteins involved in the DNA damage response may modulate L1 retrotransposition.

  18. A novel target-specific gene delivery system combining baculovirus and sequence-specific long interspersed nuclear elements.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Tomoko; Osanai, Mizuko; Futahashi, Ryo; Kojima, Tetsuya; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2007-07-01

    Transposable elements are valuable for somatic and germ-line transformation. However, long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) have not been used because of poor information on the transposition mechanism. We have developed a novel gene delivery system combining baculovirus AcNPV and two silkworm LINEs, SART1 and R1, which integrate into specific sequences of telomeric repeats and 28S ribosomal DNA, respectively. When two LINEs containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene recombined into AcNPV were infected into fifth instar larvae of the silkworm, we observed target-specific retrotransposition of LINEs at 72h post-infection, using polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing. Telomere- and 28S rDNA-specific transposition occurred in all nine tissues tested, including the ovary and testis. This is the first demonstration of site-specific gene delivery in living larvae. Insertion efficiencies were dependent on the virus titer for injection and the host strains of Bombyx mori. Using this system, we successfully detected the intergeneration transmission of retrotransposed sequences. In addition, AcNPV-mediated SART1 also transposed into telomere of another lepidopteran, Orgyia recens, suggesting that this system is useful for a wide variety of AcNPV-infectious insects. Site-specific gene delivery by virus-mediated LINE will be a potential gene therapy tool to avoid harmful unexpected insertions.

  19. Molecular characterization of the short interspersed repetitive element SIRE in the six discrete typing units (DTUs) of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pavia, Paula X; Thomas, M Carmen; López, Manuel C; Puerta, Concepción J

    2012-10-01

    Repetitive sequences constitute an important proportion of the Trypanosoma cruzi genome; hence, they have been used as molecular markers and as amplification targets to identify the parasite presence via PCR. In this study, a molecular characterization of the SIRE repetitive element was performed in the six discrete typing units (DTUs) of T. cruzi. The results evidenced that this element, located in multiple chromosomes, was interspersed in the genome of all DTUs of the parasite. The presence of several motifs implicated in element insertion, duplication, and functionality suggests that SIRE could be an active element in the parasite genome. Of interest, there were SIRE specific Alu I fragments that allowed to discriminate DTU I from the others DTUs. Moreover, an UPGMA phenetic tree constructed from fragment sharing Southern blot data showed that T. cruzi I isolates conform a cluster separated from the T. cruzi II-VI isolates. When the relative number of SIRE copies was determined, a variation from 105 to 2,000 copies per haploid genome was observed among the different isolates without kept a DTU-relationship. In all, these findings suggest that SIRE sequence is a good target for parasite DNA amplification.

  20. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) modulates long interspersed element-1 (L1) retrotransposition in human neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Coufal, Nicole G.; Garcia-Perez, Josè Luis; Peng, Grace E.; Marchetto, Maria C. N.; Muotri, Alysson R.; Mu, Yangling; Carson, Christian T.; Macia, Angela; Moran, John V.; Gage, Fred H.

    2011-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (L1) retrotransposons compose ∼20% of the mammalian genome, and ongoing L1 retrotransposition events can impact genetic diversity by various mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that endogenous L1 retrotransposition can occur in the germ line and during early embryonic development. In addition, recent data indicate that engineered human L1s can undergo somatic retrotransposition in human neural progenitor cells and that an increase in human-specific L1 DNA content can be detected in the brains of normal controls, as well as in Rett syndrome patients. Here, we demonstrate an increase in the retrotransposition efficiency of engineered human L1s in cells that lack or contain severely reduced levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated, a serine/threonine kinase involved in DNA damage signaling and neurodegenerative disease. We demonstrate that the increase in L1 retrotransposition in ataxia telangiectasia mutated-deficient cells most likely occurs by conventional target-site primed reverse transcription and generate either longer, or perhaps more, L1 retrotransposition events per cell. Finally, we provide evidence suggesting an increase in human-specific L1 DNA copy number in postmortem brain tissue derived from ataxia telangiectasia patients compared with healthy controls. Together, these data suggest that cellular proteins involved in the DNA damage response may modulate L1 retrotransposition. PMID:22159035

  1. [Detection of mycobacterial DNA with polymerase chain reaction in eye discharge and gastric juices in a case of scleritis].

    PubMed

    Tanemoto, K; Ishikawa, H; Kigasawa, K; Obazawa, H; Fusegawa, H; Miyachi, H; Ando, Y

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of mycobacterial scleritis in which prompt diagnosis was made by the detection of mycobacterial DNA with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in eye discharge and gastric juices, when conventional tests were negative. A 77-year-old woman who had a past history of pulmonary tuberculosis visited the outpatient clinic of Tokai University Hospital complaining of pain in her right eye. She was diagnosed as having scleritis and uveitis. There were no indications of active tuberculosis. We examined the gastric juices, sputum, and eye discharge by microscopy, culture, and PCR for detection of mycobacterium. The results of microscopy and culture were negative, but with PCR we detected atypical mycobacterium in eye discharge and gastric juices. After oral treatment with antituberculosis agents, the patient's eye symptoms disappeared. Detecting mycobacterial DNA with PCR could be useful for early diagnosis of mycobacterial scleritis, so that treatment with antituberculosis agents could be started.

  2. The inhibitory effects of mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan and polysaccharides upon polyclonal and monoclonal human T cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, C; Mehlert, A; Lamb, J

    1988-01-01

    Lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was able to inhibit antigen induced T cell proliferation of human CD4+ T cell clones specific for influenza virus. The inhibitory effect was also present when peripheral human T cells were stimulated with crude mycobacterial antigen extracts. Non-specific T cell stimulation, i.e. IL-2, PHA and anti-CD3 antibodies coupled to beads, was not affected. The inhibitory property was also found when arabinomannan and arabinogalactan of mycobacterial origin were tested but not with other unrelated polysaccharides used as controls. The effect appears to be related to the processing of the antigen by the antigen-presenting cells, since it was evident when T cell clones were stimulated with whole virus, whereas stimulation with a synthetic peptide containing the relevant epitope was not inhibitable. PMID:3147152

  3. T cell receptor recognition of CD1b presenting a mycobacterial glycolipid

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Stephanie; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Shahine, Adam; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Bhati, Mugdha; Tan, Li Lynn; Halim, Hanim; Tuttle, Kathryn D.; Gapin, Laurent; Le Nours, Jérôme; Moody, D. Branch; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    CD1 proteins present microbial lipids to T cells. Germline-encoded mycolyl lipid-reactive (GEM) T cells with conserved αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize CD1b presenting mycobacterial mycolates. As the molecular basis underpinning TCR recognition of CD1b remains unknown, here we determine the structure of a GEM TCR bound to CD1b presenting glucose-6-O-monomycolate (GMM). The GEM TCR docks centrally above CD1b, whereby the conserved TCR α-chain extensively contacts CD1b and GMM. Through mutagenesis and study of T cells from tuberculosis patients, we identify a consensus CD1b footprint of TCRs present among GEM T cells. Using both the TCR α- and β-chains as tweezers to surround and grip the glucose moiety of GMM, GEM TCRs create a highly specific mechanism for recognizing this mycobacterial glycolipid. PMID:27807341

  4. Mycobacterial disease and impaired IFN-γ immunity in humans with inherited ISG15 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bogunovic, Dusan; Byun, Minji; Durfee, Larissa A.; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Salem, Sandra; Radovanovic, Irena; Grant, Audrey V.; Adimi, Parisa; Mansouri, Nahal; Okada, Satoshi; Bryant, Vanessa L.; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Kreins, Alexandra; Velez, Marcela Moncada; Boisson, Bertrand; Khalilzadeh, Soheila; Ozcelik, Ugur; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schoggins, John W.; Rice, Charles M.; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Behr, Marcel; Vogt, Guillaume; Puel, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Gros, Philippe; Huibregtse, Jon M.; Abel, Laurent; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible, ubiquitin-like intracellular protein. Its conjugation to various proteins (ISGylation) contributes to antiviral immunity in mice. We describe human patients with inherited ISG15 deficiency and mycobacterial, but not viral diseases. The lack of intracellular ISG15 production and protein ISGylation was not associated with cellular susceptibility to any viruses tested, consistent with the lack of viral diseases in these patients. By contrast, the lack of mycobacterium-induced ISG15 secretion by leukocytes — granulocytes in particular — reduced the production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes, including natural killer cells, probably accounting for the enhanced susceptibility to mycobacterial disease. This experiment of Nature shows that human ISGylation is largely redundant for antiviral immunity, but that ISG15 plays an essential role as an IFN-γ-inducing secreted molecule for optimal antimycobacterial immunity. PMID:22859821

  5. Pyrazinamide and Pyrazinoic Acid Derivatives Directed to Mycobacterial Enzymes Against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Michelle Fidelis; Fernandes, João Paulo-dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious diseases responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Due to the use of antimycobacterial drugs, TB prevalence seemed to be controlled, but with the appearance of resistant tuberculosis cases, the concern about the disease had become significant again, as well as the need for new alternatives to TB treatment. Since pyrazinamide (PZA) is part of the firstline agents in TB treatment, several derivatives of this drug were described, besides pyrazinoic acid (POA) derivatives, the active form of PZA. POA has been used mainly to design prodrugs to be activated by mycobacterial esterases, while PZA derivatives should be activated specifically by the nicotinamidase/ pyrazinamidase (PZAse), or other PZAse-independent pathways. The intention of this paper is to discuss the state of art of PZA and POA derivatives and their activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacteria, besides the therapeutic potential. Focus was given in prodrugs and derivatives directed to mycobacterial enzymes involved in its activation or mechanism of action.

  6. Definition and annotation of (myco)bacterial non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Gyanu; Arnvig, Kristine B; McDonough, Kathleen A

    2013-01-01

    RNA in bacteria may be broadly classified into coding and non-coding types. The prior, also known as messenger RNA, encode proteins as their final product. The non-coding RNA include all RNAs that are not translated into a protein. Examples of extensively studied and therefore prominent non-coding RNAs include rRNA, tRNA, tmRNA, whose designations reflect the functions performed by these RNAs. Discoveries of non-coding RNAs in mycobacteria have been reported in the recent years. At this early stage of this discipline of mycobacterial research, there is an opportunity for the scientific community to establish a consistent, systematic and objective approach to annotation of these RNAs. We are providing recommendations for this systematic annotation that we hope will be adopted by the mycobacterial research community. These may also serve as templates for annotation of non-coding RNAs in other bacteria.

  7. Bedaquiline Targets the ε Subunit of Mycobacterial F-ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Subhashri; Biukovic, Goran; Grüber, Gerhard; Dick, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The tuberculosis drug bedaquiline inhibits mycobacterial F-ATP synthase by binding to its c subunit. Using the purified ε subunit of the synthase and spectroscopy, we previously demonstrated that the drug interacts with this protein near its unique tryptophan residue. Here, we show that replacement of ε's tryptophan with alanine resulted in bedaquiline hypersusceptibility of the bacteria. Overexpression of the wild-type ε subunit caused resistance. These results suggest that the drug also targets the ε subunit.

  8. Bedaquiline Targets the ε Subunit of Mycobacterial F-ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Subhashri; Biukovic, Goran; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The tuberculosis drug bedaquiline inhibits mycobacterial F-ATP synthase by binding to its c subunit. Using the purified ε subunit of the synthase and spectroscopy, we previously demonstrated that the drug interacts with this protein near its unique tryptophan residue. Here, we show that replacement of ε's tryptophan with alanine resulted in bedaquiline hypersusceptibility of the bacteria. Overexpression of the wild-type ε subunit caused resistance. These results suggest that the drug also targets the ε subunit. PMID:27620476

  9. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic approaches to characterize the role of genetic recombination in mycobacterial evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, Silvia E; Showers-Corneli, Patrice; Dardenne, Caitlin N; Harpending, Henry H; Martin, Darren P; Beiko, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium encompasses over one hundred named species of environmental and pathogenic organisms, including the causative agents of devastating human diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy. The success of these human pathogens is due in part to their ability to rapidly adapt to their changing environment and host. Recombination is the fastest way for bacterial genomes to acquire genetic material, but conflicting results about the extent of recombination in the genus Mycobacterium have been reported. We examined a data set comprising 18 distinct strains from 13 named species for evidence of recombination. Genomic regions common to all strains (accounting for 10% to 22% of the full genomes of all examined species) were aligned and concatenated in the chromosomal order of one mycobacterial reference species. The concatenated sequence was screened for evidence of recombination using a variety of statistical methods, with each proposed event evaluated by comparing maximum-likelihood phylogenies of the recombinant section with the non-recombinant portion of the dataset. Incongruent phylogenies were identified by comparing the site-wise log-likelihoods of each tree using multiple tests. We also used a phylogenomic approach to identify genes that may have been acquired through horizontal transfer from non-mycobacterial sources. The most frequent associated lineages (and potential gene transfer partners) in the Mycobacterium lineage-restricted gene trees are other members of suborder Corynebacterinae, but more-distant partners were identified as well. In two examined cases of potentially frequent and habitat-directed transfer (M. abscessus to Segniliparus and M. smegmatis to Streptomyces), observed sequence distances were small and consistent with a hypothesis of transfer, while in a third case (M. vanbaalenii to Streptomyces) distances were larger. The analyses described here indicate that whereas evidence of recombination in core regions within the genus is

  10. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling modulates susceptibility to mycobacterial infection via a nitric oxide dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Elks, Philip M; Brizee, Sabrina; van der Vaart, Michiel; Walmsley, Sarah R; van Eeden, Fredericus J; Renshaw, Stephen A; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a current major world-health problem, exacerbated by the causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), becoming increasingly resistant to conventional antibiotic treatment. Mtb is able to counteract the bactericidal mechanisms of leukocytes to survive intracellularly and develop a niche permissive for proliferation and dissemination. Understanding of the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis (TB) remains limited, especially for early infection and for reactivation of latent infection. Signaling via hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-α) transcription factors has previously been implicated in leukocyte activation and host defence. We have previously shown that hypoxic signaling via stabilization of Hif-1α prolongs the functionality of leukocytes in the innate immune response to injury. We sought to manipulate Hif-α signaling in a well-established Mycobacterium marinum (Mm) zebrafish model of TB to investigate effects on the host's ability to combat mycobacterial infection. Stabilization of host Hif-1α, both pharmacologically and genetically, at early stages of Mm infection was able to reduce the bacterial burden of infected larvae. Increasing Hif-1α signaling enhanced levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in neutrophils prior to infection and was able to reduce larval mycobacterial burden. Conversely, decreasing Hif-2α signaling enhanced RNS levels and reduced bacterial burden, demonstrating that Hif-1α and Hif-2α have opposing effects on host susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. The antimicrobial effect of Hif-1α stabilization, and Hif-2α reduction, were demonstrated to be dependent on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling at early stages of infection. Our findings indicate that induction of leukocyte iNOS by stabilizing Hif-1α, or reducing Hif-2α, aids the host during early stages of Mm infection. Stabilization of Hif-1α therefore represents a potential target for therapeutic

  11. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease in Children – Epidemiology, Diagnosis & Management at a Tertiary Center

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Duncan; Gonis, Gena; Leslie, David; Sedda, Luigi; Ritz, Nicole; Connell, Tom; Curtis, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Background There are limited data on the epidemiology, diagnosis and optimal management of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease in children. Methods Retrospective cohort study of NTM cases over a 10-year-period at a tertiary referral hospital in Australia. Results A total of 140 children with NTM disease, including 107 with lymphadenitis and 25 with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), were identified. The estimated incidence of NTM disease was 0.6–1.6 cases / 100,000 children / year; no increasing trend was observed over the study period. Temporal analyses revealed a seasonal incidence cycle around 12 months, with peaks in late winter/spring and troughs in autumn. Mycobacterium-avium-complex accounted for most cases (77.8%), followed by Mycobacterium ulcerans (14.4%) and Mycobacterium marinum (3.3%). Polymerase chain reaction testing had higher sensitivity than culture and microscopy for acid-fast bacilli (92.0%, 67.2% and 35.7%, respectively). The majority of lymphadenitis cases underwent surgical excision (97.2%); multiple recurrences in this group were less common in cases treated with clarithromycin and rifampicin compared with clarithromycin alone or no anti-mycobacterial drugs (0% versus 7.1%; OR:0.73). SSTI recurrences were also less common in cases treated with two anti-mycobacterial drugs compared with one or none (10.5% versus 33.3%; OR:0.23). Conclusions There was seasonal variation in the incidence of NTM disease, analogous to recently published observations in tuberculosis, which have been linked to seasonal variation in vitamin D. Our finding that anti-mycobacterial combination therapy was associated with a reduced risk of recurrences in patients with NTM lymphadenitis or SSTI requires further confirmation in prospective trials. PMID:26812154

  12. Fibrinogen Regulates the Cytotoxicity of Mycobacterial Trehalose Dimycolate but Is Not Required for Cell Recruitment, Cytokine Response, or Control of Mycobacterial Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kaori; Geisel, Rachel E.; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Wyatt, Bryce T.; Sellers, Llewelyn B.; Smiley, Stephen T.; Cooper, Andrea M.; Russell, David G.; Rhoades, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    During inflammatory responses and wound healing, the conversion of soluble fibrinogen to fibrin, an insoluble extracellular matrix, long has been assumed to create a scaffold for the migration of leukocytes and fibroblasts. Previous studies concluded that fibrinogen is a necessary cofactor for mycobacterial trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate-induced responses, because trehalose dimycolate-coated beads, to which fibrinogen was adsorbed, were more inflammatory than those to which other plasma proteins were adsorbed. Herein, we investigate roles for fibrin(ogen) in an in vivo model of mycobacterial granuloma formation and in infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. In wild-type mice, the subcutaneous injection of trehalose dimycolate-coated polystyrene microspheres, suspended within Matrigel, elicited a pyogranulomatous response during the course of 12 days. In fibrinogen-deficient mice, neutrophils were recruited but a more suppurative lesion developed, with the marked degradation and disintegration of the matrix. Compared to that in wild-type mice, the early formation of granulation tissue in fibrinogen-deficient mice was edematous, hypocellular, and disorganized. These deficiencies were complemented by the addition of exogenous fibrinogen. The absence of fibrinogen had no effect on cell recruitment or cytokine production in response to trehalose dimycolate, nor was there a difference in lung histopathology or overall bacterial burden in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this model, fibrin(ogen) was not required for cell recruitment, cytokine response, or response to infection, but it promoted granulation tissue formation and suppressed leukocyte necrosis. PMID:20028811

  13. Structure and function of the mycobacterial transcription initiation complex with the essential regulator RbpA.

    PubMed

    Hubin, Elizabeth A; Fay, Allison; Xu, Catherine; Bean, James M; Saecker, Ruth M; Glickman, Michael S; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-09

    RbpA and CarD are essential transcription regulators in mycobacteria. Mechanistic analyses of promoter open complex (RPo) formation establish that RbpA and CarD cooperatively stimulate formation of an intermediate (RP2) leading to RPo; formation of RP2 is likely a bottleneck step at the majority of mycobacterial promoters. Once RPo forms, CarD also disfavors its isomerization back to RP2. We determined a 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of a mycobacterial transcription initiation complex (TIC) with RbpA as well as a CarD/RbpA/TIC model. Both CarD and RbpA bind near the upstream edge of the -10 element where they likely facilitate DNA bending and impede transcription bubble collapse. In vivo studies demonstrate the essential role of RbpA, show the effects of RbpA truncations on transcription and cell physiology, and indicate additional functions for RbpA not evident in vitro. This work provides a framework to understand the control of mycobacterial transcription by RbpA and CarD.

  14. The molecular biology of mycobacterial trehalose in the quest for advanced tuberculosis therapies.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Ana; Alarico, Susana; Maranha, Ana; Mendes, Vitor; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2014-08-01

    Trehalose is a natural glucose disaccharide identified in the 19th century in fungi and insect cocoons, and later across the three domains of life. In members of the genus Mycobacterium, which includes the tuberculosis (TB) pathogen and over 160 species of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), many of which are opportunistic pathogens, trehalose has been an important focus of research over the last 60 years. It is a crucial player in the assembly and architecture of the remarkable mycobacterial cell envelope as an element of unique highly antigenic glycolipids, namely trehalose dimycolate ('cord factor'). Free trehalose has been detected in the mycobacterial cytoplasm and occasionally in oligosaccharides with unknown function. TB and NTM infection statistics and death toll, the decline in immune responses in the aging population, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS or other debilitating conditions, and the proliferation of strains with different levels of resistance to the dated drugs in use, all merge into a serious public-health threat urging more effective vaccines, efficient diagnostic tools and new drugs. This review deals with the latest findings on mycobacterial trehalose biosynthesis, catabolism, processing and recycling, as well with the ongoing quest for novel trehalose-related mechanisms to be targeted by novel TB therapeutics. In this context, the drug-discovery pipeline has recently included new lead compounds directed toward trehalose-related targets highlighting the potential of these pathways to stem the tide of rising drug resistance.

  15. Molecular basis for the differential quinolone susceptibility of mycobacterial DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rupesh; Madhumathi, Bhavani Shankar; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-01-01

    DNA gyrase is a type II topoisomerase that catalyzes the introduction of negative supercoils in the genomes of eubacteria. Fluoroquinolones (FQs), successful as drugs clinically, target the enzyme to trap the gyrase-DNA complex, leading to the accumulation of double-strand breaks in the genome. Mycobacteria are less susceptible to commonly used FQs. However, an 8-methoxy-substituted FQ, moxifloxacin (MFX), is a potent antimycobacterial, and a higher susceptibility of mycobacterial gyrase to MFX has been demonstrated. Although several models explain the mechanism of FQ action and gyrase-DNA-FQ interaction, the basis for the differential susceptibility of mycobacterial gyrase to various FQs is not understood. We have addressed the basis of the differential susceptibility of the gyrase and revisited the mode of action of FQs. We demonstrate that FQs bind both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrases in the absence of DNA and that the addition of DNA enhances the drug binding. The FQs bind primarily to the GyrA subunit of mycobacterial gyrase, while in E. coli holoenzyme is the target. The binding of MFX to GyrA of M. tuberculosis correlates with its effectiveness as a better inhibitor of the enzyme and its efficacy in cell killing.

  16. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  17. Mycofactocin-associated mycobacterial dehydrogenases with non-exchangeable NAD cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Haft, Daniel H.; Pierce, Phillip G.; Mayclin, Stephen J.; Sullivan, Amy; Gardberg, Anna S.; Abendroth, Jan; Begley, Darren W.; Phan, Isabelle Q.; Staker, Bart L.; Myler, Peter J.; Marathias, Vasilios M.; Lorimer, Donald D.; Edwards, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    During human infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives the normally bacteriocidal phagosome of macrophages. Mtb and related species may be able to combat this harsh acidic environment which contains reactive oxygen species due to the mycobacterial genomes encoding a large number of dehydrogenases. Typically, dehydrogenase cofactor binding sites are open to solvent, which allows NAD/NADH exchange to support multiple turnover. Interestingly, mycobacterial short chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) within family TIGR03971 contain an insertion at the NAD binding site. Here we present crystal structures of 9 mycobacterial SDRs in which the insertion buries the NAD cofactor except for a small portion of the nicotinamide ring. Line broadening and STD-NMR experiments did not show NAD or NADH exchange on the NMR timescale. STD-NMR demonstrated binding of the potential substrate carveol, the potential product carvone, the inhibitor tricyclazol, and an external redox partner 2,6-dichloroindophenol (DCIP). Therefore, these SDRs appear to contain a non-exchangeable NAD cofactor and may rely on an external redox partner, rather than cofactor exchange, for multiple turnover. Incidentally, these genes always appear in conjunction with the mftA gene, which encodes the short peptide MftA, and with other genes proposed to convert MftA into the external redox partner mycofactocin. PMID:28120876

  18. The influence of haemoglobin and iron on in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Rachel; O’Shea, Matthew K.; White, Andrew D.; Müller, Julius; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Matsumiya, Magali; Dennis, Mike J.; Parizotto, Eneida A.; Harris, Stephanie; Stylianou, Elena; Naranbhai, Vivek; Bettencourt, Paulo; Drakesmith, Hal; Sharpe, Sally; Fletcher, Helen A.; McShane, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The current vaccine against tuberculosis, live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG, has variable efficacy, but development of an effective alternative is severely hampered by the lack of an immune correlate of protection. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in functional in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays (MGIAs), which provide a measure of a range of different immune mechanisms and their interactions. We identified a positive correlation between mean corpuscular haemoglobin and in vitro growth of BCG in whole blood from healthy UK human volunteers. Mycobacterial growth in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both humans and macaques was increased following the experimental addition of haemoglobin (Hb) or ferric iron, and reduced following addition of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO). Expression of Hb genes correlated positively with mycobacterial growth in whole blood from UK/Asian adults and, to a lesser extent, in PBMC from South African infants. Taken together our data indicate an association between Hb/iron levels and BCG growth in vitro, which may in part explain differences in findings between whole blood and PBMC MGIAs and should be considered when using such assays. PMID:28256545

  19. Ubiquitination as a Mechanism To Transport Soluble Mycobacterial and Eukaryotic Proteins to Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Victoria L; Jackson, Liam; Schorey, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-15

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles of endocytic origin that function in intercellular communication. Our previous studies indicate that exosomes released from Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages contain soluble mycobacterial proteins. However, it was unclear how these secreted proteins were targeted to exosomes. In this study, we determined that exosome production by the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 requires the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport and that trafficking of mycobacterial proteins from phagocytosed bacilli to exosomes was dependent on protein ubiquitination. Moreover, soluble mycobacterial proteins, when added exogenously to RAW264.7 or human HEK293 cells, were endocytosed, ubiquitinated, and released via exosomes. This suggested that endocytosed proteins could be recycled from cells through exosomes. This hypothesis was supported using the tumor-associated protein He4, which, when endocytosed by RAW264.7 or HEK293 cells, was transported to exosomes in a ubiquitin-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ubiquitination is a modification sufficient for trafficking soluble proteins within the phagocytic/endocytic network to exosomes.

  20. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  1. Tetrahydrolipstatin Inhibition, Functional Analyses, and Three-dimensional Structure of a Lipase Essential for Mycobacterial Viability

    SciTech Connect

    Crellin, Paul K.; Vivian, Julian P.; Scoble, Judith; Chow, Frances M.; West, Nicholas P.; Brammananth, Rajini; Proellocks, Nicholas I.; Shahine, Adam; Le Nours, Jerome; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Britton, Warwick J.; Coppel, Ross L.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2010-09-17

    The highly complex and unique mycobacterial cell wall is critical to the survival of Mycobacteria in host cells. However, the biosynthetic pathways responsible for its synthesis are, in general, incompletely characterized. Rv3802c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a partially characterized phospholipase/thioesterase encoded within a genetic cluster dedicated to the synthesis of core structures of the mycobacterial cell wall, including mycolic acids and arabinogalactan. Enzymatic assays performed with purified recombinant proteins Rv3802c and its close homologs from Mycobacterium smegmatis (MSMEG{_}6394) and Corynebacterium glutamicum (NCgl2775) show that they all have significant lipase activities that are inhibited by tetrahydrolipstatin, an anti-obesity drug that coincidently inhibits mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. The crystal structure of MSMEG{_}6394, solved to 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, revealed an {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase fold and a catalytic triad typically present in esterases and lipases. Furthermore, we demonstrate direct evidence of gene essentiality in M. smegmatis and show the structural consequences of loss of MSMEG{_}6394 function on the cellular integrity of the organism. These findings, combined with the predicted essentiality of Rv3802c in M. tuberculosis, indicate that the Rv3802c family performs a fundamental and indispensable lipase-associated function in mycobacteria.

  2. Structure and function of the mycobacterial transcription initiation complex with the essential regulator RbpA

    PubMed Central

    Hubin, Elizabeth A; Fay, Allison; Xu, Catherine; Bean, James M; Saecker, Ruth M; Glickman, Michael S; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    RbpA and CarD are essential transcription regulators in mycobacteria. Mechanistic analyses of promoter open complex (RPo) formation establish that RbpA and CarD cooperatively stimulate formation of an intermediate (RP2) leading to RPo; formation of RP2 is likely a bottleneck step at the majority of mycobacterial promoters. Once RPo forms, CarD also disfavors its isomerization back to RP2. We determined a 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of a mycobacterial transcription initiation complex (TIC) with RbpA as well as a CarD/RbpA/TIC model. Both CarD and RbpA bind near the upstream edge of the −10 element where they likely facilitate DNA bending and impede transcription bubble collapse. In vivo studies demonstrate the essential role of RbpA, show the effects of RbpA truncations on transcription and cell physiology, and indicate additional functions for RbpA not evident in vitro. This work provides a framework to understand the control of mycobacterial transcription by RbpA and CarD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22520.001 PMID:28067618

  3. Macrophage-mediated inflammatory response decreases mycobacterial survival in mouse MSCs by augmenting NO production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yongjian; Xie, Heping; Li, Miao; Ming, Siqi; Li, Liyan; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Gong, Sitang; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular microbe, which escapes host immune attack during latent infection. Recent studies reveal that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide a protective niche for MTB to maintain latency. However, the regulation of mycobacterial residency in MSCs in the infectious microenvironment remains largely unknown. Here, we found that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during MTB infection facilitated the clearance of bacilli residing in mouse MSCs. Higher inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were observed in mouse MSCs under macrophage-mediated inflammatory circumstance. Blocking NO production in MSCs increased the survival of intracellular mycobacteria, indicating NO-mediated antimycobacterial activity. Moreover, both nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways were involved in iNOS expression and NO production in inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β could trigger NO production in MSCs and exert anti-mycobacterial activity via NF-κB signaling pathway. Neutralization of interleukin-1β in macrophage-mediated inflammatory microenvironment dampened the ability of mouse MSCs to produce NO. Together, our findings demonstrated that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during mycobacterial infection promotes the clearance of bacilli in mouse MSCs by increasing NO production, which may provide a better understanding of latent MTB infection. PMID:27251437

  4. Mycobacterial Hsp65 potentially cross-reacts with autoantibodies of diabetes sera and also induces (in vitro) cytokine responses relevant to diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rani, Pittu Sandhya; Babajan, Banaganapalli; Tulsian, Nikhil K; Begum, Mahabubunnisa; Kumar, Ashutosh; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2013-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multifactorial disease and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Among the two types of diabetes, type-2 accounts for about 90% of all diabetic cases, whereas type-1 or juvenile diabetes is less prevalent and presents with humoral immune responses against some of the autoantigens. We attempted to test whether the sera of type-1 diabetes patients cross-react with mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (Hsp65) due to postulated epitope homologies between mycobacterial Hsp65 and an important autoantigen of type-1 diabetes, glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD65). In our study, we used either recombinant mycobacterial Hsp65 protein or synthetic peptides corresponding to some of the potential epitopes of mycobacterial Hsp65 that are shared with GAD65 or human Hsp60, and a control peptide sourced from mycobacterial Hsp65 which is not shared with GAD65, Hsp60 and other autoantigens of type-1 diabetes. The indirect ELISA results indicated that both type-1 diabetes and type-2 diabetes sera cross-react with conserved mycobacterial Hsp65 peptides and recombinant mycobacterial Hsp65 protein but do not do so with the control peptide. Our results suggest that cross-reactivity of mycobacterial Hsp65 with autoantibodies of diabetes sera could be due to the presence of significantly conserved peptides between mycobacterial Hsp65 and human Hsp60 rather than between mycobacterial Hsp65 and GAD65. The treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with recombinant mycobacterial Hsp65 protein or the synthetic peptides resulted in a significant increase in the secretion of cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10. Taken together, these findings point towards a dual role for mycobacterial Hsp65: in inducing autoimmunity and in inflammation, the two cardinal features of diabetes mellitus.

  5. Haplotype and AGG interspersion analysis of FMR1 alleles in a Croatian population: no founder effect detected in patients with fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dokić, H; Barisić, I; Culić, V; Lozić, B; Hećimović, S

    2008-10-01

    Several studies have suggested that fragile X syndrome (FRAXA), the most common inherited form of mental retardation, originated from a limited number of founder chromosomes. The aim of this study is to assess the genetic origin of fragile X syndrome in a Croatian population. We performed a haplotype analysis of the polymorphic loci DXS548 and FRAXAC1 in 18 unrelated fragile X and 56 control chromosomes. The AGG interspersion pattern of the FMR1 CGG repeat region was analyzed by sequencing. This is the first report on haplotype and AGG interspersion analysis of the fragile X syndrome gene in a Croatian population-the only eastern European population of Slavic origin analyzed so far. Our findings are intriguing, because they show a distinct distribution of the DXS548 and FRAXAC1 alleles in our fragile X population compared to other European fragile X populations. The DXS548/FRAXAC1 haplotype 194/154 (7-3), which is common among normal populations, was found to be the most frequent haplotype in our fragile X population as well. The AGG interspersion analysis indicated that AGG loss rather than haplotype may determine FMR1 allele instability. Our results suggest that no common ancestral X chromosome is associated with fragile X syndrome in the Croatian population studied. Further analysis of the origin of fragile X syndrome among other Slavic populations will be necessary to better define its eastern European distribution.

  6. Emerging Tuberculosis Pathogen Hijacks Social Communication Behavior in the Group-Living Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo)

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Claire E.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Williams, Mark C.; Palmer, Mitchell V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An emerging Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) pathogen, M. mungi, infects wild banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) in Northern Botswana, causing significant mortality. This MTC pathogen did not appear to be transmitted through a primary aerosol or oral route. We utilized histopathology, spoligotyping, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR), quantitative PCR (qPCR), and molecular markers (regions of difference [RDs] from various MTC members, including region of difference 1 [RD1] from M. bovis BCG [RD1BCG], M. microti [RD1mic], and M. pinnipedii [RD1seal], genes Rv1510 [RD4], Rv1970 [RD7], Rv3877/8 [RD1], and Rv3120 [RD12], insertion element IS1561, the 16S RNA gene, and gene Rv0577 [cfp32]), including the newly characterized mongoose-specific deletion in RD1 (RD1mon), in order to demonstrate the presence of M. mungi DNA in infected mongooses and investigate pathogen invasion and exposure mechanisms. M. mungi DNA was identified in 29% of nasal planum samples (n = 52), 56% of nasal rinses and swabs (n = 9), 53% of oral swabs (n = 19), 22% of urine samples (n = 23), 33% of anal gland tissue (n = 18), and 39% of anal gland secretions (n = 44). The occurrence of extremely low cycle threshold values obtained with qPCR in anal gland and nasal planum samples indicates that high levels of M. mungi can be found in these tissue types. Histological data were consistent with these results, suggesting that pathogen invasion occurs through breaks in the nasal planum and/or skin of the mongoose host, which are in frequent contact with anal gland secretions and urine during olfactory communication behavior. Lesions in the lung, when present, occurred only with disseminated disease. No environmental sources of M. mungi DNA could be found. We report primary environmental transmission of an MTC pathogen that occurs in association with social communication behavior. PMID:27165798

  7. Inter- and Intra-subtype genotypic differences that differentiate Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is the aetiological agent of Johne’s disease or paratuberculosis and is included within the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Map strains are of two major types often referred to as ‘Sheep’ or ‘S-type’ and ‘Cattle’ or ‘C-type’. With the advent of more discriminatory typing techniques it has been possible to further classify the S-type strains into two groups referred to as Type I and Type III. This study was undertaken to genotype a large panel of S-type small ruminant isolates from different hosts and geographical origins and to compare them with a large panel of well documented C-type isolates to assess the genetic diversity of these strain types. Methods used included Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units - Variable-Number Tandem Repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR), analysis of Large Sequence Polymorphisms by PCR (LSP analysis), Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) analysis of gyr genes, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis coupled with hybridization to IS900 (IS900-RFLP) analysis. Results The presence of LSPA4 and absence of LSPA20 was confirmed in all 24 Map S-type strains analysed. SNPs within the gyr genes divided the S-type strains into types I and III. Twenty four PFGE multiplex profiles and eleven different IS900-RFLP profiles were identified among the S-type isolates, some of them not previously published. Both PFGE and IS900-RFLP segregated the S-type strains into types I and III and the results concurred with those of the gyr SNP analysis. Nine MIRU-VNTR genotypes were identified in these isolates. MIRU-VNTR analysis differentiated Map strains from other members of Mycobacterium avium Complex, and Map S-type from C-type but not type I from III. Pigmented Map isolates were found of type I or III. Conclusion This is the largest panel of S-type strains investigated to date. The S-type strains could be further divided

  8. Genetic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Assam, India: Dominance of Beijing Family and Discovery of Two New Clades Related to CAS1_Delhi and EAI Family Based on Spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR Typing.

    PubMed

    Devi, Kangjam Rekha; Bhutia, Rinchenla; Bhowmick, Shovonlal; Mukherjee, Kaustab; Mahanta, Jagadish; Narain, Kanwar

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health concerns in Assam, a remote state located in the northeastern (NE) region of India. The present study was undertaken to explore the circulating genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in this region. A total of 189 MTBC strains were collected from smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases from different designated microscopy centres (DMC) from various localities of Assam. All MTBC isolates were cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) media and subsequently genotyped using spoligotyping and 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Spoligotyping of MTBC isolates revealed 89 distinct spoligo patterns. The most dominant MTBC strain belonged to Beijing lineage and was represented by 35.45% (n = 67) of total isolates, followed by MTBC strains belonging to Central Asian-Delhi (CAS/Delhi) lineage and East African Indian (EAI5) lineage. In addition, in the present study 43 unknown spoligo patterns were detected. The discriminatory power of spoligotyping was found to be 0.8637 based on Hunter Gaston Discriminatory Index (HGDI). On the other hand, 24-loci MIRU-VNTR typing revealed that out of total 189 MTBC isolates from Assam 185 (97.9%) isolates had unique MIRU-VNTR profiles and 4 isolates grouped into 2 clusters. Phylogenetic analysis of 67 Beijing isolates based on 24-loci MIRU-VNTR typing revealed that Beijing isolates from Assam represent two major groups, each comprising of several subgroups. Neighbour-Joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree analysis based on combined spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTR data of 78 Non-Beijing isolates was carried out for strain lineage identification as implemented by MIRU-VNTRplus database. The important lineages of MTBC identified were CAS/CAS1_Delhi (41.02%, n = 78) and East-African-Indian (EAI, 33.33%). Interestingly, phylogenetic analysis of orphan (23.28%) MTBC spoligotypes revealed that majority of these orphan

  9. Tuberculous Lymphadenitis in Ethiopia Predominantly Caused by Strains Belonging to the Delhi/CAS Lineage and Newly Identified Ethiopian Clades of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Biadglegne, Fantahun; Merker, Matthias; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C.; Niemann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, newly defined clades of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains, namely Ethiopia 1–3 and Ethiopia H37Rv-like strains, and other clades associated with pulmonary TB (PTB) were identified in Ethiopia. In this study, we investigated whether these new strain types exhibit an increased ability to cause TB lymphadenitis (TBLN) and raised the question, if particular MTBC strains derived from TBLN patients in northern Ethiopia are genetically adapted to their local hosts and/or to the TBLN. Methods Genotyping of 196 MTBC strains isolated from TBLN patients was performed by spoligotyping and 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. A statistical analysis was carried out to see possible associations between patient characteristics and phylogenetic MTBC strain classification. Results Among 196 isolates, the majority of strains belonged to the Delhi/CAS (38.8%) lineage, followed by Ethiopia 1 (9.7%), Ethiopia 3 (8.7%), Ethiopia H37RV-like (8.2%), Ethiopia 2 and Haarlem (7.7% each), URAL (3.6%), Uganda l and LAM (2% each), S-type (1.5%), X-type (1%), and 0.5% isolates of TUR, EAI, and Beijing genotype, respectively. Overall, 15 strains (7.7%) could not be allocated to a previously described phylogenetic lineage. The distribution of MTBC lineages is similar to that found in studies of PTB samples. The cluster rate (35%) in this study is significantly lower (P = 0.035) compared to 45% in the study of PTB in northwestern Ethiopia. Conclusion In the studied area, lymph node samples are dominated by Dehli/CAS genotype strains and strains of largely not yet defined clades based on MIRU-VNTR 24-loci nomenclature. We found no indication that strains of particular genotypes are specifically associated with TBLN. However, a detailed analysis of specific genetic variants of the locally contained Ethiopian clades by whole genome sequencing may reveal new insights into the host-pathogen co

  10. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Complex by 24-Locus Based MIRU-VNTR Typing in Conjunction with Spoligotyping to Assess Genetic Diversity of Strains Circulating in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Bouklata, Nada; Supply, Philip; Jaouhari, Sanae; Charof, Reda; Seghrouchni, Fouad; Sadki, Khalid; El Achhab, Youness; Nejjari, Chakib; Filali-Maltouf, Abdelkarim

    2015-01-01

    Background Standard 24-locus Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit Variable Number Tandem Repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing allows to get an improved resolution power for tracing TB transmission and predicting different strain (sub) lineages in a community. Methodology During 2010–2012, a total of 168 Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex (MTBC) isolates were collected by cluster sampling from 10 different Moroccan cities, and centralized by the National Reference Laboratory of Tuberculosis over the study period. All isolates were genotyped using spoligotyping, and a subset of 75 was genotyped using 24-locus based MIRU-VNTR typing, followed by first line drug susceptibility testing. Corresponding strain lineages were predicted using MIRU-VNTRplus database. Principal Findings Spoligotyping resulted in 137 isolates in 18 clusters (2–50 isolates per cluster: clustering rate of 81.54%) corresponding to a SIT number in the SITVIT database, while 31(18.45%) patterns were unique of which 10 were labelled as “unknown” according to the same database. The most prevalent spoligotype family was LAM; (n = 81 or 48.24% of isolates, dominated by SIT42, n = 49), followed by Haarlem (23.80%), T superfamily (15.47%), >Beijing (2.97%), > U clade (2.38%) and S clade (1.19%). Subsequent 24-Locus MIRU-VNTR typing identified 64 unique types and 11 isolates in 5 clusters (2 to 3isolates per cluster), substantially reducing clusters defined by spoligotyping only. The single cluster of three isolates corresponded to two previously treated MDR-TB cases and one new MDR-TB case known to be contact a same index case and belonging to a same family, albeit residing in 3 different administrative regions. MIRU-VNTR loci 4052, 802, 2996, 2163b, 3690, 1955, 424, 2531, 2401 and 960 were highly discriminative in our setting (HGDI >0.6). Conclusions 24-locus MIRU-VNTR typing can substantially improve the resolution of large clusters initially defined by spoligotyping alone and predominating in Morocco

  11. SITVITWEB--a publicly available international multimarker database for studying Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Demay, Christophe; Liens, Benjamin; Burguière, Thomas; Hill, Véronique; Couvin, David; Millet, Julie; Mokrousov, Igor; Sola, Christophe; Zozio, Thierry; Rastogi, Nalin

    2012-06-01

    Among various genotyping methods to study Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) genotypic polymorphism, spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of DNA tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs) have recently gained international approval as robust, fast, and reproducible typing methods generating data in a portable format. Spoligotyping constituted the backbone of a publicly available database SpolDB4 released in 2006; nonetheless this method possesses a low discriminatory power when used alone and should be ideally used in conjunction with a second typing method such as MIRU-VNTRs for high-resolution epidemiological studies. We hereby describe a publicly available international database named SITVITWEB which incorporates such multimarker data allowing to have a global vision of MTC genetic diversity worldwide based on 62,582 clinical isolates corresponding to 153 countries of patient origin (105 countries of isolation). We report a total of 7105 spoligotype patterns (corresponding to 58,180 clinical isolates) - grouped into 2740 shared-types or spoligotype international types (SIT) containing 53,816 clinical isolates and 4364 orphan patterns. Interestingly, only 7% of the MTC isolates worldwide were orphans whereas more than half of SITed isolates (n=27,059) were restricted to only 24 most prevalent SITs. The database also contains a total of 2379 MIRU patterns (from 8161 clinical isolates) from 87 countries of patient origin (35 countries of isolation); these were grouped in 847 shared-types or MIRU international types (MIT) containing 6626 isolates and 1533 orphan patterns. Lastly, data on 5-locus exact tandem repeats (ETRs) were available on 4626 isolates from 59 countries of patient origin (22 countries of isolation); a total of 458 different VNTR patterns were observed - split into 245 shared-types or VNTR International Types (VIT) containing 4413 isolates) and 213 orphan patterns. Datamining of SITVITWEB further allowed to update

  12. Long interspersed element-1 is differentially regulated by food-borne carcinogens via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    PubMed Central

    Okudaira, N; Okamura, T; Tamura, M; Iijma, K; Goto, M; Matsunaga, A; Ochiai, M; Nakagama, H; Kano, S; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Ishizaka, Y

    2013-01-01

    A single human cell contains more than 5.0 × 105 copies of long interspersed element-1 (L1), 80–100 of which are competent for retrotransposition (L1-RTP). Recent observations have revealed the presence of de novo L1 insertions in various tumors, but little is known about its mechanism. Here, we found that 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), food-borne carcinogens that are present in broiled meats, induced L1-RTP. This induction was dependent on a cellular cascade comprising the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a mitogen-activated protein kinase, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β. Notably, these compounds exhibited differential induction of L1-RTP. MeIQx-induced L1-RTP was dependent on AhR nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1), a counterpart of AhR required for gene expression in response to environmental pollutants. By contrast, PhIP-induced L1-RTP did not require ARNT1 but was dependent on estrogen receptor α (ERα) and AhR repressor. In vivo studies using transgenic mice harboring the human L1 gene indicated that PhIP-induced L1-RTP was reproducibly detected in the mammary gland, which is a target organ of PhIP-induced carcinoma. Moreover, picomolar levels of each compound induced L1-RTP, which is comparable to the PhIP concentration detected in human breast milk. Data suggest that somatic cells possess machineries that induce L1-RTP in response to the carcinogenic compounds. Together with data showing that micromolar levels of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) were non-genotoxic, our observations indicate that L1-RTP by environmental compounds is a novel type of genomic instability, further suggesting that analysis of L1-RTP by HCAs is a novel approach to clarification of modes of carcinogenesis. PMID:23208499

  13. Long interspersed element-1 is differentially regulated by food-borne carcinogens via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Okudaira, N; Okamura, T; Tamura, M; Iijma, K; Goto, M; Matsunaga, A; Ochiai, M; Nakagama, H; Kano, S; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Ishizaka, Y

    2013-10-10

    A single human cell contains more than 5.0 × 10(5) copies of long interspersed element-1 (L1), 80-100 of which are competent for retrotransposition (L1-RTP). Recent observations have revealed the presence of de novo L1 insertions in various tumors, but little is known about its mechanism. Here, we found that 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), food-borne carcinogens that are present in broiled meats, induced L1-RTP. This induction was dependent on a cellular cascade comprising the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a mitogen-activated protein kinase, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β. Notably, these compounds exhibited differential induction of L1-RTP. MeIQx-induced L1-RTP was dependent on AhR nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1), a counterpart of AhR required for gene expression in response to environmental pollutants. By contrast, PhIP-induced L1-RTP did not require ARNT1 but was dependent on estrogen receptor α (ERα) and AhR repressor. In vivo studies using transgenic mice harboring the human L1 gene indicated that PhIP-induced L1-RTP was reproducibly detected in the mammary gland, which is a target organ of PhIP-induced carcinoma. Moreover, picomolar levels of each compound induced L1-RTP, which is comparable to the PhIP concentration detected in human breast milk. Data suggest that somatic cells possess machineries that induce L1-RTP in response to the carcinogenic compounds. Together with data showing that micromolar levels of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) were non-genotoxic, our observations indicate that L1-RTP by environmental compounds is a novel type of genomic instability, further suggesting that analysis of L1-RTP by HCAs is a novel approach to clarification of modes of carcinogenesis.

  14. Retrotransposition of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 is associated with colitis but not tumors in a murine colitic cancer model.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Takeshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Hagiwara, Teruki; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Dohi, Taeko; Kawamura, Yuki I

    2015-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (L1) is a transposable element that can move within the genome, potentially leading to genome diversity and modified gene function. Although L1 activity in somatic cells is normally suppressed through DNA methylation, some L1s are activated in tumors including colorectal carcinoma. However, how L1-retrotransposition (L1-RTP) is involved in gastrointestinal disorders remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that L1-RTP in somatic cells might contribute to colitis-associated cancer (CAC). To address this, we employed an experimental model of CAC using transgenic L1-reporter mice carrying a human L1-EGFP reporter gene. Mice were subjected to repeated cycles of colitis induced by administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water with injection of carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). L1-RTP levels were measured by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting the newly inserted reporter EGFP in various tissues and cell types, including samples obtained by laser microdissection and cell sorting with flow cytometry. DNA methylation levels of the human L1 promoter were analyzed by bisulfite pyrosequencing. AOM+DSS-treated mice exhibited significantly higher levels of L1-RTP in whole colon tissue during the acute phase of colitis when compared with control naïve mice. L1-RTP levels in whole colon tissue were positively correlated with the histological severity of colitis and degree of neutrophil infiltration into the lamina propria (LP), but not with tumor development in the colon. L1-RTP was enriched in LP mesenchymal cells rather than epithelial cells (ECs), myeloid, or lymphoid cells. DNA methylation levels of the human L1 promoter region showed a negative correlation with L1-RTP levels. L1-RTP was absent from most tumors found in 22-week-old mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that L1-RTP was induced in the mouse CAC mucosa in accordance with the acute inflammatory response; however, retrotransposition appears not to have

  15. Effect of Mycobacterial Drug Resistance Patterns on Patients’ Survival: A Cohort Study in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Anuwatnonthakate, Amornrat; Whitehead, Sara J.; Varma, Jay K.; Silachamroon, Udomsak; Kasetjaroen, Yuthichai; Moolphate, Saiyud; Limsomboon, Pranom; Inyaphong, Jiraphun; Suriyon, Narin; Kavinum, Suporn; Chiengson, Navarat; Tunteerapat, Phatchara; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Drug resistance substantially increases tuberculosis (TB) mortality. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of mycobacterial drug resistance pattern and association of common resistance patterns with TB mortality in Thailand. Method: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using TB surveillance data. A total of 9,518 culture-confirmed, pulmonary TB patients registered from 1 October 2004 to 31 December 2008 from the Thailand TB Active Surveillance Network were included in this study. Patients were followed up until TB treatment completion or death. Mycobacterial drug resistance patterns were categorized as pan-susceptible, rifampicin resistance, isoniazid monoresistance, and ethambutol/streptomycin resistance. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) was determined by Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) liquid culture systems. Survival analysis was applied. Result: Isoniazid monoresistance was the most common pattern, while rifampicin resistance had the largest impact on mortality. Cox regression analysis showed a significantly higher risk of death among patients with rifampicin resistance (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.9, 95% confident interval (CI), 1.5-2.5) and isoniazid monoresistance (aHR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7) than those with pan-susceptible group after adjustment for age, nationality, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and antiretroviral therapy (ART) status, diabetes mellitus, cavitary disease on chest x-ray, treatment observation, and province. HIV co-infection was associated with higher mortality in patients both on ART (aHR 1.9, 95% CI 1.5-2.5) and not on ART (aHR 8.1, 95% CI 6.8-9.8). Conclusion: Rifampicin resistance and isoniazid monoresistance were associated with increased TB mortality. HIV-coinfection was associated with a higher risk of death including among those taking antiretroviral therapy. PMID:24171875

  16. Human TYK2 deficiency: Mycobacterial and viral infections without hyper-IgE syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kreins, Alexandra Y.; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Okada, Satoshi; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Ramírez-Alejo, Noé; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Ailal, Fatima; Bousfiha, Aziz; Mansouri, Davood; Nievas, Elma; Ma, Cindy S.; Rao, Geetha; Bernasconi, Andrea; Sun Kuehn, Hye; Niemela, Julie; Stoddard, Jennifer; Deveau, Paul; Cobat, Aurelie; El Azbaoui, Safa; Sabri, Ayoub; Lim, Che Kang; Sundin, Mikael; Avery, Danielle T.; Halwani, Rabih; Grant, Audrey V.; Boisson, Bertrand; Bogunovic, Dusan; Itan, Yuval; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Migaud, Melanie; Deswarte, Caroline; Alsina, Laia; Kotlarz, Daniel; Klein, Christoph; Muller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Rose-John, Stefan; Picard, Capucine; Hammarstrom, Lennart; Puel, Anne; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Abel, Laurent; Chaussabel, Damien; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Tangye, Stuart G.; Bustamante, Jacinta; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive, complete TYK2 deficiency was previously described in a patient (P1) with intracellular bacterial and viral infections and features of hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES), including atopic dermatitis, high serum IgE levels, and staphylococcal abscesses. We identified seven other TYK2-deficient patients from five families and four different ethnic groups. These patients were homozygous for one of five null mutations, different from that seen in P1. They displayed mycobacterial and/or viral infections, but no HIES. All eight TYK2-deficient patients displayed impaired but not abolished cellular responses to (a) IL-12 and IFN-α/β, accounting for mycobacterial and viral infections, respectively; (b) IL-23, with normal proportions of circulating IL-17+ T cells, accounting for their apparent lack of mucocutaneous candidiasis; and (c) IL-10, with no overt clinical consequences, including a lack of inflammatory bowel disease. Cellular responses to IL-21, IL-27, IFN-γ, IL-28/29 (IFN-λ), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) were normal. The leukocytes and fibroblasts of all seven newly identified TYK2-deficient patients, unlike those of P1, responded normally to IL-6, possibly accounting for the lack of HIES in these patients. The expression of exogenous wild-type TYK2 or the silencing of endogenous TYK2 did not rescue IL-6 hyporesponsiveness, suggesting that this phenotype was not a consequence of the TYK2 genotype. The core clinical phenotype of TYK2 deficiency is mycobacterial and/or viral infections, caused by impaired responses to IL-12 and IFN-α/β. Moreover, impaired IL-6 responses and HIES do not appear to be intrinsic features of TYK2 deficiency in humans. PMID:26304966

  17. Immune defects in active mycobacterial diseases in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs).

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-I; Huang, Jing-Long; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Jaing, Tang-Her; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2011-12-01

    Natural human immunity to the mycobacteria group, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and/or Salmonella species, relies on the functional IL-12/23-IFN-γ integrity of macrophages (monocyte/dendritic cell) connecting to T lymphocyte/NK cells. Patients with severe forms of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) have more profound immune defects involving this impaired circuit in patients with severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) including complete DiGeorge syndrome, X-linked hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM) (CD40L mutation), CD40 deficiency, immunodeficiency with or without anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (NEMO and IKBA mutations), chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and hyper IgE recurrent infection syndromes (HIES). The patients with severe PIDs have broader diverse infections rather than mycobacterial infections. In contrast, patients with an isolated inborn error of the IL-12/23-IFN-γ pathway are exclusively prone to low-virulence mycobacterial infections and nontyphoid salmonella infections, known as Mendelian susceptibility to the mycobacterial disease (MSMD) phenotype. Restricted defective molecules in the circuit, including IFN-γR1, IFN-γR2, IL-12p40, IL-12R-β1, STAT-1, NEMO, IKBA and the recently discovered CYBB responsible for autophagocytic vacuole and proteolysis, and interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) for dendritic cell immunodeficiency, have been identified in around 60% of patients with the MSMD phenotype. Among all of the patients with PIDs referred for investigation since 1985, we have identified four cases with the specific defect (IFNRG1 for three and IL12RB for one), presenting as both BCG-induced diseases and NTM infections, in addition to some patients with SCID, HIGM, CGD and HIES. Furthermore, manifestations in patients with autoantibodies to IFN-γ (autoAbs-IFN-γ), which is categorized as an anticytokine autoantibody syndrome, can resemble the relatively persistent

  18. Solar Disinfection of MODS Mycobacterial Cultures in Resource-Poor Settings

    PubMed Central

    Nathavitharana, Ruvandhi; Coronel, Jorge; Moore, David A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Safe disposal of TB culture material in which the infectious burden of clinical samples has been greatly amplified is an important challenge in resource-limited settings. The bactericidal capacity of solar cookers has been demonstrated previously for conventional bacteria and contaminated clinical waste. We investigated the use of a simple solar cooker for the sterilization of mycobacterial broth cultures from the microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay (MODS). Methods Simulated TB culture materials were prepared by inoculating 24-well MODS plates with 500 µL of a known concentration of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. In a series of experiments, samples were simultaneously placed inside a box-type solar cooker and control box and removed at timepoints between 15 minutes and 6 hours. Quantitative cultures were performed using retrieved samples to determine sterilization effect. Results All cultures from the control box were positive at or within 1–4 logs of inoculation concentration. Simulated culture plates at concentrations from 103colony-forming-units (CFU)/ml to 107 CFU/ml were completely sterilized after only one hour of cooker exposure, at temperatures between 50–102°C. At 109 CFU/ml (far in excess of diagnostic cultures), it was only possible to recover mycobacterial growth in plates removed after 15 minutes. By 30 minutes all plates were effectively sterilized. Discussion Solar disinfection provides a very effective, safe and low-cost alternative to conventional equipment used for disposal of mycobacterial culture material. Effect of climatic conditions and optimal operating procedure remain to be defined. PMID:17971863

  19. Recognition of a common mycobacterial T-cell epitope in MPB59 of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Lightbody, K A; Girvin, R M; Pollock, D A; Mackie, D P; Neill, S D; Pollock, J M

    1998-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, which persists as a residual level of infection in many European countries, has implications not only for the economy of farming communities but also for human health. The aim of this study was to identify a common mycobacterial antigen which was recognized in bovine tuberculosis and to characterize the response to this antigen at the epitope level. A T-cell clone, phenotype CD4+, raised from an animal experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis was shown to proliferate in response to a panel of sonicates derived from different mycobacterial species indicating recognition of an antigen with broad specificity. This antigen was subsequently shown to be MPB59. Recognition of MPB59 at the epitope level was determined in experimental and field cases of bovine tuberculosis using a panel of synthetic peptides (20-mers with 10-residue overlaps) incorporating the signal sequence and mature protein. The results showed that in vitro interferon-gamma was predominantly produced in response to adjacent peptides numbers 10 and 11, suggesting that the dominant epitope was contained in the overlap, correlating to residues 101-110 (YYQSGLSIVM). This epitope was recognized by 54% of tuberculous cattle of mixed breeds, which suggests that it may be genetically permissive in terms of major histocompatibility complex presentation. Sequence analysis confirmed that there were only minor differences in the amino acid composition within this region for various mycobacterial species, which could explain the common T-cell recognition described in this study. Common recognition of this epitope indicates that it would have limited potential for use as a diagnostic reagent per se but may have potential for inclusion in a subunit vaccine. PMID:9640240

  20. Tracheal granuloma because of infection with a novel mycobacterial species in an old FIV-positive cat.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzi, D; Solano-Gallego, L

    2009-03-01

    A 15-year-old domestic shorthair feline immunodeficiency virus-positive cat was presented with a five day history of productive cough and acute respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed inspiratory dyspnoea and diffuse gingivostomatitis. Radiographs showed an intratracheal mass located at the level of the sixth and the seventh cervical vertebrae. Bronchoscopy revealed a unique intratracheal mass occluding about 85 per cent of the tracheal lumen. The tracheal mass was removed bronchoscopically. A diagnosis of pyogranulomatous inflammation referable to a mycobacterial infection was made based on cytological and histopathological findings. 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction testing and sequence analysis identified a novel mycobacterial species, likely a slow grower, with 95 per cent identity with Mycobacterium xenopi. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a tracheal mycobacterial granuloma in a cat, and the first time, a mycobacterium with this sequence has been identified.

  1. The C-type lectin receptor CLECSF8/CLEC4D is a key component of anti-mycobacterial immunity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gillian J; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J; Hoving, Jennifer C; van Laarhoven, Arjan; Drummond, Rebecca A; Kerscher, Bernhard; Keeton, Roanne; van de Vosse, Esther; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Plantinga, Theo S; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Govender, Dhirendra; Besra, Gurdyal S; Netea, Mihai G; Reid, Delyth M; Willment, Janet A; Jacobs, Muazzam; Yamasaki, Sho; van Crevel, Reinout; Brown, Gordon D

    2015-02-11

    The interaction of microbes with pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is essential for protective immunity. While many PRRs that recognize mycobacteria have been identified, none is essentially required for host defense in vivo. Here, we have identified the C-type lectin receptor CLECSF8 (CLEC4D, MCL) as a key molecule in anti-mycobacterial host defense. Clecsf8-/- mice exhibit higher bacterial burdens and increased mortality upon M. tuberculosis infection. Additionally, Clecsf8 deficiency is associated with exacerbated pulmonary inflammation, characterized by enhanced neutrophil recruitment. Clecsf8-/- mice show reduced mycobacterial uptake by pulmonary leukocytes, but infection with opsonized bacteria can restore this phagocytic defect as well as decrease bacterial burdens. Notably, a CLECSF8 polymorphism identified in humans is associated with an increased susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis. We conclude that CLECSF8 plays a non-redundant role in anti-mycobacterial immunity in mouse and in man.

  2. Purification and characterization of the acyltransferase involved in biosynthesis of the major mycobacterial cell envelope glycolipid--monoacylated phosphatidylinositol dimannoside.

    PubMed

    Svetlíková, Zuzana; Baráth, Peter; Jackson, Mary; Korduláková, Jana; Mikušová, Katarína

    2014-08-01

    Phosphatidylinositol mannosides are essential structural components of the mycobacterial cell envelope. They are implicated in host-pathogen interactions during infection and serve as a basis for biosynthesis of other unique molecules with immunomodulatory properties - mycobacterial lipopolysaccharides lipoarabinomannan and lipomannan. Acyltransferase Rv2611 is involved in one of the initial steps in the assembly of these molecules in Mycobacterium tuberculosis - the attachment of an acyl group to position-6 of the 2-linked mannosyl residue of the phosphatidylinositol mannoside anchor. Although the function of this enzyme was annotated 10 years ago, it has never been completely biochemically characterized due to lack of the pure protein. We have successfully overexpressed and purified MSMEG_2934, the ortholog of Rv2611c from the non-pathogenic model organism Mycobacteriumsmegmatis mc(2)155 using mycobacterial pJAM2 expression system, which allowed confirmation of its in vitro acyltransferase activity, and establishment of its substrate specificity.

  3. The mycobacterial acyltransferase PapA5 is required for biosynthesis of cell wall-associated phenolic glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Chavadi, Sivagami Sundaram; Onwueme, Kenolisa C; Edupuganti, Uthamaphani R; Jerome, Jeff; Chatterjee, Delphi; Soll, Clifford E; Quadri, Luis E N

    2012-05-01

    Phenolic glycolipids (PGLs) are non-covalently bound components of the outer membrane of many clinically relevant mycobacterial pathogens, and play important roles in pathogen biology. We report a mutational analysis that conclusively demonstrates that the conserved acyltransferase-encoding gene papA5 is essential for PGL production. In addition, we provide an in vitro acyltransferase activity analysis that establishes proof of principle for the competency of PapA5 to utilize diol-containing polyketide compounds of mycobacterial origin as acyl-acceptor substrates. Overall, the results reported herein are in line with a model in which PapA5 catalyses the acylation of diol-containing polyketides to form PGLs. These studies advance our understanding of the biosynthesis of an important group of mycobacterial glycolipids and suggest that PapA5 might be an attractive target for exploring the development of antivirulence drugs.

  4. Fourth-generation fluoroquinolone-resistant mycobacterial keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Moshirfar, Majid; Meyer, Jay J; Espandar, Ladan

    2007-11-01

    We report a case of mycobacterial keratitis resistant to fourth-generation fluoroquinolones after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with fourth-generation fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. While receiving moxifloxacin post LASIK, the patient was diagnosed with moxifloxacin-resistant Mycobacterium chelonae keratitis. Culture susceptibilities revealed isolates resistant to moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin, and treatment with topical amikacin and clarithromycin with oral doxycycline and clarithromycin along with flap amputation was necessary to control the infection. This case demonstrates the potential limitations in the coverage of these antibiotic agents.

  5. Structure-guided, target-based drug discovery - exploiting genome information from HIV to mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sony; Thomas, Sherine E; Ochoa Montano, Bernardo; Blundell, Tom L

    2016-01-01

    The use of protein crystallography in structure-guided drug discovery allows identification of potential inhibitor-binding sites and optimisation of interactions of hits and lead compounds with a target protein. An early example of this approach was the use of the structure of HIV protease in designing AIDS antivirals. More recently, use of structure-guided design with fragment-based drug discovery, which reduces the size of screening libraries by decreasing complexity, has improved ligand efficiency in drug design. Here, we discuss the use of structure-guided target identification and lead optimisation using fragment-based approaches in the development of new antimicrobials for mycobacterial infections.

  6. Mycobacterial lesions in fish, amphibians, reptiles, rodents, lagomorphs, and ferrets with reference to animal models.

    PubMed

    Reavill, Drury R; Schmidt, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis is a serious disease across many animal species. Approximately more than 120 species are currently recognized in the genus Mycobacterium. This article describes the zoonotic potential of mycobacteria and mycobacteriosis in fish, amphibians, rodents, rabbits, and ferrets. It considers clinical signs; histology; molecular methods of identification, such as polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing; routes of infection; and disease progression. Studying the disease in animals may aid in understanding the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections in humans and identify better therapy and preventative options such as vaccines.

  7. Anti-dormant mycobacterial activity and target analysis of nybomycin produced by a marine-derived Streptomyces sp.

    PubMed

    Arai, Masayoshi; Kamiya, Kentaro; Pruksakorn, Patamaporn; Sumii, Yuji; Kotoku, Naoyuki; Joubert, Jean-Pierre; Moodley, Prashini; Han, Chisu; Shin, Dayoung; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2015-07-01

    In the course of our search for anti-dormant Mycobacterial substances, nybomycin (1) was re-discovered from the culture broth of a marine-derived Streptomyces sp. on the bioassay-guided separation. Compound 1 showed anti-microbial activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG with the MIC of 1.0μg/mL under both actively growing aerobic conditions and dormancy inducing hypoxic conditions. Compound 1 is also effective to Mycobacterium tuberculosis including the clinically isolated strains. The mechanistic analysis indicated that 1 bound to DNA and induces a unique morphological change to mycobacterial bacilli leading the bacterial cell death.

  8. Recognition of the mycobacterial cord factor by Mincle: relevance for granuloma formation and resistance to tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The world's most successful intracellular bacterial pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), survives inside macrophages by blocking phagosome maturation and establishes chronic infection characterized by the formation of granulomas. Trehalose-6,6-dimycolate (TDM), the mycobacterial cord factor, is the most abundant cell wall lipid of virulent mycobacteria, is sufficient to cause granuloma formation, and has long been known to be a major virulence factor of MTB. Recently, TDM has been shown to activate the Syk-Card9 signaling pathway in macrophages through binding to the C-type lectin receptor Mincle. The Mincle-Card9 pathway is required for activation of macrophages by TDM in vitro and for granuloma formation in vivo following injection of TDM. Whether this pathway is also exploited by MTB to reprogram the macrophage into a comfortable niche has not been explored yet. Several recent studies have investigated the phenotype of Mincle-deficient mice in mycobacterial infection, yielding divergent results in terms of a role for Mincle in host resistance. Here, we review these studies, discuss possible reasons for discrepant results and highlight open questions in the role of Mincle and other C-type lectin receptors in the infection biology of MTB. PMID:23355839

  9. whmD is an essential mycobacterial gene required for proper septation and cell division

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, James E.; Bishai, William R.

    2000-01-01

    A study of potential mycobacterial regulatory genes led to the isolation of the Mycobacterium smegmatis whmD gene, which encodes a homologue of WhiB, a Streptomyces coelicolor protein required for sporulation. Unlike its Streptomyces homologue, WhmD is essential in M. smegmatis. The whmD gene could be disrupted only in the presence of a plasmid supplying whmD in trans. A plasmid that allowed chemically regulated expression of the WhmD protein was used to generate a conditional whmD mutant. On withdrawal of the inducer, the conditional whmD mutant exhibited irreversible, filamentous, branched growth with diminished septum formation and aberrant septal placement, whereas WhmD overexpression resulted in growth retardation and hyperseptation. Nucleic acid synthesis and levels of the essential cell division protein FtsZ were unaltered by WhmD deficiency. Together, these phenotypes indicate a role for WhmD in mycobacterial septum formation and cell division. PMID:10880571

  10. Influence of trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM) during mycobacterial infection of bone marrow macrophages.

    PubMed

    Indrigo, Jessica; Hunter, Robert L; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2002-07-01

    The relative role of surface lipids in the innate macrophage response to infection with mycobacteria remains unknown. Trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM), a major component of the mycobacterial cell wall, can elicit hypersensitive as well as T-cell-independent foreign body responses. The T-cell-independent contribution of TDM to the primary macrophage response to mycobacterial infection was investigated. Bone-marrow-derived macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice were infected with native Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) or with MTB delipidated using petroleum ether extraction methods. The removal of surface lipids caused decreased bacterial survival in macrophages, but there was no loss of bacterial growth in broth culture. Bacterial survival within macrophages was restored upon reconstitution of the bacteria with purified TDM. The cytokine and chemokine parameters of the macrophage responses were also investigated. The amounts of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and MIP-1alpha produced were significantly reduced following delipidation, but were restored upon reconstitution with TDM. The amount of IL-12 produced, but not the amount of IL-10 produced, was also significantly reduced upon macrophage infection with delipidated MTB. Furthermore, nitric oxide responses were not impaired upon infection with delipidated MTB, suggesting that intracellular survival and macrophage secretion of cytokines and chemokines are differentially controlled. These studies indicate that TDM is a major component contributing to the innate macrophage responses to MTB infection.

  11. Identification of a substrate domain that determines system specificity in mycobacterial type VII secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Trang H.; Ummels, Roy; Bitter, Wilbert; Houben, Edith N. G.

    2017-01-01

    Type VII secretion (T7S) systems are specialized machineries used by mycobacterial pathogens to transport important virulence factors across their highly hydrophobic cell envelope. There are up to five mycobacterial T7S systems, named ESX-1 to ESX-5, at least three of which specifically secrete a different subset of substrates. The T7S substrates or substrate complexes are defined by the general secretion motif YxxxD/E. However this motif does not determine system specificity. Here, we show that the substrate domain recognized by the EspG chaperone is the determinant factor for this specificity. We first show that the introduction of point mutations into the EspG1-binding domain of the ESX-1 substrate pair PE35/PPE68_1 affects their secretion. Subsequently, we demonstrate that replacing this domain by the EspG5-binding domain of the ESX-5 substrate PPE18 resulted in EspG5 dependence and exclusive rerouting to the ESX-5 system. This rerouting of PE35/PPE68_1 to the ESX-5 system had a negative effect on the secretion of endogenous ESX-5 substrates. PMID:28205541

  12. Crystal structures of Mycobacterial MeaB and MMAA-like GTPases.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thomas E; Baugh, Loren; Bullen, Jameson; Baydo, Ruth O; Witte, Pam; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Phan, Isabelle Q H; Abendroth, Jan; Clifton, Matthew C; Sankaran, Banumathi; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Myler, Peter J; Staker, Bart L; Grundner, Christoph; Lorimer, Donald D

    2015-06-01

    The methylmalonyl Co-A mutase-associated GTPase MeaB from Methylobacterium extorquens is involved in glyoxylate regulation and required for growth. In humans, mutations in the homolog methylmalonic aciduria associated protein (MMAA) cause methylmalonic aciduria, which is often fatal. The central role of MeaB from bacteria to humans suggests that MeaB is also important in other, pathogenic bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, the identity of the mycobacterial MeaB homolog is presently unclear. Here, we identify the M. tuberculosis protein Rv1496 and its homologs in M. smegmatis and M. thermoresistibile as MeaB. The crystal structures of all three homologs are highly similar to MeaB and MMAA structures and reveal a characteristic three-domain homodimer with GDP bound in the G domain active site. A structure of Rv1496 obtained from a crystal grown in the presence of GTP exhibited electron density for GDP, suggesting GTPase activity. These structures identify the mycobacterial MeaB and provide a structural framework for therapeutic targeting of M. tuberculosis MeaB.

  13. Diagnosis of mycobacterial infections by nucleic acid amplification: 18-month prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, P; Rosenau, J; Springer, B; Teschner, K; Feldmann, K; Böttger, E C

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the use of DNA amplification by PCR for the detection of mycobacteria in clinical specimens, with the gene encoding the 16S rRNA as a target. Following generic amplification of mycobacterial nucleic acids, screening was done with genus-specific probe; this was followed by species differentiation by use of highly discriminating probes or nucleic acid sequencing. In a prospective 18-month evaluation, criteria to select specimens for PCR analysis were defined. Of a total of 8,272 specimens received, 729 samples satisfied the criteria and were subjected to DNA amplification. Clinical specimens included material from the respiratory tract (sputa and bronchial washings), aspirates, biopsies, and various body fluids (cerebrospinal, pleural, peritoneal, and gastric fluids). After resolution of discrepant results, the sensitivity of the PCR assay was 84.5%, the specificity was 99.5%, the positive predictive value was 97.6%, and the negative predictive value was 96.4%. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of culture (with a combination of broth and solid media) were 77.5 and 94.8%, respectively. In conclusion, this PCR assay provides an efficient strategy to detect and identify multiple mycobacterial species and performs well in comparison with culture. PMID:8789005

  14. Mycobacterial p(1)-type ATPases mediate resistance to zinc poisoning in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Botella, Hélène; Peyron, Pascale; Levillain, Florence; Poincloux, Renaud; Poquet, Yannick; Brandli, Irène; Wang, Chuan; Tailleux, Ludovic; Tilleul, Sylvain; Charrière, Guillaume M; Waddell, Simon J; Foti, Maria; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Gao, Qian; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Butcher, Philip D; Castagnoli, Paola Ricciardi; Gicquel, Brigitte; de Chastellier, Chantal; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2011-09-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis thrives within macrophages by residing in phagosomes and preventing them from maturing and fusing with lysosomes. A parallel transcriptional survey of intracellular mycobacteria and their host macrophages revealed signatures of heavy metal poisoning. In particular, mycobacterial genes encoding heavy metal efflux P-type ATPases CtpC, CtpG, and CtpV, and host cell metallothioneins and zinc exporter ZnT1, were induced during infection. Consistent with this pattern of gene modulation, we observed a burst of free zinc inside macrophages, and intraphagosomal zinc accumulation within a few hours postinfection. Zinc exposure led to rapid CtpC induction, and ctpC deficiency caused zinc retention within the mycobacterial cytoplasm, leading to impaired intracellular growth of the bacilli. Thus, the use of P(1)-type ATPases represents a M. tuberculosis strategy to neutralize the toxic effects of zinc in macrophages. We propose that heavy metal toxicity and its counteraction might represent yet another chapter in the host-microbe arms race.

  15. Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Karen; Fishman, Jay A

    2004-05-15

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms. In immunocompetent hosts, they are a rare cause of disease. In immunocompromised hosts, disease due to NTM is well documented. Reports of NTM disease have increased in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) and solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. This increase may reflect increased numbers of transplants, intensification of immune suppressive regimens, prolonged survival of transplant recipients, and/or improved diagnostic techniques. The difficulty of diagnosis and the impact associated with infections due to NTM in HSCT and SOT recipients necessitates that, to ensure prompt diagnosis and early initiation of therapy, a high level of suspicion for NTM disease be maintained. The most common manifestations of NTM infection in SOT recipients include cutaneous and pleuropulmonary disease, and, in HSCT recipients, catheter-related infection. Skin and pulmonary lesions should be biopsied for histologic examination, special staining, and microbiologic cultures, including cultures for bacteria, Nocardia species, fungi, and mycobacteria. Mycobacterial infections associated with catheters may be documented by tunnel or blood (isolator) cultures. Susceptibility testing of mycobacterial isolates is an essential component of optimal care. The frequent isolation of NTM other than Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) from transplant recipients limits the extrapolation of therapeutic data from human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals to the population of transplant recipients. Issues involved in the management of NTM disease in transplant recipients are characterized by a case of disseminated infection due to Mycobacterium avium complex in a lung transplant recipient, with a review of the relevant literature.

  16. Induction of the autoantigen proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T lymphocytes by a mycobacterial antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Haftel, H M; Chang, Y; Hinderer, R; Hanash, S M; Holoshitz, J

    1994-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. To determine the potential effect of mycobacterial antigens on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we analyzed PBMC incubated with the acetone-precipitable fraction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (APMT) for changes in cellular protein expression. Two-dimensional gel analysis showed induction of a 36-kD polypeptide identified as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a known autoantigen, after incubation with AP-MT. PCNA plays a role in cell proliferation and is expressed as a late growth regulated factor. However, its synthesis in response to AP-MT was induced as an early event. The early induction of PCNA was regulated at a posttranscriptional level and was restricted to T cells. Treatment of PBMC with known T cell mitogens, namely PHA, anti-CD3 antibodies, and staphylococcal superantigens failed to induce an early PCNA increase. The distinct characteristics of the AP-MT effect on PCNA expression suggest a separate mechanism of induction in response to AP-MT, compared with the late increase observed in response to mitogens. The induction of PCNA in response to mycobacterial antigens may represent a pathogenically relevant mechanism in autoimmunity. Images PMID:7929811

  17. Nutritional status and eating disorders: neglected risks factor for nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease?

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karina; Morera, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTMLD) in immunocompetent patients is an increasingly important epidemiologic concern. However, risk factors associated with susceptibility to NTMLD are not completely known. A prevalence of NTMLD appears to be rising, mainly in some populations such as middle-aged or elderly thin women, (a group including those with Lady Windermere syndrome) with neither remarkable history of respiratory disease nor smoking habit. Right middle lobe (RML) and lingula are often involved. Various predisposing factors and genetic defects have been described as possible causes of development of NTMLD, namely: voluntary suppression of cough, RML anatomical factors, menopause and mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Malnutrition is also an important and common risk factor associated with other mycobacterial disease like tuberculosis (TB) and its probable association with NTMLD as have been pointed out for some authors. However, a real description of all nutritional aspects and eating habits of patients prior to NTMLD diagnosis is lacking. We hypothesized that malnutrition and eating disorders like anorexia nervosa could be risk factors that may promoting NTMLD. From a clinical viewpoint, if this hypothesis proves to be correct, eating habits and nutritional aspects should be taken into account in the diagnosis process of suspected NTMLD, since they are easily identifiable and treatable conditions.

  18. [Diagnostic value of IgG antibody levels against 38 kDa mycobacterial antigen].

    PubMed

    Demkow, U; Zielonka, T M; Strzałkowski, J; Michałowska-Mitczuk, D; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, E; Białas-Chromiec, B; Kuś, J; Skopińska-Rózewska, E; Zwolska, Z

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis diagnosis bases on clinical and radiological symptoms and identification of mycobacteria. Accuracy of both methods is limited. Therefore reliable serological test would have considerable advantage. The present study was aimed at evaluating IgG-mediated immune response against specific mycobacterial antigens 38 kDa in group of 200 patients and control subjects. Our material consisted of 104 tuberculosis patients, 25 with sarcoidosis, 24 with lung cancer, 13 with bacterial or fungal pulmonary infection, 8 with mycobacterial infections other than tuberculosis and 26 healthy persons. We used commercially available ELISA based kits (Pathozyme TB-complex). Specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 49% was achieved. Sensitivity increased to 59% in chronic cases and to 52% in culture positive cases. Sensitivity decreased to only 14% in group of new culture negative cases. Measurement of IgG serum level against 38 kDa can be helpful in tuberculosis diagnosis. As the test lacks falsely positive results it indicates its high positive predictive value.

  19. Developments on drug delivery systems for the treatment of mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, M M; Cruz, A; Fraga, A G; Castro, A G; Cruz, M E M; Pedrosa, J

    2008-01-01

    The clinical management of tuberculosis and other mycobacterial diseases with antimycobacterial chemotherapy remains a difficult task. The classical treatment protocols are long-lasting; the drugs reach mycobacteria-infected macrophages in low amounts and/or do not persist long enough to develop the desired antimycobacterial effect; and the available agents induce severe toxic effects. Nanotechnology has provided a huge improvement to pharmacology through the designing of drug delivery systems able to target phagocytic cells infected by intracellular pathogens, such as mycobacteria. Liposomes and nanoparticles of polymeric nature represent two of the most efficient drug carrier systems that after in vivo administration are endocytosed by phagocytic cells and then release the carried agents into these cells. This article reviews the relevant publications describing the effectiveness of the association of antimycobacterial agents with liposomes or nanoparticles for the treatment of mycobacterioses, particularly for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium infections. The increased therapeutic index of antimycobacterial drugs; the reduction of dosing frequency; and the improvement of solubility of hydrophobic agents, allowing the administration of higher doses, have been demonstrated in experimental infections. These advantages may lead to new therapeutic protocols that will improve patient compliance and, consequently, lead to a more successful control of mycobacterial infections. The potential therapeutic advantages resulting from the use of non-invasive administration routes for nanoparticulate systems are also discussed.

  20. Mycobacterial cell-wall skeleton as a universal vaccine vehicle for antigen conjugation.

    PubMed

    Paik, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Sook; Kim, Ki-Hye; Yang, Chul-Su; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2010-11-23

    Mycobacterial cell-wall skeleton (CWS) is an immunoactive and biodegradable particulate adjuvant and has been used for immunotherapy in patients with cancer. The CWS of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG-CWS) was studied as a universal vaccine vehicle for antigen conjugation, to develop potentially effective and safe vaccines. Here, we describe experiments in which protein antigens, such as keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), ovalbumin (OVA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were highly efficiently coupled to 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS)-activated carboxyl groups of BCG-CWS, and tested the immunogenicity of OVA-conjugated BCG-CWS vaccine. We found that a strong immune response was induced in mice immunised with OVA-conjugated BCG-CWS, which was similar to the enhancement of the immune responses in mice immunised with OVA and complete Freund's adjuvant. Covalent conjugation of OVA to BCG-CWS was essential for Th1-skewed immune responses, with prominent expression of IFN-γ. Furthermore, antigen-conjugated BCG-CWS vaccine is simple to manufacture, safe, and easy to use. Our results suggest that mycobacterial CWS as a universal vaccine vehicle for conjugation of a wide variety of antigens constitutes a breakthrough for development of the most promising vaccines for infections, allergic diseases, and cancer.

  1. Husbandry stress exacerbates mycobacterial infections in adult zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsay, J.M.; Watral, V.; Schreck, C.B.; Kent, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacteria are significant pathogens of laboratory zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton). Stress is often implicated in clinical disease and morbidity associated with mycobacterial infections but has yet to be examined with zebrafish. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of husbandry stressors on zebrafish infected with mycobacteria. Adult zebrafish were exposed to Mycobacterium marinum or Mycobacterium chelonae, two species that have been associated with disease in zebrafish. Infected fish and controls were then subjected to chronic crowding and handling stressors and examined over an 8-week period. Whole-body cortisol was significantly elevated in stressed fish compared to non-stressed fish. Fish infected with M. marinum ATCC 927 and subjected to husbandry stressors had 14% cumulative mortality while no mortality occurred among infected fish not subjected to husbandry stressors. Stressed fish, infected with M. chelonae H1E2 from zebrafish, were 15-fold more likely to be infected than non-stressed fish at week 8 post-injection. Sub-acute, diffuse infections were more common among stressed fish infected with M. marinum or M. chelonae than non-stressed fish. This is the first study to demonstrate an effect of stress and elevated cortisol on the morbidity, prevalence, clinical disease and histological presentation associated with mycobacterial infections in zebrafish. Minimizing husbandry stress may be effective at reducing the severity of outbreaks of clinical mycobacteriosis in zebrafish facilities. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of mycobacterial DNA vaccines incorporating plasmid-encoded cytokines against Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Young, Sarah L; Slobbe, Lynn J; Peacey, Matthew; Gilbert, Sarah C; Buddle, Bryce M; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Buchan, Glenn S

    2010-08-01

    DNA-based vaccines, alone or in combination with other sub-unit vaccination regimes, represent an alternative to live mycobacterial vaccines for protective immunization against tuberculosis. Here, we have used a murine immunization or Mycobacterium bovis aerosol challenge model to assess the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of mycobacterial DNA vaccines. Mice that received immunization with DNA constructs encoding M. bovis antigen 85A (Ag85-A) and arget(ESAT-6) produced measurable interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses to CD4(+) T-cell epitope-peptide recall antigens in vitro. The magnitude of these responses was enhanced by co-delivery of a construct encoding murine cytokines (macrophage inhibitory protein (MIP)-1 alpha or interleukin(IL)-7), although they did not the match responses observed in mice that received Bacille Calmette-Guerin(BCG) immunisation. In contrast, DNA priming followed by boosting with modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vaccine (expressing M. tuberculosis Ag85-A) invoked higher IFN-gamma levels, with the most immunogenic regime of Ag85 or ESAT or IL-7 prime followed by MVA boost being of commensurate immunogenicity to BCG. Despite this, neither DNA alone nor DNA-prime or MVA boost regimes conferred measurable protection against aerosol challenge with virulent M. bovis. These data highlight both the promise and the shortcomings of new generation subunit tuberculosis vaccines, with particular emphasis on their potential as vaccines against M. bovis.

  3. Elastin, a novel extracellular matrix protein adhering to mycobacterial antigen 85 complex.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Jung; Ptak, Christopher P; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Akey, Bruce L; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2013-02-08

    The antigen 85 complex (Ag85) consists of three predominantly secreted proteins (Ag85A, Ag85B, and Ag85C), which play a key role in the mycobacterial pathogenesis and also possess enzymatic mycolyltransferase activity involved in cell wall synthesis. Ag85 is not only considered to be a virulence factor because its expression is essential for intracellular survival within macrophages, but also because it contributes to adherence, invasion, and dissemination of mycobacteria in host cells. In this study, we report that the extracellular matrix components, elastin and its precursor (tropoelastin) derived from human aorta, lung, and skin, serve as binding partners of Ag85 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The binding affinity of M. tuberculosis Ag85 to human tropoelastin was characterized (K(D) = 0.13 ± 0.006 μm), and a novel Ag85-binding motif, AAAKAA(K/Q)(Y/F), on multiple tropoelastin modules was identified. In addition, the negatively charged Glu-258 of Ag85 was demonstrated to participate in an electrostatic interaction with human tropoelastin. Moreover, binding of Ag85 on elastin siRNA-transfected Caco-2 cells was significantly reduced (34.3%), implying that elastin acts as an important ligand contributing to mycobacterial invasion.

  4. Mycobacterial contamination of metalworking fluids: involvement of a possible new taxon of rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Moore, J S; Christensen, M; Wilson, R W; Wallace, R J; Zhang, Y; Nash, D R; Shelton, B

    2000-01-01

    Contamination of air and metalworking fluid (MWF) systems with a rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM) was detected in 1995 in a single manufacturing plant with recent cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). Extensive environmental sampling was performed to determine the extent of the contamination and its variability over time. RGM were present in multiple indoor air samples, 100% of the central MWF storage tanks, and 75% of the freestanding cutting, drilling, and grinding machines. With one exception, contamination was limited to a recently introduced formulation (brand) of semisynthetic MWF used in 95% of the facility's machining operations. In general, the mycobacterial counts were stable over time, with the degree of contamination ranging from 10(2)-10(7) colony forming units (CFU)/mL. A few systems were culture positive for the mycobacterium (> 10(1) CFU/mL), changed to culture negative (< 10(1) CFU/mL), then changed back to culture positive without explanation. Samples obtained from diluted (5%) but unused MWF, a replenishment line with 2% unused MWF, an MWF pasteurizer, city water, and deionized water were culture negative for this species of mycobacterium. Inoculation and growth studies demonstrated that this mycobacterium does not grow in liquid samples of 5% unused MWF. By molecular techniques, the mycobacterial isolates consisted of a single strain and represented a previously undescribed taxon closely related to Mycobacterium chelonae/abscessus. The relationship of this mycobacterium to the cases of HP is unknown.

  5. Isolation of Mycobacterium bovis and other mycobacterial species from ferrets and stoats.

    PubMed

    de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Kawakami, R Pamela; Yates, Gary F; Collins, Desmond M

    2008-12-10

    As part of wildlife surveillance for bovine tuberculosis, pooled lymph nodes from 21,481 ferrets, 1056 stoats and 83 weasels were cultured for mycobacteria. A total of 268 isolates of Mycobacterium bovis were obtained from ferrets, 2 from stoats and none from weasels, demonstrating the presence of a wildlife reservoir of infection in ferrets. DNA typing by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of 48 selected isolates of M. bovis revealed 23 REA types. Twenty-one of these types had previously been isolated from cattle and farmed deer, demonstrating a complex cycle of infection involving wildlife and domestic animals. Apart from M. bovis, a further 208 mycobacterial isolates were obtained, the majority of which (178) were members of the M. avium complex. Speciation of the remaining 30 mycobacterial isolates by DNA sequencing of the 16s rRNA gene, identified half the isolates as M. triplex. Other species identified included M. fortuitum, M. florentinum, M. interjectum, M. intracellulare, M. holsaticum, and M. septicum/M. peregrinum.

  6. Development of a murine mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marcela; Yang, Amy L; Lim, JaeHyun; Kolibab, Kristopher; Derrick, Steven; Cadieux, Nathalie; Perera, Liyanage P; Jacobs, William R; Brennan, Michael; Morris, Sheldon L

    2009-07-01

    The development and characterization of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines has been impeded by the lack of reproducible and reliable in vitro assays for measuring vaccine activity. In this study, we developed a murine in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating TB vaccines that directly assesses the capacity of immune splenocytes to control the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within infected macrophages. Using this in vitro assay, protective immune responses induced by immunization with five different types of TB vaccine preparations (Mycobacterium bovis BCG, an attenuated M. tuberculosis mutant strain, a DNA vaccine, a modified vaccinia virus strain Ankara [MVA] construct expressing four TB antigens, and a TB fusion protein formulated in adjuvant) can be detected. Importantly, the levels of vaccine-induced mycobacterial growth-inhibitory responses seen in vitro after 1 week of coculture correlated with the protective immune responses detected in vivo at 28 days postchallenge in a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. In addition, similar patterns of cytokine expression were evoked at day 7 of the in vitro culture by immune splenocytes taken from animals immunized with the different TB vaccines. Among the consistently upregulated cytokines detected in the immune cocultures are gamma interferon, growth differentiation factor 15, interleukin-21 (IL-21), IL-27, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Overall, we have developed an in vitro functional assay that may be useful for screening and comparing new TB vaccine preparations, investigating vaccine-induced protective mechanisms, and assessing manufacturing issues, including product potency and stability.

  7. [Disseminated mycobacterial infections in patients with HIV/AIDS. Evaluation of blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Coitinho, C; Brandes, E; Pardiñas, M; Rivas, C

    2005-01-01

    One thousand-forty blood cultures corresponding to 451 Uruguayan patients with AIDS and clinic diagnosis of disseminated mycobacterial infection were evaluated between 1999 and 2003. Samples were processed in the National Reference Center for Mycobacteria (Montevideo, Uruguay), using the automated blood culture system for mycobacteria MB-BacT (BioMérieux). Forty-five positive samples were detected (4.3%) corresponding to 26 patients with AIDS (average 2.3 samples per patient). In 10/26 patients M. avium complex (MAC) was identified and in 13/26 the isolated germ was M. tuberculosis. The average time of incubation was of 12.4 days (range 6-19 days) for MAC and of 22.6 days (range 7-35 days) for M. tuberculosis. Blood culture has demonstrated to be the best sample for the bacteriological confirmation of the disseminated mycobacterial infections when at least 2 samples by patient are studied. The frequency of isolates of M. tuberculosis and MAC in AIDS patients is according with a moderate prevalence of tuberculosis in Uruguay.

  8. Dynamics of Mycobacteriophage-Mycobacterial Host Interaction: Evidence for Secondary Mechanisms for Host Lethality.

    PubMed

    Samaddar, Sourabh; Grewal, Rajdeep Kaur; Sinha, Saptarshi; Ghosh, Shrestha; Roy, Soumen; Das Gupta, Sujoy K

    2015-10-16

    Mycobacteriophages infect mycobacteria, resulting in their death. Therefore, the possibility of using them as therapeutic agents against the deadly mycobacterial disease tuberculosis (TB) is of great interest. To obtain better insight into the dynamics of mycobacterial inactivation by mycobacteriophages, this study was initiated using mycobacteriophage D29 and Mycobacterium smegmatis as the phage-host system. Here, we implemented a goal-oriented iterative cycle of experiments on one hand and mathematical modeling combined with Monte Carlo simulations on the other. This integrative approach lends valuable insight into the detailed kinetics of bacterium-phage interactions. We measured time-dependent changes in host viability during the growth of phage D29 in M. smegmatis at different multiplicities of infection (MOI). The predictions emerging out of theoretical analyses were further examined using biochemical and cell biological assays. In a phage-host interaction system where multiple rounds of infection are allowed to take place, cell counts drop more rapidly than expected if cell lysis is considered the only mechanism for cell death. The phenomenon could be explained by considering a secondary factor for cell death in addition to lysis. Further investigations reveal that phage infection leads to the increased production of superoxide radicals, which appears to be the secondary factor. Therefore, mycobacteriophage D29 can function as an effective antimycobacterial agent, the killing potential of which may be amplified through secondary mechanisms.

  9. Characterization of an intracellular ATP assay for evaluating the viability of live attenuated mycobacterial vaccine preparations.

    PubMed

    Kolibab, Kristopher; Derrick, Steven C; Jacobs, William R; Morris, Sheldon L

    2012-09-01

    The viability of BCG vaccine has traditionally been monitored using a colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. Despite its widespread use, results from the CFU assay can be highly variable because of the characteristic clumping of mycobacteria, their requirement for complex growth media, and the three week incubation period needed to cultivate slow-growing mycobacteria. In this study, we evaluated whether an ATP luminescence assay (which measures intracellular ATP content) could be used to rapidly estimate the viability of lyophilized and/or frozen preparations of six different BCG vaccine preparations - Danish, Tokyo, Russia, Brazil, Tice, and Pasteur - and two live attenuated mycobacterial vaccine candidates - a ΔlysAΔpanCD M. tuberculosis strain and a ΔmmaA4 BCG vaccine mutant. For every vaccine tested, a significant correlation was observed between intracellular ATP concentrations and the number of viable attenuated bacilli. However, the extractable intracellular ATP levels detected per cell among the different live vaccines varied suggesting that validated ATP luminescence assays with specific appropriate standards must be developed for each individual live attenuated vaccine preparation. Overall, these data indicate that the ATP luminescence assay is a rapid, sensitive, and reliable alternative method for quantifying the viability of varying live attenuated mycobacterial vaccine preparations.

  10. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, L.E.; Hoffner, S.E.; Ansehn, S.

    1988-08-01

    Mycobacterial growth was monitored by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP. Cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and of 25 clinical isolates of the same species were exposed to serial dilutions of ethambutol, isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin. A suppression of ATP, indicating growth inhibition, occurred for susceptible but not resistant strains within 5 to 7 days of incubation. Breakpoint concentrations between susceptibility and resistance were determined by comparing these results with those obtained by reference techniques. Full agreement was found in 99% of the assays with the resistance ratio method on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, and 98% of the assays were in full agreement with the radiometric system (BACTEC). A main advantage of the bioluminescence method is its rapidity, with results available as fast as with the radiometric system but at a lower cost and without the need for radioactive culture medium. The method provides kinetic data concerning drug effects within available in vivo drug concentrations and has great potential for both rapid routine susceptibility testing and research applications in studies of drug effects on mycobacteria.

  11. Differentiation-induced replication-timing changes are restricted to AT-rich/long interspersed nuclear element (LINE)-rich isochores

    PubMed Central

    Hiratani, Ichiro; Leskovar, Amanda; Gilbert, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The replication timing of some genes is developmentally regulated, but the significance of replication timing to cellular differentiation has been difficult to substantiate. Studies have largely been restricted to the comparison of a few genes in established cell lines derived from different tissues, and most of these genes do not change replication timing. Hence, it has not been possible to predict how many or what types of genes might be subject to such control. Here, we have evaluated the replication timing of 54 tissue-specific genes in mouse embryonic stem cells before and after differentiation to neural precursors. Strikingly, genes residing within isochores rich in GC and poor in long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) did not change their replication timing, whereas half of genes within isochores rich in AT and long interspersed nuclear elements displayed programmed changes in replication timing that accompanied changes in gene expression. Our results provide direct evidence that differentiation-induced autosomal replication-timing changes are a significant part of mammalian development, provide a means to predict genes subject to such regulation, and suggest that replication timing may be more related to the evolution of metazoan genomes than to gene function or expression pattern. PMID:15557005

  12. Differentiation-induced replication-timing changes are restricted to AT-rich/long interspersed nuclear element (LINE)-rich isochores.

    PubMed

    Hiratani, Ichiro; Leskovar, Amanda; Gilbert, David M

    2004-11-30

    The replication timing of some genes is developmentally regulated, but the significance of replication timing to cellular differentiation has been difficult to substantiate. Studies have largely been restricted to the comparison of a few genes in established cell lines derived from different tissues, and most of these genes do not change replication timing. Hence, it has not been possible to predict how many or what types of genes might be subject to such control. Here, we have evaluated the replication timing of 54 tissue-specific genes in mouse embryonic stem cells before and after differentiation to neural precursors. Strikingly, genes residing within isochores rich in GC and poor in long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) did not change their replication timing, whereas half of genes within isochores rich in AT and long interspersed nuclear elements displayed programmed changes in replication timing that accompanied changes in gene expression. Our results provide direct evidence that differentiation-induced autosomal replication-timing changes are a significant part of mammalian development, provide a means to predict genes subject to such regulation, and suggest that replication timing may be more related to the evolution of metazoan genomes than to gene function or expression pattern.

  13. Disruption of Mycobacterial AftB Results in Complete Loss of Terminal β(1 → 2) Arabinofuranose Residues of Lipoarabinomannan

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) and arabinogalactan (AG) are the two major mycobacterial cell wall (lipo)polysaccharides, which contain a structurally similar arabinan domain that is highly branched and assembled in a stepwise fashion by variety of arabinofuranosyltransferases (ArafT). In addition to playing an essential role in mycobacterial physiology, LAM and its biochemical precursor lipomannan possess potent immunomodulatory activities that affect the host immune response. In the search of additional mycobacterial ArafTs that participate in the synthesis of the arabinan segment of LAM, we disrupted aftB (MSMEG_6400) in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The deletion of chromosomal aftB locus could only be achieved in the presence of a rescue plasmid carrying a functional copy of aftB, strongly suggesting that it is essential for the viability of M. smegmatis. Isolation and detailed structural characterization of a LAM molecule derived from the conditional mutant deficient in AftB revealed the absence of terminal β(1 → 2)-linked arabinofuranosyl residues. Furthermore, we demonstrated that truncated LAM displays proinflammatory activity, which is due to its ability to activate Toll-like receptor 2. All together, our results indicate that AftB is an essential mycobacterial ArafT that plays a role in the synthesis of the arabinan domain of LAM. PMID:28033704

  14. Detection of mycobacterial DNA by a specific and simple lateral flow assay incorporating cadmium selenide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Cimaglia, Fabio; Liandris, Emmanouil; Gazouli, Maria; Sechi, Leonardo; Chiesa, Maurizio; De Lorenzis, Enrico; Andreadou, Margarita; Taka, Styliani; Mataragka, Antonia; Ikonomopoulos, John

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium selenide quantum dots have been incorporated to a lateral flow assay for the specific and very simple detection of different mycobacterial DNA targets within only a few minutes, bypassing the complexity of conventional DNA hybridization assays. The method extends our previous work on protein detection using an identical procedure.

  15. Inhibition of phagosome maturation by mycobacteria does not interfere with presentation of mycobacterial antigens by MHC molecules.

    PubMed

    Majlessi, Laleh; Combaluzier, Benoit; Albrecht, Imke; Garcia, Jessica E; Nouze, Clémence; Pieters, Jean; Leclerc, Claude

    2007-08-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria escape host innate immune responses by surviving within phagosomes of host macrophages and blocking their delivery to lysosomes. Avoiding lysosomal delivery may also be involved in the capacity of living mycobacteria to modulate MHC class I- or II-dependent T cell responses, which may contribute to their pathogenicity in vivo. In this study, we show that the presentation of mycobacterial Ags is independent of the site of intracellular residence inside professional APCs. Infection of mouse macrophages or dendritic cells in vitro with mycobacterial mutants that are unable to escape lysosomal transfer resulted in an identical efficiency of Ag presentation compared with wild-type mycobacteria. Moreover, in vivo, such mutants induced CD4(+) Th1 or CD8(+) CTL responses in mice against various mycobacterial Ags that were comparable to those induced by their wild-type counterparts. These results suggest that the limiting factor for the generation of an adaptive immune response against mycobacteria is not the degree of lysosomal delivery. These findings are important in the rational design of improved vaccines to combat mycobacterial diseases.

  16. Mycobacterial culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... test to look for the bacteria that cause tuberculosis and similar infections. How the Test is Performed ... order this test if you have signs of tuberculosis or a related infection. Normal Results If there ...

  17. Mycobacterial Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... many different kinds. The most common one causes tuberculosis. Another one causes leprosy. Still others cause infections ... aren't "typical" because they don't cause tuberculosis. But they can still harm people, especially people ...

  18. Engineering Mycobacteria for the Production of Self-Assembling Biopolyesters Displaying Mycobacterial Antigens for Use as a Tuberculosis Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason W.; Parlane, Natalie A.; Rehm, Bernd H. A.; Buddle, Bryce M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis and still remains one of the world's biggest global health burdens. Recently, engineered polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biobeads that were produced in both Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis and displayed mycobacterial antigens were found to induce significant cell-mediated immune responses in mice. We observed that such PHA beads contained host cell proteins as impurities, which we hypothesized to have the potential to induce immunity. In this study, we aimed to develop PHA beads produced in mycobacteria (mycobacterial PHA biobeads [MBB]) and test their potential as a TB vaccine in a mouse model. As a model organism, nonpathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis was engineered to produce MBB or MBB with immobilized mycobacterial antigens Ag85A and ESAT-6 on their surface (A:E-MBB). Three key enzymes involved in the poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid) pathway, namely, β-ketothiolase (PhaA), acetoacetyl-coenzyme A reductase (PhaB), and PHA synthase (PhaC), were engineered into E. coli-Mycobacterium shuttle plasmids and expressed in trans. Immobilization of specific antigens to the surface of the MBB was achieved by creating a fusion with the PHA synthase which remains covalently attached to the polyester core, resulting in PHA biobeads displaying covalently immobilized antigens. MBB, A:E-MBB, and an M. smegmatis vector control (MVC) were used in a mouse immunology trial, with comparison to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-vaccinated and Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated groups. We successfully produced MBB and A:E-MBB and used them as vaccines to induce a cellular immune response to mycobacterial antigens. IMPORTANCE Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis and still remains one of the world's biggest global health burdens. In this study, we produced polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biobeads in mycobacteria and used them as vaccines to

  19. [Detection and identification of tuberculosis by amplification of mycobacterial DNA from clinical cultured samples].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, N; Hai, S; Ohya, N

    1993-02-01

    We examined 57 cultured mycobacteria using a method based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR), slot blot hybridization and dideoxy sequencing of nucleotides for detection of M. tuberculosis. Using standard microbiological tests, 34 of 57 specimens were identified as M. tuberculosis and the rest as atypical mycobacteria. Two of 34 specimens that contained M. tuberculosis were not hybridized with a probe specific for M. tuberculosis. These two specimens were identified as atypical mycobacterium by nucleotide sequencing. An atypical mycobacterium specimen that was hybridized with a prove specific for M. tuberculosis was identified as M. tuberculosis using nucleotide sequencing. These results suggest that the approach using PCR and slot blot hybridization for detection of mycobacterium may be more accurate than standard microbiological tests in the rapid and definitive diagnosis of mycobacterial infection.

  20. Leveraging Advances in Tuberculosis Diagnosis and Treatment to Address Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Raju, Ravikiran M; Raju, Sagar M; Zhao, Yanlin; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), defined as any mycobacterial pathogen other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium leprae, are a diverse group of pathogens that collectively cause a substantive but often unappreciated worldwide burden of illness. Although NTMs may cause illness similar to M. tuberculosis, these pathogens generally do not respond to classic tuberculosis (TB) drug regimens, resulting in misdiagnosis and poor treatment, particularly in resource-poor settings. Although a few high-quality epidemiologic surveys have been made on the topic, existing evidence suggests that NTM-associated disease is much more common than previously thought: more common than TB in the industrialized world and likely increasing in prevalence globally. Despite this evidence, these organisms remain markedly understudied, and few international grants support basic science and clinical research. Here we suggest that the considerable efforts in developing new treatments and diagnostics for TB can be harnessed in the fight against NTM-associated illnesses.

  1. Highly Deviated Asymmetric Division in Very Low Proportion of Mycobacterial Mid-log Phase Cells.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Mukkayyan, Nagaraja; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we show that about 20% of the septating Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium xenopi cells in the exponential phase populationdivideasymmetrically, with an unusually high deviation (17 ± 4%) in the division site from the median, to generate short cells and long cells, thereby generating population heterogeneity. This mode of division is very different from the symmetric division of themajority (about 80%) of the septating cells in the Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium marinum, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG exponential phase population, with 5-10% deviation in the division site from the mid-cell site, as reported by recent studies. The short cells and the long cells further grew and divided to generate a population. We speculate that the generation of the short cells and the long cells through the highly deviated asymmetric divisionin the low proportions of mycobacterial population may have a role in stress tolerance.

  2. Rapid construction of mycobacterial mutagenesis vectors using ligation-independent cloning

    PubMed Central

    Balhana, Ricardo; Stoker, Neil G.; Sikder, Mahmudul Hasan; Chauviac, Francois-Xavier; Kendall, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Targeted mutagenesis is one of the major tools for determining the function of a given gene and its involvement in bacterial pathogenesis. In mycobacteria, gene deletion is often accomplished by using allelic exchange techniques that commonly utilise a suicide delivery vector. We have adapted a widely-used suicide delivery vector (p1NIL) for cloning two flanking regions of a gene using ligation independent cloning (LIC). The pNILRB plasmid series produced allow a faster, more efficient and less laborious cloning procedure. In this paper we describe the making of pNILRB5, a modified version of p1NIL that contains two pairs of LIC sites flanking either a sacB or a lacZ gene. We demonstrate the success of this technique by generating 3 mycobacterial mutant strains. These vectors will contribute to more high-throughput methods of mutagenesis. PMID:20650290

  3. Mycobacterial toxin induces analgesia in buruli ulcer by targeting the angiotensin pathways.

    PubMed

    Marion, Estelle; Song, Ok-Ryul; Christophe, Thierry; Babonneau, Jérémie; Fenistein, Denis; Eyer, Joël; Letournel, Frank; Henrion, Daniel; Clere, Nicolas; Paille, Vincent; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Saint André, Jean-Paul; Gersbach, Philipp; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Stinear, Timothy Paul; Comoglio, Yannick; Sandoz, Guillaume; Preisser, Laurence; Delneste, Yves; Yeramian, Edouard; Marsollier, Laurent; Brodin, Priscille

    2014-06-19

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer, causes extensive skin lesions, which despite their severity are not accompanied by pain. It was previously thought that this remarkable analgesia is ensured by direct nerve cell destruction. We demonstrate here that M. ulcerans-induced hypoesthesia is instead achieved through a specific neurological pathway triggered by the secreted mycobacterial polyketide mycolactone. We decipher this pathway at the molecular level, showing that mycolactone elicits signaling through type 2 angiotensin II receptors (AT2Rs), leading to potassium-dependent hyperpolarization of neurons. We further validate the physiological relevance of this mechanism with in vivo studies of pain sensitivity in mice infected with M. ulcerans, following the disruption of the identified pathway. Our findings shed new light on molecular mechanisms evolved by natural systems for the induction of very effective analgesia, opening up the prospect of new families of analgesics derived from such systems.

  4. Rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis by identification of Antigen 85 in mycobacterial culture system.

    PubMed

    Phunpae, Ponrut; Chanwong, Sakarin; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Apiratmateekul, Napaporn; Makeudom, Anupong; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2014-03-01

    The standard culture for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis takes a long time to perform. We introduce here a method for fast identification of M. tuberculosis in mycobacterial culture system. Antibodies to Antigen (Ag) 85 of M. tuberculosis were produced and subsequently used to develop enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting Ag85 in the culture filtrate. By this detection, rapid tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis was achieved in comparison to the standard culture system with 89.6% sensitivity and 94% specificity. We thus suggest a new TB diagnosis strategy in which clinical samples are cultured in mycobacteria liquid culture medium. The culture filtrates are taken for detection of the Ag85 by ELISA. Using this strategy, 25%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of TB patients will be detected within day 3, week 1, 2, and 4, respectively. The established assay will enable a faster diagnosis of TB, leading to more efficient treatment of TB patients and control of disease transmission.

  5. The effect of Toxoplasma cell fractions and mycobacterial immunostimulants against virulent Toxoplasma gondii in mice.

    PubMed

    Masihi, K N; Brehmer, W; Werner, H

    1979-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites were disrupted in a Ribi cell fractionator and separated into cell walls and protoplasm by differential centrifugation. These products were used alone or combined with a mycobacterial glycolipid (P3) and injected either as oil-in-water emulsions or incorporated in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Mice were vaccinated by intravenous or intradermal routes and challenged intraperitoneally with a highly virulent strain of Toxoplasma gondii. A local granuloma formation was induced after i.d. inoculation of Toxoplasma vaccines containing P3 as this glycolipid enabled an adherence of the antigens on the mineral oil droplets. The adjuvant effect of P3 on antibody formation was also observed. Most of the fractions showed a low, but statistically significant prolongation of survival time. Vaccination by the i.v. route with homologous or heterologous antigens, including Trypanosoma cruzi, were not significantly effective, with the exception of a high dose of Toxoplasma protoplasm associated with P3.

  6. Identifying novel mycobacterial stress associated genes using a random mutagenesis screen in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopinath; Joshi, Shrilaxmi V; Sridhar, Aditi; Dutta, Sayantanee; Raghunand, Tirumalai R

    2015-12-10

    Cell envelope associated components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) have been implicated in stress response, immune modulation and in vivo survival of the pathogen. Although many such factors have been identified, there is a large disparity between the number of genes predicted to be involved in functions linked to the envelope and those described in the literature. To identify and characterise novel stress related factors associated with the mycobacterial cell envelope, we isolated colony morphotype mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), based on the hypothesis that mutants with unusual colony morphology may have defects in the biosynthesis of cell envelope components. On testing their susceptibility to stress conditions relevant to M.tb physiology, multiple mutants were found to be sensitive to Isoniazid, Diamide and H2O2, indicative of altered permeability due to changes in cell envelope composition. Two mutants showed defects in biofilm formation implying possible roles for the target genes in antibiotic tolerance and/or virulence. These assays identified novel stress associated roles for several mycobacterial genes including sahH, tatB and aceE. Complementation analysis of selected mutants with the M. smegmatis genes and their M.tb homologues showed phenotypic restoration, validating their link to the observed phenotypes. A mutant carrying an insertion in fhaA encoding a forkhead associated domain containing protein, showed reduced survival in THP-1 macrophages, providing in vivo validation to this screen. Taken together, these results suggest that the M.tb homologues of a majority of the identified genes may play significant roles in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis.

  7. Randomized Trial of Liposomal Amikacin for Inhalation in Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Griffith, David E; Eagle, Gina; McGinnis Ii, John P; Micioni, Liza; Liu, Keith; Daley, Charles L; Winthrop, Kevin L; Ruoss, Stephen; Addrizzo-Harris, Doreen J; Flume, Patrick A; Dorgan, Daniel; Salathe, Matthias; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Gupta, Renu; Wallace, Richard J

    2016-10-17

    Rationale Lengthy multi-drug, toxic, and low efficacy regimens limit management of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (PNTM) disease. Objective This phase 2 study investigated efficacy and safety of liposomal amikacin for inhalation (LAI) in treatment-refractory PNTM (Mycobacterium avium complex [MAC] or Mycobacterium abscessus) disease. Methods During the double-blind phase, patients were randomly assigned to LAI (590 mg) or placebo once daily added to their multi-drug regimen for 84 days. Both groups could receive open-label LAI for 84 additional days. Primary endpoint was change from baseline to day 84 on a semi-quantitative mycobacterial growth scale. Other endpoints included sputum conversion, 6-minute walk distance, and adverse events. Measurements and Main Results Modified intent-to-treat population included 89 (LAI=44; placebo=45) patients. Average age was 59 years, 88% were female, 92% were Caucasian; 80 and 59 patients completed study drug dosing during the double-blind and open-label phases, respectively. Primary endpoint was not achieved (P=0.072); however, a greater proportion of the LAI group demonstrated ≥1 negative sputum cultures (32% [14/44] vs. 9% [4/45]; P=0.006) and improvement in 6-minute walk test (+20.6 vs. -25.0 meters; P=0.017) at day 84. Treatment effect was predominantly in patients without cystic fibrosis with MAC and was sustained 1 year post-LAI. Most adverse events were respiratory and in some patients led to drug discontinuation. Conclusions Although the primary endpoint was not reached, LAI added to a multi-drug regimen produced improvements in sputum conversion and 6-minute walk distance vs. placebo with limited systemic toxicity in patients with refractory MAC lung disease. Further research is needed. Clinical trial registration available at www.clinicaltrials.gov, ID NCT01315236.

  8. Rapid radiometric methods to detect and differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis/M. bovis from other mycobacterial species

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqi, S.H.; Hwangbo, C.C.; Silcox, V.; Good, R.C.; Snider, D.E. Jr.; Middlebrook, G.

    1984-10-01

    Rapid methods for the differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis/M. bovis (TB complex) from other mycobacteria (MOTT bacilli) were developed and evaluated in a three-phase study. In the first phase, techniques for identification of Mycobacterium species were developed by using radiometric technology and BACTEC Middlebrook 7H12 liquid medium. Based on /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution, characteristic growth patterns were established for 13 commonly encountered mycobacterial species. Mycobacteria belonging to the TB complex were differentiated from other mycobacteria by cellular morphology and rate of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution. For further differentiation, radiometric tests for niacin production and inhibition by Q-nitro-alpha-acetyl amino-beta-hydroxy-propiophenone (NAP) were developed. In the second phase, 100 coded specimens on Lowenstein-Jensen medium were identified as members of the TB complex, MOTT bacilli, bacteria other than mycobacteria, or ''no viable organisms'' within 3 to 12 (average 6.4) days of receipt from the Centers for Disease Control. Isolation and identification of mycobacteria from 20 simulated sputum specimens were carried out in phase III. Out of 20 sputum specimens, 16 contained culturable mycobacteria, and all of the positives were detected by the BACTEC method in an average of 7.3 days. The positive mycobacterial cultures were isolated and identified as TB complex or MOTT bacilli in an average of 12.8 days. The radiometric NAP test was found to be highly sensitive and specific for a rapid identification of TB complex, whereas the radiometric niacin test was found to have some inherent problems. Radiometric BACTEC and conventional methodologies were in complete agreement in Phase II as well as in Phase III.

  9. Presence of mycobacterial L-forms in human blood: Challenge of BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Markova, Nadya; Slavchev, Georgi; Michailova, Lilia

    2015-01-01

    Possible persistence of bacteria in human blood as cell wall deficient forms (L-forms) represents a top research priority for microbiologists. Application of live BCG vaccine and L-form transformation of vaccine strain may display a new intriguing aspect concerning the opportunity for occurrence of unpredictable colonization inside the human body by unusual microbial life forms. L-form cultures were isolated from 141 blood samples of people previously vaccinated with BCG, none with a history of exposure to tuberculosis. Innovative methodology to access the unusual L-form elements derived from human blood was developed. The methodology outlines the path of transformation of non- cultivable L-form element to cultivable bacteria and their adaptation for growth in vitro. All isolates showed typical L-forms growth features ("fried eggs" colonies and biofilm). Electron microscopy revealed morphology evidencing peculiar characteristics of bacterial L-form population (cell wall deficient polymorphic elements of variable shape and size). Regular detection of acid fast bacteria in smears of isolated blood L-form cultures, led us to start their identification by using specific Mycobactrium spp. genetic tests. Forty five of 97 genetically tested blood cultures provided specific positive signals for mycobacteria, confirmed by at least one of the 3 specific assays (16S rRNA PCR; IS6110 Real Time PCR and spoligotyping). In conclusion, the obtained genetic evidence suggests that these L-forms are of mycobacterial origin. As the investigated people had been vaccinated with BCG, we can assume that the identified mycobacterial L-forms may be produced by persisting live BCG vaccine.

  10. The CXCR3-CXCL11 signaling axis mediates macrophage recruitment and dissemination of mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Torraca, Vincenzo; Cui, Chao; Boland, Ralf; Bebelman, Jan-Paul; van der Sar, Astrid M; Smit, Martine J; Siderius, Marco; Spaink, Herman P; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2015-03-01

    The recruitment of leukocytes to infectious foci depends strongly on the local release of chemoattractant mediators. The human CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) is an important node in the chemokine signaling network and is expressed by multiple leukocyte lineages, including T cells and macrophages. The ligands of this receptor originate from an ancestral CXCL11 gene in early vertebrates. Here, we used the optically accessible zebrafish embryo model to explore the function of the CXCR3-CXCL11 axis in macrophage recruitment and show that disruption of this axis increases the resistance to mycobacterial infection. In a mutant of the zebrafish ortholog of CXCR3 (cxcr3.2), macrophage chemotaxis to bacterial infections was attenuated, although migration to infection-independent stimuli was unaffected. Additionally, attenuation of macrophage recruitment to infection could be mimicked by treatment with NBI74330, a high-affinity antagonist of CXCR3. We identified two infection-inducible CXCL11-like chemokines as the functional ligands of Cxcr3.2, showing that the recombinant proteins exerted a Cxcr3.2-dependent chemoattraction when locally administrated in vivo. During infection of zebrafish embryos with Mycobacterium marinum, a well-established model for tuberculosis, we found that Cxcr3.2 deficiency limited the macrophage-mediated dissemination of mycobacteria. Furthermore, the loss of Cxcr3.2 function attenuated the formation of granulomatous lesions, the typical histopathological features of tuberculosis, and led to a reduction in the total bacterial burden. Prevention of mycobacterial dissemination by targeting the CXCR3 pathway, therefore, might represent a host-directed therapeutic strategy for treatment of tuberculosis. The demonstration of a conserved CXCR3-CXCL11 signaling axis in zebrafish extends the translational applicability of this model for studying diseases involving the innate immune system.

  11. Characterisation of a short interspersed repeat (Mermaid) that has family members on human chromosome 21 and elsewhere in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, J; Yulug, I G; Johnstone, K; Scambler, P J; Fisher, E M

    1996-01-01

    To understand the architecture of the human genome, we need a complete definition of all the repeat sequence families, as these make up the majority of human DNA. We have isolated a small DNA fragment from human chromosome 21 and have used sequence analysis of this fragment to uncover a new low copy repeat element of approximately 300 bp that we term the Mermaid repeat. This repeat is related to, but is different from, the MER12 repeat and is interspersed in the genome. Mermaid family members that we have studied are between 81%-87% identical to our preliminary consensus sequence. Therefore, we have added a new member to the large collection of human repetitive elements. In addition, we have mapped a Mermaid repeat to a telomeric position on the long arm of human chromosome 21, at 21q22.3.

  12. Carbon-wrapped MnO nanodendrites interspersed on reduced graphene oxide sheets as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boli; Li, Dan; Liu, Zhengjiao; Gu, Lili; Xie, Wenhe; Li, Qun; Guo, Pengqian; Liu, Dequan; He, Deyan

    2017-02-01

    Carbon-wrapped MnO nanodendrites interspersed on reduced graphene oxide sheets (C-MnO/rGO) were prepared on nickel foam by a facile vacuum filtration and a subsequent thermal treatment. As a binder-free anode of lithium-ion battery, the nanodendritic structure of C-MnO accommodates the huge volume expansion and shortens the diffusion length for lithium ion and electron, rGO sheets prevent C-MnO nanodendites from aggregation and offer a good electronic conduction. As a result, the electrode with such a novel architecture delivers superior electrochemical properties including high reversible capacity, excellent rate capability and cycle stability. Moreover, MnO nanodendrites change to nanoparticles wrapped in graphene sheets during the lithiation/delithiation process, which is a more beneficial microstructure to further increase the specific capacity and cycle life of the electrode.

  13. Systematic Analysis of Mycobacterial Acylation Reveals First Example of Acylation-mediated Regulation of Enzyme Activity of a Bacterial Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Anshika; Arora, Gunjan; Virmani, Richa; Kundu, Parijat; Khanna, Tanya; Sajid, Andaleeb; Misra, Richa; Joshi, Jayadev; Yadav, Vikas; Samanta, Sintu; Saini, Neeru; Pandey, Amit K; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Hentschker, Christian; Becher, Dörte; Gerth, Ulf; Singh, Yogendra

    2015-10-23

    Protein lysine acetylation is known to regulate multiple aspects of bacterial metabolism. However, its presence in mycobacterial signal transduction and virulence-associated proteins has not been studied. In this study, analysis of mycobacterial proteins from different cellular fractions indicated dynamic and widespread occurrence of lysine acetylation. Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins regulating diverse physiological processes were then selected and expressed in the surrogate host Mycobacterium smegmatis. The purified proteins were analyzed for the presence of lysine acetylation, leading to the identification of 24 acetylated proteins. In addition, novel lysine succinylation and propionylation events were found to co-occur with acetylation on several proteins. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase B (PtpB), a secretory phosphatase that regulates phosphorylation of host proteins and plays a critical role in Mycobacterium infection, is modified by acetylation and succinylation at Lys-224. This residue is situated in a lid region that covers the enzyme's active site. Consequently, acetylation and succinylation negatively regulate the activity of PtpB.

  14. Effects of pyrazinamide on fatty acid synthesis by whole mycobacterial cells and purified fatty acid synthase I.

    PubMed

    Boshoff, Helena I; Mizrahi, Valerie; Barry, Clifton E

    2002-04-01

    The effects of low extracellular pH and intracellular accumulation of weak organic acids were compared with respect to fatty acid synthesis by whole cells of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. The profile of fatty acids synthesized during exposure to benzoic, nicotinic, or pyrazinoic acids, as well as that observed during intracellular hydrolysis of the corresponding amides, was not a direct consequence of modulation of fatty acid synthesis by these compounds but reflected the response to inorganic acid stress. Analysis of fatty acid synthesis in crude mycobacterial cell extracts demonstrated that pyrazinoic acid failed to directly modulate the fatty acid synthase activity catalyzed by fatty acid synthase I (FAS-I). However, fatty acid synthesis was irreversibly inhibited by 5-chloro-pyrazinamide in a time-dependent fashion. Moreover, we demonstrate that pyrazinoic acid does not inhibit purified mycobacterial FAS-I, suggesting that this enzyme is not the immediate target of pyrazinamide.

  15. Plasma Membrane Profiling Reveals Upregulation of ABCA1 by Infected Macrophages Leading to Restriction of Mycobacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jing; Basu Roy, Robindra; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Antrobus, Robin; Du, Yuxian; Smith, Duncan L.; Weekes, Michael P.; Javid, Babak

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane represents a critical interface between the internal and extracellular environments, and harbors multiple proteins key receptors and transporters that play important roles in restriction of intracellular infection. We applied plasma membrane profiling, a technique that combines quantitative mass spectrometry with selective cell surface aminooxy-biotinylation, to Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG)-infected THP-1 macrophages. We quantified 559 PM proteins in BCG-infected THP-1 cells. One significantly upregulated cell-surface protein was the cholesterol transporter ABCA1. We showed that ABCA1 was upregulated on the macrophage cell-surface following infection with pathogenic mycobacteria and knockdown of ABCA1 resulted in increased mycobacterial survival within macrophages, suggesting that it may be a novel mycobacterial host-restriction factor. PMID:27462310

  16. Limited clonal heterogeneity of antigen-specific T cells localizing in the pleural space during mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Manca, F; Rossi, G; Valle, M T; Lantero, S; Li Pira, G; Fenoglio, D; De Bruin, J; Costantini, M; Damiani, G; Balbi, B

    1991-01-01

    To detect possible differences in phenotype and fine specificity for mycobacterial antigens between CD4-positive T cells from peripheral blood (PB) and from inflammatory sites, we identified four patients presenting with a mycobacterial pleural exudate (PE) rich in PPD-specific lymphocytes and with a negative skin test to tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) and a negative proliferative response of PB lymphocytes to PPD at the same time. Several weeks after chemotherapy, these patients converted to PPD responsiveness in the periphery, and PPD-specific clones could be generated from PB at this stage. The phenotypic comparison of PE lymphocytes and concomitant PB lymphocytes obtained before treatment showed an increase of CD8 cells and a high frequency of HLA-DR-positive activated T cells in PE. The frequency of tetanus toxoid-specific and Candida albicans-specific proliferating T cells was lower than that of PPD-specific cells in PE but not in PB. PPD-specific clones were derived initially from PE and from PB once the patients had converted to PPD responsiveness. The two sets of clones from each patient were compared for proliferative response to mycobacterial antigen clusters of defined molecular weight ranges. A large number of PE-derived clones (36%) responded to a fraction of 27 to 35 kDa, whereas only one clone from PB responded to the same fraction. The purified antigen P32 (32 kDa), a soluble mycobacterial protein, stimulated PE-derived clones that were responsive to the 37- to 27-kDa fraction but did not stimulate PB-derived clones. The data demonstrate that PE- and PB-derived lymphocytes differ both in phenotype and in fine specificity, suggesting a limited clonal heterogeneity of T cells localizing at the inflammatory site in tuberculous patients without a PPD response in the periphery. Therefore T cells compartmentalized at inflammatory sites provide information that is different from that provided by T cells in the periphery. PMID:1898906

  17. Expression of a long pentraxin, PTX3, by monocytes exposed to the mycobacterial cell wall component lipoarabinomannan.

    PubMed Central

    Vouret-Craviari, V; Matteucci, C; Peri, G; Poli, G; Introna, M; Mantovani, A

    1997-01-01

    PTX3 is a prototypic long pentraxin composed of a C-terminal domain similar to those of classical pentraxins (e.g., C reactive protein) and an unrelated N-terminal portion. PTX3 is expressed in a variety of cell types, notably mononuclear phagocytes and endothelial cells, after exposure to the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). The present study was designed to assess whether mycobacterial components were able to induce expression and production of PTX3. Mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan (LAM) induced expression of PTX3 mRNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The non-mannose-capped version of lipoarabinomannan (AraLAM) was considerably more potent than the mannose-capped version ManLAM or the simpler version phosphatidylinositol mannoside. Among mononuclear cells, monocytes were responsible for LAM-induced PTX3 mRNA expression. Whole mycobacteria (Mycobacterium bovis BCG) strongly induced PTX3 expression. Pretreatment with actinomycin D abolished LAM-induced PTX3 expression, whereas cycloheximide only partially reduced the expression. LAM-induced PTX3 expression was associated with the production of immunoreactive PTX3. IL-10 and IL-13 did not inhibit the induction of PTX3 by LAM. Under the same conditions, these anti-inflammatory cytokines inhibited MCP-1 expression. In contrast, gamma interferon inhibited LAM-induced PTX3 expression. Thus, in addition to IL-1, TNF, and lipopolysaccharide, mycobacterial cell wall components also induce expression and production of the long pentraxin PTX3. The significance of PTX3 in the immunobiology of mycobacterial infection and its relevance in relation to clinical involvement remain to be determined. PMID:9119472

  18. In vivo induction of apoptosis in the thymus by administration of mycobacterial cord factor (trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate).

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Y; Kaneda, K; Fujiwara, N; Morimoto, M; Oka, S; Yano, I

    1997-01-01

    It is reported that some bacteria or bacterial components cause thymic atrophy via the apoptotic process. The present study demonstrated for the first time in vivo induction of apoptosis in the mouse thymus by mycobacterial cord factor (CF) (trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate). When 300 microg of purified CF from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was intravenously administered to BALB/c mice in the form of water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) emulsion, thymic atrophy and pulmonary granulomas were induced with a peak on day 7, whereas, in the form of liposomes, CF induced thymic atrophy on days 14 to 21 in parallel with the development of hepatic granulomas. Thymic atrophy resulted from the depletion of cortical lymphocytes via apoptosis as revealed by DNA fragmentation and karyorrhectic changes. In contrast, mycobacterial sulfatide (2,3,6,6'-tetraacyl trehalose 2'-sulfate) caused neither thymic atrophy nor granuloma formation. Compared to lipopolysaccharide-induced thymocyte apoptosis, CF (w/o/w)-induced thymocyte apoptosis developed more slowly, reached a maximum later, and lasted longer but was less intense. Although serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) levels in CF-treated mice were not significantly elevated, administration of anti-TNF-alpha antibody almost completely inhibited thymic atrophy and granuloma formation. Serum corticosterone levels were only slightly elevated by CF administration. The present results indicate that mycobacterial CF induces thymic atrophy via apoptosis, which is closely linked with granuloma formation. PMID:9125563

  19. Structure of the mycobacterial ATP synthase Fo rotor ring in complex with the anti-TB drug bedaquiline.

    PubMed

    Preiss, Laura; Langer, Julian D; Yildiz, Özkan; Eckhardt-Strelau, Luise; Guillemont, Jérôme E G; Koul, Anil; Meier, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is more prevalent today than at any other time in human history. Bedaquiline (BDQ), a novel Mycobacterium-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase inhibitor, is the first drug in the last 40 years to be approved for the treatment of MDR-TB. This bactericidal compound targets the membrane-embedded rotor (c-ring) of the mycobacterial ATP synthase, a key metabolic enzyme required for ATP generation. We report the x-ray crystal structures of a mycobacterial c9 ring without and with BDQ bound at 1.55- and 1.7-Å resolution, respectively. The structures and supporting functional assays reveal how BDQ specifically interacts with the rotor ring via numerous interactions and thereby completely covers the c-ring's ion-binding sites. This prevents the rotor ring from acting as an ion shuttle and stalls ATP synthase operation. The structures explain how diarylquinoline chemicals specifically inhibit the mycobacterial ATP synthase and thus enable structure-based drug design of next-generation ATP synthase inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacterial pathogens.

  20. Structure of the mycobacterial ATP synthase Fo rotor ring in complex with the anti-TB drug bedaquiline

    PubMed Central

    Preiss, Laura; Langer, Julian D.; Yildiz, Özkan; Eckhardt-Strelau, Luise; Guillemont, Jérôme E. G.; Koul, Anil; Meier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is more prevalent today than at any other time in human history. Bedaquiline (BDQ), a novel Mycobacterium-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase inhibitor, is the first drug in the last 40 years to be approved for the treatment of MDR-TB. This bactericidal compound targets the membrane-embedded rotor (c-ring) of the mycobacterial ATP synthase, a key metabolic enzyme required for ATP generation. We report the x-ray crystal structures of a mycobacterial c9 ring without and with BDQ bound at 1.55- and 1.7-Å resolution, respectively. The structures and supporting functional assays reveal how BDQ specifically interacts with the rotor ring via numerous interactions and thereby completely covers the c-ring’s ion-binding sites. This prevents the rotor ring from acting as an ion shuttle and stalls ATP synthase operation. The structures explain how diarylquinoline chemicals specifically inhibit the mycobacterial ATP synthase and thus enable structure-based drug design of next-generation ATP synthase inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacterial pathogens. PMID:26601184

  1. Clinical Usefulness of PCR for Differential Diagnosis of Tuberculosis and Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection in Paraffin-Embedded Lung Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yo Na; Kim, Kyoung Min; Choi, Ha Na; Lee, Ju Hyung; Park, Ho Sung; Jang, Kyu Yun; Moon, Woo Sung; Kang, Myoung Jae; Lee, Dong Geun; Chung, Myoung Ja

    2015-09-01

    The need for isolation of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from clinical specimens has increased in recent years. Our aim was to determine the clinical usefulness of PCR for differential diagnosis of tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in lung tissue that show chronic granulomatous inflammation. A total of 199 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens, including 137 Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), 17 NTM cases, and 45 other than mycobacterial cases were collected. We performed acid-fast staining, MTB and NTM nested PCRs, and MTB and NTM real-time PCRs. No histologic difference between MTB and NTM infections was observed. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting MTB were 70.1% and 95.1% by nested PCR, respectively, and 70.8% and 100.0% by real-time PCR, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting NTM were 52.9% and 96.15% by nested PCR, respectively, and 35.3% and 100.0% by real-time PCR, respectively. Mycobacteria were identified by acid-fast staining in 50 of 154 cases (32.5%). All 50 acid-fast staining-positive cases showed positive nested and real-time PCR results (n = 47 MTB PCR positive; n = 3 NTM PCR positive), and results agreed with final diagnosis. PCR will be useful for the rapid diagnosis of mycobacterial infection and differentiation of MTB from NTM in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens, especially in acid-fast staining-positive specimens.

  2. Infection Sources of a Common Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogen, Mycobacterium avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Maruyama, Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed a continuous increase in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases, especially pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) diseases. Although it is not clear why NTM diseases have been increasing, one possibility is an increase of mycobacterial infection sources in the environment. Thus, in this review, we focused on the infection sources of pathogenic NTM, especially MAC. The environmental niches for MAC include water, soil, and dust. The formation of aerosols containing NTM arising from shower water, soil, and pool water implies that these niches can be infection sources. Furthermore, genotyping has shown that clinical isolates are identical to environmental ones from household tap water, bathrooms, potting soil, and garden soil. Therefore, to prevent and treat MAC diseases, it is essential to identify the infection sources for these organisms, because patients with these diseases often suffer from reinfections and recurrent infections with them. In the environmental sources, MAC and other NTM organisms can form biofilms, survive within amoebae, and exist in a free-living state. Mycobacterial communities are also likely to occur in these infection sources in households. Water distribution systems are a transmission route from natural water reservoirs to household tap water. Other infection sources include areas with frequent human contact, such as soil and bathrooms, indicating that individuals may carry NTM organisms that concomitantly attach to their household belongings. To explore the mechanisms associated with the global spread of infection and MAC transmission routes, an epidemiological population-wide genotyping survey would be very useful. A good example of the power of genotyping comes from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, where close genetic relatedness was found between isolates of it from European patients and pigs in Japan and Europe, implying global transmission of this bacterium

  3. Mycobacterial Caseinolytic Protease Gene Regulator ClgR Is a Substrate of Caseinolytic Protease

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mycobacterial caseinolytic protease ClpP1P2 is a degradative protease that recently gained interest as a genetically and pharmacologically validated drug target for tuberculosis. The first whole-cell active ClpP1P2 inhibitor, the human proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, is currently undergoing lead optimization to introduce selectivity for the bacterial target. How inhibition of ClpP1P2 translates into whole-cell antimicrobial activity is little understood. Previous work has shown that the caseinolytic protease gene regulator ClgR is an activator of the clpP1P2 genes and also suggested that this transcription factor may be a substrate of the protease. Here, we employ promoter activity reporters and direct mRNA level measurements showing that bortezomib treatment of Mycobacterium bovis BCG increased transcription of clpP1P2 and other ClgR-dependent promoters, suggesting that inhibition of ClpP1P2 increases cellular ClgR levels. Then, we carried out red fluorescent protein-ClgR fusion analyses to show that ClgR is indeed a substrate of ClpP1P2 and to identify ClgR’s C-terminal nonapeptide APVVSLAVA as the signal sufficient for recognition and efficient protein degradation by ClpP1P2. Interestingly, accumulation of ClgR appears to be toxic for bacilli, suggesting a mechanism for how pharmacological inhibition of ClpP1P2 protease activity by bortezomib translates into whole-cell antibacterial activity. IMPORTANCE With 9 million new cases and more than 1 million deaths per year, tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the biggest infectious disease killer globally. New drugs for the treatment of the drug-resistant forms of the disease are needed. Recently, a new target-lead couple, the mycobacterial protease ClpP1P2 and the human anticancer drug bortezomib, was identified. However, we know little about how expression of this protease is regulated, which proteins in the bacterium it degrades, how the protease recognizes its target proteins

  4. The characterization of DINE-1, a short, interspersed repetitive element present on chromosome and in the centric heterochromatin of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Locke, J; Howard, L T; Aippersbach, N; Podemski, L; Hodgetts, R B

    1999-11-01

    The banded portion of chromosome 4 (the "dot" chromosome) in Drosophila melanogaster displays some properties of beta-heterochromatin, which is normally found within the centric domain of the chromosomes. The nature and distribution of repetitive elements on chromosome 4 could play a role in the establishment of this unusual chromatin configuration. We describe here one such element: a short, interspersed repetitive sequence named DINE-1. Determination of a consensus sequence for the element reveals that there are two conserved regions (A and B) separated by a highly variable spacer. The conserved sequences are approximately 400 bp long but degenerate at both ends, opening the possibility that a yet-to-be-discovered mother element may be present in the genome. DINE-1 bears few of the properties of the mammalian short interspersed elements (SINEs) to which it bears a superficial resemblance in size. It does not appear to be the product of reverse transcription and lacks any polymerase III promoter consensus. The elements are not flanked by target site duplications and their termini lack direct or inverted repeats, suggesting that they themselves are not transposable. Our analysis of cosmid clones from chromosome 4, and elsewhere in the genome, revealed that the euchromatic locations of DINE-1 are almost exclusively confined to chromosome 4. In situ hybridization of a DINE-1 probe to polytene chromosomes confirmed the preferential distribution along 4, in addition to its presence in the centric heterochromatin. This unusual genomic distribution of bias toward chromosome 4 is also seen in the sibling species, D. simulans, whose dot chromosomes exhibit poorly resolved polytene bands and lack crossing over during meiosis like those of D. melanogaster. However, the dot chromosome of D. virilis, which exhibits a well-defined banded structure on polytene chromosomes and can cross over, has only a single, discrete site of DINE-1 element hybridization. The presence of DINE-1

  5. Mycobacterial Peritonitis in CAPD Patients in Limpopo: A 6-Year Cumulative Report from a Single Center in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Tamayo-Isla, Ramon A; de la Cruz, Mauro Cuba; Okpechi, Ikechi G

    2016-01-01

    South Africa has one of the highest incidences of tuberculosis (TB) worldwide due to the ongoing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. There are, however, no reports on peritonitis in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in South Africa. The aim of this study is to discuss our experience of tuberculous peritonitis in CAPD patients from a rural endemic area of South Africa. This is a retrospective descriptive study of CAPD patients diagnosed with mycobacterium peritonitis infection from January 2008 to August 2014 at the Limpopo Kidney and Dialysis Centre (LKDC) in South Africa. The diagnosis of peritonitis was based on the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis (ISPD) 2010 recommendations. Peritoneal fluid samples were collected in BACTEC Myco/F Lytic Culture Vials (Becton, Dickinson and Company, Dublin, Ireland). Tenckhoff catheter tips were sent for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear and TB culture. Mycobacterium infection was considered in patients with clinical features of peritonitis if 1) AFB smear or TB culture was positive or 2) if the patient was smear- or culture-negative but had suggestive radiological features of TB in the lungs or abdomen or 3) if the patient improved clinically following treatment with anti-tuberculous drugs. Of 170 patients on CAPD for the period reviewed, 12 (7.1%) were diagnosed and treated for mycobacterial peritonitis. There was an equal number of males and females, and all the patients were Black Africans with a mean age of 35.4 years (17-51 years). Eight of the 12 patients (66.7%) had had previous episodes of non-tuberculous peritonitis. Four patients (33.3%) had elevated white blood cell count (WCC) while 9 had higher polymorph count in the PD fluid than lymphocyte count. Mycobacterial organism was confirmed in 9/12 (75%), while the diagnosis was made on clinical and radiological features in the remaining 3 patients. Seven patients (58.3%) died, 10 patients were

  6. IL-37 Confers Protection against Mycobacterial Infection Involving Suppressing Inflammation and Modulating T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; He, Xin; Ji, Qun; Bai, Wenjuan; Chen, Hao; Chen, Jianxia; Peng, Wenxia; Liu, Siyu; Liu, Zhonghua; Ge, Baoxue

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-37 (IL-37), a novel member of the IL-1 family, plays fundamental immunosuppressive roles by broadly reducing both innate inflammation and acquired immunity, but whether it is involved in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis (TB) has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis demonstrated an association of the genetic variant rs3811047 of IL-37 with TB susceptibility. In line with previous report, a significant elevated IL-37 abundance in the sera and increased expression of IL-37 protein in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were observed in TB patients in comparison to healthy controls. Moreover, release of IL-37 were detected in either macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) or the lung of BCG-infected mice, concurrent with reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, in contrast to wild-type mice, BCG-infected IL-37-Tg mice manifested with reduced mycobacterial burden and tissue damage in the lung, accompanied by higher frequency of Th1 cell and less frequencies of regulatory T cells and Th17 cells in the spleen. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that IL-37 conferred resistance to Mtb infection possibly involving suppressing detrimental inflammation and modulating T cell responses. These findings implicated that IL-37 may be employed as a new molecular target for the therapy and diagnosis of TB. PMID:28076390

  7. Alkaline decontamination of sputum specimens adversely affects stability of mycobacterial mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Desjardin, L E; Perkins, M D; Teixeira, L; Cave, M D; Eisenach, K D

    1996-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) is an important tool for Mycobacterium tuberculosis research and diagnostics. A standard procedure using N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NALC) and NaOH has been widely adopted for digestion and decontamination of sputum specimens for mycobacterial culture. The objective of this study was to determine the compatibility of this method with the recovery of RNA for RT-PCR assays. Nineteen sputum specimens were collected from smear-positive, pretreatment tuberculosis patients. After homogenization with NALC and glass beads, specimens were further processed by the addition of either NaOH, as per the standard decontamination protocol, or phosphate buffer. RNA was prepared by using a modified guanidine-phenol extraction method developed specifically for sputum sediments. DNA was isolated from the same specimens. Reverse transcriptions of alpha antigen (85B protein) mRNA and 16S rRNA were performed together, and aliquots were removed for separate PCRs. In all specimens, the 85B mRNA target was greatly diminished by treatment with NaOH; however, the 16S rRNA target remained unaffected. Storing sputum specimens for 48 h at 4 degrees C before processing did not seem to affect the integrity or yield of RNA; however, some degradation occurred by 72 h. Data suggest that the NaOH-NALC method for processing sputum samples is not suitable for detecting mRNA targets in RT-PCR assays. PMID:8880495

  8. A new agent of mycobacterial lymphadenitis in children: Mycobacterium heidelbergense sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, W H; Butler, W R; Kirschner, P; Plikaytis, B B; Coyle, M B; Amthor, B; Steigerwalt, A G; Brenner, D J; Salfinger, M; Crawford, J T; Böttger, E C; Bremer, H J

    1997-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial lymphadenitis presents an increasing clinical problem in immunocompetent young children. A slowly growing, nonphotochromogenic mycobacterium was recovered twice (isolates 2553/91 and 2554/91) from the lymphatic tissue of a child with recurrent cervical lymphadenitis. It could be differentiated biochemically from described Mycobacterium species, although it most closely resembled Mycobacterium malmoense by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography of mycolic acids. A striking characteristic of the isolate was its high degree of susceptibility to antituberculous drugs in vitro, including isoniazid. Direct determination of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed a unique sequence and positioned the strain phylogenetically on a branch separate from M. malmoense within a group of slowly growing mycobacteria that show a high degree of similarity to M. simiae at the 16S rRNA gene level. Despite 99.6% sequence identity with M. simiae at the 16S rRNA gene level, DNA-DNA hybridization studies (hydroxyapatite method) demonstrated DNA relatedness of less than 40%. We conclude that this organism is a new species for which we propose the name M. heidelbergense. A culture of the type strain, strain 2554/91, has been deposited in the American Type Culture Collection as strain ATCC 51253. PMID:9399520

  9. Elucidating population-wide mycobacterial replication dynamics at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Mouton, Jacoba M.; Helaine, Sophie; Holden, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections result in a spectrum of clinical outcomes, and frequently the infection persists in a latent, clinically asymptomatic state. The within-host bacterial population is likely to be heterogeneous, and it is thought that persistent mycobacteria arise from a small population of viable, but non-replicating (VBNR) cells. These are likely to be antibiotic tolerant and necessitate prolonged treatment. Little is known about these persistent mycobacteria, since they are very difficult to isolate. To address this, we have successfully developed a replication reporter system for use in M. tuberculosis. This approach, termed fluorescence dilution, exploits two fluorescent reporters; a constitutive reporter allows the tracking of bacteria, while an inducible reporter enables the measurement of bacterial replication. The application of fluorescence single-cell analysis to characterize intracellular M. tuberculosis identified a distinct subpopulation of non-growing mycobacteria in murine macrophages. The presence of VBNR and actively replicating mycobacteria was observed within the same macrophage after 48 h of infection. Furthermore, our results suggest that macrophage uptake resulted in enrichment of non- or slowly replicating bacteria (as revealed by d-cycloserine treatment); this population is likely to be highly enriched for persisters, based on its drug-tolerant phenotype. These results demonstrate the successful application of the novel dual fluorescence reporter system both in vitro and in macrophage infection models to provide a window into mycobacterial population heterogeneity. PMID:27027532

  10. Cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone affect the response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to mycobacterial antigens during tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mahuad, C; Bay, M L; Farroni, M A; Bozza, V; Del Rey, A; Besedovsky, H; Bottasso, O A

    2004-12-01

    The effect of cortisol and/or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on the immune response to antigens obtained from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was studied in vitro by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients at various stages of lung tuberculosis (TB) and from healthy control people (HCo). The results obtained show for the first time that addition of cortisol within concentrations of physiological range can inhibit the mycobacterial antigen-driven proliferation of cells from HCo and TB patients and the production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), indicating that endogenous levels of cortisol may contribute to the decreased lymphoid cell response to mycobacterium antigens observed in TB patients. DHEA did not affect lymphoid cell proliferation, IFN-gamma production and the cortisol-mediated inhibitory effects. Interestingly, we found that DHEA, but not cortisol, suppressed the in vitro transforming growth factor-beta production by lymphoid cells from TB patients with an advanced disease, which is indicative of a selective direct effect of this hormone.

  11. Pre-Columbian mycobacterial genomes reveal seals as a source of New World human tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Kirsten I.; Harkins, Kelly M.; Herbig, Alexander; Coscolla, Mireia; Weber, Nico; Comas, Iñaki; Forrest, Stephen A.; Bryant, Josephine M.; Harris, Simon R.; Schuenemann, Verena J.; Campbell, Tessa J.; Majander, Kerrtu; Wilbur, Alicia K.; Guichon, Ricardo A.; Wolfe Steadman, Dawnie L.; Cook, Della Collins; Niemann, Stefan; Behr, Marcel A.; Zumarraga, Martin; Bastida, Ricardo; Huson, Daniel; Nieselt, Kay; Young, Douglas; Parkhill, Julian; Buikstra, Jane E.; Gagneux, Sebastien; Stone, Anne C.; Krause, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Modern strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Americas are closely related to those from Europe, supporting the assumption that human tuberculosis was introduced post-contact1. This notion, however, is incompatible with archaeological evidence of pre-contact tuberculosis in the New World2. Comparative genomics of modern isolates suggests that M. tuberculosis attained its worldwide distribution following human dispersals out of Africa during the Pleistocene epoch3, although this has yet to be confirmed with ancient calibration points. Here we present three 1,000-year-old mycobacterial genomes from Peruvian human skeletons, revealing that a member of the M. tuberculosis complex caused human disease before contact. The ancient strains are distinct from known human-adapted forms and are most closely related to those adapted to seals and sea lions. Two independent dating approaches suggest a most recent common ancestor for the M. tuberculosis complex less than 6,000 years ago, which supports a Holocene dispersal of the disease. Our results implicate sea mammals as having played a role in transmitting the disease to humans across the ocean. PMID:25141181

  12. Phenotypic, immunologic, and clinical characteristics of patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to elucidate the phenotypic, immunologic, and clinical characteristics of Korean patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) lung disease and compare them with non-NTM bronchiectasis (BE) patients. Methods We prospectively recruited patients between 20 and 80 years of age who had nodular BE type NTM lung disease. Phenotypic, immunologic, and clinical characteristics were evaluated through physical examination, laboratory tests, pulmonary function tests, and radiographic examinations. Questionnaires were also answered. The results of the evaluations were compared with the results of non-NTM BE patients. Results A total of 84 patients with NTM lung disease and 47 non-NTM BE patients participated in the study. Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease and M. abscessus lung disease were most common. Patients with NTM lung disease had lower body mass index than non-NTM BE patients. Scoliosis was observed more frequently in patients with NTM lung disease than in non-NTM BE patients. Conclusions Significant similarities were seen between Korean patients with NTM lung disease and patients from other countries. Differences in phenotypic and clinical characteristics between NTM lung disease and non-NTM BE patients suggest differences in the immunopathogenesis of NTM lung disease and non-NTM BE. Trial registration information ClinicalTrials.gov Registration number; NCT01616745 PMID:24274658

  13. Occurrence of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Infection in an Endemic Area of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Ana Roberta Fusco; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Barretto, Adriana Rodrigues; Felicio, João Soares; Sales, Lúcia Helena Messias; Bahia, Jeann Ricardo da Costa; Conceição, Emilyn Costa; Lima, Karla Valéria Batista

    2013-01-01

    The majority of investigations of the epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have focused on highly developed nations with a low prevalence of tuberculosis. In contrast, the Para state of north Brazil represents an area of high tuberculosis prevalence and increasing NTM incidence. Toward the goal of understanding the dynamics of infection by all Mycobacterium species, we report patient characteristics and the identification of NTM strains isolated from sputum samples from patients that were residents of Para, a state in the Amazon region, Northern of Brazil, over the period January 2010 through December 2011 (2 years). The 29 NTM patients comprised 13.5% of positive mycobacterial cultures over the 2-year period. A major risk factor for NTM pulmonary disease was previous tuberculosis (76%). Further, the average age of NTM patients (52 years) was significantly higher than that of tuberculosis patients (39 years) and more were female (72.4% vs. 37.4%). Unlike other Brazilian states, NTM pulmonary patients in Para were infected with a different spectrum of mycobacteria; primarily the rapidly growing Mycobacterium massiliense and Mycobacterium simiae complex. PMID:23875055

  14. Correlation of Phenotypic Profiles Using Targeted Proteomics Identifies Mycobacterial Esx-1 Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Esx/WXG-100 (ESAT-6/Wss) exporters are multiprotein complexes that promote protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane in a diverse range of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacterial species. The Esx-1 (ESAT-6 System-1) system mediates virulence factor translocation in mycobacterial pathogens, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although several genes have been associated with Esx-1-mediated transport and virulence, the contribution of individual Esx-1 genes to export is largely undefined. A unique aspect of Esx-1 export is that several substrates require each other for export/stability. We exploited substrate “codependency” to identify Esx-1 substrates. We simultaneously quantified changes in the levels of 13 Esx-1 proteins from both secreted and cytosolic protein fractions generated from 16 Esx-1-deficient Mycobacterium marinum strains in a single experiment using MRM/SRM targeted mass spectrometry. This expansion of measurable Esx-1 proteins allowed us to define statistical rules for assigning novel substrates using phenotypic profiles of known Esx-1 substrates. Using this approach, we identified three additional Esx-1 substrates encoded by the esx-1 region. Our studies begin to address how disruption of specific genes affects several proteins in the Esx-1 complex. Overall, our findings illuminate relationships between Esx-1 proteins and create a framework for the identification of secreted substrates applicable to other protein exporters and pathways. PMID:25106450

  15. Correlation of phenotypic profiles using targeted proteomics identifies mycobacterial esx-1 substrates.

    PubMed

    Champion, Matthew M; Williams, Emily A; Pinapati, Richard S; Champion, Patricia A DiGiuseppe

    2014-11-07

    The Esx/WXG-100 (ESAT-6/Wss) exporters are multiprotein complexes that promote protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane in a diverse range of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacterial species. The Esx-1 (ESAT-6 System-1) system mediates virulence factor translocation in mycobacterial pathogens, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although several genes have been associated with Esx-1-mediated transport and virulence, the contribution of individual Esx-1 genes to export is largely undefined. A unique aspect of Esx-1 export is that several substrates require each other for export/stability. We exploited substrate "codependency" to identify Esx-1 substrates. We simultaneously quantified changes in the levels of 13 Esx-1 proteins from both secreted and cytosolic protein fractions generated from 16 Esx-1-deficient Mycobacterium marinum strains in a single experiment using MRM/SRM targeted mass spectrometry. This expansion of measurable Esx-1 proteins allowed us to define statistical rules for assigning novel substrates using phenotypic profiles of known Esx-1 substrates. Using this approach, we identified three additional Esx-1 substrates encoded by the esx-1 region. Our studies begin to address how disruption of specific genes affects several proteins in the Esx-1 complex. Overall, our findings illuminate relationships between Esx-1 proteins and create a framework for the identification of secreted substrates applicable to other protein exporters and pathways.

  16. Structure of mycobacterial maltokinase, the missing link in the essential GlgE-pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Joana; Maranha, Ana; Mendes, Vitor; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Empadinhas, Nuno; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    A novel four-step pathway identified recently in mycobacteria channels trehalose to glycogen synthesis and is also likely involved in the biosynthesis of two other crucial polymers: intracellular methylglucose lipopolysaccharides and exposed capsular glucan. The structures of three of the intervening enzymes - GlgB, GlgE, and TreS - were recently reported, providing the first templates for rational drug design. Here we describe the structural characterization of the fourth enzyme of the pathway, mycobacterial maltokinase (Mak), uncovering a eukaryotic-like kinase (ELK) fold, similar to methylthioribose kinases and aminoglycoside phosphotransferases. The 1.15 Å structure of Mak in complex with a non-hydrolysable ATP analog reveals subtle structural rearrangements upon nucleotide binding in the cleft between the N- and the C-terminal lobes. Remarkably, this new family of ELKs has a novel N-terminal domain topologically resembling the cystatin family of protease inhibitors. By interfacing with and restraining the mobility of the phosphate-binding region of the N-terminal lobe, Mak's unusual N-terminal domain might regulate its phosphotransfer activity and represents the most likely anchoring point for TreS, the upstream enzyme in the pathway. By completing the gallery of atomic-detail models of an essential pathway, this structure opens new avenues for the rational design of alternative anti-tubercular compounds. PMID:25619172

  17. Badger macrophages fail to produce nitric oxide, a key anti-mycobacterial effector molecule.

    PubMed

    Bilham, Kirstin; Boyd, Amy C; Preston, Stephen G; Buesching, Christina D; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W; Smith, Adrian L

    2017-04-06

    The European badger is recognised as a wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (bTB); the control of which is complex, costly and controversial. Despite the importance of badgers in bTB and the well-documented role for macrophages as anti-mycobacterial effector cells, badger macrophage (bdMφ) responses remain uncharacterised. Here, we demonstrate that bdMφ fail to produce nitric oxide (NO) or upregulate inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA following Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist treatment. BdMφ also failed to make NO after stimulation with recombinant badger interferon gamma (bdIFNγ) or a combination of bdIFNγ and lipopolysaccharide. Exposure of bdMφ to TLR agonists and/or bdIFNγ resulted in upregulated cytokine (IL1β, IL6, IL12 and TNFα) mRNA levels indicating that these critical pathways were otherwise intact. Although stimulation with most TLR agonists resulted in strong cytokine mRNA responses, weaker responses were evident after exposure to TLR9 agonists, potentially due to very low expression of TLR9 in bdMφ. Both NO and TLR9 are important elements of innate immunity to mycobacteria, and these features of bdMφ biology would impair their capacity to resist bTB infection. These findings have significant implications for the development of bTB management strategies, and support the use of vaccination to reduce bTB infection in badgers.

  18. Mutational and Phylogenetic Analyses of the Mycobacterial mbt Gene Cluster ▿§

    PubMed Central

    Chavadi, Sivagami Sundaram; Stirrett, Karen L.; Edupuganti, Uthamaphani R.; Vergnolle, Olivia; Sadhanandan, Gigani; Marchiano, Emily; Martin, Che; Qiu, Wei-Gang; Soll, Clifford E.; Quadri, Luis E. N.

    2011-01-01

    The mycobactin siderophore system is present in many Mycobacterium species, including M. tuberculosis and other clinically relevant mycobacteria. This siderophore system is believed to be utilized by both pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria for iron acquisition in both in vivo and ex vivo iron-limiting environments, respectively. Several M. tuberculosis genes located in a so-called mbt gene cluster have been predicted to be required for the biosynthesis of the core scaffold of mycobactin based on sequence analysis. A systematic and controlled mutational analysis probing the hypothesized essential nature of each of these genes for mycobactin production has been lacking. The degree of conservation of mbt gene cluster orthologs remains to be investigated as well. In this study, we sought to conclusively establish whether each of nine mbt genes was required for mycobactin production and to examine the conservation of gene clusters orthologous to the M. tuberculosis mbt gene cluster in other bacteria. We report a systematic mutational analysis of the mbt gene cluster ortholog found in Mycobacterium smegmatis. This mutational analysis demonstrates that eight of the nine mbt genes investigated are essential for mycobactin production. Our genome mining and phylogenetic analyses reveal the presence of orthologous mbt gene clusters in several bacterial species. These gene clusters display significant organizational differences originating from an intricate evolutionary path that might have included horizontal gene transfers. Altogether, the findings reported herein advance our understanding of the genetic requirements for the biosynthesis of an important mycobacterial secondary metabolite with relevance to virulence. PMID:21873494

  19. Tattoo-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial skin infections--multiple states, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    2012-08-24

    Permanent tattoos have become increasingly common, with 21% of adults in the United States reporting having at least one tattoo. On rare occasions, outbreaks of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) skin infections have been reported after tattooing. In January 2012, public health officials in New York received reports of Mycobacterium chelonae skin infections in 14 New York residents who received tattoos during September-December 2011. All infections were associated with use of the same nationally distributed, prediluted gray ink manufactured by company A. CDC disseminated an Epi-X public health alert to identify additional tattoo-associated NTM skin infections; previously identified cases were reported from three states (Washington, Iowa, and Colorado). Public health investigations by CDC, state and local health departments, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found NTM contamination in tattoo inks used in two of five identified clusters. All infected persons were exposed to one of four different brands of ink. NTM contamination of inks can occur during the manufacturing process as a result of using contaminated ingredients or poor manufacturing practices, or when inks are diluted with nonsterile water by tattoo artists. No specific FDA regulatory requirement explicitly provides that tattoo inks must be sterile. However, CDC recommends that ink manufacturers ensure ink is sterile and that tattoo artists avoid contamination of ink through dilution with nonsterile water. Consumers also should be aware of the health risks associated with getting an intradermal tattoo.

  20. The cost of medical management of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Leber, A; Marras, T K

    2011-05-01

    Treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection is complex, requiring multiple antibiotics and a prolonged treatment course. We determined the monthly cost of treating patients with pulmonary NTM infections in our clinic, a tertiary care centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. We reviewed records of a single clinic at the University Health Network (Toronto) for all patients with pulmonary NTM isolates. Pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment costs were calculated using a number of Canadian references. 172 patients were reviewed, 91 of whom were treated pharmacologically. The median total duration and cost per treated patient were 14 months (interquartile range (IQR) 9-23 months) and CAD 4,916 (IQR CAD 2,934-9,063), respectively. Median monthly drug treatment cost was CAD 321 (IQR CAD 254-458) for all patients, CAD 289 (IQR CAD 237-341) for patients receiving exclusively oral antibiotics and CAD 1,161 (IQR CAD 795-1,646) for patients whose treatment included i.v. antibiotics. The most costly oral regiment consisted of a fluroquinolone, macrolide and rifampin. In multivariable analysis, Mycobacterium abscessus infection, i.v. therapy and Mycobacterium xenopi infection were all associated with increased monthly treatment costs. The direct medical costs of NTM infections are substantial. Less expensive alternative therapies might be most helpful for M. abscessus infection and when i.v. antibiotics are deemed necessary.

  1. Autophagy-Related Proteins Target Ubiquitin-Free Mycobacterial Compartment to Promote Killing in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bah, Aïcha; Lacarrière, Camille; Vergne, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative process that plays essential functions in innate immunity, particularly, in the clearance of intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The molecular mechanisms involved in autophagy activation and targeting of mycobacteria, in innate immune responses of macrophages, are only partially characterized. Autophagy targets pathogenic M. tuberculosis via a cytosolic DNA recognition- and an ubiquitin-dependent pathway. In this report, we show that non-pathogenic M. smegmatis induces a robust autophagic response in THP-1 macrophages with an up regulation of several autophagy-related genes. Autophagy activation relies in part on recognition of mycobacteria by Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Notably, LC3 targeting of M. smegmatis does not rely on membrane damage, ubiquitination, or autophagy receptor recruitment. Lastly, M. smegmatis promotes recruitment of several autophagy proteins, which are required for mycobacterial killing. In conclusion, our study uncovered an alternative autophagic pathway triggered by mycobacteria which involves cell surface recognition but not bacterial ubiquitination. PMID:27242971

  2. Badger macrophages fail to produce nitric oxide, a key anti-mycobacterial effector molecule

    PubMed Central

    Bilham, Kirstin; Boyd, Amy C.; Preston, Stephen G.; Buesching, Christina D.; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W.; Smith, Adrian L.

    2017-01-01

    The European badger is recognised as a wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (bTB); the control of which is complex, costly and controversial. Despite the importance of badgers in bTB and the well-documented role for macrophages as anti-mycobacterial effector cells, badger macrophage (bdMφ) responses remain uncharacterised. Here, we demonstrate that bdMφ fail to produce nitric oxide (NO) or upregulate inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA following Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist treatment. BdMφ also failed to make NO after stimulation with recombinant badger interferon gamma (bdIFNγ) or a combination of bdIFNγ and lipopolysaccharide. Exposure of bdMφ to TLR agonists and/or bdIFNγ resulted in upregulated cytokine (IL1β, IL6, IL12 and TNFα) mRNA levels indicating that these critical pathways were otherwise intact. Although stimulation with most TLR agonists resulted in strong cytokine mRNA responses, weaker responses were evident after exposure to TLR9 agonists, potentially due to very low expression of TLR9 in bdMφ. Both NO and TLR9 are important elements of innate immunity to mycobacteria, and these features of bdMφ biology would impair their capacity to resist bTB infection. These findings have significant implications for the development of bTB management strategies, and support the use of vaccination to reduce bTB infection in badgers. PMID:28382943

  3. Systems-level modeling of mycobacterial metabolism for the identification of new (multi-)drug targets.

    PubMed

    Rienksma, Rienk A; Suarez-Diez, Maria; Spina, Lucie; Schaap, Peter J; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A P

    2014-12-01

    Systems-level metabolic network reconstructions and the derived constraint-based (CB) mathematical models are efficient tools to explore bacterial metabolism. Approximately one-fourth of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genome contains genes that encode proteins directly involved in its metabolism. These represent potential drug targets that can be systematically probed with CB models through the prediction of genes essential (or the combination thereof) for the pathogen to grow. However, gene essentiality depends on the growth conditions and, so far, no in vitro model precisely mimics the host at the different stages of mycobacterial infection, limiting model predictions. These limitations can be circumvented by combining expression data from in vivo samples with a validated CB model, creating an accurate description of pathogen metabolism in the host. To this end, we present here a thoroughly curated and extended genome-scale CB metabolic model of Mtb quantitatively validated using 13C measurements. We describe some of the efforts made in integrating CB models and high-throughput data to generate condition specific models, and we will discuss challenges ahead. This knowledge and the framework herein presented will enable to identify potential new drug targets, and will foster the development of optimal therapeutic strategies.

  4. Understanding nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease: it’s been a long time coming

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, David E.; Aksamit, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    With a surprising predictability, most studies and reviews addressing therapy for nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) lung disease either start or end by mentioning the paucity of data from randomized and controlled trials. That is a legitimate criticism for NTM lung disease therapy, but it also somehow seems to influence attitudes toward all aspects of NTM investigation. Certainly the study of NTM diseases in general and NTM lung disease in particular is a recent development. Previously, NTM were viewed as minor, if inconvenient, pathogens similar to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, over the last three decades, NTM have emerged as increasingly important pathogens that are clearly different compared with tuberculosis. Although there has been frustratingly slow progress in the treatment of NTM diseases, in contrast there has unquestionably been impressive progress in almost every other realm of investigation into NTM disease. Our understanding of NTM lung disease a) pathophysiology, including mechanisms of organism acquisition, b) epidemiology, including estimates of disease prevalence, c) mycobacteriology, including application of molecular laboratory techniques and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI–TOF) mass spectrometry, and d) even treatment strategies, including the recognition of innate drug resistance mechanisms, has immeasurably and permanently changed and advanced the landscape for NTM lung disease. It is no longer necessary to apologize for the state of NTM lung disease knowledge and understanding, but rather it is time to recognize the great distance we have travelled over the last 30 years. PMID:27990278

  5. Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are abundant in Solanaceae and have a family-specific impact on gene structure and genome organization.

    PubMed

    Seibt, Kathrin M; Wenke, Torsten; Muders, Katja; Truberg, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are highly abundant non-autonomous retrotransposons that are widespread in plants. They are short in size, non-coding, show high sequence diversity, and are therefore mostly not or not correctly annotated in plant genome sequences. Hence, comparative studies on genomic SINE populations are rare. To explore the structural organization and impact of SINEs, we comparatively investigated the genome sequences of the Solanaceae species potato (Solanum tuberosum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), wild tomato (Solanum pennellii), and two pepper cultivars (Capsicum annuum). Based on 8.5 Gbp sequence data, we annotated 82 983 SINE copies belonging to 10 families and subfamilies on a base pair level. Solanaceae SINEs are dispersed over all chromosomes with enrichments in distal regions. Depending on the genome assemblies and gene predictions, 30% of all SINE copies are associated with genes, particularly frequent in introns and untranslated regions (UTRs). The close association with genes is family specific. More than 10% of all genes annotated in the Solanaceae species investigated contain at least one SINE insertion, and we found genes harbouring up to 16 SINE copies. We demonstrate the involvement of SINEs in gene and genome evolution including the donation of splice sites, start and stop codons and exons to genes, enlargement of introns and UTRs, generation of tandem-like duplications and transduction of adjacent sequence regions.

  6. A retroelement modifies pre-mRNA splicing: the murine Glrb(spa) allele is a splicing signal polymorphism amplified by long interspersed nuclear element insertion.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kristina; Braune, Marlen; Benderska, Natalya; Buratti, Emanuele; Baralle, Francisco; Villmann, Carmen; Stamm, Stefan; Eulenburg, Volker; Becker, Cord-Michael

    2012-09-07

    The glycine receptor-deficient mutant mouse spastic carries a full-length long interspersed nuclear element (LINE1) retrotransposon in intron 6 of the glycine receptor β subunit gene, Glrb(spa). The mutation arose in the C57BL/6J strain and is associated with skipping of exon 6 or a combination of the exons 5 and 6, thus resulting in a translational frameshift within the coding regions of the GlyR β subunit. The effect of the Glrb(spa) LINE1 insertion on pre-mRNA splicing was studied using a minigene approach. Sequence comparison as well as motif prediction and mutational analysis revealed that in addition to the LINE1 insertion the inactivation of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) within exon 6 is required for skipping of exon 6. Reconstitution of the ESE by substitution of a single residue was sufficient to prevent exon skipping. In addition to the ESE, two regions within the 5' and 3' UTR of the LINE1 were shown to be critical determinants for exon skipping, indicating that LINE1 acts as efficient modifier of subtle endogenous splicing phenotypes. Thus, the spastic allele of the murine glycine receptor β subunit gene is a two-hit mutation, where the hypomorphic alteration in an ESE is amplified by the insertion of a LINE1 element in the adjacent intron. Conversely, the LINE1 effect on splicing may be modulated by individual polymorphisms, depending on the insertional environment within the host genome.

  7. Tissue-Specific Methylation of Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element-1 of Homo Sapiens (L1Hs) During Human Embryogenesis and Roles in Neural Tube Defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Chang, S; Guan, J; Shangguan, S; Lu, X; Wang, Z; Wu, L; Zou, J; Zhao, H; Bao, Y; Qiu, Z; Niu, B; Zhang, T

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposition events plays crucial roles during early development. Previously we showed that LINE-1 hypomethylation in neuronal tissues is associated with pathogenesis of neural tube defect (NTD). Herein, we further evaluated LINE-1 Homo sapiens (L1Hs) methylation in tissues derived from three germ layers of stillborn NTD fetuses, to define patterns of tissue specific methylation and site-specific hypomethylation at CpG sites within an L1Hs promoter region. Stable, tissue-specific L1Hs methylation patterns throughout three germ layer lineages of the fetus, placenta, and maternal peripheral blood were observed. Samples from maternal peripheral blood exhibited the highest level of L1Hs methylation (64.95%) and that from placenta showed the lowest (26.82%). Between samples from NTDs and controls, decrease in L1Hs methylation was only significant in NTD-affected brain tissue at 7.35%, especially in females (8.98%). L1Hs hypomethylation in NTDs was also associated with a significant increase in expression level of an L1Hs-encoded transcript in females (r = -0.846, p = 0.004). This could be due to genomic DNA instability and alternation in chromatins accessibility resulted from abnormal L1Hs hypomethylation, as showed in this study with HCT-15 cells treated with methylation inhibitor 5-Aza.

  8. Insertion of long interspersed element-1 in the Mitf gene is associated with altered neurobehavior of the black-eyed white Mitf(mi-bw) mouse.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuhisa; Hozumi, Hiroki; Nakai, Kunihiko; Yoshizawa, Miki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2014-02-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) is required for the differentiation of melanoblasts of the neural crest origin. The mouse homozygous for the black-eyed white (Mitf(mi-bw) ) allele is characterized by white-coat color and deafness with black eye, due to the loss of melanoblasts during embryonic development. The Mitf(mi-bw) allele carries an insertion of long interspersed element-1 (L1) in intron 3 of the Mitf gene, which may cause the deficiency of melanocyte-specific Mitf-M. Here, we show that the L1 insertion results in the generation of alternatively spliced Mitf-M mRNA species, such as Mitf-M mRNA lacking exon 3, exon 4 or both exons 3 and 4, each of which encodes Mitf-M protein with an internal deletion. Transient expression assays showed the loss of or reduction in function of each aberrant Mitf-M protein and the dominant negative effect of Mitf-M lacking exon 4 that encodes an activation domain. Thus, the L1 insertion may decrease the expression level of functional Mitf-M. Importantly, Mitf-M mRNA is expressed in the wild-type mouse brain, with the highest expression level in the hypothalamus. Likewise, aberrant Mitf-M mRNAs are expressed in the bw mouse brain. The bw mice show the altered neurobehavior under a stressful environment, suggesting the role of Mitf-M in sensory perception.

  9. Analysis of the 227 bp short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) insertion of the promoter of the myostatin (MSTN) gene in different horse breeds.

    PubMed

    Dall'Olio, Stefania; Scotti, Emilio; Fontanesi, Luca; Tassinari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The myostatin (MSTN) gene encodes a protein known to be a negative regulator of muscle mass in mammalian species. Different polymorphisms of the horse (Equus caballus) MSTN gene have been identified, including single nucleotide polymorphisms and a short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) insertion of 227 bp within the promoter of the gene. The SINE insertion has been associated with performance traits in Thoroughbred racehorses and it was proposed as a predictor of optimum racing distance. The aims of this study were to perform in silico analysis to identify putative gains or abrogation of transcription-factor binding sites (TFBSs) generated by the SINE allele of the promoter and to analyse the frequency of the SINE insertion in horses used for racing (gallop and trot) and other purposes. The SINE insertion was genotyped in 227 horses from 10 breeds belonging to different morphological types (brachimorphic, mesomorphic, meso-dolichomorphic and dolichomorphic). The presence of the insertion was confirmed in the Quarter Horse (SINE allele frequency of 0.81) and in the Thoroughbred (0.51), whereas the SINE allele did not segregate in any of the other analysed breeds. As the SINE MSTN gene polymorphism may be population or breed specific, it is not a useful marker for association studies in all breeds.

  10. Large-scale cloning of human chromosome 2-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) using an interspersed repetitive sequences (IRS)-PCR approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Stanton, V P; Fujiwara, T M; Wang, J X; Rezonzew, R; Crumley, M J; Morgan, K; Gros, P; Housman, D; Schurr, E

    1995-03-20

    We report here an efficient approach to the establishment of extended YAC contigs on human chromosome 2 by using an interspersed repetitive sequences (IRS)-PCR-based screening strategy for YAC DNA pools. Genomic DNA was extracted from 1152 YAC pools comprised of 55,296 YACs mostly derived from the CEPH Mark I library. Alu-element-mediated PCR was performed for each pool, and amplification products were spotted on hybridization membranes (IRS filters). IRS probes for the screening of the IRS filters were obtained by Alu-element-mediated PCR. Of 708 distinct probes obtained from chromosome 2-specific somatic cell hybrids, 85% were successfully used for library screening. Similarly, 80% of 80 YAC walking probes were successfully used for library screening. Each probe detected an average of 6.6 YACs, which is in good agreement with the 7- to 7.5-fold genome coverage provided by the library. In a preliminary analysis, we have identified 188 YAC groups that are the basis for building contigs for chromosome 2. The coverage of the telomeric half of chromosome 2q was considered to be good since 31 of 34 microsatellites and 22 of 23 expressed sequence tags that were chosen from chromosome region 2q13-q37 were contained in a chromosome 2 YAC sublibrary generated by our experiments. We have identified a minimum of 1610 distinct chromosome 2-specific YACs, which will be a valuable asset for the physical mapping of the second largest human chromosome.

  11. Expression and immunogenicity of the mycobacterial Ag85B/ESAT-6 antigens produced in transgenic plants by elastin-like peptide fusion strategy.

    PubMed

    Floss, Doreen Manuela; Mockey, Michael; Zanello, Galliano; Brosson, Damien; Diogon, Marie; Frutos, Roger; Bruel, Timothée; Rodrigues, Valérie; Garzon, Edwin; Chevaleyre, Claire; Berri, Mustapha; Salmon, Henri; Conrad, Udo; Dedieu, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This study explored a novel system combining plant-based production and the elastin-like peptide (ELP) fusion strategy to produce vaccinal antigens against tuberculosis. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the mycobacterial antigens Ag85B and ESAT-6 fused to ELP (TBAg-ELP) were generated. Purified TBAg-ELP was obtained by the highly efficient, cost-effective, inverse transition cycling (ICT) method and tested in mice. Furthermore, safety and immunogenicity of the crude tobacco leaf extracts were assessed in piglets. Antibodies recognizing mycobacterial antigens were produced in mice and piglets. A T-cell immune response able to recognize the native mycobacterial antigens was detected in mice. These findings showed that the native Ag85B and ESAT-6 mycobacterial B- and T-cell epitopes were conserved in the plant-expressed TBAg-ELP. This study presents the first results of an efficient plant-expression system, relying on the elastin-like peptide fusion strategy, to produce a safe and immunogenic mycobacterial Ag85B-ESAT-6 fusion protein as a potential vaccine candidate against tuberculosis.

  12. Two different 16S rRNA genes in a mycobacterial strain.

    PubMed Central

    Ninet, B; Monod, M; Emler, S; Pawlowski, J; Metral, C; Rohner, P; Auckenthaler, R; Hirschel, B

    1996-01-01

    Sequencing of the gene coding for 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) is a well-established method used to identify bacteria, particularly mycobacteria. Unique sequences allow identification of a particular genus and species. If more than one 16S rDNA is present on one mycobacterial genome, their sequences are assumed to be strictly or almost identical. We have isolated a slowly growing Mycobacterium strain, "X", identified by conventional biochemical tests as Mycobacterium terrae. Identification by amplification and direct sequencing of 16S rDNA yielded ambiguous results in two variable regions, suggesting the presence of different copies of the sequenced gene. Total DNA was digested by restriction enzymes and hybridized after Southern blotting to a probe representing about two-thirds of the 16S rDNA. Two copies of 16S rDNA were identified and cloned. By sequencing, the clones were of two different types, A and B, differing in 18 positions. Oligonucleotides specific to each copy of the 16S rDNA were used to distinguish the positions of the two genes observed in the Southern blot. We conclude that Mycobacterium strain "X" has two different copies of 16S rDNA. Variations in the sequence between two copies of 16S rDNA gene have been described in archaeobacteria, but not in mycobacteria. When placed in a phylogenetic tree together with other slowly growing mycobacteria gene A shows a common root with M. terrae, whereas gene B is placed separately. PMID:8880515

  13. In vitro antimycobacterial activity and toxicity of eight medicinal plants against pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Nguta, Joseph M; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Nyarko, Alexander K; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Addo, Phyllis G A; Otchere, Isaac Darko; Kissi-Twum, Abena

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a serious public health challenge towards which new hits are urgently needed. Medicinal plants remains a major source of new ligands against global infectious illnesses. In our laboratories, we are currently investigating locally used ethnobotanicals for novel compounds against zoonotic tuberculosis. The microplate alamar blue assay (MABA) was used to study the anti-TB activity while the CellTiter 96® AQueous Assay, which is composed of solutions of a novel tetrazolium compound [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt; MTS] and an electron coupling reagent (phenazine methosulfate) PMS, was used for cytotoxic studies. Correlation coefficients (R(2)) were used to compare the relationship between antimycobacterial activity of the eight crude extracts against nonpathogenic strains and the pathogenic Mycobacterium bovis. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) values indicated that all the eight tested medicinal plant species had activity against all the three tested mycobacterial strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration value as low as 19.5µg/mL was observed against non-pathogenic strains M. bovis. Activity of the crude extracts against M. aurum was the best predictor of natural product activity against the pathogenic Mycobacterium bovis strain, with a correlation coefficient value (R(2)) of 0.1371. Results obtained from the current study validate, in part, the traditional utilization of the tested medicinal plants against tuberculosis. The unripe fruits from Solanum torvum are a potential source of safe and efficacious anti-TB crude drugs as well as a source for natural compounds that act as new anti-infection agents, and thus deserve further investigation towards development of a new class of molecules with activity against sensitive and drug resistant strains of M. bovis.

  14. Chronic Gastrointestinal Nematode Infection Mutes Immune Responses to Mycobacterial Infection Distal to the Gut.

    PubMed

    Obieglo, Katja; Feng, Xiaogang; Bollampalli, Vishnu Priya; Dellacasa-Lindberg, Isabel; Classon, Cajsa; Österblad, Markus; Helmby, Helena; Hewitson, James P; Maizels, Rick M; Gigliotti Rothfuchs, Antonio; Nylén, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Helminth infections have been suggested to impair the development and outcome of Th1 responses to vaccines and intracellular microorganisms. However, there are limited data regarding the ability of intestinal nematodes to modulate Th1 responses at sites distal to the gut. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri on Th1 responses to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). We found that H. polygyrus infection localized to the gut can mute BCG-specific CD4(+) T cell priming in both the spleen and skin-draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, H. polygyrus infection reduced the magnitude of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to PPD in the skin. Consequently, H. polygyrus-infected mice challenged with BCG had a higher mycobacterial load in the liver compared with worm-free mice. The excretory-secretory product from H. polygyrus (HES) was found to dampen IFN-γ production by mycobacteria-specific CD4(+) T cells. This inhibition was dependent on the TGF-βR signaling activity of HES, suggesting that TGF-β signaling plays a role in the impaired Th1 responses observed coinfection with worms. Similar to results with mycobacteria, H. polygyrus-infected mice displayed an increase in skin parasite load upon secondary infection with Leishmania major as well as a reduction in DTH responses to Leishmania Ag. We show that a nematode confined to the gut can mute T cell responses to mycobacteria and impair control of secondary infections distal to the gut. The ability of intestinal helminths to reduce DTH responses may have clinical implications for the use of skin test-based diagnosis of microbial infections.

  15. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Infection in NADPH Oxidase Deficiency: Defective Mycobacterial Sequestration and Granuloma Formation

    PubMed Central

    Deffert, Christine; Schäppi, Michela G.; Pache, Jean-Claude; Cachat, Julien; Vesin, Dominique; Bisig, Ruth; Ma Mulone, Xiaojuan; Kelkka, Tiina; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) lack generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2. CGD is an immune deficiency that leads to frequent infections with certain pathogens; this is well documented for S. aureus and A. fumigatus, but less clear for mycobacteria. We therefore performed an extensive literature search which yielded 297 cases of CGD patients with mycobacterial infections; M. bovis BCG was most commonly described (74%). The relationship between NOX2 deficiency and BCG infection however has never been studied in a mouse model. We therefore investigated BCG infection in three different mouse models of CGD: Ncf1 mutants in two different genetic backgrounds and Cybb knock-out mice. In addition, we investigated a macrophage-specific rescue (transgenic expression of Ncf1 under the control of the CD68 promoter). Wild-type mice did not develop severe disease upon BCG injection. In contrast, all three types of CGD mice were highly susceptible to BCG, as witnessed by a severe weight loss, development of hemorrhagic pneumonia, and a high mortality (∼50%). Rescue of NOX2 activity in macrophages restored BCG resistance, similar as seen in wild-type mice. Granulomas from mycobacteria-infected wild-type mice generated ROS, while granulomas from CGD mice did not. Bacterial load in CGD mice was only moderately increased, suggesting that it was not crucial for the observed phenotype. CGD mice responded with massively enhanced cytokine release (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-12) early after BCG infection, which might account for severity of the disease. Finally, in wild-type mice, macrophages formed clusters and restricted mycobacteria to granulomas, while macrophages and mycobacteria were diffusely distributed in lung tissue from CGD mice. Our results demonstrate that lack of the NADPH oxidase leads to a markedly increased severity of BCG infection through mechanisms including increased cytokine production and impaired

  16. Mycobacterial gene cuvA is required for optimal nutrient utilization and virulence.

    PubMed

    Mir, Mushtaq; Prisic, Sladjana; Kang, Choong-Min; Lun, Shichun; Guo, Haidan; Murry, Jeffrey P; Rubin, Eric J; Husson, Robert N

    2014-10-01

    To persist and cause disease in the host, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must adapt to its environment during infection. Adaptations include changes in nutrient utilization and alterations in growth rate. M. tuberculosis Rv1422 is a conserved gene of unknown function that was found in a genetic screen to interact with the mce4 cholesterol uptake locus. The Rv1422 protein is phosphorylated by the M. tuberculosis Ser/Thr kinases PknA and PknB, which regulate cell growth and cell wall synthesis. Bacillus subtilis strains lacking the Rv1422 homologue yvcK grow poorly on several carbon sources, and yvcK is required for proper localization of peptidoglycan synthesis. Here we show that Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis strains lacking Rv1422 have growth defects in minimal medium containing limiting amounts of several different carbon sources. These strains also have morphological abnormalities, including shortened and bulging cells, suggesting a cell wall defect. In both mycobacterial species, the Rv1422 protein localizes uniquely to the growing cell pole, the site of peptidoglycan synthesis in mycobacteria. An M. tuberculosis ΔRv1422 strain is markedly attenuated for virulence in a mouse infection model, where it elicits decreased inflammation in the lungs and shows impaired bacterial persistence. These findings led us to name this gene cuvA (carbon utilization and virulence protein A) and to suggest a model in which deletion of cuvA leads to changes in nutrient uptake and/or metabolism that affect cell wall structure, morphology, and virulence. Its role in virulence suggests that CuvA may be a useful target for novel inhibitors of M. tuberculosis during infection.

  17. Effect of Apoptotic Cell Recognition on Macrophage Polarization and Mycobacterial Persistence

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Fulco, Tatiana; Andrade, Priscila Ribeiro; de Mattos Barbosa, Mayara Garcia; Pinto, Thiago Gomes Toledo; Ferreira, Paula Fernandez; Ferreira, Helen; da Costa Nery, José Augusto; Real, Suzana Côrte; Borges, Valéria Matos; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Sampaio, Elizabeth Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular Mycobacterium leprae infection modifies host macrophage programming, creating a protective niche for bacterial survival. The milieu regulating cellular apoptosis in the tissue plays an important role in defining susceptible and/or resistant phenotypes. A higher density of apoptotic cells has been demonstrated in paucibacillary leprosy lesions than in multibacillary ones. However, the effect of apoptotic cell removal on M. leprae-stimulated cells has yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether apoptotic cell removal (efferocytosis) induces different phenotypes in proinflammatory (Mϕ1) and anti-inflammatory (Mϕ2) macrophages in the presence of M. leprae. We stimulated Mϕ1 and Mϕ2 cells with M. leprae in the presence or absence of apoptotic cells and subsequently evaluated the M. leprae uptake, cell phenotype, and cytokine pattern in the supernatants. In the presence of M. leprae and apoptotic cells, Mϕ1 macrophages changed their phenotype to resemble the Mϕ2 phenotype, displaying increased CD163 and SRA-I expression as well as higher phagocytic capacity. Efferocytosis increased M. leprae survival in Mϕ1 cells, accompanied by reduced interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-6 levels and increased transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and IL-10 secretion. Mϕ1 cells primed with M. leprae in the presence of apoptotic cells induced the secretion of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 in autologous T cells compared with cultures stimulated with M. leprae or apoptotic cells alone. Efferocytosis did not alter the Mϕ2 cell phenotype or cytokine secretion profile, except for TGF-β. Based on these data, we suggest that, in paucibacillary leprosy patients, efferocytosis contributes to mycobacterial persistence by increasing the Mϕ2 population and sustaining the infection. PMID:25024361

  18. Effects of Disseminated Mycobacterial Infection on Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Collett, Geoffrey; Lopez, Natalia; Lopez, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    Our patient, in the 7th decade of life, presented with worsening blurry vision over 3 weeks. The pertinent history included nonexudative age-related macular degeneration, recent pulmonary mycobacterial infection, and autoimmune pancreatitis. The patient had decreased visual acuity in both eyes; the remaining findings of our examination were relatively benign. The diagnosis of bilateral exudative age-related macular degeneration was aided by ocular imaging. Not only were exudative changes confirmed, but one modality suggested an underlying occult choroiditis, which presumably fueled a local inflammatory drive leading to evolution of the disease. Given the choroiditis developed in the setting of a recent Mycobacterium chelonae infection, dissemination of the organism must be considered a potential culprit. Additionally, a chronic inflammatory state perhaps played a simultaneous immunologic role. We feel the proposed pathogenic mechanism outlined sufficiently accounts for the rare event, that is, development of subacute bilateral exudative maculopathy. The patient responded well to bilateral intravitreal aflibercept injections. After 1 month, visual acuity was found to be near baseline and ocular imaging showed significant resolution of the exudative changes. An additional follow-up 3 months after confirmed similar stability. This case required thorough investigation of seemingly unrelated components within the patient's history. We stress the importance of obtaining appropriate documentation from fellow health care teams when suspicious clinical presentations arise. During our investigation, we identified cryptic retinal lesions by way of angiography - leading us to recommend usage of such methods in complex cases. We also summarize the implemented aflibercept course and the favorable response to such treatment.

  19. A spatial epidemiological analysis of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections in Queensland, Australia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been changing and the incidence has been increasing in some settings. The main route of transmission to humans is considered to be from the environment. We aimed to describe spatial clusters of cases of NTM infections and to identify associated climatic, environmental and socio-economic variables. Methods NTM data were obtained from the Queensland Mycobacterial Reference Laboratory for the period 2001–2011. A Bayesian spatial conditional autoregressive model was constructed at the postcode level, with covariates including soil variables, maximum, mean and minimum rainfall and temperature, income (proportion of population earning < $32,000 and < $52,000) and land use category. Results Significant clusters of NTM infection were identified in the central Queensland region overlying the Surat sub-division of the Great Artesian Basin, as well as in the lower North Queensland Local Government Area known as the Whitsunday region. Our models estimated an expected increase of 21% per percentage increase of population earning < $52,000 (95% CI 9–34%) and an expected decrease of 13% for every metre increase of average topsoil depth for risk of Mycobacterium intracellulare infection (95% CI -3 – -22%). There was an estimated increase of 79% per mg/m3 increase of soil bulk density (95% CI 26–156%) and 19% decrease for every percentage increase in population earning < $32,000 for risk of M. kansasii infection (95% CI -3 – -49%). Conclusions There were distinct spatial clusters of M. kansasii, M. intracellulare and M. abscessus infections in Queensland, and a number of socio-ecological, economic and environmental factors were found to be associated with NTM infection risk. PMID:24885916

  20. Long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) show tissue-specific, mosaic genome and methylation-unrestricted, widespread expression of noncoding RNAs in somatic tissues of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Deepak K.; Rath, Pramod C.

    2012-01-01

    We report strong somatic and germ line expression of LINE RNAs in eight different tissues of rat by using a novel ~2.8 kb genomic PstI-LINE DNA (P1-LINE) isolated from the rat brain. P1-LINE is present in a 93 kb LINE-SINE-cluster in sub-telomeric region of chromosome 12 (12p12) and as multiple truncated copies interspersed in all rat chromosomes. P1-LINEs occur as inverted repeats at multiple genomic loci in tissue-specific and mosaic patterns. P1-LINE RNAs are strongly expressed in brain, liver, lungs, heart, kidney, testes, spleen and thymus into large to small heterogeneous RNAs (~5.0 to 0.2 kb) in tissue-specific and dynamic patterns in individual rats. P1-LINE DNA is strongly methylated at CpG-dinucleotides in most genomic copies in all the tissues and weakly hypomethylated in few copies in some tissues. Small (700–75 nt) P1-LINE RNAs expressed in all tissues may be possible precursors for small regulatory RNAs (PIWI-interacting/piRNAs) bioinformatically derived from P1-LINE. The strong and dynamic expression of LINE RNAs from multiple chromosomal loci and the putative piRNAs in somatic tissues of rat under normal physiological conditions may define functional chromosomal domains marked by LINE RNAs as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) unrestricted by DNA methylation. The tissue-specific, dynamic RNA expression and mosaic genomic distribution of LINEs representing a steady-state genomic flux of retrotransposon RNAs suggest for biological role of LINE RNAs as long ncRNAs and small piRNAs in mammalian tissues independent of their cellular fate for translation, reverse-transcription and retrotransposition. This may provide evolutionary advantages to LINEs and mammalian genomes. PMID:23064113

  1. Genome-wide analysis of short interspersed nuclear elements SINES revealed high sequence conservation, gene association and retrotranspositional activity in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Ben-David, Smadar; Yaakov, Beery; Kashkush, Khalil

    2013-01-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are non-autonomous non-LTR retroelements that are present in most eukaryotic species. While SINEs have been intensively investigated in humans and other animal systems, they are poorly studied in plants, especially in wheat (Triticum aestivum). We used quantitative PCR of various wheat species to determine the copy number of a wheat SINE family, termed Au SINE, combined with computer-assisted analyses of the publicly available 454 pyrosequencing database of T. aestivum. In addition, we utilized site-specific PCR on 57 Au SINE insertions, transposon methylation display and transposon display on newly formed wheat polyploids to assess retrotranspositional activity, epigenetic status and genetic rearrangements in Au SINE, respectively. We retrieved 3706 different insertions of Au SINE from the 454 pyrosequencing database of T. aestivum, and found that most of the elements are inserted in A/T-rich regions, while approximately 38% of the insertions are associated with transcribed regions, including known wheat genes. We observed typical retrotransposition of Au SINE in the second generation of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid, and massive hypermethylation in CCGG sites surrounding Au SINE in the third generation. Finally, we observed huge differences in the copy numbers in diploid Triticum and Aegilops species, and a significant increase in the copy numbers in natural wheat polyploids, but no significant increase in the copy number of Au SINE in the first four generations for two of three newly formed allopolyploid species used in this study. Our data indicate that SINEs may play a prominent role in the genomic evolution of wheat through stress-induced activation. PMID:23855320

  2. Epigenetic modification of long interspersed elements-1 in cumulus cells of mature and immature oocytes from patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wasinarom, Artisa; Sereepapong, Wisan; Sirayapiwat, Porntip; Rattanatanyong, Prakasit; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2016-01-01

    Objective The long interspersed elements (LINE-1, L1s) are a group of genetic elements found in large numbers in the human genome that can translate into phenotype by controlling genes. Growing evidence supports the role of epigenetic in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the DNA methylation levels in LINE-1 in a tissue-specific manner using cumulus cells from patients with PCOS compared with normal controls. Methods The study included 19 patients with PCOS and 22 control patients who were undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. After oocyte retrieval, cumulus cells were extracted. LINE-1 DNA methylation levels were analysed by bisulfite treatment, polymerase chain reaction, and restriction enzyme digestion. The Connection Up- and Down-Regulation Expression Analysis of Microarrays software package was used to compare the gene regulatory functions of intragenic LINE-1. Results The results showed higher LINE-1 DNA methylation levels in the cumulus cells of mature oocytes in PCOS patients, 79.14 (±2.66) vs. 75.40 (±4.92); p=0.004, but no difference in the methylation of cumulus cells in immature oocytes between PCOS and control patients, 70.33 (±4.79) vs. 67.79 (±5.17); p=0.155. However, LINE-1 DNA methylation levels were found to be higher in the cumulus cells of mature oocytes than in those of immature oocytes in both PCOS and control patients. Conclusion These findings suggest that the epigenetic modification of LINE-1 DNA may play a role in regulating multiple gene expression that affects the pathophysiology and development of mature oocytes in PCOS. PMID:27358825

  3. Silencing of the PiAvr3a effector-encoding gene from Phytophthora infestans by transcriptional fusion to a short interspersed element.

    PubMed

    Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Tian, Zhendong; Avrova, Anna O; Savenkov, Eugene I; Dixelius, Christina; Whisson, Stephen C

    2011-12-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the notorious oomycete causing late blight of potato and tomato. A large proportion of the P. infestans genome is composed of transposable elements, the activity of which may be controlled by RNA silencing. Accumulation of small RNAs is one of the hallmarks of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate the presence of small RNAs corresponding to the sequence of a short interspersed retrotransposable element (SINE) suggesting that small RNAs might be involved in silencing of SINEs in P. infestans. This notion was exploited to develop novel tools for gene silencing in P. infestans by engineering transcriptional fusions of the PiAvr3a gene, encoding an RXLR avirulence effector, to the infSINEm retroelement. Transgenic P. infestans lines expressing either 5'-infSINEm::PiAvr3a-3' or 5'-PiAvr3a::SINEm-3' chimeric transcripts initially exhibited partial silencing of PiAvr3a. Over time, PiAvr3a either recovered wild type transcript levels in some lines, or became fully silenced in others. Introduction of an inverted repeat construct was also successful in yielding P. infestans transgenic lines silenced for PiAvr3a. In contrast, constructs expressing antisense or aberrant RNA transcripts failed to initiate silencing of PiAvr3a. Lines exhibiting the most effective silencing of PiAvr3a were either weakly or non-pathogenic on susceptible potato cv. Bintje. This study expands the repertoire of reverse genetics tools available for P. infestans research, and provides insights into a possible mode of variation in effector expression through spread of silencing from adjacent retroelements.

  4. The short interspersed repetitive element of Trypanosoma cruzi, SIRE, is part of VIPER, an unusual retroelement related to long terminal repeat retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Martín; Ben-Dov, Claudia; Lorenzi, Hernan; Moore, Troy; Schijman, Alejandro; Levin, Mariano J.

    2000-01-01

    The short interspersed repetitive element (SIRE) of Trypanosoma cruzi was first detected when comparing the sequences of loci that encode the TcP2β genes. It is present in about 1,500–3,000 copies per genome, depending on the strain, and it is distributed in all chromosomes. An initial analysis of SIRE sequences from 21 genomic fragments allowed us to derive a consensus nucleotide sequence and structure for the element, consisting of three regions (I, II, and III) each harboring distinctive features. Analysis of 158 transcribed SIREs demonstrates that the consensus is highly conserved. The sequences of 51 cDNAs show that SIRE is included in the 3′ end of several mRNAs, always transcribed from the sense strand, contributing the polyadenylation site in 63% of the cases. This study led to the characterization of VIPER (vestigial interposed retroelement), a 2,326-bp-long unusual retroelement. VIPER's 5′ end is formed by the first 182 bp of SIRE, whereas its 3′ end is formed by the last 220 bp of the element. Both SIRE moieties are connected by a 1,924-bp-long fragment that carries a unique ORF encoding a complete reverse transcriptase-RNase H gene whose 15 C-terminal amino acids derive from codons specified by SIRE's region II. The amino acid sequence of VIPER's reverse transcriptase-RNase H shares significant homology to that of long terminal repeat retrotransposons. The fact that SIRE and VIPER sequences are found only in the T. cruzi genome may be of relevance for studies concerning the evolution and the genome flexibility of this protozoan parasite. PMID:10688909

  5. Long interspersed nucleotide acid element-1 ORF-1 protein promotes proliferation and invasion of human colorectal cancer LoVo cells through enhancing ETS-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Li, M Y; Zhu, M; Feng, F; Cai, F Y; Fan, K C; Jiang, H; Wang, Z Q; Linghu, E Q

    2014-04-14

    The human proto-oncogene long interspersed nucleotide acid element-1 (LINE-1) open reading frame-1 protein (ORF-1p) is involved in the progress of several cancers. The transcription factor ETS-1 can mediate the transcription of some downstream genes that play specific roles in the regulation of cancerous cell invasion and metastasis. In this study, the effects of LINE-1 ORF-1p on ETS-1 activity and on the proliferation and invasion of human colorectal cancer LoVo cells were investigated. Results showed that the overexpression of LINE-1 ORF-1p enhanced the transcription of ETS-1 downstream genes and increased their protein levels, and downregulation of the LINE-1 ORF-1p level by small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the transcriptional activation of ETS-1. In addition, overexpression of LINE-1 ORF-1p promoted LoVo cell proliferation and anchor-independent growth, and a knockdown of the LINE-1 protein level by siRNA reduced the proliferation and anchor-independent growth ability of LoVo cells. In vivo data revealed that LINE-1 ORF-1p overexpression increased LoVo tumor growth in nude mice, whereas the siRNA knockdown of endogenous LINE-1 ORF-1p expression decreased LoVo cell growth in nude mice. Therefore, LINE- 1 ORF-1p could promote LoVo cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it might be a useful molecular target for the treatment of human colorectal cancer.

  6. Differential inhibition of long interspersed element 1 by APOBEC3 does not correlate with high-molecular-mass-complex formation or P-body association.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomska, Anna Maria; Tian, Chunjuan; Tan, Lindi; Wang, Tao; Sarkis, Phuong Thi Nguyen; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2007-09-01

    The human cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) and other APOBEC3 proteins exhibit differential inhibitory activities against diverse endogenous retroelements and retroviruses, including Vif-deficient human immunodeficiency virus type 1. The potential inhibitory activity of human APOBEC proteins against long interspersed element 1 (LINE-1) has not been fully evaluated. Here, we demonstrate inhibition of LINE-1 by multiple human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases, including previously unreported activity for A3DE and A3G. More ancient members of APOBEC, cytidine deaminases AID and APOBEC2, had no detectable activity against LINE-1. A3A, which did not form high-molecular-mass (HMM) complexes and interacted poorly with P bodies, was the most potent inhibitor of LINE-1. A3A specifically recognizes LINE-1 RNA but not the other cellular RNAs tested. However, in the presence of LINE-1, A3A became associated with HMM complexes containing LINE-1 RNA. The ability of A3A to recognize LINE-1 RNA required its catalytic domain and was important for its LINE-1 suppression. Although the mechanism of LINE-1 restriction did not seem to involve DNA editing, A3A inhibited the accumulation of nascent LINE-1 DNA, suggesting interference with LINE-1 reverse transcription and/or integration or intracellular movement of LINE-1 ribonucleoprotein. Thus, association with P bodies or cellular HMM complexes could not predict the potency of APOBEC3 anti-LINE-1 activities. The catalytic domain of APOBEC3 proteins may be important for proper folding and target factors such as RNA or protein interaction in addition to cytidine deamination.

  7. Induction of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (L1) retrotransposition by 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ), a tryptophan photoproduct.

    PubMed

    Okudaira, Noriyuki; Iijima, Kenta; Koyama, Takayoshi; Minemoto, Yuzuru; Kano, Shigeyuki; Mimori, Akio; Ishizaka, Yukihito

    2010-10-26

    Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (L1) is a retroelement comprising about 17% of the human genome, of which 80-100 copies are competent as mobile elements (retrotransposition: L1-RTP). Although the genetic structures modified during L1-RTP have been clarified, little is known about the cellular signaling cascades involved. Herein we found that 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ), a tryptophan photoproduct postulated as a candidate physiological ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), induces L1-RTP. Notably, RNA-interference experiments combined with back-transfection of siRNA-resistant cDNAs revealed that the induction of L1-RTP by FICZ is dependent on AhR nuclear translocator-1 (ARNT1), a binding partner of AhR, and the activation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein. However, our extensive analyses suggested that AhR is not required for L1-RTP. FICZ stimulated the interaction of the L1-encoded open reading frame-1 (ORF1) and ARNT1, and recruited ORF1 to chromatin in a manner dependent on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. Along with our additional observations that the cellular cascades for FICZ-induced L1-RTP were different from those of L1-RTP triggered by DNA damage, we propose that the presence of the cellular machinery of ARNT1 mediates L1-RTP. A possible role of ARNT1-mediated L1-RTP in the adaptation of living organisms to environmental changes is discussed.

  8. Involvement of retrotransposition of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 in skin tumorigenesis induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate.

    PubMed

    Okudaira, Noriyuki; Goto, Motohito; Yanobu-Takanashi, Rieko; Tamura, Masato; An, Akihiro; Abe, Yukiko; Kano, Shigeyuki; Hagiwara, Shotaro; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Okamura, Tadashi

    2011-11-01

    Tumor development induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) plus 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is a well-characterized model of multistep carcinogenesis. DMBA mutates the Ha-ras gene, whereas TPA promotes the growth of transformed cells by activating cellular signaling molecules. It remains to be clarified how repeated TPA treatment endows transformed cells with autonomous cell growth. Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (L1) is an endogenous retroelement, and 80-100 copies of L1 function as autonomous mobile elements. Although the L1 retrotransposition (RTP) has been found in various human tumors, implying the possible mobility of L1 during carcinogenesis, little is known about how L1-RTP arises in tumor cells, owing to a lack of experimental models. To dissect the mechanism of L1-RTP during carcinogenesis, we established a line of transgenic mice carrying human L1 and enhanced green fluorescent protein (hL1-EGFP mice) and subjected them to DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumorigenesis. Of 15 skin tumors examined, 13 were positive for L1-RTP; L1-RTP was not detected in normal skin tissues adjacent to the tumors. Moreover, nine L1-RTP-positive tumors were positive for activated Ha-ras, and immunohistochemical analysis revealed cells positive for both L1-RTP and phosphorylated Stat3, a marker of tumor cells. Additional in vivo experiments suggested that L1-RTP occurred during tumor promotion by TPA. This is the first report on the involvement of L1-RTP in chemical carcinogenesis. We propose hL1-EGFP mice as a versatile system for investigating the mode of L1-RTP in tumor development and discuss the possible role of L1-RTP in tumorigenesis.

  9. Zebrafish embryo screen for mycobacterial genes involved in the initiation of granuloma formation reveals a newly identified ESX-1 component.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Esther J M; Schipper, Tim; Rosendahl Huber, Sietske K; Nezhinsky, Alexander E; Verbeek, Fons J; Gurcha, Sudagar S; Besra, Gurdyal S; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Bitter, Wilbert; van der Sar, Astrid M

    2011-07-01

    The hallmark of tuberculosis (TB) is the formation of granulomas, which are clusters of infected macrophages surrounded by additional macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes. Although it has long been thought that granulomas are beneficial for the host, there is evidence that mycobacteria also promote the formation of these structures. In this study, we aimed to identify new mycobacterial factors involved in the initial stages of granuloma formation. We exploited the zebrafish embryo Mycobacterium marinum infection model to study initiation of granuloma formation and developed an in vivo screen to select for random M. marinum mutants that were unable to induce granuloma formation efficiently. Upon screening 200 mutants, three mutants repeatedly initiated reduced granuloma formation. One of the mutants was found to be defective in the espL gene, which is located in the ESX-1 cluster. The ESX-1 cluster is disrupted in the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strain and encodes a specialized secretion system known to be important for granuloma formation and virulence. Although espL has not been implicated in protein secretion before, we observed a strong effect on the secretion of the ESX-1 substrates ESAT-6 and EspE. We conclude that our zebrafish embryo M. marinum screen is a useful tool to identify mycobacterial genes involved in the initial stages of granuloma formation and that we have identified a new component of the ESX-1 secretion system. We are confident that our approach will contribute to the knowledge of mycobacterial virulence and could be helpful for the development of new TB vaccines.

  10. Lingual ulcer as the only sign of recurrent mycobacterial infection in an HIV/AIDS-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; González-Ramírez, Imelda; Mosqueda-Gómez, Juan Luis; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Reyes-Gutiérrez, Edgardo; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2005-01-01

    The report describes an HIV/AIDS patient seen at a referral center in Mexico City, in whom a mycobacterial infection in the oral mucosa, probably tuberculosis (TB) was identified. The purpose is to describe the clinical and histological findings in an HIV-infected patient, who after being treated successfully for tuberculous lymphangitis 4 years ago, presented with a lingual ulcer as the only suggestive sign of recurrence of mycobacterial infection, probably M. tuberculosis. A 39-year-old man seen in the HIV clinic of the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición "Salvador Zubirán" in Mexico City since 1991 for HIV infection. In 1999 the patient developed tuberculous lymphangitis; he was managed with a 4-drug regimen for 12 months, with improvement of local and systemic symptoms. In May of 2003, the patient presented a painful superficial lingual ulcer, 0.7 cm in diameter, well circumscribed, crateriform with slightly elevated, irregular and indurated borders, of 4 months duration. The histopathological examination showed chronic granulomatous inflammation with giant multinucleated cells, suggestive of mycobacterial infection, and recurrence of TB was considered. Rifampin, isoniazide, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and streptomycin were administered. The lingual lesion improved with partial healing at the first week and total remission at 45 days after the beginning of the antituberculous treatment. In June, 2003, the patient began highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) that included two NRTIs and one NNRTI. At 7 months of follow-up, the patient remains free of lingual lesions. The particularity of the present case is that the lingual ulcer was the only sign of infection by mycobacteria, suggestive of TB, in an HIV/AIDS patient that probably represented a recurrence of a previous episode.

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of Mycobacterium iranicum UM_TJL against representative mycobacterial species suggests its environmental origin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Joon Liang; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah; Ng, Hien Fuh; Choo, Siew Woh

    2014-11-24

    Mycobacterium iranicum is a newly reported mycobacterial species. We present the first comparative study of M. iranicum UM_TJL and other mycobacteria. We found M. iranicum to have a close genetic association with environmental mycobacteria infrequently associated with human infections. Nonetheless, UM_TJL is also equipped with many virulence genes (some of which appear to be the consequence of transduction-related gene transfer) that have been identified in established human pathogens. Taken all together, our data suggest that M. iranicum is an environmental bacterium adapted for pathogenicity in the human host. This comparative study provides important clues and forms the basis for future functional studies on this mycobacterium.

  12. Synthesis, anti-mycobacterial activity and DNA sequence-selectivity of a library of biaryl-motifs containing polyamides.

    PubMed

    Brucoli, Federico; Guzman, Juan D; Maitra, Arundhati; James, Colin H; Fox, Keith R; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-07-01

    The alarming rise of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) strains, compel the development of new molecules with novel modes of action to control this world health emergency. Distamycin analogues containing N-terminal biaryl-motifs 2(1-5)(1-7) were synthesised using a solution-phase approach and evaluated for their anti-mycobacterial activity and DNA-sequence selectivity. Thiophene dimer motif-containing polyamide 2(2,6) exhibited 10-fold higher inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis compared to distamycin and library member 2(5,7) showed high binding affinity for the 5'-ACATAT-3' sequence.

  13. Bilateral Candida and atypical mycobacterial infection after frontalis sling suspension with silicone rod to correct congenital ptosis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Brett W; Bratton, Emily M; Durairaj, Vikram D; Hink, Eric M

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, the authors describe an unusual complication of a frontalis sling suspension with silicone rods. A 5-year-old girl with blepharophimosis syndrome underwent frontalis sling suspension using an open sky technique. Four weeks after surgery, she was noted to have pustules over both upper eyelids and eyebrows. Cultures from the surgical sites grew Mycobacterium chelonae and Candida parapsilosis. Intravenous antibiotics and antifungals and sling explantation were curative. One month after sling explantation, the patient maintained an adequate marginal reflex distance 1. Atypical mycobacterial and Candida infection should be considered in the differential diagnoses of postoperative infection after frontalis sling suspension with silicone rods.

  14. Effects of epigallocatechin gallate on the cell-wall structure of Mycobacterial smegmatis mc²155.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tieying; Qin, Biaojie; Gao, Mingchuan; Yin, Yuling; Wang, Changyuan; Zang, Shizhu; Li, Xinli; Zhang, Cuili; Xin, Yi; Jiang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is the main component of green tea extracts that inhibits the growth of Mycobacterial smegmatis mc(2)155, and the mechanism is not clear. This study showed the effects of EGCG on the growth of mc(2)155. The content and the structure of EGCG in LB medium with mc(2)155 were identified by HPLC and LC/MS. Transmission electron microscopy was utilised to identify the cell envelope structure. As a result, the optional inhibition concentration was determined to be 20 μg mL(-1). Most of EGCG was transferred into its isomeride in LB medium, but the inhibition effects against mc(2)155 had yet been maintained. The changes of cell envelope structure were showed after EGCG treatment for 18 h. The cell wall appeared to have a less electron-translucent zone, turn rougher and thicker. The results show that EGCG impacts the integrity of mycobacterial cell wall and is likely be a better prophylactic agent against tuberculosis.

  15. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis.

  16. Systemic Expression of Notch Ligand Delta-Like 4 during Mycobacterial Infection Alters the T Cell Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Matthew A.; Allen, Ronald M.; Kimura, Soichiro; Day, Cheryl L.; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    The Notch ligand delta-like 4 (DLL4) is known to fine-tune the CD4+ T cell cytokine response. DLL4 is expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in a MyD88-dependent manner. We found that DLL4 expression was upregulated on bone marrow progenitor cells and APCs in mice infected with BCG Mycobacterium. Transfer of DLL4+ progenitor cells from infected hosts resulted in an increase DLL4+ myeloid cells in the spleen, indicating that expression of the dll4 gene is propagated throughout hematopoiesis. We also found an increase in DLL4+ monocytes from individuals who were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In latent individuals, DLL4 expression correlated with increased cytokine production from T cells in response to PPD stimulation. Finally, antibody blockade of DLL4 reduced T cell cytokine production from naïve T cells stimulated with antigen. These results demonstrate that the Notch ligand DLL4 can influence T cell cytokine production in both humans and mice, and further reveal that expression of DLL4 is upregulated on early hematopoietic progenitors in response to chronic mycobacterial infection. These data suggest that widespread DLL4 expression may occur as a result of mycobacterial infection, and that this expression may alter CD4+ T cell responses to both previously encountered and novel antigens. PMID:27933064

  17. Biologically active components from mycobacterial cell walls. III. Production of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T J; Azuma, I; Ribi, E E

    1975-02-01

    The efficacy of various fractions of mycobacterial cell walls in producing experimental ahlergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) has been evaluated. BCG (Bacillus-Calmette-Buérin) cell walls were effective in producing EAE in all animals at dose levels as low as 40 mug. Study of subfractions of these cell walls revealed the following: (1) wax D was active, but required larger doses than BCG cell walls; (2) the chloroform-methanol-soluble (CMS) portion of wax D and P3 (a mycolic acid-trehalose ester contained therein) were inactive; (3) the chloroform-methanol-insoluble (CMI) portion of wax D was active; (4) exhaustively delipidated cell wass skeletons of BCG, Nocardia asteroides, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Corynebacterium diphtheriae and M. kansaii were active; (5) two water-soluble adjuvants prepared from mycobacteria were active. These results suggest that the mycobacterial structure responsible for EAE adjuvanticity is present in the organic solvent-insoluble cell wall skeleton framework. The activity of wax D may be due to the presence of cell-wall skeleton constituents which are found in varying quanity in most wax D preparations. Wax D components soluble in a solution of chloroform:methanol (diluted 2:1 v/v) do not produce EAE.

  18. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis. PMID:27457620

  19. Host immune responses to mycobacterial antigens and their implications for the development of a vaccine to control tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Jae-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2014-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide health problem, causing around 2 million deaths per year. Despite the bacillus Calmette Guérin vaccine being available for more than 80 years, it has limited effectiveness in preventing TB, with inconsistent results in trials. This highlights the urgent need to develop an improved TB vaccine, based on a better understanding of host-pathogen interactions and immune responses during mycobacterial infection. Recent studies have revealed a potential role for autophagy, an intracellular homeostatic process, in vaccine development against TB, through enhanced immune activation. This review attempts to understand the host innate immune responses induced by a variety of protein antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and to identify future vaccine candidates against TB. We focus on recent advances in vaccine development strategies, through identification of new TB antigens using a variety of innovative tools. A new understanding of the host-pathogen relationship, and the usefulness of mycobacterial antigens as novel vaccine candidates, will contribute to the design of the next generation of vaccines, and to improving the host protective immune responses while limiting immunopathology during M. tuberculosis infection.

  20. Comparison of clinical and laboratory findings between those with pulmonary tuberculosis and those with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Thanachartwet, Vipa; Desakorn, Varunee; Duangrithi, Duangjai; Chunpongthong, Pongsak; Phojanamongkolkij, Kamol; Jitruckthai, Pasakorn; Kasetjaroen, Yuttichai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee

    2014-01-01

    In tuberculosis endemic areas, patients with sputum positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) are usually diagnosed and treated for pulmonary tuberculosis. The diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) lung disease is often ascertained only after lung disease progression occurs, increasing the risk of severe morbidity and mortality. We conducted a matched case-control study among a prospective cohort of 300 patients with newly diagnosed AFB-positive sputum in Thailand during 2010-2012. We compared clinical and laboratory parameters and outcomes among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, NTM lung disease and NTM colonization. A mycobacterial culture was performed in all patients. Ten patients with NTM lung disease were compared to 50 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 10 patients with NTM colonization. The presence of diabetes mellitus or human immunodeficiency virus infection, were associated with NTM lung disease (p = 0.030). Patients with NTM lung disease had a significantly lower body weight prior to treatment (p = 0.021), a higher body weight change from baseline (p = 0.038), and were more likely to have cavitations on chest radiograph (p = 0.033) than those with NTM colonization. In tuberculosis endemic areas, mycobacterial identification should be performed among patients with impaired immune function. NTM lung disease treatment should be considered in patients with NTM sputum isolates who have a history of significant weight loss or cavitations on chest radiography.

  1. Use of siRNA molecular beacons to detect and attenuate mycobacterial infection in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    George, Remo; Cavalcante, Renata; Jr, Celso Carvalho; Marques, Elyana; Waugh, Jonathan B; Unlap, M Tino

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the leading infectious diseases plaguing mankind and is mediated by the facultative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). Once the pathogen enters the body, it subverts the host immune defenses and thrives for extended periods of time within the host macrophages in the lung granulomas, a condition called latent tuberculosis (LTB). Persons with LTB are prone to reactivation of the disease when the body’s immunity is compromised. Currently there are no reliable and effective diagnosis and treatment options for LTB, which necessitates new research in this area. The mycobacterial proteins and genes mediating the adaptive responses inside the macrophage is largely yet to be determined. Recently, it has been shown that the mce operon genes are critical for host cell invasion by the mycobacterium and for establishing a persistent infection in both in vitro and in mouse models of tuberculosis. The YrbE and Mce proteins which are encoded by the MTB mce operons display high degrees of homology to the permeases and the surface binding protein of the ABC transports, respectively. Similarities in structure and cell surface location impute a role in cell invasion at cholesterol rich regions and immunomodulation. The mce4 operon is also thought to encode a cholesterol transport system that enables the mycobacterium to derive both energy and carbon from the host membrane lipids and possibly generating virulence mediating metabolites, thus enabling the bacteria in its long term survival within the granuloma. Various deletion mutation studies involving individual or whole mce operon genes have shown to be conferring varying degrees of attenuation of infectivity or at times hypervirulence to the host MTB, with the deletion of mce4A operon gene conferring the greatest degree of attenuation of virulence. Antisense technology using synthetic siRNAs has been used in knocking down genes in bacteria and over the years this has evolved into a powerful tool for

  2. Rapid, comprehensive, and affordable mycobacterial diagnosis with whole-genome sequencing: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Pankhurst, Louise J; del Ojo Elias, Carlos; Votintseva, Antonina A; Walker, Timothy M; Cole, Kevin; Davies, Jim; Fermont, Jilles M; Gascoyne-Binzi, Deborah M; Kohl, Thomas A; Kong, Clare; Lemaitre, Nadine; Niemann, Stefan; Paul, John; Rogers, Thomas R; Roycroft, Emma; Smith, E Grace; Supply, Philip; Tang, Patrick; Wilcox, Mark H; Wordsworth, Sarah; Wyllie, David; Xu, Li; Crook, Derrick W

    2016-01-01

    of £481 per culture-positive specimen, whereas routine diagnosis costs £518, equating to a WGS-based diagnosis cost that is 7% cheaper annually than are present diagnostic workflows. Interpretation We have shown that WGS has a scalable, rapid turnaround, and is a financially feasible method for full MTBC diagnostics. Continued improvements to mycobacterial processing, bioinformatics, and analysis will improve the accuracy, speed, and scope of WGS-based diagnosis. Funding National Institute for Health Research, Department of Health, Wellcome Trust, British Colombia Centre for Disease Control Foundation for Population and Public Health, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Trinity College Dublin. PMID:26669893

  3. Mycobacterial infection in Northern snakehead (Channa argus) from the Potomac River catchment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Christine L.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Henderson, A.P.; Iwanowicz, D.D.; Odenkirk, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    The Northern snakehead, Channa argus (Cantor), is a non-native predatory fish that has become established regionally in some temperate freshwater habitats within the United States. Over the past decade, Northern snakehead populations have developed within aquatic ecosystems throughout the eastern USA, including the Potomac River system within Virginia, Maryland and Washington, D.C. Since this species was initially observed in this region in 2002, the population has expanded considerably (Odenkirk & Owens 2007). In the Chesapeake Bay watershed, populations of Northern snakehead exist in the lower Potomac River and Rappahannock Rivers on the Western shore of the Bay, and these fish have also been found in middle or upper reaches of river systems on the Eastern shore of the Bay, including the Nanticoke and Wicomico Rivers among others. Over the past several years, many aspects of Northern snakehead life history in the Potomac River have been described, including range and dispersal patterns, microhabitat selection and diet (Lapointe, Thorson & Angermeier 2010; Saylor, Lapointe & Angermeier 2012; Lapointe, Odenkirk & Angermeier 2013). However, comparatively little is known about their health status including susceptibility to parasitism and disease and their capacity to serve as reservoirs of disease for native wildlife. Although considered hardy by fisheries biologists, snakehead fish have demonstrated susceptibility to a number of described piscine diseases within their native range and habitat in Asia. Reported pathogens of significance in snakehead species in Asia include snakehead rhabdovirus (Lio-Po et al. 2000), aeromonad bacteria (Zheng, Cao & Yang 2012), Nocardia (Wang et al. 2007) andMycobacterium spp. (Chinabut, Limsuwan & Chantatchakool 1990; ). Mycobacterial isolates recovered from another snakehead species (Channa striata) in the previous studies have included M. marinum and M. fortuitum, as identified through molecular

  4. Purification, cloning, expression, and properties of mycobacterial trehalose-phosphate phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Klutts, Stacey; Pastuszak, Irena; Edavana, Vineetha Koroth; Thampi, Prajitha; Pan, Yuan-Tseng; Abraham, Edathera C; Carroll, J David; Elbein, Alan D

    2003-01-24

    at 60 degrees C for up to 6 min, but was slowly inactivated at 70 degrees C. Circular dichroism studies on recombinant TPP indicate that the secondary structure of this protein has considerable beta-pleated sheet and is very compact. TPP may play a key role in the biosynthesis of trehalose compounds, such as trehalose mycolates, and therefore may represent an excellent target site for chemotherapy against tuberculosis and other mycobacterial diseases.

  5. Changes in cholesterol level correlate with the course of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Young; Yang, Go Eun; Ko, Yousang; Park, Yong Bum; Sim, Yun Su; Park, Sung Hoon; Lee, Chang Youl; Jung, Ki-Suck

    2016-01-01

    Background Nutritional assessment is important in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (PNTM) disease. The therapeutic effect of a cholesterol-rich diet in tuberculosis (TB) patients has been demonstrated, but the role of cholesterol in PNTM disease is unclear. This study evaluated the sequential changes in nutritional markers, including cholesterol, total lymphocyte count and visceral fat volume, according to the PNTM disease course. Methods This was an age-, sex- and number of comorbid diseases-matched case-control analysis of 89 patients with PNTM disease and 356 controls, who were participants in a Korean national survey. Results The median body mass index (BMI) and cholesterol level in the PNTM group [BMI =19.7 kg/m2; interquartile range (IQR): 17.8–21.6; cholesterol: 159 mg/dL; IQR, 135–185] were lower than those in controls (BMI: 23.1 kg/m2; IQR, 21.3–25.3; cholesterol: 188 mg/dL; IQR, 164-217; both P<0.001). In a multivariate analysis, Age more than 70 years (OR =3.38; 95% CI: 1.13–10.15, P=0.029), BMI <19.5 kg/m2 (OR =5.09; 95% CI: 1.67–15.48; P=0.004) and cavitary lesions (OR: 3.86; 95% CI: 1.30–11.47; P=0.015) were independently associated with extensive pulmonary lesions involving more than four lobes. The total cholesterol level, total lymphocyte count showed a tendency to decrease in PNTM patients with disease progression (both, P value <0.05), but not in those with a stable disease course. A decrease in cholesterol concentration of >20 mg/dL and a decrease in lymphocyte count more than 200/µL were predictive factors for disease progression (cholesterol: OR =10.50, 95% CI: 2.51–43.98, P=0.001; lymphocyte count: OR =5.32, 95% CI: 1.46–19.35, P=0.011). Conclusions These findings suggest that the change in cholesterol level may be a marker of disease progression in patients with PNTM disease. PMID:27867565

  6. Interspersed DNA repeats bcr1-bcr18 of Bacillus cereus group bacteria form three distinct groups with different evolutionary and functional patterns.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Simen M; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Økstad, Ole Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Many short (<400 bp) interspersed sequence repeats exist in bacteria, yet little is known about their origins, mode of generation, or possible function. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of 18 different previously identified repeated DNA elements, bcr1-bcr18 (Økstad OA, Hegna I, Lindback T, Rishovd AL, Kolstø AB. 1999. Genome organization is not conserved between Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis. Microbiology. 145:621-631.; Tourasse NJ, Helgason E, Økstad OA, Hegna IK, Kolstø AB. 2006. The Bacillus cereus group: novel aspects of population structure and genome dynamics. J Appl Microbiol. 101:579-593.), in 36 sequenced genomes from the Bacillus cereus group of bacteria. This group consists of genetically closely related species with variable pathogenic specificity toward different hosts and includes among others B. anthracis, B. cereus, and B. thuringiensis. The B. cereus group repeat elements could be classified into three categories with different properties: Group A elements (bcr1-bcr3) exhibited highly variable copy numbers ranging from 4 to 116 copies per strain, showed a nonconserved chromosomal distribution pattern between strains, and displayed several features characteristic of mobile elements. Group B repeats (bcr4-bcr6) were present in 0-10 copies per strain and were associated with strain-specific genes and disruptions of genome synteny, implying a possible contribution to genome rearrangements and/or horizontal gene transfer events. bcr5, in particular, was associated with large gene clusters showing resemblance to integrons. In agreement with their potentially mobile nature or involvement in horizontal transfers, the sequences of the repeats from Groups A and B (bcr1-bcr6) followed a phylogeny different from that of the host strains. Conversely, repeats from Group C (bcr7-bcr18) had a conserved chromosomal location and orthologous gene neighbors in the investigated B. cereus group genomes, and their phylogeny matched that of the host

  7. Isoscapes as a tool to capture the complexity of small water bodies interspersed across a moraine landscape managed for agriculture in NE Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzsche, K. N.; Flury, S.; Premke, K.; Gessler, A.; Kayler, Z. E.

    2013-12-01

    Across the northeastern region of Germany lies a moraine landscape where thousands of small water bodies called 'Sölle' (kettle holes) are found. These kettle holes, which are generally less than 1 ha in size, are interspersed across an agricultural landscape and predicted to undergo severe alterations in hydrology and biogeochemistry as the global climate changes. Within the project LandScales, we investigate specific C dynamics of this unique landscape at three different spatial scales: (i) C degradation at the molecular scale; (ii) lateral C transfer in the kettle hole aquatic-terrestrial transition zone; and (iii) erosion and C/N dynamics at the regional landscape scale. In the first phase of the project (iii), we constructed isotopic maps (Isoscapes; δ13C, δ15N, δ18O) to provide an overview of how these water bodies are spatially represented across the study area as seen through a biogeochemical lens. We expect to capture gradients in precipitation, land management effects (e.g., fertilization), patterns in soil erosion, and plant physiological responses. Ultimately, we will combine these isotope data with high-resolution maps involving geostatistical interpolation and link them to biogeochemical models. We collected plant, top-soil (5-20cm), sediment and water samples from a 33 km2 rectangular area of the catchment, sampling a 250 m raster in the main 2013 growing season. We sampled sediment cores, water, and plants from 50 kettle holes that represent the geomorphological and hydrological variability within the study area. Soil and sediment samples are further analyzed by physically and chemically separating organic matter fractions hypothesized to contain stabilized carbon. From these multiple lines of data, we expect to get a broader landscape view of: kettle holes function as hot spots of nutrient cycling, potential land management effects on biogeochemical processes, and patterns of erosion and carbon storage. Furthermore, the Isoscapes will serve to

  8. Structural and functional characterization of an arylamine N-acetyltransferase from the pathogen Mycobacterium abscessus: differences from other mycobacterial isoforms and implications for selective inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cocaign, Angélique; Kubiak, Xavier; Xu, Ximing; Garnier, Guillaume; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Chi-Bui, Linh; Dairou, Julien; Busi, Florent; Abuhammad, Areej; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean Marie; Herrmann, Jean Louis; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is the most pathogenic rapid-growing mycobacterium and is one of the most resistant organisms to chemotherapeutic agents. However, structural and functional studies of M. abscessus proteins that could modify/inactivate antibiotics remain nonexistent. Here, the structural and functional characterization of an arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) from M. abscessus [(MYCAB)NAT1] are reported. This novel prokaryotic NAT displays significant N-acetyltransferase activity towards aromatic substrates, including antibiotics such as isoniazid and p-aminosalicylate. The enzyme is endogenously expressed and functional in both the rough and smooth M. abscessus morphotypes. The crystal structure of (MYCAB)NAT1 at 1.8 Å resolution reveals that it is more closely related to Nocardia farcinica NAT than to mycobacterial isoforms. In particular, structural and physicochemical differences from other mycobacterial NATs were found in the active site. Peculiarities of (MYCAB)NAT1 were further supported by kinetic and docking studies showing that the enzyme was poorly inhibited by the piperidinol inhibitor of mycobacterial NATs. This study describes the first structure of an antibiotic-modifying enzyme from M. abscessus and provides bases to better understand the substrate/inhibitor-binding specificities among mycobacterial NATs and to identify/optimize specific inhibitors. These data should also contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms that are responsible for the pathogenicity and extensive chemotherapeutic resistance of M. abscessus.

  9. Incidence of mycobacterial infections in cats in Great Britain: estimate from feline tissue samples submitted to diagnostic laboratories.

    PubMed

    Gunn-Moore, D A; Gaunt, C; Shaw, D J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of mycobacterial infections in cats in Great Britain (GB). This was performed using the proxy measure of feline tissue samples submitted to diagnostic laboratories in GB that were found to have histopathological changes typical of mycobacterial infection ('MYC'). Sixteen primary diagnostic laboratories were asked for information on the number of feline samples submitted in 2009, the number with MYC, the number undergoing Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) staining and, for comparison, the number diagnosed with lymphoma. Eight laboratories provided full data for the whole year: 11,782 samples; lymphoma 3.2% (mean, 95% CI: 2.89, 3.5), MYC 1.16% (0.98; 1.37) and ZN-positive 0.31% (0.22; 0.43). Data on 1569 samples from seven laboratories that provided partial data on samples for the whole year revealed similar results, although all changes were more frequent: lymphoma 5.42% (4.35; 6.66), MYC 2.36% (1.66; 3.23) and ZN-positive 0.77% (0.40; 1.33). One laboratory only provided data for part of the year (4.5 months), reporting all three types of histopathology less frequently: 18,232 samples; lymphoma 0.2% (0.18; 0.32), MYC 0.07% (0.04; 0.12) and ZN-positive 0.05% (0.02; 0.09). The reasons for low reporting rates in this high-throughput laboratory are unclear. In total, 187 samples were reported as having MYC. Five Reference laboratories were also contacted, reporting 174 feline tissue submissions in 2009, with mycobacteria being cultured from 90. The study shows that MYC are frequently reported in tissue samples from cats in GB, being reported in ~1% of samples, with confirmation as ZN-positive in ~0.3%. Lymphoma is recognized as a common disease in cats, being seen in ~3% of samples in this study. When compared against MYC, lymphoma was reported only twice as frequently. This confirms that far from being rare, clinically significant mycobacterial infections occur commonly in cats in GB.

  10. Greater preexisting interferon γ responses to mycobacterial antigens and lower bacillary load during HIV-associated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lahey, Timothy; Czechura, Tom; Crabtree, Scott; Arbeit, Robert D; Matee, Mecky; Horsburgh, C Robert; MacKenzie, Todd; Bakari, Muhammad; Pallangyo, Kisali; von Reyn, C Fordham

    2013-11-15

    The role of preexisting interferon (IFN) γ responses in controlling bacillary burden in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated tuberculosis is not known. Among BCG-immunized HIV-infected adults who developed tuberculosis in a phase III trial of an investigational tuberculosis vaccine, greater baseline IFN-γ responses to early secretory antigenic target 6 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole-cell lysate were associated with reduced bacillary burden on sputum smear grade, days to culture positivity on agar, and sputum culture grade during subsequent tuberculosis. This association was most consistent among recipients of the investigational vaccine. When HIV-associated tuberculosis develops, greater preexisting IFN-γ responses to mycobacterial antigens are associated with reduced tuberculosis bacillary burden. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier. NCT0052195.

  11. [Implementation of the technical requirements of the UNE-EN-ISO 15189 quality standard in a mycobacterial laboratory].

    PubMed

    Guna Serrano, M del Remedio; Ocete Mochón, M Dolores; Lahiguera, M José; Bresó, M Carmen; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2013-02-01

    The UNE-EN-ISO 15189:2007 standard defines the requirements for quality and competence that must be met by medical laboratories. These laboratories should use this international standard to develop their own quality management systems and to evaluate their own competencies; in turn, this standard will be used by accreditation bodies to confirm or recognize the laboratories' competence. In clinical microbiology laboratories, application of the standard implies the implementation of the technical and specific management requirements that must be met to achieve optimal quality when carrying out microbiological tests. In Spain, accreditation is granted by the Spanish Accreditation Body (Entidad Nacional de Acreditación). This review aims to discuss the practical application of the standard's technical requirements in mycobacterial laboratory. Firstly, we define the scope of accreditation. Secondly, we specify how the items of the standard on personnel management, control of equipment, environmental facilities, method validation, internal controls and customer satisfaction surveys were developed and implemented in our laboratory.

  12. ESX-1-induced apoptosis during mycobacterial infection: to be or not to be, that is the question

    PubMed Central

    Aguiló, Nacho; Marinova, Dessislava; Martín, Carlos; Pardo, Julián

    2013-01-01

    The major Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence factor ESAT-6 exported by the ESX-1 secretion system has been described as a pro-apoptotic factor by several independent groups in recent years, sustaining a role for apoptosis in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. This role has been supported by independent studies in which apoptosis has been shown as a hallmark feature in human and mouse lungs infected with virulent strains. Nevertheless, the role of apoptosis during mycobacterial infection is subject to an intense debate. Several works maintain that apoptosis is more evident with attenuated strains, whereas virulent mycobacteria tend to inhibit this process, suggesting that apoptosis induction may be a host mechanism to control infection. In this review, we summarize the evidences that support the involvement of ESX-1-induced apoptosis in virulence, intending to provide a rational treatise for the role of programmed cell death during M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:24364000

  13. Homologous recombination mediated by the mycobacterial AdnAB helicase without end resection by the AdnAB nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Richa; Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Current models of bacterial homologous recombination (HR) posit that extensive resection of a DNA double-strand break (DSB) by a multisubunit helicase–nuclease machine (e.g. RecBCD, AddAB or AdnAB) generates the requisite 3′ single-strand DNA substrate for RecA-mediated strand invasion. AdnAB, the helicase–nuclease implicated in mycobacterial HR, consists of two subunits, AdnA and AdnB, each composed of an N-terminal ATPase domain and a C-terminal nuclease domain. DSB unwinding by AdnAB in vitro is stringently dependent on the ATPase activity of the ‘lead’ AdnB motor translocating on the 3′ ssDNA strand, but not on the putative ‘lagging’ AdnA ATPase. Here, we queried genetically which activities of AdnAB are pertinent to its role in HR and DNA damage repair in vivo by inactivating each of the four catalytic domains. Complete nuclease-dead AdnAB enzyme can sustain recombination in vivo, as long as its AdnB motor is intact and RecO and RecR are available. We conclude that AdnAB's processive DSB unwinding activity suffices for AdnAB function in HR. Albeit not excluding the agency of a backup nuclease, our findings suggest that mycobacterial HR can proceed via DSB unwinding and protein capture of the displaced 3′-OH single strand, without a need for extensive end-resection. PMID:27899634

  14. A Novel Inhibitor of Gyrase B Is a Potent Drug Candidate for Treatment of Tuberculosis and Nontuberculosis Mycobacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Steven M.; Hanzelka, Brian L.; Perola, Emanuele; Shoen, Carolyn M.; Cynamon, Michael H.; Ngwane, Andile H.; Wiid, Ian J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Betoudji, Fabrice; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Thomson, John A.

    2014-01-01

    New drugs to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis are urgently needed. Extensively drug-resistant and probably the totally drug-resistant tuberculosis strains are resistant to fluoroquinolones like moxifloxacin, which target gyrase A, and most people infected with these strains die within a year. In this study, we found that a novel aminobenzimidazole, VXc-486, which targets gyrase B, potently inhibits multiple drug-sensitive isolates and drug-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro (MICs of 0.03 to 0.30 μg/ml and 0.08 to 5.48 μg/ml, respectively) and reduces mycobacterial burdens in lungs of infected mice in vivo. VXc-486 is active against drug-resistant isolates, has bactericidal activity, and kills intracellular and dormant M. tuberculosis bacteria in a low-oxygen environment. Furthermore, we found that VXc-486 inhibits the growth of multiple strains of Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium kansasii (MICs of 0.1 to 2.0 μg/ml), as well as that of several strains of Nocardia spp. (MICs of 0.1 to 1.0 μg/ml). We made a direct comparison of the parent compound VXc-486 and a phosphate prodrug of VXc-486 and showed that the prodrug of VXc-486 had more potent killing of M. tuberculosis than did VXc-486 in vivo. In combination with other antimycobacterial drugs, the prodrug of VXc-486 sterilized M. tuberculosis infection when combined with rifapentine-pyrazinamide and bedaquiline-pyrazinamide in a relapse infection study in mice. Furthermore, the prodrug of VXc-486 appeared to perform at least as well as the gyrase A inhibitor moxifloxacin. These findings warrant further development of the prodrug of VXc-486 for the treatment of tuberculosis and nontuberculosis mycobacterial infections. PMID:25534737

  15. A Mycobacterial Phosphoribosyltransferase Promotes Bacillary Survival by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Autophagy Pathways in Macrophages and Zebrafish*

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Jagannathan, Lakshmanan; Ganguli, Geetanjali; Padhi, Avinash; Roy, Debasish; Alaridah, Nader; Saha, Pratip; Nongthomba, Upendra; Godaly, Gabriela; Gopal, Ramesh Kumar; Banerjee, Sulagna; Sonawane, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis employs various strategies to modulate host immune responses to facilitate its persistence in macrophages. The M. tuberculosis cell wall contains numerous glycoproteins with unknown roles in pathogenesis. Here, by using Concanavalin A and LC-MS analysis, we identified a novel mannosylated glycoprotein phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by Rv3242c from M. tuberculosis cell walls. Homology modeling, bioinformatic analyses, and an assay of phosphoribosyltransferase activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing recombinant Rv3242c (MsmRv3242c) confirmed the mass spectrometry data. Using Mycobacterium marinum-zebrafish and the surrogate MsmRv3242c infection models, we proved that phosphoribosyltransferase is involved in mycobacterial virulence. Histological and infection assays showed that the M. marinum mimG mutant, an Rv3242c orthologue in a pathogenic M. marinum strain, was strongly attenuated in adult zebrafish and also survived less in macrophages. In contrast, infection with wild type and the complemented ΔmimG:Rv3242c M. marinum strains showed prominent pathological features, such as severe emaciation, skin lesions, hemorrhaging, and more zebrafish death. Similarly, recombinant MsmRv3242c bacteria showed increased invasion in non-phagocytic epithelial cells and longer intracellular survival in macrophages as compared with wild type and vector control M. smegmatis strains. Further mechanistic studies revealed that the Rv3242c- and mimG-mediated enhancement of intramacrophagic survival was due to inhibition of autophagy, reactive oxygen species, and reduced activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes. Infection with MsmRv3242c also activated the MAPK pathway, NF-κB, and inflammatory cytokines. In summary, we show that a novel mycobacterial mannosylated phosphoribosyltransferase acts as a virulence and immunomodulatory factor, suggesting that it may constitute a novel target for antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:25825498

  16. High Mortality of Disseminated Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterial Infection in HIV-Infected Patients in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nishijima, Takeshi; Teruya, Katsuji; Aoki, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Little information is available on the mortality and risk factors associated with death in disseminated non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection (dNTM) in HIV-infected patients in the ART-era. Methods In a single-center study, HIV-infected dNTM with positive NTM culture from sterile sites between 2000 and 2013 were analysed. The clinical characteristics at commencement of anti-mycobacterial treatment (baseline) were compared between those who survived and died. Results Twenty-four patients were analyzed. [The median CD4 27/μL (range 2–185)]. Mycobacterium avium and M. intracellulare accounted for 20 (83%) and 3 (13%) of isolated NTM. NTM bacteremia was diagnosed in 15 (63%) patients. Seven (29%) patients died, and NTM bacteremia was significantly associated with mortality (p = 0.022). The baseline CD4 count was significantly lower in the non-survivors than the survivors (median 7/μL versus 49, p = 0.034). Concomitant AIDS-defining diseases or malignancies were not associated with mortality. Immune-reconstitution syndrome (IRS) occurred to 19 (79%) patients (8 paradoxical and 11 unmasking), and prognosis tended to be better in unmasking-IRS than the other patients (n = 13) (p = 0.078). Patients with paradoxical-IRS had marginally lower CD4 count and higher frequency of bacteremia than those with unmasking-IRS (p = 0.051, and 0.059). Treatment with systemic corticosteroids was applied in 63% and 55% of patients with paradoxical and unmasking-IRS, respectively. Conclusion dNTM in HIV-infected patients resulted in high mortality even in the ART-era. NTM bacteremia and low CD4 count were risk factors for death, whereas patients presented with unmasking-IRS had marginally better prognosis. IRS occurred in 79% of the patients, suggesting difficulty in the management of dNTM. PMID:26985832

  17. Real-Time PCR Assay Using Fine-Needle Aspirates and Tissue Biopsy Specimens for Rapid Diagnosis of Mycobacterial Lymphadenitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    van Coppenraet, E. S. Bruijnesteijn; Lindeboom, J. A.; Prins, J. M.; Peeters, M. F.; Claas, E. C. J.; Kuijper, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay was developed to diagnose and identify the causative agents of suspected mycobacterial lymphadenitis. Primers and probes for the real-time PCR were designed on the basis of the internal transcribed spacer sequence, enabling the recognition of the genus Mycobacterium and the species Mycobacterium avium and M. tuberculosis. The detection limit for the assay was established at 1,100 CFU/ml of pus, and the specificity tests showed no false-positive reaction with other mycobacterial species and other pathogens causing lymphadenitis. From 67 children with suspected mycobacterial lymphadenitis based on a positive mycobacterial skin test, 102 samples (58 fine-needle aspirates [FNA] and 44 tissue specimens) were obtained. The real-time PCR assay detected a mycobacterial infection in 48 patients (71.6%), whereas auramine staining and culturing were positive for 31 (46.3%) and 28 (41.8%) of the patients. The addition of the real-time PCR assay to conventional diagnostic tests resulted in the recognition of 13 more patients with mycobacterial disease. These results indicate that the real-time PCR is more sensitive than conventional staining and culturing techniques (P = 0.006). The M. avium-specific real-time PCR was positive for 38 patients, and the M. tuberculosis-specific real-time PCR was positive for 1 patient. Analysis of 27 patients from whom FNA and tissue biopsy specimens were collected revealed significantly more positive real-time PCR results for FNA than for tissue biopsy specimens (P = 0.003). Samples from an age-matched control group of 50 patients with PCR-proven cat scratch disease were all found to be negative by the real-time PCR. We conclude that this real-time PCR assay with a sensitivity of 72% for patients with lymphadenitis and a specificity of 100% for the detection of atypical mycobacteria can provide excellent support for clinical decision making in children with lymphadenitis. PMID:15184446

  18. Association between caudal fold tuberculin test responses and results of an ELISA for Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis and mycobacterial culture of feces in tuberculosis-free dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Brito, Barbara P; Aly, Sharif S; Anderson, Randall J; Fossler, Charles P; Garry, Franklyn B; Gardner, Ian A

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate associations between Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) and caudal fold tuberculin (CFT) test results in cattle. DESIGN--Longitudinal and cross-sectional evaluations. ANIMALS--1 California (approx 3,600 cows) and 3 Colorado (approx 640, 1,190, and 1,480 cows) dairy herds considered free of Mycobacterium bovis infection. PROCEDURES--In the California herd, the association between CFT response and MAP status was determined with ELISA and mycobacterial culture of feces within 1 year before and after CFT testing. The association between CFT and MAP status in all herds was modeled with mixed-effects logistic regression. RESULTS--In the California herd, significantly higher odds of being classified as suspect by CFT were found for cows with results of MAP ELISA negative before and positive after CFT testing (OR, 5.6) and cows positive before and after CFT testing (OR, 8.1). Higher odds were found for cows positive for mycobacterial culture of feces before and negative for culture after CFT testing (OR, 4.6) and cows negative for mycobacterial culture of feces before and positive for culture after CFT testing (OR, 13.2). All herds had higher odds of being classified as suspect by CFT testing for cows with positive results for ELISA (OR, 2.9) or mycobacterial culture of feces (OR, 5.0), compared with cows with negative results of the same tests. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE--A strong association was found between positive MAP test results and being classified as a suspect by CFT testing. Within-herd MAP prevalence may affect specificity of CFT testing for tuberculosis in cattle.

  19. RNA interference in J774 macrophages reveals a role for coronin 1 in mycobacterial trafficking but not in actin-dependent processes.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Rajesh; Gatfield, John; Massner, Jan; Albrecht, Imke; Zanolari, Bettina; Pieters, Jean

    2008-03-01

    Macrophages are crucial for innate immunity, apoptosis, and tissue remodeling, processes that rely on the capacity of macrophages to internalize and process cargo through phagocytosis. Coronin 1, a member of the WD repeat protein family of coronins specifically expressed in leukocytes, was originally identified as a molecule that is recruited to mycobacterial phagosomes and prevents the delivery of mycobacteria to lysosomes, allowing these to survive within phagosomes. However, a role for coronin 1 in mycobacterial pathogenesis has been disputed in favor for its role in mediating phagocytosis and cell motility. In this study, a role for coronin 1 in actin-mediated cellular processes was addressed using RNA interference in the murine macrophage cell line J774. It is shown that the absence of coronin 1 in J774 macrophages expressing small interfering RNA constructs specific for coronin 1 does not affect phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, cell locomotion, or regulation of NADPH oxidase activity. However, in coronin 1-negative J774 cells, internalized mycobacteria were rapidly transferred to lysosomes and killed. Therefore, these results show that in J774 cells coronin 1 has a specific role in modulating phagosome-lysosome transport upon mycobacterial infection and that it is dispensable for most F-actin-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements.

  20. Differences between Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Latent Tuberculous Infection of Mice Ex Vivo and Mycobacterial Infection of Mouse Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The search for factors that account for the reproduction and survival of mycobacteria, including vaccine strains, in host cells is the priority for studies on tuberculosis. A comparison of BCG-mycobacterial loads in granuloma cells obtained from bone marrow and spleens of mice with latent tuberculous infection and cells from mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophage cultures infected with the BCG vaccine in vitro has demonstrated that granuloma macrophages each normally contained a single BCG-Mycobacterium, while those acutely infected in vitro had increased mycobacterial loads and death rates. Mouse granuloma cells were observed to produce the IFNγ, IL-1α, GM-CSF, CD1d, CD25, CD31, СD35, and S100 proteins. None of these activation markers were found in mouse cell cultures infected in vitro or in intact macrophages. Lack of colocalization of lipoarabinomannan-labeled BCG-mycobacteria with the lysosomotropic LysoTracker dye in activated granuloma macrophages suggests that these macrophages were unable to destroy BCG-mycobacteria. However, activated mouse granuloma macrophages could control mycobacterial reproduction in cells both in vivo and in ex vivo culture. By contrast, a considerable increase in the number of BCG-mycobacteria was observed in mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophages after BCG infection in vitro, when no expression of the activation-related molecules was detected in these cells.

  1. The mycolyltransferase 85A, a putative drug target of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: development of a novel assay and quantification of glycolipid-status of the mycobacterial cell wall.

    PubMed

    Elamin, Ayssar A; Stehr, Matthias; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir

    2009-12-01

    The enzymes of the antigen 85 complex (Ag85A, B, and C) possess mycolyltransferase activity and catalyze the synthesis of the most abundant glycolipid of the mycobacterial cell wall, the cord factor. The cord factor (trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate, TDM) is essential for the integrity of the mycobacterial cell wall and pathogenesis of the bacillus. Thus, TDM biosynthesis is regarded as a potential drug target for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. Trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM) is synthesized from two molecules of trehalose-6'-monomycolate (TMM) by antigen 85A. We report here a novel enzyme assay using the natural substrate TMM. The novel colorimetric assay is based on the quantification of glucose from the degradation of trehalose, which is the product from catalytic activity of antigen 85A. Using the new assay, K(m) and K(cat) were determined with values of 129.6+/-8.1 microM and 65.4+/-4.1 min(-1), respectively. This novel assay is also suitable for robust high-throughput screening (HTS) for compound library screening against mycolyltransferase (antigen 85A). The assay is significantly faster and more convenient to use than all assays currently in use. The assay has a very low coefficient of variance (0.04) in 96-well plates and shows a Z' factor of 0.67-0.73, indicating the robustness of the assay. In addition, this new assay is highly suitable for the quantification of total TMM of the mycobacterial cell envelope.

  2. A novel mycobacterial In Vitro infection assay identifies differences of induced macrophage apoptosis between CD4+ and CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Nkwouano, Vanesa; Witkowski, Sven; Rehberg, Nidja; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Nausch, Norman; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are natural host cells for pathogenic mycobacteria, like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb). Immune surveillance by T cells and interaction with M.tb infected macrophages is crucial for protection against M.tb reactivation and development of active tuberculosis. Several factors play a role in the control of M.tb infection but reliable biomarkers remain elusive. One major obstacle is the absence of functional in vitro assays which allow concomitant determination of i) mycobacterial eradication; ii) cytotoxic effects on host macrophages; and iii) effector T-cell functions. We established a novel functional in vitro assay based on flow cytometry analysis of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) infected with a Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain containing a tetracycline inducible live/dead reporter plasmid (LD-BCG). MDM of healthy human donors were generated in vitro and infected with defined LD-BCG numbers. After short-term MDM/LD-BCG co-incubation with autologous effector T cells or in the presence of antibiotics, proportions of MDM containing live or dead LD-BCG were determined by flow cytometry. Concomitant measure of defined numbers of added beads allowed comparison of absolute MDM numbers between samples. Differential effects of T-cell subpopulations on anti-mycobacterial cytotoxicity and on MDM apoptosis were determined. Flow cytometry measure of MDM/LD-BCG treated with rifampicin correlated well with mycobacterial colony forming units and fluorescence microscopy results. Co-culture with pre-activated effector T cells reduced viability of both, LD-BCG and MDM, in a concentration-dependent manner. M.tb protein specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells contributed similarly to anti-mycobacterial cytotoxicity but CD4+ T cells induced higher levels of apoptosis in infected MDMs. This novel assay enables rapid quantification of anti-mycobacterial cytotoxicity and characterization of effector functions. Our functional in vitro assay has the potential to contribute to the

  3. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Mycobacterial Aspartyl-tRNA Synthetase AspS, a Promising TB Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan A. G.; Fütterer, Klaus; Abrahams, Katherine A.; Bhatt, Apoorva; Alderwick, Luke J.; Reynolds, Robert C.; Loman, Nicholas J.; Nataraj, VijayaShankar; Alemparte, Carlos; Barros, David; Lloyd, Adrian J.; Ballell, Lluis; Hobrath, Judith V.; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2014-01-01

    The human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), a disease with high worldwide mortality rates. Current treatment programs are under significant threat from multi-drug and extensively-drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis, and it is essential to identify new inhibitors and their targets. We generated spontaneous resistant mutants in Mycobacterium bovis BCG in the presence of 10× the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of compound 1, a previously identified potent inhibitor of mycobacterial growth in culture. Whole genome sequencing of two resistant mutants revealed in one case a single nucleotide polymorphism in the gene aspS at 535GAC>535AAC (D179N), while in the second mutant a single nucleotide polymorphism was identified upstream of the aspS promoter region. We probed whole cell target engagement by overexpressing either M. bovis BCG aspS or Mycobacterium smegmatis aspS, which resulted in a ten-fold and greater than ten-fold increase, respectively, of the MIC against compound 1. To analyse the impact of inhibitor 1 on M. tuberculosis AspS (Mt-AspS) activity we over-expressed, purified and characterised the kinetics of this enzyme using a robust tRNA-independent assay adapted to a high-throughput screening format. Finally, to aid hit-to-lead optimization, the crystal structure of apo M. smegmatis AspS was determined to a resolution of 2.4 Å. PMID:25409504

  4. Design and synthesis of novel antimicrobials with activity against Gram-positive bacteria and mycobacterial species, including M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tiruveedhula, V.V.N. Phani Babu; Witzigmann, Christopher M.; Verma, Ranjit; Kabir, M. Shahjahan; Rott, Marc; Schwan, William R.; Medina-Bielski, Sara; Lane, Michelle; Close, William; Polanowski, Rebecca L.; Sherman, David; Monte, Aaron; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Cook, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The alarming increase in bacterial resistance over the last decade along with a dramatic decrease in new treatments for infections has led to problems in the healthcare industry. Tuberculosis (TB) is caused mainly by Mycobacterium tuberculosis which is responsible for 1.4 million deaths per year. A world-wide threat with HIV co-infected with multi and extensively drug-resistant strains of TB has emerged. In this regard, herein, novel acrylic acid ethyl ester derivatives were synthesized in simple, efficient routes and evaluated as potential agents against several Mycobacterium species. These were synthesized via a stereospecific process for structure activity relationship (SAR) studies. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays indicated that esters 12, 13, and 20 exhibited greater in vitro activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis than rifampin, one of the current, first-line anti-mycobacterial chemotherapeutic agents. Based on these studies the acrylic ester 20 has been developed as a potential lead compound which was found to have an MIC value of 0.4 μg/mL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The SAR and biological activity of this series is presented; a Michael – acceptor mechanism appears to be important for potent activity of this series of analogs. PMID:24200931

  5. Direct visualization by cryo-EM of the mycobacterial capsular layer: a labile structure containing ESX-1-secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Sani, Musa; Houben, Edith N G; Geurtsen, Jeroen; Pierson, Jason; de Punder, Karin; van Zon, Maaike; Wever, Brigitte; Piersma, Sander R; Jiménez, Connie R; Daffé, Mamadou; Appelmelk, Ben J; Bitter, Wilbert; van der Wel, Nicole; Peters, Peter J

    2010-03-05

    The cell envelope of mycobacteria, a group of Gram positive bacteria, is composed of a plasma membrane and a Gram-negative-like outer membrane containing mycolic acids. In addition, the surface of the mycobacteria is coated with an ill-characterized layer of extractable, non-covalently linked glycans, lipids and proteins, collectively known as the capsule, whose occurrence is a matter of debate. By using plunge freezing cryo-electron microscopy technique, we were able to show that pathogenic mycobacteria produce a thick capsule, only present when the cells were grown under unperturbed conditions and easily removed by mild detergents. This detergent-labile capsule layer contains arabinomannan, alpha-glucan and oligomannosyl-capped glycolipids. Further immunogenic and proteomic analyses revealed that Mycobacterium marinum capsule contains high amounts of proteins that are secreted via the ESX-1 pathway. Finally, cell infection experiments demonstrated the importance of the capsule for binding to cells and dampening of pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Together, these results show a direct visualization of the mycobacterial capsular layer as a labile structure that contains ESX-1-secreted proteins.

  6. A structural and functional investigation of a novel protein from Mycobacterium smegmatis implicated in mycobacterial macrophage survivability.

    PubMed

    Shahine, Adam; Littler, Dene; Brammananath, Rajini; Chan, Phooi Y; Crellin, Paul K; Coppel, Ross L; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2014-09-01

    The success of pathogenic mycobacterial species is owing in part to their ability to parasitize the generally inhospitable phagosomal environment of host macrophages, utilizing a variety of strategies to avoid their antimycobacterial capabilities and thereby enabling their survival. A recently identified gene target in Mycobacterium smegmatis, highly conserved within Mycobacterium spp. and denoted MSMEG_5817, has been found to be important for bacterial survival within host macrophages. To gain insight into its function, the crystal structure of MSMEG_5817 has been solved to 2.40 Å resolution. The structure reveals a high level of structural homology to the sterol carrier protein (SCP) family, suggesting a potential role of MSMEG_5817 in the binding and transportation of biologically relevant lipids required for bacterial survival. The lipid-binding capacity of MSMEG_5817 was confirmed by ELISA, revealing binding to a number of phospholipids with varying binding specificities compared with Homo sapiens SCP. A potential lipid-binding site was probed by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing structurally relevant residues and a binding mechanism potentially differing from that of the SCPs.

  7. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 70 induces interleukin-10 production: immunomodulation of synovial cell cytokine profile and dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    DETANICO, T; RODRIGUES, L; SABRITTO, A C; KEISERMANN, M; BAUER, M E; ZWICKEY, H; BONORINO, C

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines are key modulators of the immune responses that take place in the inflamed synovium of arthritis patients. Consequently, substances that can reverse the inflammatory profile of the inflamed joint are potential tools for clinical management of the disease. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 70 (MTBHSP70) has been found to protect rats from experimentally induced arthritis through the induction of interleukin (IL)-10-producing T cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that MTBHSP70 induces IL-10 production in synoviocytes from arthritis patients and peripheral blood monoculear cells (PBMCs) from both patients and healthy controls. IL-10 production was accompanied by a decrease in tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α production by synovial cells. Separation studies showed that the target cells were mainly monocytes. Accordingly, we observed that MTBHSP70 delayed maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Our results suggest that MTBHSP may act on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to modulate the cytokine response in arthritis and support an anti-inflammatory role for this protein, suggesting that it may be of therapeutic use in the modulation of arthritis. PMID:14738465

  8. Synthesis of Unprecedented Sulfonylated Phosphono-exo-Glycals Designed as Inhibitors of the Three Mycobacterial Galactofuranose Processing Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Frédéric, Christophe J-M; Tikad, Abdellatif; Fu, Jian; Pan, Weidong; Zheng, Ruixiang B; Koizumi, Akihiko; Xue, Xiaochao; Lowary, Todd L; Vincent, Stéphane P

    2016-10-24

    This study reports a new methodology to synthesize exo-glycals bearing both a sulfone and a phosphonate. This synthetic strategy provides a way to generate exo-glycals displaying two electron-withdrawing groups and was applied to eight different carbohydrates from the furanose and pyranose series. The Z/E configurations of these tetrasubstituted enol ethers could be ascertained using NMR spectroscopic techniques. Deprotection of an exo-glycal followed by an UMP (uridine monophosphate) coupling generated two new UDP (uridine diphosphate)-galactofuranose analogues. These two Z/E isomers were evaluated as inhibitors of UGM, GlfT1, and GlfT2, the three mycobacterial galactofuranose processing enzymes. Molecule 46-(E) is the first characterized inhibitor of GlfT1 reported to date and was also found to efficiently inhibit UGM in a reversible manner. Interestingly, GlfT2 showed a better affinity for the (Z) isomer. The three enzymes studied in the present work are not only interesting because, mechanistically, they are still the topic of intense investigations, but also because they constitute very important targets for the development of novel antimycobacterial agents.

  9. Menaquinone synthesis is critical for maintaining mycobacterial viability during exponential growth and recovery from non-replicating persistence.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Rakesh K; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Slayden, Richard A; Boyne, Melissa E; Lenaerts, Anne; Hinshaw, Jerald C; Angala, Shiva K; Chatterjee, Delphi; Biswas, Kallolmay; Narayanasamy, Prabagaran; Kurosu, Michio; Crick, Dean C

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the basis of bacterial persistence in latent infections is critical for eradication of tuberculosis. Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mRNA expression in an in vitro model of non-replicating persistence indicated that the bacilli require electron transport chain components and ATP synthesis for survival. Additionally, low microM concentrations of aminoalkoxydiphenylmethane derivatives inhibited both the aerobic growth and survival of non-replicating, persistent M. tuberculosis. Metabolic labelling studies and quantification of cellular menaquinone levels suggested that menaquinone synthesis, and consequently electron transport, is the target of the aminoalkoxydiphenylmethane derivatives. This hypothesis is strongly supported by the observations that treatment with these compounds inhibits oxygen consumption and that supplementation of growth medium with exogenous menaquinone rescued both growth and oxygen consumption of treated bacilli. In vitro assays indicate that the aminoalkoxydiphenylmethane derivatives specifically inhibit MenA, an enzyme involved in the synthesis of menaquinone. Thus, the results provide insight into the physiology of mycobacterial persistence and a basis for the development of novel drugs that enhance eradication of persistent bacilli and latent tuberculosis.

  10. An In Silico Approach for Identification of Potential Anti-Mycobacterial Targets of Vasicine and Related Chemical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Chaliha, Amrita Kashyap; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Chetia, Pankaj; Sarma, Diganta; Buragohain, Alak Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is known to mankind as one of the most pervasive and persistent of diseases since the early days of civilization. The growing resistance of the causative pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis to the standard drug regimen for TB poses further difficulty in its treatment and control. Screening of novel plant-derived compounds with promising anti-tubercular activity has been cited as a prospective route for new anti-tubercular drug discovery and design. Justicia adhatoda L. is a perennial evergreen shrub which is widely mentioned in scientific literature on account of its potent anti-mycobacterial properties. In the present study, we have employed a series of computational methodologies to reveal the probable molecular interactions of vasicine, the principal alkaloid of Justicia adhatoda L., and two of its close natural derivatives- vasicinone and deoxyvasicine, with certain biological targets in M. tuberculosis. Targets were identified from literature and through a reverse Pharmacophore-based approach. Subsequent comparative molecular docking to identify the best ligand-target interactions revealed Antigen 85C of M. tuberculosis as the most potent biological target of vasicine on the basis of optimum molecular docking values. A chemogenomics approach was also employed to validate the molecular interactions between the same class of chemical compounds as vasicine and Antigen 85C. Further, a library of structural analogs of vasicine was created by bioiosterism-based drug design to identify structural analogs with better inhibitory potential against Antigen 85C.

  11. Mycobacterial lipid II is composed of a complex mixture of modified muramyl and peptide moieties linked to decaprenyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Yagi, Tetsuya; Belisle, John T; Espinosa, Benjamin J; Hill, Preston J; McNeil, Michael R; Brennan, Patrick J; Crick, Dean C

    2005-04-01

    Structural analysis of compounds identified as lipid I and II from Mycobacterium smegmatis demonstrated that the lipid moiety is decaprenyl phosphate; thus, M. smegmatis is the first bacterium reported to utilize a prenyl phosphate other than undecaprenyl phosphate as the lipid carrier involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. In addition, mass spectrometry showed that the muropeptides from lipid I are predominantly N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine-D-glutamate-meso-diaminopimelic acid-D-alanyl-D-alanine, whereas those isolated from lipid II form an unexpectedly complex mixture in which the muramyl residue and the pentapeptide are modified singly and in combination. The muramyl residue is present as N-acetylmuramic acid, N-glycolylmuramic acid, and muramic acid. The carboxylic functions of the peptide side-chains of lipid II showed three types of modification, with the dominant one being amidation. The preferred site for amidation is the free carboxyl group of the meso-diaminopimelic acid residue. Diamidated species were also observed. The carboxylic function of the terminal D-alanine of some molecules is methylated, as are all three carboxylic acid functions of other molecules. This study represents the first structural analysis of mycobacterial lipid I and II and the first report of extensive modifications of these molecules. The observation that lipid I was unmodified strongly suggests that the lipid II intermediates of M. smegmatis are substrates for a variety of enzymes that introduce modifications to the sugar and amino acid residues prior to the synthesis of peptidoglycan.

  12. Transforming growth factor-beta response to mycobacterial infection in striped bass Morone saxatilis and hybrid tilapia Oreochromis spp.

    PubMed

    Harms, Craig A; Howard, Kristina E; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Smith, Stephen A; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne

    2003-10-15

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) were experimentally infected with Mycobacterium marinum. Splenic mononuclear cell transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) mRNA was measured by reverse transcription quantitative-competitive PCR (RT-qcPCR). In histologic sections of liver and anterior kidney, the area of each section that was occupied by granulomas and the total area of each section were measured by computer-assisted image analysis and compared as a proportion (the granuloma proportion). Infected striped bass splenic mononuclear cell TGF-beta mRNA expression was significantly lower than uninfected controls, while for tilapia there was no significant difference between infected and control fish. Mycobacterial granuloma proportion of liver and anterior kidney sections was significantly greater for infected striped bass than tilapia. Three (of 10) infected tilapia with the most pronounced inflammatory response displayed a decrease in TGF-beta mRNA expression, similar to the overall striped bass response to mycobacterium challenge. Downregulation of TGF-beta and failure to modulate the immune response may be related to excessive inflammatory damage to organs observed in mycobacteria-sensitive fish species.

  13. Rapid Detection and Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogens in Fish by Using High-Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Phung, Thu Nguyet; Caruso, Domenico; Godreuil, Sylvain; Keck, Nicolas; Vallaeys, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterial infections in fish are commonly referred to as piscine mycobacteriosis, irrespectively of the specific identity of the causal organism. They usually cause a chronic disease and sometimes may result in high mortalities and severe economic losses. Nearly 20 species of Mycobacterium have been reported to infect fish. Among them, Mycobacterium marinum, M. fortuitum, and M. chelonae are generally considered the major agents responsible for fish mycobacteriosis. As no quick and inexpensive diagnostic test exists, we tested the potential of high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) to rapidly identify and differentiate several Mycobacterium species involved in fish infections. By analyzing both the melting temperature and melting profile of the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), we were able to discriminate 12 different species simultaneously. Sensitivity tests conducted on purified M. marinum and M. fortuitum DNA revealed a limit of detection of 10 genome equivalents per reaction. The primers used in this procedure did not lead to any amplification signal with 16 control non-Mycobacterium species, thereby demonstrating their specificity for the genus Mycobacterium. PMID:24123734

  14. Insights into horizontal acquisition patterns of dormancy and reactivation regulon genes in mycobacterial species using a partitioning-based framework.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Varun; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mande, Sharmila S

    2016-09-01

    Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) events, initially thought to be rare in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, have recently been shown to be involved in the acquisition of virulence operons in M. tuberculosis. We have developed a new partitioning framework based HGT prediction algorithm, called Grid3M, and applied the same for the prediction of HGTs in Mycobacteria. Validation and testing using simulated and real microbial genomes indicated better performance of Grid3M as compared with other widely used HGT prediction methods. Specific analysis of the genes belonging to dormancy/reactivation regulons across 14 mycobacterial genomes indicated that horizontal acquisition is specifically restricted to important accessory proteins. The results also revealed Burkholderia species to be a probable source of HGT genes belonging to these regulons. The current study provides a basis for similar analyses investigating the functional/evolutionary aspects of HGT genes in other pathogens. A database of Grid3M predicted HGTs in completely sequenced genomes is available at https://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/Grid3M/.

  15. In vitro anti-mycobacterial activity of nine medicinal plants used by ethnic groups in Sonora, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sonoran ethnic groups (Yaquis, Mayos, Seris, Guarijíos, Pimas, Kikapúes and Pápagos) use mainly herbal based preparations as their first line of medicinal treatment. Among the plants used are those with anti-tuberculosis properties; however, no formal research is available. Methods Organic extracts were obtained from nine medicinal plants traditionally used by Sonoran ethnic groups to treat different kinds of diseases; three of them are mainly used to treat tuberculosis. All of the extracts were tested against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv using the Alamar Blue redox bioassay. Results Methanolic extracts from Ambrosia confertiflora, Ambrosia ambrosioides and Guaiacum coulteri showed minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 200, 790 and 1000 μg/mL, respectively, whereas no effect was observed with the rest of the methanolic extracts at the concentrations tested. Chloroform, dichloromethane, and ethyl acetate extracts from Ambrosia confertiflora showed a MIC of 90, 120 and 160 μg/mL, respectively. Conclusions A. confertiflora and A. ambrosioides showed the best anti-mycobacterial activity in vitro. The activity of Guaiacum coulteri is consistent with the traditional use by Sonoran ethnic groups as anti-tuberculosis agent. For these reasons, it is important to investigate a broader spectrum of medicinal plants in order to find compounds active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:24267469

  16. Loculated Tuberculous Pleural Effusion: Easily Identifiable and Clinically Useful Predictor of Positive Mycobacterial Culture from Pleural Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yousang; Kim, Changhwan; Chang, Boksoon; Lee, Suh-Young; Park, So Young; Mo, Eun-Kyung; Hong, Su Jin; Lee, Myung Goo; Hyun, In Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Background Isolation of M. tuberculosis (MTB) is required in cases of Tuberculous pleural effusion (TBPE) for confirming diagnosis and successful therapy based on drug sensitivity test. Several studies have focused on predictors of MTB culture positivity in TBPE. However, the clinical role of loculated TBPE as a predictor of MTB cultivation from TBPE remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine possible predictors including loculation of TBPE of MTB culture positivity in TBPE. Methods We retrospectively examined associations between clinical, radiological, microbiological, and laboratory characteristics and positive MTB culture from TBPE to determine a potent predictor of culture positivity. Results From January 2011 to August 2015, 232 patients with TBPE were identified. Of these, 219 were finally analyzed. Among them, 69 (31.5%) were culture positive for MTB in TBPE and 86 (39.3%) had loculated TBPE. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the loculation of TBPE was independently associated with culture positivity for MTB in TBPE (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 40.062; 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.355–171.556; p<0.001). In contrast, the lymphocyte percentage of TBPE (adjusted OR, 0.934; 95% CI, 0.899–0.971; p=0.001) was inversely associated with culture positivity for MTB in TBPE. Conclusion In clinical practice, identification of loculation in TBPE is easy, reliable to measure, not uncommon and may be helpful to predict the possibility of positive mycobacterial culture. PMID:28119745

  17. Mycobacterial Membrane Vesicles Administered Systemically in Mice Induce a Protective Immune Response to Surface Compartments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Carreño, Leandro J.; Batista-Gonzalez, Ana; Baena, Andres; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M.; Xu, Jiayong; Yu, Xiaobo; Wallstrom, Garrick; Magee, D. Mitchell; LaBaer, Joshua; Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Jacobs, William R.; Chan, John; Porcelli, Steven A.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pathogenic and nonpathogenic species of bacteria and fungi release membrane vesicles (MV), containing proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids, into the extracellular milieu. Previously, we demonstrated that several mycobacterial species, including bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, release MV containing lipids and proteins that subvert host immune response in a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner (R. Prados-Rosales et al., J. Clin. Invest. 121:1471–1483, 2011, doi:10.1172/JCI44261). In this work, we analyzed the vaccine potential of MV in a mouse model and compared the effects of immunization with MV to those of standard BCG vaccination. Immunization with MV from BCG or M. tuberculosis elicited a mixed humoral and cellular response directed to both membrane and cell wall components, such as lipoproteins. However, only vaccination with M. tuberculosis MV was able to protect as well as live BCG immunization. M. tuberculosis MV boosted BCG vaccine efficacy. In summary, MV are highly immunogenic without adjuvants and elicit immune responses comparable to those achieved with BCG in protection against M. tuberculosis. PMID:25271291

  18. Specific interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein-derived peptides and target cells inhibits mycobacterial entry in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vanegas, Magnolia; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues being one of the diseases having the greatest mortality rates around the world, 8.7 million cases having been reported in 2011. An efficient vaccine against TB having a great impact on public health is an urgent need. Usually, selecting antigens for vaccines has been based on proteins having immunogenic properties for patients suffering TB and having had promising results in mice and non-human primates. Our approach has been based on a functional approach involving the pathogen-host interaction in the search for antigens to be included in designing an efficient, minimal, subunit-based anti-TB vaccine. This means that Mycobacterium tuberculosis has mainly been involved in studies and that lipoproteins represent an important kind of protein on the cell envelope which can also contribute towards this pathogen's virulence. This study has assessed the expression of four lipoproteins from M. tuberculosis H37Rv, that is, Rv1411c (LprG), Rv1911c (LppC), Rv2270 (LppN) and Rv3763 (LpqH), and the possible biological activity of peptides derived from these. Five peptides were found for these proteins which had high specific binding to both alveolar A549 epithelial cells and U937 monocyte-derived macrophages which were able to significantly inhibit mycobacterial entry to these cells in vitro.

  19. Newly Detected Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection and Peripheral Lung Cancers in Patients During Follow-Up of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sang Young; Kim, Mi Young; Hwang, Hye Jeon; Shim, Tae Sun; Choi, Chang-Min; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Dong Soon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article describes the difference between the computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with newly detected pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial infection (NTM-IIP) and Cancer-IIP. We retrospectively evaluated 35 NTM-IIP and 78 Cancer-IIP patients in reference to their null idiopathic interstitial pneumonia CT (n = 113), using >10 years of data. Two independent radiologists analyzed the CT characteristics and the axial location of the main opacity. The interobserver agreement was good (κ > 0.771). The NTM-IIP patients were older (P = 0.034). The median size of the main opacity in the NTM-IIP (27 mm; 11–73) was larger (19 mm; 5–60; P = 0.002). Consolidation (n = 30; 85.7%; odds ratio [OR], 45) and cavities (n = 14; 40%, OR, 25) were more common in NTM-IIP (all P < 0.001). The midst of the fibrotic cysts including honeycomb cysts (n = 16; 45.7%, OR, 4.95) was more common in NTM-IIP (P = 0.006). NTM-IIP appeared larger, with more frequent consolidation and cavities, and was more likely to have been located in the midst of the fibrotic cysts including honeycomb cysts at the CT, which showed that it was older than Cancer-IIP. PMID:25837763

  20. Synthesis and anti-mycobacterial activity of new 4-thiazolidinone and 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives of isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Mashooq A

    2014-01-01

    A new series of 4-thiazolidinone (3a-e) and 1,3,4-oxadiazole (4a-e) derivatives of isoniazid were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro anti-mycobacterial activity. The structures of the compounds were confirmed on the basis of spectral data and elemental analysis. Some compounds showed interesting activity against four Mycobacterium strains: M. intercellulari (ATCC 35743), M. xenopi (ATCC 14470), M. cheleneo (ATCC 35751) and M. smegmatis (ATCC 35797). Compounds 3e, N-(4-oxo-2-undecylthiazolidin-3-yl) isonicotinamide and 4e N-acetyl-4-(5-undecyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl) pyridine with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), 6.0 μg/mL were found to be more potent than isoniazid under the in vitro investigational conditions. Compound 3e and 4e bear a high lipophilic chain bonded to the 5-position of the thiazolidinone and 1,3,4-oxadiazole moiety, respectively. This fact indicates that there exists a contribution of lipophilicity, which would facilitate the transport of these molecules through membranes.

  1. Diagnosis of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis based on detection of mycobacterial antigen 85B by immuno-PCR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Netrapal; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Gupta, Krishna B; Chaudhary, Anil; Mittal, Anshu; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Prasad, Rajendra; Gakhar, Surender K; Khuller, Gopal K; Mehta, Promod K

    2015-12-01

    We developed a novel indirect sandwich immuno-polymerase chain reaction (I-PCR) assay for the detection of mycobacterial antigen 85B (Ag85B, 30kDa, Rv1886c) in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) patients. The amino-modified reporter DNA was covalently attached with the antidetection antibody through a heterobifunctional cross-linking agent succinimidyl 4-[N-maleimidomethyl]-cyclohexane-1-carboxylate. The detection limit of Ag85B by I-PCR was found to be 1 femtogram (fg)/mL, which was 10(6)-fold lower than an analogous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The sensitivities of 85% and 77% with I-PCR and 77.6% and 62.5% with ELISA were observed in smear-positive and smear-negative PTB patients, respectively, with high specificity. On the other hand, sensitivities of 84% and 63.7% with I-PCR and 68% and 47.5% with ELISA were observed in confirmed and clinically suspected EPTB cases, respectively, with high specificity.

  2. Antigen 85A and mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1 are targets of immunoglobulin G in individuals with past tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Tateishi, Yoshitaka; Hirayama, Yukio; Ozeki, Yuriko; Niki, Mamiko; Kitada, Seigo; Maekura, Ryoji; Tsujimura, Kunio; Koide, Yukio; Ohara, Naoya; Yamamoto, Taro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Sohkichi

    2013-01-01

    Development of accurate methods for predicting progression of tuberculosis (TB) from the latent state is recognized as vitally important in controlling TB, because a majority of cases develop from latent infections. Past TB that has never been treated has a higher risk of progressing than does latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in patients who have previously received treatment. Antibody responses against 23 kinds of M. tuberculosis proteins in individuals with past TB who had not been medicated were evaluated. These individuals had significantly higher concentrations of antibodies against Antigen 85A and mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1 (MDP1) than did those with active TB and uninfected controls. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed colocalization of tubercle bacilli, antigen 85 and MDP1 inside tuberculous granuloma lesions in an asymptomatic subject, showing that M. tuberculosis in lesions expresses both antigen 85 and MDP1. Our study suggests the potential usefulness of measuring antibody responses to antigen 85A and MDP1 for assessing the risk of TB progression.

  3. Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease: genetic, immunological, and clinical features of inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is a rare condition characterized by predisposition to clinical disease caused by weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria, in otherwise healthy individuals with no overt abnormalities in routine hematological and immunological tests. MSMD designation does not recapitulate all the clinical features, as patients are also prone to salmonellosis, candidiasis and tuberculosis, and more rarely to infections with other intramacrophagic bacteria, fungi, or parasites, and even, perhaps, a few viruses. Since 1996, nine MSMD-causing genes, including seven autosomal (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IL12B, IL12RB1, ISG15, and IRF8) and two X-linked (NEMO, CYBB) genes have been discovered. The high level of allelic heterogeneity has already led to the definition of 18 different disorders. The nine gene products are physiologically related, as all are involved in IFN-γ-dependent immunity. These disorders impair the production of (IL12B, IL12RB1, IRF8, ISG15, NEMO) or the response to (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IRF8, CYBB) IFN-γ. These defects account for only about half the known MSMD cases. Patients with MSMD-causing genetic defects may display other infectious diseases, or even remain asymptomatic. Most of these inborn errors do not show complete clinical penetrance for the case-definition phenotype of MSMD. We review here the genetic, immunological, and clinical features of patients with inborn errors of IFN-γ-dependent immunity. PMID:25453225

  4. Ubiquitin-fusion degradation pathway: A new strategy for inducing CD8 cells specific for mycobacterial HSP65

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Jianying; Hisaeda, Hajime; Chou Bin; Yu Qingsheng; Tu Liping; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2008-01-25

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays an indispensable role in inducing MHC class I-restricted CD8{sup +} T cells. In this study, we exploited UPS to induce CD8{sup +} T cells specific for mycobacterial HSP65 (mHSP65), one of the leading vaccine candidates against infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A chimeric DNA termed pU-HSP65 encoding a fusion protein between murine ubiquitin and mHSP65 was constructed, and C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with the DNA using gene gun bombardment. Mice immunized with the chimeric DNA acquired potent resistance against challenge with the syngeneic B16F1 melanoma cells transfected with the mHSP65 gene (HSP65/B16F1), compared with those immunized with DNA encoding only mHSP65. Splenocytes from the former group of mice showed a higher grade of cytotoxic activity against HSP65/B16F1 cells and contained a larger number of granzyme B- or IFN-{gamma}-producing CD8{sup +} T cells compared with those from the latter group of mice.

  5. Platelets Direct Monocyte Differentiation Into Epithelioid-Like Multinucleated Giant Foam Cells With Suppressive Capacity Upon Mycobacterial Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yonghong; Dorhoi, Anca; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Yin, Hongyun; Dong, Zhengwei; Mao, Ling; Zhou, Jun; Bi, Aixiao; Weber, Stephan; Maertzdorf, Jeroen; Chen, Gang; Chen, Yang; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Epithelioid, foam, and multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) are characteristics of tuberculosis granulomas, yet the precise genesis and functions of these transformed macrophages are unclear. We evaluated the role of platelets as drivers of macrophage transformation in mycobacterial infection. Methods. We employed flow cytometry and microscopy to assess cellular phenotype and phagocytosis. Immune assays allowed quantification of cytokines and chemokines, whereas gene microarray technology was applied to estimate global transcriptome alterations. Immunohistochemical investigations of tuberculosis granulomas substantiated our findings at the site of infection. Results. Monocytes differentiated in presence of platelets (MP-Macs) acquired a foamy, epithelioid appearance and gave rise to MNGCs (MP-MNGCs). MP-Macs up-regulated activation markers, phagocytosed mycobacteria, and released abundant interleukin 10. Upon extended culture, MP-Macs shared transcriptional features with epithelioid cells and M2 macrophages and up-regulated CXCL5 transcripts. In line with this, CXCL5 concentrations were significantly increased in airways of active tuberculosis patients. The platelet-specific CD42b antigen was detected in MP-Macs, likewise in macrophages, MNGCs, and epithelioid cells within tuberculosis granulomas, along with the platelet aggregation-inducing factor PDPN. Conclusions. Platelets drive macrophage differentiation into MNGCs with characteristics of epithelioid, foam, and giant cells observed in tuberculosis granulomas. Our data define platelets as novel participants in tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:24987031

  6. Non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection of the musculoskeletal system: pattern of infection and efficacy of combined surgical/antimicrobial treatment.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Kim, Y S; Yoon, J O; Kim, J S; Chang, J S; Kim, J M; Chun, J M; Jeon, I H

    2014-11-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection of the musculoskeletal tissue is a rare disease. An early and accurate diagnosis is often difficult because of the indolent clinical course and difficulty of isolating pathogens. Our goal was to determine the clinical features of musculoskeletal NTM infection and to present the treatment outcomes. A total of 29 patients (nine females, 20 males between 34 and 85 years old, mean age 61.7 years; 34 to 85) with NTM infection of the musculoskeletal system between 1998 to 2011 were identified and their treatment retrospectively analysed. Microbiological studies demonstrated NTM in 29 patients: the isolates were Mycobacterium intracellulare in six patients, M. fortuitum in three, M. abscessus in two and M. marinum in one. In the remaining patients we failed to identify the species. The involved sites were the hand/wrist in nine patients the knee in five patients, spine in four patients, foot in two patients, elbow in two patients, shoulder in one, ankle in two patients, leg in three patients and multiple in one patient. The mean interval between the appearance of symptoms and diagnosis was 20.8 months (1.5 to 180). All patients underwent surgical treatment and antimicrobial medication according to our protocol for chronic musculoskeletal infection: 20 patients had NTM-specific medication and nine had conventional antimicrobial therapy. At the final follow-up 22 patients were cured, three failed to respond to treatment and four were lost to follow-up. Identifying these diseases due the initial non-specific presentation can be difficult. Treatment consists of surgical intervention and adequate antimicrobial therapy, which can result in satisfactory outcomes.

  7. Pathogenesis of tuberculosis in mice exposed to low and high doses of an environmental mycobacterial saprophyte before infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Pando, R; Pavön, L; Arriaga, K; Orozco, H; Madrid-Marina, V; Rook, G

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacteria are ubiquitous in the environment, but they are not part of the normal human microbial flora. It has been suggested that variable contact with mycobacteria can influence susceptibility to mycobacterial pathogens and the efficacy of subsequent Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination. To test this, mice were immunized with high or low doses of an environmental saprophyte, M. vaccae, that is intensely immunogenic as an autoclaved preparation. Two months later, they received an intratracheal challenge with M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Recipients of a low Th1-inducing dose (10(7) organisms) were partially protected and maintained a high ratio of interleukin 2 (IL-2)-positive to IL-4-positive cells in the perivascular, peribronchial, and granulomatous areas of the lung, whereas in unimmunized controls the IL-4-positive cells increased markedly between days 21 and 28. In contrast, recipients of the high dose (10(9) organisms), which primes Th2 as well as Th1 cytokine production, died more rapidly than unimmunized controls and showed massive pneumonia from day 7. The ratio of IL-2-positive to IL-4-positive cells in all compartments of the lung rapidly fell to 1 by day 14 for these animals. These events correlated with cytokine mRNA profiles and with increases in the local toxicity of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), demonstrable only when a major Th2 component was present. These data indicate that cross-reactive epitopes present in an environmental saprophyte can evoke either protective responses or responses that increase susceptibility to M. tuberculosis. The latter are associated with the presence of a Th2 component and increased sensitivity to TNF-alpha. PMID:9234793

  8. Antibody responses to mycobacterial and self heat shock protein 65 in autoimmune arthritis: epitope specificity and implication in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Ro; Kim, Eugene Y; Cerny, Jan; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2006-11-15

    Many autoimmune diseases are believed to involve primarily T cell-mediated effector mechanisms. There is increasing realization, however, that Abs may also play a vital role in the propagation of T cell-driven disorders. In this study, on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model of human rheumatoid arthritis, we examined the characteristics of serum Ab response to mycobacterial heat shock protein (hsp) 65 (Bhsp65), self (rat) hsp65 (Rhsp65), and linear peptides spanning these two molecules. The AA-resistant WKY (RT.1(l)) rat responded to the heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunization with a rapid burst of Abs to both Bhsp65 and Rhsp65. These Abs reacted with numerous peptide epitopes; however, this response was reduced to a few epitopes with time. On the contrary, the susceptible Lewis (RT.1(l)) rat developed a relatively lower Ab response to Bhsp65, and Abs to Rhsp65 did not appear until the recovery from the disease. The Ab response in Lewis rats diversified with progression of AA, and there was an intriguing overlap between the repertoire of Bhsp65-reactive B and T cells during the recovery phase of AA. Nonetheless, subsets of the repertoire of the late Abs in both rat strains became focused on the same epitope regions of Bhsp65 and Rhsp65. The functional relevance of these Abs was evident from the results showing that sera from recovery phase Lewis or WKY rats, but not that of naive rats, afforded protection against subsequent AA. These results are of significance in further understanding of the role of humoral immunity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis.

  9. Incorporation of a synthetic mycobacterial monomycoloyl glycerol analogue stabilizes dimethyldioctadecylammonium liposomes and potentiates their adjuvant effect in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nordly, Pernille; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Pedersen, Esra Alici; Khilji, Tayba Sajid; Franzyk, Henrik; Jorgensen, Lene; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Agger, Else Marie; Foged, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    The combination of delivery systems such as cationic liposomes and immunopotentiating molecules is a promising approach for the rational design of vaccine adjuvants. In this study, a synthetic analogue of the mycobacterial lipid monomycoloyl glycerol (MMG), referred to as MMG-1, was synthesized and combined with the cationic surfactant dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA). The purpose of the study was to provide a thorough pharmaceutical characterization of the resulting DDA/MMG-1 binary system and to evaluate how incorporation of MMG-1 affected the adjuvant activity of DDA liposomes. Thermal analyses demonstrated that MMG-1 was incorporated into the DDA lipid bilayers, and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that liposomes were formed. The particles had a polydisperse size distribution and an average diameter of approximately 400 nm. Evaluation of the colloidal stability indicated that at least 18 mol% MMG-1 was required to stabilize the DDA liposomes as the average particle size remained constant during storage for 6 months. The improved colloidal stability is most likely caused by increased hydration of the lipid bilayer. This was demonstrated by studying Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of DDA and MMG-1 which revealed an increased surface pressure in the presence of high concentrations of MMG-1 when the DDA/MMG-1 monolayers were fully compressed, indicating an increased interaction with water due to enhanced hydration of the lipid head groups. Finally, immunization of mice with the tuberculosis fusion antigen Ag85B-ESAT-6 and DDA/MMG-1 liposomes induced a strong cell-mediated immune response characterized by a mixed Th1/Th17 profile and secretion of IgG1 and IgG2c antibodies. The Th1/Th17-biased immunostimulatory effect was increased in an MMG-1 concentration-dependent manner with maximal observed effect at 31 mol% MMG-1. Thus, incorporation of 31 mol% MMG-1 into DDA liposomes results in an adjuvant system with favorable physical as well as

  10. Lipid-restricted recognition of mycobacterial lipoglycans by human pulmonary surfactant protein A: a surface-plasmon-resonance study.

    PubMed Central

    Sidobre, Stéphane; Puzo, Germain; Rivière, Michel

    2002-01-01

    The human pulmonary surfactant protein A (hSP-A), a member of the mammalian collectin family, is thought to play a key defensive role against airborne invading pulmonary pathogens, among which is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the aetiologic agent of tuberculosis. hSP-A has been shown to promote the uptake and the phagocytosis of pathogenic bacilli through the recognition and the binding of carbohydrate motifs on the invading pathogen surface. Recently we identified lipomannan and mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM), two major mycobacterial cell-wall lipoglycans, as potential ligands for binding of hSP-A. We demonstrated that both the terminal mannose residues and the fatty acids are critical for binding, whereas the inner arabinosyl and mannosyl domains do not participate. In the present study we developed a surface-plasmon-resonance assay to analyse the molecular basis for the recognition of ManLAM by hSP-A and to try to define further the role of the lipidic aglycone moiety. Binding of ManLAM to immobilized hSP-A was consistent with the simplest one-to-one interaction model involving a single class of carbohydrate-binding site. This observation strongly suggests that the lipid moiety of ManLAM does not directly interact with hSP-A, but is rather responsible for the macromolecular organization of the lipoglycan, which may be necessary for efficient recognition of the terminal mannosyl epitopes. The indirect, structural role of the lipoglycan lipidic component is further supported by the complete lack of interaction with hSP-A in the presence of a low concentration of mild detergent. PMID:12071842

  11. Protein export by the mycobacterial SecA2 system is determined by the preprotein mature domain.

    PubMed

    Feltcher, Meghan E; Gibbons, Henry S; Ligon, Lauren S; Braunstein, Miriam

    2013-02-01

    At the core of the bacterial general secretion (Sec) pathway is the SecA ATPase, which powers translocation of unfolded preproteins containing Sec signal sequences through the SecYEG membrane channel. Mycobacteria have two nonredundant SecA homologs: SecA1 and SecA2. While the essential SecA1 handles "housekeeping" export, the nonessential SecA2 exports a subset of proteins and is required for Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence. Currently, it is not understood how SecA2 contributes to Sec export in mycobacteria. In this study, we focused on identifying the features of two SecA2 substrates that target them to SecA2 for export, the Ms1704 and Ms1712 lipoproteins of the model organism Mycobacterium smegmatis. We found that the mature domains of Ms1704 and Ms1712, not the N-terminal signal sequences, confer SecA2-dependent export. We also demonstrated that the lipid modification and the extreme N terminus of the mature protein do not impart the requirement for SecA2 in export. We further showed that the Ms1704 mature domain can be efficiently exported by the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway. Because the Tat system exports only folded proteins, this result implies that SecA2 substrates can fold in the cytoplasm and suggests a putative role of SecA2 in enabling export of such proteins. Thus, the mycobacterial SecA2 system may represent another way that bacteria solve the problem of exporting proteins that can fold in the cytoplasm.

  12. A comparison of gross pathology, histopathology, and mycobacterial culture for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in elk (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed Central

    Rohonczy, E B; Balachandran, A V; Dukes, T W; Payeur, J B; Rhyan, J C; Saari, D A; Whiting, T L; Wilson, S H; Jarnagin, J L

    1996-01-01

    Using the isolation of Mycobacterium bovis as the reference standard, this study evaluated the sensitivity, specificity and kappa statistic of gross pathology (abattoir postmortem inspection), histopathology, and parallel or series combinations of the two for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in 430 elk and red deer. Two histopathology interpretations were evaluated: histopathology I, where the presence of lesions compatible with tuberculosis was considered positive, and histopathology II, where lesions compatible with tuberculosis or a select group of additional possible diagnoses were considered positive. In the 73 animals from which M. bovis was isolated, gross lesions of tuberculosis were most often in the lung (48), the retropharyngeal lymph nodes (36), the mesenteric lymph node (35), and the mediastinal lymph nodes (16). Other mycobacterial isolates included: 11 M. paratuberculosis, 11 M. avium, and 28 rapidly growing species or M. terrae complex. The sensitivity estimates of gross pathology and histopathology I were 93% (95% confidence limits [CL] 84.97%) and 88% [CL 77.94%], respectively, and the specificity of both was 89% [CL 85.92%]). The sensitivity and specificity of histopathology II were 89% (CL 79.95%) and 77% (CL 72.81%), respectively. The highest sensitivity estimates (93-95% [CL 84.98%]) were obtained by interpreting gross pathology and histopathology in parallel (where an animal had to be positive on at least one of the two, to be classified as combination positive). The highest specificity estimates (94-95% [CL 91-97%] were generated when the two tests were interpreted in series (an animal had to be positive on both tests to be classified as combination positive). The presence of gross or microscopic lesions showed moderate to good agreement with the isolation of M. bovis (Kappa = 65-69%). The results showed that post-mortem inspection, histopathology and culture do not necessarily recognize the same infected animals and that the spectra of animals

  13. Identification of Mycobacterial RplJ/L10 and RpsA/S1 Proteins as Novel Targets for CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alison J; Kennedy, Steven C; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S; Goldberg, Michael F; Saini, Neeraj K; Xu, Jiayong; Paul, Sinu; Hegde, Subray S; Blanchard, John S; Chan, John; Jacobs, William R; Sette, Alessandro; Porcelli, Steven A

    2017-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a major global infectious disease problem, and a more efficacious vaccine is urgently needed for the control and prevention of disease caused by this organism. We previously reported that a genetically modified strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis called IKEPLUS is a promising TB vaccine candidate. Since protective immunity induced by IKEPLUS is dependent on antigen-specific CD4(+) T cell memory, we hypothesized that the specificity of the CD4(+) T cell response was a critical feature of this protection. Using in vitro assays of interferon gamma production (enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot [ELISPOT] assays) by splenocytes from IKEPLUS-immunized C57BL/6J mice, we identified an immunogenic peptide within the mycobacterial ribosomal large subunit protein RplJ, encoded by the Rv0651 gene. In a complementary approach, we generated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted T cell hybridomas from IKEPLUS-immunized mice. Screening of these T cell hybridomas against IKEPLUS and ribosomes enriched from IKEPLUS suggested that the CD4(+) T cell response in IKEPLUS-immunized mice was dominated by the recognition of multiple components of the mycobacterial ribosome. Importantly, CD4(+) T cells specific for mycobacterial ribosomes accumulate to significant levels in the lungs of IKEPLUS-immunized mice following aerosol challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis, consistent with a role for these T cells in protective host immunity in TB. The identification of CD4(+) T cell responses to defined ribosomal protein epitopes expands the range of antigenic targets for adaptive immune responses to M. tuberculosis and may help to inform the design of more effective vaccines against tuberculosis.

  14. Long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE1)-mediated deletion of EVC, EVC2, C4orf6, and STK32B in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome with borderline intelligence.

    PubMed

    Temtamy, Samia A; Aglan, Mona S; Valencia, Maria; Cocchi, Guido; Pacheco, Maria; Ashour, Adel M; Amr, Khalda S; Helmy, Sanaa M H; El-Gammal, Mona A; Wright, Michael; Lapunzina, Pablo; Goodship, Judith A; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L

    2008-07-01

    Previous work has shown Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) patients with mutations either in both alleles of EVC or in both alleles of EVC2. We now report affected individuals with the two genes inactivated on each allele. In a consanguineous pedigree diagnosed with EvC and borderline intelligence, we detected a 520-kb homozygous deletion comprising EVC, EVC2, C4orf6, and STK32B, caused by recombination between long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) elements. Patients homozygous for the deletion are deficient in EVC and EVC2 and have no increase in the severity of the EvC typical features. Similarly deletion carriers demonstrate absence of digenic inheritance in EvC. Further, the phenotype of these patients suggests that the EVC-STK32B deletion also leads to mild mental retardation and reveals that loss of the novel genes C4orf6 and STK32B causes at most mild mental deficit. In an EvC compound heterozygote of different ethnic origin we identified the same LINE-to-LINE rearrangement due to a different recombination event. These findings highlight the importance of L1 repetitive sequences in human genome architecture and disease.

  15. EsxA membrane-permeabilizing activity plays a key role in mycobacterial cytosolic translocation and virulence: effects of single-residue mutations at glutamine 5

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Decheng; Jiang, Guozhong; Liu, Wei; Deng, Qing; Li, Xiujun; Qian, Wei; Ouellet, Hugues; Sun, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    EsxA is required for virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and plays an essential role in phagosome rupture and translocation to the cytosol of macrophages. Recent biochemical studies have demonstrated that EsxA is a membrane-permeabilizing protein. However, evidence that link EsxA membrane-permeabilizing activity to Mtb cytosolic translocation and virulence is lacking. Here we found that mutations at glutamine 5 (Q5) could up or down regulate EsxA membrane-permeabilizing activity. The mutation Q5K significantly diminished the membrane-permeabilizing activity, while Q5V enhanced the activity. By taking advantage of the single-residue mutations, we tested the effects of EsxA membrane-permeabilizing activity on mycobacterial virulence and cytosolic translocation using the esxA/esxB knockout strains of Mycobacterium marinum (Mm) and Mtb. Compared to wild type (WT), the Q5K mutant exhibited significantly attenuated virulence, evidenced by intracellular survival and cytotoxicity in mouse macrophages as well as infection of zebra fish embryos. The attenuated virulence of the Q5K mutant was correlated to the impaired cytosolic translocation. On the contrary, the Q5V mutant had a significantly increased cytosolic translocation and showed an overall increased virulence. This study provides convincing evidence that EsxA contributes to mycobacterial virulence with its membrane-permeabilizing activity that is required for cytosolic translocation. PMID:27600772

  16. Mycobacterial receptor, Clec4d (CLECSF8, MCL), is coregulated with Mincle and upregulated on mouse myeloid cells following microbial challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kerscher, Bernhard; Wilson, Gillian J.; Reid, Delyth M.; Mori, Daiki; Taylor, Julie A.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Yamasaki, Sho; Brown, Gordon D.

    2015-01-01

    The C‐type lectin receptor (CTLR), Clec4d (MCL, CLECSF8), is a member of the Dectin‐2 cluster of CTLRs, which also includes the related receptors Mincle and Dectin‐2. Like Mincle, Clec4d recognizes mycobacterial cord factor, trehalose dimycolate, and we recently demonstrated its key role in anti‐mycobacterial immunity in mouse and man. Here, we characterized receptor expression in naïve mice, under inflammatory conditions, and during Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection using newly generated monoclonal antibodies. In naïve mice, Clec4d was predominantly expressed on myeloid cells within the peritoneal cavity, blood, and bone marrow. Unexpectedly, basal expression of Clec4d was very low on leukocytes in the lung. However, receptor expression was significantly upregulated on pulmonary myeloid cells during M. bovis BCG infection. Moreover, Clec4d expression could be strongly induced in vitro and in vivo by various microbial stimuli, including TLR agonists, but not exogenous cytokines. Notably, we show that Clec4d requires association with the signaling adaptor FcRγ and Mincle, but not Dectin‐2, for surface expression. In addition, we provide evidence that Clec4d and Mincle, but not Dectin‐2, are interdependently coregulated during inflammation and infection. These data show that Clec4d is an inducible myeloid‐expressed CTLR in mice, whose expression is tightly linked to that of Mincle. PMID:26558717

  17. Central memory Vgamma9Vdelta2 T lymphocytes primed and expanded by bacillus Calmette-Guérin-infected dendritic cells kill mycobacterial-infected monocytes.

    PubMed

    Martino, Angelo; Casetti, Rita; Sacchi, Alessandra; Poccia, Fabrizio

    2007-09-01

    In humans, innate immune recognition of mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), is a feature of cells as dendritic cells (DC) and gammadelta T cells. In this study, we show that BCG infection of human monocyte-derived DC induces a rapid activation of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells (the major subset of gammadelta T cell pool in human peripheral blood). Indeed, in the presence of BCG-infected DC, Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells increase both their expression of CD69 and CD25 and the production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, in contrast to DC treated with Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell-specific Ags. Without further exogenous stimuli, BCG-infected DC expand a functionally cytotoxic central memory Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell population. This subset does not display lymph node homing receptors, but express a high amount of perforin. They are highly efficient in the killing of mycobacterial-infected primary monocytes or human monocytic THP-1 cells preserving the viability of cocultured, infected DC. This study provides further evidences about the complex relationship between important players of innate immunity and suggests an immunoregulatory role of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells in the control of mycobacterial infection.

  18. A heterozygous dominant-negative mutation in the coiled-coil domain of STAT1 is the cause of autosomal-dominant Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masafumi; Ito, Kenta; Tozawa, Yusuke; Morino, Saeko; Horikoshi, Yuho; Takada, Hidetoshi; Abdrabou, Shimaa Said Mohamed Ali; Takezaki, Shunichiro; Kobayashi, Ichiro; Ariga, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Heterozygous dominant-negative mutations of STAT1 are responsible for autosomal-dominant Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (AD-MSMD). So far, only 7 mutations have been previously described and are localized to 3 domains: the DNA-binding domain, the SH2 domain, and the tail segment. In this study, we demonstrated the first coiled-coil domain (CCD) mutation of c.749G>C, p.G250A (G250A) in STAT1 as a genetic cause of AD-MSMD in a patient with mycobacterial multiple osteomyelitis. This de novo heterozygous mutation was shown to have a dominant-negative effect on the gamma-activated sequence (GAS) transcriptional activity following IFN-γ stimulation, which could be attributable to the abolished phosphorylation of STAT1 from the wild-type (WT) allele. The three-dimensional structure of STAT1 revealed the G250 residue was located distant from a cluster of residues affected by gain-of-function mutations responsible for chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

  19. In vitro Anti-mycobacterial activity of selected medicinal plants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis Strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a global burden with one –third of the world’s population infected with the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and annually 1.4 million deaths occur due to the disease. This high incidence of infection and the increased rate of multi-drug resistant and extensively-drug resistant strains of the organism further complicated the problem of TB control and have called for an urgent need to develop new anti-TB drugs from plants. In this study, the in vitro activity of root of Calpurnia aurea, seeds of Ocimum basilicum, leaves of Artemisia abyssinica, Croton macrostachyus, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis were evaluated against M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. Methods Five Ethiopian medicinal plants, root of Calpurnia aurea, seeds of Ocimum basilicum, leaves of Artemisia abyssinica, Croton macrostachyus, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis used locally for the management of TB. They were investigated for in vitro antimycobacterial activity against M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. 80% methanolic extracts of the plant materials were obtained by maceration. The antimycobacterial activity was determined using 96 wells of microplate with the help of visual Resazurin Microtiter Assay. Results The crude 80% methanolic extracts of the root of C. aurea, seeds of O. basilicum, and leaves of A. abyssinica, C. macrostachyus, and E. camaldulensis had anti-mycobacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranging from 6.25–100 μg/mL. The MIC of 80% methanol extracts in the order mentioned above ranged 25-100 μg/ml and 12.5-75 μg/mL, 25–100 μg/mL and 25–50 μg/mL, 6.25-50 μg/mL and 12.5-50 μg/mL, 12.5-100 μg/mL and 18.25-50 μg/mL and 6.25-50 μg/mL and 12.5-50 μg/mL, respectively for M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. Conclusions The results support the local use of these plants in the treatment of TB and it is suggested that these plants may have therapeutic value in the treatment of TB. However

  20. Direct Comparison of Xpert MTB/RIF Assay with Liquid and Solid Mycobacterial Culture for Quantification of Early Bactericidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kayigire, Xavier A.; Friedrich, Sven O.; Venter, Amour; Dawson, Rodney; Gillespie, Stephen H.; Boeree, Martin J.; Heinrich, Norbert; Hoelscher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The early bactericidal activity of antituberculosis agents is usually determined by measuring the reduction of the sputum mycobacterial load over time on solid agar medium or in liquid culture. This study investigated the value of a quantitative PCR assay for early bactericidal activity determination. Groups of 15 patients were treated with 6 different antituberculosis agents or regimens. Patients collected sputum for 16 h overnight at baseline and at days 7 and 14 after treatment initiation. We determined the sputum bacterial load by CFU counting (log CFU/ml sputum, reported as mean ± standard deviation [SD]), time to culture positivity (TTP, in hours [mean ± SD]) in liquid culture, and Xpert MTB/RIF cycle thresholds (CT, n [mean ± SD]). The ability to discriminate treatment effects between groups was analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). All measurements showed a decrease in bacterial load from mean baseline (log CFU, 5.72 ± 1.00; TTP, 116.0 ± 47.6; CT, 19.3 ± 3.88) to day 7 (log CFU, −0.26 ± 1.23, P = 0.2112; TTP, 35.5 ± 59.3, P = 0.0002; CT, 0.55 ± 3.07, P = 0.6030) and day 14 (log CFU, −0.55 ± 1.24, P = 0.0006; TTP, 54.8 ± 86.8, P < 0.0001; CT, 2.06 ± 4.37, P = 0.0020). The best discrimination between group effects was found with TTP at day 7 and day 14 (F = 9.012, P < 0.0001, and F = 11.580, P < 0.0001), followed by log CFU (F = 4.135, P = 0.0024, and F = 7.277, P < 0.0001). CT was not significantly discriminative (F = 1.995, P = 0.091, and F = 1.203, P = 0.316, respectively). Culture-based methods are superior to PCR for the quantification of early antituberculosis treatment effects in sputum. PMID:23596237

  1. Direct comparison of Xpert MTB/RIF assay with liquid and solid mycobacterial culture for quantification of early bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Kayigire, Xavier A; Friedrich, Sven O; Venter, Amour; Dawson, Rodney; Gillespie, Stephen H; Boeree, Martin J; Heinrich, Norbert; Hoelscher, Michael; Diacon, Andreas H

    2013-06-01

    The early bactericidal activity of antituberculosis agents is usually determined by measuring the reduction of the sputum mycobacterial load over time on solid agar medium or in liquid culture. This study investigated the value of a quantitative PCR assay for early bactericidal activity determination. Groups of 15 patients were treated with 6 different antituberculosis agents or regimens. Patients collected sputum for 16 h overnight at baseline and at days 7 and 14 after treatment initiation. We determined the sputum bacterial load by CFU counting (log CFU/ml sputum, reported as mean ± standard deviation [SD]), time to culture positivity (TTP, in hours [mean ± SD]) in liquid culture, and Xpert MTB/RIF cycle thresholds (C(T), n [mean ± SD]). The ability to discriminate treatment effects between groups was analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). All measurements showed a decrease in bacterial load from mean baseline (log CFU, 5.72 ± 1.00; TTP, 116.0 ± 47.6; C(T), 19.3 ± 3.88) to day 7 (log CFU, -0.26 ± 1.23, P = 0.2112; TTP, 35.5 ± 59.3, P = 0.0002; C(T), 0.55 ± 3.07, P = 0.6030) and day 14 (log CFU, -0.55 ± 1.24, P = 0.0006; TTP, 54.8 ± 86.8, P < 0.0001; C(T), 2.06 ± 4.37, P = 0.0020). The best discrimination between group effects was found with TTP at day 7 and day 14 (F = 9.012, P < 0.0001, and F = 11.580, P < 0.0001), followed by log CFU (F = 4.135, P = 0.0024, and F = 7.277, P < 0.0001). C(T) was not significantly discriminative (F = 1.995, P = 0.091, and F = 1.203, P = 0.316, respectively). Culture-based methods are superior to PCR for the quantification of early antituberculosis treatment effects in sputum.

  2. The Host Response to a Clinical MDR Mycobacterial Strain Cultured in a Detergent-Free Environment: A Global Transcriptomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Leisching, Gina; Pietersen, Ray-Dean; Mpongoshe, Vuyiseka; van Heerden, Carel; van Helden, Paul; Wiid, Ian; Baker, Bienyameen

    2016-01-01

    During Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) infection, the initial interactions between the pathogen and the host cell determines internalization and innate immune response events. It is established that detergents such as Tween alter the mycobacterial cell wall and solubilize various lipids and proteins. The implication of this is significant since induced changes on the cell wall affect macrophage uptake and the immune response to M.tb. Importantly, during transmission between hosts, aerosolized M.tb enters the host in its native form, i.e. in a detergent-free environment, thus in vitro and in vivo studies should mimic this as closely as possible. To this end, we have optimized a procedure for growing and processing detergent-free M.tb and assessed the response of murine macrophages (BMDM) infected with multi drug-resistant M.tb (R179 Beijing 220 clinical isolate) using RNAseq. We compared the effects of the host response to M.tb cultured under standard laboratory conditions (Tween 80 containing medium -R179T), or in detergent-free medium (R179NT). RNAseq comparisons reveal 2651 differentially expressed genes in BMDMs infected with R179T M.tb vs. BMDMs infected with R179NT M.tb. A range of differentially expressed genes involved in BMDM receptor interaction with M.tb (Mrc1, Ifngr1, Tlr9, Fpr1 and Itgax) and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines (Il6, Il1b, Tnf, Ccl5 and Cxcl14) were selected for analysis through qPCR. BMDMs infected with R179NT stimulate a robust inflammatory response. Interestingly, R179NT M.tb induce transcription of Fpr1, a receptor which detects bacterial formyl peptides and initiates a myriad of immune responses. Additionally we show that the host components Cxcl14, with an unknown role in M.tb infection, and Tlr9, an emerging role player, are only stimulated by infection with R179NT M.tb. Taken together, our results suggest that the host response differs significantly in response to Tween 80 cultured M.tb and should therefore not be used in

  3. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    Odell, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasingly recognized worldwide. Although over 150 different species of NTM have been described, pulmonary infections are most commonly due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium abscessus. The identification of these organisms in pulmonary specimens does not always equate with active infection; supportive radiographic and clinical findings are needed to establish the diagnosis. It is difficult to eradicate NTM infections. A prolonged course of therapy with a combination of drugs is required. Unfortunately, recurrent infection with new strains of mycobacteria or a relapse of infection caused by the original organism is not uncommon. Surgical resection is appropriate in selected cases of localized disease or in cases in which the infecting organism is resistant to medical therapy. Additionally, surgery may be required for infections complicated by hemoptysis or abscess formation. This review will summarize the practical aspects of the diagnosis and management of NTM thoracic infections, with emphasis on the indications for surgery and the results of surgical intervention. The management of NTM disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections is beyond the scope of this article and, unless otherwise noted, comments apply to hosts without HIV infection PMID:24624285

  4. High resolution genetic and physical mapping of the I-3 region of tomato chromosome 7 reveals almost continuous microsynteny with grape chromosome 12 but interspersed microsynteny with duplications on Arabidopsis chromosomes 1, 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Lim, G T T; Wang, G-P; Hemming, M N; McGrath, D J; Jones, D A

    2008-12-01

    The tomato I-3 gene introgressed from the Lycopersicon pennellii accession LA716 confers resistance to race 3 of the fusarium wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. We have improved the high-resolution map of the I-3 region of tomato chromosome 7 with the development and mapping of 31 new PCR-based markers. Recombinants recovered from L. esculentum cv. M82 x IL7-2 F2 and (IL7-2 x IL7-4) x M82 TC1F2 mapping populations, together with recombinants recovered from a previous M82 x IL7-3 F2 mapping population, were used to position these markers. A significantly higher recombination frequency was observed in the (IL7-2 x IL7-4) x M82 TC1F2 mapping population based on a reconstituted L. pennellii chromosome 7 compared to the other two mapping populations based on smaller segments of L. pennellii chromosome 7. A BAC contig consisting of L. esculentum cv. Heinz 1706 BACs covering the I-3 region has also been established. The new high-resolution map places the I-3 gene within a 0.38 cM interval between the molecular markers RGA332 and bP23/gPT with an estimated physical size of 50-60 kb. The I-3 region was found to display almost continuous microsynteny with grape chromosome 12 but interspersed microsynteny with Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes 1, 2 and 3. An S-receptor-like kinase gene family present in the I-3 region of tomato chromosome 7 was found to be present in the microsyntenous region of grape chromosome 12 but was absent altogether from the A. thaliana genome.

  5. Long interspersed nuclear element-1 hypomethylation is a potential biomarker for the prediction of response to oral fluoropyrimidines in microsatellite stable and CpG island methylator phenotype-negative colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kazuyuki; Matsunoki, Aika; Kaneko, Mami; Saito, Kenichiro; Watanabe, Go; Minamoto, Toshinari

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the clinical value of methylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) for the prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) and for the survival benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with oral fluoropyrimidines. LINE-1 methylation in tumor DNA was measured by quantitative methylation-specific PCR in 155 samples of stage II and stage III CRC. The presence of microsatellite instability and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) were assessed and 131 microsatellite stable/CIMP- cases were selected for survival analysis, of which 77 patients had received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with oral fluoropyrimidines. The CRC cell lines were used to investigate possible mechanistic links between LINE-1 methylation and effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). High LINE-1 methylation was a marker for better prognosis in patients treated by surgery alone. Patients with low LINE-1 methylation who were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy survived longer than those treated by surgery alone, suggestive of a survival benefit from the use of oral fluoropyrimidines. In contrast, a survival benefit from chemotherapy was not observed for patients with high LINE-1 methylation. The CRC cell lines treated with 5-FU showed increased expression of LINE-1 mRNA. This was associated with upregulation of the phospho-histone H2A.X in cells with low LINE-1 methylation, but not in cells with high LINE-1 methylation. The 5-FU-mediated induction of phospho-histone H2A.X, a marker of DNA damage, was inhibited by knockdown of LINE-1. These results suggest that LINE-1 methylation is a novel predictive marker for survival benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with oral fluoropyrimidines in CRC patients. This finding could be important for achieving personalized chemotherapy.

  6. Types of DNA methylation status of the interspersed repetitive sequences for LINE-1, Alu, HERV-E and HERV-K in the neutrophils from systemic lupus erythematosus patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Sukapan, Patadon; Promnarate, Paramate; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Hirankarn, Nattiya

    2014-04-01

    Changes of the DNA methylation at the interspersed repetitive sequences can occur in various conditions including cancer as well as autoimmune diseases. We previously reported the hypomethylation of LINE-1 and HERV-E in the lymphocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. As neutrophils are another important cell type contributing to SLE pathogenesis, in this study, we evaluated the methylation levels and patterns for LINE-1, ALU, HERV-E and HERV-K in the neutrophils from SLE patients compared with the healthy controls. We observed that the methylation levels, especially for LINE-1, in the neutrophils from SLE patients were significantly lower than the healthy controls (P-value < 0.0001). Interestingly, this hypomethylation was not correlated with the activity of the disease. Furthermore, the methylation levels and patterns for Alu, HERV-E and HERV-K in the neutrophils from the SLE patients were not significantly different from the healthy controls. In addition, we further investigated whether there were any correlations between the intragenic LINE-1 and differential expressions of the neutrophils from the SLE patients using public arrays data. The upregulated genes in the neutrophils from the SLE patients were significantly associated with the genes containing LINE-1s compared with the healthy controls (P-value GSE27427 = 7.74 × 10(-3); odds ratio (OR) = 1.28). Interestingly, this association was mainly found among genes with antisense LINE-1s (P-value GSE27427 = 6.22 × 10(-3); OR = 1.38). Bioinformatics data suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation may affect expression of the genes that may contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE. However, additional functional studies of these proposed genes are warranted to prove this hypothesis.

  7. Primary structure of a human mitochondrial protein homologous to the bacterial and plant chaperonins and to the 65-kilodalton mycobacterial antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, S; Dudani, A K; Singh, B; Harley, C B; Gupta, R S

    1989-01-01

    The complete cDNA for a human mitochondrial protein designated P1, which was previously identified as a microtubule-related protein, has been cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of P1 shows strong homology (40 to 50% identical residues and an additional 20% conservative replacements) to the 65-kilodalton major antigen of mycobacteria, to the GroEL protein of Escherichia coli, and to the ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (rubisco) subunit binding protein of plant chloroplasts. Similar to the case with the latter two proteins, which have been shown to act as chaperonins in the posttranslational assembly of oligomeric protein structures, it is suggested that P1 may play a similar role in mammalian cells. The observed high degree of homology between human P1 and mycobacterial antigen also suggests the possible involvement of this protein in certain autoimmune diseases. Images PMID:2568584

  8. Double strand break unwinding and resection by the mycobacterial helicase-nuclease AdnAB in the presence of single strand DNA-binding protein (SSB).

    PubMed

    Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Shuman, Stewart

    2010-11-05

    Mycobacterial AdnAB is a heterodimeric DNA helicase-nuclease and 3' to 5' DNA translocase implicated in the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs). The AdnA and AdnB subunits are each composed of an N-terminal motor domain and a C-terminal nuclease domain. Inclusion of mycobacterial single strand DNA-binding protein (SSB) in reactions containing linear plasmid dsDNA allowed us to study the AdnAB helicase under conditions in which the unwound single strands are coated by SSB and thereby prevented from reannealing or promoting ongoing ATP hydrolysis. We found that the AdnAB motor catalyzed processive unwinding of 2.7-11.2-kbp linear duplex DNAs at a rate of ∼250 bp s(-1), while hydrolyzing ∼5 ATPs per bp unwound. Crippling the AdnA phosphohydrolase active site did not affect the rate of unwinding but lowered energy consumption slightly, to ∼4.2 ATPs bp(-1). Mutation of the AdnB phosphohydrolase abolished duplex unwinding, consistent with a model in which the "leading" AdnB motor propagates a Y-fork by translocation along the 3' DNA strand, ahead of the "lagging" AdnA motor domain. By tracking the resection of the 5' and 3' strands at the DSB ends, we illuminated a division of labor among the AdnA and AdnB nuclease modules during dsDNA unwinding, whereby the AdnA nuclease processes the unwound 5' strand to liberate a short oligonucleotide product, and the AdnB nuclease incises the 3' strand on which the motor translocates. These results extend our understanding of presynaptic DSB processing by AdnAB and engender instructive comparisons with the RecBCD and AddAB clades of bacterial helicase-nuclease machines.

  9. New Mutations in the Mycobacterial ATP Synthase: New Insights into the Binding of the Diarylquinoline TMC207 to the ATP Synthase C-Ring Structure

    PubMed Central

    Segala, Elena; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Nevejans-Chauffour, Aurelie; Jarlier, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    TMC207 is a new antituberculous drug belonging to the diarylquinoline class which very efficiently inhibits the ATP synthase of mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the most important pathogens in the world. In order to map the amino acid residues involved in the binding of the drug, we have selected in vitro TMC207-resistant mutants from M. tuberculosis and diverse atypical mycobacteria. Six distinct mutations, Asp28→Gly, Asp28→Ala, Leu59→Val, Glu61→Asp, Ala63→Pro, and Ile66→Met, have been identified in the subunit c forming a C ring in the ATP synthase. They were studied by evaluating the levels of resistance that they confer in the selected clones and by using an isogenic complementation system in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The rates of increase of TMC207 MIC values (8- to 133-fold) were interpreted by constructing by homology modeling a structure of the mycobacterial C ring which was used for docking simulations with TMC207. Our results suggest that the residues found to be mutated in the resistant clones, together with a tyrosine specifically conserved at position 64 in mycobacteria, define a cleft located between two adjacent c subunits in the C ring. This cleft, which encompasses the proton-binding site (Glu61), is well fitted to bind TMC207 at the level of the bromoquinoline moiety, with the drug being anchored by several ionic, hydrogen, and halogen bonds with residues Glu61, Tyr64, and Asp28, respectively. These data shed light on the molecular interactions allowing TMC207 to bind specifically and efficiently at the level of the proton-binding site of the mycobacterial C ring. PMID:22354303

  10. A time-to-event pharmacodynamic model describing treatment response in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis using days to positivity in automated liquid mycobacterial culture.

    PubMed

    Chigutsa, Emmanuel; Patel, Kashyap; Denti, Paolo; Visser, Marianne; Maartens, Gary; Kirkpatrick, Carl M J; McIlleron, Helen; Karlsson, Mats O

    2013-02-01

    Days to positivity in automated liquid mycobacterial culture have been shown to correlate with mycobacterial load and have been proposed as a useful biomarker for treatment responses in tuberculosis. However, there is currently no quantitative method or model to analyze the change in days to positivity with time on treatment. The objectives of this study were to describe the decline in numbers of mycobacteria in sputum collected once weekly for 8 weeks from patients on treatment for tuberculosis using days to positivity in liquid culture. One hundred forty-four patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited from a tuberculosis clinic in Cape Town, South Africa. A nonlinear mixed-effects repeated-time-to-event modeling approach was used to analyze the time-to-positivity data. A biexponential model described the decline in the estimated number of bacteria in patients' sputum samples, while a logistic model with a lag time described the growth of the bacteria in liquid culture. At baseline, the estimated number of rapidly killed bacteria is typically 41 times higher than that of those that are killed slowly. The time to kill half of the rapidly killed bacteria was about 1.8 days, while it was 39 days for slowly killed bacteria. Patients with lung cavitation had higher bacterial loads than patients without lung cavitation. The model successfully described the increase in days to positivity as treatment progressed, differentiating between bacteria that are killed rapidly and those that are killed slowly. Our model can be used to analyze similar data from studies testing new drug regimens.

  11. Phosphoantigen-activated Vγ2Vδ2 T cells antagonize IL-2–induced CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in mycobacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Guangming; Shao, Lingyun; Wang, Yunqi; Chen, Crystal Y.; Huang, Dan; Yao, Shuyu; Zhan, Ximei; Sicard, Helene; Wang, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Although Foxp3+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) are well documented for their ability to suppress various immune cells, T-cell subsets capable of counteracting Tregs have not been demonstrated. Here, we assessed phosphoantigen-activated Vγ2Vδ2 T cells for the ability to interplay with Tregs in the context of mycobacterial infection. A short-term IL-2 treatment regimen induced marked expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells and subsequent suppression of mycobacterium-driven increases in numbers of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. Surprisingly, activation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells by adding phosphoantigen Picostim to the IL-2 treatment regimen down-regulated IL-2–induced expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. Consistently, in vitro activation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells by phosphoantigen plus IL-2 down-regulated IL-2–induced expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. Interestingly, anti–IFN-γ–neutralizing antibody, not anti–TGF-β or anti–IL-4, reduced the ability of activated Vγ2Vδ2 T cells to down-regulate Tregs, suggesting that autocrine IFN-γ and its network contributed to Vγ2Vδ2 T cells' antagonizing effects. Furthermore, activation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells by Picostim plus IL-2 treatment appeared to reverse Treg-driven suppression of immune responses of phosphoantigen-specific IFNγ+ or perforin+ Vγ2Vδ2 T cells and PPD-specific IFNγ+αβ T cells. Thus, phos-phoantigen activation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells antagonizes IL-2–induced expansion of Tregs and subsequent suppression of Ag-specific antimicrobial T-cell responses in mycobacterial infection. PMID:18981295

  12. Heterologous expression of mycobacterial Esx complexes in Escherichia coli for structural studies is facilitated by the use of maltose binding protein fusions.

    PubMed

    Arbing, Mark A; Chan, Sum; Harris, Liam; Kuo, Emmeline; Zhou, Tina T; Ahn, Christine J; Nguyen, Lin; He, Qixin; Lu, Jamie; Menchavez, Phuong T; Shin, Annie; Holton, Thomas; Sawaya, Michael R; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David

    2013-01-01

    The expression of heteroligomeric protein complexes for structural studies often requires a special coexpression strategy. The reason is that the solubility and proper folding of each subunit of the complex requires physical association with other subunits of the complex. The genomes of pathogenic mycobacteria encode many small protein complexes, implicated in bacterial fitness and pathogenicity, whose characterization may be further complicated by insolubility upon expression in Escherichia coli, the most common heterologous protein expression host. As protein fusions have been shown to dramatically affect the solubility of the proteins to which they are fused, we evaluated the ability of maltose binding protein fusions to produce mycobacterial Esx protein complexes. A single plasmid expression strategy using an N-terminal maltose binding protein fusion to the CFP-10 homolog proved effective in producing soluble Esx protein complexes, as determined by a small-scale expression and affinity purification screen, and coupled with intracellular proteolytic cleavage of the maltose binding protein moiety produced protein complexes of sufficient purity for structural studies. In comparison, the expression of complexes with hexahistidine affinity tags alone on the CFP-10 subunits failed to express in amounts sufficient for biochemical characterization. Using this strategy, six mycobacterial Esx complexes were expressed, purified to homogeneity, and subjected to crystallization screening and the crystal structures of the Mycobacterium abscessus EsxEF, M. smegmatis EsxGH, and M. tuberculosis EsxOP complexes were determined. Maltose binding protein fusions are thus an effective method for production of Esx complexes and this strategy may be applicable for production of other protein complexes.

  13. Epidemiological trends and clinical comparisons of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages in Thai TB meningitis.

    PubMed

    Faksri, Kiatichai; Drobniewski, Francis; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Brown, Timothy; Prammananan, Therdsak; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit; Prayoonwiwat, Naraporn; Chaiprasert, Angkana

    2011-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains were isolated from cerebrospinal fluids collected from individual tuberculous meningitis (TBM) patients from 1996 to 2007 (n = 184) and characterised based on IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), spoligotyping, Mycobacterium interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) and large sequence polymorphisms (LSPs). Beijing strains were found to possess the highest transmissibility and proportion in clustered isolates. Beijing strain predomination and stability, at 56% of the genotypic proportion, as well as association with drug resistance in TBM patients, was demonstrated. The proportion of Beijing sublineages revealed that the modern Beijing sublineage showed an increasing trend, whereas the ancestral Beijing sublineage showed a decreasing trend across the three periods. In contrast, there were neither clustered nor multidrug-resistance (MDR) isolates from the Euro-American (EuA) lineage, and the lineage genotypic proportion trend was also decreased. Based on LSPs, only the Beijing, Indo-Oceanic and Euro-American lineages were identified from TBM patients in Thailand. TBM mortality rates were not associated with either drug resistance or significantly different among MTB lineages. This study may support the Beijing genotype strain as most pathogenic causing TBM, with the EuA lineage genotype as the most benign of the strain genotypes tested. The analysis of drug susceptibility also revealed the trend of increasing drug resistance, especially MDR, in TBM patients in Thailand.

  14. Missense splice variant (g.20746A>G, p.Ile183Val) of interferon gamma receptor 1 (IFNGR1) coincidental with mycobacterial osteomyelitis - a screen of osteoarticular lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bińczak-Kuleta, Agnieszka; Szwed, Aleksander; Walter, Mark R.; Kołban, Maciej; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Clark, Jeremy S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, dominant partial interferon-gamma receptor 1 (IFN-γ-R1) susceptibility to environmental mycobacteria was found with IFNGR1 deletions or premature stop. Our aim was to search for IFNGR1 variants in patients with mycobacterial osteoarticular lesions. Biopsies from the patients were examined for acid-fast bacilli, inflammatory cell infiltration, and mycobacterial niacin. Mycobacterial rRNA was analyzed using a target-amplified rRNA probe test. Peripheral-blood-leukocyte genomic DNA was isolated from 19 patients using the QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, and all IFNGR1 exons were sequenced using an ABIPRISM 3130 device. After the discovery of an exon 5 variant, a Polish newborn population sample (n = 100) was assayed for the discovered variant. Splice sites and putative amino acid interactions were analyzed. All patients tested were positive for mycobacteria; one was heterozygous for the IFNGR1 exon 5 single-nucleotide-missense substitution (g.20746A>G, p.Ile183Val). No other variant was found. The splice analysis indicated the creation of an exonic splicing silencer, and alternatively, molecular graphics indicated that the p.Ile183Val might alter beta-strand packing (loss of van der Waals contacts; Val183/Pro205), possibly altering the IFN-γ-R1/IFN-γ-R2 interaction. The probability of non-deleterious variant was estimated as <10%. Heterozygous IFNGR1:p.Ile183Val (frequency 0.003%) was found to be coincidental with mycobacterial osteomyelitis. The small amount of variation detected in the patients with osteoarticular lesions indicates that screens should not yet be restricted: Intronic variants should be analyzed as well as the other genes affecting Type 1 T-helper-cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27356097

  15. Evaluation of the diagnostic value of measuring IgG, IgM, and IgA antibodies to mycobacterial A60 antigen in active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ben-selma, Walid; Harizi, Hedi; Marzouk, Manel; Ben Kahla, Imen; Ben Lazreg, Foued; Ferjeni, Asma; Boukadida, Jalel

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of detection of serum immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgG, and IgM antibodies raised against the mycobacterial A60 antigen for the diagnosis and discrimination of active tuberculosis (TB) from other pulmonary diseases. Three commercially available ELISA kits (IgA, IgG, and IgM) (ANDA Biologicals, Strasbourg, France) were evaluated simultaneously in 246 serum samples from 3 groups of patients: group I, 171 patients with active TB (128 pulmonary TB and 43 extrapulmonary TB); group II, 73 patients with pulmonary non-TB diseases; and group III, 2 leprosies patients. The sensitivities of tests ranged from 31.3% (IgA) to 94% (IgG) in pulmonary TB patients and from 21% (IgA) to 84% (IgG) in extrapulmonary TB patients. The specificities of assays varied from 92% (IgG) to 96% (IgA) in the pulmonary non-TB group. Combination of IgG with IgA and/or IgM does not improve its sensitivity. Clinical use of the A60-based serodiagnostic IgG assay is of great value for the rapid diagnosis and discrimination between active TB and pulmonary non-TB diseases. Moreover, this test could be used to increase diagnostic accuracy, especially for smear-negative TB cases, which are difficult to diagnose.

  16. Confirmation of the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacteria in mycobacterial growth indicator tubes (MGIT) by multiplex strand displacement amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Badak, F Z; Kiska, D L; O'Connell, M; Nycz, C M; Hartley, C; Setterquist, S; Hopfer, R L

    1997-01-01

    Multiplex strand displacement amplification (mSDA) is capable of amplifying three distinct DNA sequences simultaneously. These include sequences present in most genera of mycobacteria, a sequence specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and an internal control. mSDA was used to detect the presence of these target sequences in 154 (72 positive, 76 negative, and 6 failed) clinical specimens cultured in the mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) system. A wide variety of specimen types were processed and cultured. Once these cultures were deemed positive by MGIT fluorescence or were deemed negative after 8 weeks of incubation, MGIT culture aliquots were processed for mSDA analyses. A chemiluminescent microwell assay was used to detect the amplified products. The procedure was relatively simple and took less than 6 h to complete. The sensitivity of mSDA for detecting acid-fast bacilli was 96.4% compared to that of MGIT culture. Sensitivity and specificity were 97.2 and 96.1%, respectively, when all clinical criteria were considered. mSDA was shown to be a rapid and effective method for confirming the presence of M. tuberculosis and other mycobacteria in positive MGIT cultures. PMID:9114414

  17. The interaction of mycobacterial protein Rv2966c with host chromatin is mediated through non-CpG methylation and histone H3/H4 binding

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Garima; Upadhyay, Sandeep; Srilalitha, M.; Nandicoori, Vinay K.; Khosla, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    To effectively modulate the gene expression within an infected mammalian cell, the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis would need to bring about epigenetic modifications at appropriate genomic loci. Working on this hypothesis, we show in this study that the mycobacterial protein Rv2966c is a 5-methylcytosine-specific DNA methyltransferase that is secreted out from the mycobacterium and gets localized to the nucleus in addition to the cytoplasm inside the host cell. Importantly, Rv2966c binds to specific DNA sequences, methylates cytosines predominantly in a non-CpG context and its methylation activity is positively influenced by phosphorylation. Interestingly, like the mammalian DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3L, Rv2966c can also interact with histone proteins. Ours is the first study that identifies a protein from a pathogenic bacteria with potential to influence host DNA methylation in a non-canonical manner providing the pathogen with a novel mechanism to alter the host epigenetic machinery. This contention is supported by repression of host genes upon M. tuberculosis infection correlated with Rv2966c binding and non-CpG methylation. PMID:25824946

  18. Identification of mycobacterial GarA as a substrate of protein kinase G from M. tuberculosis using a KESTREL-based proteome wide approach.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Philipp; Pieters, Jean

    2017-05-01

    Signal transduction in bacteria is generally mediated via two-component systems. These systems depend on the transfer of a phosphate molecule from a donor to an acceptor by histidine kinases, thereby activating the acceptor to allow downstream signaling/activation. Several bacterial genomes, including the genome of M. tuberculosis, were shown to encode eukaryotic-like kinases. To better understand the function of these kinases and the regulatory networks within which they operate, identification of downstream targets is essential. We here present a straightforward approach for the identification of bacterial Ser/Thr-kinase substrates. This approach is based on the KESTREL (Kinase Tracking and Substrate Elucidation) procedure combined with reversed-phase chromatography and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Using this method, GarA was identified as one potential substrate for the mycobacterial Ser/Thr-protein kinase G (PknG). These results show that the modified KESTREL approach can be successfully employed for the identification of substrates for bacterial Ser/Thr-kinases.

  19. T cell reactivity against mycolyl transferase antigen 85 of M. tuberculosis in HIV-TB coinfected subjects and in AIDS patients suffering from tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Launois, Pascal; Drowart, Annie; Bourreau, Eliane; Couppie, Pierre; Farber, Claire-Michèle; Van Vooren, Jean-Paul; Huygen, Kris

    2011-01-01

    The mycolyl transferase antigen 85 complex is a major secreted protein family from mycobacterial culture filtrate, demonstrating powerful T cell stimulatory properties in most HIV-negative, tuberculin-positive volunteers with latent M.tuberculosis infection and only weak responses in HIV-negative tuberculosis patients. Here, we have analyzed T cell reactivity against PPD and Ag85 in HIV-infected individuals, without or with clinical symptoms of tuberculosis, and in AIDS patients with disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria. Whereas responses to PPD were not significantly different in HIV-negative and HIV-positive tuberculin-positive volunteers, responses to Ag85 were significantly decreased in the HIV-positive (CDC-A and CDC-B) group. Tuberculosis patients demonstrated low T cell reactivity against Ag85, irrespective of HIV infection, and finally AIDS patients suffering from NTM infections were completely nonreactive to Ag85. A one-year follow-up of twelve HIV-positive tuberculin-positive individuals indicated a decreased reactivity against Ag85 in patients developing clinical tuberculosis, highlighting the protective potential of this antigen.

  20. Structures of EccB1 and EccD1 from the core complex of the mycobacterial ESX-1 type VII secretion system

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Jonathan M.; Chan, Sum; Evans, Timothy J.; Kahng, Sara; Kim, Jennifer; Arbing, Mark A.; Eisenberg, David; Korotkov, Konstantin V.

    2016-02-27

    The ESX-1 type VII secretion system is an important determinant of virulence in pathogenic mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This complicated molecular machine secretes folded proteins through the mycobacterial cell envelope to subvert the host immune response. Despite its important role in disease very little is known about the molecular architecture of the ESX-1 secretion system. This study characterizes the structures of the soluble domains of two conserved core ESX-1 components – EccB1 and EccD1. The periplasmic domain of EccB1 consists of 4 repeat domains and a central domain, which together form a quasi 2-fold symmetrical structure. The repeat domains of EccB1 are structurally similar to a known peptidoglycan binding protein suggesting a role in anchoring the ESX-1 system within the periplasmic space. The cytoplasmic domain of EccD1 has a ubiquitin-like fold and forms a dimer with a negatively charged groove. In conclusion, these structures represent a major step towards resolving the molecular architecture of the entire ESX-1 assembly and may contribute to ESX-1 targeted tuberculosis intervention strategies.

  1. Structures of EccB1 and EccD1 from the core complex of the mycobacterial ESX-1 type VII secretion system

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Jonathan M.; Chan, Sum; Evans, Timothy J.; ...

    2016-02-27

    The ESX-1 type VII secretion system is an important determinant of virulence in pathogenic mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This complicated molecular machine secretes folded proteins through the mycobacterial cell envelope to subvert the host immune response. Despite its important role in disease very little is known about the molecular architecture of the ESX-1 secretion system. This study characterizes the structures of the soluble domains of two conserved core ESX-1 components – EccB1 and EccD1. The periplasmic domain of EccB1 consists of 4 repeat domains and a central domain, which together form a quasi 2-fold symmetrical structure. The repeat domains ofmore » EccB1 are structurally similar to a known peptidoglycan binding protein suggesting a role in anchoring the ESX-1 system within the periplasmic space. The cytoplasmic domain of EccD1 has a ubiquitin-like fold and forms a dimer with a negatively charged groove. In conclusion, these structures represent a major step towards resolving the molecular architecture of the entire ESX-1 assembly and may contribute to ESX-1 targeted tuberculosis intervention strategies.« less

  2. The mycobacterial antibiotic resistance determinant WhiB7 acts as a transcriptional activator by binding the primary sigma factor SigA (RpoV)

    PubMed Central

    Burian, Ján; Yim, Grace; Hsing, Michael; Axerio-Cilies, Peter; Cherkasov, Artem; Spiegelman, George B.; Thompson, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis therapeutic options are limited by the high intrinsic antibiotic resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The putative transcriptional regulator WhiB7 is crucial for the activation of systems that provide resistance to diverse antibiotic classes. Here, we used in vitro run-off, two-hybrid assays, as well as mutagenic, complementation and protein pull-down experiments, to characterize WhiB7 as an auto-regulatory, redox-sensitive transcriptional activator in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We provide the first direct biochemical proof that a WhiB protein promotes transcription and also demonstrate that this activity is sensitive to oxidation (diamide). Its partner protein for transcriptional activation was identified as SigA, the primary sigma factor subunit of RNA polymerase. Residues required for the interaction mapped to region 4 of SigA (including R515H) or adjacent domains of WhiB7 (including E63D). WhiB7’s ability to provide a specific spectrum of antibiotic-resistance was dependent on these residues as well as its C-terminal AT-hook module that binds to an AT-rich motif immediately upstream of the −35 hexamer recognized by SigA. These experimentally established constrains, combined with protein structure predictions, were used to generate a working model of the WhiB7–SigA-promoter complex. Inhibitors preventing WhiB7 interactions could allow the use of previously ineffective antibiotics for treatment of mycobacterial diseases. PMID:23990327

  3. Delayed-type skin hypersensitivity and in vitro lymphocyte immunostimulation responses of swine following inoculation with Mycobacterium avium cell walls and a mycobacterial immunopotentiating glycolipid.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, H W; Gessner, J W; Woodard, L F; Everson, D O

    1983-06-01

    Miniature swine (n = 5 per group) were inoculated intradermally with mineral oil-in-water emulsions containing either 150 micrograms of mycobacterial immunopotentiating glycolipid P3 (EP3), 150 micrograms of lyophilized Mycobacterium avium (serotype 8) cell walls (E-MaCW), or 150 micrograms P3 and 150 micrograms M. avium cell walls (EP3-MaCW). Swine vaccinated with E-MaCW and EP3-MaCW developed antigen-sensitive lymphocytes detectable with delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin tests and lymphocyte transformation assays. Swine injected with EP3 were not sensitized. In general EP3-MaCW evoked a more pronounced in vivo DTH tuberculin skin test and in vitro lymphocyte transformation responses than E-MaCW. Time-course studies indicated a more persistent response in swine injected with EP3-MaCW than in those given E-MaCW. Commercial type Yorkshire swine (n = 5) inoculated intradermally with EP3-MaCW developed cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to avian tuberculin detectable in vivo with delayed-type skin hypersensitivity and in vitro with lymphocyte immunostimulation responses.

  4. Optimization of Pyrrolamides as Mycobacterial GyrB ATPase Inhibitors: Structure-Activity Relationship and In Vivo Efficacy in a Mouse Model of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    P, Shahul Hameed; Mukherjee, Kakoli; Nandi, Vrinda; Waterson, David; Shandil, Radha; Balganesh, Meenakshi; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K.; Raichurkar, Anand Kumar; Deshpande, Abhijeet; Ghosh, Anirban; Awasthy, Disha; Shanbhag, Gajanan; Sheikh, Gulebahar; McMiken, Helen; Puttur, Jayashree; Reddy, Jitendar; Werngren, Jim; Read, Jon; Kumar, Mahesh; R, Manjunatha; Chinnapattu, Murugan; Madhavapeddi, Prashanti; Manjrekar, Praveena; Basu, Reetobrata; Gaonkar, Sheshagiri; Sharma, Sreevalli; Hoffner, Sven; Humnabadkar, Vaishali; Subbulakshmi, Venkita; Panduga, Vijender

    2014-01-01

    Moxifloxacin has shown excellent activity against drug-sensitive as well as drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), thus confirming DNA gyrase as a clinically validated target for discovering novel anti-TB agents. We have identified novel inhibitors in the pyrrolamide class which kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis through inhibition of ATPase activity catalyzed by the GyrB domain of DNA gyrase. A homology model of the M. tuberculosis H37Rv GyrB domain was used for deciphering the structure-activity relationship and binding interactions of inhibitors with mycobacterial GyrB enzyme. Proposed binding interactions were later confirmed through cocrystal structure studies with the Mycobacterium smegmatis GyrB ATPase domain. The most potent compound in this series inhibited supercoiling activity of DNA gyrase with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of <5 nM, an MIC of 0.03 μg/ml against M. tuberculosis H37Rv, and an MIC90 of <0.25 μg/ml against 99 drug-resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. The frequency of isolating spontaneous resistant mutants was ∼10−6 to 10−8, and the point mutation mapped to the M. tuberculosis GyrB domain (Ser208 Ala), thus confirming its mode of action. The best compound tested for in vivo efficacy in the mouse model showed a 1.1-log reduction in lung CFU in the acute model and a 0.7-log reduction in the chronic model. This class of GyrB inhibitors could be developed as novel anti-TB agents. PMID:24126580

  5. DNA-Launched Alphavirus Replicons Encoding a Fusion of Mycobacterial Antigens Acr and Ag85B Are Immunogenic and Protective in a Murine Model of TB Infection.

    PubMed

    Dalmia, Neha; Klimstra, William B; Mason, Carol; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for effective prophylactic measures against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, particularly given the highly variable efficacy of Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB). Most studies indicate that cell-mediated immune responses involving both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are necessary for effective immunity against Mtb. Genetic vaccination induces humoral and cellular immune responses, including CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, against a variety of bacterial, viral, parasitic and tumor antigens, and this strategy may therefore hold promise for the development of more effective TB vaccines. Novel formulations and delivery strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DNA-based vaccines have recently been evaluated, and have shown varying degrees of success. In the present study, we evaluated DNA-launched Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicons (Vrep) encoding a novel fusion of the mycobacterial antigens α-crystallin (Acr) and antigen 85B (Ag85B), termed Vrep-Acr/Ag85B, for their immunogenicity and protective efficacy in a murine model of pulmonary TB. Vrep-Acr/Ag85B generated antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses that persisted for at least 10 wk post-immunization. Interestingly, parenterally administered Vrep-Acr/Ag85B also induced T cell responses in the lung tissues, the primary site of infection, and inhibited bacterial growth in both the lungs and spleens following aerosol challenge with Mtb. DNA-launched Vrep may, therefore, represent an effective approach to the development of gene-based vaccines against TB, particularly as components of heterologous prime-boost strategies or as BCG boosters.

  6. Cytomegalovirus infection modulates the phenotype and functional profile of the T-cell immune response to mycobacterial antigens in older life☆

    PubMed Central

    Terrazzini, Nadia; Bajwa, Martha; Vita, Serena; Thomas, David; Smith, Helen; Vescovini, Rosanna; Sansoni, Paolo; Kern, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Cytomegalovirus is associated with accelerated immunosenescence. Expansions of CMV-specific T cell responses have previously been demonstrated to affect the ability of T cells to respond to other infections. Most people above 60 years of age display M. tuberculosis-specific immunity because of vaccination, exposure, or both. T-cell responses can be assessed by measuring intracellular IFN-γ in vitro after tuberculin stimulation. Here we investigated tuberculin-specific CD4 T-cell responses in independently living healthy older people in the South of England using flow-cytometry. Individuals were investigated for tuberculin and CMV-specific T-cell immunity using in vitro antigen stimulation followed by intracellular staining for IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL2, as well as degranulation and CD154 upregulation. We also examined a control group of younger individuals (20–35 years of age). There was no significant difference between older and young people in regards to tuberculin responsiveness of CD4 T-cells; however, older people seemed to show more outliers. Increased responsiveness to tuberculin was significantly correlated to CMV responsiveness but not age. In older donors, the memory phenotype of tuberculin-induced T-cells was significantly skewed towards a more terminal differentiation phenotype in CMV-infected compared to uninfected individuals and the degree of skewing correlated quantitatively with the size of the CMV-specific CD4 T-cell response. This is a fundamental advance over previous reports of changes of the tuberculin-specific CD4 T-cell response with CMV serostatus. Our results show that how the immune system responds to CMV has a fundamental impact on the phenotype and function of the immune response to mycobacterial antigens in older life. PMID:24370373

  7. Incidence of active mycobacterial infections in Brazilian patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and negative evaluation for latent tuberculosis infection at baseline - A longitudinal analysis after using TNFα blockers

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Carina Mori Frade; Terreri, Maria Teresa; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Barbosa, Cássia; Machado, Natália Pereira; Melo, Maria Roberta; Pinheiro, Marcelo Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Several studies point to the increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIAs) after using tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α blockers. To study the incidence of active mycobacterial infections (aMI) in patients starting TNF α blockers, 262 patients were included in this study: 109 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 93 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 44 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and 16 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All patients had indication for anti-TNF α therapy. Epidemiologic and clinical data were evaluated and a simple X-ray and tuberculin skin test (TST) were performed. The control group included 215 healthy individuals. The follow-up was 48 months to identify cases of aMI. TST positivity was higher in patients with AS (37.6%) than in RA (12.8%), PsA (18.8%) and JIA (6.8%) (p < 0.001). In the control group, TST positivity was 32.7%. Nine (3.43%) patients were diagnosed with aMI. The overall incidence rate of aMI was 86.93/100,000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 23.6-217.9] for patients and 35.79/100,000 person-years (95% CI 12.4-69.6) for control group (p < 0.001). All patients who developed aMI had no evidence of LTBI at the baseline evaluation. Patients with CIA starting TNF α blockers and no evidence of LTBI at baseline, particularly with nonreactive TST, may have higher risk of aMI. PMID:26560983

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of NAS-21 and NAS-91 analogues as potential inhibitors of the mycobacterial FAS-II dehydratase enzyme Rv0636.

    PubMed

    Bhowruth, Veemal; Brown, Alistair K; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2008-07-01

    The identification of potential new anti-tubercular chemotherapeutics is paramount due to the recent emergence of extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (XDR-TB). Libraries of NAS-21 and NAS-91 analogues were synthesized and evaluated for their whole-cell activity against Mycobacterium bovis BCG. NAS-21 analogues 1 and 2 demonstrated enhanced whole-cell activity in comparison to the parental compound, and an M. bovis BCG strain overexpressing the dehydratase enzyme Rv0636 was resistant to these analogues. NAS-91 analogues with ortho-modifications gave enhanced whole-cell activity. However, extension with biphenyl modifications compromised the whole-cell activities of both NAS-21 and NAS-91 analogues. Interestingly, both libraries demonstrated in vitro activity against fatty acid synthase II (FAS-II) but not FAS-I in cell-free extracts. In in vitro assays of FAS-II inhibition, NAS-21 analogues 4 and 5 had IC(50) values of 28 and 19 mug ml(-1), respectively, for the control M. bovis strain, and the M. bovis BCG strain overexpressing Rv0636 showed a marked increase in resistance. In contrast, NAS-91 analogues demonstrated moderate in vitro activity, although increased resistance was again observed in FAS-II activity assays with the Rv0636-overexpressing strain. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and mycolic acid methyl ester (MAME) analysis of M. bovis BCG and the Rv0636-overexpressing strain revealed that the effect of the drug was relieved in the overexpressing strain, further implicating and potentially identifying Rv0636 as the target for these known FabZ dehydratase inhibitors. This study has identified candidates for further development as drug therapeutics against the mycobacterial FAS-II dehydratase enzyme.

  9. Last step in the conversion of trehalose to glycogen: a mycobacterial enzyme that transfers maltose from maltose 1-phosphate to glycogen.

    PubMed

    Elbein, Alan D; Pastuszak, Irena; Tackett, Alan J; Wilson, Tyler; Pan, Yuan T

    2010-03-26

    We show that Mycobacterium smegmatis has an enzyme catalyzing transfer of maltose from [(14)C]maltose 1-phosphate to glycogen. This enzyme was purified 90-fold from crude extracts and characterized. Maltose transfer required addition of an acceptor. Liver, oyster, or mycobacterial glycogens were the best acceptors, whereas amylopectin had good activity, but amylose was a poor acceptor. Maltosaccharides inhibited the transfer of maltose from [(14)C]maltose-1-P to glycogen because they were also acceptors of maltose, and they caused production of larger sized radioactive maltosaccharides. When maltotetraose was the acceptor, over 90% of the (14)C-labeled product was maltohexaose, and no radioactivity was in maltopentaose, demonstrating that maltose was transferred intact. Stoichiometry showed that 0.89 micromol of inorganic phosphate was produced for each micromole of maltose transferred to glycogen, and 56% of the added maltose-1-P was transferred to glycogen. This enzyme has been named alpha1,4-glucan:maltose-1-P maltosyltransferase (GMPMT). Transfer of maltose to glycogen was inhibited by micromolar amounts of inorganic phosphate or arsenate but was only slightly inhibited by millimolar concentrations of glucose-1-P, glucose-6-P, or inorganic pyrophosphate. GMPMT was compared with glycogen phosphorylase (GP). GMPMT catalyzed transfer of [(14)C]maltose-1-P, but not [(14)C]glucose-1-P, to glycogen, whereas GP transferred radioactivity from glucose-1-P but not maltose-1-P. GMPMT and GP were both inhibited by 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-d-arabinitol, but only GP was inhibited by isofagomine. Because mycobacteria that contain trehalose synthase accumulate large amounts of glycogen when grown in high concentrations of trehalose, we propose that trehalose synthase, maltokinase, and GMPMT represent a new pathway of glycogen synthesis using trehalose as the source of glucose.

  10. microRNA-20a Inhibits Autophagic Process by Targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1 and Favors Mycobacterial Survival in Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Le; Zhao, Jin; Qu, Yuliang; Yin, Runting; Gao, Qian; Ding, Shuqin; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Jun; Xu, Guangxian

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in the host immune response against mycobacterial infection. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) can live in macrophages owing to its ability to evade attacks by regulating autophagic response. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding, endogenously encoded RNA which plays critical roles in precise regulation of macrophage functions. Whether miRNAs specifically influence the activation of macrophage autophagy during M. tuberculosis infection are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that BCG infection of macrophages resulted in enhanced expression of miRNA-20a, which inhibits autophagic process by targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1 and promotes BCG survival in macrophages. Forced overexpression of miR-20a decreased the expression levels of LC3-II and the number of LC3 puncta in macrophages, and promoted BCG survival in macrophages, while transfection with miR-20a inhibitor had the opposite effect. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of miR-20a on autophagy was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Quantification of autophagosomes per cellular cross-section revealed a significant reduction upon transfection with miR-20a mimic, but transfection with miR-20a inhibitor increased the number of autophagosomes per cellular cross-section. Moreover, silencing of ATG7 significantly inhibited autophagic response, and transfection with ATG7 siRNA plus miR-20a mimic could further decrease autophagic response. Collectively, our data reveal that miR-20a inhibits autophagic response and promotes BCG survival in macrophages by targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1, which may have implications for a better understanding of pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:27803889

  11. A murine monoclonal antibody to glycogen: characterization of epitope-fine specificity by saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy and its use in mycobacterial capsular α-glucan research.

    PubMed

    van de Weerd, Robert; Berbís, M Alvaro; Sparrius, Marrion; Maaskant, Janneke J; Boot, Maikel; Paauw, Nanne J; de Vries, Nadine; Boon, Louis; Baba, Otto; Cañada, F Javier; Geurtsen, Jeroen; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Appelmelk, Ben J

    2015-04-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is a major pathogen responsible for 1.5 million deaths annually. This bacterium is characterized by a highly unusual and impermeable cell envelope, which plays a key role in mycobacterial survival and virulence. Although many studies have focused on the composition and functioning of the mycobacterial cell envelope, the capsular α-glucan has received relatively minor attention. Here we show that a murine monoclonal antibody (Mab) directed against glycogen cross-reacts with mycobacterial α-glucans, polymers of α(1-4)-linked glucose residues with α(1-6)-branch points. We identified the Mab epitope specificity by saturation transfer difference NMR and show that the α(1-4)-linked glucose residues are important in glucan-Mab interaction. The minimal epitope is formed by (linear) maltotriose. Notably, a Mycobacterium mutant lacking the branching enzyme GlgB does not react with the Mab; this suggests that the α(1-6)-branches form part of the epitope. These seemingly conflicting data can be explained by the fact that in the mutant the linear form of the α-glucan (amylose) is insoluble. This Mab was subsequently used to develop several techniques helpful in capsular α-glucan research. By using a capsular glucan-screening methodology based on this Mab we were able to identify several unknown genes involved in capsular α-glucan biogenesis. Additionally, we developed two methods for the detection of capsular α-glucan levels. This study therefore opens new ways to study capsular α-glucan and to identify possible targets for further research.

  12. Induction of tolerance to lipopolysaccharide and mycobacterial components in Chinese hamster ovary/CD14 cells is not affected by overexpression of Toll-like receptors 2 or 4.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, A E; Henneke, P; Schromm, A; Lien, E; Ingalls, R; Fenton, M J; Golenbock, D T; Vogel, S N

    2001-08-15

    Down-regulation of cell surface expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 following LPS stimulation has been suggested to underlie endotoxin tolerance. In this study, we examined whether overexpression of TLR2 or TLR4 would affect the ability of cells to become tolerant to LPS or the mycobacterial components, arabinose-capped lipoarabinomannan (LAM) and soluble tuberculosis factor (STF). To this end, Chinese hamster ovary/CD14 cells stably transfected with a NF-kappaB-dependent reporter construct, endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule CD25 (the 3E10 clone), were engineered to overexpress either human TLR2 or TLR4. Transfected TLRs exhibited proper signaling functions, as evidenced by increased LPS responsiveness of 3E10/TLR4 cells and acquisition of sensitivity to TLR2-specific ligands upon transfection of TLR2 into TLR2-negative 3E10 cells. Pretreatment of cells with LPS, LAM, or STF did not modulate TLR2 or TLR4 cell surface expression. Following LPS exposure, 3E10, 3E10/TLR2, and 3E10/TLR4 cells exhibited comparable decreases in LPS-mediated NF-kappaB activation and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation. Likewise, LPS pretreatment profoundly inhibited LPS-induced NF-kappaB translocation in Chinese hamster ovary cells that concomitantly overexpressed human TLR4 and myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2), but failed to modulate TLR4 or MD-2 cell surface expression. Pretreatment of 3E10/TLR2 cells with LAM or STF decreased their NF-kappaB responses induced by subsequent stimulation with these substances or LPS. Conversely, prior exposure of 3E10/TLR2 cells to LPS led to hyporesponsiveness to LPS, LAM, and STF, indicating that LPS and mycobacterial products induce cross-tolerance. Thus, tolerance to LPS and mycobacterial components cannot be attributed solely to a decrease in TLR/MD-2 expression levels, suggesting inhibition of expression or function of other signaling intermediates.

  13. MiR-23a-5p modulates mycobacterial survival and autophagy during mycobacterium tuberculosis infection through TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway by targeting TLR2.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xing; Gao, Yan; Mu, De-Guang; Fu, En-Qing

    2017-03-19

    Autophagy plays a pivotal role in activating the antimicrobial host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb.). The emerging roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating immune responses have attracted increasing attention in recent years. Appreciating the potential of host-directed therapies designed to control autophagy during mycobacterial infection, we focused on the influence of miR-23a-5p on the activation of macrophage autophagy during M.tb. infection in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) and murine RAW264.7 cells. Here, we demonstrated that M.tb.-infection of macrophages lead to markedly enhanced expression of miR-23a-5p in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, forced expression of miR-23a-5p accelerated the survival rate of intracellular mycobacteria, while transfection with miR-23a-5p inhibitors attenuated mycobacterial survival. More importantly, overexpression of miR-23a-5p dramatically prevented M.tb.-induced activation of autophagy in macrophages, whereas inhibitors of miR-23a-5p remarkably accelerated M.tb.-induced autophagy. Mechanistically, miR-23a-5p is able to modulate TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB signaling activity by targeting TLR2 in RAW264.7 cells in response to M.tb.-infection. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that miR-23a-5p modulated the innate host defense by promoting mycobacteria survival and inhibiting the activation of autophagy against M.tb. through TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway by targeting TLR2, which may provide a promising therapeutic target for tuberculosis.

  14. [Molecular variability in the commom shrew Sorex araneus L. from European Russia and Siberia inferred from the length polymorphism of DNA regions flanked by short interspersed elements (Inter-SINE PCR) and the relationships between the Moscow and Seliger chromosome races].

    PubMed

    Bannikova, A A; Bulatova, N Sh; Kramerov, D A

    2006-06-01

    Genetic exchange among chromosomal races of the common shrew Sorex araneus and the problem of reproductive barriers have been extensively studied by means of such molecular markers as mtDNA, microsatellites, and allozymes. In the present study, the interpopulation and interracial polymorphism in the common shrew was derived, using fingerprints generated by amplified DNA regions flanked by short interspersed repeats (SINEs)-interSINE PCR (IS-PCR). We used primers, complementary to consensus sequences of two short retroposons: mammalian element MIR and the SOR element from the genome of Sorex araneus. Genetic differentiation among eleven populations of the common shrew from eight chromosome races was estimated. The NP and MJ analyses, as well as multidimensional scaling showed that all samples examined grouped into two main clusters, corresponding to European Russia and Siberia. The bootstrap support of the European Russia cluster in the NJ and MP analyses was respectively 76 and 61%. The bootstrap index for the Siberian cluster was 100% in both analyses; the Tomsk race, included into this cluster, was separated with the bootstrap support of NJ/MP 92/95%.

  15. Isolation and molecular characterization of Mycobacterium bovis from Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) from Zambia.

    PubMed

    Malama, Sydney; Johansen, Tone Bjordal; Muma, John Bwalya; Mwanza, Sydney; Djønne, Berit; Godfroid, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a chronic bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis. Infections due to M. bovis, which serves as a stable reservoir, can pose serious challenge to control and eradicate in both wildlife and livestock at the interface. This study aimed at isolating and characterizing M. bovis from Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) and black lechwe (Kobus leche smithemani) at the animal/human interface in Zambia. The samples with lesions compatible with BTB collected during the hunting seasons of 2009 and 2010 were cultured for isolation of mycobacteria using Stonebrink with pyruvate (BD Diagnostics, MD, USA) and Middlebrook 7H10 (BD Diagnostics) slants. Isolated mycobacteria were identified using IS6110 polymerase chain reaction and deletion analysis. Molecular characterization of the isolates was performed using spoligotyping and mycobacteria interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) with nine loci. Data was analyzed using BioNumerics software 6.1. Out of the 39 samples, acid fast bacilli were detected in 27 (69.2 %) based on smear microscopy. Seven isolates were found to belong to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, and all were identified as M. bovis based on deletion analysis. All seven isolates were identical on spoligotyping as belonging to the SB0120 (SIT 482). MIRU-VNTR differentiated the isolates into five different patterns. This study has confirmed that M. bovis circulates in the Kafue lechwe, and non-tuberculous mycobacteria were detected in the black lechwe in Zambia which represents a wildlife reservoir, with a potential to spillover to cattle and humans. Isolates of M. bovis from lechwe antelopes are much conserved as only one spoligotype was detected. The study has shown that three loci differentiated fairly well. This option is cheap and less laborious, and hence a better option in resource-strained country like Zambia. The study further showed that some of the loci recommended by the European

  16. Recent TB transmission, clustering and predictors of large clusters in London, 2010–2012: results from first 3 years of universal MIRU-VNTR strain typing

    PubMed Central

    Hamblion, Esther L; Le Menach, Arnaud; Anderson, Laura F; Lalor, Maeve K; Brown, Tim; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Anderson, Charlotte; Maguire, Helen; Anderson, Sarah R

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of TB has doubled in the last 20 years in London. A better understanding of risk groups for recent transmission is required to effectively target interventions. We investigated the molecular epidemiological characteristics of TB cases to estimate the proportion of cases due to recent transmission, and identify predictors for belonging to a cluster. Methods The study population included all culture-positive TB cases in London residents, notified between January 2010 and December 2012, strain typed using 24-loci multiple interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeats. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the risk factors for clustering using sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of cases and for cluster size based on the characteristics of the first two cases. Results There were 10 147 cases of which 5728 (57%) were culture confirmed and 4790 isolates (84%) were typed. 2194 (46%) were clustered in 570 clusters, and the estimated proportion attributable to recent transmission was 34%. Clustered cases were more likely to be UK born, have pulmonary TB, a previous diagnosis, a history of substance abuse or alcohol abuse and imprisonment, be of white, Indian, black-African or Caribbean ethnicity. The time between notification of the first two cases was more likely to be <90 days in large clusters. Conclusions Up to a third of TB cases in London may be due to recent transmission. Resources should be directed to the timely investigation of clusters involving cases with risk factors, particularly those with a short period between the first two cases, to interrupt onward transmission of TB. PMID:27417280

  17. Enhanced protection against pulmonary mycobacterial challenge by chitosan-formulated polyepitope gene vaccine is associated with increased pulmonary secretory IgA and gamma-interferon(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Ai, Wenqing; Yue, Yan; Xiong, Sidong; Xu, Wei

    2013-03-01

    Induction of local (pulmonary) immunity plays a critical role in preventing dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) during the early infection stage. To induce specific mucosal immunity, chitosan, a natural cationic polysaccharide, was employed as a mucosal gene carrier and complexed with pHSP65pep, our previously constructed multi-epitope gene vaccine, which induces splenic gamma-interferon (IFN-γ)(+) T helper cell 1 responses. The resultant chitosan-pHSP65pep was administered intranasally to BALB/c mice with four doses of 50 μg DNA followed by mycobacterial challenge 4 weeks after the final immunization. It was found that the chitosan formulation significantly induced production of secretory immunoglobulin A (P < 0.05) as determined by measuring its concentrations in lung lavage fluid and enhanced pulmonary CD4(+) and CD8(+) IFN-γ(+) T cell responses (P < 0.001) compared with naked gene vaccine. Improved protection against Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) challenge was consistently achieved by the chitosan-DNA formulation both as the vaccine alone or in a BCG prime-vaccine boost immunization scenario. Our study shows that mucosal delivery of gene vaccine in a chitosan formulation remarkably enhances specific SIgA concentrations and mucosal IFN-γ(+) T cell response, which correlated positively with immunological protection.

  18. Proliferation of weakly suppressive regulatory CD4+ T cells is associated with over-active CD4+ T-cell responses in HIV-positive patients with mycobacterial immune restoration disease.

    PubMed

    Seddiki, Nabila; Sasson, Sarah C; Santner-Nanan, Brigitte; Munier, Meeling; van Bockel, David; Ip, Susanna; Marriott, Debbie; Pett, Sarah; Nanan, Ralph; Cooper, David A; Zaunders, John J; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2009-02-01

    The role of Treg in patients with late-stage HIV disease, who commence combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and develop pathogen-specific immunopathology manifesting as immune restoration disease (IRD) remains unclear. We hypothesised that Treg could be defective in either numbers and/or function and therefore unable to ensure the physiological equilibrium of the immune system in patients with IRD. Phenotypic and functional CD4(+) T-cell subsets of eight late-stage HIV patients with nadir CD4 count <50 cells/microL, who developed mycobacterial IRD upon commencing cART were compared with six therapy naive HIV(+) patients (nadir CD4 count <50 cells/microL), who did not develop an IRD after cART. Mycobacterium-avium-specific CD4(+) T cells from IRD patients produced high levels of IFN-gamma and IL-2 compared with controls (p<0.001). Surprisingly, we found a significant expansion of CD127(lo)Foxp3(+)CD25(+) Treg in IRD patients and a higher ratio of Treg to effector/memory subsets (p<0.001). In vitro suppression assays demonstrated reduced functional capacity of suppressor cells and diminished IL-10 secretion in IRD patients. Plasma levels of IL-7 were increased in patients and, interestingly, exogenous IL-7 and other cytokines strongly inhibited Treg suppression. These data suggest that despite substantial Treg expansion in IRD, their ability to induce suppression, and thereby downregulate aberrant immune responses, is compromised.

  19. Ten tandem repeats of {beta}-hCG 109-118 enhance immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of {beta}-hCG C-terminal peptide carried by mycobacterial heat-shock protein HSP65

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yankai; Yan Rong; He Yi; Liu Wentao; Cao Rongyue; Yan Ming; Li Taiming; Liu Jingjing; Wu Jie . E-mail: wu_jie97@yahoo.com.cn

    2006-07-14

    The {beta}-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin ({beta}-hCG) is secreted by many kinds of tumors and it has been used as an ideal target antigen to develop vaccines against tumors. In view of the low immunogenicity of this self-peptide,we designed a method based on isocaudamer technique to repeat tandemly the 10-residue sequence X of {beta}-hCG (109-118), then 10 tandemly repeated copies of the 10-residue sequence combined with {beta}-hCG C-terminal 37 peptides were fused to mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 to construct a fusion protein HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 as an immunogen. In this study, we examined the effect of the tandem repeats of this 10-residue sequence in eliciting an immune by comparing the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of the two immunogens, HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 and HSP65-{beta}hCGCTP37 (without the 10 tandem repeats). Immunization of mice with the fusion protein HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 elicited much higher levels of specific anti-{beta}-hCG antibodies and more effectively inhibited the growth of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in vivo than with HSP65-{beta}hCGCTP37, which should suggest that HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 may be an effective protein vaccine for the treatment of {beta}-hCG-dependent tumors and multiple tandem repeats of a certain epitope are an efficient method to overcome the low immunogenicity of self-peptide antigens.

  20. Prime-boost BCG vaccination with DNA vaccines based in β-defensin-2 and mycobacterial antigens ESAT6 or Ag85B improve protection in a tuberculosis experimental model.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Biragyn, Arya; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio; Bodogai, Monica; Martínez-Fierro, Margarita; Sada, Eduardo; Trujillo, Valentin; Enciso-Moreno, Antonio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2013-01-11

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that there are about 8 million new cases annually of active Tuberculosis (TB). Despite its irregular effectiveness (0-89%), the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) BCG is the only vaccine available worldwide for prevention of TB; thus, the design is important of novel and more efficient vaccination strategies. Considering that β-defensin-2 is an antimicrobial peptide that induces dendritic cell maturation through the TLR-4 receptor and that both ESAT-6 and Ag85B are immunodominant mycobacterial antigens and efficient activators of the protective immune response, we constructed two DNA vaccines by the fusion of the gene encoding β-defensin-2 and antigens ESAT6 (pDE) and 85B (pDA). After confirming efficient local antigen expression that induced high and stable Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in intramuscular (i.m.) vaccinated Balb/c mice, groups of mice were vaccinated with DNA vaccines in a prime-boost regimen with BCG and with BCG alone, and 2 months later were challenged with the mild virulence reference strain H37Rv and the highly virulent clinical isolate LAM 5186. The level of protection was evaluated by survival, lung bacilli burdens, and extension of tissue damage (pneumonia). Vaccination with both DNA vaccines showed similar protection to that of BCG. After the challenge with the highly virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, animals that were prime-boosted with BCG and then boosted with both DNA vaccines showed significant higher survival and less tissue damage than mice vaccinated only with BCG. These results suggest that improvement of BCG vaccination, such as the prime-boost DNA vaccine, represents a more efficient vaccination scheme against TB.

  1. The Mycobacterial Cell Envelope—Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) lipids are indelibly imprinted in just about every key aspect of tuberculosis (TB) basic and translational research. Although the interest in these compounds originally stemmed from their abundance, structural diversity, and antigenicity, continued research in this field has been driven by their important contribution to TB pathogenesis and their interest from the perspective of drug, vaccine, diagnostic, and biomarker development. This article summarizes what is known of the roles of lipids in the physiology and pathogenicity of Mtb and the exciting developments that have occurred in recent years in identifying new lead compounds targeting their biogenesis. PMID:25104772

  2. Molecular basis of mycobacterial survival in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Awuh, Jane Atesoh; Flo, Trude Helen

    2017-05-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in the immune system by ingesting and degrading invading pathogens, initiating an inflammatory response and instructing adaptive immune cells, and resolving inflammation to restore homeostasis. More interesting is the fact that some bacteria have evolved to use macrophages as a natural habitat and tools of spread in the host, e.g., Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and some non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Mtb is considered one of humanity's most successful pathogens and is the causal agent of tuberculosis, while NTMs cause opportunistic infections all of which are of significant public health concern. Here, we describe mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens, with an emphasis on mycobacteria, manipulate macrophage functions to circumvent killing and live inside these cells even under considerable immunological pressure. Such macrophage functions include the selective evasion or engagement of pattern recognition receptors, production of cytokines, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, phagosome maturation, as well as other killing mechanisms like autophagy and cell death. A clear understanding of host responses elicited by a specific pathogen and strategies employed by the microbe to evade or exploit these is of significant importance for the development of effective vaccines and targeted immunotherapy against persistent intracellular infections like tuberculosis.

  3. Microbiological diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary disease is by far the most frequent disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). To diagnose NTM pulmonary disease (NTM-PD), patients should have symptoms and radiologic signs suggestive of NTM-PD, and cultures of multiple respiratory tract samples must grow the same NTM species. Thus, the microbiological laboratory has a central role in the diagnosis of NTM-PD. This review summarizes currently available data on techniques involved in the microbiological diagnosis of NTM-PD, and aims to provide a framework for optimal microbiological diagnosis.

  4. Nontuberculous mycobacterial disease following hot tub exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Mangione, E. J.; Huitt, G.; Lenaway, D.; Beebe, J.; Bailey, A.; Figoski, M.; Rau, M. P.; Albrecht, K. D.; Yakrus, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been recognized as an important cause of disease in immunocompromised hosts. Pulmonary disease caused by NTM is increasingly recognized in previously healthy persons. Investigation of pulmonary disease affecting a family of five identified an indoor hot tub as the source of NTM-related disease. PMID:11747738

  5. An Empirical Analysis of Interspersal Research Evidence, Implications, and Applications of the Discrete Task Completion Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Christopher H.

    2002-01-01

    Researchers have posited that when students work on assignments with many discrete tasks, that each completed discrete task may be a conditioned reinforcer. If the discrete task completion hypothesis is accurate, then relative task completion rates should influence choice behavior in the same manner as relative rates of reinforcement. Results of a…

  6. Cutaneous amelanotic signet-ring cell malignant melanoma with interspersed myofibroblastic differentiation in a young cat.

    PubMed

    Hirz, Manuela; Herden, Christiane

    2016-07-01

    The diagnosis of malignant melanoma can be difficult because these tumors can be amelanotic and may contain diverse variants and divergent differentiations, of which the signet-ring cell subtype is very rare and has only been described in humans, dogs, cats, and a hamster. We describe herein histopathologic and immunohistochemical approaches taken to diagnose a case of signet-ring cell malignant melanoma with myofibroblastic differentiation in a cat. A tumor within the abdominal skin of a 2-year-old cat was composed of signet-ring cells and irregularly interwoven streams of spindle cells. Both neoplastic cell types were periodic-acid-Schiff, Fontana, and Sudan black B negative. Signet-ring cells strongly expressed vimentin and S100 protein. Spindle cells strongly expressed vimentin and smooth muscle actin; some cells expressed S100, moderately neuron-specific enolase, and others variably actin and desmin. A few round cells expressed melan A, and a few plump spindle cells expressed melan A and PNL2, confirming the diagnosis of amelanotic signet-ring cell malignant melanoma with myofibroblastic differentiation in a cat. Differential diagnoses were excluded, including signet-ring cell forms of adenocarcinomas, lymphomas, liposarcomas, leiomyosarcomas, squamous cell carcinomas, basal cell carcinomas, and adnexal tumors.

  7. Ring chromosomes in dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans are composed of interspersed sequences from chromosomes 17 and 22.

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, R.; Lux, M. L.; Huang, S. F.; Naber, S. P.; Corson, J. M.; Fletcher, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Ring chromosomes are found in most dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSPs), and recent reports demonstrate that portions of the DFSP ring chromosomes derive from chromosome 17. In this study we characterized ring chromosomes in three DFSPs using a combined approach of karyotyping, chromosome painting, and comparative genomic hybridization. Chromosome painting demonstrated that the ring chromosomes in each DFSP were composed of discontinuous, interwoven sequences from chromosomes 17 and 22. Amplification of chromosomes 17 and 22 sequences was confirmed in each of these cases by comparative genomic hybridization, and over-representation of chromosomes 17 and 22 sequences was also demonstrated by comparative genomic hybridization in 1 of 2 cytogenetically unremarkable DFSPs. We conclude that amplification of chromosomes 17 and 22 sequences, in ring form, is a characteristic aberration in DFSP. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7495279

  8. Biased distributions and decay of long interspersed nuclear elements in the chicken genome.

    PubMed

    Abrusán, György; Krambeck, Hans-Jürgen; Junier, Thomas; Giordano, Joti; Warburton, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    The genomes of birds are much smaller than mammalian genomes, and transposable elements (TEs) make up only 10% of the chicken genome, compared with the 45% of the human genome. To study the mechanisms that constrain the copy numbers of TEs, and as a consequence the genome size of birds, we analyzed the distributions of LINEs (CR1's) and SINEs (MIRs) on the chicken autosomes and Z chromosome. We show that (1) CR1 repeats are longest on the Z chromosome and their length is negatively correlated with the local GC content; (2) the decay of CR1 elements is highly biased, and the 5'-ends of the insertions are lost much faster than their 3'-ends; (3) the GC distribution of CR1 repeats shows a bimodal pattern with repeats enriched in both AT-rich and GC-rich regions of the genome, but the CR1 families show large differences in their GC distribution; and (4) the few MIRs in the chicken are most abundant in regions with intermediate GC content. Our results indicate that the primary mechanism that removes repeats from the chicken genome is ectopic exchange and that the low abundance of repeats in avian genomes is likely to be the consequence of their high recombination rates.

  9. Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1): passenger or driver in human neoplasms?

    PubMed

    Rodić, Nemanja; Burns, Kathleen H

    2013-03-01

    LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons make up a significant portion of human genomes, with an estimated 500,000 copies per genome. Like other retrotransposons, L1 retrotransposons propagate through RNA sequences that are reverse transcribed into DNA sequences, which are integrated into new genomic loci. L1 somatic insertions have the potential to disrupt the transcriptome by inserting into or nearby genes. By mutating genes and playing a role in epigenetic dysregulation, L1 transposons may contribute to tumorigenesis. Studies of the "mobilome" have lagged behind other tumor characterizations at the sequence, transcript, and epigenetic levels. Here, we consider evidence that L1 retrotransposons may sometimes drive human tumorigenesis.

  10. The Effects of Interspersal and Reinforcement on Math Fact Accuracy and Learning Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumberger, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematics skill acquisition is a crucial component of education and ongoing research is needed to determine quality instructional techniques. A ubiquitous instructional question is how to manage time. This study investigated several flashcard presentation methods to determine the one that would provide the most learning in a set amount of time.…

  11. Opsonizing antibodies (IgG1) up-regulate monocyte proinflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-6 but not anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in mycobacterial antigen-stimulated monocytes-implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Shiratsuchi, H; Phillips, M; Ellner, J; Wallis, R S

    2001-02-01

    Cachexia is one of the prominent features of advanced tuberculosis (TB) seen in association with increased expression of the monokine TNF-alpha. Several mycobacterial proteins, including PPD, stimulate TNF-alpha secretion from monocytes. Host factors that may play a role in cytokine expression from monocytes remain largely unknown. One such factor is the opsonizing antibodies. Monocytes have high-affinity receptors (FcgammaI and FcgammaIII) for IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies that mediate antigen uptake. We have reported selective up-regulation of IgG1 (which bind to Fcgamma receptors) in advanced TB and have recently shown the ability of PPD-specific IgG1 antibodies to augment TNF-alpha expression in PPD-stimulated monocytes. These observations have now been extended to other cytokines with semipurified fractions from secreted antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (containing 30 kD and 58 kD) that were devoid of lipids, glycolipids and carbohydrates. In the presence of heat-inactivated TB plasma containing known amounts of antigen-specific IgG1 antibodies, these fractions induced significantly increased TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 secretion. Absorption of IgG1 with Protein 'A' removed the augmenting activity for TNF-alpha and IL-6 secretion from the TB plasma samples. In the case of IL-10, removal of IgG1 resulted in increased rather than decreased IL-10 secretion. These results suggest a possible pathogenic role for antibodies in TB by enhancing proinflammatory and blocking down-regulatory cytokines such as IL-10 cytokines during the chronic phase of TB.

  12. Abattoir-based estimates of mycobacterial infections in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Egbe, N. F.; Muwonge, A.; Ndip, L.; Kelly, R. F.; Sander, M.; Tanya, V.; Ngwa, V. Ngu; Handel, I. G.; Novak, A.; Ngandalo, R.; Mazeri, S.; Morgan, K. L.; Asuquo, A.; Bronsvoort, B. M. de C.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria cause major diseases including human tuberculosis, bovine tuberculosis and Johne’s disease. In livestock, the dominant species is M. bovis causing bovine tuberculosis (bTB), a disease of global zoonotic importance. In this study, we estimated the prevalence of Mycobacteria in slaughter cattle in Cameroon. A total of 2,346 cattle were examined in a cross-sectional study at four abattoirs in Cameroon. Up to three lesions per animal were collected for further study and a retropharyngeal lymph node was collected from a random sample of non-lesioned animals. Samples were cultured on Lowenstein Jensen media and the BACTEC MGIT 960 system, and identified using the Hain® Genotype kits. A total of 207/2,346 cattle were identified with bTB-like lesions, representing 4.0% (45/1,129), 11.3% (106/935), 23.8% (38/160) and 14.8% (18/122) of the cattle in the Bamenda, Ngaoundere, Garoua and Maroua abattoirs respectively. The minimum estimated prevalence of M. bovis was 2.8% (1.9–3.9), 7.7% (6.1–9.6), 21.3% (15.2–28.4) and 13.1% (7.7–20.4) in the four abattoirs respectively. One M. tuberculosis and three M. bovis strains were recovered from non-lesioned animals. The high prevalence of M. bovis is of public health concern and limits the potential control options in this setting without a viable vaccine as an alternative. PMID:27075056

  13. Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease: Clinicians' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yon Ju; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are emerging pathogens that affect both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The incidence and prevalence of NTM lung disease are increasing worldwide and rapidly becoming a major public health problem. For the diagnosis of NTM lung disease, patients suspected to have NTM lung disease are required to meet all clinical and microbiologic criteria. The development of molecular methods allows the characterization of new species and NTM identification at a subspecies level. Even after the identification of NTM species from respiratory specimens, clinicians should consider the clinical significance of such findings. Besides the limited options, treatment is lengthy and varies by species, and therefore a challenge. Treatment may be complicated by potential toxicity with discouraging outcomes. The decision to start treatment for NTM lung disease is not easy and requires careful individualized analysis of risks and benefits. Clinicians should be alert to those unique aspects of NTM lung disease concerning diagnosis with advanced molecular methods and treatment with limited options. Current recommendations and recent advances for diagnosis and treatment of NTM lung disease are summarized in this article. PMID:27066084

  14. Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Soo; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-05-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous organisms; their isolation from clinical specimens does not always indicate clinical disease. The incidence of NTM lung diseases has been increasing worldwide. Although the geographic diversity of NTM species is well known, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), M. abscessus complex (MABC), and M. kansasii are the most commonly encountered and important etiologic organisms. Two distinct types of NTM lung diseases have been reported, namely fibrocavitary and nodular bronchiectatic forms. For laboratory diagnosis of NTM lung diseases, both liquid and solid media cultures and species-level identification are strongly recommended to enhance growth detection and determine the clinical relevance of isolates. Treatment for NTM lung diseases consists of a multidrug regimen and a long course of therapy, lasting more than 12 months after negative sputum conversion. For MAC lung disease, several new macrolide-based regimens are now recommended. For nodular bronchiectatic forms of MAC lung diseases, an intermittent three-time-weekly regimen produces outcomes similar to those of daily therapy. Treatment of MABC lung disease is very difficult, requiring long-term use of parenteral agents in combination with new macrolides. Treatment outcomes are much better for M. massiliense lung disease than for M. abscessus lung disease. Thus, precise identification of species in MABC infection is needed for the prediction of antibiotic response. Likewise, increased efforts to improve treatment outcomes and develop new agents for NTM lung disease are needed.

  15. Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous organisms; their isolation from clinical specimens does not always indicate clinical disease. The incidence of NTM lung diseases has been increasing worldwide. Although the geographic diversity of NTM species is well known, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), M. abscessus complex (MABC), and M. kansasii are the most commonly encountered and important etiologic organisms. Two distinct types of NTM lung diseases have been reported, namely fibrocavitary and nodular bronchiectatic forms. For laboratory diagnosis of NTM lung diseases, both liquid and solid media cultures and species-level identification are strongly recommended to enhance growth detection and determine the clinical relevance of isolates. Treatment for NTM lung diseases consists of a multidrug regimen and a long course of therapy, lasting more than 12 months after negative sputum conversion. For MAC lung disease, several new macrolide-based regimens are now recommended. For nodular bronchiectatic forms of MAC lung diseases, an intermittent three-time-weekly regimen produces outcomes similar to those of daily therapy. Treatment of MABC lung disease is very difficult, requiring long-term use of parenteral agents in combination with new macrolides. Treatment outcomes are much better for M. massiliense lung disease than for M. abscessus lung disease. Thus, precise identification of species in MABC infection is needed for the prediction of antibiotic response. Likewise, increased efforts to improve treatment outcomes and develop new agents for NTM lung disease are needed. PMID:27134484

  16. [New drugs against tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections: a review].

    PubMed

    Amitani, R; Kuze, F

    1994-11-01

    The number of cases with tuberculosis is again increasing in many countries, and recently several nosocomial outbreaks of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis have occurred in the United States. The number of patients with disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections in AIDS population, and patients with MAC pulmonary disease unassociated with HIV seem to be also increasing. It takes at least 6 to 9 months for an initial treatment of active tuberculosis due to drug-sensitive strains with the standard regimen which includes isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RFP). Treatment for the diseases caused by drug-resistant M. tuberculosis and MAC is much more time-consuming and more toxic than for the diseases caused by drug-sensitive strains, and often unsuccessful. For the reasons described above, the developments of new agents with potent antimycobacterial activities are highly desired. The new agents should also be useful for treating patients who have acquired resistance to many of the currently available drugs. In this review the new antimycobacterial drugs are summarized. Some of them have already been used clinically, but many are still in experimental evaluations. 1) Rifamycin derivatives: rifabutin (RBT), KRM-1648 (KRM), rifapentin (RPT), FCE-22250, FCE-22807, CGP-7040, SPA-S-565 and other rifamycin derivatives. New rifamycin derivatives including RBT, KRM have increased in vitro antimycobacterial activities. RBT and KRM are much more active in vitro and in vivo than RFP against both M. tuberculosis and MAC. KRM seems to be more potent than RBT against MAC in experimental studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. [Improvement of routine works and quality control in mycobacterial laboratory].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Higuchi, Takeshi

    2007-03-01

    Many new methods have been introduced into routine laboratory works in microbiology since 1990. Molecular biology, in particular, opened a new era and promoted a technician's skill much. PCR and hybridization technique have been ordinary one in many laboratories. Since old techniques such as smear and culture are still needed, amount of routine works is increasing gradually. Thus, improving efficiency and keeping quality of routine works are becoming more and more important issues. This symposium focused on such points, and four skilled technicians around Japan presented their own tips. 1. Coexistence of M. tuberculosis and M. avium complex (MAC) in the MGIT culture system: Yasushi WATANABE (Clinical Laboratory Division, NHO Nishi-Niigata Chuo National Hospital). Sputum samples of some tuberculosis patients yielded only MAC in the MGIT culture system. Such co-infected cases presented problems to mislead proper treatment and infection control. The detection rate of MAC was significantly high, and the growth speed of MAC was significantly rapid in the MGIT culture system, compared to those of M. tuberculosis. Additionally, M. tuberculosis was not detected with even more quantity than MAC in the small amount of mixed samples. Higher sensitivity and growth speed of MAC are the important characteristics of the MGIT system. 2. Internal quality control with ordinary examination results: Akio AONO (Department of Clinical Examination, Double-Barred Cross Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association). Our laboratory utilizes ordinary examination results as the internal quality control for specimen pretreatment, culture, and drug susceptibility testing. The contamination rate of MGIT culture system is useful for the evaluation of the decontamination process. It was 6.3% on average in our laboratory in 2005. The number of drug resistant strains is also useful to assess the performance of drug susceptibility testing. The incidence of each anti-tuberculosis drug resistance detected monthly in 2005 is up to 5 for isoniazid (INH), 4 for rifampicin (RFP), 7 for streptomycin (SM), 1 for ethambutol (EB), and 2 for pyrazinamide (PZA), respectively. If any serious deviation from the average number is observed, action for the investigation is taken. The analysis of the ordinary examination data is useful to implement a quality control efficiently, and to improve the total laboratory performance. 3. The advanced devices for solving problems of the smears and cultivation of Mycobacteria: Motohisa TOMITA (NHO Kinki-chuo Chest Medical Center). Recently, the newly developed, standardized, commercially available kits including PCR and liquid media for confirmation and identification of mycobacteria are prevalent in Japan for the rapid diagnosis of M. tuberculosis. These tests are sensitive and accurate, but still expensive and technically demanding. The improvement of these methods, in particular, requires time-consuming process. We have optimized the culture technique, the identification method, and the drug-susceptibility testing for Mycobacteria in a time-saving manner. They should provide a basic grounding in the application of the techniques for anyone who is interested in these intriguing bacteria. 4. Ultimate quality control of specimens--teaching how to get a good sputum sample: Takeshi HIGUCHI (Kyoto University Hospital). Modern techniques including molecular biology have been applied to routine laboratory works for rapid detection, identification, and drug susceptibility testing of mycobacteria. Even in using such techniques, however, poor quality specimens yield only poor results. To get a high quality specimen, particularly sputum samples, is very important. Therefore, laboratory technicians in our hospital have directly taught each patient how to expectorate good quality sputa since 2001. The teaching of patients has improved the rate of P1 samples from 21.5% to 36.6% by Miller and Jones visual score of sputum. The teaching has also improved the rate of smear positive P1 samples from 11.4% to 28.8%. To teach each patient how to get good sputa seems useful for keeping the laboratory quality high.

  18. Mycobacterial mistranslation is necessary and sufficient for rifampicin phenotypic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Babak; Sorrentino, Flavia; Toosky, Melody; Zheng, Wen; Pinkham, Jessica T.; Jain, Nina; Pan, Miaomiao; Deighan, Padraig; Rubin, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Errors are inherent in all biological systems. Errors in protein translation are particularly frequent giving rise to a collection of protein quasi-species, the diversity of which will vary according to the error rate. As mistranslation rates rise, these new proteins could produce new phenotypes, although none have been identified to date. Here, we find that mycobacteria substitute glutamate for glutamine and aspartate for asparagine at high rates under specific growth conditions. Increasing the substitution rate results in remarkable phenotypic resistance to rifampicin, whereas decreasing mistranslation produces increased susceptibility to the antibiotic. These phenotypic changes are reflected in differential susceptibility of RNA polymerase to the drug. We propose that altering translational fidelity represents a unique form of environmental adaptation. PMID:24395793

  19. Host Response to Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections of Current Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria are a large group of acid-fast bacteria that are very widely distributed in the environment. While Mycobacterium avium was once regarded as innocuous, its high frequency as a cause of disseminated disease in HIV-positive individuals illustrated its potential as a pathogen. Much more recently, there is growing evidence that the incidence of M. avium and related nontuberculous species is increasing in immunocompetent individuals. The same has been observed for M. abscessus infections, which are very difficult to tre