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Sample records for mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number

  1. Application of Single-nucleotide Polymorphism and Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units-Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analyses to Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Go Eun; Jang, Mi Hee; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Sun Min; Yi, Jongyoun; Lee, Eun Yup; Chang, Chulhun L.; Kim, Yeong Dae

    2011-01-01

    Background Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis is a powerful strategy for large-scale molecular population studies examining phylogenetic relationships among bacterial strains. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) can be easily digitized to share data among laboratories. This study applied SNP and MIRU-VNTR analyses for molecular strain typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates collected throughout Korea. Methods We studied 102 clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, including 6 paired strains, collected from 11 university hospitals in Korea in 2008 and 2009. SNPs were detected using hairpin primer assays, and then, MIRU-VNTR analysis was performed. Results Thirty-five SNPs contained polymorphisms that helped differentiate the 96 tested isolates. The isolates were classified into 15 clusters. The Beijing family strains were distributed within closely related clusters in the SNP dendrogram. For MIRU-VNTR analysis, the 96 isolates were divided into 12 groups. The discriminatory index in 8 of these groups (MIRU-10, -23, -26, and -31; ETR-A, -B, -C, and -F) was high (Hunter-Gaston diversity index > 0.6). Unlike the SNP method, MIRU-VNTR analysis did not identify any notable localizations of Beijing or non-Beijing family isolates in specific clusters. Conclusions SNP and MIRU-VNTR analyses are surrogate molecular strain-typing methods for M. tuberculosis in Korea where Beijing family isolates are predominant. PMID:21239869

  2. Prospective Universal Application of Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Genotyping To Characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates for Fast Identification of Clustered and Orphan Cases▿

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Rodriguez, Noelia; Martínez-Lirola, Miguel; Sánchez, M. Luisa; Herranz, Marta; Peñafiel, Teresa; Bonillo, Magdalena del Carmen; Gonzalez-Rivera, Milagros; Martínez, Juan; Cabezas, Teresa; Diez-García, Luis Felipe; Bouza, Emilio; García de Viedma, Darío

    2009-01-01

    The use of molecular tools for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in epidemiological surveys in order to identify clustered and orphan strains requires faster response times than those offered by the reference method, IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) genotyping. A method based on PCR, the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) genotyping technique, is an option for fast fingerprinting of M. tuberculosis, although precise evaluations of correlation between MIRU-VNTR and RFLP findings in population-based studies in different contexts are required before the methods are switched. In this study, we evaluated MIRU-VNTR genotyping (with a set of 15 loci [MIRU-15]) in parallel to RFLP genotyping in a 39-month universal population-based study in a challenging setting with a high proportion of immigrants. For 81.9% (281/343) of the M. tuberculosis isolates, both RFLP and MIRU-VNTR types were obtained. The percentages of clustered cases were 39.9% (112/281) and 43.1% (121/281) for RFLP and MIRU-15 analyses, and the numbers of clusters identified were 42 and 45, respectively. For 85.4% of the cases, the RFLP and MIRU-15 results were concordant, identifying the same cases as clustered and orphan (kappa, 0.7). However, for the remaining 14.6% of the cases, discrepancies were observed: 16 of the cases clustered by RFLP analysis were identified as orphan by MIRU-15 analysis, and 25 cases identified as orphan by RFLP analysis were clustered by MIRU-15 analysis. When discrepant cases showing subtle genotypic differences were tolerated, the discrepancies fell from 14.6% to 8.6%. Epidemiological links were found for 83.8% of the cases clustered by both RFLP and MIRU-15 analyses, whereas for the cases clustered by RFLP or MIRU-VNTR analysis alone, links were identified for only 30.8% or 38.9% of the cases, respectively. The latter group of cases mainly comprised isolates that could also have been clustered

  3. Determination of Genotypic Diversity of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies from Human and Animal Origins by Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat and IS1311 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Typing Methods ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Radomski, Nicolas; Thibault, Virginie C.; Karoui, Claudine; de Cruz, Krystel; Cochard, Thierry; Gutiérrez, Cristina; Supply, Philip; Biet, Frank; Boschiroli, María Laura

    2010-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are ubiquitous bacteria that can be found in water, food, and other environmental samples and are considered opportunistic pathogens for numerous animal species, mainly birds and pigs, as well as for humans. We have recently demonstrated the usefulness of a PCR-based mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing for the molecular characterization of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium strains exclusively isolated from AIDS patients. In the present study we extended our analysis, based on eight MIRU-VNTR markers, to a strain collection comprehensively comprising the other M. avium subspecies, including M. avium subsp. avium, M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and M. avium subsp. silvaticum, isolated from numerous animal species, HIV-positive and HIV-negative humans, and environmental sources. All strains were fully typeable, with the discriminatory index being 0.885, which is almost equal to that obtained by IS1311 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing as a reference. In contrast to IS1311 RFLP typing, MIRU-VNTR typing was able to further discriminate M. avium subsp. avium strains. MIRU-VNTR alleles strongly associated with or specific for M. avium subspecies were detected in several markers. Moreover, the MIRU-VNTR typing-based results were consistent with a scenario of the independent evolution of M. avium subsp. avium/M. avium subsp. silvaticum and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, previously proposed on the basis of multilocus sequence analysis. MIRU-VNTR typing therefore appears to be a convenient typing method capable of distinguishing the three main subspecies and strains of the complex and providing new epidemiological knowledge on MAC. PMID:20107094

  4. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium intracellulare Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis, Mycobacteria Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Typing, and Multilocus Sequence Typing: Molecular Characterization and Comparison of Each Typing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Semi; Lim, Nara; Kwon, Seungjik; Shim, Taesun; Park, Misun; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Seonghan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mycobacterium intracellulare is the major causative agent of nontuberculous mycobacteria-related pulmonary infections. The strain typing of M. intracellulare is important for the treatment and control of its infections. We compared the discrimination capacity and effective value of four different molecular typing methods. Methods Antibiotic susceptibility testing, hsp65 and rpoB sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mycobacteria interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR), and VNTR assay targeting 44 M. intracellulare isolates obtained from patients with pulmonary infections were performed. Results All the antibiotic susceptibility patterns had no association with the molecular and sequence types tested in this study; however, the molecular and sequence types were related with each other. PFGE gave best results for discriminatory capacity, followed by VNTR, MLST, and MIRU-VNTR. Conclusion The high discriminatory power of PFGE, VNTR, and MLST is enough for differentiating between reinfection and relapse, as well as for other molecular epidemiological usages. The MLST could be regarded as a representative classification method, because it showed the clearest relation with the sequence types. PMID:25180144

  5. Drug-resistant tuberculosis can be predicted by Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit locus

    PubMed Central

    Yu-feng, Wen; Chao, Jiang; Xian-feng, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether MIRU-VNTR (Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit-Variable Number of Tandem Repeat) is associated with drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The purpose of this study was to explore the ability of 24 MIRU loci to predict the drug resistance of Isoniazid (INH), Rifampicin (RFP), Streptomycin (SM), Ethambutol (EMB) and Pyrazinamide (PZA). We collected the drug resistance and MIRU loci information of 109 strains of M. tuberculosis from an open database. The results of multivariate logistic regression showed that the VNTR polymorphism of MTUB04 was related to INH resistance [odds ratio (OR) = 2.82, P = 0.00], RFP resistance (OR = 1.91, P = 0.02), SM resistance (OR = 1.98, P = 0.01) and EMB resistance (OR = 1.95, P = 0.03). MIRU40 was associated with INH resistance (OR = 2.22, P = 0.00). MTUB21 was connected with INH resistance (OR = 1.63, P = 0.02) and SM resistance (OR = 1.69, P = 0.01). MIRU26 was correlated with SM resistance (OR = 1.52, P = 0.04). MIRU39 was associated with EMB resistance (OR = 4.07, P = 0.02). The prediction power of MIRU loci were 0.84, 0.70, 0.85, and 0.74 respectively for INH (predicted by MTUB04, MIRU20, and MTUB21), RFP (predicted by MTUB04), SM (predicted by MTUB21 and MIRU26) and EMB (MTUB04 and MIRU39) through ROC analysis. Our results showed that MIRU loci were related to anti-tuberculosis drug and could predict the drug resistance of tuberculosis. PMID:25759689

  6. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing and mutational profile for multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis surveillance in Portugal: a 3-year period overview.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carla; Perdigão, João; Jordão, Luísa; Portugal, Isabel

    2014-12-01

    Multidrug tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) cases constitute a serious health problem in Portugal, of which the majority of isolates belong to the Lisboa family and the Q1 cluster, highly related to the Lisboa family. Here we sought to investigate the molecular basis of resistant TB as well as to determine the prevalence of specific drug resistance mutations and their association with MDR-TB and/or XDR-TB. In total, 74 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Lisbon Health Region were genotyped by 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR), and the mutational profile associated with first- and second-line drug resistance was studied. Seven new mutations were found, whilst the remaining 28 mutations had been previously associated with drug resistance. None of the mutations was specifically associated with MDR-TB. The mutational patterns observed among isolates belonging to Lisboa3 and Q1 clusters were also observed in isolates with unique MIRU-VNTR patterns but closely related to these strains. Such data suggest that the genotyping technique employed discriminates isolates with the same mutational profile. To establish the most adequate genotyping technique, the discriminatory power of three different MIRU-VNTR sets was analysed. The 15-loci MIRU-VNTR set showed adequate discriminatory power, comparable with the 24-loci set, allowing clustering of 60% and 86% of the MDR-TB and XDR-TB isolates, respectively, the majority of which belonged to the Lisboa3 and Q1 clusters. From an epidemiological standpoint, this study suggests combined mutational and genotyping analysis as a valuable tool for drug resistance surveillance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  7. Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit Can Predict Drug Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xian-Feng; Jiang, Chao; Zhang, Min; Xia, Dan; Chu, Li-Li; Wen, Yu-Feng; Zhu, Ming; Jiang, Yue-Gen

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit (MIRU) was supposed to be associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), but whether the association exists actually in local strains in China was still unknown. This research was conducted to explore that association and the predictability of MIRU to drug resistance of Tuberculosis (TB). The clinical isolates were collected and the susceptibility test were conducted with Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) medium for five anti-TB drug. Based on PCR of MIRU-VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeat) genotyping, we tested the number of the repeat unite of MIRU. Then, we used logistic regression to evaluate the association between 15 MIRU and drug resistance. In addition, we explored the most suitable MIRU locus of identified MIRU loci for drug resistance by multivariate logistic regression. Of the 102 strains, one isolate was resistant to rifampicin and one isolate was resistant to streptomycin. Among these fifteen MIRU, there was a association between MIRU loci polymorphism and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance, ETRB (P = 0.03, OR = 0.19, 95% CI 0.05-0.81) and ETRC (P = 0.01, OR = 0.14, 95% CI 0.03-0.64) were negatively related to isoniazid resistance; MIRU20 (P = 0.05, OR = 2.87, 95% CI 1.01-8.12) was positively associated with ethambutol resistance; and QUB11a (P = 0.02, OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.65-0.96) was a negative association factor of p-aminosalicylic acid resistance. Our research showed that MIRU loci may predict drug resistance of tuberculosis in China. However, the mechanism still needs further exploration.

  8. Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit Can Predict Drug Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xian-feng; Jiang, Chao; Zhang, Min; Xia, Dan; Chu, Li-li; Wen, Yu-feng; Zhu, Ming; Jiang, Yue-gen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit (MIRU) was supposed to be associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), but whether the association exists actually in local strains in China was still unknown. This research was conducted to explore that association and the predictability of MIRU to drug resistance of Tuberculosis (TB). Methods: The clinical isolates were collected and the susceptibility test were conducted with Lowenstein–Jensen (LJ) medium for five anti-TB drug. Based on PCR of MIRU-VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeat) genotyping, we tested the number of the repeat unite of MIRU. Then, we used logistic regression to evaluate the association between 15 MIRU and drug resistance. In addition, we explored the most suitable MIRU locus of identified MIRU loci for drug resistance by multivariate logistic regression. Results: Of the 102 strains, one isolate was resistant to rifampicin and one isolate was resistant to streptomycin. Among these fifteen MIRU, there was a association between MIRU loci polymorphism and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance, ETRB (P = 0.03, OR = 0.19, 95% CI 0.05–0.81) and ETRC (P = 0.01, OR = 0.14, 95% CI 0.03–0.64) were negatively related to isoniazid resistance; MIRU20 (P = 0.05, OR = 2.87, 95% CI 1.01–8.12) was positively associated with ethambutol resistance; and QUB11a (P = 0.02, OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.65–0.96) was a negative association factor of p-aminosalicylic acid resistance. Conclusion: Our research showed that MIRU loci may predict drug resistance of tuberculosis in China. However, the mechanism still needs further exploration. PMID:27047485

  9. High-Throughput Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit–Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Genotyping for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bidault, Floriane; Mosnier, Amandine; Bablishvili, Nino; Tukvadze, Nestani; Somphavong, Silaphet; Paboriboune, Phimpha; Ocheretina, Oksana; Pape, Jean William; Paranhos-Baccala, Glaucia; Berland, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis (TB) represents a major public health concern. Understanding the transmission routes of the disease is a key factor for its control and for the implementation of efficient interventions. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) marker typing is a well-described method for lineage identification and transmission tracking. However, the conventional manual genotyping technique is cumbersome and time-consuming and entails many risks for errors, thus hindering its implementation and dissemination. We describe here a new approach using the QIAxcel system, an automated high-throughput capillary electrophoresis system that also carries out allele calling. This automated method was assessed on 1,824 amplicons from 82 TB isolates and tested with sets of markers of 15 or 24 loci. Overall allele-calling concordance between the methods from 140 to 1,317 bp was 98.9%. DNA concentrations and repeatability and reproducibility performances showed no biases in allele calling. Furthermore, turnaround time using this automated system was reduced by 81% compared to the conventional manual agarose gel method. In sum, this new automated method facilitates MIRU-VNTR genotyping and provides reliable results. Therefore, it is well suited for field genotyping. The implementation of this method will help to achieve accurate and cost-effective epidemiological studies, especially in countries with a high prevalence of TB, where the high number of strains complicates the surveillance of circulating lineages and requires efficient interventions to be carried out in an urgent manner. PMID:25428144

  10. The use of variable-number tandem-repeat mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing to identify laboratory cross-contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Jou; Jou, Ruwen; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Yang, Mei-Lin; Chen, Hung-Mo

    2005-05-01

    A retrospective study including 515 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 215 patients was conducted to investigate possible laboratory contamination with M. tuberculosis over a 1-year period in a university hospital. All cultures underwent variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) typing. Cultures suspected of being contaminated in the VNTR analysis and possible sources of contamination underwent mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU) typing further. Overall, 8 (3.7%) cases of 215 patients were considered possible false-positives. Five (2.3%) cultures might be contaminated during initial batching processing, and 1 (0.5%) and 4 (1.9%) cultures of them were further classified as presumed and possible cases, respectively, of cross-contamination on clinical grounds. Three (1.4%) cultures might be contaminated by cultures that had been processed in species identification procedures in the same laminar-flow hood. The 2-step strategy using VNTR and MIRU analyses in combination in this study appears to be a valuable means for the study of false-positive cultures.

  11. Proposal of a Consensus Set of Hypervariable Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit–Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Loci for Subtyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Allix-Béguec, Caroline; Wahl, Céline; Hanekom, Madeleine; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Drobniewski, Francis; Maeda, Shinji; Campos-Herrero, Isolina; Mokrousov, Igor; Niemann, Stefan; Kontsevaya, Irina; Rastogi, Nalin; Samper, Sofia; Sng, Li-Hwei; Warren, Robin M.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains represent targets of special importance for molecular surveillance of tuberculosis (TB), especially because they are associated with spread of multidrug resistance in some world regions. Standard 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing lacks resolution power for accurately discriminating closely related clones that often compose Beijing strain populations. Therefore, we evaluated a set of 7 additional, hypervariable MIRU-VNTR loci for better resolution and tracing of such strains, using a collection of 535 Beijing isolates from six world regions where these strains are known to be prevalent. The typeability and interlaboratory reproducibility of these hypervariable loci were lower than those of the 24 standard loci. Three loci (2163a, 3155, and 3336) were excluded because of their redundant variability and/or more frequent noninterpretable results compared to the 4 other markers. The use of the remaining 4-locus set (1982, 3232, 3820, and 4120) increased the number of types by 52% (from 223 to 340) and reduced the clustering rate from 58.3 to 36.6%, when combined with the use of the standard 24-locus set. Known major clonal complexes/24-locus-based clusters were all subdivided, although the degree of subdivision varied depending on the complex. Only five single-locus variations were detected among the hypervariable loci of an additional panel of 92 isolates, representing 15 years of clonal spread of a single Beijing strain in a geographically restricted setting. On this calibrated basis, we propose this 4-locus set as a consensus for subtyping Beijing clonal complexes and clusters, after standard typing. PMID:24172154

  12. Mixed-strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections among patients dying in a hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ted; Wilson, Douglas; Wallengren, Kristina; Samuel, Elizabeth Y; Murray, Megan

    2011-01-01

    We performed spoligotyping and 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing on M. tuberculosis culture-positive biopsy specimens collected from adults dying in a hospital in KwaZulu-Natal. Of 56 culture-positive samples genotyped, we detected mixed strains in five (9%) and clonal heterogeneity in an additional four (7%).

  13. Mixed-Strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections among Patients Dying in a Hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa▿

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ted; Wilson, Douglas; Wallengren, Kristina; Samuel, Elizabeth Y.; Murray, Megan

    2011-01-01

    We performed spoligotyping and 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing on M. tuberculosis culture-positive biopsy specimens collected from adults dying in a hospital in KwaZulu-Natal. Of 56 culture-positive samples genotyped, we detected mixed strains in five (9%) and clonal heterogeneity in an additional four (7%). PMID:20980576

  14. Assessment of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-QUB markers to further discriminate the Beijing genotype in a population-based study of the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, Japan.

    PubMed

    Millet, Julie; Miyagi-Shiohira, Chika; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Sola, Christophe; Rastogi, Nalin

    2007-11-01

    The present investigation focused on genetic diversity and drug resistance of 101 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated between July 2003 and February 2005 in the Okinawa prefecture, Ryukyu Islands, Japan. A high rate of clustering (87%, eight clusters, 2 to 69 strains/cluster) was observed upon spoligotyping; most of it was due to the lower discriminatory power of this method for the Beijing lineage (n = 72; 71.3% of the isolates). The remaining diversity was limited to seven clusters (two to five isolates/cluster), with the following distribution of major lineages: ill-defined T (n = 13; 12.8%), ancestral East African-Indian (n = 6; 5.9%), Haarlem (n = 4; 4%), Latin American-Mediterranean (n = 2; 2%), X1 (n = 1; 1%), and a total absence of the central Asian clade. Three remaining strains could not be classified on the basis of their spoligotype pattern and were labeled "unknown." Subtyping with mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRUs) in association with additional QUB minisatellites was performed to discriminate among the Beijing strains. Based on an "in-house" spoligotyping/MIRU database (n = 694 Beijing strains), eight highly discriminative MIRU loci for Beijing strains were selected (loci numbered 10, 16, 23, 26, 27, 31, 39, and 40). The highest discriminatory power (h) observed in our sample (n = 72; M-26, 0.385; M-10, 0.38; M-31, 0.255; M-16, 0.238) was too low, and 73.6% of the Beijing strains from Okinawa remained clustered. Typing of Beijing strains with additional QUB loci (with the exception of "one-copy" QUB-1451) resulted in higher discriminatory powers: QUB-11b, 0.68; QUB-11a, 0.656; QUB-26, 0.644; QUB-18, 0.553; QUB-4156, 0.5; and QUB-1895, 0.453. A definitive algorithm on the use of QUB markers to subtype Beijing isolates in expanded studies would shed light on their hypervariability, which may sometimes blur recognition between epidemiologically linked Beijing isolates. The total absence of multiple drug resistance among Beijing

  15. Assessment of Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit-QUB Markers To Further Discriminate the Beijing Genotype in a Population-Based Study of the Genetic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates from Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, Japan▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Julie; Miyagi-Shiohira, Chika; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Sola , Christophe; Rastogi, Nalin

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation focused on genetic diversity and drug resistance of 101 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated between July 2003 and February 2005 in the Okinawa prefecture, Ryukyu Islands, Japan. A high rate of clustering (87%, eight clusters, 2 to 69 strains/cluster) was observed upon spoligotyping; most of it was due to the lower discriminatory power of this method for the Beijing lineage (n = 72; 71.3% of the isolates). The remaining diversity was limited to seven clusters (two to five isolates/cluster), with the following distribution of major lineages: ill-defined T (n = 13; 12.8%), ancestral East African-Indian (n = 6; 5.9%), Haarlem (n = 4; 4%), Latin American-Mediterranean (n = 2; 2%), X1 (n = 1; 1%), and a total absence of the central Asian clade. Three remaining strains could not be classified on the basis of their spoligotype pattern and were labeled “unknown.” Subtyping with mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRUs) in association with additional QUB minisatellites was performed to discriminate among the Beijing strains. Based on an “in-house” spoligotyping/MIRU database (n = 694 Beijing strains), eight highly discriminative MIRU loci for Beijing strains were selected (loci numbered 10, 16, 23, 26, 27, 31, 39, and 40). The highest discriminatory power (h) observed in our sample (n = 72; M-26, 0.385; M-10, 0.38; M-31, 0.255; M-16, 0.238) was too low, and 73.6% of the Beijing strains from Okinawa remained clustered. Typing of Beijing strains with additional QUB loci (with the exception of “one-copy” QUB-1451) resulted in higher discriminatory powers: QUB-11b, 0.68; QUB-11a, 0.656; QUB-26, 0.644; QUB-18, 0.553; QUB-4156, 0.5; and QUB-1895, 0.453. A definitive algorithm on the use of QUB markers to subtype Beijing isolates in expanded studies would shed light on their hypervariability, which may sometimes blur recognition between epidemiologically linked Beijing isolates. The total absence of multiple drug resistance

  16. PyroTyping, a novel pyrosequencing-based assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotyping.

    PubMed

    Molina-Moya, B; Lacoma, A; García-Sierra, N; Blanco, S; Haba, L; Samper, S; Ruiz-Manzano, J; Prat, C; Arnold, C; Domínguez, J

    2017-07-28

    We developed a novel method, PyroTyping, for discrimination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates combining pyrosequencing and IS6110 polymorphism. A total of 100 isolates were analysed with IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), spoligotyping, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units - variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR), and PyroTyping. PyroTyping results regarding clustering or discrimination of the isolates were highly concordant with the other typing methods performed. PyroTyping is more rapid than RFLP and presents the same discriminatory power, thus, it may be useful for taking timely decisions for tuberculosis control.

  17. Feline mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gunn-Moore, Danièlle A

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacteria of feline importance include (1) obligate pathogens (tuberculosis), (2) mycobacteria that are difficult to grow, so the environmental niche is unknown (feline leprosy syndrome), and (3) facultative pathogenic opportunistic saprophytes (non-tuberculous mycobacteriosis). Most cats present with cutaneous disease, although some have systemic involvement. Diagnosis is challenging because there are no pathognomonic histopathological changes and many mycobacteria fail to culture, so molecular diagnostics are required. Treatment can involve extended multidrug therapy and prognosis is variable. This article reviews the microbiology, clinical diagnosis, management and prognosis of feline mycobacterial infections.

  18. Nontuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Sheng; Hu, Fei-Shu; Yu, Hai-Ying; Xu, Kai-Jin; Zheng, Bei-Wen; Ji, Zhong-Kang; Li, Jun-Jie; Deng, Mei; Hu, Hai-Yang; Sheng, Ji-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteomyelitis caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can have severe consequences and a poor prognosis. Physicians therefore need to be alert to this condition, especially in immunocompromised patients. Although the pathogenesis of NTM osteomyelitis is still unclear, studies in immunodeficient individuals have revealed close relationships between NTM osteomyelitis and defects associated with the interleukin-12–interferon-γ–tumor necrosis factor-α axis, as well as human immunodeficiency virus infection, various immunosuppressive conditions, and diabetes mellitus. Culture and species identification from tissue biopsies or surgical debridement tissue play crucial roles in diagnosing NTM osteomyelitis. Suitable imaging examinations are also important. Adequate surgical debridement and the choice of appropriate, combined antibiotics for long-term anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy, based on in vitro drug susceptibility tests, are the main therapies for these bone infections. Bacillus Calmette–Guerin vaccination might have limited prophylactic value. The use of multiple drugs and long duration of treatment mean that the therapeutic process needs to be monitored closely to detect potential side effects. Adequate duration of anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy together with regular monitoring with blood and imaging tests are key factors determining the recovery outcome in patients with NTM osteomyelitis. PMID:25915177

  19. Nontuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Hu, Fei-Shu; Yu, Hai-Ying; Xu, Kai-Jin; Zheng, Bei-Wen; Ji, Zhong-Kang; Li, Jun-Jie; Deng, Mei; Hu, Hai-Yang; Sheng, Ji-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Osteomyelitis caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can have severe consequences and a poor prognosis. Physicians therefore need to be alert to this condition, especially in immunocompromised patients. Although the pathogenesis of NTM osteomyelitis is still unclear, studies in immunodeficient individuals have revealed close relationships between NTM osteomyelitis and defects associated with the interleukin-12-interferon-γ-tumor necrosis factor-α axis, as well as human immunodeficiency virus infection, various immunosuppressive conditions, and diabetes mellitus. Culture and species identification from tissue biopsies or surgical debridement tissue play crucial roles in diagnosing NTM osteomyelitis. Suitable imaging examinations are also important. Adequate surgical debridement and the choice of appropriate, combined antibiotics for long-term anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy, based on in vitro drug susceptibility tests, are the main therapies for these bone infections. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination might have limited prophylactic value. The use of multiple drugs and long duration of treatment mean that the therapeutic process needs to be monitored closely to detect potential side effects. Adequate duration of anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy together with regular monitoring with blood and imaging tests are key factors determining the recovery outcome in patients with NTM osteomyelitis.

  20. [Biologics and mycobacterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Tomoshige

    2013-03-01

    Various biologics such as TNF-alpha inhibitor or IL-6 inhibitor are now widely used for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Many reports suggested that one of the major issues is high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB) associated with using these agents, which is especially important in Japan where tuberculosis still remains endemic. Another concern is the risk of development of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) diseases and we have only scanty information about it. The purpose of this symposium is to elucidate the role of biologics in the development of mycobacterial diseases and to establish the strategy to control them. First, Dr. Tohma showed the epidemiologic data of TB risks associated with using biologics calculated from the clinical database on National Database of Rheumatic Diseases by iR-net in Japan. He estimated TB risks in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients to be about four times higher compared with general populations and to become even higher by using biologics. He also pointed out a low rate of implementation of QuantiFERON test (QFT) as screening test for TB infection. Next, Dr. Tokuda discussed the issue of NTM disease associated with using biologics. He suggested the airway disease in RA patients might play some role in the development of NTM disease, which may conversely lead to overdiagnosis of NTM disease in RA patients. He suggested that NTM disease should not be uniformly considered a contraindication to treatment with biologics, considering from the results of recent multicenter study showing relatively favorable outcome of NTM patients receiving biologics. Patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) should receive LTBI treatment before starting biologics. Dr. Kato, a chairperson of the Prevention Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis, proposed a new LTBI guideline including active implementation of LTBI treatment, introducing interferon gamma release assay, and appropriate selection of persons at high risk for

  1. Phosphorylation regulates mycobacterial proteasome.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Tripti; Han, Jaeil; Baun, Heather; Nyayapathy, Seeta; Brown, Jacob T; Dial, Rebekah L; Moltalvo, Juan A; Kim, Min-Seon; Yang, Seung Hwan; Ronning, Donald R; Husson, Robert N; Suh, Joowon; Kang, Choong-Min

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a proteasome system that is required for the microbe to resist elimination by the host immune system. Despite the importance of the proteasome in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms by which proteasome activity is controlled remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the α-subunit (PrcA) of the M. tuberculosis proteasome is phosphorylated by the PknB kinase at three threonine residues (T84, T202, and T178) in a sequential manner. Furthermore, the proteasome with phosphorylated PrcA enhances the degradation of Ino1, a known proteasomal substrate, suggesting that PknB regulates the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Previous studies showed that depletion of the proteasome and the proteasome-associated proteins decreases resistance to reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) but increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we show that PknA phosphorylation of unprocessed proteasome β-subunit (pre-PrcB) and α-subunit reduces the assembly of the proteasome complex and thereby enhances the mycobacterial resistance to H2O2 and that H2O2 stress diminishes the formation of the proteasome complex in a PknA-dependent manner. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of the M. tuberculosis proteasome not only modulates proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but also affects the proteasome complex formation contributing to the survival of M. tuberculosis under oxidative stress conditions.

  2. Pulmonary Mycobacterial Granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Shaler, Christopher R.; Kugathasan, Kapilan; McCormick, Sarah; Damjanovic, Daniela; Horvath, Carly; Small, Cherrie-Lee; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Ping-Chang; Xing, Zhou

    2011-01-01

    The granuloma, a hallmark of host defense against pulmonary mycobacterial infection, has long been believed to be an active type 1 immune environment. However, the mechanisms regarding why granuloma fails to eliminate mycobacteria even in immune-competent hosts, have remained largely unclear. By using a model of pulmonary Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) infection, we have addressed this issue by comparing the immune responses within the airway luminal and granuloma compartments. We found that despite having a similar immune cellular profile to that in the airway lumen, the granuloma displayed severely suppressed type 1 immune cytokine but enhanced chemokine responses. Both antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T cells in granuloma produced fewer type 1 immune molecules including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and nitric oxide. As a result, the granuloma APCs developed a reduced capacity to phagocytose mycobacteria and to induce T-cell proliferation. To examine the molecular mechanisms, we compared the levels of immune suppressive cytokine IL-10 in the airway lumen and granuloma and found that both granuloma APCs and T cells produced much more IL-10. Thus, IL-10 deficiency restored type 1 immune activation within the granuloma while having a minimal effect within the airway lumen. Hence, our study provides the first experimental evidence that, contrary to the conventional belief, the BCG-induced lung granuloma represents a symbiotic host-microbe microenvironment characterized by suppressed type 1 immune activation. PMID:21406169

  3. Mycobacterial endocarditis: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Shi-Min, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective A systematic analysis was made in view of the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and main outcomes of mycobacterial endocarditis. Methods The data source of the present study was based on a comprehensive literature search in MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google search engine for publications on mycobacterial endocarditis published between 2000 and 2013. Results The rapidly growing mycobacteria become the predominant pathogens with Mycobacterium chelonae being the most common. This condition has changed significantly in terms of epidemiology since the 21st century, with more broad patient age range, longer latency, prevailed mitral valve infections and better prognosis. Conclusion Mycobacterial endocarditis is rare and the causative pathogens are predominantly the rapidly growing mycobacteria. Amikacin, ciprofloxacin and clarithromycin are the most frequently used targeted antimicrobial agents but often show poor responses. Patients with deep infections may warrant a surgical operation or line withdrawal. With periodic multidrug therapy guided by drug susceptibility testing, and surgical managements, patients may achieve good therapeutic results. PMID:25859873

  4. Therapy of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Jogi, Reena; Tyring, Stephen K

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterial infections are increasing in incidence worldwide, partly as a result of the increase in immunocompromised individuals. They cause a large number of cutaneous infections with a broad array of manifestations. Because of their diverse manifestations and sometimes fastidious nature, infections with mycobacteria are often misdiagnosed, leading to delay in and sometimes failure of therapy. In addition, many mycobacteria display both in vitro and in vivo drug resistance to antimicrobial agents. Early recognition of affected patients, initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy based on current guidelines, and tailoring of therapy after susceptibility testing is available are therefore essential to the successful treatment of mycobacterial infections.

  5. Ascertaining in vivo virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages in patients in Mbeya, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Olaru, I D; Rachow, A; Lange, C; Ntinginya, N E; Reither, K; Hoelscher, M; Vollrath, O; Niemann, S

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the degree of immunodeficiency indicated by the number of circulating CD4+ T-cells and Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages identified by spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats genotyping in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals with pulmonary tuberculosis from Mbeya, Tanzania. Of M. tuberculosis strains from 129 patients, respectively 55 (42.6%) and 37 (28.7%) belonged to Latin American Mediterranean and Delhi/Central-Asian lineages, while 37 (28.7%) patients were infected with other strains. There was no difference in the distribution of M. tuberculosis lineages among patients with early or advanced stages of HIV infection (P = 0.785), indicating that the virulence of strains from these lineages may not be substantially different in vivo.

  6. A database for animal tuberculosis (mycoDB.es) within the context of the Spanish national programme for eradication of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Campos, Sabrina; González, Sergio; de Juan, Lucía; Romero, Beatriz; Bezos, Javier; Casal, Carmen; Álvarez, Julio; Fernández-de-Mera, Isabel G; Castellanos, Elena; Mateos, Ana; Sáez-Llorente, José L; Domínguez, Lucas; Aranaz, Alicia

    2012-06-01

    Spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analysis are the international standard techniques for molecular typing of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. To enable the exploitation of molecular typing data for epidemiological purposes, the creation of large databases is indispensable. Here we describe mycoDB.es, a database for animal tuberculosis which forms part of the Spanish national programme for eradication of bovine tuberculosis. This database has been created as an epidemiological tool at national level and contains spoligotype patterns of 17,273 isolates clustered in 401 different spoligotypes of Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium caprae and M. tuberculosis. The database offers an overview of the present spoligotypes, to a lower extent also of MIRU-VNTR types, affected animal species and furthermore of the spatial distribution of these genotypes.

  7. Highly structured genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis population in Djibouti.

    PubMed

    Godreuil, S; Renaud, F; Choisy, M; Depina, J J; Garnotel, E; Morillon, M; Van de Perre, P; Bañuls, A L

    2010-07-01

    Djibouti is an East African country with a high tuberculosis incidence. This study was conducted over a 2-month period in Djibouti, during which 62 consecutive patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) were included. Genetic characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit variable-number tandem-repeat typing and spoligotyping, was performed. The genetic and phylogenetic analysis revealed only three major families (Central Asian, East African Indian and T). The high diversity and linkage disequilibrium within each family suggest a long period of clonal evolution. A Bayesian approach shows that the phylogenetic structure observed in our sample of 62 isolates is very likely to be representative of the phylogenetic structure of the M. tuberculosis population in the total number of TB cases.

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium bovis Isolates with the Same Spoligotyping Profile as Isolates from Animals†

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Beatriz; Aranaz, Alicia; Juan, Lucía de; Álvarez, Julio; Bezos, Javier; Mateos, Ana; Gómez-Mampaso, Enrique; Domínguez, Lucas

    2006-01-01

    PCR-based characterization techniques have been adopted in most laboratories for Mycobacterium bovis typing. We report a molecular characterization of human multidrug-resistant M. bovis isolates and three bovine isolates that share the spoligotyping profile. The analysis of the direct repeat region showed that both groups differed in the presence of spacers not included in the current membrane. They were also distinguished by two out of the nine mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit variable-number tandem repeat loci tested, indicating that the human infection was not acquired from the cattle from which isolates were obtained. These results highlight that a combination of techniques is required for appropriate discrimination, even for those spoligotypes that have a low frequency. PMID:16954286

  9. Molecular typing of Mycobacterium bovis isolates: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Daniela Fernandes; Tavares, Lucas; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the main causative agent of animal tuberculosis (TB) and it may cause TB in humans. Molecular typing of M. bovis isolates provides precise epidemiological data on issues of inter- or intra-herd transmission and wildlife reservoirs. Techniques used for typing M. bovis have evolved over the last 2 decades, and PCR-based methods such as spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) have been extensively used. These techniques can provide epidemiological information about isolates of M. Bovis that may help control bovine TB by indicating possible links between diseased animals, detecting and sampling outbreaks, and even demonstrating cases of laboratory cross-contamination between samples. This review will focus on techniques used for the molecular typing of M. bovis and discuss their general aspects and applications. PMID:25242917

  10. Characterization of IS6110 insertions in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Turcios, L; Casart, Y; Florez, I; de Waard, J; Salazar, L

    2009-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with identical IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns are considered to be clonally related. The presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region, one preferential locus for the integration of IS6110, was evaluated in 125 M. tuberculosis isolates. Five isolates had IS6110 inserted in this region, and two consisted of a mix of isogenic strains that putatively have evolved during a single infection. Strains from the same isolate had identical spoligo and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat profiles, but had slight variations in IS6110 RFLP patterns, due to the presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region. Duplication of the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region was found in one isogenic strain.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Single Outpatient Clinic in Panama City Exhibit Wide Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Almengor, Pedro; Domínguez, Amada; Vega, Silvio; Goodridge, Amador

    2014-01-01

    Understanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis biodiversity and transmission is significant for tuberculosis control. This short report aimed to determine the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates from an outpatient clinic in Panama City. A total of 62 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped by 12 loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Forty-five (72.6%) of the isolates showed unique MIRU-VNTR genotypes, and 13 (21%) of the isolates were grouped into four clusters. Four isolates showed polyclonal MIRU-VNTR genotypes. The MIRU-VNTR Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index reached 0.988. The Spoligotyping analysis revealed 16 M. tuberculosis families, including Latin American-Mediterranean, Harlem, and Beijing. These findings suggest a wide genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates at one outpatient clinic. A detailed molecular epidemiology survey is now warranted, especially following second massive immigration for local Panama Canal expansion activities. PMID:24865686

  12. Recent transmission of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a prison population in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Reis, Ana Julia; David, Simone Maria Martini de; Nunes, Luciana de Souza; Valim, Andreia Rosane de Moura; Possuelo, Lia Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional, retrospective study, characterized by classical and molecular epidemiology, involving M. tuberculosis isolates from a regional prison in southern Brazil. Between January of 2011 and August of 2014, 379 prisoners underwent sputum smear microscopy and culture; 53 (13.9%) were diagnosed with active tuberculosis. Of those, 8 (22.9%) presented with isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis. Strain genotyping was carried out by 15-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem-repeat analysis; 68.6% of the patients were distributed into five clusters, and 87.5% of the resistant cases were in the same cluster. The frequency of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases and the rate of recent transmission were high. Our data suggest the need to implement an effective tuberculosis control program within the prison system. RESUMO Estudo transversal, retrospectivo, com isolados de M. tuberculosis de pacientes de um presídio regional no sul do Brasil, caracterizado através de epidemiologia clássica e molecular. Entre janeiro de 2011 e agosto de 2014, 379 detentos foram submetidos a baciloscopia e cultura, sendo 53 (13,9%) diagnosticados com tuberculose ativa. Desses, 8 (22,9%) apresentavam tuberculose resistente a isoniazida. A genotipagem das cepas foi realizada por 15-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeat analysis; 68,6% dos pacientes estavam distribuídos em cinco clusters, e 87,5% dos casos resistentes estavam em um mesmo cluster. Verificou-se uma frequência elevada de casos de resistência e alta taxa de transmissão recente. Estes dados sugerem a necessidade da implantação de um programa efetivo de controle da tuberculose no sistema prisional.

  13. Mycobacterial manipulation of vacuolar sorting.

    PubMed

    Philips, Jennifer A

    2008-12-01

    Approximately one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the World Health Organization estimates 1.6 million deaths were caused by M. tuberculosis in 2005. The enormous worldwide burden of disease underscores the proficiency by which M. tuberculosis is able to evade eradication by the host, subverting innate and adaptive defences. At the cellular level, mycobacteria are able to modulate macrophage defences by altering phagosome maturation. This review focuses on the bacterial proteins and lipids that are important in establishing the mycobacterial replicative niche. While there is a detailed molecular description of the vacuole and an increasing number of bacterial effectors have been implicated in creating this compartment, exactly how they intersect host cell processes remains ill-defined. However, the emerging picture is that an array of lipid and protein effectors collaborate to create and maintain the mycobacterial phagosome.

  14. Therapy of environmental mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Fabroni, Caterina; Buggiani, Gionata; Lotti, Torello

    2008-01-01

    Environmental mycobacteria are the causative factors of an increasing number of infections worldwide. Cutaneous infections as a result of environmental mycobacteria are often misdiagnosed, and their treatment is difficult because these agents can show in vivo and in vitro multidrug resistance. The most common environmental mycobacteria that can cause cutaneous infections are Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium marinum. All mycobacteria are characterized by low pathogenicity and they can contaminate affected or traumatized skin only in immunocompetent subjects (mainly in fishermen, swimming-pool attendants, and aquarium owners) whereas medical and esthetic procedures are at risk for the infections because of the quick-growing mycobacteria. Immunocompromised subjects can instead easily develop environmental mycobacterial infections of differing degrees of severity.

  15. Body piercing complicated by atypical mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Ferringer, Tammie; Pride, Howard; Tyler, William

    2008-01-01

    Body piercing is a growing trend, especially in young people, but the literature on complications of piercing consists mostly of case reports involving ear piercing. Previous reported complications of piercing include contact dermatitis, keloids, traumatic tearing, viral transmission, and bacterial infections. We report two patients who presented with atypical mycobacterial infections of body piercing sites. It is important to recognize the association of piercing and mycobacterial infections so that tissue can be obtained for histopathologic examination and appropriate culture.

  16. Hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 in hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Jung; White-Cross, Jill A; Shen, Lanlan; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Rashid, Asif

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed the epigenetic alterations are involved in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the function of long interspersed nuclear element-1 hypomethylation in hepatocellular carcinomas, and relationship among other clinicopathologic features, and genetic and epigenetic alterations, including CpG island hypermethylation, have not been studied. We determined long interspersed nuclear element-1 methylation, a marker of global methylation, in 57 tumor and nonneoplastic samples, including 24 from high-risk and 33 from low-risk countries. We compared methylation levels of long interspersed nuclear element-1 with eight CpG islands including p16, cyclooxygenase-2, T-type calcium channel, and estrogen receptor genes, and MINT31, MINT1, MINT2, and MINT27, as well as CpG island methylator phenotype and p53 gene mutation. Most hepatocellular carcinomas samples (88%) showed hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1, with a mean level of global methylation of 58+/-14 compared to 77+/-6 in nonneoplastic hepatic tissue (P<0.001). Levels of long interspersed nuclear element-1 hypomethylation differed depending on geographic location (P=0.02), status of hepatitis (P=0.01), hypermethylation of p16, estrogen receptor and MINT2 (P=0.01, 0.002, and 0.045, respectively), CpG island methylator phenotype-positive status (P=0.006), and p53 gene mutation (P=0.04). In conclusion, environmental factors such as geographic location and hepatitis status contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis through global hypomethylation. In hepatocellular carcinomas, hypermethylation of CpG islands, and CpG island methylator phenotype status seems to correlate with levels of long interspersed nuclear element-1 hypomethylation.

  17. Biosynthesis of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Vitor; Maranha, Ana; Alarico, Susana; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterial pathogenesis is closely associated with a unique cell envelope rich in complex carbohydrates and unique lipids, among which are the mycolic acids. Mycobacteria also synthesize unique intracellular polymethylated polysaccharides (PMPSs), namely methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLPs), which are acylated with short-chain fatty acids, and methylmannose polysaccharides (MMPs). Since PMPSs modulate the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids in vitro, the possibility of a similar role in vivo and the regulation of mycolic acids assembly have been anticipated. Unlike MGLPs, MMPs have been identified in M. smegmatis and other fast-growing mycobacteria but not in M. tuberculosis, implying an essential role for MGLPs in this pathogen and turning the biosynthetic enzymes into attractive drug targets. The genome of M. tuberculosis was decoded 14 years ago but only recently has the identity of the genes involved in MGLPs biosynthesis been investigated. Two gene clusters (Rv1208-Rv1213 and Rv3030-Rv3037c) containing a few genes considered to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, have initially been proposed to coordinate MGLPs biosynthesis. Among these genes, only the product of Rv1208 for the first step in the MGLPs pathway has, so far, been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure been determined. However, recent results indicate that at least three additional clusters may be involved in this pathway. The functional assignment of authentic roles to some of these M. tuberculosis H37Rv genes sheds new light on the intricacy of MGLPs biogenesis and renewed interest on their biological role.

  18. Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium africanum, United States, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aditya; Bloss, Emily; Heilig, Charles M; Click, Eleanor S

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium africanum is endemic to West Africa and causes tuberculosis (TB). We reviewed reported cases of TB in the United States during 2004-2013 that had lineage assigned by genotype (spoligotype and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit variable number tandem repeats). M. africanum caused 315 (0.4%) of 73,290 TB cases with lineage assigned by genotype. TB caused by M. africanum was associated more with persons from West Africa (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 253.8, 95% CI 59.9-1,076.1) and US-born black persons (aOR 5.7, 95% CI 1.2-25.9) than with US-born white persons. TB caused by M. africanum did not show differences in clinical characteristics when compared with TB caused by M. tuberculosis. Clustered cases defined as >2 cases in a county with identical 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit genotypes, were less likely for M. africanum (aOR 0.1, 95% CI 0.1-0.4), which suggests that M. africanum is not commonly transmitted in the United States.

  19. Interspersal Technique and Behavioral Momentum for Reading Word Lists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Matthew K.; Ardoin, Scott P.; Parker, David C.; Hodgson, Jennifer; Klingbeil, David A.; Scholin, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Academic tasks that include easy responses increase the probability that less preferred and/or more challenging tasks will be performed. The current study applied the process of arranging easier stimuli within reading word lists with behavioral momentum and an interspersal technique. We hypothesized that the behavioral momentum condition, which…

  20. Additive Effects From Interspersed Adjunct Questions In Prose Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagaria, Sabato D.; Di Vesta, Francis J.

    A total of 150 undergraduate students randomly assigned to five experimental groups studied ten paragraphs with questions interspersed at different locations in the text. Performance on incidental items was significantly lower (p < .05) in the question before (QB) than in the question after (QA), question before and after (QBA), and the…

  1. Prediction and phylogenetic analysis of mammalian short interspersed elements (SINEs).

    PubMed

    Rogozin, I B; Mayorov, V I; Lavrentieva, M V; Milanesi, L; Adkison, L R

    2000-09-01

    The presence of repetitive elements can create serious problems for sequence analysis, especially in the case of homology searches in nucleotide sequence databases. Repetitive elements should be treated carefully by using special programs and databases. In this paper, various aspects of SINE (short interspersed repetitive element) identification, analysis and evolution are discussed.

  2. Identification of mycobacterial lectins from genomic data.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, M

    2013-04-01

    Sixty-four sequences containing lectin domains with homologs of known three-dimensional structure were identified through a search of mycobacterial genomes. They appear to belong to the β-prism II, the C-type, the Microcystis virdis (MV), and the β-trefoil lectin folds. The first three always occur in conjunction with the LysM, the PI-PLC, and the β-grasp domains, respectively while mycobacterial β-trefoil lectins are unaccompanied by any other domain. Thirty heparin binding hemagglutinins (HBHA), already annotated, have also been included in the study although they have no homologs of known three-dimensional structure. The biological role of HBHA has been well characterized. A comparison between the sequences of the lectin from pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria provides insights into the carbohydrate binding region of the molecule, but the structure of the molecule is yet to be determined. A reasonable picture of the structural features of other mycobacterial proteins containing one or the other of the four lectin domains can be gleaned through the examination of homologs proteins, although the structure of none of them is available. Their biological role is also yet to be elucidated. The work presented here is among the first steps towards exploring the almost unexplored area of the structural biology of mycobacterial lectins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Searches among mycobacterial cultures for antileprosy vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, C C; van Landingham, R; Walker, L L

    1980-01-01

    All mycobacteria species share some antigens, so there may be cultivable mycobacterial cultures that can provide vaccine protection against leprosy. Vaccine protection against Mycobacterium leprae infections in mice has been demonstrated for M. leprae itself, as living or heat-killed suspensions, and for Mycobacterium bovis (BCG), as living suspensions. Results are reported here with 17 other cultures. The mycobacterial suspensions were injected intradermally, and the mice were challenged in the footpad with infectious suspensions of M. leprae. In two experiments the mice were also challenged by footpad injections of 10(7) heat-killed M. leprae so the footpad enlargment could be measured. That some mycobacterial suspensions were immunogenic for some of their own antigens was suggested by reactions at the vaccine site and enlargement of the regional lymph nodes. Some mycobacterial suspensions also stimulated footpad enlargement on challenge by homologous suspensions or by challenge with M. leprae suspensions. Consistent protection against infectious challenge with M. leprae was observed only with BCG and M. leprae, however. PMID:7000701

  4. Mycobacterial signaling through toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Joyoti; Shin, Dong-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2012-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have helped to decipher molecular networks dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, in mycobacteria-infected macrophages. Stimulation of TLRs by mycobacteria and their antigenic components rapidly induces intracellular signaling cascades involved in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, which play important roles in orchestrating proinflammatory responses and innate defense through generation of a variety of antimicrobial effector molecules. Recent studies have provided evidence that mycobacterial TLR-signaling cross talks with other intracellular antimicrobial innate pathways, the autophagy process and functional vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling. In this article we describe recent advances in the recognition, responses, and regulation of mycobacterial signaling through TLRs. PMID:23189273

  5. Metabolomics: Applications and Promise in Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Banoei, Mohammad Mehdi; Winston, Brent W.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, the study of mycobacterial diseases was trapped in culture-based technology that is more than a century old. The use of nucleic acid amplification is changing this, and powerful new technologies are on the horizon. Metabolomics, which is the study of sets of metabolites of both the bacteria and host, is being used to clarify mechanisms of disease, and can identify changes leading to better diagnosis, treatment, and prognostication of mycobacterial diseases. Metabolomic profiles are arrays of biochemical products of genes in their environment. These complex patterns are biomarkers that can allow a more complete understanding of cell function, dysfunction, and perturbation than genomics or proteomics. Metabolomics could herald sweeping advances in personalized medicine and clinical trial design, but the challenges in metabolomics are also great. Measured metabolite concentrations vary with the timing within a condition, the intrinsic biology, the instruments, and the sample preparation. Metabolism profoundly changes with age, sex, variations in gut microbial flora, and lifestyle. Validation of biomarkers is complicated by measurement accuracy, selectivity, linearity, reproducibility, robustness, and limits of detection. The statistical challenges include analysis, interpretation, and description of the vast amount of data generated. Despite these drawbacks, metabolomics provides great opportunity and the potential to understand and manage mycobacterial diseases. PMID:26196272

  6. Cellular inhibitors of long interspersed element 1 and Alu retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Wiegand, Heather L.; Hulme, Amy E.; Garcia-Perez, José L.; O’Shea, K. Sue; Moran, John V.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2006-01-01

    Long interspersed element (LINE) 1 retrotransposons are major genomic parasites that represent ≈17% of the human genome. The LINE-1 ORF2 protein is also responsible for the mobility of Alu elements, which constitute a further ≈11% of genomic DNA. Representative members of each element class remain mobile, and deleterious retrotransposition events can induce spontaneous genetic diseases. Here, we demonstrate that APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B, two members of the APOBEC3 family of human innate antiretroviral resistance factors, can enter the nucleus, where LINE-1 and Alu reverse transcription occurs, and specifically inhibit both LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposition. These data suggest that the APOBEC3 protein family may have evolved, at least in part, to defend the integrity of the human genome against endogenous retrotransposons. PMID:16728505

  7. Short interspersed elements (SINEs) of the Geomyoidea superfamily rodents.

    PubMed

    Gogolevsky, Konstantin P; Kramerov, Dmitri A

    2006-05-24

    A new short interspersed element (SINE) was isolated from the genome of desert kangaroo rat (Dipodomys deserti) using single-primer PCR. This SINE consists of two monomers: the left monomer (IDL) resembles rodent ID element and other tRNAAla(CGC)-derived SINEs, whereas the right one (Geo) shows no similarity with known SINE sequences. PCR and hybridization analyses demonstrated that IDL-Geo SINE is restricted to the rodent superfamily Geomyoidea (families Geomyidea and Heteromyidea). Isolation and analysis of IDL-Geo from California pocket mouse (Chaetodipus californicus) and Botta's pocket gopher (Thomomys bottae) revealed some species-specific features of this SINE family. The structure and evolution of known dimeric SINEs are discussed.

  8. Cellular inhibitors of long interspersed element 1 and Alu retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Wiegand, Heather L; Hulme, Amy E; Garcia-Perez, José L; O'Shea, K Sue; Moran, John V; Cullen, Bryan R

    2006-06-06

    Long interspersed element (LINE) 1 retrotransposons are major genomic parasites that represent approximately 17% of the human genome. The LINE-1 ORF2 protein is also responsible for the mobility of Alu elements, which constitute a further approximately 11% of genomic DNA. Representative members of each element class remain mobile, and deleterious retrotransposition events can induce spontaneous genetic diseases. Here, we demonstrate that APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B, two members of the APOBEC3 family of human innate antiretroviral resistance factors, can enter the nucleus, where LINE-1 and Alu reverse transcription occurs, and specifically inhibit both LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposition. These data suggest that the APOBEC3 protein family may have evolved, at least in part, to defend the integrity of the human genome against endogenous retrotransposons.

  9. Recurrent nontuberculous mycobacterial endophthalmitis: a diagnostic conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, Nandini; Yeaney, Gabrielle; Chung, Mina; Hindman, Holly B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report a case of recurrent nontuberculous mycobacterial endophthalmitis in the context of neurotrophic keratopathy secondary to herpes zoster ophthalmicus that had an atypical presentation and complex course, and highlights the challenges of causative organism identification and therapeutic interventions in this condition. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted to determine the visual outcomes of the patient. Results A 68-year-old pseudophakic male with long-standing neurotrophic keratopathy and perforated descemetocele managed with cyanoacrylate glue and a contact bandage lens in the left eye, began experiencing recurrent episodes of endophthalmitis after undergoing a penetrating keratoplasty. Several therapeutic procedures including an anterior chamber washout, two pars plana vitrectomies, explantation of the posterior chamber intraocular lens and capsular bag, and multiple intravitreal antimicrobial injections, were performed to which he has ultimately responded favorably, with no signs of infection to date and stable visual acuity. The causative organism of his recurrent infections was initially identified as Mycobacterium abscessus through biochemical testing and 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene sequencing; however, repeat polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the 65 kDa heat shock protein (hsp65) gene for experimental purposes confirmed the accurate identification of the organism to be Mycobacterium chelonae. Given the greater reliability of PCR and sequencing of the hsp65 gene over traditional biochemical tests and culture techniques, M. chelonae was likely the infectious agent all along, and the organism was originally misidentified on the basis of less accurate tests. Conclusion Recurrent atypical mycobacterial endophthalmitis requires expedient identification and management to prevent poor visual outcomes. Standard biochemical testing can identify the causative organism but is limited by the inability to distinguish

  10. Type I Interferon Controls Propagation of Long Interspersed Element-1*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qiujing; Carbone, Christopher J.; Katlinskaya, Yuliya V.; Zheng, Hui; Zheng, Ke; Luo, Mengcheng; Wang, P. Jeremy; Greenberg, Roger A.; Fuchs, Serge Y.

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN) including IFNα and IFNβ are critical for the cellular defense against viruses. Here we report that increased levels of IFNβ were found in testes from mice deficient in MOV10L1, a germ cell-specific RNA helicase that plays a key role in limiting the propagation of retrotransposons including Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1). Additional experiments revealed that activation of LINE-1 retrotransposons increases the expression of IFNβ and of IFN-stimulated genes. Conversely, pretreatment of cells with IFN suppressed the replication of LINE-1. Furthermore, the efficacy of LINE-1 replication was increased in isogenic cell lines harboring inactivating mutations in diverse elements of the IFN signaling pathway. Knockdown of the IFN receptor chain IFNAR1 also stimulated LINE-1 propagation in vitro. Finally, a greater accumulation of LINE-1 was found in mice that lack IFNAR1 compared with wild type mice. We propose that LINE-1-induced IFN plays an important role in restricting LINE-1 propagation and discuss the putative role of IFN in preserving the genome stability. PMID:25716322

  11. Type I interferon controls propagation of long interspersed element-1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiujing; Carbone, Christopher J; Katlinskaya, Yuliya V; Zheng, Hui; Zheng, Ke; Luo, Mengcheng; Wang, P Jeremy; Greenberg, Roger A; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2015-04-17

    Type I interferons (IFN) including IFNα and IFNβ are critical for the cellular defense against viruses. Here we report that increased levels of IFNβ were found in testes from mice deficient in MOV10L1, a germ cell-specific RNA helicase that plays a key role in limiting the propagation of retrotransposons including Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1). Additional experiments revealed that activation of LINE-1 retrotransposons increases the expression of IFNβ and of IFN-stimulated genes. Conversely, pretreatment of cells with IFN suppressed the replication of LINE-1. Furthermore, the efficacy of LINE-1 replication was increased in isogenic cell lines harboring inactivating mutations in diverse elements of the IFN signaling pathway. Knockdown of the IFN receptor chain IFNAR1 also stimulated LINE-1 propagation in vitro. Finally, a greater accumulation of LINE-1 was found in mice that lack IFNAR1 compared with wild type mice. We propose that LINE-1-induced IFN plays an important role in restricting LINE-1 propagation and discuss the putative role of IFN in preserving the genome stability.

  12. Network Analysis of Human Genes Influencing Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lipner, Ettie M.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Strong, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections constitute a high burden of pulmonary disease in humans, resulting in over 1.5 million deaths per year. Building on the premise that genetic factors influence the instance, progression, and defense of infectious disease, we undertook a systems biology approach to investigate relationships among genetic factors that may play a role in increased susceptibility or control of mycobacterial infections. We combined literature and database mining with network analysis and pathway enrichment analysis to examine genes, pathways, and networks, involved in the human response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. This approach allowed us to examine functional relationships among reported genes, and to identify novel genes and enriched pathways that may play a role in mycobacterial susceptibility or control. Our findings suggest that the primary pathways and genes influencing mycobacterial infection control involve an interplay between innate and adaptive immune proteins and pathways. Signaling pathways involved in autoimmune disease were significantly enriched as revealed in our networks. Mycobacterial disease susceptibility networks were also examined within the context of gene-chemical relationships, in order to identify putative drugs and nutrients with potential beneficial immunomodulatory or anti-mycobacterial effects. PMID:26751573

  13. Drug Targets in Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Muse, Wilson B.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:17970225

  14. High mycobacterial diversity in recreational lakes.

    PubMed

    Roguet, A; Therial, C; Saad, M; Boudahmane, L; Moulin, L; Lucas, F S

    2016-05-01

    Although nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are natural inhabitants of freshwater ecosystems, few studies have focused on their distribution in these habitats. Thus, the knowledge about the abundance as well as the composition of NTM remains limited and patchy in these environments. In this context, a prospective study was performed to identify favourable habitats for mycobacteria in two recreational lakes. Mycobacterial density and diversity were measured using quantitative real-time PCR and the MiSeq Illumina platform. For both lakes, five compartments were investigated, i.e. water column, air-water interface, sediment, epilithon and epiphyton biofilms. Nontuberculous mycobacteria were detected in all compartments in large densities and displayed a remarkable diversity. NTM were dominated by fast-growing species. Lakes and compartments appeared to shape mycobacteria assemblage composition as well as their densities. In both lakes, some OTUs assigned to the species level were identified as related to known opportunistic pathogens.

  15. [Buruli ulcer--Africa's latest mycobacterial scourge].

    PubMed

    Roupe, Gösta

    2003-11-06

    Buruliulcer is an extensive ulceration usually on the extremities. The ulcer can spread to subcutaneous fat, muscle and even bone causing osteomyelitis and death. It is the the third most common mycobacterial disease in humans after tuberculosis and leprosy. The bacterium grows in still standing water and infects children through small ulcerations in their skin. Mycobacterium ulcerans may also be transmitted by the bite of aquatic bugs (Naucordiae), which harbor the bacterium in their salivary glands. The disease affects poor people in rural, tropical areas where deforestation has led to flooding rivers, stagnant bodies of water and marsh. Benin, Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana in West Africa are seriously hit. Skin transplantation is the treatment of choice. Treatment with antibiotics has been disappointing.

  16. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease mimicking lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the features and clinical implications of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy (PCNB) in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease manifesting as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. Among a cohort of 388 patients with NTM pulmonary disease, 14 patients with clinically and radiologically suspected lung cancer were included in our study. Two chest radiologists evaluated CT features, including lesion type (nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation), morphologic features (margin, degree of enhancement, calcification), and presence of accompanying findings suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease (bronchiectasis with clustered centrilobular nodules or upper-lobe cavitary lesions) by consensus. Diagnostic procedures for microbiologic diagnosis of NTM disease and clinical outcome were reviewed. Incidence of NTM pulmonary disease presenting as solitary nodule/mass (n = 8) or mass-like consolidation (n = 6) was 3.6% (14 of 388). Most lesions were detected incidentally during routine health check-up or evaluation of other disease (11 of 14, 79%). Lesions typically showed poor contrast-enhancement (9 of 12) and internal calcification (6 of 14). No lesions had CT features suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease. All 4 lesions for which PET/CT imaging was performed showed strong fluorodeoxyglucose uptake simulating malignant lesions (mean, 4.9; range, 3.6–7.8). PCNB revealed mycobacterial histology in 6 of 11 specimens and positive culture results were obtained for 7 of 7 specimens. NTM pulmonary disease may present as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. CT features and PCNB are important to diagnose NTM disease mimicking lung cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:27367996

  17. Atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis and bursitis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Zor, Fatih; Kocaoğlu, Murat; Bulakbaşi, Nail

    2009-12-01

    Atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis of the wrist can easily be misdiagnosed as synovial chondromatosis. Both sonography and magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in depicting "rice bodies" within the distended tendon sheaths and bursae of atypical mycobacterial infection. An endemic place for Mycobacterium species and the occupation of the patient should raise the suspicion for the disease. Polymerase chain reaction of the distended tendon fluid is a sensitive, specific and rapid method in identification of the mycobacteria.

  18. Correlations between major risk factors and closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates grouped by three current enotyping procedures: a population-based study in northeast Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Molina-Salinas, Gloria María; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Padilla-Rivas, Gerardo Raymundo; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Torres-de-la-Cruz, Víctor Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Yazmin Berenice; Ortega-García, Jorge Luis; Garza-Treviño, Elsa Nancy; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Becerril-Montes, Pola; Said-Fernández/, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) patients related to a chain of recent TB transmissions were investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates (120) were genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 (R), spacer oligotyping (S) and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (M) methods. The MTB isolates were clustered and the clusters were grouped according to the similarities of their genotypes. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients between the groups of MTB isolates with similar genotypes and those patient characteristics indicating a risk for a pulmonary TB (PTB) chain transmission were ana- lysed. The isolates showing similar genotypes were distributed as follows: SMR (5%), SM (12.5%), SR (1.67%), MR (0%), S (46.67%), M (5%) and R (0%). The remaining 35 cases were orphans. SMR exhibited a significant correlation (p < 0.05) with visits to clinics, municipalities and comorbidities (primarily diabetes mellitus). S correlated with drug consumption and M with comorbidities. SMR is needed to identify a social network in metropolitan areas for PTB transmission and S and M are able to detect risk factors as secondary components of a transmission chain of TB. PMID:25317710

  19. Evaluation of 24-locus MIRU-VNTR genotyping in Mycobacterium tuberculosis cluster investigations in four jurisdictions in the United States, 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Teeter, Larry D; Kammerer, J Steven; Ghosh, Smita; Nguyen, Duc T M; Vempaty, Padmaja; Tapia, Jane; Miramontes, Roque; Cronin, Wendy A; Graviss, Edward A

    2017-09-01

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses a combination of spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping) and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) analyses as part of the National TB Genotyping Service (NTGS). The NTGS expansion from 12-locus MIRU-VNTR (MIRU12) to 24-locus MIRU-VNTR (MIRU24) in 2009 enhanced the ability to discriminate Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. In the current study, we investigated the MIRU24 concordance among epidemiologic-linked tuberculosis (TB) patients in four U.S. health jurisdictions. We also evaluated the programmatic benefits of combining MIRU24 and spoligotyping with epidemiologic evidence in identifying potential recent TB transmission. We examined 342 TB patients in 42 spoligotype/MIRU12 (PCRType) clusters (equivalent to 46 spoligotype/MIRU24 [GENType] clusters) to identify epidemiologic links among cases. GENType clusters, when compared to PCRType clusters, had 12 times higher odds of epidemiologic links being identified if patients were younger than 25 years and 3 times higher odds if patients resided in the same zip code, or had HIV infection. Sixty (18%) fewer PCRType-clustered patients would need investigations if clusters are defined using GENType instead of PCRType. An important advantage of defining clusters by MIRU24 is resource savings related to the reduced number of clustered cases needing investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mycobacterium bovis infection at the interface between domestic and wild animals in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Hang'ombe, Mudenda B; Munyeme, Musso; Nakajima, Chie; Fukushima, Yukari; Suzuki, Haruka; Matandiko, Wigganson; Ishii, Akihiro; Mweene, Aaron S; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2012-11-14

    In Zambia, the presence of bovine tuberculosis in both wild and domestic animals has long been acknowledged and mutual transmission between them has been predicted without any direct evidence. Elucidation of the circulating Mycobacterium bovis strains at wild and domestic animals interphase area in Zambia, where bovine tuberculosis was diagnosed in wildlife seemed to be important. A PCR identified 15 and 37 M. bovis isolates from lechwe and cattle, respectively. Spoligotype analysis revealed that M. bovis strains from lechwe and cattle in Kafue basin clustered into a major node SB0120, where isolates outside the Kafue basin clustered into different nodes of SB0131 and SB0948. The comparatively higher variety of strains in cattle compared to lechwe elucidated by Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units-Variable Number Tandem Repeats analyses are consistent with cattle being the probable source of M. bovis in wild and domestic animals interphase area in Zambia. These results provide strong evidence of M. bovis strains transfer between cattle and lechwe, with the latter having developed into a sylvatic reservoir host.

  1. High incidence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis infection in a zoo population of bongo antelopes (Tragelaphus eurycerus).

    PubMed

    Moravkova, Monika; Mrlik, Vojtech; Parmova, Ilona; Kriz, Petr; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (Mah) infection was diagnosed in 5 captive bongo antelopes (Tragelaphus eurycerus) originating from a collection in a zoological garden. The animals suffered from emaciation. Postmortem examination revealed nodular lesions in the lungs of all 5 examined animals. Acid-fast bacilli were observed in the lungs of 4 animals. Culture and polymerase chain reaction identification based on IS901 negativity and IS1245 positivity confirmed Mah infection in the lungs of all 5 antelopes. In 3 animals, Mah was also isolated from other organs (liver, spleen, and kidney). Molecular analysis of these isolates using IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism and/or mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat revealed that the studied antelopes were infected by 1 identical genotype. Furthermore, in 2 antelopes, other genotypes were also detected. This shows the possibility of either genetic modifications occurring during infection or polyclonal infection. Culture examination of environmental samples from the enclosures holding the bongos revealed Mah in mulch bark, peat, and soil. Genotyping of these environmental isolates determined several genotypes with 1 dominant genotype that was identical to the dominant genotype detected in antelopes.

  2. Multiple large clusters of tuberculosis in London: a cross-sectional analysis of molecular and spatial data.

    PubMed

    Smith, Catherine M; Maguire, Helen; Anderson, Charlotte; Macdonald, Neil; Hayward, Andrew C

    2017-01-01

    Large outbreaks of tuberculosis (TB) represent a particular threat to disease control because they reflect multiple instances of active transmission. The extent to which long chains of transmission contribute to high TB incidence in London is unknown. We aimed to estimate the contribution of large clusters to the burden of TB in London and identify risk factors. We identified TB patients resident in London notified between 2010 and 2014, and used 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat strain typing data to classify cases according to molecular cluster size. We used spatial scan statistics to test for spatial clustering and analysed risk factors through multinomial logistic regression. TB isolates from 7458 patients were included in the analysis. There were 20 large molecular clusters (with n>20 cases), comprising 795 (11%) of all cases; 18 (90%) large clusters exhibited significant spatial clustering. Cases in large clusters were more likely to be UK born (adjusted odds ratio 2.93, 95% CI 2.28-3.77), of black-Caribbean ethnicity (adjusted odds ratio 3.64, 95% CI 2.23-5.94) and have multiple social risk factors (adjusted odds ratio 3.75, 95% CI 1.96-7.16). Large clusters of cases contribute substantially to the burden of TB in London. Targeting interventions such as screening in deprived areas and social risk groups, including those of black ethnicities and born in the UK, should be a priority for reducing transmission.

  3. Comparison of semi-automated commercial rep-PCR fingerprinting, spoligotyping, 12-locus MIRU-VNTR typing and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of the embB gene as molecular typing tools for Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Armas, Federica; Camperio, Cristina; Coltella, Luana; Selvaggini, Serena; Boniotti, Maria Beatrice; Pacciarini, Maria Lodovica; Di Marco Lo Presti, Vincenzo; Marianelli, Cinzia

    2017-08-04

    Highly discriminatory genotyping strategies are essential in molecular epidemiological studies of tuberculosis. In this study we evaluated, for the first time, the efficacy of the repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) DiversiLab Mycobacterium typing kit over spoligotyping, 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing and embB single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis for Mycobacterium bovis typing. A total of 49 M. bovis animal isolates were used. DNA was extracted and genomic DNA was amplified using the DiversiLab Mycobacterium typing kit. The amplified fragments were separated and detected using a microfluidics chip with Agilent 2100. The resulting rep-PCR-based DNA fingerprints were uploaded to and analysed using web-based DiversiLab software through Pearson's correlation coefficient. Rep-PCR DiversiLab grouped M. bovis isolates into ten different clusters. Most isolates sharing identical spoligotype, MIRU-VNTR profile or embB gene polymorphism were grouped into different rep-PCR clusters. Rep-PCR DiversiLab displayed greater discriminatory power than spoligotyping and embB SNP analysis but a lower resolution power than the 12-locus MIRU-VNTR analysis. MIRU-VNTR confirmed that it is superior to the other PCR-based methods tested here. In combination with spoligotyping and 12-locus MIRU-VNTR analysis, rep-PCR improved the discriminatory power for M. bovis typing.

  4. Standardised PCR-based molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Allix-Béguec, C; Supply, P; Wanlin, M; Bifani, P; Fauville-Dufaux, M

    2008-05-01

    A population-based molecular epidemiology investigation has been undertaken to evaluate tuberculosis transmission and control in the Brussels-Capital Region (Belgium). All tuberculosis cases reported from January 2003 to December 2004 were investigated. In total, 536 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates (89% of culture-positive samples) were genotyped by the newly standardised 24 loci-based mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem-repeat typing, spoligotyping and IS6110 fingerprinting. Of all the patients, 30% were grouped based on strain clusters, suggesting a transmission index of 20%. An unsuspected outbreak entailing > or = 23 patients was evidenced by molecular typing analysis and confirmed by contact tracing. Foreign-born status accounted for 79% of the studied patients, including 37.9% illegal immigrants and asylum seekers. Among foreign-born patients, asylum seekers and illegal immigrants were significantly less abundant in strain clusters than settled residents. Tuberculosis in the Brussels-Capital Region is a bi-faceted problem, comprising both persisting recent transmission and "imported diseases". Molecular epidemiology based on real-time genotyping techniques has proven invaluable in better understanding tuberculosis transmission. However, it will most efficiently contribute to tuberculosis control when implemented in an integrated public health system.

  5. Isolation of Mycobacterium caprae (Lechtal genotype) from red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Italy.

    PubMed

    Chiari, Mario; Zanoni, M; Alborali, L G; Zanardi, G; Avisani, D; Tagliabue, S; Gaffuri, A; Pacciarini, M L; Boniotti, M B

    2014-04-01

    During tuberculosis (TB) surveillance, 53 hunted red deer (Cervus elaphus) were collected to determine whether TB was present in free-ranging animals from an Italian alpine area. Samples (lungs, liver, intestine, and lymph nodes) were cultured and analyzed by real-time PCR assay carried out directly on tissue. Mycobacterium caprae was isolated from small granulomatous, tuberculosis-like lesions in the liver of a 12-yr-old female. Identification of suspect colonies was done by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the gyrb gene, and genotyping was performed by spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit variable number tandem repeat analysis. The isolated strain was genetically identical to strains isolated in the study area in 2001 from dairy cows imported from Austria and in 2010 from an indigenous cow. The genotype, called "Lechtal," is the most frequently detected in the TB outbreaks in Austria and Germany. The possibility that red deer act as a maintenance host of M. caprae between TB outbreaks could be not excluded. Despite the high red deer population density, the detection of only one infected red deer could suggest that the wildlife management measures applied in the study area (prohibition of artificial feeding and secure removal of offal from hunted animals) may reduce the risk of TB spreading.

  6. Identifying Hotspots of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Transmission Using Spatial and Molecular Genetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Zelner, Jonathan L.; Murray, Megan B.; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Galea, Jerome; Lecca, Leonid; Calderon, Roger; Yataco, Rosa; Contreras, Carmen; Zhang, Zibiao; Manjourides, Justin; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Cohen, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Background. We aimed to identify and determine the etiology of “hotspots” of concentrated multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-tuberculosis) risk in Lima, Peru. Methods. From 2009 to 2012, we conducted a prospective cohort study among households of tuberculosis cases from 106 health center (HC) areas in Lima, Peru. All notified tuberculosis cases and their household contacts were followed for 1 year. Symptomatic individuals were screened by microscopy and culture; positive cultures were tested for drug susceptibility (DST) and genotyped by 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable-number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR). Results. 3286 individuals with culture-confirmed disease, DST, and 24-loci MIRU-VNTR were included in our analysis. Our analysis reveals: (1) heterogeneity in annual per-capita incidence of tuberculosis and MDR-tuberculosis by HC, with a rate of MDR-tuberculosis 89 times greater (95% confidence interval [CI], 54,185) in the most-affected versus the least-affected HC; (2) high risk for MDR-tuberculosis in a region spanning several HCs (odds ratio = 3.19, 95% CI, 2.33, 4.36); and (3) spatial aggregation of MDR-tuberculosis genotypes, suggesting localized transmission. Conclusions. These findings reveal that localized transmission is an important driver of the epidemic of MDR-tuberculosis in Lima. Efforts to interrupt transmission may be most effective if targeted to this area of the city. PMID:26175455

  7. Multiple introductions of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis into households, Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ted; Murray, Megan; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Zhang, Zibiao; Sloutsky, Alexander; Arteaga, Fernando; Chalco, Katiuska; Franke, Molly F; Becerra, Mercedes C

    2011-06-01

    Two cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) in a household are assumed to reflect within-household transmission. However, in high-incidence areas of MDR TB, secondary cases may arise through exposure to MDR TB in the community. To estimate the frequency of multiple introductions of MDR TB into households, we used spoligotyping and 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit- variable number tandem repeats to classify isolates from 101 households in Lima, Peru, in which >1 MDR TB patient received treatment during 1996-2004. We found different MDR TB strains in >10% of households. Alternate approaches for classifying matching strains produced estimates of multiple introductions in <38% of households. At least 4% of MDR TB patients were reinfected by a second strain of MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These findings suggest that community exposure to MDR TB in Lima occurs frequently. Rapid drug sensitivity testing of strains from household contacts of known MDR TB patients is needed to identify optimal treatment regimens.

  8. First insight into the genetic population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Diab, Hassan Mahmoud; Nakajima, Chie; Kotb, Saber A; Mokhtar, Alaa; Khder, Nagwa F M; Abdelaal, Ahmed S A; Hegazy, Azza; Poudel, Ajay; Shah, Yogendra; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates from Egypt. A total of 230 MTB isolates were analysed using spoligotyping, large sequence polymorphism (LSPs), mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The majority of isolates (93.0%) belonged to lineage 4, including 44.3, 13.4 and 10.8% of the ill-defined T clade, LAM and Haarlem families, respectively, and lineage 3 was identified in 7.0% of the isolates. MIRU-VNTRs typing allowed efficient discrimination of the spoligotype-defined clusters, including spoligo-international types (SIT) 53, 34, and 4, into 56 patterns, including 13 clusters and 43 unique patterns. A new SNP at position 311614 was identified in all six isolates to form the biggest MIRU-VNTR cluster, which suggested a recent clonal expansion. This SNP could possibly be used as a genetic marker for robust discriminations of Egyptian MTB isolates belonging to SIT53. The combination of spoligotyping, 12 MIRU-VNTRs loci and MLST provided insight into the genetic diversity and transmission dynamics of the Egyptian MTB genotypes and could be a key to implementation of effective control measures by public health authorities.

  9. Isolation of Mycobacterium bovis from Free-Ranging Wildlife in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yunho; Ryoo, Soyoon; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Kim, Narae; Lee, Hang; Park, So-Young; Song, Woong-Seog; Kim, Jong-Taek; Lee, Hee Soo; Myung Kim, Jae

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate Mycobacterium bovis infection in wild boar ( Sus scrofa ) in South Korea. During 2012-15, we attempted to isolate M. bovis from 847 wild animals, mainly Korean water deer ( Hydropotes inermis argyropus), raccoon dogs ( Nyctereutes procyonoides ), and wild boar, from 11 regions in South Korea. We isolated M. bovis from three of 118 wild boar (2.5%) captured in Gyeonggi Province, where bovine tuberculosis (bTB) outbreaks have also occurred in livestock. Spoligotypes and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeats types of these M. bovis isolates (SB0140 and SB1040, 4-2-3-3-7-5-5-4-4-3-4-3 and 5-2-3-3-7-5-5-4-3-10-5-2; MIRU4, MIRU16, MIRU27, MIRU31, ETR-A, ETR-B, ETR-C, QUB11b, QUB26, QUB3336, VNTR2401, and VNTR3171) have also been identified from farmed livestock such as cattle ( Bos taurus coreanae), Formosan sika deer ( Cervus nippon taiouanus), and American elk ( Cervus canadensis ) in the country. In South Korea, bTB appears to be endemic in livestock, and there are numerous opportunities for contact between wild boar and livestock due to high population densities and broad activity ranges. Our results support the hypothesis that M. bovis is transmitted between domestic and wild animals.

  10. Mechanisms of heteroresistance to isoniazid and rifampin of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Tashkent, Uzbekistan.

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Thiel, S; van Ingen, J; Feldmann, K; Turaev, L; Uzakova, G T; Murmusaeva, G; van Soolingen, D; Hoffmann, H

    2009-02-01

    Heteroresistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is defined as the coexistence of susceptible and resistant organisms to anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs in the same patient. Heteroresistance of MTB is considered a preliminary stage to full resistance. To date, no mechanism causing heteroresistance of MTB has been proven. Clinical specimens and cultures from 35 TB patients from Tashkent, Uzbekistan, were analysed using the Genotype MTBDR assay (Hain Lifescience, Nehren, Germany), which is designed to detect genetic mutations associated with resistance to rifampin and isoniazid. Cases of heteroresistance were further subjected to genotyping using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat typing, spoligotyping and IS6110 fingerprinting. Heteroresistance to rifampin and/or isoniazid was found in seven cases (20%). In five of them, heteroresistance was caused by two different strains and in two by a single strain of the Beijing genotype. The latter cases had a history of relapse of their TB. For the first time, two different mechanisms of heteroresistance in tuberculosis have been proven using a stepwise molecular-biological approach: 1) superinfection with two different strains, which is of interest for clinical infection control practitioners; and 2) splitting of a single strain into susceptible and resistant organisms. The latter mechanism is most likely to be related to poor treatment quality and could serve as a quality marker for tuberculosis therapy programmes in the future.

  11. Pros and cons of direct genotyping on tuberculosis clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Sadegh, Hamidreza; Kargarpour Kamakoli, Mansour; Farmanfarmaei, Ghazaleh; Masoumi, Morteza; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Fateh, Abolfazl; Ebrahimzadeh, Nayereh; Rahimi Jamnani, Fatemeh; Vaziri, Farzam; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2017-02-01

    Prompt genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is crucial for improving molecular epidemiological investigation of tuberculosis (TB). We performed a retrospective study to evaluate the use of 24 loci MIRU-VNTR (mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem-repeat) directly on 135 clinical samples from 84 TB patients. There was a direct correlation between genotyping on clinical samples by MIRU-VNTR and bacterial load (P = 0.001). VNTR loci were amplified successfully for 41.5% of the clinical samples (19-24 loci), 32.6% (13-18 loci), 23.7% (7-12 loci) and 2.2% (1-6 loci). Loci of 2401, 577, 2996 and 154 had the highest power to show the mixed strains infection in clinical samples. Direct MIRU-VNTR is partially successful in complete genotyping of M. tuberculosis strains. On the other hand, detection of polyclonal infection is undoubtedly reliable based on the direct MIRU-VNTR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison between RFLP and MIRU-VNTR Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains Isolated in Stockholm 2009 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Jerker; Hoffner, Sven; Berggren, Ingela; Bruchfeld, Judith; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Pennhag, Alexandra; Groenheit, Ramona

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to analyze the difference between methods for genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates. We collected genotyping results from Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units - Variable Numbers of Tandem Repeat (MIRU-VNTR) in a geographically limited area (Stockholm) during a period of three years. The number and proportion of isolates belonging to clusters was reduced by 45 and 35% respectively when combining the two methods compared with using RFLP or MIRU-VNTR only. The mean size of the clusters was smaller when combining methods and smaller with RFLP compared to MIRU-VNTR. In clusters with confirmed epidemiological links RFLP coincided slightly better than MIRU-VNTR but where there was a difference, the variation in MIRU-VNTR pattern was only in a single locus. In isolates with few IS6110 bands in RFLP, MIRU-VNTR differentiated the isolates more, dividing the RFLP clusters. Since MIRU-VNTR is faster and less labour-intensive it is the method of choice for routine genotyping. In most cases it will be sufficient for epidemiological purposes but true clustering might still be considered if there are epidemiological links and the MIRU-VNTR results differ in only one of its 24 loci. PMID:24733167

  13. Correlations between major risk factors and closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates grouped by three current genotyping procedures: a population-based study in northeast Mexico.

    PubMed

    Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Molina-Salinas, Gloria María; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Padilla-Rivas, Gerardo Raymundo; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Torres-de-la-Cruz, Víctor Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Yazmin Berenice; Ortega-García, Jorge Luis; Garza-Treviño, Elsa Nancy; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Becerril-Montes, Pola; Said-Fernández, Salvador

    2014-09-01

    The characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) patients related to a chain of recent TB transmissions were investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates (120) were genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 (R), spacer oligotyping (S) and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (M) methods. The MTB isolates were clustered and the clusters were grouped according to the similarities of their genotypes. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between the groups of MTB isolates with similar genotypes and those patient characteristics indicating a risk for a pulmonary TB (PTB) chain transmission were ana- lysed. The isolates showing similar genotypes were distributed as follows: SMR (5%), SM (12.5%), SR (1.67%), MR (0%), S (46.67%), M (5%) and R (0%). The remaining 35 cases were orphans. SMR exhibited a significant correlation (p < 0.05) with visits to clinics, municipalities and comorbidities (primarily diabetes mellitus). S correlated with drug consumption and M with comorbidities. SMR is needed to identify a social network in metropolitan areas for PTB transmission and S and M are able to detect risk factors as secondary components of a transmission chain of TB.

  14. First report of MIRU-VNTR genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates from Egypt.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, A; Fayed, A; Youssef, H; El-Sayed, A; Zschöck, M

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease, an economically important disease in ruminants worldwide. It was first isolated in Egypt in 2005. Since then, the pathogen has been detected in different Egyptian provinces. In order to trace the source of infection, genotyping using simple methods of high discriminatory power such as mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) were carried out in different countries. Until now there is no published information about MIRU-VNTR genotyping of MAP isolates in Egypt. To address that point, 100 faecal samples were collected and cultivated from 3 different suspected dairy farms. Fourteen isolates belonging to one farm were identified as MAP and subjected to genotyping using 8 different MIRU-VNTR loci PCRs. Two different genotypes were recognized based on size polymorphism observed in one locus (VNTR-7) that was confirmed by sequencing. Our work provides a preliminary basis of constructing a MIRU-VNTR genotyping database of MAP in Egypt.

  15. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Mycobacterium marinum: New Insights into Host and Environmental Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Broutin, Vincent; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Aubry, Alexandra; Keck, Nicolas; Choisy, Marc; Bernardet, Jean-François; Michel, Christian; Raymond, Jean-Christophe; Libert, Cédric; Barnaud, Antoine; Stragier, Pieter; Portaels, Françoise; Terru, Dominique; Belon, Claudine; Dereure, Olivier; Gutierrez, Cristina; Boschiroli, Maria-Laura; Van De Perre, Philippe; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum causes a systemic tuberculosis-like disease in fish and skin infections in humans that can spread to deeper structures, resulting in tenosynovitis, arthritis, and osteomyelitis. However, little information is available concerning (i) the intraspecific genetic diversity of M. marinum isolated from humans and animals; (ii) M. marinum genotype circulation in the different ecosystems, and (iii) the link between M. marinum genetic diversity and hosts (humans and fish). Here, we conducted a genetic study on 89 M. marinum isolates from humans (n = 68) and fish (n = 21) by using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. The results show that the M. marinum population is genetically structured not only according to the host but also according to the ecosystem as well as to tissue tropism in humans. This suggests the existence of different genetic pools in the function of the biological and ecological compartments. Moreover, the presence of only certain M. marinum genotypes in humans suggests a different zoonotic potential of the M. marinum genotypes. Considering that the infection is linked to aquarium activity, a significant genetic difference was also detected when the human tissue tropism of M. marinum was taken into consideration, with a higher genetic polymorphism in strains isolated from patients with cutaneous forms than from individuals with deeper-structure infection. It appears that only few genotypes can produce deeper infections in humans, suggesting that the immune system might play a filtering role. PMID:22952269

  16. Genetic diversity and population structure of Mycobacterium marinum: new insights into host and environmental specificities.

    PubMed

    Broutin, Vincent; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Aubry, Alexandra; Keck, Nicolas; Choisy, Marc; Bernardet, Jean-François; Michel, Christian; Raymond, Jean-Christophe; Libert, Cédric; Barnaud, Antoine; Stragier, Pieter; Portaels, Françoise; Terru, Dominique; Belon, Claudine; Dereure, Olivier; Gutierrez, Cristina; Boschiroli, Maria-Laura; Van De Perre, Philippe; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2012-11-01

    Mycobacterium marinum causes a systemic tuberculosis-like disease in fish and skin infections in humans that can spread to deeper structures, resulting in tenosynovitis, arthritis, and osteomyelitis. However, little information is available concerning (i) the intraspecific genetic diversity of M. marinum isolated from humans and animals; (ii) M. marinum genotype circulation in the different ecosystems, and (iii) the link between M. marinum genetic diversity and hosts (humans and fish). Here, we conducted a genetic study on 89 M. marinum isolates from humans (n = 68) and fish (n = 21) by using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. The results show that the M. marinum population is genetically structured not only according to the host but also according to the ecosystem as well as to tissue tropism in humans. This suggests the existence of different genetic pools in the function of the biological and ecological compartments. Moreover, the presence of only certain M. marinum genotypes in humans suggests a different zoonotic potential of the M. marinum genotypes. Considering that the infection is linked to aquarium activity, a significant genetic difference was also detected when the human tissue tropism of M. marinum was taken into consideration, with a higher genetic polymorphism in strains isolated from patients with cutaneous forms than from individuals with deeper-structure infection. It appears that only few genotypes can produce deeper infections in humans, suggesting that the immune system might play a filtering role.

  17. Tuberculosis in swine co-infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis and Mycobacterium bovis in a cluster from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Barandiaran, S; Pérez, A M; Gioffré, A K; Martínez Vivot, M; Cataldi, A A; Zumárraga, M J

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY In Argentina little is known about the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) infection in swine. We characterized the epidemiological dynamics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in a swine population of Argentina using molecular tools and spatial analysis techniques. Isolates (n = 196) obtained from TB-like lesions (n = 200) were characterized by polymerase chain reaction. The isolates were positive to either M. bovis (IS6110) (n = 160) or M. avium (IS1245) (n = 16) while the remaining 20 (10.2%) isolates were positive to both M. bovis and M. avium. The detection of both bacteria together suggests co-infection at the animal level. In addition, MAC-positive isolates (n = 36) were classified as M. avium subsp. avium (MAA) (n = 30) and M. avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) (n = 6), which resulted in five genotypes when they were typed using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit, variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR). One significant (P = 0.017) spatial clustering of genotypes was detected, in which the proportion of MAH isolates was larger than expected under the null hypothesis of even distribution of genotypes. These results show that in Argentina the proportion of TB cases in pigs caused by M. avium is larger than that reported in earlier studies. The proportion of M. bovis-MAC co-infections was also higher than in previous reports. These results provide valuable information on the epidemiology of MAC infection in swine in Argentina.

  18. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from a low-endemic setting in northwestern state of Paraná in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Noguti, Erika Noda; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; Malaspina, Ana Carolina; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Hirata, Rosário Dominguez Crespo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Mamizuka, Elsa Massae; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide information about the genetic diversity and prevalent genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a low-endemic setting in northwestern state of Paraná in Southern Brazil. We employed spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) techniques to genotype M. tuberculos isisolates from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). The 93 isolates analyzed by spoligotyping were divided into 36 different patterns, 30 of which were described in the SITVIT database. Latin American and Mediterranean, Haarlem and T families were responsible for 26.9%, 17.2% and 11.8% of TB cases, respectively. From the 84 isolates analyzed by MIRU-VNTR, 58 shared a unique pattern and the remaining 26 belonged to nine clusters. The MIRU loci 40, 23, 10 and 16 were the most discriminatory. A combination of MIRU-VNTR and spoligotyping resulted in 85.7% discriminatory power (Hunter-Gaston index = 0.995). Thus, combining spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing proved to be most useful for epidemiological study in this low-endemic setting in Southern Brazil. The current study demonstrated that there is significant diversity in circulating strains in the city of Maringá and the surrounding regions, with no single genotype of M. tuberculosis predominating.

  19. Diagnosis and Molecular Characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Dairy Cows in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Silva, J. A.; Abdulmawjood, A.; Bülte, M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was the serological, bacteriological and molecular diagnosis, as well as the molecular characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) in adult cows of five Colombian dairy herds. Serum samples were tested by an indirect absorbed enzyme–linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA-C). All fecal samples were tested by pooled culture. After that, fecal samples of Map positive pools were tested individually by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In one herd, slurry and tissue samples from one animal were also taken and tested by PCR and culture. Map isolates were analyzed by the Multilocus Short Sequence Repeat (MLSSR) and the Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units-Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (MIRU-VNTR) methods. ELISA produced positive results in 1.8% (6/329) of the animals and 40% (2/5) of the herds. Four fecal, two tissue, and two slurry samples from a herd were Map positive by culture and PCR. MLSSR and MIRU-VNTR revealed two different strain profiles among eight Map isolates recovered. This study reports the first molecular characterization of Map in one dairy herd in Colombia, the limitations for individual diagnosis of subclinical Map infections in cattle, and the usefulness of pooled fecal samples and environmental sampling for Map diagnosis. PMID:21785685

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from single outpatient clinic in Panama City exhibit wide genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Almengor, Pedro; Domínguez, Amada; Vega, Silvio; Goodridge, Amador

    2014-08-01

    Understanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis biodiversity and transmission is significant for tuberculosis control. This short report aimed to determine the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates from an outpatient clinic in Panama City. A total of 62 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped by 12 loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Forty-five (72.6%) of the isolates showed unique MIRU-VNTR genotypes, and 13 (21%) of the isolates were grouped into four clusters. Four isolates showed polyclonal MIRU-VNTR genotypes. The MIRU-VNTR Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index reached 0.988. The Spoligotyping analysis revealed 16 M. tuberculosis families, including Latin American-Mediterranean, Harlem, and Beijing. These findings suggest a wide genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates at one outpatient clinic. A detailed molecular epidemiology survey is now warranted, especially following second massive immigration for local Panama Canal expansion activities. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  1. Prospective genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fresh clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Bidovec-Stojkovič, Urška; Seme, Katja; Žolnir-Dovč, Manca; Supply, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Shorter time-to-result is key for improving molecular-guided epidemiological investigation of tuberculosis (TB) cases. We performed a prospective study to evaluate the use of standardized MIRU-VNTR (mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat) typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly on 79 fresh clinical samples from 26 TB patients consecutively enrolled over a 17-month period. Overall, complete 24-locus types were obtained for 18 out of the 26 (69.2%) patients and 14 of the 16 grade 3+ and grade 2+ samples (87.5%). The degree of completion of the genotypes obtained significantly correlated with smear microscopy grade both for 26 first samples (p = 0.0003) and for 53 follow-up samples (p = 0.002). For 20 of the 26 patients for whom complete or even incomplete M. tuberculosis isolate genotypes were obtained, typing applied to the clinical samples allowed the same unambiguous conclusions regarding case clustering or uniqueness as those that could have been drawn based on the corresponding cultured isolates. Standard 24 locus MIRU-VNTR typing of M. tuberculosis can be applied directly to fresh clinical samples, with typeability depending on the bacterial load in the sample.

  2. High diversity of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Central Asian Strain isolates in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shah, Yogendra; Maharjan, Bhagwan; Thapa, Jeewan; Poudel, Ajay; Diab, Hassan Mahmoud; Pandey, Basu Dev; Solo, Eddie S; Isoda, Norikazu; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Nakajima, Chie

    2017-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) poses a major public health problem in Nepal. Although it has been reported as one of the dominant genotypes of MTB in Nepal, little information on the Central Asian Strain (CAS) family is available, especially isolates related to multidrug resistance (MDR) cases. This study aimed to elucidate the genetic and epidemiological characteristics of MDR CAS isolates in Nepal. A total of 145 MDR CAS isolates collected in Nepal from 2008 to 2013 were characterized by spoligotyping, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analysis, and drug resistance-associated gene sequencing. Spoligotyping analysis showed CAS1_Delhi SIT26 as predominant (60/145, 41.4%). However, by combining spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing, it was possible to successfully discriminate all 145 isolates into 116 different types including 18 clusters with 47 isolates (clustering rate 32.4%). About a half of these clustered isolates shared the same genetic and geographical characteristics with other isolates in each cluster, and some of them shared rare point mutations in rpoB that are thought to be associated with rifampicin resistance. Although the data obtained show little evidence that large outbreaks of MDR-TB caused by the CAS family have occurred in Nepal, they strongly suggest several MDR-MTB transmission cases. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular analysis and MIRU-VNTR typing of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains from various sources.

    PubMed

    Rónai, Z; Csivincsik, Á; Gyuranecz, M; Kreizinger, Z; Dán, Á; Jánosi, S

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease. Genotypic discrimination of MAP isolates is pivotal to epidemiological studies requisite for revealing infection sources and disease transmission. This study was undertaken to determine the genetic diversity of MAP strains from diverse sources. Five hundred and sixty-nine MAP isolates were collected during an 8-year period from nine animal species, originating from seven European countries, including the whole geographic region of Hungary. Isolates were classified into cattle type and sheep type, and 515 strains were included in mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable-number tandem repeat analysis. The same genotype was found in different host species cohabiting on the same property, demonstrating interspecies transmission. Detecting identical patterns in numerous related animals underlines the importance of vertical transmission. The revealed 15 genotypes expose relatively low strain diversity and indicate the need of an improved typing system that provides higher resolution in the case of this subspecies. Our results demonstrate the circulation and transmission of different MAP strain types among individuals, herds and even wildlife reservoirs in Hungary and other European countries; correlation between production type or breed and MAP genotype is hypothesized. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit–Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat (MIRU-VNTR) Genotyping of Mycobacterium intracellulare for Strain Comparison with Establishment of a PCR-Based Database

    PubMed Central

    Iakhiaeva, Elena; McNulty, Steven; Brown Elliott, Barbara A.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Williams, Myra D.; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Wilson, Rebecca W.; Turenne, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Strain comparison is important to population genetics and to evaluate relapses in patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease, but the “gold standard” of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is time-consuming and complex. We used variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR) for fingerprinting of respiratory isolates of M. intracellulare from patients with underlying bronchiectasis, to establish a nonsequence-based database for population analysis. Different genotypes identified by PFGE underwent species identification using a 16S rRNA gene multiplex PCR. Genotypes of M. intracellulare were confirmed by internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequencing and characterized using seven VNTR primers. The pattern of VNTR amplicon sizes and repeat number defined each specific VNTR type. Forty-two VNTR types were identified among 84 genotypes. PFGE revealed most isolates with the same VNTR type to be clonal or exhibit similar grouping of bands. Repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) showed minimal pattern diversity between VNTR types compared to PFGE. Fingerprinting of relapse isolates from 31 treated patients using VNTR combined with 16S multiplex PCR unambiguously and reliably distinguished different genotypes from the same patient, with results comparable to those of PFGE. VNTR for strain comparison is easier and faster than PFGE, is as accurate as PFGE, and does not require sequencing. Starting with a collection of 167 M. intracellulare isolates, VNTR distinguished M. intracellulare into 42 clonal groups. Comparison of isolates from different geographic areas, habitats, and clinical settings is now possible. PMID:23175249

  5. Mycobacterial disease, immunosuppression, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F M

    1989-01-01

    The mycobacteria are an important group of acid-fast pathogens ranging from obligate intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium leprae to environmental species such as M. gordonae and M. fortuitum. The latter may behave as opportunistic human pathogens if the host defenses have been depleted in some manner. The number and severity of such infections have increased markedly with the emergence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. These nontuberculous mycobacteria tend to be less virulent for humans than M. tuberculosis, usually giving rise to self-limiting infections involving the cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of young children. However, the more virulent serovars of M. avium complex can colonize the bronchial and intestinal mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, becoming virtual members of the commensal gut microflora and thus giving rise to low levels of skin hypersensitivity to tuberculins prepared from M. avium and M. intracellulare. Systemic disease develops when the normal T-cell-mediated defenses become depleted as a result of old age, cancer chemotherapy, or infection with human immunodeficiency virus. As many as 50% of human immunodeficiency virus antibody-positive individuals develop mycobacterial infections at some time during their disease. Most isolates of M. avium complex from AIDS patients fall into serotypes 4 and 8. The presence of these drug-resistant mycobacteria in the lungs of the AIDS patient makes their effective clinical treatment virtually impossible. More effective chemotherapeutic, prophylactic, and immunotherapeutic reagents are urgently needed to treat this rapidly increasing patient population. PMID:2680057

  6. Inhibitors Selective for Mycobacterial Versus Human Proteasomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Sorio de Carvalho, L; Deng, H; Tao, H; Vogt, G; Wu, K; Schneider, J; Chidawanyika, T; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Many anti-infectives inhibit the synthesis of bacterial proteins, but none selectively inhibits their degradation. Most anti-infectives kill replicating pathogens, but few preferentially kill pathogens that have been forced into a non-replicating state by conditions in the host. To explore these alternative approaches we sought selective inhibitors of the proteasome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given that the proteasome structure is extensively conserved, it is not surprising that inhibitors of all chemical classes tested have blocked both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteasomes, and no inhibitor has proved substantially more potent on proteasomes of pathogens than of their hosts. Here we show that certain oxathiazol-2-one compounds kill non-replicating M.?tuberculosis and act as selective suicide-substrate inhibitors of the M.?tuberculosis proteasome by cyclocarbonylating its active site threonine. Major conformational changes protect the inhibitor-enzyme intermediate from hydrolysis, allowing formation of an oxazolidin-2-one and preventing regeneration of active protease. Residues outside the active site whose hydrogen bonds stabilize the critical loop before and after it moves are extensively non-conserved. This may account for the ability of oxathiazol-2-one compounds to inhibit the mycobacterial proteasome potently and irreversibly while largely sparing the human homologue.

  7. PRESENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSP. PARATUBERCULOSIS IN ALPACAS (LAMA PACOS) INHABITING THE CHILEAN ALTIPLANO.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Miguel; Sevilla, Iker; Rios, Carolina; Crossley, Jorge; Tejeda, Carlos; Manning, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of paratuberculosis. The organism causes disease in both domestically managed and wild ruminant species. South American camelids have a long, shared history with indigenous people in the Andes. Over the last few decades, increasing numbers of alpacas were exported to numerous countries outside South America. No paratuberculosis surveillance has been reported for these source herds. In this study, individual fecal samples from 85 adult alpacas were collected from six separate herds in the Chilean Altiplano. A ParaTB mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture of each individual fecal sample, followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was used for confirmation. DNA extracts from a subset of confirmed MAP isolates were subjected to mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Fifteen alpaca were fecal culture test-positive. Five false-positive culture samples were negative on PCR analysis for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA), Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), and the 16 S rDNA gene. Three MAP isolates subset-tested belonged to the same MIRU-VNTR type, showing four repeats for TR292 (locus 1) in contrast to the three repeats typical of the MAP reference strain K10. The number of repeats found in the remaining loci was identical to that of the K10 strain. It is not known how nor when MAP was introduced into the alpaca population in the Chilean Altiplano. The most plausible hypothesis to explain the presence of MAP in these indigenous populations is transmission by contact with infected domestic small ruminant species that may on occasion share pastures or range with alpacas. Isolation of this mycobacterial pathogen from such a remote region suggests that MAP has found its way beyond the confines of intensively managed domestic agriculture premises.

  8. Nontuberculous mycobacterial infections of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Stewart, M G; Starke, J R; Coker, N J

    1994-08-01

    To review the treatment and outcome of patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial infections of the head and neck. Retrospective examination of the medical records of patients treated by several surgeons during a 5-year period with a minimum 6-month follow-up. Large teaching children's hospital. Twenty-six children hospitalized for treatment of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections of the head and neck. Resolution of infection, recurrence, and need for additional surgical intervention for cure. Eleven patients initially were treated by incisional biopsy or incision and drainage procedures; eight patients developed recurrence or a draining sinus tract, necessitating a second surgical procedure. In contrast, 15 patients initially underwent complete excision; only one developed a recurrence (P < .01). Thus, eight (31%) of 26 patients required at least two surgical procedures owing to inadequate initial treatment. Excisional biopsy is both the diagnostic procedure and treatment of choice for nontuberculous mycobacterial adenitis.

  9. Mycobacterial Arthritis and Synovitis in Painted Reed Frogs (Hyperolius marmoratus).

    PubMed

    Barrows, M; Koeppel, K; Michel, A; Mitchell, E

    2017-02-20

    Several species of atypical mycobacteria have been isolated from wild and captive amphibians. In captive anurans, cutaneous and visceral mycobacteriosis are common and can result in significant mortality, particularly when animals are immunocompromised. Mycobacterial arthritis and synovitis are reported rarely in amphibians. We describe 20 cases in painted reed frogs (Hyperolius marmoratus), which presented with cachexia, limb paresis or paralysis or 'spindly leg syndrome'. Histopathology revealed multifocal histiocytic to granulomatous synovitis affecting appendicular, rib or spinal intervertebral joints. Periarticular granulomata, granulomatous cellulitis and skeletal muscle atrophy, necrosis and degeneration were also present. In one case, granulomatous spinal osteomyelitis was recorded. Ziehl-Neelsen stains showed large numbers of acid-fast bacteria in macrophages and histiocytes. The mycobacterial isolates obtained from culture were identified as members of the Mycobacterium chelonae complex (either M. chelonae or Mycobacteriumabscessus). This was confirmed by 5'-16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequencing. In 17 cases mycobacterial lesions were present only in the joints and skeleton, highlighting the importance of not ruling out mycobacterial infection on the basis of absence of cutaneous or visceral lesions.

  10. Development of IgG responses to mycobacterial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Pilkington, C; Costello, A M; Rook, G A; Stanford, J L

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies link mycobacterial and human heat shock protein antigens with autoimmune diseases. Little is known about the development of antibody responses to these antigens in children. IgG responses to mycobacterial antigens were studied in children living in the UK (an environment low in mycobacteria) who had not received BCG vaccination. Age curves of IgG response to sonicates from different species of mycobacteria were similar suggesting that the greater part of the developing IgG response is to the common antigens shared by all mycobacteria. The major part of the IgG response was to carbohydrate antigens: lipoarabinomannan is a mycobacterial cell wall carbohydrate and was confirmed as a major immunodominant antigen. Infants showed a marked early response to the mycobacterial 65 kilodalton (kDa) and 70 kDa heat shock proteins, but not to the human 65 kDa heat shock protein. The early IgG response to heat shock proteins may reflect cross reactivity to proteins released by a wide variety of bacteria (possibly from breakdown in the gut) or recognition of other immunodominant antigens with high levels of cross reactivity to self. PMID:8285775

  11. Mycobacterial infections in striped bass from Delaware Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ottinger, C.A.; Brown, J.J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Starliper, C.E.; Blazer, V.S.; Weyers, H.S.; Beauchamp, K.A.; Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Gauthier, David T.; Vogelbein, W.K.

    2007-01-01

    Eighty striped bass Morone saxatilis were obtained from Delaware Bay using commercial gill nets set adjacent to Woodland Beach (n = 70) and Bowers Beach (n = 10) in December 2003. Fish were examined for gross lesions. Total lengths (TLs) and eviscerated weights were determined to calculate condition factors (K). Portions of spleens were aseptically harvested for bacterial culture, and portions of spleens, kidneys (anterior and posterior), livers, and gonads were obtained for histological examination. The size distribution of the striped bass was relatively homogeneous; the mean TL was about 600 mm for all samples. Mean K exceeded 0.95 in all samples and was not significantly different (P > 0.05) among samples. Significant differences in mycobacterial infection prevalence (P ??? 0.05) were observed among samples; samples obtained at Woodland Beach (WB) on December 10 (53.8%, n = 13) and December 17 (7.1%, n = 42) exhibited the most striking differences in prevalence. Mycobacterial infection intensity ranged from 1 ?? 102 to 1 ?? 107 colony-forming units per gram of spleen. Acanthocephalan infection prevalence and intensity, non-acid-fast bacterial infection prevalence, and fish sex ratio were also significantly different among the samples (P ??? 0.05). Similar to the mycobacterial infections, differences in sex ratio, acanthocephalan infection, and non-acid-fast bacterial infection were observed between the WB samples taken on December 10 and 17. However, no significant associations (P > 0.05) were observed between sex ratio or these infections and mycobacterial infection. The differences in bacterial and parasite infection prevalence and intensity and fish sex ratio in some samples indicate that these fish had a different history and that the epizootiology of mycobacterial infection in striped bass from Delaware Bay may be relatively complex. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  12. Task Interspersal and Performance of Matching Tasks by Preschoolers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavides, Christian A.; Poulson, Claire L.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of task interspersal on the performance of matching-to-sample tasks by three children with autism. A pre-baseline assessed each child's mastery level of a large body of matching stimuli. These matching tasks included matching identical and non-identical animals, numbers, letters, and shapes. Through this…

  13. Task Interspersal and Performance of Matching Tasks by Preschoolers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavides, Christian A.; Poulson, Claire L.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of task interspersal on the performance of matching-to-sample tasks by three children with autism. A pre-baseline assessed each child's mastery level of a large body of matching stimuli. These matching tasks included matching identical and non-identical animals, numbers, letters, and shapes. Through this…

  14. CORE-SINEs: Eukaryotic short interspersed retroposing elements with common sequence motifs

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Nicolas; Labuda, Damian

    1999-01-01

    A 65-bp “core” sequence is dispersed in hundreds of thousands copies in the human genome. This sequence was found to constitute the central segment of a group of short interspersed elements (SINEs), referred to as mammalian-wide interspersed repeats, that proliferated before the radiation of placental mammals. Here, we propose that the core identifies an ancient tRNA-like SINE element, which survived in different lineages such as mammals, reptiles, birds, and fish, as well as mollusks, presumably for >550 million years. This element gave rise to a number of sequence families (CORE-SINEs), including mammalian-wide interspersed repeats, whose distinct 3′ ends are shared with different families of long interspersed elements (LINEs). The evolutionary success of the generic CORE-SINE element can be related to the recruitment of the internal promoter from highly transcribed host RNA as well as to its capacity to adapt to changing retropositional opportunities by sequence exchange with actively amplifying LINEs. It reinforces the notion that the very existence of SINEs depends on the cohabitation with both LINEs and the host genome. PMID:10077603

  15. CORE-SINEs: eukaryotic short interspersed retroposing elements with common sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, N; Labuda, D

    1999-03-16

    A 65-bp "core" sequence is dispersed in hundreds of thousands copies in the human genome. This sequence was found to constitute the central segment of a group of short interspersed elements (SINEs), referred to as mammalian-wide interspersed repeats, that proliferated before the radiation of placental mammals. Here, we propose that the core identifies an ancient tRNA-like SINE element, which survived in different lineages such as mammals, reptiles, birds, and fish, as well as mollusks, presumably for >550 million years. This element gave rise to a number of sequence families (CORE-SINEs), including mammalian-wide interspersed repeats, whose distinct 3' ends are shared with different families of long interspersed elements (LINEs). The evolutionary success of the generic CORE-SINE element can be related to the recruitment of the internal promoter from highly transcribed host RNA as well as to its capacity to adapt to changing retropositional opportunities by sequence exchange with actively amplifying LINEs. It reinforces the notion that the very existence of SINEs depends on the cohabitation with both LINEs and the host genome.

  16. Mycobacterial pseudotumor of the plantar fascia: how common is it?

    PubMed

    Sideras, Panagiotis A; Heiba, Sherif; Machac, Josef; Hechtman, Jaclyn; Vatti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumor (MSCP) is an extremely rare complication of mycobacterial infections. It has been reported to occur in various sites such as skin, lymph nodes, bone marrow, lungs, and spleen. This tumor-like lesion can be confused clinically as well as radiographically with dermatofibroma, nodular fasciitis, xanthogranuloma, and Kaposi's sarcoma. While this lesion is rare and has been previously reported to occur only in superficial skin, we emphasize its consideration and inclusion in the differential diagnoses when a deep soft tissue mass is complicated by symptoms of deep tissue infection secondary to abscess formation in immunocompromised hosts. Here, we present the clinical and radiologic findings of a case of MSCP involving the deep plantar sheaths.

  17. Targeting drug tolerance in mycobacteria: a perspective from mycobacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad S; Richards, Jacob P; Ojha, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug chemotherapy for 6–9-months is one of the primary treatments in effective control of tuberculosis, although the mechanisms underlying the persistence of its etiological agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, against antibiotics remain unclear. Ever-mounting evidence indicates that the survival of many environmental and pathogenic microbial species against antibiotics is influenced by their ability to grow as surface-associated multicellular communities called biofilms. In recent years, several mycobacterial species, including M. tuberculosis, have been found to form drug-tolerant biofilms in vitro through genetically controlled mechanisms. In this review, the authors discuss the relevance of the in vitro mycobacterial biofilms in understanding the antibiotic recalcitrance of tuberculosis infections. PMID:23106280

  18. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection after Fractionated CO2 Laser Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Culton, Donna A.; Miller, Becky A.; Miller, Melissa B.; MacKuen, Courteney; Groben, Pamela; White, Becky; Cox, Gary M.; Stout, Jason E.

    2013-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are increasingly associated with cutaneous infections after cosmetic procedures. Fractionated CO2 resurfacing, a widely used technique for photorejuvenation, has been associated with a more favorable side effect profile than alternative procedures. We describe 2 cases of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection after treatment with a fractionated CO2 laser at a private clinic. Densely distributed erythematous papules and pustules developed within the treated area within 2 weeks of the laser procedure. Diagnosis was confirmed by histologic analysis and culture. Both infections responded to a 4-month course of a multidrug regimen. An environmental investigation of the clinic was performed, but no source of infection was found. The case isolates differed from each other and from isolates obtained from the clinic, suggesting that the infection was acquired by postprocedure exposure. Papules and pustules after fractionated CO2 resurfacing should raise the suspicion of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. PMID:23628077

  19. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Ocular Infections: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, Wajiha J.; Sheheitli, Huda; Abdul Fattah, Maamoun; Hamam, Rola N.

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous or atypical mycobacterial ocular infections have been increasing in prevalence over the past few decades. They are known to cause periocular, adnexal, ocular surface and intraocular infections and are often recalcitrant to medical therapy. These infections can potentially cause detrimental outcomes, in part due to a delay in diagnosis. We review 174 case reports and series on nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) ocular infections and discuss etiology, microbiology, risk factors, diagnosis, clinical presentation, and treatment of these infections. History of interventions, trauma, foreign bodies, implants, contact lenses, and steroids are linked to NTM ocular infections. Steroid use may prolong the duration of the infection and cause poorer visual outcomes. Early diagnosis and initiation of treatment with multiple antibiotics are necessary to achieve the best visual outcome. PMID:26106601

  20. Mycobacterial proteins--immune targets for antituberculous subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, N; Khuller, G K

    1999-12-01

    Cellular and humoral immunity induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has led to identification of newer vaccine candidates, but despite this, many questions concerning the protection against tuberculosis remain unanswered. Recent progress in this field has centered on T cell subset responses and cytokines that these cells secrete. There has been a steady progress in identification and characterization of several classes of major mycobacterial proteins which includes secretory/export proteins, cell wall associated proteins, heat shock proteins and cytoplasmic proteins. The protein antigens are now believed to represent the key protective immunity inducing antigens in the bacillus. In this review, various mycobacterial protein antigens of vaccination potential are compared for their efficacy in light of current immunological knowledge.

  1. Novel prenyl-linked benzophenone substrate analogues of mycobacterial mannosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Guy, Mark R; Illarionov, Petr A; Gurcha, Sudagar S; Dover, Lynn G; Gibson, Kevin J C; Smith, Paul W; Minnikin, David E; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2004-09-15

    PPM (polyprenol monophosphomannose) has been shown to act as a glycosyl donor in the biosynthesis of the Man (mannose)-rich mycobacterial lipoglycans LM (lipomannan) and LAM (lipoarabinomannan). The Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPM synthase (Mt-Ppm1) catalyses the transfer of Man from GDP-Man to polyprenyl phosphates. The resulting PPM then serves as a donor of Man residues leading to the formation of an alpha(1-->6)LM intermediate through a PPM-dependent alpha(1-->6)mannosyltransferase. In the present study, we prepared a series of ten novel prenyl-related photoactivatable probes based on benzophenone with lipophilic spacers replacing several internal isoprene units. These probes were excellent substrates for the recombinant PPM synthase Mt-Ppm1/D2 and, on photoactivation, several inhibited its activity in vitro. The protection of the PPM synthase activity by a 'natural' C(75) polyprenyl acceptor during phototreatment is consistent with probe-mediated photoinhibition occurring via specific covalent modification of the enzyme active site. In addition, the unique mannosylated derivatives of the photoreactive probes were all donors of Man residues, through a PPM-dependent mycobacterial alpha(1-->6)mannosyltransferase, to a synthetic Manp(1-->6)-Manp-O-C(10:1) disaccharide acceptor (where Manp stands for mannopyranose). Photoactivation of probe 7 led to striking-specific inhibition of the M. smegmatis alpha(1-->6)mannosyltransferase. The present study represents the first application of photoreactive probes to the study of mycobacterial glycosyltransferases involved in LM and LAM biosynthesis. These preliminary findings suggest that the probes will prove useful in investigating the polyprenyl-dependent steps of the complex biosynthetic pathways to the mycobacterial lipoglycans, aiding in the identification of novel glycosyltransferases.

  2. Novel prenyl-linked benzophenone substrate analogues of mycobacterial mannosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    PPM (polyprenol monophosphomannose) has been shown to act as a glycosyl donor in the biosynthesis of the Man (mannose)-rich mycobacterial lipoglycans LM (lipomannan) and LAM (lipoarabinomannan). The Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPM synthase (Mt-Ppm1) catalyses the transfer of Man from GDP-Man to polyprenyl phosphates. The resulting PPM then serves as a donor of Man residues leading to the formation of an α(1→6)LM intermediate through a PPM-dependent α(1→6)mannosyltransferase. In the present study, we prepared a series of ten novel prenyl-related photoactivatable probes based on benzophenone with lipophilic spacers replacing several internal isoprene units. These probes were excellent substrates for the recombinant PPM synthase Mt-Ppm1/D2 and, on photoactivation, several inhibited its activity in vitro. The protection of the PPM synthase activity by a ‘natural’ C75 polyprenyl acceptor during phototreatment is consistent with probe-mediated photoinhibition occurring via specific covalent modification of the enzyme active site. In addition, the unique mannosylated derivatives of the photoreactive probes were all donors of Man residues, through a PPM-dependent mycobacterial α(1→6)mannosyltransferase, to a synthetic Manp(1→6)-Manp-O-C10:1 disaccharide acceptor (where Manp stands for mannopyranose). Photoactivation of probe 7 led to striking-specific inhibition of the M. smegmatis α(1→6)mannosyltransferase. The present study represents the first application of photoreactive probes to the study of mycobacterial glycosyltransferases involved in LM and LAM biosynthesis. These preliminary findings suggest that the probes will prove useful in investigating the polyprenyl-dependent steps of the complex biosynthetic pathways to the mycobacterial lipoglycans, aiding in the identification of novel glycosyltransferases. PMID:15202931

  3. Vaccination Against Tuberculosis With Whole-Cell Mycobacterial Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Thomas J; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Henri Lambert, Paul; Sanicas, Melvin; Martin, Carlos; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Live attenuated and killed whole-cell vaccines (WCVs) offer promising vaccination strategies against tuberculosis. A number of WCV candidates, based on recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or related mycobacterial species are in various stages of preclinical or clinical development. In this review, we discuss the vaccine candidates and key factors shaping the development pathway for live and killed WCVs and provide an update on progress.

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Zinc Metalloprotease-1 Assists Mycobacterial Dissemination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Mani H.; Medisetti, Raghavender; Ganji, Rakesh; Jakkala, Kiran; Sankati, Swetha; Chatti, Kiranam; Banerjee, Sharmistha

    2016-01-01

    Zinc metalloprotease-1 (Zmp1) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), the tuberculosis (TB) causing bacillus, is a virulence factor involved in inflammasome inactivation and phagosome maturation arrest. We earlier reported that Zmp1 was secreted under granuloma-like stress conditions, induced Th2 cytokine microenvironment and was highly immunogenic in TB patients as evident from high anti-Zmp1 antibody titers in their sera. In this study, we deciphered a new physiological role of Zmp1 in mycobacterial dissemination. Exogenous treatment of THP-1 cells with 500 nM and 1 μM of recombinant Zmp1 (rZmp1) resulted in necrotic cell death. Apart from inducing secretion of necrotic cytokines, TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1β, it also induced the release of chemotactic chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1β, and IL-8, suggesting its likely function in cell migration and mycobacterial dissemination. This was confirmed by Gap closure and Boyden chamber assays, where Zmp1 treated CHO or THP-1 cells showed ∼2 fold increased cell migration compared to the untreated cells. Additionally, Zebrafish-M. marinum based host–pathogen model was used to study mycobacterial dissemination in vivo. Td-Tomato labeled M. marinum (TdM. marinum) when injected with rZmp1 showed increased dissemination to tail region from the site of injection as compared to the untreated control fish in a dose-dependent manner. Summing up these observations along with the earlier reports, we propose that Zmp1, a multi-faceted protein, when released by mycobacteria in granuloma, may lead to necrotic cell damage and release of chemotactic chemokines by surrounding infected macrophages, attracting new immune cells, which in turn may lead to fresh cellular infections, thus assisting mycobacterial dissemination. PMID:27621726

  5. Non-tuberculous mycobacterial keratitis: a study of 22 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S C; Soong, H K; Chang, J S; Liang, Y S

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To investigate causes and clinical findings of non-tuberculous mycobacterial keratitis, and to study its response to topical antibiotic therapy and surgical extirpative keratectomy. METHOD: A single centre, retrospective review of 22 patients with non-tuberculous mycobacterial keratitis seen in a 3 year period. Laboratory diagnoses were established with Ziehl-Nielsen acid fast staining and Löwenstein-Jensen cultures. RESULTS: In 20 patients (91%), there was an antecedent history of foreign body eye trauma (18 patients) or elective surgery (two patients). There were 19 cases of Mycobacterium chelonei, and three of M fortuitum. Clinical signs included epithelial defects, satellite or ring stromal infiltrates, crystalline keratopathy, and hypopyon. For topical antibiotic therapy, 20 patients received amikacin, while one patient received rifampin and another received ciprofloxacin, each in accordance with the results of the in vitro drug sensitivities. An extirpative keratectomy was performed in 15 cases; four of these cases additionally required a temporary conjunctival flap in order to finally eradicate the infection. At the end of the follow up period (median 18 months; range 3 months to 3 years) all eyes were stable and free of infection, with 19 (86%) having final visual acuities of 20/200 or better. CONCLUSION: Early clinical recognition and prompt laboratory diagnosis, together with aggressive topical antibiotic therapy and early keratectomy, may shorten morbidity and improve the clinical outcome of non-tuberculous mycobacterial keratitis. Images PMID:8976722

  6. Conserved nucleotide differences and subfamily structure of porcine short interspersed elements.

    PubMed

    Brenig, B

    1999-04-01

    Interspersed elements are ubiquitous in the genomes of higher eukaryotes and account for over a third of the genomic DNA (Smit 1996). In swine the short interspersed elements, SINEs or PREs (porcine repetitive elements), have been found in a number of introns and 3' untranslated regions of different genes. However, compared to human Alu repeats the number of available PRE DNA sequences is still limited. In this study we have compared 85 PREs selected from DNA sequence database entries. The PREs were aligned and for each nucleotide position the relative frequencies of the four bases were calculated. A consensus sequence was derived from the first base usage. Similar to studies of SINEs in other species, the analysis showed that most mutations in PREs occur at CpG dinucleotide hot spots. The position variability for the two most frequent bases shows a bimodal distribution. The analysis suggests that the porcine SINEs can be divided into three major subfamilies sharing conserved nucleotide similarities.

  7. [Short interspersed repetitive sequences (SINEs) and their use as a phylogenetic tool].

    PubMed

    Kramerov, D A; Vasetskiĭ, N S

    2009-01-01

    The data on one of the most common repetitive elements of eukaryotic genomes, short interspersed elements (SINEs), are reviewed. Their structure, origin, and functioning in the genome are discussed. The variation and abundance of these neutral genomic markers makes them a convenient and reliable tool for phylogenetic analysis. The main methods of such analysis are presented, and the potential and limitations of this approach are discussed using specific examples.

  8. Xenopus interspersed RNA families, Ocr and XR, bind DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Guttridge, K L; Smith, L D

    1995-05-01

    Interspersed RNA makes up two-thirds of cytoplasmic polyadenylated RNA in Xenopus and sea urchin eggs. Although it has no known function, previous work has suggested that at least one family of interspersed RNA, XR, binds Xenopus oocyte proteins, and can influence the rate of translation. We have used two Xenopus repeat families, Ocr and XR, to explore their protein binding abilities. Ocr RNA binds the same pattern of highly abundant oocyte proteins that XR RNA binds, which are believed to be messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particle proteins. In addition, we show that Ocr RNA binds the Oct-60 protein, a member of the POU-domain family of transcription factors found in Xenopus oocytes. Using a 32 base pair sequence from the XR repeat in a DNA affinity column two proteins were isolated, 66 kDa and 92 kDa, that together form a complex with XR DNA. One of these proteins (92 kDa) also binds XR RNA. We suggest that the role of at least a subset of interspersed RNAs in development may be to bind, and sequester in the cytoplasm, DNA-binding proteins until the end of oogenesis.

  9. Short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs) are excluded from imprinted regions in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Greally, John M

    2002-01-08

    To test whether regions undergoing genomic imprinting have unique genomic characteristics, imprinted and nonimprinted human loci were compared for nucleotide and retroelement composition. Maternally and paternally expressed subgroups of imprinted genes were found to differ in terms of guanine and cytosine, CpG, and retroelement content, indicating a segregation into distinct genomic compartments. Imprinted regions have been normally permissive to L1 long interspersed transposable element retroposition during mammalian evolution but universally and significantly lack short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs). The primate-specific Alu SINEs, as well as the more ancient mammalian-wide interspersed repeat SINEs, are found at significantly low densities in imprinted regions. The latter paleogenomic signature indicates that the sequence characteristics of currently imprinted regions existed before the mammalian radiation. Transitions from imprinted to nonimprinted genomic regions in cis are characterized by a sharp inflection in SINE content, demonstrating that this genomic characteristic can help predict the presence and extent of regions undergoing imprinting. During primate evolution, SINE accumulation in imprinted regions occurred at a decreased rate compared with control loci. The constraint on SINE accumulation in imprinted regions may be mediated by an active selection process. This selection could be because of SINEs attracting and spreading methylation, as has been found at other loci. Methylation-induced silencing could lead to deleterious consequences at imprinted loci, where inactivation of one allele is already established, and expression is often essential for embryonic growth and survival.

  10. Short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs) are excluded from imprinted regions in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Greally, John M.

    2002-01-01

    To test whether regions undergoing genomic imprinting have unique genomic characteristics, imprinted and nonimprinted human loci were compared for nucleotide and retroelement composition. Maternally and paternally expressed subgroups of imprinted genes were found to differ in terms of guanine and cytosine, CpG, and retroelement content, indicating a segregation into distinct genomic compartments. Imprinted regions have been normally permissive to L1 long interspersed transposable element retroposition during mammalian evolution but universally and significantly lack short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs). The primate-specific Alu SINEs, as well as the more ancient mammalian-wide interspersed repeat SINEs, are found at significantly low densities in imprinted regions. The latter paleogenomic signature indicates that the sequence characteristics of currently imprinted regions existed before the mammalian radiation. Transitions from imprinted to nonimprinted genomic regions in cis are characterized by a sharp inflection in SINE content, demonstrating that this genomic characteristic can help predict the presence and extent of regions undergoing imprinting. During primate evolution, SINE accumulation in imprinted regions occurred at a decreased rate compared with control loci. The constraint on SINE accumulation in imprinted regions may be mediated by an active selection process. This selection could be because of SINEs attracting and spreading methylation, as has been found at other loci. Methylation-induced silencing could lead to deleterious consequences at imprinted loci, where inactivation of one allele is already established, and expression is often essential for embryonic growth and survival. PMID:11756672

  11. Production of matrix metalloproteinases in response to mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Quiding-Järbrink, M; Smith, D A; Bancroft, G J

    2001-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a large family of enzymes with specificity for the various proteins of the extracellular matrix which are implicated in tissue remodeling processes and chronic inflammatory conditions. To investigate the role of MMPs in immunity to mycobacterial infections, we incubated murine peritoneal macrophages with viable Mycobacterium bovis BCG or Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and assayed MMP activity in the supernatants by zymography. Resting macrophages secreted only small amounts of MMP-9 (gelatinase B), but secretion increased dramatically in a dose-dependent manner in response to either BCG or M. tuberculosis in vitro. Incubation with mycobacteria also induced increased MMP-2 (gelatinase A) activity. Neutralization of tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-alpha), and to a lesser extent interleukin 18 (IL-18), substantially reduced MMP production in response to mycobacteria. Exogenous addition of TNF-alpha or IL-18 induced macrophages to express MMPs, even in the absence of bacteria. The immunoregulatory cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), IL-4, and IL-10 all suppressed BCG-induced MMP production, but through different mechanisms. IFN-gamma treatment increased macrophage secretion of TNF-alpha but still reduced their MMP activity. Conversely, IL-4 and IL-10 seemed to act by reducing the amount of TNF-alpha available to the macrophages. Finally, infection of BALB/c or severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with either BCG or M. tuberculosis induced substantial increases in MMP-9 activity in infected tissues. In conclusion, we show that mycobacterial infection induces MMP-9 activity both in vitro and in vivo and that this is regulated by TNF-alpha, IL-18, and IFN-gamma. These findings indicate a possible contribution of MMPs to tissue remodeling processes that occur in mycobacterial infections.

  12. Mycobacterial species as case-study of comparative genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Zakham, F; Belayachi, L; Ussery, D; Akrim, M; Benjouad, A; El Aouad, R; Ennaji, M M

    2011-02-08

    The genus Mycobacterium represents more than 120 species including important pathogens of human and cause major public health problems and illnesses. Further, with more than 100 genome sequences from this genus, comparative genome analysis can provide new insights for better understanding the evolutionary events of these species and improving drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics tools for controlling Mycobacterial diseases. In this present study we aim to outline a comparative genome analysis of fourteen Mycobacterial genomes: M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K—10, M. bovis AF2122/97, M. bovis BCG str. Pasteur 1173P2, M. leprae Br4923, M. marinum M, M. sp. KMS, M. sp. MCS, M. tuberculosis CDC1551, M. tuberculosis F11, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis KZN 1435 , M. ulcerans Agy99,and M. vanbaalenii PYR—1, For this purpose a comparison has been done based on their length of genomes, GC content, number of genes in different data bases (Genbank, Refseq, and Prodigal). The BLAST matrix of these genomes has been figured to give a lot of information about the similarity between species in a simple scheme. As a result of multiple genome analysis, the pan and core genome have been defined for twelve Mycobacterial species. We have also introduced the genome atlas of the reference strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv which can give a good overview of this genome. And for examining the phylogenetic relationships among these bacteria, a phylogenic tree has been constructed from 16S rRNA gene for tuberculosis and non tuberculosis Mycobacteria to understand the evolutionary events of these species.

  13. Mycobacterial Infection after Cosmetic Procedure with Botulinum Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Solis-Arreola, Gerardo-Victor

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of mycobacterial infection at the sites of previous injections of botulinum toxin A in a 45-year-old woman. She presented with erythematous, swollen, warm, and tender plaques and nodules at the points of injection from which a biopsy was taken, demonstrating a deep dermal and hypodermal abscessified epithelioid granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate in which some acid-fast bacilli were identified with Ziehl-Neelsen and Fite-Faraco stains. The lesion was first treated with clarithromycin plus azithromycin, to which rifampicin was later added. A good therapeutic response was obtained. PMID:26023629

  14. Chemotherapy of arthritis induced in rats by mycobacterial adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Newbould, B. B.

    1963-01-01

    Arthritis induced in rats by mycobacterial adjuvant has been used for the study of compounds of known value in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in man. The development of the arthritic syndrome in treated and control rats was followed by measuring the changes in foot thickness of both hind-feet with a micrometer. This method allowed the effect of anti-inflammatory compounds to be expressed quantitatively. Anti-inflammatory activity was readily observed in certain steroids, pyrazolidines, salicylates and sodium aurothiomalate. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine were inactive. The inhibition obtained by daily treatment with the steroid paramethasone disappeared when treatment was withdrawn. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:14066137

  15. Studies of transmission of mycobacterial infections in Chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, A.J.; Johnson, H.E.

    1962-01-01

    THE INCLUSION OF VISCERA AND CARCASSES OF TUBERCULOUS ADULT SALMON IN THE DIET OF JUVENILE SALMONIDS is considered to be the major source of mycobacterial infections in hatchery-reared fish (Wood and Ordal, 1958; Ross, Earp, and Wood, 1959). In considering additional modes of infection, we speculated about transovarian transmission or a mechanical process arising from contamination of the ova at the egg-taking stage with subsequent entry of the bacteria into the egg at the time of fertilization. This paper is a report on observations made during an experiment designed to test the latter theories.

  16. A Rhesus Macaque Model of Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Winthrop, Kevin; Rivera, Andrea; Engelmann, Flora; Rose, Sasha; Lewis, Anne; Ku, Jennifer; Bermudez, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to develop a nonhuman primate model of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected from three female rhesus macaques infected intrabronchially with escalating doses of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Immunity was determined by measuring cytokine levels, lymphocyte proliferation, and antigen-specific responses. Disease progression was monitored clinically and microbiologically with serial thoracic radiographs, computed tomography scans, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures. The animal subjected to the highest inoculum showed evidence of chronic pulmonary MAC disease. Therefore, rhesus macaques could provide a robust model in which to investigate host–pathogen interactions during MAC infection. PMID:26562499

  17. Elevated serum CA 19-9 levels in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Young; Jang, Sun Hee; Kim, Song Yee; Chung, Kyung Soo; Song, Joo Han; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Kang, Young Ae

    2016-01-01

    Increased serum CA 19-9 levels in patients with nonmalignant diseases have been investigated in previous reports. This study evaluates the clinical significance of serum CA 19-9 elevation in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease and pulmonary tuberculosis. The median CA 19-9 level was higher in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease than in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease: 13.80, tuberculosis: 5.85, p<0.001). A multivariate logistic regression analysis performed in this study showed that Mycobacterium abscessus (OR 9.97, 95% CI: 1.58, 62.80; p=0.014) and active phase of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease (OR 12.18, 95% CI: 1.07, 138.36, p=0.044) were found to be risk factors for serum CA 19-9 elevation in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. The serum CA 19-9 levels showed a tendency to decrease during successful treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease but not in pulmonary tuberculosis. These findings suggest that CA 19-9 may be a useful marker for monitoring therapeutic responses in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, although it is not pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease-specific marker.

  18. Distinctive patterns of age-dependent hypomethylation in interspersed repetitive sequences.

    PubMed

    Jintaridth, Pornrutsami; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2010-04-01

    Interspersed repetitive sequences (IRSs) are a major contributor to genome size and may contribute to cellular functions. IRSs are subdivided according to size and functionally related structures into short interspersed elements, long interspersed elements (LINEs), DNA transposons, and LTR-retrotransposons. Many IRSs may produce RNA and regulate genes by a variety of mechanisms. The majority of DNA methylation occurs in IRSs and is believed to suppress IRS activities. Global hypomethylation, or the loss of genome-wide methylation, is a common epigenetic event not only in senescent cells but also in cancer cells. Loss of LINE-1 methylation has been characterized in many cancers. Here, we evaluated the methylation levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of LINE-1, Alu, and human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) in 177 samples obtained from volunteers between 20 and 88 yr of age. Age was negatively associated with methylation levels of Alu (r = -0.452, P < 10(-3)) and HERV-K (r = -0.326, P < 10(-3)) but not LINE-1 (r = 0.145, P = 0.055). Loss of methylation of Alu occurred during ages 34-68 yr, and loss of methylation of HERV-K occurred during ages 40-63 yr and again during ages 64-83 yr. Interestingly, methylation of Alu and LINE-1 are directly associated, particularly at ages 49 yr and older (r = 0.49, P < 10(-3)). Therefore, only some types of IRSs lose methylation at certain ages. Moreover, Alu and HERV-K become hypomethylated differently. Finally, there may be several mechanisms of global methylation. However, not all of these mechanisms are age-dependent. This finding may lead to a better understanding of not only the biological causes and consequences of genome-wide hypomethylation but also the role of IRSs in the aging process.

  19. Mermaid, a family of short interspersed repetitive elements, is useful for zebrafish genome mapping.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, N; Chevrette, M; Ekker, M; Kikuchi, Y; Hotta, Y; Okamoto, H

    1996-03-07

    A family of short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs), designated mermaid, is present in the genomes of fish, amphibian and primates, but absent in the mouse genome. We have demonstrated that the sequences of the mermaid family are highly polymorphic in the zebrafish genome as in the human genome. We have also shown that the mermaid sequence can be used to recover zebrafish specific DNA from zebrafish-mouse cell hybrids by using mermaid-specific oligonucleotides as PCR primers. Thus, the mermaid family serves as a valuable genetic tool for the zebrafish genome mapping.

  20. Mermaid: a family of short interspersed repetitive elements widespread in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, N; Chevrette, M; Ekker, M; Kikuchi, Y; Hotta, Y; Okamoto, H

    1996-03-07

    We have discovered a family of short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs) that are present in the genomes of fish, amphibian and primates. The family of the SINEs, designated mermaid, is distinctive in each species except for a conserved region of approximately 80 bp. Some members of the mermaid family were found in transposon-like repetitive elements, including Tcl-like elements which were also distributed in the genomes of fish and amphibian. This raises the possibility of horizontal transfer of the mermaid family between vertebrates via transposons.

  1. Characterization of short interspersed elements (SINEs) in a red alga, Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbo; Lin, Xiaofei; Peddigari, Suresh; Takechi, Katsuaki; Takano, Hiroyoshi; Takio, Susumu

    2007-02-01

    Short interspersed element (SINE)-like sequences referred to as PySN1 and PySN2 were identified in a red alga, Porphyra yezoensis. Both elements contained an internal promoter with motifs (A box and B box) recognized by RNA polymerase III, and target site duplications at both ends. Genomic Southern blot analysis revealed that both elements were widely and abundantly distributed on the genome. 3' and 5' RACE suggested that PySN1 was expressed as a chimera transcript with flanking SINE-unrelated sequences and possessed the poly-A tail at the same position near the 3' end of PySN1.

  2. CD1 and mycobacterial lipids activate human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Moody, D. Branch

    2014-01-01

    Summary For decades, proteins were thought to be the sole or at least the dominant source of antigens for T cells. Studies in the 1990s demonstrated that CD1 proteins and mycobacterial lipids form specific targets of human αβ T cells. The molecular basis by which T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize CD1-lipid complexes is now well understood. Many types of mycobacterial lipids function as antigens in the CD1 system, and new studies done with CD1 tetramers identify T-cell populations in the blood of tuberculosis patients. In human populations, a fundamental difference between the CD1 and major histocompatibility complex systems is that all humans express nearly identical CD1 proteins. Correspondingly, human CD1 responsive T cells show evidence of conserved TCRs. In addition to natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells), conserved TCRs define other subsets of human T cells, including germline-encoded mycolyl-reactive (GEM) T cells. The simple immunogenetics of the CD1 system and new investigative tools to measure T-cell responses in humans now creates a situation in which known lipid antigens can be developed as immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic reagents for tuberculosis disease. PMID:25703557

  3. T cell-dependent chronic neutrophilia during mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Silva, M T

    1989-01-01

    Euthymic (nu/+) C57BL/6 mice intraperitoneally inoculated with 2.5 x 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU) of Mycobacterium avium developed a chronic peritoneal neutrophilic granulocytosis during the 30 days of infection studied; in contrast, congenitally athymic nude (nu/nu) mice of C57BL/6 background did not show such persistent neutrophil influx. The acute phase of peritoneal infection, characterized by an extensive accumulation of neutrophils peaking at 6 to 12 h post-inoculation, was similar in euthymic and athymic mice. Subcutaneous vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with BCG enhanced the peritoneal influx of granulocytes after the i.p. inoculation of 2.5 x 10(60 CFU of M. avium. Finally, spleen cells from M. avium-infected mice pulsed in vitro with mycobacterial antigen induced a higher neutrophil accumulation after inoculation into the peritoneal cavity of naive recipient mice than unpulsed spleen cells or spleen cells from noninfected mice. These data indicate that the immune system is involved in the regulation of the chronic neutrophil influx during mycobacterial infection. PMID:2575473

  4. A mycobacterial coinfection in a dog suspected on blood smear.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Claire-Lise; Granat, Fanny; Trumel, Catherine; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Lucas, Marie-Noëlle; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Pingret, Jean-Luc; Magne, Laurent; Delverdier, Maxence

    2013-12-01

    A 4-year-old neutered female crossbred Shepherd was referred for a history of 10 days of anorexia, polyuria, polydipsia, polyadenomegaly, and diarrhea. On physical examination, the dog appeared quiet, responsive, and apyretic, with generalized and severe lymphadenomegaly. Hematologic abnormalities included neutrophilic leukocytosis with left shift, and lymphopenia. Blood smears revealed intracytoplasmic bacilli negatively stained with May-Grünwald-Giemsa in neutrophils and monocytes. Lymph node smears revealed pyogranulomatous adenitis with calcified deposits and many negative-staining rod structures, both within the cytoplasm of neutrophils and macrophages, and free in the background. An acid-fast stain (Ziehl-Neelsen) confirmed the diagnosis of mycobacterial infection. The dog was euthanized for public health and ethical reasons, and the postmortem examination revealed severe and generalized granulomatous and necrotizing lymphadenitis, panniculitis, and hepatitis, and infiltration of epithelioid macrophages in the lungs, colon, and spleen. Numerous acid-fast bacilli, consistent with mycobacterial infection, were observed both in the cytoplasm of epithelioid macrophages and giant cells, and free in the background. Mycobacterium bovis was first confirmed by conventional PCR of organ extracts. Mycobacterium avium was detected in a culture of the same organs. Further PCR amplifications and sequencing revealed a coinfection with 2 different species of mycobacterium, one belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex and the other to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. © 2013 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  5. Biallelic JAK1 mutations in immunodeficient patient with mycobacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Eletto, Davide; Burns, Siobhan O.; Angulo, Ivan; Plagnol, Vincent; Gilmour, Kimberly C.; Henriquez, Frances; Curtis, James; Gaspar, Miguel; Nowak, Karolin; Daza-Cajigal, Vanessa; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Doffinger, Rainer; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Nejentsev, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the immune system cause primary immunodeficiencies. Here, we study a patient with recurrent atypical mycobacterial infection and early-onset metastatic bladder carcinoma. Exome sequencing identified two homozygous missense germline mutations, P733L and P832S, in the JAK1 protein that mediates signalling from multiple cytokine receptors. Cells from this patient exhibit reduced JAK1 and STAT phosphorylation following cytokine stimulations, reduced induction of expression of interferon-regulated genes and dysregulated cytokine production; which are indicative of signalling defects in multiple immune response pathways including Interferon-γ production. Reconstitution experiments in the JAK1-deficient cells demonstrate that the impaired JAK1 function is mainly attributable to the effect of the P733L mutation. Further analyses of the mutant protein reveal a phosphorylation-independent role of JAK1 in signal transduction. These findings clarify JAK1 signalling mechanisms and demonstrate a critical function of JAK1 in protection against mycobacterial infection and possibly the immunological surveillance of cancer. PMID:28008925

  6. The fourth chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster: Interspersed euchromatic and heterochromatic domains

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fang-Lin; Cuaycong, Matthew H.; Craig, Carolyn A.; Wallrath, Lori L.; Locke, John; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2000-01-01

    The small fourth chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster (3.5% of the genome) presents a puzzle. Cytological analysis suggests that the bulk of the fourth, including the portion that appears banded in the polytene chromosomes, is heterochromatic; the banded region includes blocks of middle repetitious DNA associated with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). However, genetic screens indicate 50–75 genes in this region, a density similar to that in other euchromatic portions of the genome. Using a P element containing an hsp70-white gene and a copy of hsp26 (marked with a fragment of plant DNA designated pt), we have identified domains that allow for full expression of the white marker (R domains), and others that induce a variegating phenotype (V domains). In the former case, the hsp26-pt gene shows an accessibility and heat-shock-inducible activity similar to that seen in euchromatin, whereas in the latter case, accessibility and inducible expression are reduced to levels typical of heterochromatin. Mapping by in situ hybridization and by hybridization of flanking DNA sequences to a collection of cosmid and bacterial artificial chromosome clones shows that the R domains (euchromatin-like) and V domains (heterochromatin-like) are interspersed. Examination of the effect of genetic modifiers on the variegating transgenes shows some differences among these domains. The results suggest that heterochromatic and euchromatic domains are interspersed and closely associated within this 1.2-megabase region of the genome. PMID:10779561

  7. Molecular characterization and evolution of an interspersed repetitive DNA family of oysters.

    PubMed

    López-Flores, Inmaculada; Ruiz-Rejón, Carmelo; Cross, Ismael; Rebordinos, Laureana; Robles, Francisca; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; de la Herrán, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    When genomic DNA from the European flat oyster Ostrea edulis L. was digested by BclI enzyme, a band of about 150 bp was observed in agarose gel. After cloning and sequencing this band and analysing their molecular characteristics and genomic organization by means of Southern blot, in situ hybridisation, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocols, we concluded that this band is an interspersed highly repeated DNA element, which is related in sequence to the flanking regions of (CT)-microsatellite loci of the species O. edulis and Crassostrea gigas. Furthermore, we determined that this element forms part of a longer repetitive unit of 268 bp in length that, at least in some loci, is present in more than one copy. By Southern blot hybridisation and PCR amplifications-using primers designed for conserved regions of the 150-bp BclI clones of O. edulis-we determined that this repetitive DNA family is conserved in five other oyster species (O. stentina, C. angulata, C. gigas, C. ariakensis, and C. sikamea) while it is apparently absent in C. gasar. Finally, based on the analysis of the repetitive units in these oyster species, we discuss the slow degree of concerted evolution in this interspersed repetitive DNA family and its use for phylogenetic analysis.

  8. Methylation Status of Alu and LINE-1 Interspersed Repetitive Sequences in Behcet's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Şahru; Kucukazman, Selma Ozbek; Karataş, Gülten Sungur; Ozturk, Mehmet Akif; Prombhul, Sasiprapa; Hirankarn, Nattiya

    2016-01-01

    Behcet's Disease (BD) is a multisystem chronic inflammatory disease. The pathology is believed to involve both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Hypomethylation leading to activation of interspersed repetitive sequences (IRSs) such as LINE-1 and Alu contributes to the pathologies of autoimmune diseases and cancer. Herein, the epigenetic changes of IRSs in BD were evaluated using combined bisulfite restriction analysis-interspersed repetitive sequences (COBRA-IRS). DNA from neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of BD patients with ocular involvement that were in active or inactive states and healthy controls were used to analyze LINE-1 and Alu methylation levels. For Alu sequences, significant differences were observed in the frequency of uCuC alleles between PBMCs of patients and controls (p = 0.03), and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.03). For neutrophils, the frequency of uCuC was significantly higher between patients and controls (p = 0.006) and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.002). The partial methylation (uCmC + mCuC) frequencies of Alu between inactive patients and control samples also differed (p = 0.02). No statistically significant differences for LINE-1 were detected. Thus, changes in the methylation level of IRS elements might contribute to the pathogenesis of BD. The role of Alu transcripts in BD should be investigated further. PMID:27123441

  9. Sauria SINEs: Novel short interspersed retroposable elements that are widespread in reptile genomes.

    PubMed

    Piskurek, Oliver; Austin, Christopher C; Okada, Norihiro

    2006-05-01

    SINEs are short interspersed retrotransposable elements that invade new genomic sites. Their retrotransposition depends on reverse transcriptase and endonuclease activities encoded by partner LINEs (long interspersed elements). Recent genomic research has demonstrated that retroposons account for at least 40% of the human genome. Hitherto, more than 30 families of SINEs have been characterized in mammalian genomes, comprising approximately 4600 extant species; the distribution and extent of SINEs in reptilian genomes, however, are poorly documented. With more than 7400 species of lizards and snakes, Squamata constitutes the largest and most diverse group of living reptiles. We have discovered and characterized a novel SINE family, Sauria SINEs, whose members are widely distributed among genomes of lizards, snakes, and tuataras. Sauria SINEs comprise a 5' tRNA-related region, a tRNA-unrelated region, and a 3' tail region (containing short tandem repeats) derived from LINEs. We distinguished eight Sauria SINE subfamilies in genomes of four major squamate lineages and investigated their evolutionary relationships. Our data illustrate the overall efficacy of Sauria SINEs as novel retrotransposable markers for elucidation of squamate evolutionary history. We show that all Sauria SINEs share an identical 3' sequence with Bov-B LINEs and propose that they utilize the enzymatic machinery of Bov-B LINEs for their own retrotransposition. This finding, along with the ubiquity of Bov-B LINEs previously demonstrated in squamate genomes, suggests that these LINEs have been an active partner of Sauria SINEs since this SINE family was generated more than 200 million years ago.

  10. Enrichment of short interspersed transposable elements to embryonic stem cell-specific hypomethylated gene regions.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Hiroki; Yagi, Shintaro; Hirabayashi, Keiji; Sato, Shinya; Ohgane, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Shiota, Kunio

    2010-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have a distinctive epigenome, which includes their genome-wide DNA methylation modification status, as represented by the ESC-specific hypomethylation of tissue-dependent and differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs) of Pou5f1 and Nanog. Here, we conducted a genome-wide investigation of sequence characteristics associated with T-DMRs that were differentially methylated between ESCs and somatic cells, by focusing on transposable elements including short interspersed elements (SINEs), long interspersed elements (LINEs) and long terminal repeats (LTRs). We found that hypomethylated T-DMRs were predominantly present in SINE-rich/LINE-poor genomic loci. The enrichment for SINEs spread over 300 kb in cis and there existed SINE-rich genomic domains spreading continuously over 1 Mb, which contained multiple hypomethylated T-DMRs. The characterization of sequence information showed that the enriched SINEs were relatively CpG rich and belonged to specific subfamilies. A subset of the enriched SINEs were hypomethylated T-DMRs in ESCs at Dppa3 gene locus, although SINEs are overall methylated in both ESCs and the liver. In conclusion, we propose that SINE enrichment is the genomic property of regions harboring hypomethylated T-DMRs in ESCs, which is a novel aspect of the ESC-specific epigenomic information.

  11. Epigenetic regulation of transcription and possible functions of mammalian short interspersed elements, SINEs.

    PubMed

    Ichiyanagi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are a class of retrotransposons, which amplify their copy numbers in their host genomes by retrotransposition. More than a million copies of SINEs are present in a mammalian genome, constituting over 10% of the total genomic sequence. In contrast to the other two classes of retrotransposons, long interspersed elements (LINEs) and long terminal repeat (LTR) elements, SINEs are transcribed by RNA polymerase III. However, like LINEs and LTR elements, the SINE transcription is likely regulated by epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, at least for human Alu and mouse B1. Whereas SINEs and other transposable elements have long been thought as selfish or junk DNA, recent studies have revealed that they play functional roles at their genomic locations, for example, as distal enhancers, chromatin boundaries and binding sites of many transcription factors. These activities imply that SINE retrotransposition has shaped the regulatory network and chromatin landscape of their hosts. Whereas it is thought that the epigenetic mechanisms were originated as a host defense system against proliferation of parasitic elements, this review discusses a possibility that the same mechanisms are also used to regulate the SINE-derived functions.

  12. Methylation Status of Alu and LINE-1 Interspersed Repetitive Sequences in Behcet's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Şahru; Kucukazman, Selma Ozbek; Karataş, Gülten Sungur; Ozturk, Mehmet Akif; Prombhul, Sasiprapa; Hirankarn, Nattiya

    2016-01-01

    Behcet's Disease (BD) is a multisystem chronic inflammatory disease. The pathology is believed to involve both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Hypomethylation leading to activation of interspersed repetitive sequences (IRSs) such as LINE-1 and Alu contributes to the pathologies of autoimmune diseases and cancer. Herein, the epigenetic changes of IRSs in BD were evaluated using combined bisulfite restriction analysis-interspersed repetitive sequences (COBRA-IRS). DNA from neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of BD patients with ocular involvement that were in active or inactive states and healthy controls were used to analyze LINE-1 and Alu methylation levels. For Alu sequences, significant differences were observed in the frequency of (u)C(u)C alleles between PBMCs of patients and controls (p = 0.03), and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.03). For neutrophils, the frequency of (u)C(u)C was significantly higher between patients and controls (p = 0.006) and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.002). The partial methylation ((u)C(m)C + (m)C(u)C) frequencies of Alu between inactive patients and control samples also differed (p = 0.02). No statistically significant differences for LINE-1 were detected. Thus, changes in the methylation level of IRS elements might contribute to the pathogenesis of BD. The role of Alu transcripts in BD should be investigated further.

  13. Sequence conservation in avian CR1: an interspersed repetitive DNA family evolving under functional constraints.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z Q; Ritzel, R G; Lin, C C; Hodgetts, R B

    1991-01-01

    CR1 is a short interspersed repetitive DNA element originally identified in the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus). However, unlike virtually all other such sequences described to date, CR1 is not confined to one or a few closely related species. It is probably a ubiquitous component of the avian genome, having been detected in representatives of nine orders encompassing a wide spectrum of the class Aves. This identification was made possible by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which revealed interspecific similarities not detected by conventional Southern analysis. DNA sequence comparisons between a CR1 element isolated from a sarus crane (Grus antigone) and those isolated from an emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) showed that two short highly conserved regions are present. These are included within two regions previously characterized in the CR1 units of domestic fowl. One of these behaves as a transcriptional silencer and the other is a binding site for a nuclear protein. Our observations suggest that CR1 has evolved under functional constraints and that interspersed repetitive sequences as a class may constitute a more significant component of the eukaryotic genome than is generally acknowledged. Images PMID:1829530

  14. The Forest behind the Tree: Phylogenetic Exploration of a Dominant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain Lineage from a High Tuberculosis Burden Country

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso Oelemann, Maranibia; Gomes, Harrison M.; Willery, Eve; Possuelo, Lia; Batista Lima, Karla Valéria; Allix-Béguec, Caroline; Locht, Camille; Goguet de la Salmonière, Yves-Olivier L.; Gutierrez, Maria Cristina; Suffys, Philip; Supply, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Background Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates is a powerful tool for epidemiological control of tuberculosis (TB) and phylogenetic exploration of the pathogen. Standardized PCR-based typing, based on 15 to 24 mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) loci combined with spoligotyping, has been shown to have adequate resolution power for tracing TB transmission and to be useful for predicting diverse strain lineages in European settings. Its informative value needs to be tested in high TB-burden countries, where the use of genotyping is often complicated by dominance of geographically specific, genetically homogeneous strain lineages. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested this genotyping system for molecular epidemiological analysis of 369 M. tuberculosis isolates from 3 regions of Brazil, a high TB-burden country. Deligotyping, targeting 43 large sequence polymorphisms (LSPs), and the MIRU-VNTRplus identification database were used to assess phylogenetic predictions. High congruence between the different typing results consistently revealed the countrywide supremacy of the Latin-American-Mediterranean (LAM) lineage, comprised of three main branches. In addition to an already known RDRio branch, at least one other branch characterized by a phylogenetically informative LAM3 spoligo-signature seems to be globally distributed beyond Brazil. Nevertheless, by distinguishing 321 genotypes in this strain population, combined MIRU-VNTR typing and spoligotyping demonstrated the presence of multiple distinct clones. The use of 15 to 24 loci discriminated 21 to 25% more strains within the LAM lineage, compared to a restricted lineage-specific locus set suggested to be used after SNP analysis. Noteworthy, 23 of the 28 molecular clusters identified were exclusively composed of patient isolates from a same region, consistent with expected patterns of mostly local TB transmission. Conclusions/Significance Standard MIRU

  15. Molecular epidemiology and transmission dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Northwest Ethiopia: new phylogenetic lineages found in Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tessema, Belay; Beer, Joerg; Merker, Matthias; Emmrich, Frank; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C; Niemann, Stefan

    2013-03-11

    Although Ethiopia ranks seventh among the world's 22 high-burden tuberculosis (TB) countries, little is known about strain diversity and transmission. In this study, we present the first in-depth analysis of the population structure and transmission dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from Northwest Ethiopia. In the present study, 244 M. tuberculosis isolates where analysed by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit - variable number tandem repeat 24-loci typing and spoligotyping methods to determine phylogenetic lineages and perform cluster analysis. Clusters of strains with identical genotyping patterns were considered as an indicator for the recent transmission. Of 244 isolates, 59.0% were classified into nine previously described lineages: Dehli/CAS (38.9%), Haarlem (8.6%), Ural (3.3%), LAM (3.3%), TUR (2.0%), X-type (1.2%), S-type (0.8%), Beijing (0.4%) and Uganda II (0.4%). Interestingly, 31.6% of the strains were grouped into four new lineages and were named as Ethiopia_3 (13.1%), Ethiopia_1 (7.8%), Ethiopia_H37Rv like (7.0%) and Ethiopia_2 (3.7%) lineages. The remaining 9.4% of the isolates could not be assigned to the known or new lineages. Overall, 45.1% of the isolates were grouped in clusters, indicating a high rate of recent transmission. This study confirms a highly diverse M. tuberculosis population structure, the presence of new phylogenetic lineages and a predominance of the Dehli/CAS lineage in Northwest Ethiopia. The high rate of recent transmission indicates defects of the TB control program in Northwest Ethiopia. This emphasizes the importance of strengthening laboratory diagnosis of TB, intensified case finding and treatment of TB patients to interrupt the chain of transmission.

  16. Genetic structure of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis population in cattle herds in Quebec as revealed by using a combination of multilocus genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Sohal, Jagdip Singh; Arsenault, Julie; Labrecque, Olivia; Fairbrother, Julie-Hélène; Roy, Jean-Philippe; Fecteau, Gilles; L'Homme, Yvan

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the etiological agent of paratuberculosis, a granulomatous enteritis affecting a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants worldwide. A variety of molecular typing tools are used to distinguish M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains, contributing to a better understanding of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis epidemiology. In the present study, PCR-based typing methods, including mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units/variable-number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and small sequence repeats (SSR) in addition to IS1311 PCR-restriction enzyme analysis (PCR-REA), were used to investigate the genetic heterogeneity of 200 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains from dairy herds located in the province of Quebec, Canada. The majority of strains were of the "cattle type," or type II, although 3 strains were of the "bison type." A total of 38 genotypes, including a novel one, were identified using a combination of 17 genetic markers, which generated a Simpson's index of genetic diversity of 0.876. Additional analyses revealed no differences in genetic diversity between environmental and individual strains. Of note, a spatial and spatiotemporal cluster was evidenced regarding the distribution of one of the most common genotypes. The population had an overall homogeneous genetic structure, although a few strains stemmed out of the consensus cluster, including the bison-type strains. The genetic structure of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis populations within most herds suggested intraherd dissemination and microevolution, although evidence of interherd contamination was also revealed. The level of genetic diversity obtained by combining MIRU-VNTR and SSR markers shows a promising avenue for molecular epidemiology investigations of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis transmission patterns.

  17. Genetic analysis of extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Lisbon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, João; Macedo, Rita; Malaquias, Ana; Ferreira, Ana; Brum, Laura; Portugal, Isabel

    2010-02-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) threatens the global control of TB worldwide. Lisbon has a high XDR-TB rate [50% of the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB)], which is mainly associated with Lisboa family strains. Few studies have addressed the identification of mutations associated with resistance to second-line injectable drugs, and the relative frequency of such mutations varies geographically. The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic changes associated with the high number of XDR-TB cases in Lisbon. In the present study we analysed 26 XDR-TB clinical isolates. The gyrA, tlyA and rrs genes were screened for mutations that could be responsible for resistance to fluoroquinolones and second-line injectable drugs. Moreover, the strains under analysis were also genotyped by MIRU-VNTR ('mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem repeats'). The mutational analysis identified the most frequent mutations in the resistance-associated genes: S91P in gyrA (42.3%); A1401G in rrs (30.8%); and Ins755GT in tlyA (42.3%). The occurrence of mutations in rrs was associated with the non-occurrence of mutations in tlyA. The genotypic analysis revealed that the strains were highly clonal, belonging to one of two MIRU-VNTR clusters, with the largest belonging to the Lisboa family. Association between mutations in gyrA and rrs or tlyA was verified. The association of specific mutations highlighted the strains' high clonality and indicates recent XDR-TB transmission. In addition, the identification of the most frequent resistance-associated mutations will be invaluable in applying XDR-TB molecular detection tests in the region in the near future.

  18. Identification and Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolated From Water and Soil Samples of a Metropolitan City

    PubMed Central

    Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Malekshahian, Donya; Farahbod, Amir Masoud; Seif, Shima; Rahideh, Snaz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potential role of environmental Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the epidemiology of TB remains unknown. We investigated the transmission of M tuberculosis from humans to the environment and the possible transmission of M tuberculosis from the environment to humans. METHODS: A total of 1,500 samples were collected from three counties of the Tehran, Iran metropolitan area from February 2012 to January 2014. A total of 700 water samples (47%) and 800 soil samples (53%) were collected. Spoligotyping and the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats typing method were performed on DNA extracted from single colonies. Genotypes of M tuberculosis strains isolated from the environment were compared with the genotypes obtained from 55 patients with confirmed pulmonary TB diagnosed during the study period in the same three counties. RESULTS: M tuberculosis was isolated from 11 of 800 soil samples (1%) and 71 of 700 water samples (10%). T family (56 of 82, 68%) followed by Delhi/CAS (11 of 82, 13.4%) were the most frequent M tuberculosis superfamilies in both water and soil samples. Overall, 27.7% of isolates in clusters were related. No related typing patterns were detected between soil, water, and clinical isolates. The most frequent superfamily of M tuberculosis in clinical isolates was Delhi/CAS (142, 30.3%) followed by NEW-1 (127, 27%). The bacilli in contaminated soil (36%) and damp water (8.4%) remained reculturable in some samples up to 9 months. CONCLUSIONS: Although the dominant M tuberculosis superfamilies in soil and water did not correspond to the dominant M tuberculosis family in patients, the presence of circulating genotypes of M tuberculosis in soil and water highlight the risk of transmission. PMID:25340935

  19. Genetic Diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Family Based on SNP and VNTR Typing Profiles in Asian Countries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yih-Yuan; Chang, Jia-Ru; Huang, Wei-Feng; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Su, Ih-Jen; Sun, Jun-Ren; Chiueh, Tzong-Shi; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Chen, Yao-Shen; Dou, Horng-Yunn

    2012-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) Beijing strain is highly virulent, drug resistant, and endemic over Asia. To explore the genetic diversity of this family in several different regions of eastern Asia, 338 Beijing strains collected in Taiwan (Republic of China) were analyzed by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing and compared with published MIRU-VNTR profiles and by the Hunter-Gaston diversity index (HGDI) of Beijing strains from Japan and South Korea. The results revealed that VNTR2163b (HGDI>0.6) and five other loci (VNTR424, VNTR4052, VNTR1955, VNTR4156 and VNTR 2996; HGDI>0.3) could be used to discriminate the Beijing strains in a given geographic region. Analysis based on the number of VNTR repeats showed three VNTRs (VNTR424, 3192, and 1955) to be phylogenetically informative loci. In addition, to determine the geographic variation of sequence types in MTB populations, we also compared sequence type (ST) data of our strains with published ST profiles of Beijing strains from Japan and Thailand. ST10, ST22, and ST19 were found to be prevalent in Taiwan (82%) and Thailand (92%). Furthermore, classification of Beijing sublineages as ancient or modern in Taiwan was found to depend on the repeat number of VNTR424. Finally, phylogenetic relationships of MTB isolates in Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan were revealed by a minimum spanning tree based on MIRU-VNTR genotyping. In this topology, the MIRU-VNTR genotypes of the respective clusters were tightly correlated to other genotypic characters. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that clonal evolution of these MTB lineages has occurred. PMID:22808061

  20. Protocol for a population-based molecular epidemiology study of tuberculosis transmission in a high HIV-burden setting: the Botswana Kopanyo study

    PubMed Central

    Zetola, N M; Modongo, C; Moonan, P K; Click, E; Oeltmann, J E; Shepherd, J; Finlay, A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is transmitted from person to person via airborne droplet nuclei. At the community level, Mtb transmission depends on the exposure venue, infectiousness of the tuberculosis (TB) index case and the susceptibility of the index case's social network. People living with HIV infection are at high risk of TB, yet the factors associated with TB transmission within communities with high rates of TB and HIV are largely undocumented. The primary aim of the Kopanyo study is to better understand the demographic, clinical, social and geospatial factors associated with TB and multidrug-resistant TB transmission in 2 communities in Botswana, a country where 60% of all patients with TB are also infected with HIV. This manuscript describes the methods used in the Kopanyo study. Methods and analysis The study will be conducted in greater Gaborone, which has high rates of HIV and a mobile population; and in Ghanzi, a rural community with lower prevalence of HIV infection and home to the native San population. Kopanyo aims to enrol all persons diagnosed with TB during a 4-year study period. From each participant, sputum will be cultured, and for all Mtb isolates, molecular genotyping (24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats) will be performed. Patients with matching genotype results will be considered members of a genotype cluster, a proxy for recent transmission. Demographic, behavioural, clinical and social information will be collected by interview. Participant residence, work place, healthcare facilities visited and social gathering venues will be geocoded. We will assess relationships between these factors and cluster involvement to better plan interventions for reducing TB transmission. Ethics Ethical approval from the Independent Review Boards at the University of Pennsylvania, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Botswana Ministry of Health and University of Botswana has been

  1. Acquisition of second-line drug resistance and extensive drug resistance during recent transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rural China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Mathema, B; Zhao, Q; Chen, L; Lu, W; Wang, W; Kreiswirth, B; Xu, B

    2015-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is prevalent in countries with a high TB burden, like China. As little is known about the emergence and spread of second-line drug (SLD) -resistant TB, we investigate the emergence and transmission of SLD-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rural China. In a multi-centre population-based study, we described the bacterial population structure and the transmission characteristics of SLD-resistant TB using Spoligotyping in combination with genotyping based on 24-locus MIRU-VNTR (mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat) plus four highly variable loci for the Beijing family, in four rural Chinese regions with diverse geographic and socio-demographic characteristics. Transmission networks among genotypically clustered patients were constructed using social network analysis. Of 1332 M. tuberculosis patient isolates recovered, the Beijing family represented 74.8% of all isolates and an association with MDR and simultaneous resistance between first-line drugs and SLDs. The genotyping analysis revealed that 189 isolates shared MIRU-VNTR patterns in 78 clusters with clustering rate and recent transmission rate of 14.2% and 8.3%, respectively. Fifty-three SLD-resistant isolates were observed in 31 clusters, 30 of which contained the strains with different drug susceptibility profiles and genetic mutations. In conjunction with molecular data, socio-network analysis indicated a key role of Central Township in the transmission across a highly interconnected network where SLD resistance accumulation occurred during transmission. SLD-resistant M. tuberculosis has been spreading in rural China with Beijing family being the dominant strains. Primary transmission of SLD-resistant strains in the population highlights the importance of routine drug susceptibility testing and effective anti-tuberculosis regimens for drug-resistant TB.

  2. GenoType MTBDRsl performance on clinical samples with diverse genetic background.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Paolo; Cabibbe, Andrea M; Mantegani, Paola; Borroni, Emanuele; Fattorini, Lanfranco; Tortoli, Enrico; Migliori, Giovanni B; Cirillo, Daniela M

    2012-09-01

    We evaluate the performance of the GenoType® MTBDRsl (Hain Lifescience Nehren, Germany) for the detection of second-line resistant tuberculosis and we correlate the frequency of mutations to different Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypes. We tested 175 strains and 59 clinical specimens interpreting the results according to the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy recommendations. All the strains were also investigated by spoligotyping and Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units-Variable Number of Tandem Repeats typing. The performances of the MTBDRsl in detecting resistance to fluoroquinolones (FQ), second-line injectable drugs (SLID), and ethambutol (EMB) on clinical isolates were similar (specificity ∼ 99%, sensitivity ∼ 70%, and positive predictive value (PPV) ∼ 99%). Of the 59 respiratory specimens, three samples were classified as "indeterminate". The specificity in detecting resistances was similar for FQs and EMB 100% (95% CI 92.7-100%) and 100% (95% CI 83.9-100%), respectively with a PPV of 100% (95% CI 64.6-100%) and 100% (95% CI 87.9-100%), respectively. Detection of SLID showed a specificity of 89.1% (95% CI 77.0-95.3%) and a PPV of 58.3% (95% CI 32.0-80.7%). Sensitivity for FQ-resistance detection was 100% (95% CI 64.6-100%), whereas for SLID and EMB it was 89.1% (95% CI 77.0-95.3%) and 86.1% (95% CI 71.3-93.9%), respectively. We detected a significant association between mutations in the rrs gene and Beijing lineage. The MTBDRsl can be used to "rule in" extensively drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis in a high risk group; the low sensitivity and negative predicted value (NPV) make confirmation by conventional drug susceptibility testing mandatory when mutations are not identified. NPV for SLID is higher in Beijing strains, showing that the predictive values of the molecular tests are related to the genetic background.

  3. Rapid genotypic assays to identify drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Evans, Joanna; Stead, Michael C; Nicol, Mark P; Segal, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Molecular assays to detect drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis are more rapid than standard drug susceptibility testing. To evaluate the efficacy of such assays in this setting, the GenoType MTBDRplus assay (HAIN Lifescience) and multiplex allele-specific PCR assays were carried out. The GenoType MTBDRplus assay was evaluated for the detection of rifampicin and isoniazid resistance in 223 M. tuberculosis isolates of known phenotypic drug sensitivity. The presence of KatG S315T and inhA C-15T mutations that confer isoniazid resistance was determined using multiplex allele-specific PCR assays. The relationship between isolate lineage and resistance determinant was investigated by spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat analysis. The GenoType MTBDRplus assay detected multidrug-resistant, isoniazid-monoresistant and rifampicin-monoresistant isolates with sensitivities of 91.5%, 56.1% and 70%, respectively. Multiplex allele-specific PCR detected isoniazid resistance in 91.5% of the MDR isolates and 53.7% of the isoniazid-monoresistant isolates. The W-Beijing lineage was overrepresented in the MDR subgroup of strains (odds ratio, 3.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.76-6.16). A proportion of isoniazid resistance, particularly in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates of lineage X3, is due to resistance determinants other than KatG S315T and inhA C-15T. The fact that these isolates will be indicated as drug susceptible highlights the need for determining local patterns of resistance mutations to provide users with information regarding the capabilities of rapid genotypic assays.

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in a country with low tuberculosis incidence: role of immigration and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Fenner, Lukas; Gagneux, Sebastien; Helbling, Peter; Battegay, Manuel; Rieder, Hans L; Pfyffer, Gaby E; Zwahlen, Marcel; Furrer, Hansjakob; Siegrist, Hans H; Fehr, Jan; Dolina, Marisa; Calmy, Alexandra; Stucki, David; Jaton, Katia; Janssens, Jean-Paul; Stalder, Jesica Mazza; Bodmer, Thomas; Ninet, Beatrice; Böttger, Erik C; Egger, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    Immigrants from high-burden countries and HIV-coinfected individuals are risk groups for tuberculosis (TB) in countries with low TB incidence. Therefore, we studied their role in transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Switzerland. We included all TB patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort and a sample of patients from the national TB registry. We identified molecular clusters by spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analysis and used weighted logistic regression adjusted for age and sex to identify risk factors for clustering, taking sampling proportions into account. In total, we analyzed 520 TB cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2008; 401 were foreign born, and 113 were HIV coinfected. The Euro-American M. tuberculosis lineage dominated throughout the study period (378 strains; 72.7%), with no evidence for another lineage, such as the Beijing genotype, emerging. We identified 35 molecular clusters with 90 patients, indicating recent transmission; 31 clusters involved foreign-born patients, and 15 involved HIV-infected patients. Birth origin was not associated with clustering (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73 to 3.43; P = 0.25, comparing Swiss-born with foreign-born patients), but clustering was reduced in HIV-infected patients (aOR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.93; P = 0.030). Cavitary disease, male sex, and younger age were all associated with molecular clustering. In conclusion, most TB patients in Switzerland were foreign born, but transmission of M. tuberculosis was not more common among immigrants and was reduced in HIV-infected patients followed up in the national HIV cohort study. Continued access to health services and clinical follow-up will be essential to control TB in this population.

  5. Genomic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains in Cantabria (Spain), a Moderate TB Incidence Setting

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Molino Bernal, Inmaculada C.; Lillebaek, Troels; Pedersen, Mathias K.; Martinez-Martinez, Luis; Folkvardsen, Dorte B.; Agüero, Jesús; Rasmussen, E. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) control strategies are focused mainly on prevention, early diagnosis, compliance to treatment and contact tracing. The objectives of this study were to explore the frequency and risk factors of recent transmission of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in Cantabria in Northern Spain from 2012 through 2013 and to analyze their clonal complexity for better understanding of the transmission dynamics in a moderate TB incidence setting. Methods DNA from 85 out of 87 isolates from bacteriologically confirmed cases of MTBC infection were extracted directly from frozen stocks and genotyped using the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) method. The MIRU-VNTRplus database tool was used to identify clusters and lineages and to build a neighbor joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree. In addition, data were compared to the SITVIT2 database at the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results The rate of recent transmission was calculated to 24%. Clustering was associated with being Spanish-born. A high prevalence of isolates of the Euro-American lineage was found. In addition, MIRU-VNTR profiles of the studied isolates corresponded to previously found MIRU-VNTR types in other countries, including Spain, Belgium, Great Britain, USA, Croatia, South Africa and The Netherlands. Six of the strains analyzed represented clonal variants. Conclusion Transmission of MTBC is well controlled in Cantabria. The majority of TB patients were born in Spain. The population structure of MTBC in Cantabria has a low diversity of major clonal lineages with the Euro-American lineage predominating. PMID:27315243

  6. Tuberculosis drug-resistance in Lisbon, Portugal: a 6-year overview.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, J; Macedo, R; Silva, C; Pinto, C; Furtado, C; Brum, L; Portugal, I

    2011-09-01

    Multidrug-resistance and extensive drug-resistance pose a serious threat to tuberculosis management in Portugal. The country has high TB incidence rates in comparison with other European Union countries, with the Lisbon Health Region being one of the most affected. In the present study we have analysed a convenience sample of 3025 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates, recovered over a 6-year period (2001-2006) in the Lisbon Health Region, regarding drug-resistance both to first-line and second-line drugs. Moreover, 100 of these isolates were also genotyped by 12-loci Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit - Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (MIRU-VNTR) analysis. We have compared each year and observed the existence of 22 different resistance profiles, with MDR-TB rates ranging between 9.9% and 15.2% and XDR-TB rates, relative to the number of MDR-TB isolates, between 44.3% and 66.1% (excluding 1 year here considered as an outlier). A steady increase in the fraction of MDR-TB isolates resistant to all first-line drugs was also noticed. The genotyping analysis of MDR-TB isolates revealed six clusters, of which three (Lisboa3, Lisboa4 and Q1) were related to XDR-TB. Our results show that active transmission of MDR- and XDR-TB is taking place and that the high prevalence of observed XDR-TB is due to the continued transmission of particular genetic clusters. Enforcement of the implementation of genotyping in diagnostic routines would lead to early detection of resistant cases.

  7. An investigation on the population structure of mixed infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoying; Liu, Haican; Wei, Jianhao; Wu, Xiaocui; Yu, Qin; Zhao, Xiuqin; Lyu, Jianxin; Lou, Yongliang; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-12-01

    Mixed infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains have attracted more attention due to their increasing frequencies worldwide, especially in the areas of high tuberculosis (TB) prevalence. In this study, we accessed the rates of mixed infections in a setting with high TB prevalence in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. A total of 384 M. tuberculosis isolates from the local TB hospital were subjected to mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing method. The single clones of the strains with mixed infections were separated by subculturing them on the Löwenstein-Jensen medium. Of these 384 isolates, twelve strains (3.13%) were identified as mixed infections by MIRU-VNTR. Statistical analysis indicated that demographic characteristics and drug susceptibility profiles showed no statistically significant association with the mixed infections. We further subcultured the mixed infection strains and selected 30 clones from the subculture for each mixed infection. Genotyping data revealed that eight (8/12, 66.7%) strains with mixed infections had converted into single infection through subculture. The higher growth rate was associated with the increasing proportion of variant subpopulation through subculture. In conclusion, by using the MIRU-VNTR method, we demonstrate that the prevalence of mixed infections in Inner Mongolia is low. Additionally, our findings reveal that the subculture changes the population structures of mixed infections, and the subpopulation with higher growth rate show better fitness, which is associated with high proportion among the population structure after subculture. This study highlights that the use of clinical specimens, rather than subcultured isolates, is preferred to estimate the prevalence of mixed infections in the specific regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic Lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Riyahi Zaniani, Fatemeh; Moghim, Sharareh; Mirhendi, Hossein; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Fazeli, Hossein; Salehi, Mahshid; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to identify the genetic lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Isfahan via the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable number tandem repeat typing method based on 15 loci. Forty-nine M. tuberculosis isolates were collected between 2013 and 2015 from Tuberculosis patients in Mollahadi Sabzevari Tuberculosis Center in Isfahan. All isolates were typed by 15-locus MIRU-VNTR typing. The highest percentage of isolates, 44.89 % (22/49), belonged to the Euro-American lineage, while the frequencies of the East-African-Indian, East-Asian, and Indo-Oceanic lineages were 28.57 % (14/49), 24.4 % (12/49), and 2.04 % (1/49), respectively. Among the 22 isolates of the Euro-American lineage, those belonging to the NEW-1 sub-lineage were most prevalent (24.4 %). Approximately, the same proportion of isolates belonging to the Delhi/CAS, Beijing, and NEW-1 sub-lineages were identified in Iranian and Afghan immigrant patients. The Delhi/CAS and Beijing sub-lineage isolates were prevalent among patients who had been previously treated for TB. Results showed that all of the 49 MIRU-VNTR patterns were unique and the clustering rate of the 15-locus MIRU-VNTR was 0.0 (minimum recent transmission). The results of this study show that the lineages of M. tuberculosis isolates in Isfahan are similar to those reported in the Eastern Mediterranean region (indicative of the epidemiological relationship between the countries in the region). The low clustering rate in our results reveals that transmission of tuberculosis in Isfahan is, in most cases, a reactivation of previous tuberculosis infection and the role of recently transmitted disease is minor.

  9. Use of whole-genome sequencing to distinguish relapse from reinfection in a completed tuberculosis clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Witney, Adam A; Bateson, Anna L E; Jindani, Amina; Phillips, Patrick P J; Coleman, David; Stoker, Neil G; Butcher, Philip D; McHugh, Timothy D

    2017-03-29

    RIFAQUIN was a tuberculosis chemotherapy trial in southern Africa including regimens with high-dose rifapentine with moxifloxacin. Here, the application of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is evaluated within RIFAQUIN for identifying new infections in treated patients as either relapses or reinfections. WGS is further compared with mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. This is the first report of WGS being used to evaluate new infections in a completed clinical trial for which all treatment and epidemiological data are available for analysis. DNA from 36 paired samples of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultured from patients before and after treatment was typed using 24-loci MIRU-VNTR, in silico spoligotyping and WGS. Following WGS, the sequences were mapped against the reference strain H37Rv, the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) differences between pairs were identified, and a phylogenetic reconstruction was performed. WGS indicated that 32 of the paired samples had a very low number of SNP differences (0-5; likely relapses). One pair had an intermediate number of SNP differences, and was likely the result of a mixed infection with a pre-treatment minor genotype that was highly related to the post-treatment genotype; this was reclassified as a relapse, in contrast to the MIRU-VNTR result. The remaining three pairs had very high SNP differences (>750; likely reinfections). WGS and MIRU-VNTR both similarly differentiated relapses and reinfections, but WGS provided significant extra information. The low proportion of reinfections seen suggests that in standard chemotherapy trials with up to 24 months of follow-up, typing the strains brings little benefit to an analysis of the trial outcome in terms of differentiating relapse and reinfection. However, there is a benefit to using WGS as compared to MIRU-VNTR in terms of the additional genotype information obtained, in particular for defining the presence of mixed

  10. Synchronous Comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Epidemiology Strains by "MIRU-VNTR" and "MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping" Technique.

    PubMed

    Jafarian, Mehdi; Aghali-Merza, Muayed; Farnia, Parissa; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2010-07-01

    Molecular epidemiology analyses are frequently used in determining epidemiology of tuberculosis. Recently, Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit Variable Number Tandem Repeat (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping has become an important method, as it allows high-through put, discriminatory and reproducible analysis of clinical isolate. The purpose of this study is to compare techniques of "MIRU-VNTR" versus "MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping" together for study of genetic pattern of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) strains. Sixty M. tuberculosis (MTB) isolates were selected (30 susceptible, 30 multi-drug resistant) for this study. Thereafter, the "MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping" were performed to identify their genetic patterns. The frequency of unknown genetic pattern of MTB was compared using technique of "MIRU-VNTR" alone versus "MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping" together. The MIRU-VNTR allelic diversity at each of the loci was calculated by Hunter - Gaston Discriminatory Index (HGDI). Based on differentiation index of all strains 10, 16, 26, 31 and 40 loci were identified as the most distinctive (HGI ≥0.6) and 2, 4, 20 and 24 as the weakest distinctive locus (HGI ≤0.3). By using MIRU-VNTR technique 38% (n = 23) of isolates could not be typed, whereas by applying "MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping" together only 15% (n = 9) of isolates remained unknown (p = 0.004). For sensitive strains, the difference was significant (67% vs. 90%, p = 0.028), but only marginally significant for drug resistant strains (57% vs. 80%, p = 0.052). The discrimination power of 12-locus MIRU-VNTR and Spoligotyping was equal to that of MIRU-VNTR analysis. If appropriate loci are added to the standard MIRU analysis, MIRU-VNTR genotyping could be a valuable tool for strain typing and epidemiological research of M. tuberculosis. With this approach a more clear understanding about genetic pattern of MTB can be achieved.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis causing tuberculous lymphadenitis in Maputo, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Sofia Omar; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Massawo, Leguesse; Alberto, Matos; Fernandes, Fabíola Couto; Monteiro, Eliane; Couvin, David; Matavele, José Maiane; Rastogi, Nalin; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Machado, Adelina; Carrilho, Carla; Groenheit, Ramona; Källenius, Gunilla; Koivula, Tuija

    2015-11-21

    The zoonosis bovine tuberculosis (TB) is known to be responsible for a considerable proportion of extrapulmonary TB. In Mozambique, bovine TB is a recognised problem in cattle, but little has been done to evaluate how Mycobacterium bovis has contributed to human TB. We here explore the public health risk for bovine TB in Maputo, by characterizing the isolates from tuberculous lymphadenitis (TBLN) cases, a common manifestation of bovine TB in humans, in the Pathology Service of Maputo Central Hospital, in Mozambique, during one year. Among 110 patients suspected of having TBLN, 49 had a positive culture result. Of those, 48 (98%) were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and one for nontuberculous mycobacteria. Of the 45 isolates analysed by spoligotyping and Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit-Variable Number Tandem Repeat (MIRU-VNTR), all were M. tuberculosis. No M. bovis was found. Cervical TBLN, corresponding to 39 (86.7%) cases, was the main cause of TBLN and 66.7% of those where from HIV positive patients. We found that TBLN in Maputo was caused by a variety of M. tuberculosis strains. The most prevalent lineage was the EAI (n = 19; 43.2%). Particular common spoligotypes were SIT 48 (EAI1_SOM sublineage), SIT 42 (LAM 9), SIT 1 (Beijing) and SIT53 (T1), similar to findings among pulmonary cases. M. tuberculosis was the main etiological agent of TBLN in Maputo. M. tuberculosis genotypes were similar to the ones causing pulmonary TB, suggesting that in Maputo, cases of TBLN arise from the same source as pulmonary TB, rather than from an external zoonotic source. Further research is needed on other forms of extrapulmonary TB and in rural areas where there is high prevalence of bovine TB in cattle, to evaluate the risk of transmission of M. bovis from cattle to humans.

  12. Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Assay for Genotyping Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Leão, Célia; Goldstone, Robert J; Bryant, Josephine; McLuckie, Joyce; Inácio, João; Smith, David G E; Stevenson, Karen

    2016-03-01

    Typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains presents a challenge, since they are genetically monomorphic and traditional molecular techniques have limited discriminatory power. The recent advances and availability of whole-genome sequencing have extended possibilities for the characterization of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and whole-genome sequencing can provide a phylogenetic context to facilitate global epidemiology studies. In this study, we developed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay based on PCR and restriction enzyme digestion or sequencing of the amplified product. The SNP analysis was performed using genome sequence data from 133 Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates with different genotypes from 8 different host species and 17 distinct geographic regions around the world. A total of 28,402 SNPs were identified among all of the isolates. The minimum number of SNPs required to distinguish between all of the 133 genomes was 93 and between only the type C isolates was 41. To reduce the number of SNPs and PCRs required, we adopted an approach based on sequential detection of SNPs and a decision tree. By the analysis of 14 SNPs Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates can be characterized within 14 phylogenetic groups with a higher discriminatory power than mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat assay and other typing methods. Continuous updating of genome sequences is needed in order to better characterize new phylogenetic groups and SNP profiles. The novel SNP assay is a discriminative, simple, reproducible method and requires only basic laboratory equipment for the large-scale global typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Population structure among mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Realpe, Teresa; Correa, Nidia; Rozo, Juan Carlos; Ferro, Beatriz Eugenia; Ferro, Beatriz Elena; Gomez, Verónica; Zapata, Elsa; Ribon, Wellman; Puerto, Gloria; Castro, Claudia; Nieto, Luisa María; Diaz, Maria Lilia; Rivera, Oriana; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Arbelaez, Maria Patricia; Robledo, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Phylogeographic composition of M. tuberculosis populations reveals associations between lineages and human populations that might have implications for the development of strategies to control the disease. In Latin America, lineage 4 or the Euro-American, is predominant with considerable variations among and within countries. In Colombia, although few studies from specific localities have revealed differences in M. tuberculosis populations, there are still areas of the country where this information is lacking, as is a comparison of Colombian isolates with those from the rest of the world. A total of 414 M. tuberculosis isolates from adult pulmonary tuberculosis cases from three Colombian states were studied. Isolates were genotyped using IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), spoligotyping, and 24-locus Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs). SIT42 (LAM9) and SIT62 (H1) represented 53.3% of isolates, followed by 8.21% SIT50 (H3), 5.07% SIT53 (T1), and 3.14% SIT727 (H1). Composite spoligotyping and 24-locus MIRU- VNTR minimum spanning tree analysis suggest a recent expansion of SIT42 and SIT62 evolved originally from SIT53 (T1). The proportion of Haarlem sublineage (44.3%) was significantly higher than that in neighboring countries. Associations were found between M. tuberculosis MDR and SIT45 (H1), as well as HIV-positive serology with SIT727 (H1) and SIT53 (T1). This study showed the population structure of M. tuberculosis in several regions from Colombia with a dominance of the LAM and Haarlem sublineages, particularly in two major urban settings (Medellín and Cali). Dominant spoligotypes were LAM9 (SIT 42) and Haarlem (SIT62). The proportion of the Haarlem sublineage was higher in Colombia compared to that in neighboring countries, suggesting particular conditions of co-evolution with the corresponding human population that favor the success of this sublineage.

  14. Population Structure among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Realpe, Teresa; Correa, Nidia; Rozo, Juan Carlos; Ferro, Beatriz Elena; Gomez, Verónica; Zapata, Elsa; Ribon, Wellman; Puerto, Gloria; Castro, Claudia; Nieto, Luisa María; Diaz, Maria Lilia; Rivera, Oriana; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Arbelaez, Maria Patricia; Robledo, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Background Phylogeographic composition of M. tuberculosis populations reveals associations between lineages and human populations that might have implications for the development of strategies to control the disease. In Latin America, lineage 4 or the Euro-American, is predominant with considerable variations among and within countries. In Colombia, although few studies from specific localities have revealed differences in M. tuberculosis populations, there are still areas of the country where this information is lacking, as is a comparison of Colombian isolates with those from the rest of the world. Principal Findings A total of 414 M. tuberculosis isolates from adult pulmonary tuberculosis cases from three Colombian states were studied. Isolates were genotyped using IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), spoligotyping, and 24-locus Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs). SIT42 (LAM9) and SIT62 (H1) represented 53.3% of isolates, followed by 8.21% SIT50 (H3), 5.07% SIT53 (T1), and 3.14% SIT727 (H1). Composite spoligotyping and 24-locus MIRU- VNTR minimum spanning tree analysis suggest a recent expansion of SIT42 and SIT62 evolved originally from SIT53 (T1). The proportion of Haarlem sublineage (44.3%) was significantly higher than that in neighboring countries. Associations were found between M. tuberculosis MDR and SIT45 (H1), as well as HIV-positive serology with SIT727 (H1) and SIT53 (T1). Conclusions This study showed the population structure of M. tuberculosis in several regions from Colombia with a dominance of the LAM and Haarlem sublineages, particularly in two major urban settings (Medellín and Cali). Dominant spoligotypes were LAM9 (SIT 42) and Haarlem (SIT62). The proportion of the Haarlem sublineage was higher in Colombia compared to that in neighboring countries, suggesting particular conditions of co-evolution with the corresponding human population that favor the success of this

  15. Identifying Hotspots of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Transmission Using Spatial and Molecular Genetic Data.

    PubMed

    Zelner, Jonathan L; Murray, Megan B; Becerra, Mercedes C; Galea, Jerome; Lecca, Leonid; Calderon, Roger; Yataco, Rosa; Contreras, Carmen; Zhang, Zibiao; Manjourides, Justin; Grenfell, Bryan T; Cohen, Ted

    2016-01-15

    We aimed to identify and determine the etiology of "hotspots" of concentrated multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-tuberculosis) risk in Lima, Peru. From 2009 to 2012, we conducted a prospective cohort study among households of tuberculosis cases from 106 health center (HC) areas in Lima, Peru. All notified tuberculosis cases and their household contacts were followed for 1 year. Symptomatic individuals were screened by microscopy and culture; positive cultures were tested for drug susceptibility (DST) and genotyped by 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable-number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR). 3286 individuals with culture-confirmed disease, DST, and 24-loci MIRU-VNTR were included in our analysis. Our analysis reveals: (1) heterogeneity in annual per-capita incidence of tuberculosis and MDR-tuberculosis by HC, with a rate of MDR-tuberculosis 89 times greater (95% confidence interval [CI], 54,185) in the most-affected versus the least-affected HC; (2) high risk for MDR-tuberculosis in a region spanning several HCs (odds ratio = 3.19, 95% CI, 2.33, 4.36); and (3) spatial aggregation of MDR-tuberculosis genotypes, suggesting localized transmission. These findings reveal that localized transmission is an important driver of the epidemic of MDR-tuberculosis in Lima. Efforts to interrupt transmission may be most effective if targeted to this area of the city. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Tuberculous spondylitis in Russia and prominent role of multidrug-resistant clone Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing B0/W148.

    PubMed

    Vyazovaya, Anna; Mokrousov, Igor; Solovieva, Natalia; Mushkin, Alexander; Manicheva, Olga; Vishnevsky, Boris; Zhuravlev, Viacheslav; Narvskaya, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Extrapulmonary and, in particular, spinal tuberculosis (TB) constitutes a minor but significant part of the total TB incidence. In spite of this, almost no studies on the genetic diversity and drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from spinal TB patients have been published to date. Here, we report results of the first Russian and globally largest molecular study of M. tuberculosis isolates recovered from patients with tuberculous spondylitis (TBS). The majority of 107 isolates were assigned to the Beijing genotype (n = 80); the other main families were T (n = 11), Ural (n = 7), and LAM (n = 4). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was more frequently found among Beijing (90.5%) and, intriguingly, Ural (71.4%) isolates than other genotypes (5%; P < 0.001). The extremely drug-resistant (XDR) phenotype was exclusively found in the Beijing isolates (n = 7). A notable prevalence of the rpoB531 and katG315 mutations in Beijing strains that were similarly high in both TBS (this study) and published pulmonary TB (PTB) samples from Russia shows that TBS and PTB Beijing strains follow the same paradigm of acquisition of rifampin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) resistance. The 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) subtyping of 80 Beijing isolates further discriminated them into 24 types (Hunter Gaston index [HGI] = 0.83); types 100-32 and 94-32 represented the largest groups. A genotype of Russian successful clone B0/W148 was identified in 30 of 80 Beijing isolates. In conclusion, this study highlighted a crucial impact of the Beijing genotype and the especially prominent role of its MDR-associated successful clone B0/W148 cluster in the development of spinal MDR-TB in Russian patients. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium bovis Strains Isolated in Italy from 2000 to 2006 and Evaluation of Variable-Number Tandem Repeats for Geographically Optimized Genotyping▿

    PubMed Central

    Boniotti, M. Beatrice; Goria, Maria; Loda, Daniela; Garrone, Annalisa; Benedetto, Alessandro; Mondo, Alessandra; Tisato, Ernesto; Zanoni, Mariagrazia; Zoppi, Simona; Dondo, Alessandro; Tagliabue, Silvia; Bonora, Stefano; Zanardi, Giorgio; Pacciarini, M. Lodovica

    2009-01-01

    Spoligotyping and exact tandem repeat (ETR) analysis of Mycobacterium bovis and M. caprae isolated strains has been routinely carried out in Italy since 2000 to obtain a database of genetic profiles and support traditional epidemiological investigations. In this study, we characterized 1,503 M. bovis and 57 M. caprae isolates obtained from 2000 to 2006 in 747 cattle herds mainly located in northern Italy. We identified 81 spoligotypes and 113 ETR profiles, while the combination of spoligotyping/ETR analysis differentiated 228 genotypes, with genotypic diversity indices of 0.70 (spoligotyping), 0.94 (ETR-A to -E typing), and 0.97 (spoligotyping/ETR-A to -E typing), respectively. Despite the high degree of resolution obtained, the spoligotyping/ETR methods were not discriminative enough in the case of genotypes characterized by the combination of SB0120, the predominant spoligotype in Italy, with the most common ETR profiles. To obtain a more informative subset of typing loci, 24 mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) markers were evaluated by analyzing a panel of 100 epidemiologically unrelated SB0120 isolates. The panel was differentiated into 89 profiles with an overall genotypic diversity of 0.987 that could be also achieved by using a minimal group of 13 loci: ETR-A, -B, and -E; MIRU 26 and 40; and VNTR 2163a, 2163b, 3155, 1612, 4052, 1895, 3232, and 3336. The allelic diversity index and the stability of single loci was evaluated to provide the most discriminative genotyping method for locally prevalent strains. PMID:19144792

  18. Molecular typing of Mycobacterium bovis strains isolated in Italy from 2000 to 2006 and evaluation of variable-number tandem repeats for geographically optimized genotyping.

    PubMed

    Boniotti, M Beatrice; Goria, Maria; Loda, Daniela; Garrone, Annalisa; Benedetto, Alessandro; Mondo, Alessandra; Tisato, Ernesto; Zanoni, Mariagrazia; Zoppi, Simona; Dondo, Alessandro; Tagliabue, Silvia; Bonora, Stefano; Zanardi, Giorgio; Pacciarini, M Lodovica

    2009-03-01

    Spoligotyping and exact tandem repeat (ETR) analysis of Mycobacterium bovis and M. caprae isolated strains has been routinely carried out in Italy since 2000 to obtain a database of genetic profiles and support traditional epidemiological investigations. In this study, we characterized 1,503 M. bovis and 57 M. caprae isolates obtained from 2000 to 2006 in 747 cattle herds mainly located in northern Italy. We identified 81 spoligotypes and 113 ETR profiles, while the combination of spoligotyping/ETR analysis differentiated 228 genotypes, with genotypic diversity indices of 0.70 (spoligotyping), 0.94 (ETR-A to -E typing), and 0.97 (spoligotyping/ETR-A to -E typing), respectively. Despite the high degree of resolution obtained, the spoligotyping/ETR methods were not discriminative enough in the case of genotypes characterized by the combination of SB0120, the predominant spoligotype in Italy, with the most common ETR profiles. To obtain a more informative subset of typing loci, 24 mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) markers were evaluated by analyzing a panel of 100 epidemiologically unrelated SB0120 isolates. The panel was differentiated into 89 profiles with an overall genotypic diversity of 0.987 that could be also achieved by using a minimal group of 13 loci: ETR-A, -B, and -E; MIRU 26 and 40; and VNTR 2163a, 2163b, 3155, 1612, 4052, 1895, 3232, and 3336. The allelic diversity index and the stability of single loci was evaluated to provide the most discriminative genotyping method for locally prevalent strains.

  19. The population structure of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Sichuan in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuding; Feng, Qin; Tang, Ke; Zhang, Congcong; Sun, Honghu; Luo, Tao; Yang, Zhirong; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Sun, Qun

    2012-06-01

    China ranks second next to India among 22 high-burden countries despite decades' effort on tuberculosis (TB) control. The Sichuan province today contains the second-largest number of TB cases among Chinese provinces, where the prevalence of drug-resistant TB, especially MDR-TB, is much higher than the average level in eastern China. In this study, the population structure and the transmission characteristics of drug-resistant TB in Sichuan province were studied by spoligotyping and 24-locus Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem DNA repeats (MIRU-VNTR), applied to a total of 306 clinical isolates. Spoligotyping-based analysis showed that Beijing family represented 69.28% of all isolates and constituted the largest group (66.24%) of MDR-TB in Sichuan. The remaining isolates, accounting for 33.76% of MDR isolates, belonged to the ill-defined T family, Manu2, H3, LAM9, and other minor unassigned clades. The discriminatory power evaluated for spoligotyping was poor (HGI=0.595), but high for 24-locus MIRU-VNTRs (HGI=0.999). The number of the most discriminatory loci (h>0.6) was 12, including locus 424, 802, 960, 1644, 1955, 2163b, 2996, 3007, 3192, 3690, 4348 and 4052. It was concluded that 24-locus MIRU-VNTRs could be a more discriminatory tool for differentiating clinical isolates from Sichuan region. The small clustering size obtained from the current population structure analysis suggested that the high prevalence of drug-resistant TB in this region might be attributed partially to the acquired resistance due to inappropriate drug use rather than active transmission of drug-resistant TB (primary resistance).

  20. Evaluation of the inaccurate assignment of mixed infections by Mycobacterium tuberculosis as exogenous reinfection and analysis of the potential role of bacterial factors in reinfection.

    PubMed

    Martín, Ana; Herranz, Marta; Navarro, Yurena; Lasarte, Sandra; Ruiz Serrano, María Jesús; Bouza, Emilio; García de Viedma, Darío

    2011-04-01

    Molecular analysis of recurrent tuberculosis has revealed that a second episode may be caused by a strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis other than that involved in the first infection, thus indicating that exogenous reinfection plays a role in recurrence. We focused on two aspects of reinfection that have received little attention. First, we evaluated whether a lack of methodological refinement could lead to inaccurate assignment of mixed infections as exogenous reinfection, in which a differential selection of each of the coinfecting strains occurred over time. We used the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) method to genotype 122 isolates from 40 patients with recurrent tuberculosis. We identified 11/40 (27.5%) cases with genotypic differences between the isolates involved in the sequential episodes. Major genotypic differences were found in 8/11 cases, suggesting exogenous reinfection; in the remaining 3 cases, subtle genotypic differences were observed, probably indicating microevolution from a parental strain. In all cases, only a single strain was detected for the isolate(s) from each episode, thus ruling out the possibility that reinfection could correspond to undetected mixed infection. Second, we analyzed the infectivity of a selection of 12 strains from six cases with genotypically different strains between episodes. No main differences were observed in an ex vivo model of infection between the strains involved in the first episodes and those involved in the recurrent episodes. In our setting, our results suggest the following: (i) the possibility of misassignment of mixed infection as exogenous reinfection is improbable, and (ii) bacterial infectivity does not seem to play a role in exogenous reinfection.

  1. Molecular characterization and second-line antituberculosis drug resistance patterns of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the northern region of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Said, Halima M; Kock, Marleen M; Ismail, Nazir A; Mphahlele, Matsie; Baba, Kamaldeen; Omar, Shaheed V; Osman, Ayman G; Hoosen, Anwar A; Ehlers, Marthie M

    2012-09-01

    Despite South Africa being one of the high-burden multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) countries, information regarding the population structure of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains is limited from many regions of South Africa. This study investigated the population structure and transmission patterns of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates in a high-burden setting of South Africa as well as the possible association of genotypes with drug resistance and demographic characteristics. A total of 336 consecutive MDR-TB isolates from four provinces of South Africa were genotyped using spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Drug susceptibility testing for ofloxacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin was performed using the agar proportion method. The results showed that 4.8% of MDR-TB isolates were resistant to ofloxacin, 2.7% were resistant to kanamycin, and 4.5% were resistant to capreomycin, while 7.1% were extensively drug resistant (XDR), and the remaining 83.6% were susceptible to all of the second-line drugs tested. Spoligotyping grouped 90.8% of the isolates into 25 clusters, while 9.2% isolates were unclustered. Ninety-one percent of the 336 isolates were assigned to 21 previously described shared types, with the Beijing family being the predominant genotype in the North-West and Limpopo Provinces, while the EAI1_SOM family was the predominant genotype in the Gauteng and Mpumalanga Provinces. No association was found between genotypes and specific drug resistance patterns or demographic information. The high level of diversity and the geographical distribution of the drug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates in this study suggest that the transmission of TB in the study settings is not caused by the clonal spread of a specific M. tuberculosis strain.

  2. A close-up on the epidemiology and transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Poland.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, T; Brzostek, A; van Belkum, A; Dziadek, J; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, E; Zwolska, Z

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) poses a serious challenge to the global control of the disease. The purpose of this study was to characterize MDR-TB patients from Poland and to determine the extent of MDR-TB disease attributable to recent transmission. The study included all 46 patients diagnosed with MDR-TB in Poland in 2004 and followed up for 6 years (until 2011). For each patient, sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and bacteriological data were collected by the review of medical and laboratory records. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from all patients were characterized using spoligotyping, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing, IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and sequencing analysis of drug resistance-associated loci (katG, mabA-inhA, rpoβ, rpsL, and embB). The majority of patients were male (86.9%), 40-64 years of age (60.8%), with a history of TB treatment (84.8%), and producing smear-positive sputa (86.9%). Twenty-two (47.8%) patients suffered from concomitant diseases and 28 (60.8%) were alcohol abusers. Treatment outcome assessment revealed that 8 (17.4%) patients were cured or completed therapy, while 15 (32.6%) died of TB, 11 (23.9%) defaulted, 8 (17.4%) failed, and 1 (2.2%) was transferred and lost to follow-up. Upon genotyping, 10 (21.7%) isolates were allocated in four clusters. These were further subdivided by mutational profiling. Overall, in 6 (13%) patients, MDR-TB was a result of recent transmission. For 4 (8.7%) of these patients, a direct epidemiological link was established. The study shows that the transmission of MDR-TB occurs at a low rate in Poland. Of urgent need is the implementation of a policy of enforced treatment of MDR-TB patients in Poland.

  3. Avian mycobacteriosis in free-living raptors in Majorca Island, Spain.

    PubMed

    Millán, Javier; Negre, Nieves; Castellanos, Elena; de Juan, Lucía; Mateos, Ana; Parpal, Lluis; Aranaz, Alicia

    2010-02-01

    Avian mycobacteriosis is a chronic, infectious disease caused by different species of mycobacteria, usually belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex. From 2004 to 2007, 589 raptors brought dead or sick to a wildlife rehabilitation centre in Majorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) were necropsied. The birds belonged to 12 different species, chiefly common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) (n=297), scops owl (Otus scops) (n=109), barn owl (Tyto alba) (n=75), long-eared owl (Asio otus) (n=58), peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) (n=27), and booted eagle (Hieraaetus pennatus) (n=13). Gross lesions compatible with mycobacteriosis were observed in 14 birds (2.4%) found in several locations in Majorca. They were 12 kestrels (prevalence in this species, 4.0%), one long-eared owl (1.7%) and one scops owl (0.9%), all the birds presenting white-yellowish nodules from pinpoint size to 1 cm in diameter in diverse organs, mainly in the liver, spleen and intestine. Affected organs were subjected to bacteriology and molecular identification by polymerase chain reaction and, in all cases, infection with M. avium subspecies avium was confirmed. The observed prevalences are similar to those previously observed in Holland, although the actual prevalence detected in this study is likely to be higher than reported because only birds with gross lesions were subjected to culture. Further molecular characterization with a set of six mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat loci was used to sub-type the isolates in order to show the existence of possible epidemiological links. Six different genotypes were found, which points to infection from multiple foci. No temporal or geographical aggregation of the cases was observed to be associated with the presence of positive birds or with the different variable number tandem repeat allelic profiles. The most feasible origin might be water or food sources, although the reservoir of mycobacteria remains unknown.

  4. Predominance of Central Asian and European families among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Kashmir Valley, India.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Gulnaz; Wani, Tehmeena; Sharma, Pragya; Katoch, V M; Lone, Rubina; Shah, Azra; Katoch, Kiran; Kakru, D K; Chauhan, Devendra Singh

    2017-10-01

    As there are no data available regarding the strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis circulating in Kashmir Valley, India, the current study aimed at describing the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis strains in this region, by spoligotyping and 12-locus-based MIRU-VNTR typing (Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit-Variable Number Tandem Repeat). Sputa from 207 smear positive cases with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis were subjected to culture for M. tuberculosis. Eighty-five isolates confirmed as M. tuberculosis were subjected to drug susceptibility testing and molecular typing by spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTRs. Drug susceptibility results of 72 isolates revealed 76.3% as fully sensitive while 5.5% as multidrug resistant (MDR). Spoligotyping of 85 isolates detected 42 spoligotypes with 50 isolates (58.8%) clustered into seven spoligotypes. SIT26/CAS1_Del was the major spoligotype (23, 27%) followed by SIT127/H4 (12, 14.1%); CAS lineage (37.6%) was predominant, followed by Haarlem (25.8%) and ill-defined T clade (23.5%). MIRU-VNTR analysis displayed 82 MIRU patterns from 85 strains, including 3 small clusters and 79 unique. MIRU 26 was found to be the most discriminatory locus. Kashmir Valley has CAS as the predominant lineage of M. tuberculosis similar to the rest of the Indian sub-continent, while it is peculiar in having Euro American lineages such as Haarlem and ill-defined T clade. Copyright © 2017 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular analysis and MIRU-VNTR typing of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, 'hominissuis' and silvaticum strains of veterinary origin.

    PubMed

    Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Csivincsik, Ágnes; Dán, Ádám; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2016-06-01

    Besides Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), M. avium subsp. avium (MAA), M. avium subsp. silvaticum (MAS), and 'M. avium subsp. hominissuis' (MAH) are equally important members of M. avium complex, with worldwide distribution and zoonotic potential. Genotypic discrimination is a prerequisite to epidemiological studies which can facilitate disease prevention through revealing infection sources and transmission routes. The primary aim of this study was to identify the genetic diversity within 135 MAA, 62 MAS, and 84 MAH strains isolated from wild and domestic mammals, reptiles and birds. Strains were tested for the presence of large sequence polymorphism LSP(A)17 and were submitted to Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable-number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analysis at 8 loci, including MIRU1, 2, 3, and 4, VNTR25, 32, and 259, and MATR9. In 12 strains hsp65 sequence code type was also determined. LSP(A)17 was present only in 19.9% of the strains. All LSP(A)17 positive strains belonged to subspecies MAH. The discriminatory power of the MIRU-VNTR loci set used reached 0.9228. Altogether 54 different genotypes were detected. Within MAH, MAA, and MAS strains 33, 16, and 5 different genotypes were observed. The described genotypes were not restricted to geographic regions or host species, but proved to be subspecies specific. Our knowledge about MAS is limited due to isolation and identification difficulties. This is the first study including a large number of MAS field strains. Our results demonstrate the high diversity of MAH and MAA strains and the relative uniformity of MAS strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Are mouse models of human mycobacterial diseases relevant? Genetics says: ‘yes!’

    PubMed Central

    Apt, Alexander S

    2011-01-01

    Relevance and accuracy of experimental mouse models of tuberculosis (TB) are the subject of constant debate. This article briefly reviews genetic aspects of this problem and provides a few examples of mycobacterial diseases with similar or identical genetic control in mice and humans. The two species display more similarities than differences regarding both genetics of susceptibility/severity of mycobacterial diseases and the networks of protective and pathological immune reactions. In the opinion of the author, refined mouse models of mycobacterial diseases are extremely useful for modelling the corresponding human conditions, if genetic diversity is taken into account. PMID:21896006

  7. Expect the Unexpected: Mycobacterial Infection in Post Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mohan M; Wade, Roshan N; Bava, Surendar S

    2017-01-01

    Orthopaedic Surgeons rarely encounter mycobacterial infections in Post Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) patients. We present series of two cases to create awareness among clinicians to expect the unexpected. Tuberculosis typical/ atypical is a hidden culprit in catch clinical situations when chronic infection is Suspected, but the lab investigations are negative in persistently symptomatic patients. In such situations clinicians should suspect atypical or complex mycobacterial infections and evaluate the patients accordingly. Clinical suspicion, evaluation, isolation and treatment of atypical or complex mycobacterial infections with sensitive chemotherapy, leads to complete resolution of infection and full functional rehabilitation.

  8. A comparison of the effects of interspersal and concurrent training sequences on acquisition, retention, and generalization of picture names.

    PubMed

    Rowan, V C; Pear, J J

    1985-01-01

    A comparison was made between an interspersal and a concurrent procedure in teaching picture names to three mentally handicapped children. During the interspersal procedure a picture thats name was being trained was alternated with pictures already known; during the concurrent procedure a picture thats name was being trained was alternated with other pictures thats names were unknown. An ABA design with counterbalancing (BAB) was used. The children learned naming responses more rapidly when trained by the interspersal procedure than by the concurrent procedure. Weekly retention tests on pictures learned to criterion during the week showed no consistent difference between the two procedures in percentage of learned picture names retained. Weekly generalization tests showed that picture names that were retained in both conditions tended to generalize equally to a different setting and tester, and to the objects depicted in the pictures.

  9. Hansen's disease (leprosy) complicated by secondary mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Scollard, David M; Stryjewska, Barbara M; Prestigiacomo, John F; Gillis, Thomas P; Waguespack-Labiche, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    A patient with Hansen's disease received corticosteroids for a type 1 leprosy reaction and subsequently developed a new cutaneous lesion at the original biopsy site from which Mycobacterium fortuitum was cultured. A review of the literature found only two other cases of coinfection with atypical mycobacteria and Mycobacterium leprae, although there are many reports of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with leprosy. This case highlights the diagnostic difficulties encountered when a patient has two different mycobacterial infections of the skin. The published experience emphasizes that such coinfection is remarkably uncommon in leprosy, despite the frequent use of high doses of corticosteroids for leprosy reactions. Copyright © 2009 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. New Targets and Inhibitors of Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism§

    PubMed Central

    Paritala, Hanumantharao; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress made in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:23808874

  11. The Mycobacterial Cell Wall--Peptidoglycan and Arabinogalactan.

    PubMed

    Alderwick, Luke J; Harrison, James; Lloyd, Georgina S; Birch, Helen L

    2015-03-27

    The mycobacterial bacillus is encompassed by a remarkably elaborate cell wall structure. The mycolyl-arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan (mAGP) complex is essential for the viability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and maintains a robust basal structure supporting the upper "myco-membrane." M. tuberculosis peptidoglycan, although appearing to be unexceptional at first glance, contains a number of unique molecular subtleties that become particularly important as the TB-bacilli enters into nonreplicative growth during dormancy. Arabinogalactan, a highly branched polysaccharide, serves to connect peptidoglycan with the outer mycolic acid layer, and a variety of unique glycolsyltransferases are used for its assembly. In this review, we shall explore the microbial chemistry of this unique heteropolysacchride, examine the molecular genetics that underpins its fabrication, and discuss how the essential biosynthetic process might be exploited for the development of future anti-TB chemotherapies.

  12. Total synthesis of mycobacterial arabinogalactan containing 92 monosaccharide units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong; Xiong, De-Cai; Chen, Si-Cong; Wang, Yong-Shi; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2017-03-01

    Carbohydrates are diverse bio-macromolecules with highly complex structures that are involved in numerous biological processes. Well-defined carbohydrates obtained by chemical synthesis are essential to the understanding of their functions. However, synthesis of carbohydrates is greatly hampered by its insufficient efficiency. So far, assembly of long carbohydrate chains remains one of the most challenging tasks for synthetic chemists. Here we describe a highly efficient assembly of a 92-mer polysaccharide by the preactivation-based one-pot glycosylation protocol. Several linear and branched oligosaccharide/polysaccharide fragments ranging from 5-mer to 31-mer in length have been rapidly constructed in one-pot manner, which enables the first total synthesis of a biologically important mycobacterial arabinogalactan through a highly convergent [31+31+30] coupling reaction. Our results show that the preactivation-based one-pot glycosylation protocol may provide access to the construction of long and complicated carbohydrate chains.

  13. Octanoylation of early intermediates of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Maranha, Ana; Moynihan, Patrick J; Miranda, Vanessa; Correia Lourenço, Eva; Nunes-Costa, Daniela; Fraga, Joana S; José Barbosa Pereira, Pedro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Ventura, M Rita; Clarke, Anthony J; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacteria synthesize unique intracellular methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLP) proposed to modulate fatty acid metabolism. In addition to the partial esterification of glucose or methylglucose units with short-chain fatty acids, octanoate was invariably detected on the MGLP reducing end. We have identified a novel sugar octanoyltransferase (OctT) that efficiently transfers octanoate to glucosylglycerate (GG) and diglucosylglycerate (DGG), the earliest intermediates in MGLP biosynthesis. Enzymatic studies, synthetic chemistry, NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry approaches suggest that, in contrast to the prevailing consensus, octanoate is not esterified to the primary hydroxyl group of glycerate but instead to the C6 OH of the second glucose in DGG. These observations raise important new questions about the MGLP reducing end architecture and about subsequent biosynthetic steps. Functional characterization of this unique octanoyltransferase, whose gene has been proposed to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, adds new insights into a vital mycobacterial pathway, which may inspire new drug discovery strategies.

  14. Emergence of a unique group of necrotizing mycobacterial diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Dobos, K. M.; Quinn, F. D.; Ashford, D. A.; Horsburgh, C. R.; King, C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Although most diseases due to pathogenic mycobacteria are caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, several other mycobacterial diseases-caused by M. ulcerans (Buruli ulcer), M. marinum, and M. haemophilum-have begun to emerge. We review the emergence of diseases caused by these three pathogens in the United States and around the world in the last decade. We examine the pathophysiologic similarities of the diseases (all three cause necrotizing skin lesions) and common reservoirs of infection (stagnant or slow-flowing water). Examination of the histologic and pathogenic characteristics of these mycobacteria suggests differences in the modes of transmission and pathogenesis, though no singular mechanism for either characteristic has been definitively described for any of these mycobacteria. PMID:10341173

  15. Total synthesis of mycobacterial arabinogalactan containing 92 monosaccharide units

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Xiong, De-Cai; Chen, Si-Cong; Wang, Yong-Shi; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrates are diverse bio-macromolecules with highly complex structures that are involved in numerous biological processes. Well-defined carbohydrates obtained by chemical synthesis are essential to the understanding of their functions. However, synthesis of carbohydrates is greatly hampered by its insufficient efficiency. So far, assembly of long carbohydrate chains remains one of the most challenging tasks for synthetic chemists. Here we describe a highly efficient assembly of a 92-mer polysaccharide by the preactivation-based one-pot glycosylation protocol. Several linear and branched oligosaccharide/polysaccharide fragments ranging from 5-mer to 31-mer in length have been rapidly constructed in one-pot manner, which enables the first total synthesis of a biologically important mycobacterial arabinogalactan through a highly convergent [31+31+30] coupling reaction. Our results show that the preactivation-based one-pot glycosylation protocol may provide access to the construction of long and complicated carbohydrate chains. PMID:28300074

  16. Octanoylation of early intermediates of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Maranha, Ana; Moynihan, Patrick J.; Miranda, Vanessa; Correia Lourenço, Eva; Nunes-Costa, Daniela; Fraga, Joana S.; José Barbosa Pereira, Pedro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Ventura, M. Rita; Clarke, Anthony J.; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria synthesize unique intracellular methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLP) proposed to modulate fatty acid metabolism. In addition to the partial esterification of glucose or methylglucose units with short-chain fatty acids, octanoate was invariably detected on the MGLP reducing end. We have identified a novel sugar octanoyltransferase (OctT) that efficiently transfers octanoate to glucosylglycerate (GG) and diglucosylglycerate (DGG), the earliest intermediates in MGLP biosynthesis. Enzymatic studies, synthetic chemistry, NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry approaches suggest that, in contrast to the prevailing consensus, octanoate is not esterified to the primary hydroxyl group of glycerate but instead to the C6 OH of the second glucose in DGG. These observations raise important new questions about the MGLP reducing end architecture and about subsequent biosynthetic steps. Functional characterization of this unique octanoyltransferase, whose gene has been proposed to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, adds new insights into a vital mycobacterial pathway, which may inspire new drug discovery strategies. PMID:26324178

  17. Persistent inactivation of macrophage cyclooxygenase-2 in mycobacterial pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Tsutomu; Pantuso, Traci; Shinohara, Shizuka; Kogiso, Mari; Myrvik, Quentin N; Henriksen, Ruth Ann; Shibata, Yoshimi

    2009-08-01

    The induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in tissue macrophages (MØ) increases prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) release, potentially down-regulating granulomatous inflammation. In response to Mycobacteria, local MØ express COX-2, which is either nuclear envelope (NE)-associated or NE-dissociated. Persistent mycobacterial pulmonary inflammation is characterized by alveolar MØ expressing NE-dissociated (inactive) COX-2 without release of PGE(2). In this study, we examined COX-2 in alveolar MØ after intranasal exposure to heat-killed Mycobacterium bovis BCG (HK-BCG). After administration, whole lungs of C57Bl/6 mice were lavaged with saline; COX-2 expression and PGE(2) release by alveolar MØ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and nitric oxide levels in the lung lavage were monitored. Normal alveolar MØ had undetectable levels of COX-2 on Western blots. However, 1 day after intranasal administration, almost all alveolar MØ had phagocytosed HK-BCG and expressed NE-dissociated COX-2 without any increase in the release of PGE(2). At 28 days after intranasal administration, 68% of alveolar MØ still contained both BCG and the NE-dissociated form of COX-2. NE-associated (active) COX-2 was not observed in alveolar MØ. In contrast, 7 days after intraperitoneal injection of HK-BCG, peritoneal MØ containing HK-BCG were no longer detected. At 28 days after intranasal administration, TNF-alpha and nitrite levels in the lung lavage fluid were significantly higher than those in controls. Our results indicate that mycobacterial pulmonary inflammation is associated with suppressed PGE(2) production by alveolar MØ, with expression of COX-2 dissociated from the NE.

  18. Biomarker Discovery in Subclinical Mycobacterial Infections of Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Janagama, Harish K.; Widdel, Andrea; Vulchanova, Lucy; Stabel, Judith R.; Waters, W. Ray; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2009-01-01

    Background Bovine tuberculosis is a highly prevalent infectious disease of cattle worldwide; however, infection in the United States is limited to 0.01% of dairy herds. Thus detection of bovine TB is confounded by high background infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The present study addresses variations in the circulating peptidome based on the pathogenesis of two biologically similar mycobacterial diseases of cattle. Methodology/Principal Findings We hypothesized that serum proteomes of animals in response to either M. bovis or M. paratuberculosis infection will display several commonalities and differences. Sera prospectively collected from animals experimentally infected with either M. bovis or M. paratuberculosis were analyzed using high-resolution proteomics approaches. iTRAQ, a liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry approach, was used to simultaneously identify and quantify peptides from multiple infections and contemporaneous uninfected control groups. Four comparisons were performed: 1) M. bovis infection versus uninfected controls, 2) M. bovis versus M. paratuberculosis infection, 3) early, and 4) advanced M. paratuberculosis infection versus uninfected controls. One hundred and ten differentially elevated proteins (P≤0.05) were identified. Vitamin D binding protein precursor (DBP), alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, alpha-1B glycoprotein, fetuin, and serine proteinase inhibitor were identified in both infections. Transthyretin, retinol binding proteins, and cathelicidin were identified exclusively in M. paratuberculosis infection, while the serum levels of alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor (AMBP) protein, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, fetuin, and alpha-1B glycoprotein were elevated exclusively in M. bovis infected animals. Conclusions/Significance The discovery of these biomarkers has significant impact on the elucidation of pathogenesis of two mycobacterial diseases at the cellular and the molecular level and can be applied in the

  19. General secretion signal for the mycobacterial type VII secretion pathway

    PubMed Central

    Daleke, Maria H.; Ummels, Roy; Bawono, Punto; Heringa, Jaap; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Luirink, Joen; Bitter, Wilbert

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterial pathogens use specialized type VII secretion (T7S) systems to transport crucial virulence factors across their unusual cell envelope into infected host cells. These virulence factors lack classical secretion signals and the mechanism of substrate recognition is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that the model T7S substrates PE25/PPE41, which form a heterodimer, are targeted to the T7S pathway ESX-5 by a signal located in the C terminus of PE25. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues within this C terminus resulted in the identification of a highly conserved motif, i.e., YxxxD/E, which is required for secretion. This motif was also essential for the secretion of LipY, another ESX-5 substrate. Pathogenic mycobacteria have several different T7S systems and we identified a PE protein that is secreted by the ESX-1 system, which allowed us to compare substrate recognition of these two T7S systems. Surprisingly, this ESX-1 substrate contained a C-terminal signal functionally equivalent to that of PE25. Exchange of these C-terminal secretion signals between the PE proteins restored secretion, but each PE protein remained secreted via its own ESX secretion system, indicating that an additional signal(s) provides system specificity. Remarkably, the YxxxD/E motif was also present in and required for efficient secretion of the ESX-1 substrates CFP-10 and EspB. Therefore, our data show that the YxxxD/E motif is a general secretion signal that is present in all known mycobacterial T7S substrates or substrate complexes. PMID:22733768

  20. ParTIES: a toolbox for Paramecium interspersed DNA elimination studies.

    PubMed

    Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Sperling, Linda

    2016-02-15

    Developmental DNA elimination occurs in a wide variety of multicellular organisms, but ciliates are the only single-celled eukaryotes in which this phenomenon has been reported. Despite considerable interest in ciliates as models for DNA elimination, no standard methods for identification and characterization of the eliminated sequences are currently available. We present the Paramecium Toolbox for Interspersed DNA Elimination Studies (ParTIES), designed for Paramecium species, that (i) identifies eliminated sequences, (ii) measures their presence in a sequencing sample and (iii) detects rare elimination polymorphisms. ParTIES is multi-threaded Perl software available at https://github.com/oarnaiz/ParTIES. ParTIES is distributed under the GNU General Public Licence v3. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Morphine and Fentanyl Citrate Induce Retrotransposition of Long Interspersed Element-1.

    PubMed

    Okudaira, Noriyuki; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Nishio, Hajime; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The retroelement long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) comprises about 17% of the human genome. A single human cell has 80 to 100 copies of retrotransposition-competent L1, approximately 10% of which are 'hot' and actively 'jump' around the genome. Recent observations demonstrated that low-molecular weight compounds may induce L1 retrotransposition through unknown mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrated that the painkillers morphine and fentanyl citrate trigger L1 retrotransposition in neuronal cells without inducing DNA damage or up-regulating L1 mRNA expression. This effect was blocked by an antagonist of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Taken together, the data suggest that L1 retrotransposition due to morphine and fentanyl citrate is distinct from that triggered by DNA damage, requires TLR4, and is a novel type of genomic instability. Thus, we propose that L1 retrotransposition should be characterized as a component of the pharmacological activity of these analgesic agents.

  2. Regulation of phagocyte triglyceride by a STAT-ATG2 pathway controls mycobacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Péan, Claire B.; Schiebler, Mark; Tan, Sharon W. S.; Sharrock, Jessica A.; Kierdorf, Katrin; Brown, Karen P.; Maserumule, M. Charlotte; Menezes, Shinelle; Pilátová, Martina; Bronda, Kévin; Guermonprez, Pierre; Stramer, Brian M.; Andres Floto, R.; Dionne, Marc S.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a global threat to human health, yet the molecular mechanisms regulating immunity remain poorly understood. Cytokines can promote or inhibit mycobacterial survival inside macrophages and the underlying mechanisms represent potential targets for host-directed therapies. Here we show that cytokine-STAT signalling promotes mycobacterial survival within macrophages by deregulating lipid droplets via ATG2 repression. In Drosophila infected with Mycobacterium marinum, mycobacterium-induced STAT activity triggered by unpaired-family cytokines reduces Atg2 expression, permitting deregulation of lipid droplets. Increased Atg2 expression or reduced macrophage triglyceride biosynthesis, normalizes lipid deposition in infected phagocytes and reduces numbers of viable intracellular mycobacteria. In human macrophages, addition of IL-6 promotes mycobacterial survival and BCG-induced lipid accumulation by a similar, but probably not identical, mechanism. Our results reveal Atg2 regulation as a mechanism by which cytokines can control lipid droplet homeostasis and consequently resistance to mycobacterial infection in Drosophila. PMID:28262681

  3. Novel Mutation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Gene Presenting as Early Life Mycobacterial Bronchial Disease.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Maria J; Kalra, Neelu; Horwitz, Alexandra; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) are a spectrum of inherited disorders characterized by localized or disseminated infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) deficiency was the first identified genetic disorder recognized as MSMD. Mutations in the genes encoding IFNGR1 can be recessive or dominant and cause complete or partial receptor deficiency. We present the case of a 2½-year-old boy with a history of recurrent wheezing, diagnosed with endobronchial mycobacterial infection. Immunological workup revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the IFNGR1 gene, a novel mutation predicted in silico to cause complete IFNGR1 deficiency. This case demonstrates that (a) Interferon-γ receptor deficiency can present resembling common disorders of the lung; (b) mycobacterial infections should be suspected when parenchymal lung disease, hilar lymphadenopathy, and endobronchial disease are present; and (c) high index of suspicion for immunodeficiency should be maintained in patients with disseminated nontubercular mycobacterial infection.

  4. Novel Mutation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Gene Presenting as Early Life Mycobacterial Bronchial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Maria J.; Kalra, Neelu; Horwitz, Alexandra; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) are a spectrum of inherited disorders characterized by localized or disseminated infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) deficiency was the first identified genetic disorder recognized as MSMD. Mutations in the genes encoding IFNGR1 can be recessive or dominant and cause complete or partial receptor deficiency. We present the case of a 2½-year-old boy with a history of recurrent wheezing, diagnosed with endobronchial mycobacterial infection. Immunological workup revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the IFNGR1 gene, a novel mutation predicted in silico to cause complete IFNGR1 deficiency. This case demonstrates that (a) Interferon-γ receptor deficiency can present resembling common disorders of the lung; (b) mycobacterial infections should be suspected when parenchymal lung disease, hilar lymphadenopathy, and endobronchial disease are present; and (c) high index of suspicion for immunodeficiency should be maintained in patients with disseminated nontubercular mycobacterial infection. PMID:27868075

  5. A genetic perspective on granulomatous diseases with an emphasis on mycobacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Un-In; Holland, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the genetic factors predisposing to mycobacterial infections has been a subject of intense research activities. Current knowledge of the genetic and immunological basis of susceptibility to mycobacteria largely comes from natural human and experimental models of Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. These observations support the central role of the IL-12/IFN-γ pathway in controlling mycobacterial infection. In this review, we discuss the knowledge that associates both simple and complex inheritance with susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. We place a special emphasis on monogenic disorders, since these clearly pinpoint pathway and can adduce mechanism. We also describe the clinical, immunological and pathological features that may steer clinical investigation in the appropriate directions. PMID:26733044

  6. Sulfatase-activated fluorophores for rapid discrimination of mycobacterial species and strains

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Kimberly E.; Williams, Monique; Carlson, Brian L.; Swarts, Benjamin M.; Warren, Robin M.; van Helden, Paul D.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2013-01-01

    Most current diagnostic tests for tuberculosis do not reveal the species or strain of pathogen causing pulmonary infection, which can lead to inappropriate treatment regimens and the spread of disease. Here, we report an assay for mycobacterial strain assignment based on genetically conserved mycobacterial sulfatases. We developed a sulfatase-activated probe, 7-hydroxy-9H-(1,3-dichloro-9,9-dimethylacridin-2-one)–sulfate, that detects enzyme activity in native protein gels, allowing the rapid detection of sulfatases in mycobacterial lysates. This assay revealed that mycobacterial strains have distinct sulfatase fingerprints that can be used to judge both the species and lineage. Our results demonstrate the potential of enzyme-activated probes for rapid pathogen discrimination for infectious diseases. PMID:23878250

  7. Association between polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial Mycobacterium avium complex infection and environmental exposure.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kohei; Ito, Yutaka; Hirai, Toyohiro; Kubo, Takeshi; Maekawa, Koichi; Togashi, Kaori; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2014-01-01

    Polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection is observed in pulmonary MAC disease. Human living environments contain multiple species or genotypes of nontuberculous mycobacterial strains and are considered sources of infection. To investigate the association of environmental exposure with polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial infection in pulmonary MAC disease after adjustments for potential confounding diseases and conditions and radiographic findings. We collected two separate sputum samples from 102 patients and single sputum samples from 18 patients in whom the second MAC strain was not isolated in our prospective cohort of pulmonary MAC disease. MAC isolates from sputum samples and patients' residential soils were used for variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) analyses. Polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial MAC infections were defined as having different VNTR genotypes and other mycobacterial species, respectively. Monoclonal MAC infection was defined as all isolates showing a single VNTR genotype. Associations of the type of infection with clinical and radiographic findings and environmental exposure were measured. Polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial MAC and monoclonal infections were observed in 42 and 78 patients, respectively. By stepwise regression analysis, patients with polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial MAC infections were associated with history of asthma (odds ratio [OR], 11.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-255.77; P = 0.021), high soil exposure (≥2 h/wk; OR, 4.31; 95% CI, 1.72-11.45; P < 0.01), shower use in a bathroom (OR, 4.57; 95% CI, 1.28-23.23; P = 0.018), and swimming in a pool (OR, 9.69; 95% CI, 1.21-206.92; P < 0.01). Environmental exposure was associated with polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial MAC infection in pulmonary MAC disease.

  8. Who Has Mycobacterial Disease? A Cross Sectional Study in Agropastoral Communities in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kilale, Andrew Martin; Ngadaya, Esther; Muhumuza, Julius; Kagaruki, Gibson Benard; Lema, Yakobo Leonard; Ngowi, Bernard James; Mfinanga, Sayoki Godfrey; Hinderaker, Sven Gudmund

    2016-01-01

    To determine and describe clinical symptoms, demographic characteristics and environmental exposures as determinants of pulmonary mycobacterial diseases among patients examined for tuberculosis in agropastoral communities in Northern Tanzania. This was a cross sectional study. Sputum samples were collected from patients attending three hospitals in Tanzania, and were investigated for pulmonary tuberculosis by microscopy between November 2010 and June 2012. The patients were interviewed about background information, and potential exposure to mycobacteria. We examined 1,711 presumptive tuberculosis cases where 936 (54.2%) were males and 775 (45.3%) females. Of all the study participants, 277 (16%) were found to have sputum samples positive for mycobacteria; 228 (13%) were smear positive, 123 (7%) were culture positive and 74 (4%) were positive by both smear microscopy and culture. Of the 123 mycobacterial culture positive, 15 (12.2%) had non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Males were more likely than females to be positive for mycobacteria. Factors associated with mycobacterial disease were loss of appetite, age groups below 41 years, and being a male. Among HIV negative patients, loss of appetite, age below 20 years and being a male were associated with being mycobacterial positive. Among HIV positive patients, males and those patients with a persistently coughing family member were more likely to harbor mycobacteria. The findings in this study show that both M. tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacterial strains were prevalent in the study community. Some risk factors were identified. Although the reported predictors may improve screening for mycobacterial diseases, their use requires some precaution.

  9. Molecular-based mycobacterial identification in a clinical laboratory setting: a comparison of two methods.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, N; Corcoran, D; Lucey, B; Barrett, A

    2012-01-01

    Many mycobacterial species are pathogenic to humans, with infection occurring worldwide. Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a well-described global phenomenon, but other mycobacterial species are increasingly shown to be the cause of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary infection and are managed differently from M. tuberculosis infection. Rapid and accurate differentiation of mycobacterial species is, therefore, critical to guide timely and appropriate therapeutic and public health management. This study evaluates two commercially available DNA strip assays, the Genotype Common Mycobacteria (CM) assay (Hain Lifescience, Nehren, Germany) and the Speed-oligo Mycobacteria assay (Vircell, Spain) for their usefulness in a clinical laboratory setting. Both assays were evaluated on 71 clinical mycobacterial isolates, previously identified using Gen-Probe AccuProbe and through a UK mycobacteriology reference laboratory, as well as 29 non-mycobacterial isolates. Concordant results were obtained for 98% of isolates using both assays. The sensitivity was 97% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 93.3-100%) for the CM assay and 98.6% (95% CI: 95.9-100%) for the Speed-oligo assay. Overall, both assays proved to be useful tools for rapid and sensitive mycobacterial species identification, although interpretation of results was easier with the CM assay. Finally, results were available within one day, compared to current identification times which range between seven days and four weeks.

  10. microRNA-146a promotes mycobacterial survival in macrophages through suppressing nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Wang, Jinli; Fang, Yimin; Gong, Sitang; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Lai, Xiaomin; Zeng, Gucheng; Wang, Yi; Yang, Kun; Huang, Xi

    2016-03-30

    Macrophages play a crucial role in host innate anti-mycobacterial defense, which is tightly regulated by multiple factors, including microRNAs. Our previous study showed that a panel of microRNAs was markedly up-regulated in macrophages upon mycobacterial infection. Here, we investigated the biological function of miR-146a during mycobacterial infection. miR-146a expression was induced both in vitro and in vivo after Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection. The inducible miR-146a could suppress the inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) expression and NO generation, thus promoting mycobacterial survival in macrophages. Inhibition of endogenous miR-146a increased NO production and mycobacterial clearance. Moreover, miR-146a attenuated the activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathways during BCG infection, which in turn repressed iNOS expression. Mechanistically, miR-146a directly targeted tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) at post-transcriptional level. Silencing TRAF6 decreased iNOS expression and NO production in BCG-infected macrophages, while overexpression of TRAF6 reversed miR-146a-mediated inhibition of NO production and clearance of mycobacteria. Therefore, we demonstrated a novel role of miR-146a in the modulation of host defense against mycobacterial infection by repressing NO production via targeting TRAF6, which may provide a promising therapeutic target for tuberculosis.

  11. Enhanced anti-mycobacterial immunity in children with erythema nodosum and a positive tuberculin skin test.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Mark P; Kampmann, Beate; Lawrence, Patricia; Wood, Kathy; Pienaar, Sandy; Pienaar, David; Eley, Brian; Levin, Michael; Beatty, David; Anderson, Suzanne T B

    2007-09-01

    Erythema nodosum (EN) may follow a variety of infections, but in regions with a high prevalence of tuberculosis, is frequently associated with a positive tuberculin skin test (TST) and tuberculosis infection. We aimed to investigate the immunological differences between patients with EN as a manifestation of primary tuberculosis, and those with progressive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) or asymptomatic infection. We studied the inflammatory response to both mycobacterial and non-mycobacterial antigens in 11 children with EN associated with a positive TST, 22 children with culture-confirmed tuberculosis, and 53 healthy skin test-positive children. In addition, we evaluated functional anti-mycobacterial immunity using an ex vivo assay of mycobacterial growth restriction in five children with EN and 15 with PTB. Patients with EN were distinguished by enhanced mycobacterial growth restriction on the functional assay, which was associated with a markedly increased production of IFNgamma in response to stimulation with purified protein derivative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Children presenting with EN and a positive TST show evidence of responses associated with enhanced anti-mycobacterial immunity.

  12. Use of variations in staphylococcal interspersed repeat units for molecular typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Katherine J; Oppenheim, Beryl A; Gossain, Savita; Gao, Fang; Hawkey, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcal interspersed repeat unit typing has previously been shown to have the ability to discriminate between epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in the United Kingdom. The current study illustrates its ability to distinguish between strains within an endemic setting thereby providing a rapid transportable typing method for the identification of transmission events.

  13. Effects of Interspersing Rates on Students Performance on and Preferences for Mathematics Assignments: Testing the Discrete Task Completion Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Gary L.; Erkfritz, Karyn N.

    2007-01-01

    The current study investigated the discreet task completion hypothesis presented by C. H. Skinner (2002) by investigating how the rate of interspersing affects performance on and preferences for academic assignments. Specifically, 70 sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students were presented with four assignment pairs of multiplication problems.…

  14. The Effect of an Interspersed Refuge on Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae), Their Natural Enemies, and Biological Control

    PubMed Central

    O’Neal, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Soybean production in the north central United States has relied heavily on the use of foliar and seed applied insecticides to manage Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae). An additional management strategy is the use soybean cultivars containing A. glycines resistance genes (Rag). Previous research has demonstrated that Rag cultivars are capable of preventing yield loss equivalent to the use of foliar and seed-applied insecticides. However, the presence of virulent biotypes in North America has raised concern for the durability of Rag genes. A resistance management program that includes a refuge for avirulent biotypes could limit the frequency at which virulent biotypes increase within North America. To what extent such a refuge reduces the effectiveness of aphid-resistant soybean is not clear. We conducted an experiment to determine whether a susceptible refuge mixed into resistant soybean (i.e., interspersed refuge or refuge-in-a-bag) affects the seasonal exposure of aphids, their natural enemies, biological control, and yield protection provided by aphid resistance. We compared three ratios of interspersed refuges (resistant: susceptible; 95:5, 90:10, 75:25) to plots grown with 100% susceptible or resistant soybean. We determined that an interspersed refuge of at least 25% susceptible seed would be necessary to effectively produce avirulent individuals. Interspersed refuges had negligible effects on yield and the natural enemy community. However, there was evidence that they increased the amount of biological control that occurred within a plot. We discuss the compatibility of interspersed refuges for A. glycines management and whether resistance management can prolong the durability of Rag genes. PMID:26476557

  15. The Effect of an Interspersed Refuge on Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae), Their Natural Enemies, and Biological Control.

    PubMed

    Varenhorst, A J; O'Neal, M E

    2016-02-01

    Soybean production in the north central United States has relied heavily on the use of foliar and seed applied insecticides to manage Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae). An additional management strategy is the use soybean cultivars containing A. glycines resistance genes (Rag). Previous research has demonstrated that Rag cultivars are capable of preventing yield loss equivalent to the use of foliar and seed-applied insecticides.However, the presence of virulent biotypes in North America has raised concern for the durability of Rag genes. A resistance management program that includes a refuge for avirulent biotypes could limit the frequency at which virulent biotypes increase within North America. To what extent such a refuge reduces the effectiveness of aphid-resistant soybean is not clear. We conducted an experiment to determine whether a susceptible refuge mixed into resistant soybean (i.e., interspersed refuge or refuge-in-a-bag) affects the seasonal exposure of aphids, their natural enemies, biological control, and yield protection provided by aphid resistance. We compared three ratios of interspersed refuges (resistant: susceptible; 95:5, 90:10, 75:25) to plots grown with 100%susceptible or resistant soybean. We determined that an interspersed refuge of at least 25% susceptible seed would be necessary to effectively produce avirulent individuals. Interspersed refuges had negligible effects onyield and the natural enemy community. However, there was evidence that they increased the amount of biological control that occurred within a plot. We discuss the compatibility of interspersed refuges for A. glycines management and whether resistance management can prolong the durability of Rag genes.

  16. Epidemiology of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease and Tuberculosis, Hawaii, USA

    PubMed Central

    Frankland, Timothy B.; Daida, Yihe G.; Honda, Jennifer R.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Zelazny, Adrian; Honda, Stacey; Prevots, D. Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies found Hawaiians and Asian-Americans/Pacific Islanders to be independently at increased risk for nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease (NTMPD) and tuberculosis (TB). To better understand NTM infection and TB risk patterns in Hawaii, USA, we evaluated data on a cohort of patients in Hawaii for 2005–2013. Period prevalence of NTMPD was highest among Japanese, Chinese, and Vietnamese patients (>300/100,000 persons) and lowest among Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (50/100,000). Japanese patients were twice as likely as all other racial/ethnic groups to have Mycobacterium abscessus isolated (adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.2) but were not at increased risk for infection with other mycobacteria species. In contrast, incidence of TB was stable and was lowest among Japanese patients (no cases) and highest among Filipino, Korean, and Vietnamese patients (>50/100,000). Substantial differences exist in the epidemiology of NTMPD by race/ethnicity, suggesting behavioral and biologic factors that affect disease susceptibility. PMID:28221128

  17. Cholesterol Ester Oxidation by Mycobacterial Cytochrome P450*

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Daniel J.; Madrona, Yarrow; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacteria share a common cholesterol degradation pathway initiated by oxidation of the alkyl side chain by enzymes of cytochrome P450 (CYP) families 125 and 142. Structural and sequence comparisons of the two enzyme families revealed two insertions into the N-terminal region of the CYP125 family (residues 58–67 and 100–109 in the CYP125A1 sequence) that could potentially sterically block the oxidation of the longer cholesterol ester molecules. Catalytic assays revealed that only CYP142 enzymes are able to oxidize cholesteryl propionate, and although CYP125 enzymes could oxidize cholesteryl sulfate, they were much less efficient at doing so than the CYP142 enzymes. The crystal structure of CYP142A2 in complex with cholesteryl sulfate revealed a substrate tightly fit into a smaller active site than was previously observed for the complex of CYP125A1 with 4-cholesten-3-one. We propose that the larger CYP125 active site allows for multiple binding modes of cholesteryl sulfate, the majority of which trigger the P450 catalytic cycle, but in an uncoupled mode rather than one that oxidizes the sterol. In contrast, the more unhindered and compact CYP142 structure enables enzymes of this family to readily oxidize cholesteryl esters, thus providing an additional source of carbon for mycobacterial growth. PMID:25210044

  18. Treatment of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Philley, Julie V; DeGroote, Mary Ann; Honda, Jennifer R; Chan, Michael M; Kasperbauer, Shannon; Walter, Nicholas D; Chan, Edward D

    2016-12-01

    Treatment of non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTM-LD) is challenging for several reasons including the relative resistance of NTM to currently available drugs and the difficulty in tolerating prolonged treatment with multiple drugs. Yet-to-be-done, large, multicenter, prospective randomized studies to establish the best regimens will also be arduous because multiple NTM species are known to cause human lung disease, differences in virulence and response to treatment between different species and strains within a species will make randomization more difficult, the need to distinguish relapse from a new infection, and the difficulty in adhering to the prescribed treatment due to intolerance, toxicity, and/or drug-drug interactions, often necessitating modification of therapeutic regimens. Furthermore, the out-of-state resident status of many patients seen at the relatively few centers that care for large number of NTM-LD patients pose logistical issues in monitoring response to treatment. Thus, current treatment regimens for NTM-LD is largely based on small case series, retrospective analyses, and guidelines based on expert opinions. It has been nearly 10 years since the publication of a consensus guideline for the treatment of NTM-LD. This review is a summary of the available evidence on the treatment of the major NTM-LD until more definitive studies and guidelines become available.

  19. Defensins: The Case for Their Use against Mycobacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Haodi; Lv, Yue; Zhao, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Human tuberculosis remains a huge global public health problem with an estimated 1/3rd of the population being infected. Defensins are antibacterial cationic peptides produced by a number of cell types, most notably neutrophil granulocytes and epithelial cells. All three defensin types (α-, β-, and θ-defensins) have antibacterial activities, mainly through bacterial membrane permeabilization. Defensins are effective against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria including mycobacteria and are active both intra- and extracellularly. Mycobacterial resistance has never been demonstrated although the mprF gene encoding resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome. In addition to their antibacterial effect, defensins are chemoattractants for macrophages and neutrophils. There are many cases for their use for therapy or prophylaxis in tuberculosis as well. In conclusion, we propose that there is considerable scope and potential for exploring their use as therapeutic/prophylactic agents and more comprehensive survey of defensins from different species and their bioactivity is timely. PMID:27725944

  20. Visualization of mycobacterial membrane dynamics in live cells

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacteria are endowed with a highly impermeable mycomembrane that confers intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. Several unique mycomembrane glycolipids have been isolated and structurally characterized, but the underlying organization and dynamics of glycolipids within the cell envelope remain poorly understood. We report here a study of mycomembrane dynamics that was enabled by trehalose–fluorophore conjugates capable of labeling trehalose glycolipids in live actinomycetes. We identified fluorescein–trehalose analogues that are metabolically incorporated into the trehalose mycolates of representative Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium, Nocardia, and Rhodococcus species. Using these probes, we studied the mobilities of labeled glycolipids by time-lapse microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments and found that mycomembrane fluidity varies widely across species and correlates with mycolic acid structure. Finally, we discovered that treatment of mycobacteria with ethambutol, a front-line tuberculosis (TB) drug, significantly increases mycomembrane fluidity. These findings enhance our understanding of mycobacterial cell envelope structure and dynamics and have implications for development of TB drug cocktails. PMID:28075574

  1. Structural insights into antibody recognition of mycobacterial polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Murase, Tomohiko; Zheng, Ruixiang Blake; Joe, Maju; Bai, Yu; Marcus, Sandra L; Lowary, Todd L; Ng, Kenneth K S

    2009-09-18

    Mycobacteria are major human pathogens responsible for such serious and widespread diseases as tuberculosis and leprosy. Among the evolutionary adaptations essential for pathogenicity in mycobacteria is a complex carbohydrate-rich cell-wall structure that contains as a major immunomodulatory molecule the polysaccharide lipoarabinomannan (LAM). We report here crystal structures of three fragments from the non-reducing termini of LAM in complex with a murine antibody Fab fragment (CS-35Fab). These structures reveal for the first time the three-dimensional structures of key components of LAM and the molecular basis of LAM recognition at between 1.8- and 2.0-A resolution. The antigen-binding site of CS-35Fab forms three binding pockets that show a high degree of complementarity to the reducing end, the branch point and one of the non-reducing ends of the Y-shaped hexasaccharide moiety found at most of the non-reducing termini of LAM. Structures of CS-35Fab bound to two additional tetrasaccharides confirm the general mode of binding seen in the hexasaccharide and indicate how different parts of LAM are recognized. Altogether, these structures provide a rational basis for understanding the overall architecture of LAM and identify the key elements of an epitope that may be exploited for the development of novel and more effective anti-mycobacterial vaccines. Moreover, this study represents the first high-resolution X-ray crystallographic investigation of oligofuranoside-protein recognition.

  2. Over-Expression of the Mycobacterial Trehalose-Phosphate Phosphatase OtsB2 Results in a Defect in Macrophage Phagocytosis Associated with Increased Mycobacterial-Macrophage Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Wu, Mei; Shi, Yan; Javid, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (OtsB2) is involved in the OtsAB trehalose synthesis pathway to produce free trehalose and is strictly essential for mycobacterial growth. We wished to determine the effects of OtsB2 expression on mycobacterial phenotypes such as growth, phagocytosis and survival in macrophages. Mycobacterium bovis-bacillus calmette-guerin (BCG) over-expressing OtsB2 were able to better survive in stationary phase. Over-expression of OtsB2 led to a decrease in phagocytosis but not survival in THP-1 macrophage-like cells, and this was not due to a decrease in general macrophage phagocytic activity. Surprisingly, when we investigated macrophage–mycobacterial interactions by flow cytometry and atomic force microscopy, we discovered that BCG over-expressing OtsB2 have stronger binding to THP-1 cells than wild-type BCG. These results suggest that altering OtsB2 expression has implications for mycobacterial host–pathogen interactions. Macrophage–mycobacteria phagocytic interactions are complex and merit further study. PMID:27867377

  3. Tracking the past: interspersed repeats in an extinct Afrotherian mammal, Mammuthus primigenius.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fangqing; Qi, Ji; Schuster, Stephan C

    2009-08-01

    The woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) died out about several thousand years ago, yet recent paleogenomic studies have successfully recovered genetic information from both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of this extinct species. Mammoths belong to Afrotheria, a group of mammals exhibiting extreme morphological diversity and large genome sizes. In this study, we found that the mammoth genome contains a larger proportion of interspersed repeats than any other mammalian genome reported so far, in which the proliferation of the RTE family of retrotransposons (covering 12% of the genome) may be the main reason for an increased genome size. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RTEs in mammoth are closely related to the family BovB/RTE. The incongruence of the reconstructed RTE phylogeny indicates that RTEs in mammoth may be acquired through an ancient lateral gene transfer event. A recent proliferation of SINEs was also found in the probocidean lineage, whereas the Afrotherian-wide SINEs in mammoth have undergone a rather flat and stepwise expansion. Comparisons of the transposable elements (TEs) between mammoth and other mammals may shed light on the evolutionary history of TEs in various mammalian lineages.

  4. Retrotransposon long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is activated during salamander limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Kuo, Dwight; Nathanson, Jason; Satoh, Akira; Pao, Gerald M; Yeo, Gene W; Bryant, Susan V; Voss, S Randal; Gardiner, David M; Hunter, Tony

    2012-09-01

    Salamanders possess an extraordinary capacity for tissue and organ regeneration when compared to mammals. In our effort to characterize the unique transcriptional fingerprint emerging during the early phase of salamander limb regeneration, we identified transcriptional activation of some germline-specific genes within the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells into a germline-like state. In this work, we focus on one of these genes, the long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon, which is usually active in germ cells and silent in most of the somatic tissues in other organisms. LINE-1 was found to be dramatically upregulated during regeneration. In addition, higher genomic LINE-1 content was also detected in the limb regenerate when compared to that before amputation indicating that LINE-1 retrotransposition is indeed active during regeneration. Active LINE-1 retrotransposition has been suggested to have a potentially deleterious impact on genomic integrity. Silencing of activated LINE-1 by small RNAs has been reported to be part of the machinery aiming to maintain genomic integrity. Indeed, we were able to identify putative LINE-1-related piRNAs in the limb blastema. Transposable element-related piRNAs have been identified frequently in the germline in other organisms. Thus, we present here a scenario in which a unique germline-like state is established during axolotl limb regeneration, and the re-activation of LINE-1 may serve as a marker for cellular dedifferentiation in the early-stage of limb regeneration.

  5. Variant repeats are interspersed throughout the telomeres and recruit nuclear receptors in ALT cells

    PubMed Central

    Conomos, Dimitri; Stutz, Michael D.; Hills, Mark; Neumann, Axel A.; Bryan, Tracy M.

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres in cells that use the recombination-mediated alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway elicit a DNA damage response that is partly independent of telomere length. We therefore investigated whether ALT telomeres contain structural abnormalities that contribute to ALT activity. Here we used next generation sequencing to analyze the DNA content of ALT telomeres. We discovered that variant repeats were interspersed throughout the telomeres of ALT cells. We found that the C-type (TCAGGG) variant repeat predominated and created a high-affinity binding site for the nuclear receptors COUP-TF2 and TR4. Nuclear receptors were directly recruited to telomeres and ALT-associated characteristics were induced after incorporation of the C-type variant repeat by a mutant telomerase. We propose that the presence of variant repeats throughout ALT telomeres results from recombination-mediated telomere replication and spreading of variant repeats from the proximal regions of the telomeres and that the consequent binding of nuclear receptors alters the architecture of telomeres to facilitate further recombination. PMID:23229897

  6. Mosaic DNA Imports with Interspersions of Recipient Sequence after Natural Transformation of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Didelot, Xavier; Falush, Daniel; Kraft, Christian; Suerbaum, Sebastian

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of half of the human population, causing gastritis, ulcers, and cancer. H. pylori is naturally competent for transformation by exogenous DNA, and recombination during mixed infections of one stomach with multiple H. pylori strains generates extensive allelic diversity. We developed an in vitro transformation protocol to study genomic imports after natural transformation of H. pylori. The mean length of imported fragments was dependent on the combination of donor and recipient strain and varied between 1294 bp and 3853 bp. In about 10% of recombinant clones, the imported fragments of donor DNA were interrupted by short interspersed sequences of the recipient (ISR) with a mean length of 82 bp. 18 candidate genes were inactivated in order to identify genes involved in the control of import length and generation of ISR. Inactivation of the antimutator glycosylase MutY increased the length of imports, but did not have a significant effect on ISR frequency. Overexpression of mutY strongly increased the frequency of ISR, indicating that MutY, while not indispensable for ISR formation, is part of at least one ISR-generating pathway. The formation of ISR in H. pylori increases allelic diversity, and contributes to the uniquely low linkage disequilibrium characteristic of this pathogen. PMID:19030104

  7. Similarities between long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) reverse transcriptase and telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Kopera, Huira C.; Moldovan, John B.; Morrish, Tammy A.; Moran, John V.

    2011-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposons encode two proteins (ORF1p and ORF2p) that contain activities required for conventional retrotransposition by a mechanism termed target-site primed reverse transcription. Previous experiments in XRCC4 or DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit-deficient CHO cell lines, which are defective for the nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair pathway, revealed an alternative endonuclease-independent (ENi) pathway for L1 retrotransposition. Interestingly, some ENi retrotransposition events in DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit-deficient cells are targeted to dysfunctional telomeres. Here we used an in vitro assay to detect L1 reverse transcriptase activity to demonstrate that wild-type or endonuclease-defective L1 ribonucleoprotein particles can use oligonucleotide adapters that mimic telomeric ends as primers to initiate the reverse transcription of L1 mRNA. Importantly, these ribonucleoprotein particles also contain a nuclease activity that can process the oligonucleotide adapters before the initiation of reverse transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that ORF1p is not strictly required for ENi retrotransposition at dysfunctional telomeres. Thus, these data further highlight similarities between the mechanism of ENi L1 retrotransposition and telomerase. PMID:21940498

  8. Association between Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Methylation and Relative Telomere Length in Wilms Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui-Bo; Zou, Ji-Zhen; He, Cai; Zeng, Rui; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Fei-Fei; Liu, Zhuo; Ye, Hui; Wu, Jian-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background: DNA hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (LINEs-1) occurs during carcinogenesis, whereas information addressing LINE-1 methylation in Wilms tumor (WT) is limited. The main purpose of our study was to quantify LINE-1 methylation levels and evaluate their relationship with relative telomere length (TL) in WT. Methods: We investigated LINE-1 methylation and relative TL using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR, respectively, in 20 WT tissues, 10 normal kidney tissues and a WT cell line. Significant changes were analyzed by t-tests. Results: LINE-1 methylation levels were significantly lower (P < 0.05) and relative TLs were significantly shorter (P < 0.05) in WT compared with normal kidney. There was a significant positive relationship between LINE-1 methylation and relative TL in WT (r = 0.671, P = 0.001). LINE-1 Methylation levels were significantly associated with global DNA methylation (r = 0.332, P < 0.01). In addition, relative TL was shortened and LINE-1 methylation was decreased in a WT cell line treated with the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine compared with untreated WT cell line. Conclusion: These results suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is common and may be linked to telomere shortening in WT. PMID:26608986

  9. Gene conversion as a secondary mechanism of short interspersed element (SINE) evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, D.H.; Batzer, M.A.; Deininger, P.L. |

    1995-01-01

    The Alu repetitive family of short interspersed elements (SINEs) in primates can be subdivided into distinct subfamilies by specific diagnostic nucleotide changes. The older subfamilies are generally very abundant, while the younger subfamilies have fewer copies. Some of the youngest Alu elements are absent in the orthologous loci of nonhuman primates, indicative of recent retroposition events, the primary mode of SINE evolutions. PCR analysis of one young Alu subfamily (Sb2) member found in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene apparently revealed the presence of this element in the green monkey, orangutan, gorilla, and chimpanzee genomes, as well as the human genome. However, sequence analysis of these genomes revealed a highly mutated, older, primate-specific Alu element was present at this position in the nonhuman primates. Comparison of the flanking DNA sequences upstream of this Alu insertion corresponded to evolution expected for standard primate phylogeny, but comparison of the Alu repeat sequences revealed that the human element departed from this phylogeny. The change in the human sequence apparently occurred by a gene conversion event only within the Alu element itself, converting it from one of the oldest to one of the youngest Alu subfamilies. Although gene conversions of Alu elements are clearly very rare, this finding shows that such events can occur and contribute to specific cases of SINE subfamily evolution.

  10. Distribution, Diversity, and Long-Term Retention of Grass Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements (SINEs)

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Instances of highly conserved plant short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) families and their enrichment near genes have been well documented, but little is known about the general patterns of such conservation and enrichment and underlying mechanisms. Here, we perform a comprehensive investigation of the structure, distribution, and evolution of SINEs in the grass family by analyzing 14 grass and 5 other flowering plant genomes using comparative genomics methods. We identify 61 SINE families composed of 29,572 copies, in which 46 families are first described. We find that comparing with other grass TEs, grass SINEs show much higher level of conservation in terms of genomic retention: The origin of at least 26% families can be traced to early grass diversification and these families are among most abundant SINE families in 86% species. We find that these families show much higher level of enrichment near protein coding genes than families of relatively recent origin (51%:28%), and that 40% of all grass SINEs are near gene and the percentage is higher than other types of grass TEs. The pattern of enrichment suggests that differential removal of SINE copies in gene-poor regions plays an important role in shaping the genomic distribution of these elements. We also identify a sequence motif located at 3′ SINE end which is shared in 17 families. In short, this study provides insights into structure and evolution of SINEs in the grass family. PMID:28903462

  11. Tracking the past: Interspersed repeats in an extinct Afrotherian mammal, Mammuthus primigenius

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fangqing; Qi, Ji; Schuster, Stephan C.

    2009-01-01

    The woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) died out about several thousand years ago, yet recent paleogenomic studies have successfully recovered genetic information from both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of this extinct species. Mammoths belong to Afrotheria, a group of mammals exhibiting extreme morphological diversity and large genome sizes. In this study, we found that the mammoth genome contains a larger proportion of interspersed repeats than any other mammalian genome reported so far, in which the proliferation of the RTE family of retrotransposons (covering 12% of the genome) may be the main reason for an increased genome size. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RTEs in mammoth are closely related to the family BovB/RTE. The incongruence of the reconstructed RTE phylogeny indicates that RTEs in mammoth may be acquired through an ancient lateral gene transfer event. A recent proliferation of SINEs was also found in the probocidean lineage, whereas the Afrotherian-wide SINEs in mammoth have undergone a rather flat and stepwise expansion. Comparisons of the transposable elements (TEs) between mammoth and other mammals may shed light on the evolutionary history of TEs in various mammalian lineages. PMID:19508981

  12. Unusual horizontal transfer of a long interspersed nuclear element between distant vertebrate classes

    PubMed Central

    Kordis, Dusan; Gubensek, Franc

    1998-01-01

    We have shown previously by Southern blot analysis that Bov-B long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) are present in different Viperidae snake species. To address the question as to whether Bov-B LINEs really have been transmitted horizontally between vertebrate classes, the analysis has been extended to a larger number of vertebrate, invertebrate, and plant species. In this paper, the evolutionary origin of Bov-B LINEs is shown unequivocally to be in Squamata. The previously proposed horizontal transfer of Bov-B LINEs in vertebrates has been confirmed by their discontinuous phylogenetic distribution in Squamata (Serpentes and two lizard infra-orders) as well as in Ruminantia, by the high level of nucleotide identity, and by their phylogenetic relationships. The horizontal transfer of Bov-B LINEs from Squamata to the ancestor of Ruminantia is evident from the genetic distances and discontinuous phylogenetic distribution. The ancestor of Colubroidea snakes is a possible donor of Bov-B LINEs to Ruminantia. The timing of horizontal transfer has been estimated from the distribution of Bov-B LINEs in Ruminantia and the fossil data of Ruminantia to be 40–50 My ago. The phylogenetic relationships of Bov-B LINEs from the various Squamata species agrees with that of the species phylogeny, suggesting that Bov-B LINEs have been maintained stably by vertical transmission since the origin of Squamata in the Mesozoic era. PMID:9724768

  13. Long interspersed nucleotide element 1 hypomethylation is associated with poor prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Koei; Shiraishi, Kenji; Eguchi, Ayami; Shibata, Hidekatsu; Yoshimoto, Kentaro; Mori, Takeshi; Baba, Yoshifumi; Baba, Hideo; Suzuki, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation is known to play important roles in genomic instability and carcinogenesis. Methylation in long interspersed nucleotide element 1 (LINE-1) is a good indicator of the global DNA methylation level within a cell. The aim of this study was to evaluate prognostic significance of LINE-1 hypomethylation in lung adenocarcinoma. A consecutive series of 211 lung adenocarcinoma patients who underwent curative resections without any preoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy at Kumamoto University Hospital between April 2010 and December 2012 were included. The LINE-1 methylation levels were quantified in tumor and noncancerous tissue by Pyrosequencing assay. Higher histologic grade and positive findings for vascular invasion were significantly associated with lower methylation levels. The disease-free survival in the hypomethylation group was significantly shorter than that of the non-hypomethylation group. The prognostic difference was more obvious in advanced cases (stage II, III) than in stage I cases. The LINE-1 methylation level is associated with histologic grade and vascular invasion of lung adenocarcinoma. Additionally, LINE-1 hypomethylation is a useful biomarker to predict early recurrence of lung adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Association between Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Methylation and Relative Telomere Length in Wilms Tumor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Bo; Zou, Ji-Zhen; He, Cai; Zeng, Rui; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Fei-Fei; Liu, Zhuo; Ye, Hui; Wu, Jian-Xin

    2015-11-20

    DNA hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (LINEs-1) occurs during carcinogenesis, whereas information addressing LINE-1 methylation in Wilms tumor (WT) is limited. The main purpose of our study was to quantify LINE-1 methylation levels and evaluate their relationship with relative telomere length (TL) in WT. We investigated LINE-1 methylation and relative TL using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR, respectively, in 20 WT tissues, 10 normal kidney tissues and a WT cell line. Significant changes were analyzed by t-tests. LINE-1 methylation levels were significantly lower (P < 0.05) and relative TLs were significantly shorter (P < 0.05) in WT compared with normal kidney. There was a significant positive relationship between LINE-1 methylation and relative TL in WT (r = 0.671, P = 0.001). LINE-1 Methylation levels were significantly associated with global DNA methylation (r = 0.332, P < 0.01). In addition, relative TL was shortened and LINE-1 methylation was decreased in a WT cell line treated with the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine compared with untreated WT cell line. These results suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is common and may be linked to telomere shortening in WT.

  15. Long interspersed nuclear element (LINE)-1 methylation level as a molecular marker of early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jung; Chung, Woo Chul; Kim, Dae Bum; Kim, Yeon-Ji; Lee, Ji Min; Jung, Ji Han; Lee, Yun Kyung

    2016-09-01

    This study was performed to examine the state of long interspersed nuclear element (LINE)-1 methylation level in gastric epithelial dysplasias (GEDs) and evaluate as a molecular marker for gastric carcinogenesis when it was compared with RUNX3 expression. We examined 89 patients with GEDs subcategorized by the Vienna classification - 41 category 3 (low grade) and 48 category 4 (high grade/intramucosal carcinoma) lesion. All tissue samples were evaluated for RUNX3 immunohistochemical staining and the level of LINE-1 methylation. The rate of negative expression of RUNX3 in category 4 lesion was significant higher than category 3 (P<0.01). LINE-1 methylation level was statistically different between category 3 and category 4 lesion (P<0.01). Between positive and negative expression of RUNX3 in GEDs, there was a significant difference of LINE-1 methylation level (P<0.01). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of LINE-1 methylation level for diagnosis of category 4 lesion was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.76-1.00). LINE-1 methylation level was well correlated with the Vienna classification of GED and it had a close relationship with the negative expression of RUNX3 in category 4 lesion. LINE-1 methylation level could be a good candidate for a molecular marker of early gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Human Long Interspersed Element-1 Retrotransposon: An Emerging Biomarker of Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ardeljan, Daniel; Taylor, Martin S; Ting, David T; Burns, Kathleen H

    2017-04-01

    A large portion of intronic and intergenic space in our genome consists of repeated sequences. One of the most prevalent is the long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1, L1) mobile DNA. LINE-1 is rightly receiving increasing interest as a cancer biomarker. Intact LINE-1 elements are self-propagating. They code for RNA and proteins that function to make more copies of the genomic element. Our current understanding is that this process is repressed in most normal cells, but that LINE-1 expression is a hallmark of many types of malignancy. Here, we will consider features of cancer cells when cellular defense mechanisms repressing LINE-1 go awry. We will review evidence that genomic LINE-1 methylation, LINE-1-encoded RNAs, and LINE-1 ORF1p (open reading frame 1 protein) may be useful in cancer diagnosis. The repetitive and variable nature of LINE-1 DNA sequences poses unique challenges to studying them, but recent advances in reagents and next generation sequencing present opportunities to characterize LINE-1 expression and activity in cancers and to identify clinical applications. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  17. Whole-genome expression analysis of mammalian-wide interspersed repeat elements in human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Carnevali, Davide; Conti, Anastasia; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract With more than 500,000 copies, mammalian-wide interspersed repeats (MIRs), a sub-group of SINEs, represent ∼2.5% of the human genome and one of the most numerous family of potential targets for the RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcription machinery. Since MIR elements ceased to amplify ∼130 myr ago, previous studies primarily focused on their genomic impact, while the issue of their expression has not been extensively addressed. We applied a dedicated bioinformatic pipeline to ENCODE RNA-Seq datasets of seven human cell lines and, for the first time, we were able to define the Pol III-driven MIR transcriptome at single-locus resolution. While the majority of Pol III-transcribed MIR elements are cell-specific, we discovered a small set of ubiquitously transcribed MIRs mapping within Pol II-transcribed genes in antisense orientation that could influence the expression of the overlapping gene. We also identified novel Pol III-transcribed ncRNAs, deriving from transcription of annotated MIR fragments flanked by unique MIR-unrelated sequences, and confirmed the role of Pol III-specific internal promoter elements in MIR transcription. Besides demonstrating widespread transcription at these retrotranspositionally inactive elements in human cells, the ability to profile MIR expression at single-locus resolution will facilitate their study in different cell types and states including pathological alterations. PMID:28028040

  18. Long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE-1): potential triggers of systemic autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Crow, Mary K

    2010-02-01

    Recent advances have identified immune complexes containing nucleic acids as stimuli for toll-like receptors and inducers of type I interferon (IFN). While a similar mechanism may serve to amplify immune system activation and production of inflammatory mediators in vivo in the context of systemic autoimmune diseases, the initial triggers of autoimmunity have not been defined. In this review, we describe a category of potential inducers of autoimmunity, the endogenous retroelements, with a particular focus on long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE-1, L1). Increased expression of L1 transcripts or decreased degradation of L1 DNA or RNA could provide potent stimuli for an innate immune response, priming of the immune system, and induction of autoimmunity and inflammation. Genomic and genetic variations among individuals, sex-related differences in L1 regulation, and environmental triggers are among the potential mechanisms that might account for increased L1 expression. Induction of type I IFN by L1-enriched nucleic acids through TLR-independent pathways could represent a first step in the complex series of events leading to systemic autoimmune disease.

  19. Transcriptional activation of short interspersed elements by DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Rudin, C M; Thompson, C B

    2001-01-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs), typified by the human Alu repeat, are RNA polymerase III (pol III)-transcribed sequences that replicate within the genome through an RNA intermediate. Replication of SINEs has been extensive in mammalian evolution: an estimated 5% of the human genome consists of Alu repeats. The mechanisms regulating transcription, reverse transcription, and reinsertion of SINE elements in genomic DNA are poorly understood. Here we report that expression of murine SINE transcripts of both the B1 and B2 classes is strongly upregulated after prolonged exposure to cisplatin, etoposide, or gamma radiation. A similar induction of Alu transcripts in human cells occurs under these conditions. This induction is not due to a general upregulation of pol III activity in either species. Genotoxic treatment of murine cells containing an exogenous human Alu element induced Alu transcription. Concomitant with the increased expression of SINEs, an increase in cellular reverse transcriptase was observed after exposure to these same DNA-damaging agents. These findings suggest that genomic damage may be an important activator of SINEs, and that SINE mobility may contribute to secondary malignancy after exposure to DNA-damaging chemotherapy.

  20. RUDI, a short interspersed element of the V-SINE superfamily widespread in molluscan genomes.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, Andrea; Šatović, Eva; Mantovani, Barbara; Plohl, Miroslav

    2016-06-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are non-autonomous retrotransposons that are widespread in eukaryotic genomes. They exhibit a chimeric sequence structure consisting of a small RNA-related head, an anonymous body and an AT-rich tail. Although their turnover and de novo emergence is rapid, some SINE elements found in distantly related species retain similarity in certain core segments (or highly conserved domains, HCD). We have characterized a new SINE element named RUDI in the bivalve molluscs Ruditapes decussatus and R. philippinarum and found this element to be widely distributed in the genomes of a number of mollusc species. An unexpected structural feature of RUDI is the HCD domain type V, which was first found in non-amniote vertebrate SINEs and in the SINE from one cnidarian species. In addition to the V domain, the overall sequence conservation pattern of RUDI elements resembles that found in ancient AmnSINE (~310 Myr old) and Au SINE (~320 Myr old) families, suggesting that RUDI might be among the most ancient SINE families. Sequence conservation suggests a monophyletic origin of RUDI. Nucleotide variability and phylogenetic analyses suggest long-term vertical inheritance combined with at least one horizontal transfer event as the most parsimonious explanation for the observed taxonomic distribution.

  1. BoS: a large and diverse family of short interspersed elements (SINEs) in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wessler, Susan R

    2005-05-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are nonautonomous non-LTR retrotransposons that populate eukaryotic genomes. Numerous SINE families have been identified in animals, whereas only a few have been described in plants. Here we describe a new family of SINEs, named BoS, that is widespread in Brassicaceae and present at approximately 2000 copies in Brassica oleracea. In addition to sharing a modular structure and target site preference with previously described SINEs, BoS elements have several unusual features. First, the head regions of BoS RNAs can adopt a distinct hairpin-like secondary structure. Second, with 15 distinct subfamilies, BoS represents one of the most diverse SINE families described to date. Third, several of the subfamilies have a mosaic structure that has arisen through the exchange of sequences between existing subfamilies, possibly during retrotransposition. Analysis of BoS subfamilies indicate that they were active during various time periods through the evolution of Brassicaceae and that active elements may still reside in some Brassica species. As such, BoS elements may be a valuable tool as phylogenetic makers for resolving outstanding issues in the evolution of species in the Brassicaceae family.

  2. Short interspersed elements (SINEs) in plants: origin, classification, and use as phylogenetic markers.

    PubMed

    Deragon, Jean-Marc; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2006-12-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are a class of dispersed mobile sequences that use RNA as an intermediate in an amplification process called retroposition. The presence-absence of a SINE at a given locus has been used as a meaningful classification criterion to evaluate phylogenetic relations among species. We review here recent developments in the characterisation of plant SINEs and their use as molecular makers to retrace phylogenetic relations among wild and cultivated Oryza and Brassica species. In Brassicaceae, further use of SINE markers is limited by our partial knowledge of endogenous SINE families (their origin and evolution histories) and by the absence of a clear classification. To solve this problem, phylogenetic relations among all known Brassicaceae SINEs were analyzed and a new classification, grouping SINEs in 15 different families, is proposed. The relative age and size of each Brassicaceae SINE family was evaluated and new phylogenetically supported subfamilies were described. We also present evidence suggesting that new potentially active SINEs recently emerged in Brassica oleracea from the shuffling of preexisting SINE portions. Finally, the comparative evolution history of SINE families present in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea revealed that SINEs were in general more active in the Brassica lineage. The importance of these new data for the use of Brassicaceae SINEs as molecular markers in future applications is discussed.

  3. Phylogenetic relationships among East African haplochromine fish as revealed by short interspersed elements (SINEs).

    PubMed

    Terai, Yohey; Takezaki, Naoko; Mayer, Werner E; Tichy, Herbert; Takahata, Naoyuki; Klein, Jan; Okada, Norihiro

    2004-01-01

    Genomic DNA libraries were prepared from two endemic species of Lake Victoria haplochromine (cichlid) fish and used to isolate and characterize a set of short interspersed elements (SINEs). The distribution and sequences of the SINEs were used to infer phylogenetic relationships among East African haplochromines. The SINE-based classification divides the fish into four groups, which, in order of their divergence from a stem lineage, are the endemic Lake Tanganyika flock (group 1); fish of the nonendemic, monotypic, widely distributed genus Astatoreochromis (group 2); the endemic Lake Malawi flock (group 3); and group 4, which contains fish from widely dispersed East African localities including Lakes Victoria, Edward, George, Albert, and Rukwa, as well as many rivers. The group 4 haplochromines are characterized by a subset of polymorphic SINEs, each of which is present in some individuals and absent in others of the same population at a given locality, the same morphologically defined species, and the same mtDNA-defined haplogroup. SINE-defined group 4 contains six of the seven previously described mtDNA haplogroups. One of the polymorphic SINEs appears to be fixed in the endemic Lake Victoria flock; four others display the presence-or-absence polymorphism within the species of this flock. These findings have implications for the origin of Lake Victoria cichlids and for their founding population sizes.

  4. Ionising irradiation alters the dynamics of human long interspersed nuclear elements 1 (LINE1) retrotransposon.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Nakatani, Youko; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Shimizu, Nobuaki; Wada, Seiichi; Funayama, Tomoo; Mori, Takahisa; Islam, Salequl; Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Shinagawa, Masahiko; Ohtsuki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2012-09-01

    It is important to identify the mechanism by which ionising irradiation induces various genomic alterations in the progeny of surviving cells. Ionising irradiation activates mobile elements like retrotransposons, although the mechanism of its phenomena consisting of transcriptions and insertions of the products into new sites of the genome remains unclear. In this study, we analysed the effects of sparsely ionising X-rays and densely ionising carbon-ion beams on the activities of a family of active retrotransposons, long interspersed nuclear elements 1 (L1). We used the L1/reporter knock-in human glioma cell line, NP-2/L1RP-enhanced GFP (EGFP), that harbours full-length L1 tagged with EGFP retrotransposition detection cassette (L1RP-EGFP) in the chromosomal DNA. X-rays and carbon-ion beams similarly increased frequencies the transcription from L1RP-EGFP and its retrotransposition. Short-sized de novo L1RP-EGFP insertions with 5'-truncation were induced by X-rays, while full-length or long-sized insertions (>5 kb, containing ORF1 and ORF2) were found only in cell clones irradiated by the carbon-ion beams. These data suggest that X-rays and carbon-ion beams induce different length of de novo L1 insertions, respectively. Our findings thus highlight the necessity to investigate the mechanisms of mutations caused by transposable elements by ionising irradiation.

  5. Similarities between long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) reverse transcriptase and telomerase.

    PubMed

    Kopera, Huira C; Moldovan, John B; Morrish, Tammy A; Garcia-Perez, Jose Luis; Moran, John V

    2011-12-20

    Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposons encode two proteins (ORF1p and ORF2p) that contain activities required for conventional retrotransposition by a mechanism termed target-site primed reverse transcription. Previous experiments in XRCC4 or DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit-deficient CHO cell lines, which are defective for the nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair pathway, revealed an alternative endonuclease-independent (ENi) pathway for L1 retrotransposition. Interestingly, some ENi retrotransposition events in DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit-deficient cells are targeted to dysfunctional telomeres. Here we used an in vitro assay to detect L1 reverse transcriptase activity to demonstrate that wild-type or endonuclease-defective L1 ribonucleoprotein particles can use oligonucleotide adapters that mimic telomeric ends as primers to initiate the reverse transcription of L1 mRNA. Importantly, these ribonucleoprotein particles also contain a nuclease activity that can process the oligonucleotide adapters before the initiation of reverse transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that ORF1p is not strictly required for ENi retrotransposition at dysfunctional telomeres. Thus, these data further highlight similarities between the mechanism of ENi L1 retrotransposition and telomerase.

  6. Ultraviolet-induced transformation of keratinocytes: possible involvement of long interspersed element-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Gautam; Gupta, Nishma; Tiwari, Jyoti; Raman, Govindarajan

    2005-02-01

    The normal human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, was transformed using multiple doses of ultraviolet (UV)A+B (UVA, 150-200 mJ/cm(2) and UVB, 15-20 mJ/cm(2) x 6). Malignant transformation was confirmed by upregulation of Cyclin D1 (mRNA) and formation of colonies on soft agar. To identify the genes involved in this transformation process, we have done rapid amplification of polymorphic DNA using RNA from unexposed and multiple-exposed cells. Six percent PAGE showed several differentially regulated genes in exposed cells compared with unexposed cells. Total 19 genes were identified, cloned and sequenced. Three of these 19 cloned genes showed 99% homology at both DNA and protein levels to a stretch of 540 bp (180 aa) of long interspersed element (LINE)-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) open reading frame (ORF-2). Colonies from soft agar showed upregulation of this gene compared with non-colonized (lawn on soft agar) cells as detected by RT-PCR. This data implicates LINE-1 RT (ORF-2) in UV-induced malignancy and can possibly be used as a marker for the diagnosis of UV-induced skin cancer.

  7. Monitoring Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 Expression During Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bodak, Maxime; Ciaudo, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements-1 (LINE-1 or L1) are a class of transposable elements which account for almost 19 % of the mouse genome. This represents around 600,000 L1 fragments, among which it is estimated that 3000 intact copies still remain capable to retrotranspose and to generate deleterious mutation by insertion into genomic coding region. In differentiated cells, full length L1 are transcriptionally repressed by DNA methylation. However at the blastocyst stage, L1 elements are subject to a demethylation wave and able to be expressed and to be inserted into new genomic locations. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (mESCs) are pluripotent stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts. Mouse ESCs can be maintained undifferentiated under controlled culture conditions or induced into the three primary germ layers, therefore they represent a suitable model to follow mechanisms involved in L1 repression during the process of differentiation of mESCs. This protocol presents how to maintain culture of undifferentiated mESCs, induce their differentiation, and monitor L1 expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. L1 transcriptional levels are assessed by real-time qRT-PCR performed on total RNA extracts using specific L1 primers and translation levels are measured by Western blot analysis of L1 protein ORF1 using a specific L1 antibody.

  8. Species distribution in human immunodeficiency virus-related mycobacterial infections: implications for selection of initial treatment.

    PubMed

    Montessori, V; Phillips, P; Montaner, J; Haley, L; Craib, K; Bessuille, E; Black, W

    1996-06-01

    Management of mycobacterial infection is species specific; however, treatment is prompted by positive smears or cultures, often several weeks before species identification. The objective of this study was to determine the species distribution of mycobacterial isolates from various body sites in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). All mycobacterial isolates recovered at St. Paul's Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) from April 1989 to March 1993 were reviewed. Among 357 HIV-positive patients with mycobacterial infections, 64% (96) of the sputum isolates were Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), 18% were Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and 17% were Mycobacterium kansasii. Lymph node involvement (25 patients) was due to either MAC (72%) or M. tuberculosis (24%). Two hundred ninety-eight episodes of mycobacteremia were due to MAC (98%), M. tuberculosis (1%), and M. kansasii (1%). Similarly, cultures of 84 bone marrow biopsy specimens (99%), 19 intestinal biopsy specimens (100%), and 30 stool specimens (97%) yielded predominantly MAC. These results have implications for initial therapy, particularly in areas where rapid methods for species identification are not readily available. Because of considerable geographic variation, development of guidelines for selection of initial therapy depends on regional determination of species distribution in HIV-related mycobacterial infections.

  9. Mycobacterial RNA polymerase forms unstable open promoter complexes that are stabilized by CarD

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elizabeth; Chen, James; Leon, Katherine; Darst, Seth A.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli has served as the archetypal organism on which the overwhelming majority of biochemical characterizations of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) have been focused; the properties of E. coli RNAP have been accepted as generally representative for all bacterial RNAPs. Here, we directly compare the initiation properties of a mycobacterial transcription system with E. coli RNAP on two different promoters. The detailed characterizations include abortive transcription assays, RNAP/promoter complex stability assays and DNAse I and KMnO4 footprinting. Based on footprinting, we find that promoter complexes formed by E. coli and mycobacterial RNAPs use very similar protein/DNA interactions and generate the same transcription bubbles. However, we find that the open promoter complexes formed by E. coli RNAP on the two promoters tested are highly stable and essentially irreversible (with lifetimes much greater than 1 h), while the open promoter complexes on the same two promoters formed by mycobacterial RNAP are very unstable (lifetimes of about 2 min or less) and readily reversible. We show here that CarD, an essential mycobacterial transcription activator that is not found in E. coli, stabilizes the mycobacterial RNAP/open promoter complexes considerably by preventing transcription bubble collapse. PMID:25510492

  10. Role of interleukin-12 family cytokines in the cellular response to mycobacterial disease.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia

    2010-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-12 is a multifunctional cytokine acting as a key regulator of cell-mediated immune responses through the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into type 1 helper T cells (Th1) producing interferon-gamma. As our knowledge of IL-12 family members is rapidly growing, it will be important to specify their involvement in the regulation of mycobacterial infection. This article is a review of the current knowledge regarding the functions of the IL-12 family cytokines in the immune host defense system against mycobacteria. Specifically, this review aims to describe recent scientific evidence concerning the protective role of some members of the IL-12 family cytokines for the control of mycobacterial infection, as well as to summarize knowledge of the potential use of the IL-12 family members as potent adjuvants in the prevention and treatment of mycobacterial infectious diseases. In addition, recent data supporting the importance of the IL-12 family members in mycobacterial diseases in relation to Th17 function are discussed. This examination will help to improve our understanding of the immune response to mycobacterial infection and also improve vaccine design and immunotherapeutic intervention against tuberculosis.

  11. To catch a killer. What can mycobacterial models teach us about Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis?

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Michael U; Champion, Patricia A DiGiuseppe

    2010-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of the global tuberculosis epidemic. To combat this successful human pathogen we need a better understanding of the basic biology of mycobacterial pathogenesis. The use of mycobacterial model systems has the potential to greatly facilitate our understanding of how M. tuberculosis causes disease. Recently, studies using mycobacterial models, including M. bovis BCG, M. marinum, and M. smegmatis have significantly contributed to understanding M. tuberculosis. Specifically, there have been advances in genetic manipulation of M. tuberculosis using inducible promoters and recombineering that alleviate technical limitations in working with mycobacteria. Model systems have helped elucidate how secretion systems function at both the molecular level and during virulence. Mycobacterial models have also led to interesting hypotheses about how M. tuberculosis mediates latent infection and host response. While there is utility in using model systems to understand tuberculosis, each of these models represent distinct mycobacterial species with unique environmental adaptations. Directly comparing findings in model mycobacteria to those in M. tuberculosis will illuminate the similarities and differences between these species and increase our understanding of why M. tuberculosis is such a potent human pathogen. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Atypical mycobacterial cutaneous infections in Egyptians: a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    El-Khalawany, Mohamed A

    2014-04-01

    Atypical mycobacteria comprise an uncommon heterogenous non-tuberculous group of acid-fast bacteria that rarely involve skin. The pattern of atypical mycobacterial cutaneous infections (AMCI) has not been previously studied in Egypt. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics, pathological features and species profile of AMCI among Egyptian patients. A retrospective study included 46 cases, diagnosed with AMCI during the period 2002 to 2012. The study included 34 males (73.9%) and 12 females (26.9%). The average age of patients was 39 years while the average duration of lesions was 15 months. The lesions were mostly located on the extremities (91.3%) and there was predominance of single (65.2%) and nodular (41.4%) lesions. History of trauma was confirmed in 91.3%. Histologically, the granulomas were mostly superficial (67.4%) with predominance of nodular suppurative pattern (84.8%). Other significant histological findings included epidermal hypertrophy (100%), presence of large-sized multinucleated giant cells (87%) and intrafollicular neutrophilic abscesses (84.8%). The diagnosis was proved by direct smear in 6.5%, skin biopsy in 10.9%, tissue culture in 47.8% and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 34.8%. Isolated species included Mycobacterium marinum (84.8%), Mycobacterium fortuitum (10.9%) and Mycobacterium kansasii (4.3%). Although the results of this study recommend that the diagnosis of AMCI is based mainly on culture and PCR, other clinicopathological features such as history of trauma, acral location of the lesion and suppurative granulomatous reaction with intrafollicular abscesses could be helpful clues in suspecting AMCI.

  13. Ultrastructural morphologic changes in mycobacterial biofilm in different extreme condition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra; Sachan, Tarun Kumar; Sharma, Pragya; Rawat, Krishna Dutta

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the morphologic and ultrastructural features of biofilms of slow and fast-growing mycobacteria in different stress conditions, presence and absence of oleic acid albumin dextrose catalase (OADC) enrichment and at different temperatures: 30, 37 and 42 °C. Four hundred mycobacterial isolates were taken. The biomass of each biofilm was quantified using a modified microtiter plate assay method. Isolates were divided into those that formed fully established biofilms, moderately attached biofilms and weakly adherent biofilms by comparison with a known biofilm-forming strain. The large quantity of biofilm was produced by Mycobacterium smegmatis at temperature 37 and 42 °C as compared to 30 °C. Mycobacterium fortuitum and M. avium developed large amount of biofilm at 30 °C as compared to 37 and 42 °C. Mycobacterium tuberculosis developed strong biofilm at 37 °C and no biofilm at 30 and 42 °C in Sauton's media. The selected non-tuberculous mycobacteria and H37Rv developed strong biofilm in the presence of OADC enrichment in Sauton's medium. Microscopic examination of biofilms by scanning electron microscopy revealed that poorly adherent biofilm formers failed to colonize the entire surface of the microtiter well. While moderately adherent biofilm formers grew in uniform monolayers but failed to develop a mature three-dimensional structure. SEM analysis of an isolate representative of the group formed fully established biofilms with a textured, multi-layered, three-dimensional structure.

  14. Long interspersed nuclear element ORF-1 protein promotes proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fan; Lu, Yin-Ying; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Chuan-Fu; Meredith, Alex; Xu, Zhong-Xian; Yang, Yu-Tao; Chang, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Hong; Qu, Jian-Hui; Zeng, Zhen; Yang, Jun-Lan; Wang, Chun-Ping; Zhu, Yun-Feng; Cui, Jia-Jun; Yang, Yong-Ping

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the specific roles and mechanisms of long interspersed nuclear element-1 ORF-1 protein [human long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1), ORF-1p] in chemotherapeutic drug resistance and cell proliferation regulation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. METHODS: MTT assays were performed to identify the effect of the chemotherapeutic drug toxicity on HepG2 cells. Cell proliferation inhibition and the IC50 were calculated by the Origin 8.0 software. Western blotting assays were performed to investigate whether LINE-1 ORF-1p modulates the expression of some important genes, including p53, p27, p15, Bcl-2, mdr, and p-gp. To corroborate the proliferation and anchor-independent growth results, the HepG2 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry to investigate the effect of LINE-1 ORF-1p on the apoptosis regulation. RESULTS: LINE-1 ORF-1p contributed to the resistance to several chemotherapeutic drugs (cisplatin and epirubicin) in HepG2 cells. The IC50 of the epirubicin and cisplatin increased from 36.04 nmol/L to 59.11 nmol/L or from 37.94 nmol/L to 119.32 nmol/L. Repression of LINE-1 ORF-1p expression by the siRNA could markedly enhance the response of HepG2 cells to the epirubicin and cisplatin. The IC50 correspondingly decreased from 28.06 nmol/L to 3.83 nmol/L or from 32.04 nmol/L to 2.89 nmol/L. Interestingly, down-regulation of LINE-1 ORF-1p level by siRNA could promote the response of HepG2 cells to the paclitaxel. The IC50 decreased from 35.90 nmol/L to 7.36 nmol/L. However, overexpression of LINE-1 ORF-1p did not modulate the paclitaxel toxicity in HepG2 cells. Further Western blotting revealed that LINE-1 ORF-1p enhanced mdr and p-gp gene expression. As a protein arrested in the nucleus, LINE-1 ORF-1p may function through modulating transcriptional activity of some important transcription factors. Indeed, LINE-1 ORF-1p promoted HepG2 cell proliferation, anchor-independent growth and protected the cells against apoptosis through modulating the

  15. Long interspersed nuclear element ORF-1 protein promotes proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fan; Lu, Yin-Ying; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Chuan-Fu; Meredith, Alex; Xu, Zhong-Xian; Yang, Yu-Tao; Chang, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Hong; Qu, Jian-Hui; Zeng, Zhen; Yang, Jun-Lan; Wang, Chun-Ping; Zhu, Yun-Feng; Cui, Jia-Jun; Yang, Yong-Ping

    2013-02-21

    To clarify the specific roles and mechanisms of long interspersed nuclear element-1 ORF-1 protein [human long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1), ORF-1p] in chemotherapeutic drug resistance and cell proliferation regulation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. MTT assays were performed to identify the effect of the chemotherapeutic drug toxicity on HepG2 cells. Cell proliferation inhibition and the IC50 were calculated by the Origin 8.0 software. Western blotting assays were performed to investigate whether LINE-1 ORF-1p modulates the expression of some important genes, including p53, p27, p15, Bcl-2, mdr, and p-gp. To corroborate the proliferation and anchor-independent growth results, the HepG2 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry to investigate the effect of LINE-1 ORF-1p on the apoptosis regulation. LINE-1 ORF-1p contributed to the resistance to several chemotherapeutic drugs (cisplatin and epirubicin) in HepG2 cells. The IC50 of the epirubicin and cisplatin increased from 36.04 nmol/L to 59.11 nmol/L or from 37.94 nmol/L to 119.32 nmol/L. Repression of LINE-1 ORF-1p expression by the siRNA could markedly enhance the response of HepG2 cells to the epirubicin and cisplatin. The IC50 correspondingly decreased from 28.06 nmol/L to 3.83 nmol/L or from 32.04 nmol/L to 2.89 nmol/L. Interestingly, down-regulation of LINE-1 ORF-1p level by siRNA could promote the response of HepG2 cells to the paclitaxel. The IC50 decreased from 35.90 nmol/L to 7.36 nmol/L. However, overexpression of LINE-1 ORF-1p did not modulate the paclitaxel toxicity in HepG2 cells. Further Western blotting revealed that LINE-1 ORF-1p enhanced mdr and p-gp gene expression. As a protein arrested in the nucleus, LINE-1 ORF-1p may function through modulating transcriptional activity of some important transcription factors. Indeed, LINE-1 ORF-1p promoted HepG2 cell proliferation, anchor-independent growth and protected the cells against apoptosis through modulating the expression of p15, p21

  16. AGG interspersions within the FMR1 CGG repeat: Mechanisms and models of triplet repeat instability

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, E.E.; Nelson, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome CGG repeat alleles are typically classified as normal, premutation, or full mutation based on the length of the repeat in the 5{prime} UTR of the FMR1 gene. The distinction between high-end normals and low-end premutation alleles, however, is not always clear since repeats of similar size differ markedly in their intergenerational stability. This fact suggest that differences in sequence content may play a key role in determining an allele`s predisposition to instability. It has been postulated that the loss of AGG interruptions within the CGG tract may trigger this instability. To test this model, we have developed a simple indirect method to determine the presence or absence of internal AGGs within the FMR1 CGG repeat tract. Analysis of 84 human X chromosomes for the presence of interrupting AGG trinucleotides revealed that most alleles possess two interspersed AGGs at a periodicity of 9 or 10 CGGs. The longest tract of uninterrupted CGG repeats is usually found at the 3{prime} end indicating that variation in the length of the repeat is polar. Alleles containing between 34 and 55 repeats, with documented unstable transmissions, were shown to have lost one or both AGG interruptions when compared to stable alleles of similar length. These comparisons define an instability threshold between 34 and 38 uninterrupted CGG repeats. Analysis of premutation alleles in fragile X syndrome carriers reveals that 70% of these alleles contain a single AGG interruption. Population studies confirm that such highly punctuated FMR1 CGG repeats are virtually static in terms of length variation. These data suggest that the loss of an AGG is an important mutational event in the generation of unstable alleles predisposed to the fragile X syndrome. Loss of AGG trinucleotides and polarized variability support Okazaki fragment slippage as a model for CGG repeat instability and hyperexpansion.

  17. Retrotransposon long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is activated during salamander limb regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Kuo, Dwight; Nathanson, Jason; Satoh, Akira; Pao, Gerald M.; Yeo, Gene W.; Bryant, Susan V.; Voss, S. Randal; Gardiner, David M.; Hunter, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Salamanders possess an extraordinary capacity for tissue and organ regeneration when compared to mammals. In our effort to characterize the unique transcriptional fingerprint emerging during the early phase of salamander limb regeneration, we identified transcriptional activation of some germline-specific genes within the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells into a germline-like state. In this work, we focus on one of these genes, the long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon, which is usually active in germ cells and silent in most of the somatic tissues in other organisms. LINE-1 was found to be dramatically upregulated during regeneration. In addition, higher genomic LINE-1 content was also detected in the limb regenerate when compared to that before amputation indicating that LINE-1 retrotransposition is indeed active during regeneration. Active LINE-1 retrotransposition has been suggested to have a potentially deleterious impact on genomic integrity. Silencing of activated LINE-1 by small RNAs has been reported to be part of the machinery aiming to maintain genomic integrity. Indeed, we were able to identify putative LINE-1-related piRNAs in the limb blastema. Transposable element-related piRNAs have been identified frequently in the germline in other organisms. Thus, we present here a scenario in which a unique germline-like state is established during axolotl limb regeneration, and the re-activation of LINE-1 may serve as a marker for cellular dedifferentiation in the early-stage of limb regeneration. PMID:22913491

  18. A PCR technique based on the Hip1 interspersed repetitive sequence distinguishes cyanobacterial species and strains.

    PubMed

    Smith, J K; Parry, J D; Day, J G; Smith, R J

    1998-10-01

    The use of primers based on the Hip1 sequence as a typing technique for cyanobacteria has been investigated. The discovery of short repetitive sequence structures in bacterial DNA during the last decade has led to the development of PCR-based methods for typing, i.e., distinguishing and identifying, bacterial species and strains. An octameric palindromic sequence known as Hip1 has been shown to be present in the chromosomal DNA of many species of cyanobacteria as a highly repetitious interspersed sequence. PCR primers were constructed that extended the Hip1 sequence at the 3' end by two bases. Five of the 16 possible extended primers were tested. Each of the five primers produced a different set of products when used to prime PCR from cyanobacterial genomic DNA. Each primer produced a distinct set of products for each of the 15 cyanobacterial species tested. The ability of Hip1-based PCR to resolve taxonomic differences was assessed by analysis of independent isolates of Anabaena flos-aquae and Nostoc ellipsosporum obtained from the CCAP (Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa, IFE, Cumbria, UK). A PCR-based RFLP analysis of products amplified from the 23S-16S rDNA intergenic region was used to characterize the isolates and to compare with the Hip1 typing data. The RFLP and Hip1 typing yielded similar results and both techniques were able to distinguish different strains. On the basis of these results it is suggested that the Hip1 PCR technique may assist in distinguishing cyanobacterial species and strains.

  19. Retrotransposition of long interspersed element 1 induced by methamphetamine or cocaine.

    PubMed

    Okudaira, Noriyuki; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Nishio, Hajime

    2014-09-12

    Long interspersed element 1 (L1) is a retroelement constituting ∼17% of the human genome. A single human cell has 80-100 copies of L1 capable of retrotransposition (L1-RTP), ∼10% of which are "hot L1" copies, meaning they are primed for "jumping" within the genome. Recent studies demonstrated induction of L1 activity by drugs of abuse or low molecular weight compounds, but little is known about the underlying mechanism. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism and effects of methamphetamine (METH) and cocaine on L1-RTP. Our results revealed that METH and cocaine induced L1-RTP in neuronal cell lines. This effect was found to be reverse transcriptase-dependent. However, METH and cocaine did not induce double-strand breaks. RNA interference experiments combined with add-back of siRNA-resistant cDNAs revealed that the induction of L1-RTP by METH or cocaine depends on the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). METH or cocaine recruited the L1-encoded open reading frame 1 (ORF1) to chromatin in a CREB-dependent manner. These data suggest that the cellular cascades underlying METH- and cocaine-induced L1-RTP are different from those behind L1-RTP triggered by DNA damage; CREB is involved in drug-induced L1-RTP. L1-RTP caused by drugs of abuse is a novel type of genomic instability, and analysis of this phenomenon might be a novel approach to studying substance-use disorders.

  20. Retrotransposition of Long Interspersed Element 1 Induced by Methamphetamine or Cocaine*

    PubMed Central

    Okudaira, Noriyuki; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Nishio, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Long interspersed element 1 (L1) is a retroelement constituting ∼17% of the human genome. A single human cell has 80–100 copies of L1 capable of retrotransposition (L1-RTP), ∼10% of which are “hot L1” copies, meaning they are primed for “jumping” within the genome. Recent studies demonstrated induction of L1 activity by drugs of abuse or low molecular weight compounds, but little is known about the underlying mechanism. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism and effects of methamphetamine (METH) and cocaine on L1-RTP. Our results revealed that METH and cocaine induced L1-RTP in neuronal cell lines. This effect was found to be reverse transcriptase-dependent. However, METH and cocaine did not induce double-strand breaks. RNA interference experiments combined with add-back of siRNA-resistant cDNAs revealed that the induction of L1-RTP by METH or cocaine depends on the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). METH or cocaine recruited the L1-encoded open reading frame 1 (ORF1) to chromatin in a CREB-dependent manner. These data suggest that the cellular cascades underlying METH- and cocaine-induced L1-RTP are different from those behind L1-RTP triggered by DNA damage; CREB is involved in drug-induced L1-RTP. L1-RTP caused by drugs of abuse is a novel type of genomic instability, and analysis of this phenomenon might be a novel approach to studying substance-use disorders. PMID:25053411

  1. Methylation levels of the "long interspersed nucleotide element-1" repetitive sequences predict survival of melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Luca; Fratta, Elisabetta; Bidoli, Ettore; Covre, Alessia; Parisi, Giulia; Colizzi, Francesca; Coral, Sandra; Massarut, Samuele; Kirkwood, John M; Maio, Michele

    2011-05-26

    The prognosis of cutaneous melanoma (CM) differs for patients with identical clinico-pathological stage, and no molecular markers discriminating the prognosis of stage III individuals have been established. Genome-wide alterations in DNA methylation are a common event in cancer. This study aimed to define the prognostic value of genomic DNA methylation levels in stage III CM patients. Overall level of genomic DNA methylation was measured using bisulfite pyrosequencing at three CpG sites (CpG1, CpG2, CpG3) of the Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element-1 (LINE-1) sequences in short-term CM cultures from 42 stage IIIC patients. The impact of LINE-1 methylation on overall survival (OS) was assessed using Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Hypomethylation (i.e., methylation below median) at CpG2 and CpG3 sites significantly associated with improved prognosis of CM, CpG3 showing the strongest association. Patients with hypomethylated CpG3 had increased OS (P = 0.01, log-rank = 6.39) by Kaplan-Meyer analysis. Median OS of patients with hypomethylated or hypermethylated CpG3 were 31.9 and 11.5 months, respectively. The 5 year OS for patients with hypomethylated CpG3 was 48% compared to 7% for patients with hypermethylated sequences. Among the variables examined by Cox regression analysis, LINE-1 methylation at CpG2 and CpG3 was the only predictor of OS (Hazard Ratio = 2.63, for hypermethylated CpG3; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.21-5.69; P = 0.01). LINE-1 methylation is identified as a molecular marker of prognosis for CM patients in stage IIIC. Evaluation of LINE-1 promises to represent a key tool for driving the most appropriate clinical management of stage III CM patients.

  2. Relation between hypomethylation of long interspersed nucleotide elements and risk of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wang, Fang; Guan, Jing; Le, Jing; Wu, Lihua; Zou, Jizhen; Zhao, Huizhi; Pei, Lijun; Zheng, Xiaoying; Zhang, Ting

    2010-05-01

    Impaired one-carbon metabolism is thought to be associated with the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs); however, the role of methylation in NTDs remains unclear. Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) constitutes 17-25% of the human genome. LINE-1 hypomethylation correlates with global DNA methylation levels in cancerous cells, but limited information is available on LINE-1 methylation in NTDs. We determined whether LINE-1 methylation patterns were associated with neural tube development and the possible relations between DNA methylation and key maternal metabolites involved in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism. Global methylation, maternal plasma folic acid, vitamin B-12, and total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations were assessed in 48 NTD and 49 control samples by immunoassay, and LINE-1 methylation levels were evaluated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Methylation levels of genomic DNA and LINE-1 decreased significantly in the neural tissue of NTD samples. The risk of NTDs increased with decreasing levels of LINE-1 methylation, with an odds ratio of 5.246 (95% CI: 1.519, 18.124; P = 0.009) for the lowest quartile (methylation level < or = 57.94%) compared with the highest quartile (methylation level > or = 60.94%). Compared with control subjects, case subjects had lower maternal plasma concentrations of vitamin B-12. Hypomethylation of LINE-1 and genomic DNA was associated with an increased risk of NTDs. Functional insufficiency of maternal plasma vitamin B-12 was associated with NTDs, although no significant correlation could be established between maternal folic acid, vitamin B, tHcy, and LINE-1 methylation.

  3. Viral protein R of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 induces retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Kenta; Okudaira, Noriyuki; Tamura, Masato; Doi, Akihiro; Saito, Yoshikazu; Shimura, Mari; Goto, Motohito; Matsunaga, Akihiro; Kawamura, Yuki I; Otsubo, Takeshi; Dohi, Taeko; Hoshino, Shigeki; Kano, Shigeyuki; Hagiwara, Shotaro; Tanuma, Junko; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Baba, Masanori; Iguchi, Taku; Yanagita, Motoko; Oka, Shinichi; Okamura, Tadashi; Ishizaka, Yukihito

    2013-08-05

    Viral protein R (Vpr), a protein of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) with various biological functions, was shown to be present in the blood of HIV-1-positive patients. However, it remained unclear whether circulating Vpr in patients' blood is biologically active. Here, we examined the activity of blood Vpr using an assay system by which retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1 (L1-RTP) was detected. We also investigated the in vivo effects of recombinant Vpr (rVpr) by administrating it to transgenic mice harboring human L1 as a transgene (hL1-Tg mice). Based on our data, we discuss the involvement of blood Vpr in the clinical symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We first discovered that rVpr was active in induction of L1-RTP. Biochemical analyses revealed that rVpr-induced L1-RTP depended on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β. By using a sensitive L1-RTP assay system, we showed that 6 of the 15 blood samples from HIV-1 patients examined were positive for induction of L1-RTP. Of note, the L1-RTP-inducing activity was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for Vpr. Moreover, L1-RTP was reproducibly induced in various organs, including the kidney, when rVpr was administered to hL1-Tg mice. Blood Vpr is biologically active, suggesting that its monitoring is worthwhile for clarification of the roles of Vpr in the pathogenesis of AIDS. This is the first report to demonstrate a soluble factor in patients' blood active for L1-RTP activity, and implies the involvement of L1-RTP in the development of human diseases.

  4. Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Hypomethylation and Oxidative Stress: Correlation and Bladder Cancer Diagnostic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Amnattrakul, Passakorn; Dissayabutra, Thasinas; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Tosukhowong, Piyaratana

    2012-01-01

    Although, increased oxidative stress and hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) associate with bladder cancer (BCa) development, the relationship between these alterations is unknown. We evaluated the oxidative stress and hypomethylation of the LINE-1 in 61 BCa patients and 45 normal individuals. To measure the methylation levels and to differentiate the LINE-1 loci into hypermethylated, partially methylated and hypomethylated, peripheral blood cells, urinary exfoliated cells and cancerous tissues were evaluated by combined bisulfite restriction analysis PCR. The urinary total antioxidant status (TAS) and plasma protein carbonyl content were determined. The LINE-1 methylation levels and patterns, especially hypomethylated loci, in the blood and urine cells of the BCa patients were different from the levels and patterns in the healthy controls. The urinary TAS was decreased, whereas the plasma protein carbonyl content was increased in the BCa patients relative to the controls. A positive correlation between the methylation of LINE-1 in the blood-derived DNA and urinary TAS was found in both the BCa and control groups. The urinary hypomethylated LINE-1 loci and the plasma protein carbonyl content provided the best diagnostic potential for BCa prediction. Based on post-diagnostic samples, the combination test improved the diagnostic power to a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 96%. In conclusion, decreased LINE-1 methylation is associated with increased oxidative stress both in healthy and BCa subjects across the various tissue types, implying a dose-response association. Increases in the LINE-1 hypomethylation levels and the number of hypomethylated loci in both the blood- and urine-derived cells and increase in the oxidative stress were found in the BCa patients. The combination test of the urinary hypomethylated LINE-1 loci and the plasma protein carbonyl content may be useful for BCa screening and monitoring of treatment. PMID

  5. Viral protein R of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 induces retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Viral protein R (Vpr), a protein of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) with various biological functions, was shown to be present in the blood of HIV-1-positive patients. However, it remained unclear whether circulating Vpr in patients’ blood is biologically active. Here, we examined the activity of blood Vpr using an assay system by which retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1 (L1-RTP) was detected. We also investigated the in vivo effects of recombinant Vpr (rVpr) by administrating it to transgenic mice harboring human L1 as a transgene (hL1-Tg mice). Based on our data, we discuss the involvement of blood Vpr in the clinical symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Results We first discovered that rVpr was active in induction of L1-RTP. Biochemical analyses revealed that rVpr-induced L1-RTP depended on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β. By using a sensitive L1-RTP assay system, we showed that 6 of the 15 blood samples from HIV-1 patients examined were positive for induction of L1-RTP. Of note, the L1-RTP-inducing activity was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for Vpr. Moreover, L1-RTP was reproducibly induced in various organs, including the kidney, when rVpr was administered to hL1-Tg mice. Conclusions Blood Vpr is biologically active, suggesting that its monitoring is worthwhile for clarification of the roles of Vpr in the pathogenesis of AIDS. This is the first report to demonstrate a soluble factor in patients’ blood active for L1-RTP activity, and implies the involvement of L1-RTP in the development of human diseases. PMID:23915234

  6. Plasmodium Helical Interspersed Subtelomeric (PHIST) Proteins, at the Center of Host Cell Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Warncke, Jan D.; Vakonakis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY During the asexual cycle, Plasmodium falciparum extensively remodels the human erythrocyte to make it a suitable host cell. A large number of exported proteins facilitate this remodeling process, which causes erythrocytes to become more rigid, cytoadherent, and permeable for nutrients and metabolic products. Among the exported proteins, a family of 89 proteins, called the Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric (PHIST) protein family, has been identified. While also found in other Plasmodium species, the PHIST family is greatly expanded in P. falciparum. Although a decade has passed since their first description, to date, most PHIST proteins remain uncharacterized and are of unknown function and localization within the host cell, and there are few data on their interactions with other host or parasite proteins. However, over the past few years, PHIST proteins have been mentioned in the literature at an increasing rate owing to their presence at various localizations within the infected erythrocyte. Expression of PHIST proteins has been implicated in molecular and cellular processes such as the surface display of PfEMP1, gametocytogenesis, changes in cell rigidity, and also cerebral and pregnancy-associated malaria. Thus, we conclude that PHIST proteins are central to host cell remodeling, but despite their obvious importance in pathology, PHIST proteins seem to be understudied. Here we review current knowledge, shed light on the definition of PHIST proteins, and discuss these proteins with respect to their localization and probable function. We take into consideration interaction studies, microarray analyses, or data from blood samples from naturally infected patients to combine all available information on this protein family. PMID:27582258

  7. Polycaprolactone nanofiber interspersed collagen type-I scaffold for bone regeneration: a unique injectable osteogenic scaffold.

    PubMed

    Baylan, Nuray; Bhat, Samerna; Ditto, Maggie; Lawrence, Joseph G; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2013-08-01

    There is an increasing demand for an injectable cell coupled three-dimensional (3D) scaffold to be used as bone fracture augmentation material. To address this demand, a novel injectable osteogenic scaffold called PN-COL was developed using cells, a natural polymer (collagen type-I), and a synthetic polymer (polycaprolactone (PCL)). The injectable nanofibrous PN-COL is created by interspersing PCL nanofibers within pre-osteoblast cell embedded collagen type-I. This simple yet novel and powerful approach provides a great benefit as an injectable bone scaffold over other non-living bone fracture stabilization polymers, such as polymethylmethacrylate and calcium content resin-based materials. The advantages of injectability and the biomimicry of collagen was coupled with the structural support of PCL nanofibers, to create cell encapsulated injectable 3D bone scaffolds with intricate porous internal architecture and high osteoconductivity. The effects of PCL nanofiber inclusion within the cell encapsulated collagen matrix has been evaluated for scaffold size retention and osteocompatibility, as well as for MC3T3-E1 cells osteogenic activity. The structural analysis of novel bioactive material proved that the material is chemically stable enough in an aqueous solution for an extended period of time without using crosslinking reagents, but it is also viscous enough to be injected through a syringe needle. Data from long-term in vitro proliferation and differentiation data suggests that novel PN-COL scaffolds promote the osteoblast proliferation, phenotype expression, and formation of mineralized matrix. This study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of creating a structurally competent, injectable, cell embedded bone tissue scaffold. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the advantages of mimicking the hierarchical architecture of native bone with nano- and micro-size formation through introducing PCL nanofibers within macron-size collagen fibers and in

  8. Short interspersed DNA elements and miRNAs: a novel hidden gene regulation layer in zebrafish?

    PubMed

    Scarpato, Margherita; Angelini, Claudia; Cocca, Ennio; Pallotta, Maria M; Morescalchi, Maria A; Capriglione, Teresa

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated by in silico analysis the possible correlation between microRNAs (miRNAs) and Anamnia V-SINEs (a superfamily of short interspersed nuclear elements), which belong to those retroposon families that have been preserved in vertebrate genomes for millions of years and are actively transcribed because they are embedded in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of several genes. We report the results of the analysis of the genomic distribution of these mobile elements in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and discuss their involvement in generating miRNA gene loci. The computational study showed that the genes predicted to bear V-SINEs can be targeted by miRNAs with a very high hybridization E-value. Gene ontology analysis indicates that these genes are mainly involved in metabolic, membrane, and cytoplasmic signaling pathways. Nearly all the miRNAs that were predicted to target the V-SINEs of these genes, i.e., miR-338, miR-9, miR-181, miR-724, miR-735, and miR-204, have been validated in similar regulatory roles in mammals. The large number of genes bearing a V-SINE involved in metabolic and cellular processes suggests that V-SINEs may play a role in modulating cell responses to different stimuli and in preserving the metabolic balance during cell proliferation and differentiation. Although they need experimental validation, these preliminary results suggest that in the genome of D. rerio, as in other TE families in vertebrates, the preservation of V-SINE retroposons may also have been favored by their putative role in gene network modulation.

  9. Identification and characterisation of Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements in the olive tree (Olea europaea L.) genome.

    PubMed

    Barghini, Elena; Mascagni, Flavia; Natali, Lucia; Giordani, Tommaso; Cavallini, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements (SINEs) are nonautonomous retrotransposons in the genome of most eukaryotic species. While SINEs have been intensively investigated in humans and other animal systems, SINE identification has been carried out only in a limited number of plant species. This lack of information is apparent especially in non-model plants whose genome has not been sequenced yet. The aim of this work was to produce a specific bioinformatics pipeline for analysing second generation sequence reads of a non-model species and identifying SINEs. We have identified, for the first time, 227 putative SINEs of the olive tree (Olea europaea), that constitute one of the few sets of such sequences in dicotyledonous species. The identified SINEs ranged from 140 to 362 bp in length and were characterised with regard to the occurrence of the tRNA domain in their sequence. The majority of identified elements resulted in single copy or very lowly repeated, often in association with genic sequences. Analysis of sequence similarity allowed us to identify two major groups of SINEs showing different abundances in the olive tree genome, the former with sequence similarity to SINEs of Scrophulariaceae and Solanaceae and the latter to SINEs of Salicaceae. A comparison of sequence conservation between olive SINEs and LTR retrotransposon families suggested that SINE expansion in the genome occurred especially in very ancient times, before LTR retrotransposon expansion, and presumably before the separation of the rosids (to which Oleaceae belong) from the Asterids. Besides providing data on olive SINEs, our results demonstrate the suitability of the pipeline employed for SINE identification. Applying this pipeline will favour further structural and functional analyses on these relatively unknown elements to be performed also in other plant species, even in the absence of a reference genome, and will allow establishing general evolutionary patterns for this kind of repeats in

  10. Short interspersed elements (SINEs) of squamate reptiles (Squam1 and Squam2): structure and phylogenetic significance.

    PubMed

    Grechko, Vernata V; Kosushkin, Sergei A; Borodulina, Olga R; Butaeva, Fatima G; Darevsky, Ilya S

    2011-05-15

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are important nuclear molecular markers of the evolution of many eukaryotes. However, the SINEs of squamate reptile genomes have been little studied. We first identified two families of SINEs, termed Squam1 and Squam2, in the DNA of meadow lizard Darevskia praticola (Lacertidae) by performing DNA hybridization and PCR. Later, the same families of retrotransposons were found using the same methods in members of another 25 lizard families (from Iguania, Scincomorpha, Gekkota, Varanoidea, and Diploglossa infraorders) and two snake families, but their abundances in these taxa varied greatly. Both SINEs were Squamata-specific and were absent from mammals, birds, crocodiles, turtles, amphibians, and fish. Squam1 possessed some characteristics common to tRNA-related SINEs from fish and mammals, while Squam2 belonged to the tRNA(Ala) group of SINEs and had a more unusual and divergent structure. Squam2-related sequences were found in several unannotated GenBank sequences of squamate reptiles. Squam1 abundance in the Polychrotidae, Agamidae, Leiolepididae, Chamaeleonidae, Scincidae, Lacertidae, Gekkonidae, Varanidae, Helodermatidae, and two snake families were 10(2) -10(4) times higher than those in other taxa (Corytophanidae, Iguanidae, Anguidae, Cordylidae, Gerrhosauridae, Pygopodidae, and Eublepharidae). A less dramatic degree of copy number variation was observed for Squam2 in different taxa. Several Squam1 copies from Lacertidae, Chamaeleonidae, Gekkonidae, Varanidae, and Colubridae were sequenced and found to have evident orthologous features, as well as taxa-specific autapomorphies. Squam1 from Lacertidae and Chamaeleonidae could be divided into several subgroups based on sequence differences. Possible applications of these SINEs as Squamata phylogeny markers are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  11. Molecular characterization, genomic distribution and evolutionary dynamics of Short INterspersed Elements in the termite genome.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, Andrea; Mantovani, Barbara

    2011-02-01

    Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs) in invertebrates, and especially in animal inbred genomes such that of termites, are poorly known; in this paper we characterize three new SINE families (Talub, Taluc and Talud) through the analyses of 341 sequences, either isolated from the Reticulitermes lucifugus genome or drawn from EST Genbank collection. We further add new data to the only isopteran element known so far, Talua. These SINEs are tRNA-derived elements, with an average length ranging from 258 to 372 bp. The tails are made up by poly(A) or microsatellite motifs. Their copy number varies from 7.9 × 10(3) to 10(5) copies, well within the range observed for other metazoan genomes. Species distribution, age and target site duplication analysis indicate Talud as the oldest, possibly inactive SINE originated before the onset of Isoptera (~150 Myr ago). Taluc underwent to substantial sequence changes throughout the evolution of termites and data suggest it was silenced and then re-activated in the R. lucifugus lineage. Moreover, Taluc shares a conserved sequence block with other unrelated SINEs, as observed for some vertebrate and cephalopod elements. The study of genomic environment showed that insertions are mainly surrounded by microsatellites and other SINEs, indicating a biased accumulation within non-coding regions. The evolutionary dynamics of Talu~ elements is explained through selective mechanisms acting in an inbred genome; in this respect, the study of termites' SINEs activity may provide an interesting framework to address the (co)evolution of mobile elements and the host genome.

  12. Evolutionary modes of emergence of short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) families in grasses.

    PubMed

    Kögler, Anja; Schmidt, Thomas; Wenke, Torsten

    2017-08-30

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are non-autonomous transposable elements which are propagated by retrotransposition and constitute an inherent part of the genome of most eukaryotic species. Knowledge of heterogeneous and highly abundant SINEs is crucial for de novo (or improvement of) annotation of whole genome sequences. We scanned Poaceae genome sequences of six important cereals (Oryza sativa, Triticum aestivum, Hordeum vulgare, Panicum virgatum, Sorghum bicolor, Zea mays) and Brachypodium distachyon to examine the diversity and evolution of SINE populations. We comparatively analyzed the structural features, distribution, evolutionary relation and abundance of 32 SINE families and subfamilies within grasses, comprising 11 052 individual copies. The investigation of activity profiles within the Poaceae provides insights into their species-specific diversification and amplification. We found that Poaceae SINEs (PoaS) fall into two length categories: simple SINEs of up to 180 bp and dimeric SINEs larger than 240 bp. Detailed analysis at the nucleotide level revealed that multimerization of related and unrelated SINE copies is an important evolutionary mechanism of SINE formation. We conclude that PoaS families diversify by massive reshuffling between SINE families, likely caused by insertion of truncated copies, and provide a model for this evolutionary scenario. Twenty-eight of 32 PoaS families and subfamilies show significant conservation, in particular either in the 5' or 3' regions, across Poaceae species and share large sequence stretches with one or more other PoaS families. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Families of short interspersed elements in the genome of the oomycete plant pathogen, Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Whisson, Stephen C; Avrova, Anna O; Lavrova, Olga; Pritchard, Leighton

    2005-04-01

    The first known families of tRNA-related short interspersed elements (SINEs) in the oomycetes were identified by exploiting the genomic DNA sequence resources for the potato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans. Fifteen families of tRNA-related SINEs, as well as predicted tRNAs, and other possible RNA polymerase III-transcribed sequences were identified. The size of individual elements ranges from 101 to 392 bp, representing sequences present from low (1) to highly abundant (over 2000) copy number in the P. infestans genome, based on quantitative PCR analysis. Putative short direct repeat sequences (6-14 bp) flanking the elements were also identified for eight of the SINEs. Predicted SINEs were named in a series prefixed infSINE (for infestans-SINE). Two SINEs were apparently present as multimers of tRNA-related units; four copies of a related unit for infSINEr, and two unrelated units for infSINEz. Two SINEs, infSINEh and infSINEi, were typically located within 400 bp of each other. These were also the only two elements identified as being actively transcribed in the mycelial stage of P. infestans by RT-PCR. It is possible that infSINEh and infSINEi represent active retrotransposons in P. infestans. Based on the quantitative PCR estimates of copy number for all of the elements identified, tRNA-related SINEs were estimated to comprise 0.3% of the 250 Mb P. infestans genome. InfSINE-related sequences were found to occur in species throughout the genus Phytophthora. However, seven elements were shown to be exclusive to P. infestans.

  14. Long interspersed nuclear element-1 hypomethylation and oxidative stress: correlation and bladder cancer diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Patchsung, Maturada; Boonla, Chanchai; Amnattrakul, Passakorn; Dissayabutra, Thasinas; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Tosukhowong, Piyaratana

    2012-01-01

    Although, increased oxidative stress and hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) associate with bladder cancer (BCa) development, the relationship between these alterations is unknown. We evaluated the oxidative stress and hypomethylation of the LINE-1 in 61 BCa patients and 45 normal individuals. To measure the methylation levels and to differentiate the LINE-1 loci into hypermethylated, partially methylated and hypomethylated, peripheral blood cells, urinary exfoliated cells and cancerous tissues were evaluated by combined bisulfite restriction analysis PCR. The urinary total antioxidant status (TAS) and plasma protein carbonyl content were determined. The LINE-1 methylation levels and patterns, especially hypomethylated loci, in the blood and urine cells of the BCa patients were different from the levels and patterns in the healthy controls. The urinary TAS was decreased, whereas the plasma protein carbonyl content was increased in the BCa patients relative to the controls. A positive correlation between the methylation of LINE-1 in the blood-derived DNA and urinary TAS was found in both the BCa and control groups. The urinary hypomethylated LINE-1 loci and the plasma protein carbonyl content provided the best diagnostic potential for BCa prediction. Based on post-diagnostic samples, the combination test improved the diagnostic power to a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 96%. In conclusion, decreased LINE-1 methylation is associated with increased oxidative stress both in healthy and BCa subjects across the various tissue types, implying a dose-response association. Increases in the LINE-1 hypomethylation levels and the number of hypomethylated loci in both the blood- and urine-derived cells and increase in the oxidative stress were found in the BCa patients. The combination test of the urinary hypomethylated LINE-1 loci and the plasma protein carbonyl content may be useful for BCa screening and monitoring of treatment.

  15. Methylation levels of the "long interspersed nucleotide element-1" repetitive sequences predict survival of melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognosis of cutaneous melanoma (CM) differs for patients with identical clinico-pathological stage, and no molecular markers discriminating the prognosis of stage III individuals have been established. Genome-wide alterations in DNA methylation are a common event in cancer. This study aimed to define the prognostic value of genomic DNA methylation levels in stage III CM patients. Methods Overall level of genomic DNA methylation was measured using bisulfite pyrosequencing at three CpG sites (CpG1, CpG2, CpG3) of the Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element-1 (LINE-1) sequences in short-term CM cultures from 42 stage IIIC patients. The impact of LINE-1 methylation on overall survival (OS) was assessed using Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results Hypomethylation (i.e., methylation below median) at CpG2 and CpG3 sites significantly associated with improved prognosis of CM, CpG3 showing the strongest association. Patients with hypomethylated CpG3 had increased OS (P = 0.01, log-rank = 6.39) by Kaplan-Meyer analysis. Median OS of patients with hypomethylated or hypermethylated CpG3 were 31.9 and 11.5 months, respectively. The 5 year OS for patients with hypomethylated CpG3 was 48% compared to 7% for patients with hypermethylated sequences. Among the variables examined by Cox regression analysis, LINE-1 methylation at CpG2 and CpG3 was the only predictor of OS (Hazard Ratio = 2.63, for hypermethylated CpG3; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.21-5.69; P = 0.01). Conclusion LINE-1 methylation is identified as a molecular marker of prognosis for CM patients in stage IIIC. Evaluation of LINE-1 promises to represent a key tool for driving the most appropriate clinical management of stage III CM patients. PMID:21615918

  16. Reprogramming of the HepG2 genome by long interspersed nuclear element-1.

    PubMed

    Bojang, Pasano; Roberts, Ruth A; Anderton, Mark J; Ramos, Kenneth S

    2013-08-01

    Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) is an autonomous, mobile element within the human genome that transposes via a "copy and paste" mechanism and relies upon L1-encoded endonuclease and reverse transcriptase (RT) activities to compromise genome integrity. L1 has been implicated in various forms of cancer, but its role in the regulation of the oncogenic phenotype is not understood. The present studies were conducted to evaluate mechanisms of genetic regulatory control in HepG2 cells by human L1, or a D702Y mutant deficient in RT activity, and their influence on cellular phenotype. Forced expression of synthetic L1 ORF1p and ORF2p was associated with formation of cytoplasmic foci and minor association with the nuclear compartment. While de novo L1 mobilizations were only identified in cells expressing wild type L1, and were absent in the D702Y mutant, changes in gene expression profiles involved RT dependent as well as RT independent mechanisms. Synthetic L1 altered the expression of 24 in silico predicted genetic targets; ten of which showed RT-dependence, ten RT-independence, and four reciprocal regulatory control by both wild type and RT mutant. Of five targets examined, only VCAM1 and PTPRB colocalized with newly retrotransposed wild type L1. Biological discretization to partition patterns of gene expression into unique frequencies identified adhesion, inflammation, and cellular metabolism as key processes targeted for molecular interference with disruption of epithelial-to-mesenchymal programming seen irrespective of the RT phenotype. These findings establish L1 as a key regulator of genome plasticity and EMT via mechanisms independent of RT activity.

  17. Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 hypomethylation in folate-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shaoyan; Wang, Li; Guan, Yunqian; Shangguan, Shaofang; Du, Qingan; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Folate is thought to contribute to health and development by methylation regulation. Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1), which is regulated by methylation modification, plays an important role in sculpting the structure and function of genomes. Some studies have shown that folate concentration is related to LINE-1 methylation. However, the direct association between LINE-1 methylation and folate deficiency remains unclear. To explore whether folate deficiency directly induced LINE-1 hypomethylation and to analyze the relationship between folate concentration and the LINE-1 methylation level, mouse ESCs were treated with various concentrations of folate which was measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay, and the homocysteine content was detected by ELISA. LINE-1 methylation was examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry at various time points. Concurrently, cell proliferation and differentiation were observed. The result showed that the intracellular folate decreases under folate-deficient condition, conversely, homocysteine content increased gradually and there was a negatively correlated between them. Folate insufficiency induced LINE-1 hypomethylation at the lowest levels in folate-free group and moderate in folate-deficient group, compared with that in the folate-normal group at day 18. Moreover, LINE-1 methylation level was positively correlated with folate content, and negatively correlated with homocysteine content. At corresponding time points, proliferation and differentiation of mouse ESCs showed no alteration in all groups. Our data indicated that folate deficiency affected the homeostasis of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism, leading to reduced LINE-1 methylation in mouse ESCs. This study provides preliminary evidence of folate deficiency affecting early embryonic development.

  18. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment

    PubMed Central

    Pagán, Antonio J.; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E.; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J.; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis. PMID:26159717

  19. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Antonio J; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-07-08

    The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis.

  20. Specific detection of the cleavage activity of mycobacterial enzymes using a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Morten Leth; Harmsen, Charlotte; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-07

    We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes.

  1. [Pulmonary aspergillosis complicating atypical mycobacterial infection in two patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Montaigne, E; Petit, F X; Gourdier, A L; Urban, T; Gagnadoux, F

    2012-01-01

    Atypical mycobacteria and Aspergillus are opportunistic organisms responsible for severe pulmonary diseases whose development is encouraged by the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and related immunosuppression. We report the cases of two patients, both alcoholics with emphysematous COPD, who developed chronic pulmonary aspergillosis following atypical mycobacterial infection. Patient 1 developed chronic necrotising aspergillosis several months after the diagnosis of infection with Mycobacterium avium. Patient 2 developed an aspergilloma several weeks after the diagnosis of infection with Mycobacterium xenopi. The association of these two pathologies presents diagnostic and therapeutic problems that are discussed. The development of Aspergillus pulmonary disease may complicate atypical mycobacterial infections and explain a poor response to treatment. Our two case reports suggest that a systematic search should be made for pulmonary aspergillosis during the follow-up of patients with atypical mycobacterial infection. Copyright © 2011 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient Report and Review of Rapidly Growing Mycobacterial Infection after Cardiac Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Phadke, Varun K; Hirsh, David S; Goswami, Neela D

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterial infections resulting from cardiac implantable electronic devices are rare, but as more devices are implanted, these organisms are increasingly emerging as causes of early-onset infections. We report a patient with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator pocket and associated bloodstream infection caused by an organism of the Mycobacterium fortuitum group, and we review the literature regarding mycobacterial infections resulting from cardiac device implantations. Thirty-two such infections have been previously described; most (70%) were caused by rapidly growing species, of which M. fortuitum group species were predominant.When managing such infections, clinicians should consider the potential need for extended incubation of routine cultures or dedicated mycobacterial cultures for accurate diagnosis; combination antimicrobial drug therapy, even for isolates that appear to be macrolide susceptible, because of the potential for inducible resistance to this drug class; and the arrhythmogenicity of the antimicrobial drugs traditionally recommended for infections caused by these organisms.

  3. Paradoxical responses in a cohort of HIV-1-infected patients with mycobacterial disease.

    PubMed

    Olalla, J; Pulido, F; Rubio, R; Costa, M A; Monsalvo, R; Palenque, E; Costa, J R; Del, Palacio A

    2002-01-01

    Paradoxical worsening or relapse of opportunistic infections has been described after initiation of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients. Retrospective study of a group of 33 HIV-infected patients with mycobacterial disease analysing the incidence and characteristics of patients with and without paradoxical response after starting HAART and/or mycobacterial treatment. Nine patients in the group had paradoxical response. No significant difference of baseline characteristics was observed in these patients. The decrease in viral load was significantly greater among patients with paradoxical response than in patients without. No clinical difference was found in the evolution of HIV-infected patients with mycobacterial disease after the resolution of the episode of paradoxical response.

  4. Isolation by genetic labeling of a new mycobacterial plasmid, pJAZ38, from Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed Central

    Gavigan, J A; Aínsa, J A; Pérez, E; Otal, I; Martín, C

    1997-01-01

    In a two-step mating experiment with recipient strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis, the Mycobacterium fortuitum cryptic plasmid pJAZ38 was isolated. Plasmid pJAZ38 was genetically labeled by cointegration formation mediated by the kanamycin-resistant mycobacterial transposon Tn611. The region responsible for replication of pJAZ38 was located and sequenced. This region showed homology with the Mycobacterium avium plasmid pLR7 and the Mycobacterium scrofulaceum plasmid pMSC262, a family of plasmids which have been found to be widespread throughout the mycobacteria. Further experiments showed pJAZ38 to be stably inherited in the absence of selection pressure and compatible with the most commonly used mycobacterial replicon, pAL5000. In contrast to pLR7 and pMSC262, pJAZ38 was able to replicate in M. smegmatis mc(2)155, making it a useful tool for mycobacterial genetics. PMID:9209023

  5. Multiple mycobacterial antigens are targets of the adaptive immune response in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease for which the association with mycobacteria continues to strengthen. It is hypothesized that a single, poorly degradable antigen is responsible for sarcoidosis pathogenesis. Several reports from independent groups support mycobacterial antigens having a role in sarcoidosis pathogenesis. To identify other microbial targets of the adaptive immune response, we tested the ability of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to recognize multiple mycobacterial antigens. Methods Fifty-four subjects were enrolled in this study: 31 sarcoidosis patients, nine non-tuberculosis mycobacterial (NTM) infection controls, and 14 PPD- controls. Using flow cytometry, we assessed for Th1 immune responses to ESAT-6, katG, Ag85A, sodA, and HSP. Results Alveolar T-cells from twenty-two of the 31 sarcoidosis patients produced a CD4+ response to at least one of ESAT-6, katG, Ag85A, sodA, or HSP, compared to two of 14 PPD- controls (p = 0.0008) and five of nine NTM controls (p = 0.44), while eighteen of the 31 sarcoidosis subjects tested produced a CD8+ response to at least one of the mycobacterial antigens compared to two of 14 PPD- controls (p = 0.009) and three of nine NTM controls (0.26). Not only did the BAL-derived T cells respond to multiple virulence factors, but also to multiple, distinct epitopes within a given protein. The detection of proliferation upon stimulation with the mycobacterial virulence factors demonstrates that these responses are initiated by antigen specific recognition. Conclusions Together these results reveal that antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells responses to multiple mycobacterial epitopes are present within sites of active sarcoidosis involvement, and that these antigen-specific responses are present at the time of diagnosis. PMID:21092305

  6. Specific detection of the cleavage activity of mycobacterial enzymes using a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Morten Leth; Harmsen, Charlotte; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes.We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of the QD-based DNA Nanosensor. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06326d

  7. Molecular immunity to mycobacteria: knowledge from the mutation and phenotype spectrum analysis of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hui-Qi; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.; McCormick, Joseph B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding molecular immunity against mycobacterial infection is critical for the development of effective strategies to control tuberculosis (TB), which is a major health issue in the developing world. Host immunogenetic studies represent an indispensable approach to understand the molecular mechanisms against mycobacterial infection. A superb paradigm is the identification of rare mutations causing Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD). Mutations in the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) receptor genes are highly specific (although not exclusive) for mycobacterial infection. Only dominant negative mutations of STAT1 have specific susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. Mutations in the interleukin-12 (IL-12) signaling genes have phenotypes with non-specificity. Current studies highlight a complex molecular network in antimycobacterial immunity, centered on IFN-γ signaling. PMID:21330176

  8. Tsukamurella: an unrecognized mimic of atypical mycobacterial keratitis? The first case report.

    PubMed

    Tam, Patrick M K; Young, Alvin L; Cheng, Lulu; Congdon, Nathan; Lam, Philip T H

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to report on Tsukamurella as a mimic of atypical mycobacterial infection. We report a patient who had received repeated corneal grafts with culture-proven Tsukamurella keratitis. A slow-progressing corneal abscess that initially developed adjacent to a corneal stitch responded poorly to empiric antibiotic treatment. A preliminary culture report revealed fast-growing mycobacterial species. Treatment adjustments successfully controlled the disease. A final diagnosis of Tsukamurella was subsequently made on the basis of cultures. Tsukamurella exhibits laboratory similarities to mycobacteria and should be considered in the differential of atypical infection of the ocular surface.

  9. Enhanced mycobacterial diagnostics in liquid medium by microaerobic bubble flow in Portable Microbe Enrichment Unit.

    PubMed

    Hakalehto, Elias

    2013-06-01

    Portable Microbe Enrichment Unit (PMEU) method with microaerobic bubbling speeded up the growth of otherwise slowly starting and propagating Mycobacterium sp. Mycobacterium fortuitum growth was detected after 10-11h and Mycobacterium marinum produced clear growth in 4 days. A mycobacterial environmental isolate was verified in 2 days in the PMEU Spectrion(®) equipped with infrared sensors. In parallel static (without gas bubbling) cultures hardly any growth occurred. In conclusion, PMEU technology provided thus a rapid detection of environmental and clinical mycobacterial isolates. It would also help in the field diagnosis of antibiotic resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  10. The path of anti-tuberculosis drugs: from blood to lesions to mycobacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Dartois, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    For the successful treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, drugs need to penetrate complex lung lesions and permeate the mycobacterial cell wall in order to reach their intracellular targets. However, most currently used anti-tuberculosis drugs were introduced into clinical use without considering the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties that influence drug distribution, and this has contributed to the long duration and limited success of current therapies. In this Progress article, I describe new methods to quantify and image drug distribution in infected lung tissue and in mycobacterial cells, and I explore how this technology could be used to design optimized multidrug regimens. PMID:24487820

  11. Plasma-dependent chemotaxis of macrophages toward BCG cell walls and the mycobacterial glycolipid P3.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M T

    1977-01-01

    BCG cell walls, associated with oil droplets in the form of emulsions in saline, generate macrophage chemotactic activity from fresh guinea pig plasma. Serum and heat-inactivated plasma were inactive, suggesting involvement of complement or fibrinogen-derived chemotactic factors. Suspensions of cell walls and oil droplets each generated chemotactic activity from plasma, and the activity of the cell wall vaccine was due to the additive effects of these two components. A mycobacterial glycolipid (P3), which is a constituent of BCG cell walls, also had plasma-dependent chemotactic activity. The results suggest that macrophage chemotaxis may be an important part of the immunopotentiating activity of these mycobacterial products.

  12. Novel nicotine analogues with potential anti-mycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Paresh T; Athmaram, Thimmasandra Narayanappa; Arunkumar, Gundaiah Ramesh

    2016-04-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second leading lethal infectious disease in the world after acquired immuno deficiency (AIDs). We have developed a series of twenty-five novel nicotine analogues with de-addiction property and tested them for their activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). In an effort to increase the specificity of action and directing nicotine analogues to target MTB, four promising compounds were further optimized via molecular docking studies against the Dihydrofolate reductase of MTB. After lead optimization, one nicotine analogue [3-(5-(3fluorophenyl)nicotinoyl)-1-methylpyrrolidin-2-one] exhibited minimum inhibitory concentration of 1 μg/mL (2.86 nM) against M. tuberculosis (H37Rv strain), a human pathogenic strain of clinically significant importance. Pharmacokinetic analysis of [3-(5-(3fluorophenyl)nicotinoyl)-1methylpyrrolidin-2-one] with lowest MIC value via oral route in Wistar rats revealed that at a dosage of 5 mg/kg body weight gave a maximum serum drug concentration (Cmax) of 2.86 μg/mL, Tmax of one hour and a half-life (T1/2) of more than 24 h and Volume of distribution (Vd) of 27.36 L. Whereas the parenteral (intra venous) route showed a Cmax of 3.37 μg/mL, Tmax of 0.05 h, T1/2 of 24 h and Vd equivalent to 23.18 L. The acute oral toxicity and repeated oral toxicity studies in female Wistar rats had an LD50>2000 mg/kg body weight. Our data suggests that nicotine derivatives developed in the present study has good metabolic stability with tunable pharmacokinetics (PK) with therapeutic potential to combat MTB. However, further in vivo studies for anti-tuberculosis activity and elucidation of mode of action could result in more promising novel drug for treating MTB. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report revealing the anti-mycobacterial potential of nicotine analogue at potential therapeutic concentrations.

  13. Mycobacterial DNA Replication as a Target for Antituberculosis Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Płocinska, Renata; Korycka-Machala, Malgorzata; Plocinski, Przemyslaw; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2017-06-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), the causative agent of tuberculosis, is a leading infectious disease organism, causing millions of deaths each year. This serious pathogen has been greatly spread worldwide and recent years have observed an increase in the number of multi-drug resistant and totally drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains (WHO report, 2014). The danger of tuberculosis becoming an incurable disease has emphasized the need for the discovery of a new generation of antimicrobial agents. The development of novel alternative medical strategies, new drugs and the search for optimal drug targets are top priority areas of tuberculosis research. Key characteristics of mycobacteria include: slow growth, the ability to transform into a metabolically silent - latent state, intrinsic drug resistance and the relatively rapid development of acquired drug resistance. These factors make finding an ideal antituberculosis drug enormously challenging, even if it is designed to treat drug sensitive tuberculosis strains. A vast majority of canonical antibiotics including antituberculosis agents target bacterial cell wall biosynthesis or DNA/RNA processing. Novel therapeutic approaches are being tested to target mycobacterial cell division, twocomponent regulatory factors, lipid synthesis and the transition between the latent and actively growing states. This review discusses the choice of cellular targets for an antituberculosis therapy, describes putative drug targets evaluated in the recent literature and summarizes potential candidates under clinical and pre-clinical development. We focus on the key cellular process of DNA replication, as a prominent target for future antituberculosis therapy. We describe two main pathways: the biosynthesis of nucleic acids precursors - the nucleotides, and the synthesis of DNA molecules. We summarize data regarding replication associated proteins that are critical for nucleotide synthesis, initiation, unwinding and

  14. Sex Steroids Regulate Expression of Genes Containing Long Interspersed Elements-1s in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongwatanakul, Saichon; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee; Tongsima, Sissades; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Boonyaratanakornkit, Viroj

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed elements-1s (LINE-1s) are dispersed all over the human genome. There is evidence that hypomethylation of LINE-1s and levels of sex steroids regulate gene expression leading to cancer development. Here, we compared mRNA levels of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 in breast cancer cells treated with various sex steroids from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), with the gene expression database using chi-square analysis (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo). We evaluated whether sex steroids influence expression of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1. Three sex steroids at various concentrations, 1 and 10 nM estradiol (E2), 10 nM progesterone (PG) and 10 nM androgen (AN), were assessed. In breast cancer cells treated with 1 or 10 nM E2, a significant percentage of genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 were down-regulated. A highly significant percentage of E2-regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 was down-regulated in cells treated with 1 nM E2 for 3 hours (<3.70E-25; OR=1.91; 95% CI=2.16-1.69). Similarly, high percentages of PG or AN- regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 were also down-regulated in cells treated with 10 nM PG or 10 nM AN for 16 hr (p=9.53E-06; OR=1.65; 95% CI=2.06-1.32 and p=3.81E-14; OR=2.01; 95% CI=2.42-1.67). Interestingly, a significant percentage of AN-regulated genes containing an intragenic LINE-1 was up-regulated in cells treated with 10 nM AN for 16 hr (p=4.03E-02; OR=1.40; 95% CI=1.95-1.01). These findings suggest that intragenic LINE-1s may play roles in sex steroid mediated gene expression in breast cancer cells, which could have significant implications for the development and progression of sex steroid-dependent cancers.

  15. Evaluation of Oral Antiseptic Rinsing before Sputum Collection To Reduce Contamination of Mycobacterial Cultures▿

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Renata L.; Palaci, Moisés; Loureiro, Rafaela B.; Dietze, Reynaldo; Johnson, John L.; Golub, Jonathan E.; Ruffino-Netto, A.; Maciel, Ethel L.

    2011-01-01

    To assess whether rinsing with oral antiseptics before sputum collection would reduce contamination of mycobacterial cultures, 120 patients with suspected tuberculosis were randomly assigned to rinse with chlorhexidine or cetylpyridinium mouthwash before collection. The culture contamination rate was significantly lower after rinsing with chlorhexidine before collection, especially for cultures grown in MGIT medium. PMID:21677070

  16. [Alterations in recruitment and activation of Rab proteins during mycobacterial infection].

    PubMed

    Castaño, Diana; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    At the phagosome level, Mycobacterium spp. alters activation and recruitment of several "Ras gene from rat brain" proteins, commonly known as Rab. Mycobacterial phagosomes have a greater and sustained expression of Rab5, Rab11, Rab14 and Rab22a, and lowered or no expression of Rab7, Rab9 and Rab6. This correlates with increased fusion of the phagosomes with early and recycling endosomes acquiring some features of early phagosomes, allowing the bacteria to gain access to nutrients and preventing the activation of anti-mycobacterial mechanisms. The expression of constitutively active mutants of Rab from the early stage endosomes prevents the maturation of phagosomes containing latex beads or heat-inactivated mycobacteria. Silencing of these mutants by interference RNA or dominant negative forms induces the maturation of mycobacterial phagosomes. The mechanisms have not been established by which mycobacteria alter the expression of these GTPases and thereby shift the phagolysosomal maturation. The problem can be explained by alterations in the recruitment of proteins that interact with Rab, such as phosphoinositide 3-kinases and early endosomal antigen 1. Identifying the mechanisms used by Mycobacterium spp. to disrupt the cycle of Rab activation will be essential to understand the pathophysiology of mycobacterial infections and usefully to potential drug targets.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Meets the Cytosol: The Role of cGAS in Anti-mycobacterial Immunity.

    PubMed

    Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland

    2015-06-10

    The intracellular fate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a subject of long debate. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, three independent studies reveal the detection of cytosolic mycobacterial DNA by the nucleotidyltransferase cGAS, emphasizing the concept of cytosolic access by M. tuberculosis and its role in balancing immune-protection and immune-pathogenesis.

  18. Dissecting the membrane cholesterol requirement for mycobacterial entry into host cells.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopinath; Jafurulla, Md; Kumar, G Aditya; Raghunand, Tirumalai R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacteria are intracellular pathogens that can invade and survive within host macrophages, and are a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The molecular mechanism involved in the internalization of mycobacteria is poorly understood. In this work, we have explored the role of host membrane cholesterol in the entry of the avirulent surrogate mycobacterial strain Mycobacterium smegmatis into THP-1 macrophages. Our results show that depletion of host membrane cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin results in a significant reduction in the entry of M. smegmatis into host cells. More importantly, we show that the inhibition in the ability of M. smegmatis to enter host macrophages could be reversed upon replenishment of membrane cholesterol. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute the first report showing that membrane cholesterol replenishment can reverse the inhibition in the entry of mycobacteria into host cells. In addition, we demonstrate that cholesterol complexation using amphotericin B (without physical depletion) is sufficient to inhibit mycobacterial entry. Importantly, we observed a significant reduction in mycobacterial entry upon enrichment of host membrane cholesterol. Taken together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that an optimum host plasma membrane cholesterol is necessary for the entry of mycobacteria. These results assume relevance in the context of developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting cholesterol-mediated mycobacterial host cell entry.

  19. Mycobacterial DNA extraction for whole-genome sequencing from early positive liquid (MGIT) cultures.

    PubMed

    Votintseva, Antonina A; Pankhurst, Louise J; Anson, Luke W; Morgan, Marcus R; Gascoyne-Binzi, Deborah; Walker, Timothy M; Quan, T Phuong; Wyllie, David H; Del Ojo Elias, Carlos; Wilcox, Mark; Walker, A Sarah; Peto, Tim E A; Crook, Derrick W

    2015-04-01

    We developed a low-cost and reliable method of DNA extraction from as little as 1 ml of early positive mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) cultures that is suitable for whole-genome sequencing to identify mycobacterial species and predict antibiotic resistance in clinical samples. The DNA extraction method is based on ethanol precipitation supplemented by pretreatment steps with a MolYsis kit or saline wash for the removal of human DNA and a final DNA cleanup step with solid-phase reversible immobilization beads. The protocol yielded ≥0.2 ng/μl of DNA for 90% (MolYsis kit) and 83% (saline wash) of positive MGIT cultures. A total of 144 (94%) of the 154 samples sequenced on the MiSeq platform (Illumina) achieved the target of 1 million reads, with <5% of reads derived from human or nasopharyngeal flora for 88% and 91% of samples, respectively. A total of 59 (98%) of 60 samples that were identified by the national mycobacterial reference laboratory (NMRL) as Mycobacterium tuberculosis were successfully mapped to the H37Rv reference, with >90% coverage achieved. The DNA extraction protocol, therefore, will facilitate fast and accurate identification of mycobacterial species and resistance using a range of bioinformatics tools. Copyright © 2015, Votintseva et al.

  20. Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in a patient with myelofibrosis: case report and concise review.

    PubMed

    Henriquez-Camacho, Cesar; Martinez-Barranco, Pilar; Velasco, Maria; Villafuerte-Gutierrez, Paola; Losa, Juan

    2015-06-01

    A 70-year-old patient having massive refractory ascites in the course of idiopathic myelofibrosis was diagnosed of peritoneal extramedullary hematopoiesis and developed an overwhelming nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. The case describes this unusual infection and highlights the need for additional studies to confirm the etiology of ascites in primary myelofibrosis.

  1. Laboratory diagnosis of mycobacterial infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehn, T E; Cammarata, R

    1986-01-01

    Disseminated mycobacterial infections are commonly seen in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, and laboratory culture is the best method for diagnosing these infections. In addition to conventional agar media, we used BACTEC 12A (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) broth medium for culture. More isolates of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were recovered from 12A broth than from Lowenstein-Jensen or Middlebrook 7H11 agar. Also, the average detection time of these mycobacteria was the earliest with 12A broth. Stool examination has been helpful in diagnosing mycobacterial disease in AIDS patients, and in this study both acid-fast stain and culture of fecal material was necessary for efficient detection of mycobacteria. Another sensitive and practical method for detecting mycobacterial infections in patients with AIDS is the Isolator lysis-centrifugation system (Du Pont Co., Wilmington, Del.) which offers the advantage of quantitating the degree of mycobacteremia. Laboratories should be alerted to the possibility of mixed mycobacterial infection in patients with AIDS, and positive cultures should be repeatedly examined to detect coinfection with a slower-growing mycobacterium such as M. tuberculosis as well as M. avium complex. PMID:3095369

  2. Evidence of low prevalence of mycobacterial lymphadenitis in wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Poland.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Lucjan; Orłowska, Blanka; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Czopowicz, Michał; Welz, Mirosław; Anusz, Krzysztof; Kita, Jerzy

    2017-01-25

    Mycobacterium spp. and Rhodococcus equi are generally regarded as the main causes of lymphadenitis in pigs and wild boars. In Poland, mycobacterial submandibular lymphadenitis was first diagnosed in a wild boar in 2012 but Mycobacterium spp. infections are also present in the Polish population of European bison (Bison bonasus). The prevalence of lymphadenitis in Polish wild boars has been found to 8.4% (95% CI 6.2-11.3%) and it has been proved that R. equi is not an important cause of purulent lesions in these animals. The current study was carried out to assess the prevalence of mycobacterial lymphadenitis in the Polish wild boar population. Submandibular lymph nodes with purulent lesions collected from 38 wild boars in 2010/2011 and negative for R. equi were included. Calculations based on the hypergeometric approximation were used to determine the probability that at least one positive individual would be detected if the infection had been present at a prevalence greater than or equal to the design prevalence. All 38 samples were negative for Mycobacterium spp. [0% (95% CI 0, 9.2%)]. Epidemiological analysis showed that the true prevalence was 95% likely to be lower than 10%. In conclusion, mycobacterial lymphadenitis seems to occur rarely in wild boars in Poland. Due to the presence of Mycobacterium spp. infections in other wildlife, the surveillance of mycobacterial infections in wild animals in Poland remains an important issue.

  3. MicroRNA in innate immunity and autophagy during mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Kyung; Kim, Tae Sung; Basu, Joyoti; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2017-01-01

    The fine-tuning of innate immune responses is an important aspect of host defenses against mycobacteria. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs, play essential roles in regulating multiple biological pathways including innate host defenses against various infections. Accumulating evidence shows that many miRNAs regulate the complex interplay between mycobacterial survival strategies and host innate immune pathways. Recent studies have contributed to understanding the role of miRNAs, the levels of which can be modulated by mycobacterial infection, in tuning host autophagy to control bacterial survival and innate effector function. Despite considerable efforts devoted to miRNA profiling over the past decade, further work is needed to improve the selection of appropriate biomarkers for tuberculosis. Understanding the roles and mechanisms of miRNAs in regulating innate immune signaling and autophagy may provide insights into new therapeutic modalities for host-directed anti-mycobacterial therapies. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the recent literature regarding miRNA profiling in tuberculosis and the roles of miRNAs in modulating innate immune responses and autophagy defenses against mycobacterial infections.

  4. Primed Mycobacterial Uveitis (PMU): Histologic and Cytokine Characterization of a Model of Uveitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pepple, Kathryn L.; Rotkis, Lauren; Van Grol, Jennifer; Wilson, Leslie; Sandt, Angela; Lam, Deborah L.; Carlson, Eric; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the histologic features and cytokine profiles of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) and a primed mycobacterial uveitis (PMU) model in rats. Methods In Lewis rats, EAU was induced by immunization with interphotoreceptor binding protein peptide, and PMU was induced by immunization with a killed mycobacterial extract followed by intravitreal injection of the same extract. Clinical course, histology, and the cytokine profiles of the aqueous and vitreous were compared using multiplex bead fluorescence immunoassays. Results Primed mycobacterial uveitis generates inflammation 2 days after intravitreal injection and resolves spontaneously 14 days later. CD68+ lymphocytes are the predominant infiltrating cells and are found in the anterior chamber, surrounding the ciliary body and in the vitreous. In contrast to EAU, no choroidal infiltration or retinal destruction is noted. At the day of peak inflammation, C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10), IL-1β, IL-18, and leptin were induced in the aqueous of both models. Interleukin-6 was induced 2-fold in the aqueous of PMU but not EAU. Cytokines elevated in the aqueous of EAU exclusively include regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), lipopolysaccharide-induced CXC chemokine (LIX), growth-related oncogene/keratinocyte chemokine (GRO/KC), VEGF, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), and IL-17A. In the vitreous, CXCL10, GRO/KC, RANTES, and MIP-1α were elevated in both models. Interleukin-17A and IL-18 were elevated exclusively in EAU. Conclusions Primed mycobacterial uveitis generates an acute anterior and intermediate uveitis without retinal involvement. Primed mycobacterial uveitis has a distinct proinflammatory cytokine profile compared with EAU, suggesting PMU is a good complementary model for study of immune-mediated uveitis. CXCL10, a proinflammatory cytokine, was increased in the aqueous and

  5. Inhibition of mycobacterial growth in vitro following primary but not secondary vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Helen A; Tanner, Rachel; Wallis, Robert S; Meyer, Joel; Manjaly, Zita-Rose; Harris, Stephanie; Satti, Iman; Silver, Richard F; Hoft, Dan; Kampmann, Beate; Walker, K Barry; Dockrell, Hazel M; Fruth, Uli; Barker, Lew; Brennan, Michael J; McShane, Helen

    2013-11-01

    Despite the widespread use of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine, there are more than 9 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) every year, and there is an urgent need for better TB vaccines. TB vaccine candidates are selected for evaluation based in part on the detection of an antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response. The measurement of mycobacterial growth in blood specimens obtained from subjects immunized with investigational TB vaccines may be a better in vitro correlate of in vivo vaccine efficacy. We performed a clinical study with 30 United Kingdom adults who were followed for 6 months to evaluate the abilities of both a whole-blood- and a novel peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based mycobacterial growth inhibition assay to measure a response to primary vaccination and revaccination with BCG. Using cryopreserved PBMCs, we observed a significant improvement in mycobacterial growth inhibition following primary vaccination but no improvement in growth inhibition following revaccination with BCG (P < 0.05). Mycobacterial growth inhibition following primary BCG vaccination was not correlated with purified protein derivative (PPD) antigen-specific IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) responses. We demonstrate that a mycobacterial growth inhibition assay can detect improved capacity to control growth following primary immunization, but not revaccination, with BCG. This is the first study to demonstrate that an in vitro growth inhibition assay can identify a difference in vaccine responses by comparing both primary and secondary BCG vaccinations, suggesting that in vitro growth inhibition assays may serve as better surrogates of clinical efficacy than the assays currently used for the assessment of candidate TB vaccines.

  6. A first insight on the population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex as studied by spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTRs in Santiago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Balcells, María Elvira; García, Patricia; Meza, Paulina; Peña, Carlos; Cifuentes, Marcela; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant public health problem worldwide, but the ecology of the prevalent mycobacterial strains, and their transmission, can vary depending on country and region. Chile is a country with low incidence of TB, that has a geographically isolated location in relation to the rest of South American countries due to the Andes Mountains, but recent migration from neighboring countries has changed this situation. We aimed to assess the genotypic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains in Santiago, Chile, and compare with reports from other Latin-American countries. We analyzed MTBC isolates from pulmonary tuberculosis cases collected between years 2008 and 2013 in Central Santiago, using two genotyping methods: spoligotyping and 12-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs). Data obtained were analyzed and compared to the SITVIT2 database. Mean age of the patients was 47.5 years and 61% were male; 11.6% were migrants. Of 103 strains (1 isolate/patient) included, there were 56 distinct spoligotype patterns. Of these, 16 strains (15.5%) corresponded to orphan strains in the SITVIT2 database, not previously reported. Latin American and Mediterranean (LAM) (34%) and T (33%) lineages were the most prevalent strains, followed by Haarlem lineage (16.5%). Beijing family was scarcely represented with only two cases (1.9%), one of them isolated from a Peruvian migrant. The most frequent clustered spoligotypes were SIT33/LAM3 (10.7%), SIT53/T1 (8.7%), SIT50/H3 (7.8%), and SIT37/T3 (6.8%). We conclude that LAM and T genotypes are the most prevalent genotypes of MTBC in Santiago, Chile, and together correspond to almost two thirds of analyzed strains, which is similar to strain distribution reported from other countries of Latin America. Nevertheless, the high proportion of SIT37/T3, which was rarely found in other Latin American countries, may underline a specific history or

  7. A First Insight on the Population Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex as Studied by Spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTRs in Santiago, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Balcells, María Elvira; García, Patricia; Meza, Paulina; Peña, Carlos; Cifuentes, Marcela; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant public health problem worldwide, but the ecology of the prevalent mycobacterial strains, and their transmission, can vary depending on country and region. Chile is a country with low incidence of TB, that has a geographically isolated location in relation to the rest of South American countries due to the Andes Mountains, but recent migration from neighboring countries has changed this situation. We aimed to assess the genotypic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains in Santiago, Chile, and compare with reports from other Latin-American countries. We analyzed MTBC isolates from pulmonary tuberculosis cases collected between years 2008 and 2013 in Central Santiago, using two genotyping methods: spoligotyping and 12-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs). Data obtained were analyzed and compared to the SITVIT2 database. Mean age of the patients was 47.5 years and 61% were male; 11.6% were migrants. Of 103 strains (1 isolate/patient) included, there were 56 distinct spoligotype patterns. Of these, 16 strains (15.5%) corresponded to orphan strains in the SITVIT2 database, not previously reported. Latin American and Mediterranean (LAM) (34%) and T (33%) lineages were the most prevalent strains, followed by Haarlem lineage (16.5%). Beijing family was scarcely represented with only two cases (1.9%), one of them isolated from a Peruvian migrant. The most frequent clustered spoligotypes were SIT33/LAM3 (10.7%), SIT53/T1 (8.7%), SIT50/H3 (7.8%), and SIT37/T3 (6.8%). We conclude that LAM and T genotypes are the most prevalent genotypes of MTBC in Santiago, Chile, and together correspond to almost two thirds of analyzed strains, which is similar to strain distribution reported from other countries of Latin America. Nevertheless, the high proportion of SIT37/T3, which was rarely found in other Latin American countries, may underline a specific history or

  8. Ultrathin Carbon with Interspersed Graphene/Fullerene-like Nanostructures: A Durable Protective Overcoat for High Density Magnetic Storage

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Yeo, Reuben J.; Xu, Hai; Ping Loh, Kian; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2015-01-01

    One of the key issues for future hard disk drive technology is to design and develop ultrathin (<2 nm) overcoats with excellent wear- and corrosion protection and high thermal stability. Forming carbon overcoats (COCs) having interspersed nanostructures by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) process can be an effective approach to achieve the desired target. In this work, by employing a novel bi-level surface modification approach using FCVA, the formation of a high sp3 bonded ultrathin (~1.7 nm) amorphous carbon overcoat with interspersed graphene/fullerene-like nanostructures, grown on magnetic hard disk media, is reported. The in-depth spectroscopic and microscopic analyses by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy support the observed findings. Despite a reduction of ~37 % in COC thickness, the FCVA-processed thinner COC (~1.7 nm) shows promising functional performance in terms of lower coefficient of friction (~0.25), higher wear resistance, lower surface energy, excellent hydrophobicity and similar/better oxidation corrosion resistance than current commercial COCs of thickness ~2.7 nm. The surface and tribological properties of FCVA-deposited COC was further improved after deposition of lubricant layer. PMID:26109208

  9. Ultrathin Carbon with Interspersed Graphene/Fullerene-like Nanostructures: A Durable Protective Overcoat for High Density Magnetic Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Yeo, Reuben J.; Xu, Hai; Ping Loh, Kian; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2015-06-01

    One of the key issues for future hard disk drive technology is to design and develop ultrathin (<2 nm) overcoats with excellent wear- and corrosion protection and high thermal stability. Forming carbon overcoats (COCs) having interspersed nanostructures by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) process can be an effective approach to achieve the desired target. In this work, by employing a novel bi-level surface modification approach using FCVA, the formation of a high sp3 bonded ultrathin (~1.7 nm) amorphous carbon overcoat with interspersed graphene/fullerene-like nanostructures, grown on magnetic hard disk media, is reported. The in-depth spectroscopic and microscopic analyses by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy support the observed findings. Despite a reduction of ~37 % in COC thickness, the FCVA-processed thinner COC (~1.7 nm) shows promising functional performance in terms of lower coefficient of friction (~0.25), higher wear resistance, lower surface energy, excellent hydrophobicity and similar/better oxidation corrosion resistance than current commercial COCs of thickness ~2.7 nm. The surface and tribological properties of FCVA-deposited COC was further improved after deposition of lubricant layer.

  10. Ultrathin Carbon with Interspersed Graphene/Fullerene-like Nanostructures: A Durable Protective Overcoat for High Density Magnetic Storage.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Yeo, Reuben J; Xu, Hai; Ping Loh, Kian; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2015-06-25

    One of the key issues for future hard disk drive technology is to design and develop ultrathin (<2 nm) overcoats with excellent wear- and corrosion protection and high thermal stability. Forming carbon overcoats (COCs) having interspersed nanostructures by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) process can be an effective approach to achieve the desired target. In this work, by employing a novel bi-level surface modification approach using FCVA, the formation of a high sp(3) bonded ultrathin (~1.7 nm) amorphous carbon overcoat with interspersed graphene/fullerene-like nanostructures, grown on magnetic hard disk media, is reported. The in-depth spectroscopic and microscopic analyses by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy support the observed findings. Despite a reduction of ~37% in COC thickness, the FCVA-processed thinner COC (~1.7 nm) shows promising functional performance in terms of lower coefficient of friction (~0.25), higher wear resistance, lower surface energy, excellent hydrophobicity and similar/better oxidation corrosion resistance than current commercial COCs of thickness ~2.7 nm. The surface and tribological properties of FCVA-deposited COC was further improved after deposition of lubricant layer.

  11. Targeted identification of short interspersed nuclear element families shows their widespread existence and extreme heterogeneity in plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Wenke, Torsten; Döbel, Thomas; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Junghans, Holger; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons that are highly abundant, heterogeneous, and mostly not annotated in eukaryotic genomes. We developed a tool designated SINE-Finder for the targeted discovery of tRNA-derived SINEs. We analyzed sequence data of 16 plant genomes, including 13 angiosperms and three gymnosperms and identified 17,829 full-length and truncated SINEs falling into 31 families showing the widespread occurrence of SINEs in higher plants. The investigation focused on potato (Solanum tuberosum), resulting in the detection of seven different SolS SINE families consisting of 1489 full-length and 870 5' truncated copies. Consensus sequences of full-length members range in size from 106 to 244 bp depending on the SINE family. SolS SINEs populated related species and evolved separately, which led to some distinct subfamilies. Solanaceae SINEs are dispersed along chromosomes and distributed without clustering but with preferred integration into short A-rich motifs. They emerged more than 23 million years ago and were species specifically amplified during the radiation of potato, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). We show that tobacco TS retrotransposons are composite SINEs consisting of the 3' end of a long interspersed nuclear element integrated downstream of a nonhomologous SINE family followed by successfully colonization of the genome. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the formation of TS as a spontaneous event, which could be typical for the emergence of SINE families.

  12. Targeted Identification of Short Interspersed Nuclear Element Families Shows Their Widespread Existence and Extreme Heterogeneity in Plant Genomes[W

    PubMed Central

    Wenke, Torsten; Döbel, Thomas; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Junghans, Holger; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons that are highly abundant, heterogeneous, and mostly not annotated in eukaryotic genomes. We developed a tool designated SINE-Finder for the targeted discovery of tRNA-derived SINEs. We analyzed sequence data of 16 plant genomes, including 13 angiosperms and three gymnosperms and identified 17,829 full-length and truncated SINEs falling into 31 families showing the widespread occurrence of SINEs in higher plants. The investigation focused on potato (Solanum tuberosum), resulting in the detection of seven different SolS SINE families consisting of 1489 full-length and 870 5′ truncated copies. Consensus sequences of full-length members range in size from 106 to 244 bp depending on the SINE family. SolS SINEs populated related species and evolved separately, which led to some distinct subfamilies. Solanaceae SINEs are dispersed along chromosomes and distributed without clustering but with preferred integration into short A-rich motifs. They emerged more than 23 million years ago and were species specifically amplified during the radiation of potato, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). We show that tobacco TS retrotransposons are composite SINEs consisting of the 3′ end of a long interspersed nuclear element integrated downstream of a nonhomologous SINE family followed by successfully colonization of the genome. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the formation of TS as a spontaneous event, which could be typical for the emergence of SINE families. PMID:21908723

  13. Determination of humoral immunoglobulins M and G directed against mycobacterial antigen 60 failed to diagnose primary tuberculosis and mycobacterial adenitis in children.

    PubMed

    Turneer, M; Van Nerom, E; Nyabenda, J; Waelbroeck, A; Duvivier, A; Toppet, M

    1994-12-01

    The serodiagnosis of primary tuberculosis (TB) and mycobacterial adenitis in children was tried using the Anda-Tb tests (Anda Biologicals, France) that measure immunoglobulins (Ig) M and G directed against mycobacterial antigen 60 (A60) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The 188 cases studied included 81 healthy or mycobacteria-unrelated diseased children with no reaction to tuberculin skin test (STN); 9 recent BCG vaccination (BCG); 35 asymptomatic (AsTB), 29 symptomatic (STB) primary TB and 11 adenitis caused by atypical mycobacteria from the group avium-intracellulare-scrofulaceum (MAIS) tested before treatment; and 23 past primary TB tested at different times after completion of specific treatment (past TB). The individual IgM and IgG levels largely overlapped whatever the clinical status of the children. Setting the normal upper limit at the 95th percentile of the STN values, which by definition gives 95% specificity, the highest IgM sensitivity was found in past TB (35%), AsTB showing 23%, STB 17%, and MAIS 18% sensitivity. IgG sensitivity was also the highest in past TB (26%) and was equal to 6, 14, and 9% in AsTB, STB, and MAIS, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values and the test efficiency (63 and 62% for IgM and IgG, respectively) were far too low. Combining positivity for IgM and/or IgG did not improve the results. In our study, the anti-A60 IgM and IgG measurements using the Anda-Tb tests in primary TB and mycobacterial adenitis in children did not prove of any diagnostic help.

  14. [Detection of mycobacterial DNA with polymerase chain reaction in eye discharge and gastric juices in a case of scleritis].

    PubMed

    Tanemoto, K; Ishikawa, H; Kigasawa, K; Obazawa, H; Fusegawa, H; Miyachi, H; Ando, Y

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of mycobacterial scleritis in which prompt diagnosis was made by the detection of mycobacterial DNA with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in eye discharge and gastric juices, when conventional tests were negative. A 77-year-old woman who had a past history of pulmonary tuberculosis visited the outpatient clinic of Tokai University Hospital complaining of pain in her right eye. She was diagnosed as having scleritis and uveitis. There were no indications of active tuberculosis. We examined the gastric juices, sputum, and eye discharge by microscopy, culture, and PCR for detection of mycobacterium. The results of microscopy and culture were negative, but with PCR we detected atypical mycobacterium in eye discharge and gastric juices. After oral treatment with antituberculosis agents, the patient's eye symptoms disappeared. Detecting mycobacterial DNA with PCR could be useful for early diagnosis of mycobacterial scleritis, so that treatment with antituberculosis agents could be started.

  15. The inhibitory effects of mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan and polysaccharides upon polyclonal and monoclonal human T cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, C; Mehlert, A; Lamb, J

    1988-01-01

    Lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was able to inhibit antigen induced T cell proliferation of human CD4+ T cell clones specific for influenza virus. The inhibitory effect was also present when peripheral human T cells were stimulated with crude mycobacterial antigen extracts. Non-specific T cell stimulation, i.e. IL-2, PHA and anti-CD3 antibodies coupled to beads, was not affected. The inhibitory property was also found when arabinomannan and arabinogalactan of mycobacterial origin were tested but not with other unrelated polysaccharides used as controls. The effect appears to be related to the processing of the antigen by the antigen-presenting cells, since it was evident when T cell clones were stimulated with whole virus, whereas stimulation with a synthetic peptide containing the relevant epitope was not inhibitable. PMID:3147152

  16. Synthetic UDP-furanoses as potent inhibitors of mycobacterial galactan biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Pauline; Beláňová, Martina; Dianišková, Petronela; Zhou, Ruokun; Zheng, Ruixiang Blake; Pearcey, Jean A.; Joe, Maju; Brennan, Patrick J.; Nugier-Chauvin, Caroline; Ferrières, Vincent; Lowary, Todd L.; Daniellou, Richard; Mikušová, Katarína

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY UDP-galactofuranose (UDP-Galf) is a substrate for two types of enzymes, UDP-galactopyranose mutase and galactofuranosyltransferases, which are present in many pathogenic organisms but absent from mammals. In particular, these enzymes are involved in the biosynthesis of cell wall galactan, a polymer essential for the survival of the causative agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We describe here the synthesis of derivatives of UDP-Galf modified at C-5 and C-6 using a chemoenzymatic route. In cell-free assays, these compounds prevented the formation of mycobacterial galactan, via the production of short “dead-end” intermediates resulting from their incorporation into the growing oligosaccharide chain. Modified UDP-furanoses thus constitute novel probes for the study of the two classes of enzymes involved in mycobacterial galactan assembly, and studies with these compounds may ultimately facilitate the future development of new therapeutic agents against tuberculosis. PMID:21168771

  17. The lta4h Locus Modulates Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Infection in Zebrafish and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, David M.; Vary, Jay C.; Ray, John P.; Walsh, Gregory S.; Dunstan, Sarah J.; Bang, Nguyen D.; Hagge, Deanna A.; Khadge, Saraswoti; King, Mary-Claire; Hawn, Thomas R.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces varied early outcomes, ranging from resistance to infection to progressive disease. Here we report results from a forward genetic screen in zebrafish larvae that identify multiple mutant classes with distinct patterns of innate susceptibility to Mycobacterium marinum. A hypersusceptible mutant maps to the lta4h locus encoding leukotriene A4 hydrolase, which catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a potent chemoattractant and proinflammatory eicosanoid. lta4h mutations confer hypersusceptibility independent of LTB4 reduction, by redirecting eicosanoid substrates to anti-inflammatory lipoxins. The resultant anti-inflammatory state permits increased mycobacterial proliferation by limiting production of tumor necrosis factor. In humans, we find that protection from both tuberculosis and multibacillary leprosy is associated with heterozygosity for LTA4H polymorphisms that have previously been correlated with differential LTB4 production. Our results suggest conserved roles for balanced eicosanoid production in vertebrate resistance to mycobacterial infection. PMID:20211140

  18. Pyrazinamide and Pyrazinoic Acid Derivatives Directed to Mycobacterial Enzymes Against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Michelle Fidelis; Fernandes, João Paulo-dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious diseases responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Due to the use of antimycobacterial drugs, TB prevalence seemed to be controlled, but with the appearance of resistant tuberculosis cases, the concern about the disease had become significant again, as well as the need for new alternatives to TB treatment. Since pyrazinamide (PZA) is part of the firstline agents in TB treatment, several derivatives of this drug were described, besides pyrazinoic acid (POA) derivatives, the active form of PZA. POA has been used mainly to design prodrugs to be activated by mycobacterial esterases, while PZA derivatives should be activated specifically by the nicotinamidase/ pyrazinamidase (PZAse), or other PZAse-independent pathways. The intention of this paper is to discuss the state of art of PZA and POA derivatives and their activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacteria, besides the therapeutic potential. Focus was given in prodrugs and derivatives directed to mycobacterial enzymes involved in its activation or mechanism of action.

  19. Definition and annotation of (myco)bacterial non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Gyanu; Arnvig, Kristine B; McDonough, Kathleen A

    2013-01-01

    RNA in bacteria may be broadly classified into coding and non-coding types. The prior, also known as messenger RNA, encode proteins as their final product. The non-coding RNA include all RNAs that are not translated into a protein. Examples of extensively studied and therefore prominent non-coding RNAs include rRNA, tRNA, tmRNA, whose designations reflect the functions performed by these RNAs. Discoveries of non-coding RNAs in mycobacteria have been reported in the recent years. At this early stage of this discipline of mycobacterial research, there is an opportunity for the scientific community to establish a consistent, systematic and objective approach to annotation of these RNAs. We are providing recommendations for this systematic annotation that we hope will be adopted by the mycobacterial research community. These may also serve as templates for annotation of non-coding RNAs in other bacteria.

  20. Mycobacterial disease and impaired IFN-γ immunity in humans with inherited ISG15 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Dusan; Byun, Minji; Durfee, Larissa A; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Salem, Sandra; Radovanovic, Irena; Grant, Audrey V; Adimi, Parisa; Mansouri, Nahal; Okada, Satoshi; Bryant, Vanessa L; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Kreins, Alexandra; Velez, Marcela Moncada; Boisson, Bertrand; Khalilzadeh, Soheila; Ozcelik, Ugur; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schoggins, John W; Rice, Charles M; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Behr, Marcel; Vogt, Guillaume; Puel, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Gros, Philippe; Huibregtse, Jon M; Abel, Laurent; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-09-28

    ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible, ubiquitin-like intracellular protein. Its conjugation to various proteins (ISGylation) contributes to antiviral immunity in mice. Here, we describe human patients with inherited ISG15 deficiency and mycobacterial, but not viral, diseases. The lack of intracellular ISG15 production and protein ISGylation was not associated with cellular susceptibility to any viruses that we tested, consistent with the lack of viral diseases in these patients. By contrast, the lack of mycobacterium-induced ISG15 secretion by leukocytes-granulocyte, in particular-reduced the production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes, including natural killer cells, probably accounting for the enhanced susceptibility to mycobacterial disease. This experiment of nature shows that human ISGylation is largely redundant for antiviral immunity, but that ISG15 plays an essential role as an IFN-γ-inducing secreted molecule for optimal antimycobacterial immunity.

  1. Mycobacterial disease and impaired IFN-γ immunity in humans with inherited ISG15 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bogunovic, Dusan; Byun, Minji; Durfee, Larissa A.; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Salem, Sandra; Radovanovic, Irena; Grant, Audrey V.; Adimi, Parisa; Mansouri, Nahal; Okada, Satoshi; Bryant, Vanessa L.; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Kreins, Alexandra; Velez, Marcela Moncada; Boisson, Bertrand; Khalilzadeh, Soheila; Ozcelik, Ugur; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schoggins, John W.; Rice, Charles M.; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Behr, Marcel; Vogt, Guillaume; Puel, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Gros, Philippe; Huibregtse, Jon M.; Abel, Laurent; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible, ubiquitin-like intracellular protein. Its conjugation to various proteins (ISGylation) contributes to antiviral immunity in mice. We describe human patients with inherited ISG15 deficiency and mycobacterial, but not viral diseases. The lack of intracellular ISG15 production and protein ISGylation was not associated with cellular susceptibility to any viruses tested, consistent with the lack of viral diseases in these patients. By contrast, the lack of mycobacterium-induced ISG15 secretion by leukocytes — granulocytes in particular — reduced the production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes, including natural killer cells, probably accounting for the enhanced susceptibility to mycobacterial disease. This experiment of Nature shows that human ISGylation is largely redundant for antiviral immunity, but that ISG15 plays an essential role as an IFN-γ-inducing secreted molecule for optimal antimycobacterial immunity. PMID:22859821

  2. T cell receptor recognition of CD1b presenting a mycobacterial glycolipid

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Stephanie; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Shahine, Adam; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Bhati, Mugdha; Tan, Li Lynn; Halim, Hanim; Tuttle, Kathryn D.; Gapin, Laurent; Le Nours, Jérôme; Moody, D. Branch; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    CD1 proteins present microbial lipids to T cells. Germline-encoded mycolyl lipid-reactive (GEM) T cells with conserved αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize CD1b presenting mycobacterial mycolates. As the molecular basis underpinning TCR recognition of CD1b remains unknown, here we determine the structure of a GEM TCR bound to CD1b presenting glucose-6-O-monomycolate (GMM). The GEM TCR docks centrally above CD1b, whereby the conserved TCR α-chain extensively contacts CD1b and GMM. Through mutagenesis and study of T cells from tuberculosis patients, we identify a consensus CD1b footprint of TCRs present among GEM T cells. Using both the TCR α- and β-chains as tweezers to surround and grip the glucose moiety of GMM, GEM TCRs create a highly specific mechanism for recognizing this mycobacterial glycolipid. PMID:27807341

  3. Macrophage form, function, and phenotype in mycobacterial infection: lessons from tuberculosis and other diseases.

    PubMed

    McClean, Colleen M; Tobin, David M

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages play a central role in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Recent work has highlighted the importance of diverse macrophage types and phenotypes that depend on local environment and developmental origins. In this review, we highlight how distinct macrophage phenotypes may influence disease progression in tuberculosis. In addition, we draw on work investigating specialized macrophage populations important in cancer biology and atherosclerosis in order to suggest new areas of investigation relevant to mycobacterial pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the repertoire of macrophage phenotypes and behaviors during infection may provide opportunities for novel control of disease through modulation of macrophage form and function. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Hyper-interspersed NANO/MEMS - Architecture design for new concepts in miniature robotics for space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoli, Salvatore

    1999-05-01

    Launch weight and volume requirements are substantially decreased by reduction of probe size in exploration mission systems, as mass and volume both scale as the third power of system size. Accordingly, the already quite developed MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) technology, that offers low cost, small, light weight, and increasingly reliable devices through durability and redundancy, is strongly attractive as a near-term technology for significantly reducing the cost to launch and operate space systems. It is shown that the final goal of MEMS technology, i.e. the merging through solid state microdcvices of the functions of sensing, computation, communication and actuation, can lead to a new, biomimetic kind of miniature robotics, particularly suitable for planetary exploration, through molecular mono- electronics/MEMS integration jointly with a hyper-interspersed architecture made up of autonomous units embodying sensors, information processors and actuators. The problem tackled here concerns the basic design of such miniature robots, from some μm to insect size, featuring finely structured intelligent autonomous parts as smart skins, sensory and manipulating members working on the analogue external reality and communicating with their inner molecular level nondiscrete pseudo-analogue information processing networks. The (mesoscopic network)/MEMS units are shown to embody a quantum mechanical/macroscopic world connection, in which the nondiscrete molecular devices allow the automaton parts to perform very complex, fast information processing operations as metaphores of bionic functions like learning, attention, and decision making under uncertain conditions, this last due to the stochasticity inherent in the quantum network. Flexible architectures instead of von Neumann type rigid architectures in addition to hyper-interspersion of autonomous units can be realized through such nano/MEMS devices, and the μm — cm size of the whole robots and their organs

  5. Evidence for an association between U1 RNA and interspersed repeat single-copy RNAs in the cytoplasm of sea urchin eggs.

    PubMed

    Ruzdijic, S; Pederson, T

    1987-09-01

    Psoralen crosslinking of RNA-RNA intermolecular duplexes in sea urchin egg extracts reveals that some maternal poly(A)+ RNA molecules are complexed with U1 RNA, a cofactor in somatic nuclear pre-mRNA splicing. Reaction of egg extracts with a monoclonal antibody specific for U1 snRNP selects, in addition to U1, RNAs that contain repeated sequences interspersed with single-copy elements. Antibody-selection experiments with nucleate and anucleate egg halves demonstrate that most of the U1 RNA-interspersed RNA complexes are cytoplasmic, as is the egg's store of total U1 snRNP. These results raise the possibility that maternal interspersed RNAs include unprocessed pre-messenger RNA molecules in arrested complexes with splicing cofactors.

  6. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease in Children – Epidemiology, Diagnosis & Management at a Tertiary Center

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Duncan; Gonis, Gena; Leslie, David; Sedda, Luigi; Ritz, Nicole; Connell, Tom; Curtis, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Background There are limited data on the epidemiology, diagnosis and optimal management of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease in children. Methods Retrospective cohort study of NTM cases over a 10-year-period at a tertiary referral hospital in Australia. Results A total of 140 children with NTM disease, including 107 with lymphadenitis and 25 with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), were identified. The estimated incidence of NTM disease was 0.6–1.6 cases / 100,000 children / year; no increasing trend was observed over the study period. Temporal analyses revealed a seasonal incidence cycle around 12 months, with peaks in late winter/spring and troughs in autumn. Mycobacterium-avium-complex accounted for most cases (77.8%), followed by Mycobacterium ulcerans (14.4%) and Mycobacterium marinum (3.3%). Polymerase chain reaction testing had higher sensitivity than culture and microscopy for acid-fast bacilli (92.0%, 67.2% and 35.7%, respectively). The majority of lymphadenitis cases underwent surgical excision (97.2%); multiple recurrences in this group were less common in cases treated with clarithromycin and rifampicin compared with clarithromycin alone or no anti-mycobacterial drugs (0% versus 7.1%; OR:0.73). SSTI recurrences were also less common in cases treated with two anti-mycobacterial drugs compared with one or none (10.5% versus 33.3%; OR:0.23). Conclusions There was seasonal variation in the incidence of NTM disease, analogous to recently published observations in tuberculosis, which have been linked to seasonal variation in vitamin D. Our finding that anti-mycobacterial combination therapy was associated with a reduced risk of recurrences in patients with NTM lymphadenitis or SSTI requires further confirmation in prospective trials. PMID:26812154

  7. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic approaches to characterize the role of genetic recombination in mycobacterial evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, Silvia E; Showers-Corneli, Patrice; Dardenne, Caitlin N; Harpending, Henry H; Martin, Darren P; Beiko, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium encompasses over one hundred named species of environmental and pathogenic organisms, including the causative agents of devastating human diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy. The success of these human pathogens is due in part to their ability to rapidly adapt to their changing environment and host. Recombination is the fastest way for bacterial genomes to acquire genetic material, but conflicting results about the extent of recombination in the genus Mycobacterium have been reported. We examined a data set comprising 18 distinct strains from 13 named species for evidence of recombination. Genomic regions common to all strains (accounting for 10% to 22% of the full genomes of all examined species) were aligned and concatenated in the chromosomal order of one mycobacterial reference species. The concatenated sequence was screened for evidence of recombination using a variety of statistical methods, with each proposed event evaluated by comparing maximum-likelihood phylogenies of the recombinant section with the non-recombinant portion of the dataset. Incongruent phylogenies were identified by comparing the site-wise log-likelihoods of each tree using multiple tests. We also used a phylogenomic approach to identify genes that may have been acquired through horizontal transfer from non-mycobacterial sources. The most frequent associated lineages (and potential gene transfer partners) in the Mycobacterium lineage-restricted gene trees are other members of suborder Corynebacterinae, but more-distant partners were identified as well. In two examined cases of potentially frequent and habitat-directed transfer (M. abscessus to Segniliparus and M. smegmatis to Streptomyces), observed sequence distances were small and consistent with a hypothesis of transfer, while in a third case (M. vanbaalenii to Streptomyces) distances were larger. The analyses described here indicate that whereas evidence of recombination in core regions within the genus is

  8. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling modulates susceptibility to mycobacterial infection via a nitric oxide dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Elks, Philip M; Brizee, Sabrina; van der Vaart, Michiel; Walmsley, Sarah R; van Eeden, Fredericus J; Renshaw, Stephen A; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a current major world-health problem, exacerbated by the causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), becoming increasingly resistant to conventional antibiotic treatment. Mtb is able to counteract the bactericidal mechanisms of leukocytes to survive intracellularly and develop a niche permissive for proliferation and dissemination. Understanding of the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis (TB) remains limited, especially for early infection and for reactivation of latent infection. Signaling via hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-α) transcription factors has previously been implicated in leukocyte activation and host defence. We have previously shown that hypoxic signaling via stabilization of Hif-1α prolongs the functionality of leukocytes in the innate immune response to injury. We sought to manipulate Hif-α signaling in a well-established Mycobacterium marinum (Mm) zebrafish model of TB to investigate effects on the host's ability to combat mycobacterial infection. Stabilization of host Hif-1α, both pharmacologically and genetically, at early stages of Mm infection was able to reduce the bacterial burden of infected larvae. Increasing Hif-1α signaling enhanced levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in neutrophils prior to infection and was able to reduce larval mycobacterial burden. Conversely, decreasing Hif-2α signaling enhanced RNS levels and reduced bacterial burden, demonstrating that Hif-1α and Hif-2α have opposing effects on host susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. The antimicrobial effect of Hif-1α stabilization, and Hif-2α reduction, were demonstrated to be dependent on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling at early stages of infection. Our findings indicate that induction of leukocyte iNOS by stabilizing Hif-1α, or reducing Hif-2α, aids the host during early stages of Mm infection. Stabilization of Hif-1α therefore represents a potential target for therapeutic

  9. A potential target gene for the host-directed therapy of mycobacterial infection in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhang; Chen, Ran; Zhang, Pei; Lu, Shan; Chen, Xing; Yao, Yake; Jin, Xiaozheng; Sun, Yilan; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), one of the major bacterial pathogens for lethal infectious diseases, is capable of surviving within the phagosomes of host alveolar macrophages; therefore, host genetic variations may alter the susceptibility to MTB. In this study, to identify host genes exploited by MTB during infection, genes were non-selectively inactivated using lentivirus-based antisense RNA methods in Raw264.7 macrophages, and the cells that survived virulent MTB infection were then screened. Following DNA sequencing of the surviving cell clones, 26 host genes affecting susceptibility to MTB were identified and their pathways were analyzed by bioinformatics analysis. In total, 9 of these genes were confirmed as positive regulators of collagen α-5(IV) chain (Col4a5) expression, a gene encoding a type IV collagen subunit present on the cell surface. The knockdown of Col4a5 consistently suppressed intracellular mycobacterial viability, promoting the survival of Raw264.7 macrophages following mycobacterial infection. Furthermore, Col4a5 deficiency lowered the pH levels of intracellular vesicles, including endosomes, lysosomes and phagosomes in the Raw264.7 cells. Finally, the knockdown of Col4a5 post-translationally increased microsomal vacuolar-type H+-ATPase activity in macrophages, leading to the acidification of intracellular vesicles. Our findings reveal a novel role for Col4a5 in the regulation of macrophage responses to mycobacterial infection and identify Col4a5 as a potential target for the host-directed anti-mycobacterial therapy.

  10. Bedaquiline Targets the ε Subunit of Mycobacterial F-ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Subhashri; Biukovic, Goran; Grüber, Gerhard; Dick, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The tuberculosis drug bedaquiline inhibits mycobacterial F-ATP synthase by binding to its c subunit. Using the purified ε subunit of the synthase and spectroscopy, we previously demonstrated that the drug interacts with this protein near its unique tryptophan residue. Here, we show that replacement of ε's tryptophan with alanine resulted in bedaquiline hypersusceptibility of the bacteria. Overexpression of the wild-type ε subunit caused resistance. These results suggest that the drug also targets the ε subunit.

  11. Bedaquiline Targets the ε Subunit of Mycobacterial F-ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Subhashri; Biukovic, Goran; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The tuberculosis drug bedaquiline inhibits mycobacterial F-ATP synthase by binding to its c subunit. Using the purified ε subunit of the synthase and spectroscopy, we previously demonstrated that the drug interacts with this protein near its unique tryptophan residue. Here, we show that replacement of ε's tryptophan with alanine resulted in bedaquiline hypersusceptibility of the bacteria. Overexpression of the wild-type ε subunit caused resistance. These results suggest that the drug also targets the ε subunit. PMID:27620476

  12. Association of Mycobacterium infections in patients with Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease with venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Alinejad Dizaj, Maryam; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Tabarsi, Payam; Ahari, Hamed; Ebrahimi, Ahmad; Nadji, Seyed Alireza; Emami, Habib; Mortaz, Esmaeil

    2016-10-01

    An association between a hypercoagulable state and Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) has been established in a few studies; resultant thrombosis is considered rare. In a case-control study, the prevalence of factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T, A1298C mutations were investigated in mycobacterium-infected patients. The study comprised 30 patients with mycobacterial infections (invasive, disseminated and/or recurrent infections with Bacille Calmette-Guerin or non-tuberculosis mycobacteria and Mycobacterium Tuberculosis with positive results for acid-fast bacilli and tuberculin skin tests) and 30 normal healthy controls. Forty female (66.7%) and 20 male subjects (33.3%) aged from 3 to 70 years were recruited into this study. Genotyping of targeted genes was performed by RT-PCR and cytokine TNF-α concentrations were quantified using a commercially available ELISA kit. Significant associations between mycobacterial infection and TNF-α production after stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with LPS alone and with IFN-γ plus LPS were identified. Moreover, genotyping analysis in the studied population revealed a significant association between MTHFR c.677C>T (OR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.35-7.92; P < 0.05), MTHFR c.1298A>C (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.10-4.93; P < 0.05) and mycobacterial infection in affected patients, indicating susceptibility to venous thromboembolism according to previous studies. Additionally, mycobacterium-infected patients had a significantly greater prevalence of MTHFR C677T and A1298C mutations than controls.

  13. Fibrinogen Regulates the Cytotoxicity of Mycobacterial Trehalose Dimycolate but Is Not Required for Cell Recruitment, Cytokine Response, or Control of Mycobacterial Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kaori; Geisel, Rachel E.; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Wyatt, Bryce T.; Sellers, Llewelyn B.; Smiley, Stephen T.; Cooper, Andrea M.; Russell, David G.; Rhoades, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    During inflammatory responses and wound healing, the conversion of soluble fibrinogen to fibrin, an insoluble extracellular matrix, long has been assumed to create a scaffold for the migration of leukocytes and fibroblasts. Previous studies concluded that fibrinogen is a necessary cofactor for mycobacterial trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate-induced responses, because trehalose dimycolate-coated beads, to which fibrinogen was adsorbed, were more inflammatory than those to which other plasma proteins were adsorbed. Herein, we investigate roles for fibrin(ogen) in an in vivo model of mycobacterial granuloma formation and in infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. In wild-type mice, the subcutaneous injection of trehalose dimycolate-coated polystyrene microspheres, suspended within Matrigel, elicited a pyogranulomatous response during the course of 12 days. In fibrinogen-deficient mice, neutrophils were recruited but a more suppurative lesion developed, with the marked degradation and disintegration of the matrix. Compared to that in wild-type mice, the early formation of granulation tissue in fibrinogen-deficient mice was edematous, hypocellular, and disorganized. These deficiencies were complemented by the addition of exogenous fibrinogen. The absence of fibrinogen had no effect on cell recruitment or cytokine production in response to trehalose dimycolate, nor was there a difference in lung histopathology or overall bacterial burden in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this model, fibrin(ogen) was not required for cell recruitment, cytokine response, or response to infection, but it promoted granulation tissue formation and suppressed leukocyte necrosis. PMID:20028811

  14. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  15. Structure and function of the mycobacterial transcription initiation complex with the essential regulator RbpA.

    PubMed

    Hubin, Elizabeth A; Fay, Allison; Xu, Catherine; Bean, James M; Saecker, Ruth M; Glickman, Michael S; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-09

    RbpA and CarD are essential transcription regulators in mycobacteria. Mechanistic analyses of promoter open complex (RPo) formation establish that RbpA and CarD cooperatively stimulate formation of an intermediate (RP2) leading to RPo; formation of RP2 is likely a bottleneck step at the majority of mycobacterial promoters. Once RPo forms, CarD also disfavors its isomerization back to RP2. We determined a 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of a mycobacterial transcription initiation complex (TIC) with RbpA as well as a CarD/RbpA/TIC model. Both CarD and RbpA bind near the upstream edge of the -10 element where they likely facilitate DNA bending and impede transcription bubble collapse. In vivo studies demonstrate the essential role of RbpA, show the effects of RbpA truncations on transcription and cell physiology, and indicate additional functions for RbpA not evident in vitro. This work provides a framework to understand the control of mycobacterial transcription by RbpA and CarD.

  16. Structure and function of the mycobacterial transcription initiation complex with the essential regulator RbpA

    PubMed Central

    Hubin, Elizabeth A; Fay, Allison; Xu, Catherine; Bean, James M; Saecker, Ruth M; Glickman, Michael S; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    RbpA and CarD are essential transcription regulators in mycobacteria. Mechanistic analyses of promoter open complex (RPo) formation establish that RbpA and CarD cooperatively stimulate formation of an intermediate (RP2) leading to RPo; formation of RP2 is likely a bottleneck step at the majority of mycobacterial promoters. Once RPo forms, CarD also disfavors its isomerization back to RP2. We determined a 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of a mycobacterial transcription initiation complex (TIC) with RbpA as well as a CarD/RbpA/TIC model. Both CarD and RbpA bind near the upstream edge of the −10 element where they likely facilitate DNA bending and impede transcription bubble collapse. In vivo studies demonstrate the essential role of RbpA, show the effects of RbpA truncations on transcription and cell physiology, and indicate additional functions for RbpA not evident in vitro. This work provides a framework to understand the control of mycobacterial transcription by RbpA and CarD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22520.001 PMID:28067618

  17. Mycofactocin-associated mycobacterial dehydrogenases with non-exchangeable NAD cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Haft, Daniel H.; Pierce, Phillip G.; Mayclin, Stephen J.; Sullivan, Amy; Gardberg, Anna S.; Abendroth, Jan; Begley, Darren W.; Phan, Isabelle Q.; Staker, Bart L.; Myler, Peter J.; Marathias, Vasilios M.; Lorimer, Donald D.; Edwards, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    During human infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives the normally bacteriocidal phagosome of macrophages. Mtb and related species may be able to combat this harsh acidic environment which contains reactive oxygen species due to the mycobacterial genomes encoding a large number of dehydrogenases. Typically, dehydrogenase cofactor binding sites are open to solvent, which allows NAD/NADH exchange to support multiple turnover. Interestingly, mycobacterial short chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) within family TIGR03971 contain an insertion at the NAD binding site. Here we present crystal structures of 9 mycobacterial SDRs in which the insertion buries the NAD cofactor except for a small portion of the nicotinamide ring. Line broadening and STD-NMR experiments did not show NAD or NADH exchange on the NMR timescale. STD-NMR demonstrated binding of the potential substrate carveol, the potential product carvone, the inhibitor tricyclazol, and an external redox partner 2,6-dichloroindophenol (DCIP). Therefore, these SDRs appear to contain a non-exchangeable NAD cofactor and may rely on an external redox partner, rather than cofactor exchange, for multiple turnover. Incidentally, these genes always appear in conjunction with the mftA gene, which encodes the short peptide MftA, and with other genes proposed to convert MftA into the external redox partner mycofactocin. PMID:28120876

  18. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  19. The influence of haemoglobin and iron on in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Rachel; O’Shea, Matthew K.; White, Andrew D.; Müller, Julius; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Matsumiya, Magali; Dennis, Mike J.; Parizotto, Eneida A.; Harris, Stephanie; Stylianou, Elena; Naranbhai, Vivek; Bettencourt, Paulo; Drakesmith, Hal; Sharpe, Sally; Fletcher, Helen A.; McShane, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The current vaccine against tuberculosis, live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG, has variable efficacy, but development of an effective alternative is severely hampered by the lack of an immune correlate of protection. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in functional in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays (MGIAs), which provide a measure of a range of different immune mechanisms and their interactions. We identified a positive correlation between mean corpuscular haemoglobin and in vitro growth of BCG in whole blood from healthy UK human volunteers. Mycobacterial growth in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both humans and macaques was increased following the experimental addition of haemoglobin (Hb) or ferric iron, and reduced following addition of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO). Expression of Hb genes correlated positively with mycobacterial growth in whole blood from UK/Asian adults and, to a lesser extent, in PBMC from South African infants. Taken together our data indicate an association between Hb/iron levels and BCG growth in vitro, which may in part explain differences in findings between whole blood and PBMC MGIAs and should be considered when using such assays. PMID:28256545

  20. Molecular basis for the differential quinolone susceptibility of mycobacterial DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rupesh; Madhumathi, Bhavani Shankar; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-01-01

    DNA gyrase is a type II topoisomerase that catalyzes the introduction of negative supercoils in the genomes of eubacteria. Fluoroquinolones (FQs), successful as drugs clinically, target the enzyme to trap the gyrase-DNA complex, leading to the accumulation of double-strand breaks in the genome. Mycobacteria are less susceptible to commonly used FQs. However, an 8-methoxy-substituted FQ, moxifloxacin (MFX), is a potent antimycobacterial, and a higher susceptibility of mycobacterial gyrase to MFX has been demonstrated. Although several models explain the mechanism of FQ action and gyrase-DNA-FQ interaction, the basis for the differential susceptibility of mycobacterial gyrase to various FQs is not understood. We have addressed the basis of the differential susceptibility of the gyrase and revisited the mode of action of FQs. We demonstrate that FQs bind both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrases in the absence of DNA and that the addition of DNA enhances the drug binding. The FQs bind primarily to the GyrA subunit of mycobacterial gyrase, while in E. coli holoenzyme is the target. The binding of MFX to GyrA of M. tuberculosis correlates with its effectiveness as a better inhibitor of the enzyme and its efficacy in cell killing.

  1. Molecular Basis for the Differential Quinolone Susceptibility of Mycobacterial DNA Gyrase

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rupesh; Madhumathi, Bhavani Shankar

    2014-01-01

    DNA gyrase is a type II topoisomerase that catalyzes the introduction of negative supercoils in the genomes of eubacteria. Fluoroquinolones (FQs), successful as drugs clinically, target the enzyme to trap the gyrase-DNA complex, leading to the accumulation of double-strand breaks in the genome. Mycobacteria are less susceptible to commonly used FQs. However, an 8-methoxy-substituted FQ, moxifloxacin (MFX), is a potent antimycobacterial, and a higher susceptibility of mycobacterial gyrase to MFX has been demonstrated. Although several models explain the mechanism of FQ action and gyrase-DNA-FQ interaction, the basis for the differential susceptibility of mycobacterial gyrase to various FQs is not understood. We have addressed the basis of the differential susceptibility of the gyrase and revisited the mode of action of FQs. We demonstrate that FQs bind both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrases in the absence of DNA and that the addition of DNA enhances the drug binding. The FQs bind primarily to the GyrA subunit of mycobacterial gyrase, while in E. coli holoenzyme is the target. The binding of MFX to GyrA of M. tuberculosis correlates with its effectiveness as a better inhibitor of the enzyme and its efficacy in cell killing. PMID:24419347

  2. Periprosthetic atypical mycobacterial infection in breast implants: a new kid on the block!

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mohan; D'Silva, James A; Borole, Ateesh J; Chilgar, Ram M

    2013-01-01

    Breast augmentation is one of the most commonly performed cosmetic surgical procedures. Infection in the breast implant surgery can range from simple wound infection to periprosthetic infection usually with skin commensals such as staphylococci. However, with routine use of broad-spectrum antibiotics atypical mycobacterial infections are being increasingly reported. We studied 12 cases of atypical mycobacterial breast implant infections over a period of 8 years from 2002 to 2010. Six of them were primarily operated at our centre and six referred from elsewhere after implant infection. Age range was 30-40 years and follow-up after secondary surgery ranged from 1 to 5 years. All patients were explanted and started on combination antibiotics namely, clarithromycin, gatifloxacillin and linezolid for 3 months. After a period of 3 months, all patients underwent implant surgery again with the same antibiotic cover for 6 weeks. All the secondary implant augmentations were successful. Organisms grown in primary culture were Mycobacterium fortuitum and M. chelonei. All patients were satisfied with the final breast form and size achieved. The possibility of an atypical mycobacterial infection should always be at the back of the mind of an alert surgeon to prevent a periprosthetic infection from compromising the final aesthetic result of a breast implant procedure. Diagnosed early and eradicated in time, the final result is not compromised. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ubiquitination as a Mechanism To Transport Soluble Mycobacterial and Eukaryotic Proteins to Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Victoria L; Jackson, Liam; Schorey, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-15

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles of endocytic origin that function in intercellular communication. Our previous studies indicate that exosomes released from Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages contain soluble mycobacterial proteins. However, it was unclear how these secreted proteins were targeted to exosomes. In this study, we determined that exosome production by the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 requires the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport and that trafficking of mycobacterial proteins from phagocytosed bacilli to exosomes was dependent on protein ubiquitination. Moreover, soluble mycobacterial proteins, when added exogenously to RAW264.7 or human HEK293 cells, were endocytosed, ubiquitinated, and released via exosomes. This suggested that endocytosed proteins could be recycled from cells through exosomes. This hypothesis was supported using the tumor-associated protein He4, which, when endocytosed by RAW264.7 or HEK293 cells, was transported to exosomes in a ubiquitin-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ubiquitination is a modification sufficient for trafficking soluble proteins within the phagocytic/endocytic network to exosomes.

  4. The molecular biology of mycobacterial trehalose in the quest for advanced tuberculosis therapies.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Ana; Alarico, Susana; Maranha, Ana; Mendes, Vitor; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2014-08-01

    Trehalose is a natural glucose disaccharide identified in the 19th century in fungi and insect cocoons, and later across the three domains of life. In members of the genus Mycobacterium, which includes the tuberculosis (TB) pathogen and over 160 species of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), many of which are opportunistic pathogens, trehalose has been an important focus of research over the last 60 years. It is a crucial player in the assembly and architecture of the remarkable mycobacterial cell envelope as an element of unique highly antigenic glycolipids, namely trehalose dimycolate ('cord factor'). Free trehalose has been detected in the mycobacterial cytoplasm and occasionally in oligosaccharides with unknown function. TB and NTM infection statistics and death toll, the decline in immune responses in the aging population, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS or other debilitating conditions, and the proliferation of strains with different levels of resistance to the dated drugs in use, all merge into a serious public-health threat urging more effective vaccines, efficient diagnostic tools and new drugs. This review deals with the latest findings on mycobacterial trehalose biosynthesis, catabolism, processing and recycling, as well with the ongoing quest for novel trehalose-related mechanisms to be targeted by novel TB therapeutics. In this context, the drug-discovery pipeline has recently included new lead compounds directed toward trehalose-related targets highlighting the potential of these pathways to stem the tide of rising drug resistance.

  5. Tetrahydrolipstatin Inhibition, Functional Analyses, and Three-dimensional Structure of a Lipase Essential for Mycobacterial Viability

    SciTech Connect

    Crellin, Paul K.; Vivian, Julian P.; Scoble, Judith; Chow, Frances M.; West, Nicholas P.; Brammananth, Rajini; Proellocks, Nicholas I.; Shahine, Adam; Le Nours, Jerome; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Britton, Warwick J.; Coppel, Ross L.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2010-09-17

    The highly complex and unique mycobacterial cell wall is critical to the survival of Mycobacteria in host cells. However, the biosynthetic pathways responsible for its synthesis are, in general, incompletely characterized. Rv3802c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a partially characterized phospholipase/thioesterase encoded within a genetic cluster dedicated to the synthesis of core structures of the mycobacterial cell wall, including mycolic acids and arabinogalactan. Enzymatic assays performed with purified recombinant proteins Rv3802c and its close homologs from Mycobacterium smegmatis (MSMEG{_}6394) and Corynebacterium glutamicum (NCgl2775) show that they all have significant lipase activities that are inhibited by tetrahydrolipstatin, an anti-obesity drug that coincidently inhibits mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. The crystal structure of MSMEG{_}6394, solved to 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, revealed an {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase fold and a catalytic triad typically present in esterases and lipases. Furthermore, we demonstrate direct evidence of gene essentiality in M. smegmatis and show the structural consequences of loss of MSMEG{_}6394 function on the cellular integrity of the organism. These findings, combined with the predicted essentiality of Rv3802c in M. tuberculosis, indicate that the Rv3802c family performs a fundamental and indispensable lipase-associated function in mycobacteria.

  6. Diagnostic potential of the pulsed discharged helium ionization detector (PDHID) for pathogenic Mycobacterial volatile biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Pimentel, Adam S; Mowry, Curtis D; Mangan, Michael A; Moorman, Matthew W; Allen, Amy; Schares, Elizabeth S; Achyuthan, Komandoor E

    2013-09-01

    Pathogenic Mycobacteria cause diseases in animals and humans with significant economic and societal consequences. Current methods for Mycobacterial detection relies upon time- and labor-intensive techniques such as culturing or DNA analysis. Using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, four volatile compounds (methyl phenylacetate, methyl p-anisate, methyl nicotinate and o-phenyl anisole) were recently proposed as potential biomarkers for Mycobacteria. We demonstrate for the first time the capabilities of a field-deployable, pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (PDHID) for sensing these volatiles. We determined the analytical performance of the PDHID toward these Mycobacterial volatiles. Detector performance was moderately affected over the temperature range of 150 to 350 °C. The linear dynamic range for all four analytes exceeded three orders of magnitude. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) were calculated as 150 and 450 pg respectively, for all compounds, except methyl phenylacetate (LOD and LOQ, 90 and 270 pg, respectively). Control charts revealed that the PDHID detection system was generally stable, and deviations could be traced to common causes and excluded special causes. Grob tests and ionization potential data suggest that the PDHID is capable of detecting Mycobacterial volatiles in a complex milieu such as culture headspace or breath samples from tuberculosis patients. The diagnostic potential of the PDHID is critical to our goal of a handheld, field-deployable 'sniffer' system for biological pathogens and chemical warfare agents.

  7. Macrophage-mediated inflammatory response decreases mycobacterial survival in mouse MSCs by augmenting NO production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yongjian; Xie, Heping; Li, Miao; Ming, Siqi; Li, Liyan; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Gong, Sitang; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular microbe, which escapes host immune attack during latent infection. Recent studies reveal that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide a protective niche for MTB to maintain latency. However, the regulation of mycobacterial residency in MSCs in the infectious microenvironment remains largely unknown. Here, we found that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during MTB infection facilitated the clearance of bacilli residing in mouse MSCs. Higher inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were observed in mouse MSCs under macrophage-mediated inflammatory circumstance. Blocking NO production in MSCs increased the survival of intracellular mycobacteria, indicating NO-mediated antimycobacterial activity. Moreover, both nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways were involved in iNOS expression and NO production in inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β could trigger NO production in MSCs and exert anti-mycobacterial activity via NF-κB signaling pathway. Neutralization of interleukin-1β in macrophage-mediated inflammatory microenvironment dampened the ability of mouse MSCs to produce NO. Together, our findings demonstrated that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during mycobacterial infection promotes the clearance of bacilli in mouse MSCs by increasing NO production, which may provide a better understanding of latent MTB infection. PMID:27251437

  8. Activation of human long interspersed nuclear element 1 retrotransposition by benzo(a)pyrene, an ubiquitous environmental carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Stribinskis, Vilius; Ramos, Kenneth S

    2006-03-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements [LINE-1 (L1)] are abundant retrotransposons in mammalian genomes that remain silent under most conditions. Cellular stress signals activate L1, but the molecular mechanisms controlling L1 activation remain unclear. Evidence is presented here that benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), an environmental hydrocarbon metabolized by mammalian cytochrome P450s to reactive carcinogenic intermediates, increases L1 retrotransposition in HeLa cells. Increased retrotransposition is mediated by up-regulation of L1 RNA levels, increased L1 cDNA synthesis, and stable genomic integration. Activation of L1 is dependent on the ability of BaP to cause DNA damage because it is absent in HeLa cells challenged with nongenotoxic hydrocarbon carcinogens. Thus, the mutations and genomic instability observed in human populations exposed to genotoxic environmental hydrocarbons may involve epigenetic activation of mobile elements dispersed throughout the human genome.

  9. Evolution of Two Short Interspersed Elements in Callorhinchus milii (Chondrichthyes, Holocephali) and Related Elements in Sharks and the Coelacanth

    PubMed Central

    Plazzi, Federico; Mantovani, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are non-autonomous retrotransposons. Although they usually show fast evolutionary rates, in some instances highly conserved domains (HCDs) have been observed in elements with otherwise divergent sequences and from distantly related species. Here, we document the life history of two HCD-SINE families in the elephant shark Callorhinchus milii, one specific to the holocephalan lineage (CmiSINEs) and another one (SacSINE1-CM) with homologous elements in sharks and the coelacanth (SacSINE1s, LmeSINE1s). The analyses of their relationships indicated that these elements share the same 3′-tail, which would have allowed both elements to rise to high copy number by exploiting the C. milii L2-2_CM long interspersed element (LINE) enzymes. Molecular clock analysis on SINE activity in C. milii genome evidenced two replication bursts occurring right after two major events in the holocephalan evolution: the end-Permian mass extinction and the radiation of modern Holocephali. Accordingly, the same analysis on the coelacanth homologous elements, LmeSINE1, identified a replication wave close to the split age of the two extant Latimeria species. The genomic distribution of the studied SINEs pointed out contrasting results: some elements were preferentially sorted out from gene regions, but accumulated in flanking regions, while others appear more conserved within genes. Moreover, data from the C. milii transcriptome suggest that these SINEs could be involved in miRNA biogenesis and may be targets for miRNA-based regulation. PMID:28505260

  10. Mycobacterial Hsp65 potentially cross-reacts with autoantibodies of diabetes sera and also induces (in vitro) cytokine responses relevant to diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rani, Pittu Sandhya; Babajan, Banaganapalli; Tulsian, Nikhil K; Begum, Mahabubunnisa; Kumar, Ashutosh; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2013-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multifactorial disease and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Among the two types of diabetes, type-2 accounts for about 90% of all diabetic cases, whereas type-1 or juvenile diabetes is less prevalent and presents with humoral immune responses against some of the autoantigens. We attempted to test whether the sera of type-1 diabetes patients cross-react with mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (Hsp65) due to postulated epitope homologies between mycobacterial Hsp65 and an important autoantigen of type-1 diabetes, glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD65). In our study, we used either recombinant mycobacterial Hsp65 protein or synthetic peptides corresponding to some of the potential epitopes of mycobacterial Hsp65 that are shared with GAD65 or human Hsp60, and a control peptide sourced from mycobacterial Hsp65 which is not shared with GAD65, Hsp60 and other autoantigens of type-1 diabetes. The indirect ELISA results indicated that both type-1 diabetes and type-2 diabetes sera cross-react with conserved mycobacterial Hsp65 peptides and recombinant mycobacterial Hsp65 protein but do not do so with the control peptide. Our results suggest that cross-reactivity of mycobacterial Hsp65 with autoantibodies of diabetes sera could be due to the presence of significantly conserved peptides between mycobacterial Hsp65 and human Hsp60 rather than between mycobacterial Hsp65 and GAD65. The treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with recombinant mycobacterial Hsp65 protein or the synthetic peptides resulted in a significant increase in the secretion of cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10. Taken together, these findings point towards a dual role for mycobacterial Hsp65: in inducing autoimmunity and in inflammation, the two cardinal features of diabetes mellitus.

  11. The Chinese hamster Alu-equivalent sequence: a conserved highly repetitious, interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid sequence in mammals has a structure suggestive of a transposable element.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, S R; Toomey, T P; Leinwand, L; Jelinek, W R

    1981-01-01

    A consensus sequence has been determined for a major interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid repeat in the genome of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells). This sequence is extensively homologous to (i) the human Alu sequence (P. L. Deininger et al., J. Mol. Biol., in press), (ii) the mouse B1 interspersed repetitious sequence (Krayev et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1201-1215, 1980) (iii) an interspersed repetitious sequence from African green monkey deoxyribonucleic acid (Dhruva et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:4514-4518, 1980) and (iv) the CHO and mouse 4.5S ribonucleic acid (this report; F. Harada and N. Kato, Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1273-1285, 1980). Because the CHO consensus sequence shows significant homology to the human Alu sequence it is termed the CHO Alu-equivalent sequence. A conserved structure surrounding CHO Alu-equivalent family members can be recognized. It is similar to that surrounding the human Alu and the mouse B1 sequences, and is represented as follows: direct repeat-CHO-Alu-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. A composite interspersed repetitious sequence has been identified. Its structure is represented as follows: direct repeat-residue 47 to 107 of CHO-Alu-non-Alu repetitious sequence-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. Because the Alu flanking sequences resemble those that flank known transposable elements, we think it likely that the Alu sequence dispersed throughout the mammalian genome by transposition. Images PMID:9279371

  12. Comparing Massed-Trial Instruction, Distributed-Trial Instruction, and Task Interspersal to Teach Tacts to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majdalany, Lina M.; Wilder, David A.; Greif, Abigail; Mathisen, David; Saini, Valdeep

    2014-01-01

    Although massed-trial instruction, distributed-trial instruction, and task interspersal have been shown to be effective methods of teaching skills to children with autism spectrum disorders, they have not been directly compared. In the current study, we taught 6 children to tact shapes of countries using these methods to determine which would…

  13. Short Interspersed Nuclear Element (SINE) Sequences in the Genome of the Human Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus Af293

    PubMed Central

    Kanhayuwa, Lakkhana; Coutts, Robert H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Novel families of short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) sequences in the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, clinical isolate Af293, were identified and categorised into tRNA-related and 5S rRNA-related SINEs. Eight predicted tRNA-related SINE families originating from different tRNAs, and nominated as AfuSINE2 sequences, contained target site duplications of short direct repeat sequences (4–14 bp) flanking the elements, an extended tRNA-unrelated region and typical features of RNA polymerase III promoter sequences. The elements ranged in size from 140–493 bp and were present in low copy number in the genome and five out of eight were actively transcribed. One putative tRNAArg-derived sequence, AfuSINE2-1a possessed a unique feature of repeated trinucleotide ACT residues at its 3’-terminus. This element was similar in sequence to the I-4_AO element found in A. oryzae and an I-1_AF long nuclear interspersed element-like sequence identified in A. fumigatus Af293. Families of 5S rRNA-related SINE sequences, nominated as AfuSINE3, were also identified and their 5'-5S rRNA-related regions show 50–65% and 60–75% similarity to respectively A. fumigatus 5S rRNAs and SINE3-1_AO found in A. oryzae. A. fumigatus Af293 contains five copies of AfuSINE3 sequences ranging in size from 259–343 bp and two out of five AfuSINE3 sequences were actively transcribed. Investigations on AfuSINE distribution in the fungal genome revealed that the elements are enriched in pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions and inserted within gene-rich regions. We also demonstrated that some, but not all, AfuSINE sequences are targeted by host RNA silencing mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrated that infection of the fungus with mycoviruses had no apparent effects on SINE activity. PMID:27736869

  14. Short Interspersed Nuclear Element (SINE) Sequences in the Genome of the Human Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus Af293.

    PubMed

    Kanhayuwa, Lakkhana; Coutts, Robert H A

    2016-01-01

    Novel families of short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) sequences in the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, clinical isolate Af293, were identified and categorised into tRNA-related and 5S rRNA-related SINEs. Eight predicted tRNA-related SINE families originating from different tRNAs, and nominated as AfuSINE2 sequences, contained target site duplications of short direct repeat sequences (4-14 bp) flanking the elements, an extended tRNA-unrelated region and typical features of RNA polymerase III promoter sequences. The elements ranged in size from 140-493 bp and were present in low copy number in the genome and five out of eight were actively transcribed. One putative tRNAArg-derived sequence, AfuSINE2-1a possessed a unique feature of repeated trinucleotide ACT residues at its 3'-terminus. This element was similar in sequence to the I-4_AO element found in A. oryzae and an I-1_AF long nuclear interspersed element-like sequence identified in A. fumigatus Af293. Families of 5S rRNA-related SINE sequences, nominated as AfuSINE3, were also identified and their 5'-5S rRNA-related regions show 50-65% and 60-75% similarity to respectively A. fumigatus 5S rRNAs and SINE3-1_AO found in A. oryzae. A. fumigatus Af293 contains five copies of AfuSINE3 sequences ranging in size from 259-343 bp and two out of five AfuSINE3 sequences were actively transcribed. Investigations on AfuSINE distribution in the fungal genome revealed that the elements are enriched in pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions and inserted within gene-rich regions. We also demonstrated that some, but not all, AfuSINE sequences are targeted by host RNA silencing mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrated that infection of the fungus with mycoviruses had no apparent effects on SINE activity.

  15. Solar Disinfection of MODS Mycobacterial Cultures in Resource-Poor Settings

    PubMed Central

    Nathavitharana, Ruvandhi; Coronel, Jorge; Moore, David A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Safe disposal of TB culture material in which the infectious burden of clinical samples has been greatly amplified is an important challenge in resource-limited settings. The bactericidal capacity of solar cookers has been demonstrated previously for conventional bacteria and contaminated clinical waste. We investigated the use of a simple solar cooker for the sterilization of mycobacterial broth cultures from the microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay (MODS). Methods Simulated TB culture materials were prepared by inoculating 24-well MODS plates with 500 µL of a known concentration of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. In a series of experiments, samples were simultaneously placed inside a box-type solar cooker and control box and removed at timepoints between 15 minutes and 6 hours. Quantitative cultures were performed using retrieved samples to determine sterilization effect. Results All cultures from the control box were positive at or within 1–4 logs of inoculation concentration. Simulated culture plates at concentrations from 103colony-forming-units (CFU)/ml to 107 CFU/ml were completely sterilized after only one hour of cooker exposure, at temperatures between 50–102°C. At 109 CFU/ml (far in excess of diagnostic cultures), it was only possible to recover mycobacterial growth in plates removed after 15 minutes. By 30 minutes all plates were effectively sterilized. Discussion Solar disinfection provides a very effective, safe and low-cost alternative to conventional equipment used for disposal of mycobacterial culture material. Effect of climatic conditions and optimal operating procedure remain to be defined. PMID:17971863

  16. Human TYK2 deficiency: Mycobacterial and viral infections without hyper-IgE syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kreins, Alexandra Y.; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Okada, Satoshi; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Ramírez-Alejo, Noé; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Ailal, Fatima; Bousfiha, Aziz; Mansouri, Davood; Nievas, Elma; Ma, Cindy S.; Rao, Geetha; Bernasconi, Andrea; Sun Kuehn, Hye; Niemela, Julie; Stoddard, Jennifer; Deveau, Paul; Cobat, Aurelie; El Azbaoui, Safa; Sabri, Ayoub; Lim, Che Kang; Sundin, Mikael; Avery, Danielle T.; Halwani, Rabih; Grant, Audrey V.; Boisson, Bertrand; Bogunovic, Dusan; Itan, Yuval; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Migaud, Melanie; Deswarte, Caroline; Alsina, Laia; Kotlarz, Daniel; Klein, Christoph; Muller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Rose-John, Stefan; Picard, Capucine; Hammarstrom, Lennart; Puel, Anne; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Abel, Laurent; Chaussabel, Damien; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Tangye, Stuart G.; Bustamante, Jacinta; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive, complete TYK2 deficiency was previously described in a patient (P1) with intracellular bacterial and viral infections and features of hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES), including atopic dermatitis, high serum IgE levels, and staphylococcal abscesses. We identified seven other TYK2-deficient patients from five families and four different ethnic groups. These patients were homozygous for one of five null mutations, different from that seen in P1. They displayed mycobacterial and/or viral infections, but no HIES. All eight TYK2-deficient patients displayed impaired but not abolished cellular responses to (a) IL-12 and IFN-α/β, accounting for mycobacterial and viral infections, respectively; (b) IL-23, with normal proportions of circulating IL-17+ T cells, accounting for their apparent lack of mucocutaneous candidiasis; and (c) IL-10, with no overt clinical consequences, including a lack of inflammatory bowel disease. Cellular responses to IL-21, IL-27, IFN-γ, IL-28/29 (IFN-λ), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) were normal. The leukocytes and fibroblasts of all seven newly identified TYK2-deficient patients, unlike those of P1, responded normally to IL-6, possibly accounting for the lack of HIES in these patients. The expression of exogenous wild-type TYK2 or the silencing of endogenous TYK2 did not rescue IL-6 hyporesponsiveness, suggesting that this phenotype was not a consequence of the TYK2 genotype. The core clinical phenotype of TYK2 deficiency is mycobacterial and/or viral infections, caused by impaired responses to IL-12 and IFN-α/β. Moreover, impaired IL-6 responses and HIES do not appear to be intrinsic features of TYK2 deficiency in humans. PMID:26304966

  17. [Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: a multicenter prevalence study].

    PubMed

    Girón, Rosa M; Máiz, Luis; Barrio, Isabel; Martínez, M Teresa; Salcedo, Antonio; Prados, Concepción

    2008-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. We performed a prospective study in which patients with cystic fibrosis were followed for 2 years; the patients were recruited from specialized units and were all over 6 years old. Sputum samples collected every 6 months were stained with auramine-rhodamine and cultures were prepared with a liquid and a solid medium. When stains or cultures were positive for nontuberculous mycobacteria, 1 or 2 additional sputum samples were obtained from the patients, who were monitored closely to assess the need for specific treatment. We assessed the following clinical variables: age, sex, presence of pancreatic insufficiency, use of aerosol antibiotic therapy, and long-term azithromycin and inhaled or oral corticosteroid therapies. A total of 220 patients (119 women) with a mean age of 22.62 years (range, 6-74 years) were enrolled; of these 23.6% were receiving azithromycin. We prepared 1303 sputum samples for mycobacterial growth (range per patient, 4-68 samples); 65 samples from a total of 17 patients (7.72%) were positive: 17 by auramine-rhodamine staining and 48 by culture. Eighty-eight culture samples were contaminated and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was not isolated in any of the cases. The mycobacteria isolated were M avium complex (n=10), M abscessus (n=6), and M fortuitum (n=1). Two or more positive cultures were obtained in 9 patients, 5 of whom experienced clinical deterioration and were prescribed specific treatment. No significant differences in clinical variables were found between patients with nontuberculous mycobacteria and those without. The prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in patients with cystic fibrosis was not very high (7.72%), perhaps because azithromycin interfered with the growth of these bacteria. Patients with repeat isolations of mycobacteria should be monitored closely.

  18. Immune defects in active mycobacterial diseases in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs).

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-I; Huang, Jing-Long; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Jaing, Tang-Her; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2011-12-01

    Natural human immunity to the mycobacteria group, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and/or Salmonella species, relies on the functional IL-12/23-IFN-γ integrity of macrophages (monocyte/dendritic cell) connecting to T lymphocyte/NK cells. Patients with severe forms of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) have more profound immune defects involving this impaired circuit in patients with severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) including complete DiGeorge syndrome, X-linked hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM) (CD40L mutation), CD40 deficiency, immunodeficiency with or without anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (NEMO and IKBA mutations), chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and hyper IgE recurrent infection syndromes (HIES). The patients with severe PIDs have broader diverse infections rather than mycobacterial infections. In contrast, patients with an isolated inborn error of the IL-12/23-IFN-γ pathway are exclusively prone to low-virulence mycobacterial infections and nontyphoid salmonella infections, known as Mendelian susceptibility to the mycobacterial disease (MSMD) phenotype. Restricted defective molecules in the circuit, including IFN-γR1, IFN-γR2, IL-12p40, IL-12R-β1, STAT-1, NEMO, IKBA and the recently discovered CYBB responsible for autophagocytic vacuole and proteolysis, and interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) for dendritic cell immunodeficiency, have been identified in around 60% of patients with the MSMD phenotype. Among all of the patients with PIDs referred for investigation since 1985, we have identified four cases with the specific defect (IFNRG1 for three and IL12RB for one), presenting as both BCG-induced diseases and NTM infections, in addition to some patients with SCID, HIGM, CGD and HIES. Furthermore, manifestations in patients with autoantibodies to IFN-γ (autoAbs-IFN-γ), which is categorized as an anticytokine autoantibody syndrome, can resemble the relatively persistent

  19. Effect of Mycobacterial Drug Resistance Patterns on Patients’ Survival: A Cohort Study in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Anuwatnonthakate, Amornrat; Whitehead, Sara J.; Varma, Jay K.; Silachamroon, Udomsak; Kasetjaroen, Yuthichai; Moolphate, Saiyud; Limsomboon, Pranom; Inyaphong, Jiraphun; Suriyon, Narin; Kavinum, Suporn; Chiengson, Navarat; Tunteerapat, Phatchara; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Drug resistance substantially increases tuberculosis (TB) mortality. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of mycobacterial drug resistance pattern and association of common resistance patterns with TB mortality in Thailand. Method: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using TB surveillance data. A total of 9,518 culture-confirmed, pulmonary TB patients registered from 1 October 2004 to 31 December 2008 from the Thailand TB Active Surveillance Network were included in this study. Patients were followed up until TB treatment completion or death. Mycobacterial drug resistance patterns were categorized as pan-susceptible, rifampicin resistance, isoniazid monoresistance, and ethambutol/streptomycin resistance. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) was determined by Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) liquid culture systems. Survival analysis was applied. Result: Isoniazid monoresistance was the most common pattern, while rifampicin resistance had the largest impact on mortality. Cox regression analysis showed a significantly higher risk of death among patients with rifampicin resistance (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.9, 95% confident interval (CI), 1.5-2.5) and isoniazid monoresistance (aHR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7) than those with pan-susceptible group after adjustment for age, nationality, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and antiretroviral therapy (ART) status, diabetes mellitus, cavitary disease on chest x-ray, treatment observation, and province. HIV co-infection was associated with higher mortality in patients both on ART (aHR 1.9, 95% CI 1.5-2.5) and not on ART (aHR 8.1, 95% CI 6.8-9.8). Conclusion: Rifampicin resistance and isoniazid monoresistance were associated with increased TB mortality. HIV-coinfection was associated with a higher risk of death including among those taking antiretroviral therapy. PMID:24171875

  20. Solar disinfection of MODS mycobacterial cultures in resource-poor settings.

    PubMed

    Nathavitharana, Ruvandhi; Coronel, Jorge; Moore, David A J

    2007-10-31

    Safe disposal of TB culture material in which the infectious burden of clinical samples has been greatly amplified is an important challenge in resource-limited settings. The bactericidal capacity of solar cookers has been demonstrated previously for conventional bacteria and contaminated clinical waste. We investigated the use of a simple solar cooker for the sterilization of mycobacterial broth cultures from the microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay (MODS). Simulated TB culture materials were prepared by inoculating 24-well MODS plates with 500 microL of a known concentration of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. In a series of experiments, samples were simultaneously placed inside a box-type solar cooker and control box and removed at timepoints between 15 minutes and 6 hours. Quantitative cultures were performed using retrieved samples to determine sterilization effect. All cultures from the control box were positive at or within 1-4 logs of inoculation concentration. Simulated culture plates at concentrations from 10(3) colony-forming-units (CFU)/ml to 10(7) CFU/ml were completely sterilized after only one hour of cooker exposure, at temperatures between 50-102 degrees C. At 10(9) CFU/ml (far in excess of diagnostic cultures), it was only possible to recover mycobacterial growth in plates removed after 15 minutes. By 30 minutes all plates were effectively sterilized. Solar disinfection provides a very effective, safe and low-cost alternative to conventional equipment used for disposal of mycobacterial culture material. Effect of climatic conditions and optimal operating procedure remain to be defined.

  1. Recognition of a common mycobacterial T-cell epitope in MPB59 of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Lightbody, K A; Girvin, R M; Pollock, D A; Mackie, D P; Neill, S D; Pollock, J M

    1998-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, which persists as a residual level of infection in many European countries, has implications not only for the economy of farming communities but also for human health. The aim of this study was to identify a common mycobacterial antigen which was recognized in bovine tuberculosis and to characterize the response to this antigen at the epitope level. A T-cell clone, phenotype CD4+, raised from an animal experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis was shown to proliferate in response to a panel of sonicates derived from different mycobacterial species indicating recognition of an antigen with broad specificity. This antigen was subsequently shown to be MPB59. Recognition of MPB59 at the epitope level was determined in experimental and field cases of bovine tuberculosis using a panel of synthetic peptides (20-mers with 10-residue overlaps) incorporating the signal sequence and mature protein. The results showed that in vitro interferon-gamma was predominantly produced in response to adjacent peptides numbers 10 and 11, suggesting that the dominant epitope was contained in the overlap, correlating to residues 101-110 (YYQSGLSIVM). This epitope was recognized by 54% of tuberculous cattle of mixed breeds, which suggests that it may be genetically permissive in terms of major histocompatibility complex presentation. Sequence analysis confirmed that there were only minor differences in the amino acid composition within this region for various mycobacterial species, which could explain the common T-cell recognition described in this study. Common recognition of this epitope indicates that it would have limited potential for use as a diagnostic reagent per se but may have potential for inclusion in a subunit vaccine. PMID:9640240

  2. Structure-guided, target-based drug discovery - exploiting genome information from HIV to mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sony; Thomas, Sherine E; Ochoa Montano, Bernardo; Blundell, Tom L

    2016-01-01

    The use of protein crystallography in structure-guided drug discovery allows identification of potential inhibitor-binding sites and optimisation of interactions of hits and lead compounds with a target protein. An early example of this approach was the use of the structure of HIV protease in designing AIDS antivirals. More recently, use of structure-guided design with fragment-based drug discovery, which reduces the size of screening libraries by decreasing complexity, has improved ligand efficiency in drug design. Here, we discuss the use of structure-guided target identification and lead optimisation using fragment-based approaches in the development of new antimicrobials for mycobacterial infections.

  3. Fourth-generation fluoroquinolone-resistant mycobacterial keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Moshirfar, Majid; Meyer, Jay J; Espandar, Ladan

    2007-11-01

    We report a case of mycobacterial keratitis resistant to fourth-generation fluoroquinolones after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with fourth-generation fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. While receiving moxifloxacin post LASIK, the patient was diagnosed with moxifloxacin-resistant Mycobacterium chelonae keratitis. Culture susceptibilities revealed isolates resistant to moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin, and treatment with topical amikacin and clarithromycin with oral doxycycline and clarithromycin along with flap amputation was necessary to control the infection. This case demonstrates the potential limitations in the coverage of these antibiotic agents.

  4. Mycobacterial lesions in fish, amphibians, reptiles, rodents, lagomorphs, and ferrets with reference to animal models.

    PubMed

    Reavill, Drury R; Schmidt, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis is a serious disease across many animal species. Approximately more than 120 species are currently recognized in the genus Mycobacterium. This article describes the zoonotic potential of mycobacteria and mycobacteriosis in fish, amphibians, rodents, rabbits, and ferrets. It considers clinical signs; histology; molecular methods of identification, such as polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing; routes of infection; and disease progression. Studying the disease in animals may aid in understanding the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections in humans and identify better therapy and preventative options such as vaccines.

  5. The C-type lectin receptor CLECSF8/CLEC4D is a key component of anti-mycobacterial immunity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gillian J; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J; Hoving, Jennifer C; van Laarhoven, Arjan; Drummond, Rebecca A; Kerscher, Bernhard; Keeton, Roanne; van de Vosse, Esther; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Plantinga, Theo S; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Govender, Dhirendra; Besra, Gurdyal S; Netea, Mihai G; Reid, Delyth M; Willment, Janet A; Jacobs, Muazzam; Yamasaki, Sho; van Crevel, Reinout; Brown, Gordon D

    2015-02-11

    The interaction of microbes with pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is essential for protective immunity. While many PRRs that recognize mycobacteria have been identified, none is essentially required for host defense in vivo. Here, we have identified the C-type lectin receptor CLECSF8 (CLEC4D, MCL) as a key molecule in anti-mycobacterial host defense. Clecsf8-/- mice exhibit higher bacterial burdens and increased mortality upon M. tuberculosis infection. Additionally, Clecsf8 deficiency is associated with exacerbated pulmonary inflammation, characterized by enhanced neutrophil recruitment. Clecsf8-/- mice show reduced mycobacterial uptake by pulmonary leukocytes, but infection with opsonized bacteria can restore this phagocytic defect as well as decrease bacterial burdens. Notably, a CLECSF8 polymorphism identified in humans is associated with an increased susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis. We conclude that CLECSF8 plays a non-redundant role in anti-mycobacterial immunity in mouse and in man.

  6. Tracheal granuloma because of infection with a novel mycobacterial species in an old FIV-positive cat.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzi, D; Solano-Gallego, L

    2009-03-01

    A 15-year-old domestic shorthair feline immunodeficiency virus-positive cat was presented with a five day history of productive cough and acute respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed inspiratory dyspnoea and diffuse gingivostomatitis. Radiographs showed an intratracheal mass located at the level of the sixth and the seventh cervical vertebrae. Bronchoscopy revealed a unique intratracheal mass occluding about 85 per cent of the tracheal lumen. The tracheal mass was removed bronchoscopically. A diagnosis of pyogranulomatous inflammation referable to a mycobacterial infection was made based on cytological and histopathological findings. 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction testing and sequence analysis identified a novel mycobacterial species, likely a slow grower, with 95 per cent identity with Mycobacterium xenopi. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a tracheal mycobacterial granuloma in a cat, and the first time, a mycobacterium with this sequence has been identified.

  7. Emerging Tuberculosis Pathogen Hijacks Social Communication Behavior in the Group-Living Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo)

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Claire E.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Williams, Mark C.; Palmer, Mitchell V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An emerging Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) pathogen, M. mungi, infects wild banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) in Northern Botswana, causing significant mortality. This MTC pathogen did not appear to be transmitted through a primary aerosol or oral route. We utilized histopathology, spoligotyping, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR), quantitative PCR (qPCR), and molecular markers (regions of difference [RDs] from various MTC members, including region of difference 1 [RD1] from M. bovis BCG [RD1BCG], M. microti [RD1mic], and M. pinnipedii [RD1seal], genes Rv1510 [RD4], Rv1970 [RD7], Rv3877/8 [RD1], and Rv3120 [RD12], insertion element IS1561, the 16S RNA gene, and gene Rv0577 [cfp32]), including the newly characterized mongoose-specific deletion in RD1 (RD1mon), in order to demonstrate the presence of M. mungi DNA in infected mongooses and investigate pathogen invasion and exposure mechanisms. M. mungi DNA was identified in 29% of nasal planum samples (n = 52), 56% of nasal rinses and swabs (n = 9), 53% of oral swabs (n = 19), 22% of urine samples (n = 23), 33% of anal gland tissue (n = 18), and 39% of anal gland secretions (n = 44). The occurrence of extremely low cycle threshold values obtained with qPCR in anal gland and nasal planum samples indicates that high levels of M. mungi can be found in these tissue types. Histological data were consistent with these results, suggesting that pathogen invasion occurs through breaks in the nasal planum and/or skin of the mongoose host, which are in frequent contact with anal gland secretions and urine during olfactory communication behavior. Lesions in the lung, when present, occurred only with disseminated disease. No environmental sources of M. mungi DNA could be found. We report primary environmental transmission of an MTC pathogen that occurs in association with social communication behavior. PMID:27165798

  8. Tuberculous Lymphadenitis in Ethiopia Predominantly Caused by Strains Belonging to the Delhi/CAS Lineage and Newly Identified Ethiopian Clades of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Biadglegne, Fantahun; Merker, Matthias; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C.; Niemann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, newly defined clades of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains, namely Ethiopia 1–3 and Ethiopia H37Rv-like strains, and other clades associated with pulmonary TB (PTB) were identified in Ethiopia. In this study, we investigated whether these new strain types exhibit an increased ability to cause TB lymphadenitis (TBLN) and raised the question, if particular MTBC strains derived from TBLN patients in northern Ethiopia are genetically adapted to their local hosts and/or to the TBLN. Methods Genotyping of 196 MTBC strains isolated from TBLN patients was performed by spoligotyping and 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. A statistical analysis was carried out to see possible associations between patient characteristics and phylogenetic MTBC strain classification. Results Among 196 isolates, the majority of strains belonged to the Delhi/CAS (38.8%) lineage, followed by Ethiopia 1 (9.7%), Ethiopia 3 (8.7%), Ethiopia H37RV-like (8.2%), Ethiopia 2 and Haarlem (7.7% each), URAL (3.6%), Uganda l and LAM (2% each), S-type (1.5%), X-type (1%), and 0.5% isolates of TUR, EAI, and Beijing genotype, respectively. Overall, 15 strains (7.7%) could not be allocated to a previously described phylogenetic lineage. The distribution of MTBC lineages is similar to that found in studies of PTB samples. The cluster rate (35%) in this study is significantly lower (P = 0.035) compared to 45% in the study of PTB in northwestern Ethiopia. Conclusion In the studied area, lymph node samples are dominated by Dehli/CAS genotype strains and strains of largely not yet defined clades based on MIRU-VNTR 24-loci nomenclature. We found no indication that strains of particular genotypes are specifically associated with TBLN. However, a detailed analysis of specific genetic variants of the locally contained Ethiopian clades by whole genome sequencing may reveal new insights into the host-pathogen co

  9. Molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated from pulmonary tuberculosis patients in central Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bedewi, Zufan; Worku, Adane; Mekonnen, Yalemtsehay; Yimer, Getnet; Medhin, Girmay; Mamo, Gezahegne; Pieper, Rembert; Ameni, Gobena

    2017-03-01

    strains using spolygotyping in present study does not give conclusive finding as spoligotyping has low discriminatory power. Thus, further identification of these isolates using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VENTR) and or whole genome sequencing (WGS) recommended.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage 7 strains are associated with prolonged patient delay in seeking treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis in Amhara Region, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Yimer, Solomon A; Norheim, Gunnstein; Namouchi, Amine; Zegeye, Ephrem D; Kinander, Wibeke; Tønjum, Tone; Bekele, Shiferaw; Mannsåker, Turid; Bjune, Gunnar; Aseffa, Abraham; Holm-Hansen, Carol

    2015-04-01

    Recent genotyping studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Ethiopia have reported the identification of a new phylogenetically distinct M. tuberculosis lineage, lineage 7. We therefore investigated the genetic diversity and association of specific M. tuberculosis lineages with sociodemographic and clinical parameters among pulmonary TB patients in the Amhara Region, Ethiopia. DNA was isolated from M. tuberculosis-positive sputum specimens (n=240) and analyzed by PCR and 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analysis and spoligotyping. Bioinformatic analysis assigned the M. tuberculosis genotypes to global lineages, and associations between patient characteristics and genotype were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. The study revealed a high diversity of modern and premodern M. tuberculosis lineages, among which approximately 25% were not previously reported. Among the M. tuberculosis strains (n=138) assigned to seven subgroups, the largest cluster belonged to the lineage Central Asian (CAS) (n=60; 26.0%), the second largest to lineage 7 (n=36; 15.6%), and the third largest to the lineage Haarlem (n=35; 15.2%). Four sublineages were new in the MIRU-VNTRplus database, designated NW-ETH3, NW-ETH1, NW-ETH2, and NW-ETH4, which included 24 (10.4%), 18 (7.8%), 8 (3.5%), and 5 (2.2%) isolates, respectively. Notably, patient delay in seeking treatment was significantly longer among patients infected with lineage 7 strains (Mann-Whitney test, P<0.008) than in patients infected with CAS strains (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6 to 13.5). Lineage 7 strains also grew more slowly than other M. tuberculosis strains. Cases of Haarlem (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.2 to 6.6) and NW-ETH3 (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.0 to 7.3) infection appeared in defined clusters. Intensified active case finding and contact tracing activities in the study region are needed to expedite diagnosis and treatment of TB

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in the southern ecological zones of Cameroon, as shown by genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Assam Assam, Jean Paul; Penlap Beng, Véronique; Cho-Ngwa, Fidelis; Toukam, Michel; Ngoh, Ane-Anyangwe Irene; Kitavi, Mercy; Nzuki, Inoster; Nyonka, Juliette N; Tata, Emilienne; Tedom, Jean Claude; Skilton, Robert A; Pelle, Roger; Titanji, Vincent P K

    2013-09-13

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of mortality and suffering worldwide, with over 95% of TB deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. In recent years, molecular typing methods have been widely used in epidemiological studies to aid the control of TB, but this usage has not been the case with many African countries, including Cameroon. The aims of the present investigation were to identify and evaluate the diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) isolates circulating in two ecological zones of Cameroon, seven years after the last studies in the West Region, and after the re-organization of the National TB Control Program (NTBCP). These were expected to shed light also on the transmission of TB in the country. The study was conducted from February to July 2009. During this period, 169 patients with symptomatic disease and with sputum cultures that were positive for MTBC were randomly selected for the study from amongst 964 suspected patients in the savannah mosaic zone (West and North West regions) and the tropical rainforest zone (Central region). After culture and diagnosis, DNA was extracted from each of the MTBC isolates and transported to the BecA-ILRI Hub in Nairobi, Kenya for molecular analysis. Genetic characterization was done by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat typing (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Molecular analysis showed that all TB cases reported in this study were caused by infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (98.8%) and Mycobacterium africanum (M. africanum) (1.2%) respectively. We did not detect any M. bovis. Comparative analyses using spoligotyping revealed that the majority of isolates belong to major clades of M. tuberculosis: Haarlem (7.6%), Latin American-Mediterranean (34.4%) and T clade (26.7%); the remaining isolates (31.3%) where distributed among the minor clades. The predominant group of isolates (34.4%) corresponded to spoligotype 61, previously described as the

  12. Genetic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Assam, India: Dominance of Beijing Family and Discovery of Two New Clades Related to CAS1_Delhi and EAI Family Based on Spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR Typing.

    PubMed

    Devi, Kangjam Rekha; Bhutia, Rinchenla; Bhowmick, Shovonlal; Mukherjee, Kaustab; Mahanta, Jagadish; Narain, Kanwar

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health concerns in Assam, a remote state located in the northeastern (NE) region of India. The present study was undertaken to explore the circulating genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in this region. A total of 189 MTBC strains were collected from smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases from different designated microscopy centres (DMC) from various localities of Assam. All MTBC isolates were cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) media and subsequently genotyped using spoligotyping and 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Spoligotyping of MTBC isolates revealed 89 distinct spoligo patterns. The most dominant MTBC strain belonged to Beijing lineage and was represented by 35.45% (n = 67) of total isolates, followed by MTBC strains belonging to Central Asian-Delhi (CAS/Delhi) lineage and East African Indian (EAI5) lineage. In addition, in the present study 43 unknown spoligo patterns were detected. The discriminatory power of spoligotyping was found to be 0.8637 based on Hunter Gaston Discriminatory Index (HGDI). On the other hand, 24-loci MIRU-VNTR typing revealed that out of total 189 MTBC isolates from Assam 185 (97.9%) isolates had unique MIRU-VNTR profiles and 4 isolates grouped into 2 clusters. Phylogenetic analysis of 67 Beijing isolates based on 24-loci MIRU-VNTR typing revealed that Beijing isolates from Assam represent two major groups, each comprising of several subgroups. Neighbour-Joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree analysis based on combined spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTR data of 78 Non-Beijing isolates was carried out for strain lineage identification as implemented by MIRU-VNTRplus database. The important lineages of MTBC identified were CAS/CAS1_Delhi (41.02%, n = 78) and East-African-Indian (EAI, 33.33%). Interestingly, phylogenetic analysis of orphan (23.28%) MTBC spoligotypes revealed that majority of these orphan

  13. Genetic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Assam, India: Dominance of Beijing Family and Discovery of Two New Clades Related to CAS1_Delhi and EAI Family Based on Spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR Typing

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Kangjam Rekha; Bhutia, Rinchenla; Bhowmick, Shovonlal; Mukherjee, Kaustab; Mahanta, Jagadish; Narain, Kanwar

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health concerns in Assam, a remote state located in the northeastern (NE) region of India. The present study was undertaken to explore the circulating genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in this region. A total of 189 MTBC strains were collected from smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases from different designated microscopy centres (DMC) from various localities of Assam. All MTBC isolates were cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) media and subsequently genotyped using spoligotyping and 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Spoligotyping of MTBC isolates revealed 89 distinct spoligo patterns. The most dominant MTBC strain belonged to Beijing lineage and was represented by 35.45% (n = 67) of total isolates, followed by MTBC strains belonging to Central Asian-Delhi (CAS/Delhi) lineage and East African Indian (EAI5) lineage. In addition, in the present study 43 unknown spoligo patterns were detected. The discriminatory power of spoligotyping was found to be 0.8637 based on Hunter Gaston Discriminatory Index (HGDI). On the other hand, 24-loci MIRU-VNTR typing revealed that out of total 189 MTBC isolates from Assam 185 (97.9%) isolates had unique MIRU-VNTR profiles and 4 isolates grouped into 2 clusters. Phylogenetic analysis of 67 Beijing isolates based on 24-loci MIRU-VNTR typing revealed that Beijing isolates from Assam represent two major groups, each comprising of several subgroups. Neighbour-Joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree analysis based on combined spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTR data of 78 Non-Beijing isolates was carried out for strain lineage identification as implemented by MIRU-VNTRplus database. The important lineages of MTBC identified were CAS/CAS1_Delhi (41.02%, n = 78) and East-African-Indian (EAI, 33.33%). Interestingly, phylogenetic analysis of orphan (23.28%) MTBC spoligotypes revealed that majority of these orphan

  14. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Complex by 24-Locus Based MIRU-VNTR Typing in Conjunction with Spoligotyping to Assess Genetic Diversity of Strains Circulating in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Bouklata, Nada; Supply, Philip; Jaouhari, Sanae; Charof, Reda; Seghrouchni, Fouad; Sadki, Khalid; El Achhab, Youness; Nejjari, Chakib; Filali-Maltouf, Abdelkarim

    2015-01-01

    Background Standard 24-locus Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit Variable Number Tandem Repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing allows to get an improved resolution power for tracing TB transmission and predicting different strain (sub) lineages in a community. Methodology During 2010–2012, a total of 168 Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex (MTBC) isolates were collected by cluster sampling from 10 different Moroccan cities, and centralized by the National Reference Laboratory of Tuberculosis over the study period. All isolates were genotyped using spoligotyping, and a subset of 75 was genotyped using 24-locus based MIRU-VNTR typing, followed by first line drug susceptibility testing. Corresponding strain lineages were predicted using MIRU-VNTRplus database. Principal Findings Spoligotyping resulted in 137 isolates in 18 clusters (2–50 isolates per cluster: clustering rate of 81.54%) corresponding to a SIT number in the SITVIT database, while 31(18.45%) patterns were unique of which 10 were labelled as “unknown” according to the same database. The most prevalent spoligotype family was LAM; (n = 81 or 48.24% of isolates, dominated by SIT42, n = 49), followed by Haarlem (23.80%), T superfamily (15.47%), >Beijing (2.97%), > U clade (2.38%) and S clade (1.19%). Subsequent 24-Locus MIRU-VNTR typing identified 64 unique types and 11 isolates in 5 clusters (2 to 3isolates per cluster), substantially reducing clusters defined by spoligotyping only. The single cluster of three isolates corresponded to two previously treated MDR-TB cases and one new MDR-TB case known to be contact a same index case and belonging to a same family, albeit residing in 3 different administrative regions. MIRU-VNTR loci 4052, 802, 2996, 2163b, 3690, 1955, 424, 2531, 2401 and 960 were highly discriminative in our setting (HGDI >0.6). Conclusions 24-locus MIRU-VNTR typing can substantially improve the resolution of large clusters initially defined by spoligotyping alone and predominating in Morocco

  15. Inter- and Intra-subtype genotypic differences that differentiate Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is the aetiological agent of Johne’s disease or paratuberculosis and is included within the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Map strains are of two major types often referred to as ‘Sheep’ or ‘S-type’ and ‘Cattle’ or ‘C-type’. With the advent of more discriminatory typing techniques it has been possible to further classify the S-type strains into two groups referred to as Type I and Type III. This study was undertaken to genotype a large panel of S-type small ruminant isolates from different hosts and geographical origins and to compare them with a large panel of well documented C-type isolates to assess the genetic diversity of these strain types. Methods used included Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units - Variable-Number Tandem Repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR), analysis of Large Sequence Polymorphisms by PCR (LSP analysis), Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) analysis of gyr genes, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis coupled with hybridization to IS900 (IS900-RFLP) analysis. Results The presence of LSPA4 and absence of LSPA20 was confirmed in all 24 Map S-type strains analysed. SNPs within the gyr genes divided the S-type strains into types I and III. Twenty four PFGE multiplex profiles and eleven different IS900-RFLP profiles were identified among the S-type isolates, some of them not previously published. Both PFGE and IS900-RFLP segregated the S-type strains into types I and III and the results concurred with those of the gyr SNP analysis. Nine MIRU-VNTR genotypes were identified in these isolates. MIRU-VNTR analysis differentiated Map strains from other members of Mycobacterium avium Complex, and Map S-type from C-type but not type I from III. Pigmented Map isolates were found of type I or III. Conclusion This is the largest panel of S-type strains investigated to date. The S-type strains could be further divided

  16. Genetic diversity and molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Nayanne Gama Teixeira; Suffys, Phillip Noel; Carvalho, Wânia da Silva; Gomes, Harrison Magdinier; de Almeida, Isabela Neves; de Assis, Lida Jouca; Augusto, Claudio José; Gomgnimbou, Michel Kireopori; Refregier, Guislaine; Sola, Christophe; de Miranda, Silvana Spíndola

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to characterize the genetic diversity of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) clinical isolates and investigate the molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis from Minas Gerais State, Brazil. One hundred and four MTb clinical isolates were assessed by IS6110-RFLP, 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units variable-number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR), TB-SPRINT (simultaneous spoligotyping and rifampicin-isoniazid drug-resistance mutation analysis) and 3R-SNP-typing (analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes involved in replication, recombination and repair functions). Fifty-seven different IS6110-RFLP patterns were found, among which 50 had unique patterns and 17 were grouped into seven clusters. The discriminatory index (Hunter and Gaston, HGDI) for RFLP was 0.9937. Ninety-nine different MIRU-VNTR patterns were found, 95 of which had unique patterns and nine isolates were grouped into four clusters. The major allelic diversity index in the MIRU-VNTR loci ranged from 0.6568 to 0.7789. The global HGDI for MIRU-VNTR was 0.9991. Thirty-two different spoligotyping profiles were found: 16 unique patterns (n = 16) and 16 clustered profiles (n = 88). The HGDI for spoligotyping was 0.9009. The spoligotyped clinical isolates were phylogenetically classified into Latin-American Mediterranean (66.34 %), T (14.42 %), Haarlem (5.76 %), X (1.92 %), S (1.92 %) and U (unknown profile; 8.65 %). Among the U isolates, 77.8 % were classified further by 3R-SNP-typing as 44.5 % Haarlem and 33.3 % LAM, while the 22.2 % remaining were not classified. Among the 104 clinical isolates, 86 were identified by TB-SPRINT as MDR, 12 were resistant to rifampicin only, one was resistant to isoniazid only, three were susceptible to both drugs, and two were not successfully amplified by PCR. A total of 42, 28 and eight isolates had mutations in rpoB positions 531, 526 and 516, respectively. Correlating the cluster analysis with the

  17. SITVITWEB--a publicly available international multimarker database for studying Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Demay, Christophe; Liens, Benjamin; Burguière, Thomas; Hill, Véronique; Couvin, David; Millet, Julie; Mokrousov, Igor; Sola, Christophe; Zozio, Thierry; Rastogi, Nalin

    2012-06-01

    Among various genotyping methods to study Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) genotypic polymorphism, spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of DNA tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs) have recently gained international approval as robust, fast, and reproducible typing methods generating data in a portable format. Spoligotyping constituted the backbone of a publicly available database SpolDB4 released in 2006; nonetheless this method possesses a low discriminatory power when used alone and should be ideally used in conjunction with a second typing method such as MIRU-VNTRs for high-resolution epidemiological studies. We hereby describe a publicly available international database named SITVITWEB which incorporates such multimarker data allowing to have a global vision of MTC genetic diversity worldwide based on 62,582 clinical isolates corresponding to 153 countries of patient origin (105 countries of isolation). We report a total of 7105 spoligotype patterns (corresponding to 58,180 clinical isolates) - grouped into 2740 shared-types or spoligotype international types (SIT) containing 53,816 clinical isolates and 4364 orphan patterns. Interestingly, only 7% of the MTC isolates worldwide were orphans whereas more than half of SITed isolates (n=27,059) were restricted to only 24 most prevalent SITs. The database also contains a total of 2379 MIRU patterns (from 8161 clinical isolates) from 87 countries of patient origin (35 countries of isolation); these were grouped in 847 shared-types or MIRU international types (MIT) containing 6626 isolates and 1533 orphan patterns. Lastly, data on 5-locus exact tandem repeats (ETRs) were available on 4626 isolates from 59 countries of patient origin (22 countries of isolation); a total of 458 different VNTR patterns were observed - split into 245 shared-types or VNTR International Types (VIT) containing 4413 isolates) and 213 orphan patterns. Datamining of SITVITWEB further allowed to update

  18. FIND Tuberculosis Strain Bank: a Resource for Researchers and Developers Working on Tests To Detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Related Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Tessema, Belay; Nabeta, Pamela; Valli, Eloise; Albertini, Audrey; Collantes, Jimena; Lan, Nguyen Huu; Romancenco, Elena; Tukavdze, Nestani; Denkinger, Claudia M; Dolinger, David L

    2017-04-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB hampers global efforts in the fight against tuberculosis. To enhance the development and evaluation of diagnostic tests quickly and efficiently, well-characterized strains and samples from drug-resistant tuberculosis patients are necessary. In this project, the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND) has focused on the collection, characterization, and storage of such well-characterized reference materials and making them available to researchers and developers. The collection is being conducted at multiple centers in Southeast Asia, South America, Eastern Europe, and soon the sub-Saharan Africa regions. Strains are characterized for their phenotypic resistances and MICs to first-line drugs (FLDs) and second-line drugs (SLDs) using the automated MGIT 960 system following validated procedures and WHO criteria. Analysis of resistance-associated mutations is done by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) using the Illumina NextSeq system. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat analysis and WGS are used to determine strain lineages. All strains are maintained frozen at -80°C ± 10°C as distinct mother and daughter lots. All strains are extensively quality assured. The data presented here represent an analysis of the initial part of the collection. Currently, the bank contains 118 unique strains with extracted genomic DNA and matched sputum, serum, and plasma samples and will be expanded to a minimum of 1,000 unique strains over the next 3 years. Analysis of the current strains by phenotypic resistance testing shows 102 (86.4%), 10 (8.5%), and 6 (5.1%) MDR, XDR, and mono/poly resistant strains, respectively. Two of the strains are resistant to all 11 drugs that were phenotypically tested. WGS mutation analysis revealed FLD resistance-associated mutations in the rpoB, katG, inhA, embB, embA, and pncA genes; SLD resistance in the gyrA, gyr

  19. Association of Nuclear Localization of a Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Protein in Breast Tumors with Poor Prognostic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Chris R.; Normart, Robin; Yang, Qifeng; Stevenson, Elizabeth; Haffty, Bruce G.; Ganesan, Shridar; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Levine, Arnold J.; Tang, Laura H.

    2010-01-01

    Within healthy human somatic cells, retrotransposition by long interspersed nuclear element-1 (also known as LINE-1 or L1) is thought to be held in check by a variety of mechanisms, including DNA methylation and RNAi. The expression of L1-ORF1 protein, which is rarely found in normal tissue, was assayed using antibodies with a variety of clinical cancer specimens and cancer cell lines. L1-ORF1p expression was detected in nearly all breast tumors that the authors examined, and the protein was also present in a high percentage of ileal carcinoids, bladder, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, as well as in a smaller percentage of prostate and colorectal tumors. Tumors generally demonstrated cytoplasmic L1-ORF1p; however, in several breast cancers, L1-ORF1p was nuclear. Patients with breast tumors displaying nuclear L1-ORF1p had a greater incidence of both local recurrence and distal metastases and also showed poorer overall survival when compared with patients with tumors displaying cytoplasmic L1-ORF1p. These data suggest that expression of L1-ORF1p is widespread in many cancers and that redistribution from cytoplasm to nucleus could be a poor prognostic indicator during breast cancer. High expression and nuclear localization of L1-ORF1p may result in a higher rate of L1 retrotransposition, which could increase genomic instability. PMID:20948976

  20. SINE_scan: an efficient tool to discover short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) in large-scale genomic datasets.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hongliang; Wang, Hao

    2017-03-01

    Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements (SINEs) are transposable elements (TEs) that amplify through a copy-and-paste mode via RNA intermediates. The computational identification of new SINEs are challenging because of their weak structural signals and rapid diversification in sequences. Here we report SINE_Scan, a highly efficient program to predict SINE elements in genomic DNA sequences. SINE_Scan integrates hallmark of SINE transposition, copy number and structural signals to identify a SINE element. SINE_Scan outperforms the previously published de novo SINE discovery program. It shows high sensitivity and specificity in 19 plant and animal genome assemblies, of which sizes vary from 120 Mb to 3.5 Gb. It identifies numerous new families and substantially increases the estimation of the abundance of SINEs in these genomes. The code of SINE_Scan is freely available at http://github.com/maohlzj/SINE_Scan , implemented in PERL and supported on Linux. wangh8@fudan.edu.cn. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. Global long interspersed nuclear element 1 DNA methylation in a Colombian sample of patients with late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Hernán G; Mahecha, María F; Mejía, Adriana; Arboleda, Humberto; Forero, Diego A

    2014-02-01

    Alterations in DNA methylation have implicated as an epigenetic event in the pathogenesis of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). The objective of this work was to evaluate global DNA methylation levels for long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) repetitive sequences in Colombian patients with LOAD and controls. The LINE-1 DNA methylation levels in peripheral blood samples from 28 Colombian patients with LOAD and 30 healthy participants were assessed using a methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM) quantitative assay. We did not find differences in LINE-1 methylation levels between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD; median 76.2%, interquartile range [IQR]: 69.8-81.9) and control participants (median 79.8%, IQR: 73.2-83.8; P = .3). Additional stratified analyses did not show differences in LINE-1 methylation levels for male or female patients versus controls nor for apolipoprotein E4 carriers and noncarriers. This is the first report of LINE-1 methylation levels in patients with LOAD using the cost-effective MS-HRM technique, and this is the first global DNA methylation study in Latin American patients with AD.

  2. PCR and magnetic bead-mediated target capture for the isolation of short interspersed nucleotide elements in fishes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Zhu, Guoli; Tang, Wenqiao; Yang, Jinquan; Guo, Hongyi

    2012-01-01

    Short interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs), a type of retrotransposon, are widely distributed in various genomes with multiple copies arranged in different orientations, and cause changes to genes and genomes during evolutionary history. This can provide the basis for determining genome diversity, genetic variation and molecular phylogeny, etc. SINE DNA is transcribed into RNA by polymerase III from an internal promoter, which is composed of two conserved boxes, box A and box B. Here we present an approach to isolate novel SINEs based on these promoter elements. Box A of a SINE is obtained via PCR with only one primer identical to box B (B-PCR). Box B and its downstream sequence are acquired by PCR with one primer corresponding to box A (A-PCR). The SINE clone produced by A-PCR is selected as a template to label a probe with biotin. The full-length SINEs are isolated from the genomic pool through complex capture using the biotinylated probe bound to magnetic particles. Using this approach, a novel SINE family, Cn-SINE, from the genomes of Coilia nasus, was isolated. The members are 180-360 bp long. Sequence homology suggests that Cn-SINEs evolved from a leucine tRNA gene. This is the first report of a tRNA(Leu)-related SINE obtained without the use of a genomic library or inverse PCR. These results provide new insights into the origin of SINEs.

  3. Molecular characterization of the short interspersed repetitive element SIRE in the six discrete typing units (DTUs) of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pavia, Paula X; Thomas, M Carmen; López, Manuel C; Puerta, Concepción J

    2012-10-01

    Repetitive sequences constitute an important proportion of the Trypanosoma cruzi genome; hence, they have been used as molecular markers and as amplification targets to identify the parasite presence via PCR. In this study, a molecular characterization of the SIRE repetitive element was performed in the six discrete typing units (DTUs) of T. cruzi. The results evidenced that this element, located in multiple chromosomes, was interspersed in the genome of all DTUs of the parasite. The presence of several motifs implicated in element insertion, duplication, and functionality suggests that SIRE could be an active element in the parasite genome. Of interest, there were SIRE specific Alu I fragments that allowed to discriminate DTU I from the others DTUs. Moreover, an UPGMA phenetic tree constructed from fragment sharing Southern blot data showed that T. cruzi I isolates conform a cluster separated from the T. cruzi II-VI isolates. When the relative number of SIRE copies was determined, a variation from 105 to 2,000 copies per haploid genome was observed among the different isolates without kept a DTU-relationship. In all, these findings suggest that SIRE sequence is a good target for parasite DNA amplification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diversification, evolution and methylation of short interspersed nuclear element families in sugar beet and related Amaranthaceae species.

    PubMed

    Schwichtenberg, Katrin; Wenke, Torsten; Zakrzewski, Falk; Seibt, Kathrin M; Minoche, André; Dohm, Juliane C; Weisshaar, Bernd; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are non-autonomous non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons which are widely distributed in eukaryotic organisms. While SINEs have been intensively studied in animals, only limited information is available about plant SINEs. We analysed 22 SINE families from seven genomes of the Amaranthaceae family and identified 34 806 SINEs, including 19 549 full-length copies. With the focus on sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), we performed a comparative analysis of the diversity, genomic and chromosomal organization and the methylation of SINEs to provide a detailed insight into the evolution and age of Amaranthaceae SINEs. The lengths of consensus sequences of SINEs range from 113 nucleotides (nt) up to 224 nt. The SINEs show dispersed distribution on all chromosomes but were found with higher incidence in subterminal euchromatic chromosome regions. The methylation of SINEs is increased compared with their flanking regions, and the strongest effect is visible for cytosines in the CHH context, indicating an involvement of asymmetric methylation in the silencing of SINEs. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. PCR and Magnetic Bead-Mediated Target Capture for the Isolation of Short Interspersed Nucleotide Elements in Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Zhu, Guoli; Tang, Wenqiao; Yang, Jinquan; Guo, Hongyi

    2012-01-01

    Short interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs), a type of retrotransposon, are widely distributed in various genomes with multiple copies arranged in different orientations, and cause changes to genes and genomes during evolutionary history. This can provide the basis for determining genome diversity, genetic variation and molecular phylogeny, etc. SINE DNA is transcribed into RNA by polymerase III from an internal promoter, which is composed of two conserved boxes, box A and box B. Here we present an approach to isolate novel SINEs based on these promoter elements. Box A of a SINE is obtained via PCR with only one primer identical to box B (B-PCR). Box B and its downstream sequence are acquired by PCR with one primer corresponding to box A (A-PCR). The SINE clone produced by A-PCR is selected as a template to label a probe with biotin. The full-length SINEs are isolated from the genomic pool through complex capture using the biotinylated probe bound to magnetic particles. Using this approach, a novel SINE family, Cn-SINE, from the genomes of Coilia nasus, was isolated. The members are 180–360 bp long. Sequence homology suggests that Cn-SINEs evolved from a leucine tRNA gene. This is the first report of a tRNALeu-related SINE obtained without the use of a genomic library or inverse PCR. These results provide new insights into the origin of SINEs. PMID:22408437

  6. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) modulates long interspersed element-1 (L1) retrotransposition in human neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Coufal, Nicole G.; Garcia-Perez, Josè Luis; Peng, Grace E.; Marchetto, Maria C. N.; Muotri, Alysson R.; Mu, Yangling; Carson, Christian T.; Macia, Angela; Moran, John V.; Gage, Fred H.

    2011-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (L1) retrotransposons compose ∼20% of the mammalian genome, and ongoing L1 retrotransposition events can impact genetic diversity by various mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that endogenous L1 retrotransposition can occur in the germ line and during early embryonic development. In addition, recent data indicate that engineered human L1s can undergo somatic retrotransposition in human neural progenitor cells and that an increase in human-specific L1 DNA content can be detected in the brains of normal controls, as well as in Rett syndrome patients. Here, we demonstrate an increase in the retrotransposition efficiency of engineered human L1s in cells that lack or contain severely reduced levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated, a serine/threonine kinase involved in DNA damage signaling and neurodegenerative disease. We demonstrate that the increase in L1 retrotransposition in ataxia telangiectasia mutated-deficient cells most likely occurs by conventional target-site primed reverse transcription and generate either longer, or perhaps more, L1 retrotransposition events per cell. Finally, we provide evidence suggesting an increase in human-specific L1 DNA copy number in postmortem brain tissue derived from ataxia telangiectasia patients compared with healthy controls. Together, these data suggest that cellular proteins involved in the DNA damage response may modulate L1 retrotransposition. PMID:22159035

  7. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) modulates long interspersed element-1 (L1) retrotransposition in human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Coufal, Nicole G; Garcia-Perez, Josè Luis; Peng, Grace E; Marchetto, Maria C N; Muotri, Alysson R; Mu, Yangling; Carson, Christian T; Macia, Angela; Moran, John V; Gage, Fred H

    2011-12-20

    Long interspersed element-1 (L1) retrotransposons compose ∼20% of the mammalian genome, and ongoing L1 retrotransposition events can impact genetic diversity by various mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that endogenous L1 retrotransposition can occur in the germ line and during early embryonic development. In addition, recent data indicate that engineered human L1s can undergo somatic retrotransposition in human neural progenitor cells and that an increase in human-specific L1 DNA content can be detected in the brains of normal controls, as well as in Rett syndrome patients. Here, we demonstrate an increase in the retrotransposition efficiency of engineered human L1s in cells that lack or contain severely reduced levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated, a serine/threonine kinase involved in DNA damage signaling and neurodegenerative disease. We demonstrate that the increase in L1 retrotransposition in ataxia telangiectasia mutated-deficient cells most likely occurs by conventional target-site primed reverse transcription and generate either longer, or perhaps more, L1 retrotransposition events per cell. Finally, we provide evidence suggesting an increase in human-specific L1 DNA copy number in postmortem brain tissue derived from ataxia telangiectasia patients compared with healthy controls. Together, these data suggest that cellular proteins involved in the DNA damage response may modulate L1 retrotransposition.

  8. A novel target-specific gene delivery system combining baculovirus and sequence-specific long interspersed nuclear elements.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Tomoko; Osanai, Mizuko; Futahashi, Ryo; Kojima, Tetsuya; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2007-07-01

    Transposable elements are valuable for somatic and germ-line transformation. However, long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) have not been used because of poor information on the transposition mechanism. We have developed a novel gene delivery system combining baculovirus AcNPV and two silkworm LINEs, SART1 and R1, which integrate into specific sequences of telomeric repeats and 28S ribosomal DNA, respectively. When two LINEs containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene recombined into AcNPV were infected into fifth instar larvae of the silkworm, we observed target-specific retrotransposition of LINEs at 72h post-infection, using polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing. Telomere- and 28S rDNA-specific transposition occurred in all nine tissues tested, including the ovary and testis. This is the first demonstration of site-specific gene delivery in living larvae. Insertion efficiencies were dependent on the virus titer for injection and the host strains of Bombyx mori. Using this system, we successfully detected the intergeneration transmission of retrotransposed sequences. In addition, AcNPV-mediated SART1 also transposed into telomere of another lepidopteran, Orgyia recens, suggesting that this system is useful for a wide variety of AcNPV-infectious insects. Site-specific gene delivery by virus-mediated LINE will be a potential gene therapy tool to avoid harmful unexpected insertions.

  9. Mycobacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Suggests Important Role of Plasmids in the Radiation of Type VII Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Emilie; Christina Boritsch, Eva; Vandenbogaert, Mathias; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C.; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Caro, Valerie; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Heym, Beate; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Brosch, Roland; Sapriel, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In mycobacteria, various type VII secretion systems corresponding to different ESX (ESAT-6 secretory) types, are contributing to pathogenicity, iron acquisition, and/or conjugation. In addition to the known chromosomal ESX loci, the existence of plasmid-encoded ESX systems was recently reported. To investigate the potential role of ESX-encoding plasmids on mycobacterial evolution, we analyzed a large representative collection of mycobacterial genomes, including both chromosomal and plasmid-borne sequences. Data obtained for chromosomal ESX loci confirmed the previous five classical ESX types and identified a novel mycobacterial ESX-4-like type, termed ESX-4-bis. Moreover, analysis of the plasmid-encoded ESX loci showed extensive diversification, with at least seven new ESX profiles, identified. Three of them (ESX-P clusters 1–3) were found in multiple plasmids, while four corresponded to singletons. Our phylogenetic and gene-order-analyses revealed two main groups of ESX types: 1) ancestral types, including ESX-4 and ESX-4-like systems from mycobacterial and non-mycobacterial actinobacteria and 2) mycobacteria-specific ESX systems, including ESX-1-2-3-5 systems and the plasmid-encoded ESX types. Synteny analysis revealed that ESX-P systems are part of phylogenetic groups that derived from a common ancestor, which diversified and resulted in the different ESX types through extensive gene rearrangements. A converging body of evidence, derived from composition bias-, phylogenetic-, and synteny analyses points to a scenario in which ESX-encoding plasmids have been a major driving force for acquisition and diversification of type VII systems in mycobacteria, which likely played (and possibly still play) important roles in the adaptation to new environments and hosts during evolution of mycobacterial pathogenesis. PMID:26748339

  10. Mycobacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Suggests Important Role of Plasmids in the Radiation of Type VII Secretion Systems.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Emilie; Christina Boritsch, Eva; Vandenbogaert, Mathias; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Caro, Valerie; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Heym, Beate; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Brosch, Roland; Sapriel, Guillaume

    2016-01-08

    In mycobacteria, various type VII secretion systems corresponding to different ESX (ESAT-6 secretory) types, are contributing to pathogenicity, iron acquisition, and/or conjugation. In addition to the known chromosomal ESX loci, the existence of plasmid-encoded ESX systems was recently reported. To investigate the potential role of ESX-encoding plasmids on mycobacterial evolution, we analyzed a large representative collection of mycobacterial genomes, including both chromosomal and plasmid-borne sequences. Data obtained for chromosomal ESX loci confirmed the previous five classical ESX types and identified a novel mycobacterial ESX-4-like type, termed ESX-4-bis. Moreover, analysis of the plasmid-encoded ESX loci showed extensive diversification, with at least seven new ESX profiles, identified. Three of them (ESX-P clusters 1-3) were found in multiple plasmids, while four corresponded to singletons. Our phylogenetic and gene-order-analyses revealed two main groups of ESX types: 1) ancestral types, including ESX-4 and ESX-4-like systems from mycobacterial and non-mycobacterial actinobacteria and 2) mycobacteria-specific ESX systems, including ESX-1-2-3-5 systems and the plasmid-encoded ESX types. Synteny analysis revealed that ESX-P systems are part of phylogenetic groups that derived from a common ancestor, which diversified and resulted in the different ESX types through extensive gene rearrangements. A converging body of evidence, derived from composition bias-, phylogenetic-, and synteny analyses points to a scenario in which ESX-encoding plasmids have been a major driving force for acquisition and diversification of type VII systems in mycobacteria, which likely played (and possibly still play) important roles in the adaptation to new environments and hosts during evolution of mycobacterial pathogenesis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Unnatural amino acid analogues of membrane-active helical peptides with anti-mycobacterial activity and improved stability.

    PubMed

    Khara, Jasmeet Singh; Priestman, Miles; Uhía, Iria; Hamilton, Melissa Shea; Krishnan, Nitya; Wang, Ying; Yang, Yi Yan; Langford, Paul R; Newton, Sandra M; Robertson, Brian D; Ee, Pui Lai Rachel

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of MDR-TB, coupled with shrinking antibiotic pipelines, has increased demands for new antimicrobials with novel mechanisms of action. Antimicrobial peptides have increasingly been explored as promising alternatives to antibiotics, but their inherent poor in vivo stability remains an impediment to their clinical utility. We therefore systematically evaluated unnatural amino acid-modified peptides to design analogues with enhanced anti-mycobacterial activities. Anti-mycobacterial activities were evaluated in vitro and intracellularly against drug-susceptible and MDR isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using MIC, killing efficacy and intracellular growth inhibition studies. Toxicity profiles were assessed against mammalian cells to verify cell selectivity. Anti-mycobacterial mechanisms were investigated using microfluidic live-cell imaging with time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Unnatural amino acid incorporation was well tolerated without an appreciable effect on toxicity profiles and secondary conformations of the synthetic peptides. The modified peptides also withstood proteolytic digestion by trypsin. The all d-amino acid peptide, i(llkk)2i (II-D), displayed superior activity against all six mycobacterial strains tested, with a 4-fold increase in selectivity index as compared with the unmodified l-amino acid peptide in broth. II-D effectively reduced the intracellular bacterial burden of both drug-susceptible and MDR clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis after 4 days of treatment. Live-cell imaging studies demonstrated that II-D permeabilizes the mycobacterial membrane, while confocal microscopy revealed that II-D not only permeates the cell membrane, but also accumulates within the cytoplasm. Unnatural amino acid modifications not only decreased the susceptibility of peptides to proteases, but also enhanced mycobacterial selectivity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  12. Anti-dormant mycobacterial activity and target analysis of nybomycin produced by a marine-derived Streptomyces sp.

    PubMed

    Arai, Masayoshi; Kamiya, Kentaro; Pruksakorn, Patamaporn; Sumii, Yuji; Kotoku, Naoyuki; Joubert, Jean-Pierre; Moodley, Prashini; Han, Chisu; Shin, Dayoung; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2015-07-01

    In the course of our search for anti-dormant Mycobacterial substances, nybomycin (1) was re-discovered from the culture broth of a marine-derived Streptomyces sp. on the bioassay-guided separation. Compound 1 showed anti-microbial activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG with the MIC of 1.0μg/mL under both actively growing aerobic conditions and dormancy inducing hypoxic conditions. Compound 1 is also effective to Mycobacterium tuberculosis including the clinically isolated strains. The mechanistic analysis indicated that 1 bound to DNA and induces a unique morphological change to mycobacterial bacilli leading the bacterial cell death.

  13. Identification of Mycobacterial Species by Comparative Sequence Analysis of the RNA Polymerase Gene (rpoB)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum-Joon; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Lyu, Mi-Ae; Kim, Seo-Jeong; Bai, Gill-Han; Kim, Sang-Jae; Chae, Gue-Tae; Kim, Eui-Chong; Cha, Chang-Yong; Kook, Yoon-Hoh

    1999-01-01

    For the differentiation and identification of mycobacterial species, the rpoB gene, encoding the β subunit of RNA polymerase, was investigated. rpoB DNAs (342 bp) were amplified from 44 reference strains of mycobacteria and clinical isolates (107 strains) by PCR. The nucleotide sequences were directly determined (306 bp) and aligned by using the multiple alignment algorithm in the MegAlign package (DNASTAR) and the MEGA program. A phylogenetic tree was constructed by the neighbor-joining method. Comparative sequence analysis of rpoB DNAs provided the basis for species differentiation within the genus Mycobacterium. Slowly and rapidly growing groups of mycobacteria were clearly separated, and each mycobacterial species was differentiated as a distinct entity in the phylogenetic tree. Pathogenic Mycobacterium kansasii was easily differentiated from nonpathogenic M. gastri; this differentiation cannot be achieved by using 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequences. By being grouped into species-specific clusters with low-level sequence divergence among strains of the same species, all of the clinical isolates could be easily identified. These results suggest that comparative sequence analysis of amplified rpoB DNAs can be used efficiently to identify clinical isolates of mycobacteria in parallel with traditional culture methods and as a supplement to 16S rDNA gene analysis. Furthermore, in the case of M. tuberculosis, rifampin resistance can be simultaneously determined. PMID:10325313

  14. Development of a murine mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marcela; Yang, Amy L; Lim, JaeHyun; Kolibab, Kristopher; Derrick, Steven; Cadieux, Nathalie; Perera, Liyanage P; Jacobs, William R; Brennan, Michael; Morris, Sheldon L

    2009-07-01

    The development and characterization of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines has been impeded by the lack of reproducible and reliable in vitro assays for measuring vaccine activity. In this study, we developed a murine in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating TB vaccines that directly assesses the capacity of immune splenocytes to control the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within infected macrophages. Using this in vitro assay, protective immune responses induced by immunization with five different types of TB vaccine preparations (Mycobacterium bovis BCG, an attenuated M. tuberculosis mutant strain, a DNA vaccine, a modified vaccinia virus strain Ankara [MVA] construct expressing four TB antigens, and a TB fusion protein formulated in adjuvant) can be detected. Importantly, the levels of vaccine-induced mycobacterial growth-inhibitory responses seen in vitro after 1 week of coculture correlated with the protective immune responses detected in vivo at 28 days postchallenge in a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. In addition, similar patterns of cytokine expression were evoked at day 7 of the in vitro culture by immune splenocytes taken from animals immunized with the different TB vaccines. Among the consistently upregulated cytokines detected in the immune cocultures are gamma interferon, growth differentiation factor 15, interleukin-21 (IL-21), IL-27, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Overall, we have developed an in vitro functional assay that may be useful for screening and comparing new TB vaccine preparations, investigating vaccine-induced protective mechanisms, and assessing manufacturing issues, including product potency and stability.

  15. [Disseminated mycobacterial infections in patients with HIV/AIDS. Evaluation of blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Coitinho, C; Brandes, E; Pardiñas, M; Rivas, C

    2005-01-01

    One thousand-forty blood cultures corresponding to 451 Uruguayan patients with AIDS and clinic diagnosis of disseminated mycobacterial infection were evaluated between 1999 and 2003. Samples were processed in the National Reference Center for Mycobacteria (Montevideo, Uruguay), using the automated blood culture system for mycobacteria MB-BacT (BioMérieux). Forty-five positive samples were detected (4.3%) corresponding to 26 patients with AIDS (average 2.3 samples per patient). In 10/26 patients M. avium complex (MAC) was identified and in 13/26 the isolated germ was M. tuberculosis. The average time of incubation was of 12.4 days (range 6-19 days) for MAC and of 22.6 days (range 7-35 days) for M. tuberculosis. Blood culture has demonstrated to be the best sample for the bacteriological confirmation of the disseminated mycobacterial infections when at least 2 samples by patient are studied. The frequency of isolates of M. tuberculosis and MAC in AIDS patients is according with a moderate prevalence of tuberculosis in Uruguay.

  16. Post-translational Acetylation of MbtA Modulates Mycobacterial Siderophore Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Vergnolle, Olivia; Xu, Hua; Tufariello, JoAnn M; Favrot, Lorenza; Malek, Adel A; Jacobs, William R; Blanchard, John S

    2016-10-14

    Iron is an essential element for life, but its soluble form is scarce in the environment and is rarer in the human body. Mtb (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) produces two aryl-capped siderophores, mycobactin (MBT) and carboxymycobactin (cMBT), to chelate intracellular iron. The adenylating enzyme MbtA catalyzes the first step of mycobactin biosynthesis in two half-reactions: activation of the salicylic acid as an acyl-adenylate and ligation onto the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain of MbtB to form covalently salicylated MbtB-ACP. We report the first apo-MbtA structure from Mycobacterium smegmatis at 2.3 Å. We demonstrate here that MbtA activity can be reversibly, post-translationally regulated by acetylation. Indeed the mycobacterial Pat (protein lysine acetyltransferase), Rv0998, specifically acetylates MbtA on lysine 546, in a cAMP-dependent manner, leading to enzyme inhibition. MbtA acetylation can be reversed by the NAD(+)-dependent DAc (deacetyltransferase), Rv1151c. Deletion of Pat and DAc genes in Mtb revealed distinct phenotypes for strains lacking one or the other gene at low pH and limiting iron conditions. This study establishes a direct connection between the reversible acetylation system Pat/DAc and the ability of Mtb to adapt in limited iron conditions, which is critical for mycobacterial infection. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Identification of a substrate domain that determines system specificity in mycobacterial type VII secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Trang H.; Ummels, Roy; Bitter, Wilbert; Houben, Edith N. G.

    2017-01-01

    Type VII secretion (T7S) systems are specialized machineries used by mycobacterial pathogens to transport important virulence factors across their highly hydrophobic cell envelope. There are up to five mycobacterial T7S systems, named ESX-1 to ESX-5, at least three of which specifically secrete a different subset of substrates. The T7S substrates or substrate complexes are defined by the general secretion motif YxxxD/E. However this motif does not determine system specificity. Here, we show that the substrate domain recognized by the EspG chaperone is the determinant factor for this specificity. We first show that the introduction of point mutations into the EspG1-binding domain of the ESX-1 substrate pair PE35/PPE68_1 affects their secretion. Subsequently, we demonstrate that replacing this domain by the EspG5-binding domain of the ESX-5 substrate PPE18 resulted in EspG5 dependence and exclusive rerouting to the ESX-5 system. This rerouting of PE35/PPE68_1 to the ESX-5 system had a negative effect on the secretion of endogenous ESX-5 substrates. PMID:28205541

  18. Nutritional status and eating disorders: neglected risks factor for nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease?

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karina; Morera, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTMLD) in immunocompetent patients is an increasingly important epidemiologic concern. However, risk factors associated with susceptibility to NTMLD are not completely known. A prevalence of NTMLD appears to be rising, mainly in some populations such as middle-aged or elderly thin women, (a group including those with Lady Windermere syndrome) with neither remarkable history of respiratory disease nor smoking habit. Right middle lobe (RML) and lingula are often involved. Various predisposing factors and genetic defects have been described as possible causes of development of NTMLD, namely: voluntary suppression of cough, RML anatomical factors, menopause and mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Malnutrition is also an important and common risk factor associated with other mycobacterial disease like tuberculosis (TB) and its probable association with NTMLD as have been pointed out for some authors. However, a real description of all nutritional aspects and eating habits of patients prior to NTMLD diagnosis is lacking. We hypothesized that malnutrition and eating disorders like anorexia nervosa could be risk factors that may promoting NTMLD. From a clinical viewpoint, if this hypothesis proves to be correct, eating habits and nutritional aspects should be taken into account in the diagnosis process of suspected NTMLD, since they are easily identifiable and treatable conditions.

  19. Husbandry stress exacerbates mycobacterial infections in adult zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsay, J.M.; Watral, V.; Schreck, C.B.; Kent, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacteria are significant pathogens of laboratory zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton). Stress is often implicated in clinical disease and morbidity associated with mycobacterial infections but has yet to be examined with zebrafish. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of husbandry stressors on zebrafish infected with mycobacteria. Adult zebrafish were exposed to Mycobacterium marinum or Mycobacterium chelonae, two species that have been associated with disease in zebrafish. Infected fish and controls were then subjected to chronic crowding and handling stressors and examined over an 8-week period. Whole-body cortisol was significantly elevated in stressed fish compared to non-stressed fish. Fish infected with M. marinum ATCC 927 and subjected to husbandry stressors had 14% cumulative mortality while no mortality occurred among infected fish not subjected to husbandry stressors. Stressed fish, infected with M. chelonae H1E2 from zebrafish, were 15-fold more likely to be infected than non-stressed fish at week 8 post-injection. Sub-acute, diffuse infections were more common among stressed fish infected with M. marinum or M. chelonae than non-stressed fish. This is the first study to demonstrate an effect of stress and elevated cortisol on the morbidity, prevalence, clinical disease and histological presentation associated with mycobacterial infections in zebrafish. Minimizing husbandry stress may be effective at reducing the severity of outbreaks of clinical mycobacteriosis in zebrafish facilities. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Role of interleukin-6 in the induction of protective T cells during mycobacterial infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Castro, A G; Pedrosa, J; Minóprio, P

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been shown to regulate numerous functions of the immune system including the differentiation of T-cell subpopulations. Here we examined the involvement of this cytokine in the in vivo generation of a population of T cells able to protect mice against mycobacterial infections. BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with Mycobacterium avium 2447 and anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies were administered intraperitoneally throughout the course of the infection. Control mice were able to control the mycobacterial proliferation 1 month after inoculation, whereas mice whose IL-6 had been blocked showed progressive bacterial growth. To distinguish a role for IL-6 associated to the induction or expression of immunity mediated by T cells, we immunized mice with M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Pasteur and challenged them 2 months later with M. avium. One group of mice received anti-IL-6 during the BCG vaccination and another during the M. avium challenge. When M. avium proliferation was assessed at day 30 of the challenge, it was found that the administration of anti-IL-6 during vaccination reduced the protection afforded by BCG compared to administration of the isotype control antibody. No difference in bacterial proliferation was observed at day 30 of challenge when antibodies were administered during M. avium challenge. Our results show that protective T cells arise during M. avium infections in mice after differentiating in the presence of IL-6. PMID:7959868

  1. Developments on drug delivery systems for the treatment of mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, M M; Cruz, A; Fraga, A G; Castro, A G; Cruz, M E M; Pedrosa, J

    2008-01-01

    The clinical management of tuberculosis and other mycobacterial diseases with antimycobacterial chemotherapy remains a difficult task. The classical treatment protocols are long-lasting; the drugs reach mycobacteria-infected macrophages in low amounts and/or do not persist long enough to develop the desired antimycobacterial effect; and the available agents induce severe toxic effects. Nanotechnology has provided a huge improvement to pharmacology through the designing of drug delivery systems able to target phagocytic cells infected by intracellular pathogens, such as mycobacteria. Liposomes and nanoparticles of polymeric nature represent two of the most efficient drug carrier systems that after in vivo administration are endocytosed by phagocytic cells and then release the carried agents into these cells. This article reviews the relevant publications describing the effectiveness of the association of antimycobacterial agents with liposomes or nanoparticles for the treatment of mycobacterioses, particularly for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium infections. The increased therapeutic index of antimycobacterial drugs; the reduction of dosing frequency; and the improvement of solubility of hydrophobic agents, allowing the administration of higher doses, have been demonstrated in experimental infections. These advantages may lead to new therapeutic protocols that will improve patient compliance and, consequently, lead to a more successful control of mycobacterial infections. The potential therapeutic advantages resulting from the use of non-invasive administration routes for nanoparticulate systems are also discussed.

  2. Mycobacterial cell-wall skeleton as a universal vaccine vehicle for antigen conjugation.

    PubMed

    Paik, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Sook; Kim, Ki-Hye; Yang, Chul-Su; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2010-11-23

    Mycobacterial cell-wall skeleton (CWS) is an immunoactive and biodegradable particulate adjuvant and has been used for immunotherapy in patients with cancer. The CWS of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG-CWS) was studied as a universal vaccine vehicle for antigen conjugation, to develop potentially effective and safe vaccines. Here, we describe experiments in which protein antigens, such as keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), ovalbumin (OVA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were highly efficiently coupled to 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS)-activated carboxyl groups of BCG-CWS, and tested the immunogenicity of OVA-conjugated BCG-CWS vaccine. We found that a strong immune response was induced in mice immunised with OVA-conjugated BCG-CWS, which was similar to the enhancement of the immune responses in mice immunised with OVA and complete Freund's adjuvant. Covalent conjugation of OVA to BCG-CWS was essential for Th1-skewed immune responses, with prominent expression of IFN-γ. Furthermore, antigen-conjugated BCG-CWS vaccine is simple to manufacture, safe, and easy to use. Our results suggest that mycobacterial CWS as a universal vaccine vehicle for conjugation of a wide variety of antigens constitutes a breakthrough for development of the most promising vaccines for infections, allergic diseases, and cancer.

  3. Induction of the autoantigen proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T lymphocytes by a mycobacterial antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Haftel, H M; Chang, Y; Hinderer, R; Hanash, S M; Holoshitz, J

    1994-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. To determine the potential effect of mycobacterial antigens on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we analyzed PBMC incubated with the acetone-precipitable fraction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (APMT) for changes in cellular protein expression. Two-dimensional gel analysis showed induction of a 36-kD polypeptide identified as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a known autoantigen, after incubation with AP-MT. PCNA plays a role in cell proliferation and is expressed as a late growth regulated factor. However, its synthesis in response to AP-MT was induced as an early event. The early induction of PCNA was regulated at a posttranscriptional level and was restricted to T cells. Treatment of PBMC with known T cell mitogens, namely PHA, anti-CD3 antibodies, and staphylococcal superantigens failed to induce an early PCNA increase. The distinct characteristics of the AP-MT effect on PCNA expression suggest a separate mechanism of induction in response to AP-MT, compared with the late increase observed in response to mitogens. The induction of PCNA in response to mycobacterial antigens may represent a pathogenically relevant mechanism in autoimmunity. Images PMID:7929811

  4. Mycobacterial p(1)-type ATPases mediate resistance to zinc poisoning in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Botella, Hélène; Peyron, Pascale; Levillain, Florence; Poincloux, Renaud; Poquet, Yannick; Brandli, Irène; Wang, Chuan; Tailleux, Ludovic; Tilleul, Sylvain; Charrière, Guillaume M; Waddell, Simon J; Foti, Maria; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Gao, Qian; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Butcher, Philip D; Castagnoli, Paola Ricciardi; Gicquel, Brigitte; de Chastellier, Chantal; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2011-09-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis thrives within macrophages by residing in phagosomes and preventing them from maturing and fusing with lysosomes. A parallel transcriptional survey of intracellular mycobacteria and their host macrophages revealed signatures of heavy metal poisoning. In particular, mycobacterial genes encoding heavy metal efflux P-type ATPases CtpC, CtpG, and CtpV, and host cell metallothioneins and zinc exporter ZnT1, were induced during infection. Consistent with this pattern of gene modulation, we observed a burst of free zinc inside macrophages, and intraphagosomal zinc accumulation within a few hours postinfection. Zinc exposure led to rapid CtpC induction, and ctpC deficiency caused zinc retention within the mycobacterial cytoplasm, leading to impaired intracellular growth of the bacilli. Thus, the use of P(1)-type ATPases represents a M. tuberculosis strategy to neutralize the toxic effects of zinc in macrophages. We propose that heavy metal toxicity and its counteraction might represent yet another chapter in the host-microbe arms race.

  5. Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Karen; Fishman, Jay A

    2004-05-15

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms. In immunocompetent hosts, they are a rare cause of disease. In immunocompromised hosts, disease due to NTM is well documented. Reports of NTM disease have increased in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) and solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. This increase may reflect increased numbers of transplants, intensification of immune suppressive regimens, prolonged survival of transplant recipients, and/or improved diagnostic techniques. The difficulty of diagnosis and the impact associated with infections due to NTM in HSCT and SOT recipients necessitates that, to ensure prompt diagnosis and early initiation of therapy, a high level of suspicion for NTM disease be maintained. The most common manifestations of NTM infection in SOT recipients include cutaneous and pleuropulmonary disease, and, in HSCT recipients, catheter-related infection. Skin and pulmonary lesions should be biopsied for histologic examination, special staining, and microbiologic cultures, including cultures for bacteria, Nocardia species, fungi, and mycobacteria. Mycobacterial infections associated with catheters may be documented by tunnel or blood (isolator) cultures. Susceptibility testing of mycobacterial isolates is an essential component of optimal care. The frequent isolation of NTM other than Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) from transplant recipients limits the extrapolation of therapeutic data from human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals to the population of transplant recipients. Issues involved in the management of NTM disease in transplant recipients are characterized by a case of disseminated infection due to Mycobacterium avium complex in a lung transplant recipient, with a review of the relevant literature.

  6. Isolation of Mycobacterium bovis and other mycobacterial species from ferrets and stoats.

    PubMed

    de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Kawakami, R Pamela; Yates, Gary F; Collins, Desmond M

    2008-12-10

    As part of wildlife surveillance for bovine tuberculosis, pooled lymph nodes from 21,481 ferrets, 1056 stoats and 83 weasels were cultured for mycobacteria. A total of 268 isolates of Mycobacterium bovis were obtained from ferrets, 2 from stoats and none from weasels, demonstrating the presence of a wildlife reservoir of infection in ferrets. DNA typing by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of 48 selected isolates of M. bovis revealed 23 REA types. Twenty-one of these types had previously been isolated from cattle and farmed deer, demonstrating a complex cycle of infection involving wildlife and domestic animals. Apart from M. bovis, a further 208 mycobacterial isolates were obtained, the majority of which (178) were members of the M. avium complex. Speciation of the remaining 30 mycobacterial isolates by DNA sequencing of the 16s rRNA gene, identified half the isolates as M. triplex. Other species identified included M. fortuitum, M. florentinum, M. interjectum, M. intracellulare, M. holsaticum, and M. septicum/M. peregrinum.

  7. [Diagnostic value of IgG antibody levels against 38 kDa mycobacterial antigen].

    PubMed

    Demkow, U; Zielonka, T M; Strzałkowski, J; Michałowska-Mitczuk, D; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, E; Białas-Chromiec, B; Kuś, J; Skopińska-Rózewska, E; Zwolska, Z

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis diagnosis bases on clinical and radiological symptoms and identification of mycobacteria. Accuracy of both methods is limited. Therefore reliable serological test would have considerable advantage. The present study was aimed at evaluating IgG-mediated immune response against specific mycobacterial antigens 38 kDa in group of 200 patients and control subjects. Our material consisted of 104 tuberculosis patients, 25 with sarcoidosis, 24 with lung cancer, 13 with bacterial or fungal pulmonary infection, 8 with mycobacterial infections other than tuberculosis and 26 healthy persons. We used commercially available ELISA based kits (Pathozyme TB-complex). Specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 49% was achieved. Sensitivity increased to 59% in chronic cases and to 52% in culture positive cases. Sensitivity decreased to only 14% in group of new culture negative cases. Measurement of IgG serum level against 38 kDa can be helpful in tuberculosis diagnosis. As the test lacks falsely positive results it indicates its high positive predictive value.

  8. Crystal structures of Mycobacterial MeaB and MMAA-like GTPases.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thomas E; Baugh, Loren; Bullen, Jameson; Baydo, Ruth O; Witte, Pam; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Phan, Isabelle Q H; Abendroth, Jan; Clifton, Matthew C; Sankaran, Banumathi; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Myler, Peter J; Staker, Bart L; Grundner, Christoph; Lorimer, Donald D

    2015-06-01

    The methylmalonyl Co-A mutase-associated GTPase MeaB from Methylobacterium extorquens is involved in glyoxylate regulation and required for growth. In humans, mutations in the homolog methylmalonic aciduria associated protein (MMAA) cause methylmalonic aciduria, which is often fatal. The central role of MeaB from bacteria to humans suggests that MeaB is also important in other, pathogenic bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, the identity of the mycobacterial MeaB homolog is presently unclear. Here, we identify the M. tuberculosis protein Rv1496 and its homologs in M. smegmatis and M. thermoresistibile as MeaB. The crystal structures of all three homologs are highly similar to MeaB and MMAA structures and reveal a characteristic three-domain homodimer with GDP bound in the G domain active site. A structure of Rv1496 obtained from a crystal grown in the presence of GTP exhibited electron density for GDP, suggesting GTPase activity. These structures identify the mycobacterial MeaB and provide a structural framework for therapeutic targeting of M. tuberculosis MeaB.

  9. Mycobacterial contamination of metalworking fluids: involvement of a possible new taxon of rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Moore, J S; Christensen, M; Wilson, R W; Wallace, R J; Zhang, Y; Nash, D R; Shelton, B

    2000-01-01

    Contamination of air and metalworking fluid (MWF) systems with a rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM) was detected in 1995 in a single manufacturing plant with recent cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). Extensive environmental sampling was performed to determine the extent of the contamination and its variability over time. RGM were present in multiple indoor air samples, 100% of the central MWF storage tanks, and 75% of the freestanding cutting, drilling, and grinding machines. With one exception, contamination was limited to a recently introduced formulation (brand) of semisynthetic MWF used in 95% of the facility's machining operations. In general, the mycobacterial counts were stable over time, with the degree of contamination ranging from 10(2)-10(7) colony forming units (CFU)/mL. A few systems were culture positive for the mycobacterium (> 10(1) CFU/mL), changed to culture negative (< 10(1) CFU/mL), then changed back to culture positive without explanation. Samples obtained from diluted (5%) but unused MWF, a replenishment line with 2% unused MWF, an MWF pasteurizer, city water, and deionized water were culture negative for this species of mycobacterium. Inoculation and growth studies demonstrated that this mycobacterium does not grow in liquid samples of 5% unused MWF. By molecular techniques, the mycobacterial isolates consisted of a single strain and represented a previously undescribed taxon closely related to Mycobacterium chelonae/abscessus. The relationship of this mycobacterium to the cases of HP is unknown.

  10. Retrobiosynthetic Approach Delineates the Biosynthetic Pathway and the Structure of the Acyl Chain of Mycobacterial Glycopeptidolipids*

    PubMed Central

    Vats, Archana; Singh, Anil Kumar; Mukherjee, Raju; Chopra, Tarun; Ravindran, Madhu Sudhan; Mohanty, Debasisa; Chatterji, Dipankar; Reyrat, Jean-Marc; Gokhale, Rajesh S.

    2012-01-01

    Glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) are dominant cell surface molecules present in several non-tuberculous and opportunistic mycobacterial species. GPLs from Mycobacterium smegmatis are composed of a lipopeptide core unit consisting of a modified C26-C34 fatty acyl chain that is linked to a tetrapeptide (Phe-Thr-Ala-alaninol). The hydroxyl groups of threonine and terminal alaninol are further modified by glycosylations. Although chemical structures have been reported for 16 GPLs from diverse mycobacteria, there is still ambiguity in identifying the exact position of the hydroxyl group on the fatty acyl chain. Moreover, the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the fatty acyl component are unknown. In this study we show that a bimodular polyketide synthase in conjunction with a fatty acyl-AMP ligase dictates the synthesis of fatty acyl chain of GPL. Based on genetic, biochemical, and structural investigations, we determine that the hydroxyl group is present at the C-5 position of the fatty acyl component. Our retrobiosynthetic approach has provided a means to understand the biosynthesis of GPLs and also resolve the long-standing debate on the accurate structure of mycobacterial GPLs. PMID:22798073

  11. whmD is an essential mycobacterial gene required for proper septation and cell division

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, James E.; Bishai, William R.

    2000-01-01

    A study of potential mycobacterial regulatory genes led to the isolation of the Mycobacterium smegmatis whmD gene, which encodes a homologue of WhiB, a Streptomyces coelicolor protein required for sporulation. Unlike its Streptomyces homologue, WhmD is essential in M. smegmatis. The whmD gene could be disrupted only in the presence of a plasmid supplying whmD in trans. A plasmid that allowed chemically regulated expression of the WhmD protein was used to generate a conditional whmD mutant. On withdrawal of the inducer, the conditional whmD mutant exhibited irreversible, filamentous, branched growth with diminished septum formation and aberrant septal placement, whereas WhmD overexpression resulted in growth retardation and hyperseptation. Nucleic acid synthesis and levels of the essential cell division protein FtsZ were unaltered by WhmD deficiency. Together, these phenotypes indicate a role for WhmD in mycobacterial septum formation and cell division. PMID:10880571

  12. Crystal structures of Mycobacterial MeaB and MMAA-like GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Baugh, Loren; Bullen, Jameson; Baydo, Ruth O.; Witte, Pam; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Phan, Isabelle Q.H.; Abendroth, Jan; Clifton, Matthew C.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.; Staker, Bart L.; Grundner, Christoph; Lorimer, Donald D.

    2015-01-01

    The methylmalonyl Co-A mutase-associated GTPase MeaB from Methylobacterium extorquens is involved in glyoxylate regulation and required for growth. In humans, mutations in the homolog methylmalonic aciduria associated protein (MMAA) cause methylmalonic aciduria, which is often fatal. The central role of MeaB from bacteria to humans suggests that MeaB is also important in other, pathogenic bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, the identity of the mycobacterial MeaB homolog is presently unclear. Here, we identify the M. tuberculosis protein Rv1496 and its homologs in M. smegmatis and M. thermoresistibile as MeaB. The crystal structures of all three homologs are highly similar to MeaB and MMAA structures and reveal a characteristic three-domain homodimer with GDP bound in the G domain active site. A structure of Rv1496 obtained from a crystal grown in the presence of GTP exhibited electron density for GDP, suggesting GTPase activity. These structures identify the mycobacterial MeaB and provide a structural framework for therapeutic targeting of M. tuberculosis MeaB. PMID:25832174

  13. Mycobacterial growth and bacterial contamination in the mycobacteria growth indicator tube and BACTEC 460 culture systems.

    PubMed Central

    Cornfield, D B; Beavis, K G; Greene, J A; Bojak, M; Bondi, J

    1997-01-01

    The BACTEC 460 system currently provides the most rapid detection of mycobacterial growth, but the system is radiometric and requires needles to inoculate specimens through the bottle's septum. The Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) system has a liquid medium, like the BACTEC system, and does not require needles when inoculating specimens. We compared mycobacterial growth from 510 specimens in the two systems. Average time to acid-fast bacillus (AFB) detection and identification to the species level was less with the BACTEC system, but this result was statistically significant only for AFB detection in specimens containing Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex. The contamination rate with MGIT was 29%; the BACTEC rate was 5%. To investigate MGIT contamination, we initiated a second study with changes in specimen processing. The MGIT contamination rate was reduced to 12%; the BACTEC rate was not significantly affected (5.5%). The most likely explanation for the contamination in MGIT is the richness of its medium compared to the BACTEC medium. Cost analysis for the two systems in a laboratory that processes 4,500 specimens a year is presented. The data suggest that the BACTEC 460 and the MGIT systems are approximately equivalent in cost and ability to support the growth of AFB. The MGIT system appears safer and easier to use and was preferred by laboratory personnel, but it cannot currently be used for blood specimens or antituberculosis susceptibility testing. PMID:9230383

  14. Macrophage and T Cell Dynamics During the Development and Disintegration of Mycobacterial Granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Egen, Jackson G.; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Feng, Carl G.; Winter, Nathalie; Sher, Alan; Germain, Ronald N.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Granulomas play a key role in host protection against mycobacterial pathogens, with their breakdown contributing to exacerbated disease. To better understand the initiation and maintenance of these structures, we employed both high-resolution multiplex static imaging and intravital multiphoton microscopy of Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced liver granulomas. We found that Kupffer cells directly capture blood-borne bacteria and subsequently nucleate formation of a nascent granuloma by recruiting both uninfected liver-resident macrophages and blood-derived monocytes. Within the mature granuloma, these myeloid cell populations form a relatively immobile cellular matrix that interacts with a highly dynamic effector T cell population. The efficient recruitment of these T cells is highly dependent on TNFα-derived signals, which also maintain the granuloma structure through preferential effects on uninfected macrophage populations. By characterizing the migration of both innate and adaptive immune cells throughout the process of granuloma development, these studies provide a new perspective on the cellular events involved in mycobacterial containment and escape. PMID:18261937

  15. Macrophage and T cell dynamics during the development and disintegration of mycobacterial granulomas.

    PubMed

    Egen, Jackson G; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Feng, Carl G; Winter, Nathalie; Sher, Alan; Germain, Ronald N

    2008-02-01

    Granulomas play a key role in host protection against mycobacterial pathogens, with their breakdown contributing to exacerbated disease. To better understand the initiation and maintenance of these structures, we employed both high-resolution multiplex static imaging and intravital multiphoton microscopy of Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced liver granulomas. We found that Kupffer cells directly capture blood-borne bacteria and subsequently nucleate formation of a nascent granuloma by recruiting both uninfected liver-resident macrophages and blood-derived monocytes. Within the mature granuloma, these myeloid cell populations formed a relatively immobile cellular matrix that interacted with a highly dynamic effector T cell population. The efficient recruitment of these T cells was highly dependent on TNF-alpha-derived signals, which also maintained the granuloma structure through preferential effects on uninfected macrophage populations. By characterizing the migration of both innate and adaptive immune cells throughout the process of granuloma development, these studies provide a new perspective on the cellular events involved in mycobacterial containment and escape.

  16. Influence of trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM) during mycobacterial infection of bone marrow macrophages.

    PubMed

    Indrigo, Jessica; Hunter, Robert L; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2002-07-01

    The relative role of surface lipids in the innate macrophage response to infection with mycobacteria remains unknown. Trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM), a major component of the mycobacterial cell wall, can elicit hypersensitive as well as T-cell-independent foreign body responses. The T-cell-independent contribution of TDM to the primary macrophage response to mycobacterial infection was investigated. Bone-marrow-derived macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice were infected with native Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) or with MTB delipidated using petroleum ether extraction methods. The removal of surface lipids caused decreased bacterial survival in macrophages, but there was no loss of bacterial growth in broth culture. Bacterial survival within macrophages was restored upon reconstitution of the bacteria with purified TDM. The cytokine and chemokine parameters of the macrophage responses were also investigated. The amounts of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and MIP-1alpha produced were significantly reduced following delipidation, but were restored upon reconstitution with TDM. The amount of IL-12 produced, but not the amount of IL-10 produced, was also significantly reduced upon macrophage infection with delipidated MTB. Furthermore, nitric oxide responses were not impaired upon infection with delipidated MTB, suggesting that intracellular survival and macrophage secretion of cytokines and chemokines are differentially controlled. These studies indicate that TDM is a major component contributing to the innate macrophage responses to MTB infection.

  17. Cytokines in the balance of protection and pathology during mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Egídio; Cooper, Andrea M

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of natural infections with pathogenic mycobacteria can range from early asymptomatic clearance through latent infection to clinical disease. Different host and pathogen-specific factors have been implicated in determining the outcome of these infections; however, it is clear that the interaction of mycobacteria with the innate and acquired components of the immune system plays a central role. Specifically, the recognition of mycobacterial components by innate immune cells through different pathogen recognition receptors (PPRs) induces a cytokine response that can promote early control of the infection. In fact, in the majority of individuals that come into contact with mycobacteria, this response is enough to control the infection. Among PRRs, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), Nucleotide Oligomerization Domain (NOD)-like receptors, and C-type lectins have all been implicated in recognition of mycobacteria and in the initiation of the cytokine response. Defining the mechanisms by which distinct mycobacterial components and their receptors stimulate the immune response is an area of intense research.

  18. Diagnosis of mycobacterial infections by nucleic acid amplification: 18-month prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, P; Rosenau, J; Springer, B; Teschner, K; Feldmann, K; Böttger, E C

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the use of DNA amplification by PCR for the detection of mycobacteria in clinical specimens, with the gene encoding the 16S rRNA as a target. Following generic amplification of mycobacterial nucleic acids, screening was done with genus-specific probe; this was followed by species differentiation by use of highly discriminating probes or nucleic acid sequencing. In a prospective 18-month evaluation, criteria to select specimens for PCR analysis were defined. Of a total of 8,272 specimens received, 729 samples satisfied the criteria and were subjected to DNA amplification. Clinical specimens included material from the respiratory tract (sputa and bronchial washings), aspirates, biopsies, and various body fluids (cerebrospinal, pleural, peritoneal, and gastric fluids). After resolution of discrepant results, the sensitivity of the PCR assay was 84.5%, the specificity was 99.5%, the positive predictive value was 97.6%, and the negative predictive value was 96.4%. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of culture (with a combination of broth and solid media) were 77.5 and 94.8%, respectively. In conclusion, this PCR assay provides an efficient strategy to detect and identify multiple mycobacterial species and performs well in comparison with culture. PMID:8789005

  19. [Experience of rapid drug desensitization therapy in the treatment of mycobacterial disease].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yuka; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Morimoto, Kozo; Okumura, Masao; Watanabe, Masato; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Ogata, Hideo; Gotoh, Hajime; Kudoh, Shoji; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    Drugs for tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis mycobacterial diseases are limited. In particular, no new drugs for non-tuberculosis mycobacterial disease have been developed in recent years. Antimycobacterial drugs have many adverse reactions, for which drug desensitization therapy has been used. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) therapy, including antituberculosis drugs and clarithromycin, has been implemented in many regions in Europe and the United States. We investigated the validity of RDD therapy in Japan. We report our experience with RDD therapy in 13 patients who developed severe drug allergy to antimycobacterial treatment. The desensitization protocol reported by Holland and Cernandas was adapted. The underlying diseases were 7 cases of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease and 6 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Isoniazid was readministered in 2 (100%) of 2 patients; rifampicin, in 8 (67.7%) of 12 patients; ethambutol, in 4 (67.7%) of 6 patients; and clarithromycin, in 2 (100%) of 2 patients. In Japan, the desensitization therapy recommended by the Treatment Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis have been implemented generally. We think RDD therapy is effective and safe as the other desensitization therapy. We will continue to investigate the efficiency of RDD therapy in patients who had discontinued antimycobacterial treatment because of the drug allergic reaction.

  20. Novel STAT1 Alleles in Otherwise Healthy Patients with Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Vogt, Guillaume; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Prochnicka-Chalufour, Ada; Casrouge, Armanda; Yang, Kun; Soudais, Claire; Fieschi, Claire; Santos, Orchidée Filipe; Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; de Beaucoudrey, Ludovic; Emile, Jean-François; Arkwright, Peter D; Schreiber, Robert D; Rolinck-Werninghaus, Claudia; Rösen-Wolff, Angela; Magdorf, Klaus; Roesler, Joachim; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2006-01-01

    The transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) plays a key role in immunity against mycobacterial and viral infections. Here, we characterize three human STAT1 germline alleles from otherwise healthy patients with mycobacterial disease. The previously reported L706S, like the novel Q463H and E320Q alleles, are intrinsically deleterious for both interferon gamma (IFNG)–induced gamma-activating factor–mediated immunity and interferon alpha (IFNA)–induced interferon-stimulated genes factor 3–mediated immunity, as shown in STAT1-deficient cells transfected with the corresponding alleles. Their phenotypic effects are however mediated by different molecular mechanisms, L706S affecting STAT1 phosphorylation and Q463H and E320Q affecting STAT1 DNA-binding activity. Heterozygous patients display specifically impaired IFNG-induced gamma-activating factor–mediated immunity, resulting in susceptibility to mycobacteria. Indeed, IFNA-induced interferon-stimulated genes factor 3–mediated immunity is not affected, and these patients are not particularly susceptible to viral disease, unlike patients homozygous for other, equally deleterious STAT1 mutations recessive for both phenotypes. The three STAT1 alleles are therefore dominant for IFNG-mediated antimycobacterial immunity but recessive for IFNA-mediated antiviral immunity at the cellular and clinical levels. These STAT1 alleles define two forms of dominant STAT1 deficiency, depending on whether the mutations impair STAT1 phosphorylation or DNA binding. PMID:16934001

  1. Carboxyl terminal domain basic amino acids of mycobacterial topoisomerase I bind DNA to promote strand passage.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Anuradha Gopal; Leelaram, Majety Naga; Menon, Shruti; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) carries out relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA through a series of orchestrated steps, DNA binding, cleavage, strand passage and religation. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of the type IA topoisomerases harbor DNA cleavage and religation activities, but the carboxyl terminal domain (CTD) is highly diverse. Most of these enzymes contain a varied number of Zn(2+) finger motifs in the CTD. The Zn(2+) finger motifs were found to be essential in Escherichia coli topoI but dispensable in the Thermotoga maritima enzyme. Although, the CTD of mycobacterial topoI lacks Zn(2+) fingers, it is indispensable for the DNA relaxation activity of the enzyme. The divergent CTD harbors three stretches of basic amino acids needed for the strand passage step of the reaction as demonstrated by a new assay. We also show that the basic amino acids constitute an independent DNA-binding site apart from the NTD and assist the simultaneous binding of two molecules of DNA to the enzyme, as required during the catalytic step. Although the NTD binds to DNA in a site-specific fashion to carry out DNA cleavage and religation, the basic residues in CTD bind to non-scissile DNA in a sequence-independent manner to promote the crucial strand passage step during DNA relaxation. The loss of Zn(2+) fingers from the mycobacterial topoI could be associated with Zn(2+) export and homeostasis.

  2. Husbandry stress exacerbates mycobacterial infections in adult zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, J M; Watral, V; Schreck, C B; Kent, M L

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacteria are significant pathogens of laboratory zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton). Stress is often implicated in clinical disease and morbidity associated with mycobacterial infections but has yet to be examined with zebrafish. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of husbandry stressors on zebrafish infected with mycobacteria. Adult zebrafish were exposed to Mycobacterium marinum or Mycobacterium chelonae, two species that have been associated with disease in zebrafish. Infected fish and controls were then subjected to chronic crowding and handling stressors and examined over an 8-week period. Whole-body cortisol was significantly elevated in stressed fish compared to non-stressed fish. Fish infected with M. marinum ATCC 927 and subjected to husbandry stressors had 14% cumulative mortality while no mortality occurred among infected fish not subjected to husbandry stressors. Stressed fish, infected with M. chelonae H1E2 from zebrafish, were 15-fold more likely to be infected than non-stressed fish at week 8 post-injection. Sub-acute, diffuse infections were more common among stressed fish infected with M. marinum or M. chelonae than non-stressed fish. This is the first study to demonstrate an effect of stress and elevated cortisol on the morbidity, prevalence, clinical disease and histological presentation associated with mycobacterial infections in zebrafish. Minimizing husbandry stress may be effective at reducing the severity of outbreaks of clinical mycobacteriosis in zebrafish facilities. PMID:19531062

  3. Dynamics of Mycobacteriophage-Mycobacterial Host Interaction: Evidence for Secondary Mechanisms for Host Lethality.

    PubMed

    Samaddar, Sourabh; Grewal, Rajdeep Kaur; Sinha, Saptarshi; Ghosh, Shrestha; Roy, Soumen; Das Gupta, Sujoy K

    2015-10-16

    Mycobacteriophages infect mycobacteria, resulting in their death. Therefore, the possibility of using them as therapeutic agents against the deadly mycobacterial disease tuberculosis (TB) is of great interest. To obtain better insight into the dynamics of mycobacterial inactivation by mycobacteriophages, this study was initiated using mycobacteriophage D29 and Mycobacterium smegmatis as the phage-host system. Here, we implemented a goal-oriented iterative cycle of experiments on one hand and mathematical modeling combined with Monte Carlo simulations on the other. This integrative approach lends valuable insight into the detailed kinetics of bacterium-phage interactions. We measured time-dependent changes in host viability during the growth of phage D29 in M. smegmatis at different multiplicities of infection (MOI). The predictions emerging out of theoretical analyses were further examined using biochemical and cell biological assays. In a phage-host interaction system where multiple rounds of infection are allowed to take place, cell counts drop more rapidly than expected if cell lysis is considered the only mechanism for cell death. The phenomenon could be explained by considering a secondary factor for cell death in addition to lysis. Further investigations reveal that phage infection leads to the increased production of superoxide radicals, which appears to be the secondary factor. Therefore, mycobacteriophage D29 can function as an effective antimycobacterial agent, the killing potential of which may be amplified through secondary mechanisms.

  4. Characterization of an intracellular ATP assay for evaluating the viability of live attenuated mycobacterial vaccine preparations.

    PubMed

    Kolibab, Kristopher; Derrick, Steven C; Jacobs, William R; Morris, Sheldon L

    2012-09-01

    The viability of BCG vaccine has traditionally been monitored using a colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. Despite its widespread use, results from the CFU assay can be highly variable because of the characteristic clumping of mycobacteria, their requirement for complex growth media, and the three week incubation period needed to cultivate slow-growing mycobacteria. In this study, we evaluated whether an ATP luminescence assay (which measures intracellular ATP content) could be used to rapidly estimate the viability of lyophilized and/or frozen preparations of six different BCG vaccine preparations - Danish, Tokyo, Russia, Brazil, Tice, and Pasteur - and two live attenuated mycobacterial vaccine candidates - a ΔlysAΔpanCD M. tuberculosis strain and a ΔmmaA4 BCG vaccine mutant. For every vaccine tested, a significant correlation was observed between intracellular ATP concentrations and the number of viable attenuated bacilli. However, the extractable intracellular ATP levels detected per cell among the different live vaccines varied suggesting that validated ATP luminescence assays with specific appropriate standards must be developed for each individual live attenuated vaccine preparation. Overall, these data indicate that the ATP luminescence assay is a rapid, sensitive, and reliable alternative method for quantifying the viability of varying live attenuated mycobacterial vaccine preparations.

  5. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, L.E.; Hoffner, S.E.; Ansehn, S.

    1988-08-01

    Mycobacterial growth was monitored by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP. Cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and of 25 clinical isolates of the same species were exposed to serial dilutions of ethambutol, isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin. A suppression of ATP, indicating growth inhibition, occurred for susceptible but not resistant strains within 5 to 7 days of incubation. Breakpoint concentrations between susceptibility and resistance were determined by comparing these results with those obtained by reference techniques. Full agreement was found in 99% of the assays with the resistance ratio method on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, and 98% of the assays were in full agreement with the radiometric system (BACTEC). A main advantage of the bioluminescence method is its rapidity, with results available as fast as with the radiometric system but at a lower cost and without the need for radioactive culture medium. The method provides kinetic data concerning drug effects within available in vivo drug concentrations and has great potential for both rapid routine susceptibility testing and research applications in studies of drug effects on mycobacteria.

  6. Recognition of the mycobacterial cord factor by Mincle: relevance for granuloma formation and resistance to tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The world's most successful intracellular bacterial pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), survives inside macrophages by blocking phagosome maturation and establishes chronic infection characterized by the formation of granulomas. Trehalose-6,6-dimycolate (TDM), the mycobacterial cord factor, is the most abundant cell wall lipid of virulent mycobacteria, is sufficient to cause granuloma formation, and has long been known to be a major virulence factor of MTB. Recently, TDM has been shown to activate the Syk-Card9 signaling pathway in macrophages through binding to the C-type lectin receptor Mincle. The Mincle-Card9 pathway is required for activation of macrophages by TDM in vitro and for granuloma formation in vivo following injection of TDM. Whether this pathway is also exploited by MTB to reprogram the macrophage into a comfortable niche has not been explored yet. Several recent studies have investigated the phenotype of Mincle-deficient mice in mycobacterial infection, yielding divergent results in terms of a role for Mincle in host resistance. Here, we review these studies, discuss possible reasons for discrepant results and highlight open questions in the role of Mincle and other C-type lectin receptors in the infection biology of MTB. PMID:23355839

  7. Evaluation of auditory, visual and olfactory event-related potentials for comparing interspersed- and single-stimulus paradigms.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Steven; Andersson, Linus; Olofsson, Jonas K; McCormack, Michael; Polich, John

    2011-09-01

    An interspersed-stimulus paradigm (ISP) for event-related potential (ERP) recordings in which different sensory modality stimuli are presented within the same test session was developed to minimize recording time and facilitate modality comparison. The present study compared the ISP with a single-stimulus paradigm (SSP), using auditory, visual, and olfactory stimuli. Normal participants (n=16) were assessed on two independent test occasions to obtain data on inter-paradigm and test-retest reliability. Peak amplitude/latency and area measures were obtained for the N1, P2 and P3 peaks for each paradigm. Except for larger auditory and visual P3 peaks and smaller visual P2 peaks in the ISP, no significant differences in amplitudes or latencies were found between the two paradigms. Correlation coefficients between paradigms were generally fairly high (amplitude mean r=0.76; latency r=0.42). Test-retest reliability within paradigms for amplitudes (ISP r=0.70; SSP r=0.68) and latencies (ISP r=0.44; SSP r=0.42) was similar across paradigms. The findings suggest that the ISP, compared to the SSP, produces, in general, highly comparable auditory, visual, and olfactory peak amplitudes and latencies, and comparable reliability estimates, even though the ISP takes much less time to record (25 vs. 50min). The larger auditory and visual P3 peaks and smaller visual P2 peaks in the ISP may be attributable to a less predictable stimulus environment. Thus, this method enables systematic comparisons of ERP peaks across sensory modalities while reducing testing time. Practical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 promoter is associated with poor outcomes for curative resected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu-dong; Qu, Jian-hui; Chang, Xiu-juan; Lu, Yin-ying; Bai, Wen-lin; Wang, Hong; Xu, Zhong-xian; An, Lin-jing; Wang, Chun-ping; Zeng, Zhen; Yang, Yong-ping

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations are well documented in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element 1(LINE-1) promoter and its relationship with clinicopathological features in hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) remain unknown. The bisulfite-specific PCR and DNA sequencing analysis was performed to assess the methylation status of LINE-1 promoter in a pilot cohort of 71 patients with HCC. Additionally,methylation levels of two hot CpG sites of LINE-1 promoter, site 7 and 18 were measured by real-time PCR and compared with clinicopathological parameters in a cohort of 172 HCC. All the patients included were in BCLC stage A or B. Most patients with HCC (87.3%) showed hypomethylation of LINE-1 promoter compared with HBV-related cirrhosis and normal controls (P < 0.001). The HCC patients with LINE-1 promoter hypomethylation had a median tumour-free survival (TFS) and overall survival (OS)post-resection of 22.0 (95% CI: 13.3–30.7) months and 35.0 (95% CI: 24.0–46.1) months, respectively, compared with 40 months and ~60 months for those with LINE-1 promoter hypermethylation (P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses showed that the hypomethylation level at CpG site 7 and 18 of LINE-1 promoter, along with tumour size and tumour differentiation, was independently associated with both TFS and OS for patients with HCC after resection. Promoter hypomethylation of LINE-1, especially at the CpG site 7 and 18, was associated with a poor prognosis in HCC.

  9. Hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 promoter is associated with poor outcomes for curative resected hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xu-dong; Qu, Jian-hui; Chang, Xiu-juan; Lu, Yin-ying; Bai, Wen-lin; Wang, Hong; Xu, Zhong-xian; An, Lin-jing; Wang, Chun-ping; Zeng, Zhen; Yang, Yong-ping

    2014-01-01

    Background Epigenetic alterations are well documented in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element 1(LINE-1) promoter and its relationship with clinicopathological features in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unknown. Methods The bisulfite-specific PCR and DNA sequencing analysis was performed to assess the methylation status of LINE-1 promoter in a pilot cohort of 71 patients with HCC. Additionally, methylation levels of two hot CpG sites of LINE-1 promoter, site 7 and 18 were measured by real-time PCR and compared with clinicopathological parameters in a cohort of 172 HCC. All the patients included were in BCLC stage A or B. Results Most patients with HCC (87.3%) showed hypomethylation of LINE-1 promoter compared with HBV-related cirrhosis and normal controls (P < 0.001). The HCC patients with LINE-1 promoter hypomethylation had a median tumour-free survival (TFS) and overall survival (OS) post-resection of 22.0 (95% CI: 13.3–30.7) months and 35.0 (95% CI: 24.0–46.1) months, respectively, compared with 40 months and ∼60 months for those with LINE-1 promoter hypermethylation (P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses showed that the hypomethylation level at CpG site 7 and 18 of LINE-1 promoter, along with tumour size and tumour differentiation, was independently associated with both TFS and OS for patients with HCC after resection. Conclusion Promoter hypomethylation of LINE-1, especially at the CpG site 7 and 18, was associated with a poor prognosis in HCC. PMID:23875825

  10. Haplotype and AGG interspersion analysis of FMR1 alleles in a Croatian population: no founder effect detected in patients with fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dokić, H; Barisić, I; Culić, V; Lozić, B; Hećimović, S

    2008-10-01

    Several studies have suggested that fragile X syndrome (FRAXA), the most common inherited form of mental retardation, originated from a limited number of founder chromosomes. The aim of this study is to assess the genetic origin of fragile X syndrome in a Croatian population. We performed a haplotype analysis of the polymorphic loci DXS548 and FRAXAC1 in 18 unrelated fragile X and 56 control chromosomes. The AGG interspersion pattern of the FMR1 CGG repeat region was analyzed by sequencing. This is the first report on haplotype and AGG interspersion analysis of the fragile X syndrome gene in a Croatian population-the only eastern European population of Slavic origin analyzed so far. Our findings are intriguing, because they show a distinct distribution of the DXS548 and FRAXAC1 alleles in our fragile X population compared to other European fragile X populations. The DXS548/FRAXAC1 haplotype 194/154 (7-3), which is common among normal populations, was found to be the most frequent haplotype in our fragile X population as well. The AGG interspersion analysis indicated that AGG loss rather than haplotype may determine FMR1 allele instability. Our results suggest that no common ancestral X chromosome is associated with fragile X syndrome in the Croatian population studied. Further analysis of the origin of fragile X syndrome among other Slavic populations will be necessary to better define its eastern European distribution.

  11. Mycobacterial Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... many different kinds. The most common one causes tuberculosis. Another one causes leprosy. Still others cause infections ... aren't "typical" because they don't cause tuberculosis. But they can still harm people, especially people ...

  12. Mycobacterial culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... on how the test is done. Follow your health care provider's instructions. How the Test will Feel How the test will feel depends on the specific procedure. Your health care provider can discuss this with you before the test. Why the Test is Performed Your doctor may ...

  13. Cellular Responses to Mycobacterial Antigens Are Present in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Used in the Diagnosis of Sarcoidosis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Oswald-Richter, Kyra A.; Culver, Daniel A.; Hawkins, Charlene; Hajizadeh, Rana; Abraham, Susamma; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Judson, Marc A.; Drake, Wonder P.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the concept that CD4+ T cells are important in sarcoidosis pathogenesis, but the antigens responsible for the observed Th1 immunophenotype remain elusive. The epidemiologic association with bioaerosols and the presence of granulomatous inflammation support consideration of mycobacterial antigens. To explore the role of mycobacterial antigens in sarcoidosis immunopathogenesis, we assessed the immune recognition of mycobacterial antigens, the 6-kDa early secreted antigenic protein (ESAT-6) and catalase-peroxidase (KatG), by T cells derived from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid obtained during diagnostic bronchoscopy. We report the presence of antigen-specific recognition of ESAT-6 and KatG in T cells from BAL fluid of 32/44 sarcoidosis subjects, compared to 1/27 controls (P < 0.0001). CD4+ T cells were primarily responsible for immune recognition (32/44 sarcoidosis subjects), although CD8+ T-cell responses were observed (25/41 sarcoidosis subjects). Recognition was significantly absent from BAL fluid cells of patients with other lung diseases, including infectious granulomatous diseases. Blocking of Toll-like receptor 2 reduced the strength of the observed immune response. The presence of immune responses to mycobacterial antigens in cells from BAL fluid used for sarcoidosis diagnosis suggests a strong association between mycobacteria and sarcoidosis pathogenesis. Inhibition of immune recognition with monoclonal antibody against Toll-like receptor 2 suggests that induction of innate immunity by mycobacteria contributes to the polarized Th1 immune response. PMID:19596780

  14. Detection of mycobacterial DNA by a specific and simple lateral flow assay incorporating cadmium selenide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Cimaglia, Fabio; Liandris, Emmanouil; Gazouli, Maria; Sechi, Leonardo; Chiesa, Maurizio; De Lorenzis, Enrico; Andreadou, Margarita; Taka, Styliani; Mataragka, Antonia; Ikonomopoulos, John

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium selenide quantum dots have been incorporated to a lateral flow assay for the specific and very simple detection of different mycobacterial DNA targets within only a few minutes, bypassing the complexity of conventional DNA hybridization assays. The method extends our previous work on protein detection using an identical procedure.

  15. Disruption of Mycobacterial AftB Results in Complete Loss of Terminal β(1 → 2) Arabinofuranose Residues of Lipoarabinomannan

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) and arabinogalactan (AG) are the two major mycobacterial cell wall (lipo)polysaccharides, which contain a structurally similar arabinan domain that is highly branched and assembled in a stepwise fashion by variety of arabinofuranosyltransferases (ArafT). In addition to playing an essential role in mycobacterial physiology, LAM and its biochemical precursor lipomannan possess potent immunomodulatory activities that affect the host immune response. In the search of additional mycobacterial ArafTs that participate in the synthesis of the arabinan segment of LAM, we disrupted aftB (MSMEG_6400) in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The deletion of chromosomal aftB locus could only be achieved in the presence of a rescue plasmid carrying a functional copy of aftB, strongly suggesting that it is essential for the viability of M. smegmatis. Isolation and detailed structural characterization of a LAM molecule derived from the conditional mutant deficient in AftB revealed the absence of terminal β(1 → 2)-linked arabinofuranosyl residues. Furthermore, we demonstrated that truncated LAM displays proinflammatory activity, which is due to its ability to activate Toll-like receptor 2. All together, our results indicate that AftB is an essential mycobacterial ArafT that plays a role in the synthesis of the arabinan domain of LAM. PMID:28033704

  16. Application of a whole blood mycobacterial growth inhibition assay to study immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a high tuberculosis burden population

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Erica; Erasmus, Mzwandile; Day, Jonathan; Makhethe, Lebohang; de Kock, Marwou; Hughes, E. Jane; van Rooyen, Michele; Stone, Lynnett; Hanekom, Willem; Brennan, Michael J.; Wallis, Robert S.; Hatherill, Mark; Scriba, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The determinants of immunological protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) infection in humans are not known. Mycobacterial growth inhibition assays have potential utility as in vitro surrogates of in vivo immunological control of M.tb. We evaluated a whole blood growth inhibition assay in a setting with high burden of TB and aimed to identify immune responses that correlate with control of mycobacterial growth. We hypothesized that individuals with underlying M.tb infection will exhibit greater M.tb growth inhibition than uninfected individuals and that children aged 4 to 12 years, an age during which TB incidence is curiously low, will also exhibit greater M.tb growth inhibition than adolescents or adults. Neither M.tb infection status, age of the study participants, nor M.tb strain was associated with differential control of mycobacterial growth. Abundance and function of innate or T cell responses were also not associated with mycobacterial growth. Our data suggest that this assay does not provide a useful measure of age-associated differential host control of M.tb infection in a high TB burden setting. We propose that universally high levels of mycobacterial sensitization (through environmental non-tuberculous mycobacteria and/or universal BCG vaccination) in persons from high TB burden settings may impart broad inhibition of mycobacterial growth, irrespective of M.tb infection status. This sensitization may mask the augmentative effects of mycobacterial sensitization on M.tb growth inhibition that is typical in low burden settings. PMID:28886145

  17. Application of a whole blood mycobacterial growth inhibition assay to study immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a high tuberculosis burden population.

    PubMed

    Baguma, Richard; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Smit, Erica; Erasmus, Mzwandile; Day, Jonathan; Makhethe, Lebohang; de Kock, Marwou; Hughes, E Jane; van Rooyen, Michele; Pienaar, Bernadette; Stone, Lynnett; Hanekom, Willem; Brennan, Michael J; Wallis, Robert S; Hatherill, Mark; Scriba, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    The determinants of immunological protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) infection in humans are not known. Mycobacterial growth inhibition assays have potential utility as in vitro surrogates of in vivo immunological control of M.tb. We evaluated a whole blood growth inhibition assay in a setting with high burden of TB and aimed to identify immune responses that correlate with control of mycobacterial growth. We hypothesized that individuals with underlying M.tb infection will exhibit greater M.tb growth inhibition than uninfected individuals and that children aged 4 to 12 years, an age during which TB incidence is curiously low, will also exhibit greater M.tb growth inhibition than adolescents or adults. Neither M.tb infection status, age of the study participants, nor M.tb strain was associated with differential control of mycobacterial growth. Abundance and function of innate or T cell responses were also not associated with mycobacterial growth. Our data suggest that this assay does not provide a useful measure of age-associated differential host control of M.tb infection in a high TB burden setting. We propose that universally high levels of mycobacterial sensitization (through environmental non-tuberculous mycobacteria and/or universal BCG vaccination) in persons from high TB burden settings may impart broad inhibition of mycobacterial growth, irrespective of M.tb infection status. This sensitization may mask the augmentative effects of mycobacterial sensitization on M.tb growth inhibition that is typical in low burden settings.

  18. Experienced and Perceived Risks of Mycobacterial Diseases: A Cross Sectional Study among Agropastoral Communities in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kilale, Andrew Martin; Ngadaya, Esther; Kagaruki, Gibson Benard; Lema, Yakobo Leonard; Muhumuza, Julius; Ngowi, Bernard James; Mfinanga, Sayoki Godfrey; Hinderaker, Sven Gudmund

    2015-01-01

    The current study was conducted to assess experienced risk factors and perceptions of mycobacterial diseases in communities in northern Tanzania. We conducted a cross-sectional study in Arusha and Manyara regions in Northern Tanzania. We enrolled tuberculosis (TB) patients attending Mount Meru Hospital, Enduleni Hospital and Haydom Lutheran Hospitals in Arusha municipality, Ngorongoro and Mbulu districts, respectively. Patient addresses were recorded during their first visit to the hospitals. Patients with confirmed diagnosis of TB by sputum smear microscopy and/or culture at central laboratory were followed up and interviewed using pre-tested questionnaires, and selected relatives and neighbors were also interviewed. The study was conducted between June 2011 and May 2013. The study involved 164 respondents: 41(25%) were TB patients, 68(41.5%) were their relatives and 55(33.5%) their neighbors. Sixty four (39%) knew a risk factor for mycobacterial disease. Overall, 64(39%) perceived to be at risk of mycobacterial diseases. Exposure to potential risks of mycobacterial diseases were: keeping livestock, not boiling drinking water, large family, smoking and sharing dwelling with TB patients. Rural dwellers were more often livestock keepers (p<0.01), more often shared dwelling with livestock (p<0.01) than urban dwellers. More primary school leavers reported sharing dwelling with TB patients than participants with secondary and higher education (p = 0.01). Livestock keeping, sharing dwelling with livestock, sharing household with a TB patient were perceived risk factors for mycobacterial diseases and the participants were exposed to some of these risk factors. Improving knowledge about the risk factors may protect them from these serious diseases.

  19. Support Vector Machine-based method for predicting subcellular localization of mycobacterial proteins using evolutionary information and motifs.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamoon; Saha, Sudipto; Raghava, Gajendra Ps

    2007-09-13

    In past number of methods have been developed for predicting subcellular location of eukaryotic, prokaryotic (Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria) and human proteins but no method has been developed for mycobacterial proteins which may represent repertoire of potent immunogens of this dreaded pathogen. In this study, attempt has been made to develop method for predicting subcellular location of mycobacterial proteins. The models were trained and tested on 852 mycobacterial proteins and evaluated using five-fold cross-validation technique. First SVM (Support Vector Machine) model was developed using amino acid composition and overall accuracy of 82.51% was achieved with average accuracy (mean of class-wise accuracy) of 68.47%. In order to utilize evolutionary information, a SVM model was developed using PSSM (Position-Specific Scoring Matrix) profiles obtained from PSI-BLAST (Position-Specific Iterated BLAST) and overall accuracy achieved was of 86.62% with average accuracy of 73.71%. In addition, HMM (Hidden Markov Model), MEME/MAST (Multiple Em for Motif Elicitation/Motif Alignment and Search Tool) and hybrid model that combined two or more models were also developed. We achieved maximum overall accuracy of 86.8% with average accuracy of 89.00% using combination of PSSM based SVM model and MEME/MAST. Performance of our method was compared with that of the existing methods developed for predicting subcellular locations of Gram-positive bacterial proteins. A highly accurate method has been developed for predicting subcellular location of mycobacterial proteins. This method also predicts very important class of proteins that is membrane-attached proteins. This method will be useful in annotating newly sequenced or hypothetical mycobacterial proteins. Based on above study, a freely accessible web server TBpred http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/tbpred/ has been developed.

  20. Engineering Mycobacteria for the Production of Self-Assembling Biopolyesters Displaying Mycobacterial Antigens for Use as a Tuberculosis Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason W.; Parlane, Natalie A.; Rehm, Bernd H. A.; Buddle, Bryce M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis and still remains one of the world's biggest global health burdens. Recently, engineered polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biobeads that were produced in both Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis and displayed mycobacterial antigens were found to induce significant cell-mediated immune responses in mice. We observed that such PHA beads contained host cell proteins as impurities, which we hypothesized to have the potential to induce immunity. In this study, we aimed to develop PHA beads produced in mycobacteria (mycobacterial PHA biobeads [MBB]) and test their potential as a TB vaccine in a mouse model. As a model organism, nonpathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis was engineered to produce MBB or MBB with immobilized mycobacterial antigens Ag85A and ESAT-6 on their surface (A:E-MBB). Three key enzymes involved in the poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid) pathway, namely, β-ketothiolase (PhaA), acetoacetyl-coenzyme A reductase (PhaB), and PHA synthase (PhaC), were engineered into E. coli-Mycobacterium shuttle plasmids and expressed in trans. Immobilization of specific antigens to the surface of the MBB was achieved by creating a fusion with the PHA synthase which remains covalently attached to the polyester core, resulting in PHA biobeads displaying covalently immobilized antigens. MBB, A:E-MBB, and an M. smegmatis vector control (MVC) were used in a mouse immunology trial, with comparison to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-vaccinated and Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated groups. We successfully produced MBB and A:E-MBB and used them as vaccines to induce a cellular immune response to mycobacterial antigens. IMPORTANCE Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis and still remains one of the world's biggest global health burdens. In this study, we produced polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biobeads in mycobacteria and used them as vaccines to

  1. T cell regulation of the chronic peritoneal neutrophilia during mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R

    1992-01-01

    Intraperitoneal infection of mice with mycobacteria induces the persistent mobilization of neutrophils to the infected peritoneal cavities. The recruitment of the neutrophils was mediated by the immune system since it was enhanced by immunization and reduced in T cell-deficient nude and SCID mice. Anti-mitotic treatments with cyclophosphamide or X-rays led to a reduction in the number of mononuclear cells in the peritoneal cavity of infected mice, followed by a reduction in neutrophil numbers despite the presence of a normal circulating pool of neutrophils. The depletion of T cells with antibodies during mycobacterial i.p. infection led to a reduction in the number of neutrophils. Such a reduction was more extensive if the antibodies were administered early. Our data suggest that T cells are partially involved in the direct recruitment of neutrophils during chronic mycobacteriosis but they also play a role in the priming of other cell types for the mobilization of these phagocytes. PMID:1628420

  2. Neutrophils are involved in the non-specific resistance to listeriosis induced by mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Leal, I S; Appelberg, R; Silva, M T

    1996-01-01

    A major role has been recently ascribed to the neutrophil in the resistance to infection by Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes). Here we evaluated whether such neutrophils played a role in the non-specific resistance to listeriosis that develops in hosts infected by mycobacteria. We found that the depletion of neutrophils completely abrogated the resistance conferred by the activated macrophages induced during the mycobacterial infection. The lack of killing by activated Kupffer cells and the visualization of bacteria proliferating inside peritoneal macrophages in neutrophil-depleted mice allowed us to postulate a role for the cooperation between neutrophils and macrophages in the killing of L. monocytogenes. We also found listerial proliferation in hepatocytes of neutrophil-depleted, mycobacteria-infected mice showing that the neutrophils may be involved in the control of listeria infection of parenchymal cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8958060

  3. Rapid construction of mycobacterial mutagenesis vectors using ligation-independent cloning

    PubMed Central

    Balhana, Ricardo; Stoker, Neil G.; Sikder, Mahmudul Hasan; Chauviac, Francois-Xavier; Kendall, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Targeted mutagenesis is one of the major tools for determining the function of a given gene and its involvement in bacterial pathogenesis. In mycobacteria, gene deletion is often accomplished by using allelic exchange techniques that commonly utilise a suicide delivery vector. We have adapted a widely-used suicide delivery vector (p1NIL) for cloning two flanking regions of a gene using ligation independent cloning (LIC). The pNILRB plasmid series produced allow a faster, more efficient and less laborious cloning procedure. In this paper we describe the making of pNILRB5, a modified version of p1NIL that contains two pairs of LIC sites flanking either a sacB or a lacZ gene. We demonstrate the success of this technique by generating 3 mycobacterial mutant strains. These vectors will contribute to more high-throughput methods of mutagenesis. PMID:20650290

  4. Mycobacterial toxin induces analgesia in buruli ulcer by targeting the angiotensin pathways.

    PubMed

    Marion, Estelle; Song, Ok-Ryul; Christophe, Thierry; Babonneau, Jérémie; Fenistein, Denis; Eyer, Joël; Letournel, Frank; Henrion, Daniel; Clere, Nicolas; Paille, Vincent; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Saint André, Jean-Paul; Gersbach, Philipp; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Stinear, Timothy Paul; Comoglio, Yannick; Sandoz, Guillaume; Preisser, Laurence; Delneste, Yves; Yeramian, Edouard; Marsollier, Laurent; Brodin, Priscille

    2014-06-19

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer, causes extensive skin lesions, which despite their severity are not accompanied by pain. It was previously thought that this remarkable analgesia is ensured by direct nerve cell destruction. We demonstrate here that M. ulcerans-induced hypoesthesia is instead achieved through a specific neurological pathway triggered by the secreted mycobacterial polyketide mycolactone. We decipher this pathway at the molecular level, showing that mycolactone elicits signaling through type 2 angiotensin II receptors (AT2Rs), leading to potassium-dependent hyperpolarization of neurons. We further validate the physiological relevance of this mechanism with in vivo studies of pain sensitivity in mice infected with M. ulcerans, following the disruption of the identified pathway. Our findings shed new light on molecular mechanisms evolved by natural systems for the induction of very effective analgesia, opening up the prospect of new families of analgesics derived from such systems.

  5. Effects of oil-treated mycobacterial cell walls on the organs of mice.

    PubMed

    Barclay, W R; Anacker, R; Brehmer, W; Ribi, E

    1967-11-01

    Intravenous vaccination of mice with oil-treated mycobacterial cell walls resulted in a marked macrophage accumulation in the lungs and spleens of vaccinated animals. Injection of oil emulsion alone or of cell walls alone failed to elicit the macrophage response. Although a correlation existed between the magnitude of the macrophage response and the degree of immunity against aerosol challenge with H(37)Rv organisms, the findings presented here do not rule out the possibility that qualitative differences may be present in the macrophages of animals vaccinated against tuberculosis. The ability of oil-treated cell walls to elicit an immune response appeared to be a function of the physical association of cell wall fragments and the surface of oil droplets.

  6. [Detection and identification of tuberculosis by amplification of mycobacterial DNA from clinical cultured samples].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, N; Hai, S; Ohya, N

    1993-02-01

    We examined 57 cultured mycobacteria using a method based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR), slot blot hybridization and dideoxy sequencing of nucleotides for detection of M. tuberculosis. Using standard microbiological tests, 34 of 57 specimens were identified as M. tuberculosis and the rest as atypical mycobacteria. Two of 34 specimens that contained M. tuberculosis were not hybridized with a probe specific for M. tuberculosis. These two specimens were identified as atypical mycobacterium by nucleotide sequencing. An atypical mycobacterium specimen that was hybridized with a prove specific for M. tuberculosis was identified as M. tuberculosis using nucleotide sequencing. These results suggest that the approach using PCR and slot blot hybridization for detection of mycobacterium may be more accurate than standard microbiological tests in the rapid and definitive diagnosis of mycobacterial infection.

  7. Leveraging Advances in Tuberculosis Diagnosis and Treatment to Address Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Raju, Ravikiran M; Raju, Sagar M; Zhao, Yanlin; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), defined as any mycobacterial pathogen other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium leprae, are a diverse group of pathogens that collectively cause a substantive but often unappreciated worldwide burden of illness. Although NTMs may cause illness similar to M. tuberculosis, these pathogens generally do not respond to classic tuberculosis (TB) drug regimens, resulting in misdiagnosis and poor treatment, particularly in resource-poor settings. Although a few high-quality epidemiologic surveys have been made on the topic, existing evidence suggests that NTM-associated disease is much more common than previously thought: more common than TB in the industrialized world and likely increasing in prevalence globally. Despite this evidence, these organisms remain markedly understudied, and few international grants support basic science and clinical research. Here we suggest that the considerable efforts in developing new treatments and diagnostics for TB can be harnessed in the fight against NTM-associated illnesses.

  8. The acylation state of mycobacterial lipomannans modulates innate immunity response through toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Gilleron, Martine; Nigou, Jérôme; Nicolle, Delphine; Quesniaux, Valérie; Puzo, Germain

    2006-01-01

    Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens by professional phagocytes via toll-like receptors (TLR) contributes to controlling chronic M. tuberculosis infection. Lipomannans (LM), which are major lipoglycans of the mycobacterial envelope, were recently described as agonists of TLR2 with potent activity on proinflammatory cytokine regulation. LM correspond to a heterogeneous population of acyl- and glyco-forms. We report here the purification and the complete structural characterization of four LM acyl-forms from Mycobacterium bovis BCG using MALDI MS and 2D (1)H-(31)P NMR analyses. All this biochemical work provided the tools to investigate the implication of LM acylation degree on its proinflammatory activity. The latter was ascribed to the triacylated LM form, essentially an agonist of TLR2, using TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers for signaling. Altogether, these findings shed more light on the molecular basis of LM recognition by TLR.

  9. The effect of Toxoplasma cell fractions and mycobacterial immunostimulants against virulent Toxoplasma gondii in mice.

    PubMed

    Masihi, K N; Brehmer, W; Werner, H

    1979-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites were disrupted in a Ribi cell fractionator and separated into cell walls and protoplasm by differential centrifugation. These products were used alone or combined with a mycobacterial glycolipid (P3) and injected either as oil-in-water emulsions or incorporated in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Mice were vaccinated by intravenous or intradermal routes and challenged intraperitoneally with a highly virulent strain of Toxoplasma gondii. A local granuloma formation was induced after i.d. inoculation of Toxoplasma vaccines containing P3 as this glycolipid enabled an adherence of the antigens on the mineral oil droplets. The adjuvant effect of P3 on antibody formation was also observed. Most of the fractions showed a low, but statistically significant prolongation of survival time. Vaccination by the i.v. route with homologous or heterologous antigens, including Trypanosoma cruzi, were not significantly effective, with the exception of a high dose of Toxoplasma protoplasm associated with P3.

  10. Long interspersed element-1 is differentially regulated by food-borne carcinogens via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    PubMed Central

    Okudaira, N; Okamura, T; Tamura, M; Iijma, K; Goto, M; Matsunaga, A; Ochiai, M; Nakagama, H; Kano, S; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Ishizaka, Y

    2013-01-01

    A single human cell contains more than 5.0 × 105 copies of long interspersed element-1 (L1), 80–100 of which are competent for retrotransposition (L1-RTP). Recent observations have revealed the presence of de novo L1 insertions in various tumors, but little is known about its mechanism. Here, we found that 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), food-borne carcinogens that are present in broiled meats, induced L1-RTP. This induction was dependent on a cellular cascade comprising the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a mitogen-activated protein kinase, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β. Notably, these compounds exhibited differential induction of L1-RTP. MeIQx-induced L1-RTP was dependent on AhR nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1), a counterpart of AhR required for gene expression in response to environmental pollutants. By contrast, PhIP-induced L1-RTP did not require ARNT1 but was dependent on estrogen receptor α (ERα) and AhR repressor. In vivo studies using transgenic mice harboring the human L1 gene indicated that PhIP-induced L1-RTP was reproducibly detected in the mammary gland, which is a target organ of PhIP-induced carcinoma. Moreover, picomolar levels of each compound induced L1-RTP, which is comparable to the PhIP concentration detected in human breast milk. Data suggest that somatic cells possess machineries that induce L1-RTP in response to the carcinogenic compounds. Together with data showing that micromolar levels of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) were non-genotoxic, our observations indicate that L1-RTP by environmental compounds is a novel type of genomic instability, further suggesting that analysis of L1-RTP by HCAs is a novel approach to clarification of modes of carcinogenesis. PMID:23208499

  11. Hypomethylation of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 in peripheral mononuclear cells of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus patients in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaolan; Su, Gaixiu; Wang, Zhen; Shangguan, Shaofang; Cui, Xiaodai; Zhu, Jia; Kang, Min; Li, Shengnan; Zhang, Ting; Wu, Fengqi; Wang, Li

    2014-03-01

    Methylation abnormalities in T lymphocytes have been reported to correlate with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Previous studies identified hypomethylation in the promoter of several genes linked to SLE. Long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) constitutes 17-25% of the human genome, and LINE-1 hypomethylation has been reported in SLE. Limited information is available regarding LINE-1 methylation in juvenile SLE (JSLE). Methylation levels of LINE-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 59 JSLE and 47 control samples were examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations in plasma were measured by immunoassay. Significant hypomethylation of LINE-1 was observed in PBMCs from JSLE patients (60.93% in cases compared with 62.88% in controls, P = 0.001). Significant LINE-1 hypomethylation was observed in active SLE compared to controls (60.66% vs. 62.88%, P = 0.001). According to other clinical parameters, a significant correlation was found between LINE-1 methylation levels and the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2000) of the cases (r = -0.285, P = 0.032). The risk of JSLE increased with decreasing levels of LINE-1 methylation, with an odds ratio of 14.5 (95% CI: 2.8-75.6, P = 0.002). Cases had significantly higher plasma concentrations of tHcy than controls (15.11 vs. 11.02 μmol/L, P = 0.028); the correlation between LINE-1 methylation levels and tHcy was significant (r = -0.4, P = 0.013). Correlations between methylation levels of LINE-1 and complement component 3 were significant (r = 0.317, P = 0.044; r = 0.387, P = 0.031, in total JSLE and active JSLE, respectively). Hypomethylation of LINE-1 is associated with risk of JSLE, and LINE-1 methylation levels were related to disease activity and clinical manifestations. The correlation between tHcy levels and LINE-1 methylation was significant. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of

  12. Prognostic and predictive significance of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 methylation in advanced-stage colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Mami; Kotake, Masanori; Bando, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Tetsuji; Takemura, Hirofumi; Minamoto, Toshinari

    2016-12-12

    Hypomethylation of Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element-1 (LINE-1) is associated with worse prognosis in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, little is known about the relevance of this marker for the prognosis and response to chemotherapy of metastatic and recurrent (advanced-stage) CRC. Our aim was therefore to investigate whether tumor LINE-1 hypomethylation correlates with patient survival and with response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/ oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) chemotherapy in advanced-stage CRC. The study included 40 CRC patients who developed metastasis or local recurrence after surgery and subsequently underwent FOLFOX therapy. Progression-free and overall survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. LINE-1 methylation levels in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded primary tumor tissues were measured by MethyLight assay and correlated with patient survival. In vitro analyses were also conducted with human colon cancer cell lines having different LINE-1 methylation levels to examine the effects of 5-FU and oxaliplatin on LINE-1 activity and DNA double-strand-breaks. Patients with LINE-1 hypomethylation showed significantly worse progression-free (median: 6.6 vs 9.4 months; P = 0.02) and overall (median: 16.6 vs 23.2 months; P = 0.01) survival following chemotherapy compared to patients with high methylation. LINE-1 hypomethylation was an independent factor for poor prognosis (P = 0.018) and was associated with a trend for non-response to FOLFOX chemotherapy. In vitro analysis showed that oxaliplatin increased the LINE-1 score in LINE-1-expressing (hypomethylated) cancer cells, thereby enhancing and prolonging the effect of 5-FU against these cells. This finding supports the observed correlation between tumor LINE-1 methylation and response to chemotherapy in CRC patients. Tumor LINE-1 hypomethylation is an independent marker of poor prognosis in advanced-stage CRC and may also predict non-response to combination FOLFOX chemotherapy. Prospective

  13. Expression of Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 Retroelements and Induction of Type I Interferon in Patients With Systemic Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Mavragani, Clio P; Sagalovskiy, Irina; Guo, Qiu; Nezos, Adrianos; Kapsogeorgou, Efstathia K; Lu, Pin; Liang Zhou, Jun; Kirou, Kyriakos A; Seshan, Surya V; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M; Crow, Mary K

    2016-11-01

    Increased expression of type I interferon (IFN) and a broad signature of type I IFN-induced gene transcripts are observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other systemic autoimmune diseases. To identify disease-relevant triggers of the type I IFN pathway, this study sought to investigate whether endogenous virus-like genomic repeat elements, normally silent, are expressed in patients with systemic autoimmune disease, and whether these retroelements could activate an innate immune response and induce type I IFN. Expression of type I IFN and long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1; L1) was studied by polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry in samples of kidney tissue from patients with lupus nephritis and minor salivary gland (MSG) tissue from patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Induction of type I IFN by L1 was investigated by transfection of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) or monocytes with an L1-encoding plasmid or L1 RNA. Involvement of innate immune pathways and altered L1 methylation were assessed. Levels of L1 messenger RNA transcripts were increased in lupus nephritis kidneys and in MSG tissue from patients with SS. Transcript expression correlated with the expression of type I IFN and L1 DNA demethylation. L1 open-reading frame 1/p40 protein and IFNβ were expressed in MSG ductal epithelial cells and in lupus nephritis kidneys, and IFNα was detected in infiltrating PDCs. Transfection of PDCs or monocytes with L1-encoding DNA or RNA induced type I IFN. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR-7)/TLR-8 reduced the induction of IFNα by L1 in PDCs, and an inhibitor of IKKε/TANK-binding kinase 1 abrogated the induction of type I IFN by L1 RNA in monocytes. L1 genomic repeat elements represent endogenous nucleic acid triggers of the type I IFN pathway in SLE and SS and may contribute to initiation or amplification of autoimmune disease. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. The SIDER2 elements, interspersed repeated sequences that populate the Leishmania genomes, constitute subfamilies showing chromosomal proximity relationship.

    PubMed

    Requena, Jose M; Folgueira, Cristina; López, Manuel C; Thomas, M Carmen

    2008-06-02

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania are causative agents of a diverse spectrum of human diseases collectively known as leishmaniasis. These eukaryotic pathogens that diverged early from the main eukaryotic lineage possess a number of unusual genomic, molecular and biochemical features. The completion of the genome projects for three Leishmania species has generated invaluable information enabling a direct analysis of genome structure and organization. By using DNA macroarrays, made with Leishmania infantum genomic clones and hybridized with total DNA from the parasite, we identified a clone containing a repeated sequence. An analysis of the recently completed genome sequence of L. infantum, using this repeated sequence as bait, led to the identification of a new class of repeated elements that are interspersed along the different L. infantum chromosomes. These elements turned out to be homologues of SIDER2 sequences, which were recently identified in the Leishmania major genome; thus, we adopted this nomenclature for the Leishmania elements described herein. Since SIDER2 elements are very heterogeneous in sequence, their precise identification is rather laborious. We have characterized 54 LiSIDER2 elements in chromosome 32 and 27 ones in chromosome 20. The mean size for these elements is 550 bp and their sequence is G+C rich (mean value of 66.5%). On the basis of sequence similarity, these elements can be grouped in subfamilies that show a remarkable relationship of proximity, i.e. SIDER2s of a given subfamily locate close in a chromosomal region without intercalating elements. For comparative purposes, we have identified the SIDER2 elements existing in L. major and Leishmania braziliensis chromosomes 32. While SIDER2 elements are highly conserved both in number and location between L. infantum and L. major, no such conservation exists when comparing with SIDER2s in L. braziliensis chromosome 32. SIDER2 elements constitute a relevant piece in the Leishmania

  15. Long interspersed element-1 is differentially regulated by food-borne carcinogens via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Okudaira, N; Okamura, T; Tamura, M; Iijma, K; Goto, M; Matsunaga, A; Ochiai, M; Nakagama, H; Kano, S; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Ishizaka, Y

    2013-10-10

    A single human cell contains more than 5.0 × 10(5) copies of long interspersed element-1 (L1), 80-100 of which are competent for retrotransposition (L1-RTP). Recent observations have revealed the presence of de novo L1 insertions in various tumors, but little is known about its mechanism. Here, we found that 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), food-borne carcinogens that are present in broiled meats, induced L1-RTP. This induction was dependent on a cellular cascade comprising the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a mitogen-activated protein kinase, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β. Notably, these compounds exhibited differential induction of L1-RTP. MeIQx-induced L1-RTP was dependent on AhR nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1), a counterpart of AhR required for gene expression in response to environmental pollutants. By contrast, PhIP-induced L1-RTP did not require ARNT1 but was dependent on estrogen receptor α (ERα) and AhR repressor. In vivo studies using transgenic mice harboring the human L1 gene indicated that PhIP-induced L1-RTP was reproducibly detected in the mammary gland, which is a target organ of PhIP-induced carcinoma. Moreover, picomolar levels of each compound induced L1-RTP, which is comparable to the PhIP concentration detected in human breast milk. Data suggest that somatic cells possess machineries that induce L1-RTP in response to the carcinogenic compounds. Together with data showing that micromolar levels of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) were non-genotoxic, our observations indicate that L1-RTP by environmental compounds is a novel type of genomic instability, further suggesting that analysis of L1-RTP by HCAs is a novel approach to clarification of modes of carcinogenesis.

  16. Retrotransposition of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 is associated with colitis but not tumors in a murine colitic cancer model.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Takeshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Hagiwara, Teruki; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Dohi, Taeko; Kawamura, Yuki I

    2015-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (L1) is a transposable element that can move within the genome, potentially leading to genome diversity and modified gene function. Although L1 activity in somatic cells is normally suppressed through DNA methylation, some L1s are activated in tumors including colorectal carcinoma. However, how L1-retrotransposition (L1-RTP) is involved in gastrointestinal disorders remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that L1-RTP in somatic cells might contribute to colitis-associated cancer (CAC). To address this, we employed an experimental model of CAC using transgenic L1-reporter mice carrying a human L1-EGFP reporter gene. Mice were subjected to repeated cycles of colitis induced by administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water with injection of carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). L1-RTP levels were measured by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting the newly inserted reporter EGFP in various tissues and cell types, including samples obtained by laser microdissection and cell sorting with flow cytometry. DNA methylation levels of the human L1 promoter were analyzed by bisulfite pyrosequencing. AOM+DSS-treated mice exhibited significantly higher levels of L1-RTP in whole colon tissue during the acute phase of colitis when compared with control naïve mice. L1-RTP levels in whole colon tissue were positively correlated with the histological severity of colitis and degree of neutrophil infiltration into the lamina propria (LP), but not with tumor development in the colon. L1-RTP was enriched in LP mesenchymal cells rather than epithelial cells (ECs), myeloid, or lymphoid cells. DNA methylation levels of the human L1 promoter region showed a negative correlation with L1-RTP levels. L1-RTP was absent from most tumors found in 22-week-old mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that L1-RTP was induced in the mouse CAC mucosa in accordance with the acute inflammatory response; however, retrotransposition appears not to have

  17. Presence of mycobacterial L-forms in human blood: Challenge of BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Markova, Nadya; Slavchev, Georgi; Michailova, Lilia

    2015-01-01

    Possible persistence of bacteria in human blood as cell wall deficient forms (L-forms) represents a top research priority for microbiologists. Application of live BCG vaccine and L-form transformation of vaccine strain may display a new intriguing aspect concerning the opportunity for occurrence of unpredictable colonization inside the human body by unusual microbial life forms. L-form cultures were isolated from 141 blood samples of people previously vaccinated with BCG, none with a history of exposure to tuberculosis. Innovative methodology to access the unusual L-form elements derived from human blood was developed. The methodology outlines the path of transformation of non- cultivable L-form element to cultivable bacteria and their adaptation for growth in vitro. All isolates showed typical L-forms growth features ("fried eggs" colonies and biofilm). Electron microscopy revealed morphology evidencing peculiar characteristics of bacterial L-form population (cell wall deficient polymorphic elements of variable shape and size). Regular detection of acid fast bacteria in smears of isolated blood L-form cultures, led us to start their identification by using specific Mycobactrium spp. genetic tests. Forty five of 97 genetically tested blood cultures provided specific positive signals for mycobacteria, confirmed by at least one of the 3 specific assays (16S rRNA PCR; IS6110 Real Time PCR and spoligotyping). In conclusion, the obtained genetic evidence suggests that these L-forms are of mycobacterial origin. As the investigated people had been vaccinated with BCG, we can assume that the identified mycobacterial L-forms may be produced by persisting live BCG vaccine.

  18. Rapid radiometric methods to detect and differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis/M. bovis from other mycobacterial species

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqi, S.H.; Hwangbo, C.C.; Silcox, V.; Good, R.C.; Snider, D.E. Jr.; Middlebrook, G.

    1984-10-01

    Rapid methods for the differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis/M. bovis (TB complex) from other mycobacteria (MOTT bacilli) were developed and evaluated in a three-phase study. In the first phase, techniques for identification of Mycobacterium species were developed by using radiometric technology and BACTEC Middlebrook 7H12 liquid medium. Based on /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution, characteristic growth patterns were established for 13 commonly encountered mycobacterial species. Mycobacteria belonging to the TB complex were differentiated from other mycobacteria by cellular morphology and rate of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution. For further differentiation, radiometric tests for niacin production and inhibition by Q-nitro-alpha-acetyl amino-beta-hydroxy-propiophenone (NAP) were developed. In the second phase, 100 coded specimens on Lowenstein-Jensen medium were identified as members of the TB complex, MOTT bacilli, bacteria other than mycobacteria, or ''no viable organisms'' within 3 to 12 (average 6.4) days of receipt from the Centers for Disease Control. Isolation and identification of mycobacteria from 20 simulated sputum specimens were carried out in phase III. Out of 20 sputum specimens, 16 contained culturable mycobacteria, and all of the positives were detected by the BACTEC method in an average of 7.3 days. The positive mycobacterial cultures were isolated and identified as TB complex or MOTT bacilli in an average of 12.8 days. The radiometric NAP test was found to be highly sensitive and specific for a rapid identification of TB complex, whereas the radiometric niacin test was found to have some inherent problems. Radiometric BACTEC and conventional methodologies were in complete agreement in Phase II as well as in Phase III.

  19. Identifying novel mycobacterial stress associated genes using a random mutagenesis screen in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopinath; Joshi, Shrilaxmi V; Sridhar, Aditi; Dutta, Sayantanee; Raghunand, Tirumalai R

    2015-12-10

    Cell envelope associated components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) have been implicated in stress response, immune modulation and in vivo survival of the pathogen. Although many such factors have been identified, there is a large disparity between the number of genes predicted to be involved in functions linked to the envelope and those described in the literature. To identify and characterise novel stress related factors associated with the mycobacterial cell envelope, we isolated colony morphotype mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), based on the hypothesis that mutants with unusual colony morphology may have defects in the biosynthesis of cell envelope components. On testing their susceptibility to stress conditions relevant to M.tb physiology, multiple mutants were found to be sensitive to Isoniazid, Diamide and H2O2, indicative of altered permeability due to changes in cell envelope composition. Two mutants showed defects in biofilm formation implying possible roles for the target genes in antibiotic tolerance and/or virulence. These assays identified novel stress associated roles for several mycobacterial genes including sahH, tatB and aceE. Complementation analysis of selected mutants with the M. smegmatis genes and their M.tb homologues showed phenotypic restoration, validating their link to the observed phenotypes. A mutant carrying an insertion in fhaA encoding a forkhead associated domain containing protein, showed reduced survival in THP-1 macrophages, providing in vivo validation to this screen. Taken together, these results suggest that the M.tb homologues of a majority of the identified genes may play significant roles in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis.

  20. Randomized Trial of Liposomal Amikacin for Inhalation in Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Griffith, David E; Eagle, Gina; McGinnis Ii, John P; Micioni, Liza; Liu, Keith; Daley, Charles L; Winthrop, Kevin L; Ruoss, Stephen; Addrizzo-Harris, Doreen J; Flume, Patrick A; Dorgan, Daniel; Salathe, Matthias; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Gupta, Renu; Wallace, Richard J

    2016-10-17

    Rationale Lengthy multi-drug, toxic, and low efficacy regimens limit management of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (PNTM) disease. Objective This phase 2 study investigated efficacy and safety of liposomal amikacin for inhalation (LAI) in treatment-refractory PNTM (Mycobacterium avium complex [MAC] or Mycobacterium abscessus) disease. Methods During the double-blind phase, patients were randomly assigned to LAI (590 mg) or placebo once daily added to their multi-drug regimen for 84 days. Both groups could receive open-label LAI for 84 additional days. Primary endpoint was change from baseline to day 84 on a semi-quantitative mycobacterial growth scale. Other endpoints included sputum conversion, 6-minute walk distance, and adverse events. Measurements and Main Results Modified intent-to-treat population included 89 (LAI=44; placebo=45) patients. Average age was 59 years, 88% were female, 92% were Caucasian; 80 and 59 patients completed study drug dosing during the double-blind and open-label phases, respectively. Primary endpoint was not achieved (P=0.072); however, a greater proportion of the LAI group demonstrated ≥1 negative sputum cultures (32% [14/44] vs. 9% [4/45]; P=0.006) and improvement in 6-minute walk test (+20.6 vs. -25.0 meters; P=0.017) at day 84. Treatment effect was predominantly in patients without cystic fibrosis with MAC and was sustained 1 year post-LAI. Most adverse events were respiratory and in some patients led to drug discontinuation. Conclusions Although the primary endpoint was not reached, LAI added to a multi-drug regimen produced improvements in sputum conversion and 6-minute walk distance vs. placebo with limited systemic toxicity in patients with refractory MAC lung disease. Further research is needed. Clinical trial registration available at www.clinicaltrials.gov, ID NCT01315236.

  1. The CXCR3-CXCL11 signaling axis mediates macrophage recruitment and dissemination of mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Torraca, Vincenzo; Cui, Chao; Boland, Ralf; Bebelman, Jan-Paul; van der Sar, Astrid M; Smit, Martine J; Siderius, Marco; Spaink, Herman P; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2015-03-01

    The recruitment of leukocytes to infectious foci depends strongly on the local release of chemoattractant mediators. The human CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) is an important node in the chemokine signaling network and is expressed by multiple leukocyte lineages, including T cells and macrophages. The ligands of this receptor originate from an ancestral CXCL11 gene in early vertebrates. Here, we used the optically accessible zebrafish embryo model to explore the function of the CXCR3-CXCL11 axis in macrophage recruitment and show that disruption of this axis increases the resistance to mycobacterial infection. In a mutant of the zebrafish ortholog of CXCR3 (cxcr3.2), macrophage chemotaxis to bacterial infections was attenuated, although migration to infection-independent stimuli was unaffected. Additionally, attenuation of macrophage recruitment to infection could be mimicked by treatment with NBI74330, a high-affinity antagonist of CXCR3. We identified two infection-inducible CXCL11-like chemokines as the functional ligands of Cxcr3.2, showing that the recombinant proteins exerted a Cxcr3.2-dependent chemoattraction when locally administrated in vivo. During infection of zebrafish embryos with Mycobacterium marinum, a well-established model for tuberculosis, we found that Cxcr3.2 deficiency limited the macrophage-mediated dissemination of mycobacteria. Furthermore, the loss of Cxcr3.2 function attenuated the formation of granulomatous lesions, the typical histopathological features of tuberculosis, and led to a reduction in the total bacterial burden. Prevention of mycobacterial dissemination by targeting the CXCR3 pathway, therefore, might represent a host-directed therapeutic strategy for treatment of tuberculosis. The demonstration of a conserved CXCR3-CXCL11 signaling axis in zebrafish extends the translational applicability of this model for studying diseases involving the innate immune system.

  2. Plasma Membrane Profiling Reveals Upregulation of ABCA1 by Infected Macrophages Leading to Restriction of Mycobacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jing; Basu Roy, Robindra; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Antrobus, Robin; Du, Yuxian; Smith, Duncan L.; Weekes, Michael P.; Javid, Babak

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane represents a critical interface between the internal and extracellular environments, and harbors multiple proteins key receptors and transporters that play important roles in restriction of intracellular infection. We applied plasma membrane profiling, a technique that combines quantitative mass spectrometry with selective cell surface aminooxy-biotinylation, to Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG)-infected THP-1 macrophages. We quantified 559 PM proteins in BCG-infected THP-1 cells. One significantly upregulated cell-surface protein was the cholesterol transporter ABCA1. We showed that ABCA1 was upregulated on the macrophage cell-surface following infection with pathogenic mycobacteria and knockdown of ABCA1 resulted in increased mycobacterial survival within macrophages, suggesting that it may be a novel mycobacterial host-restriction factor. PMID:27462310

  3. Effects of pyrazinamide on fatty acid synthesis by whole mycobacterial cells and purified fatty acid synthase I.

    PubMed

    Boshoff, Helena I; Mizrahi, Valerie; Barry, Clifton E

    2002-04-01

    The effects of low extracellular pH and intracellular accumulation of weak organic acids were compared with respect to fatty acid synthesis by whole cells of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. The profile of fatty acids synthesized during exposure to benzoic, nicotinic, or pyrazinoic acids, as well as that observed during intracellular hydrolysis of the corresponding amides, was not a direct consequence of modulation of fatty acid synthesis by these compounds but reflected the response to inorganic acid stress. Analysis of fatty acid synthesis in crude mycobacterial cell extracts demonstrated that pyrazinoic acid failed to directly modulate the fatty acid synthase activity catalyzed by fatty acid synthase I (FAS-I). However, fatty acid synthesis was irreversibly inhibited by 5-chloro-pyrazinamide in a time-dependent fashion. Moreover, we demonstrate that pyrazinoic acid does not inhibit purified mycobacterial FAS-I, suggesting that this enzyme is not the immediate target of pyrazinamide.

  4. Systematic Analysis of Mycobacterial Acylation Reveals First Example of Acylation-mediated Regulation of Enzyme Activity of a Bacterial Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Anshika; Arora, Gunjan; Virmani, Richa; Kundu, Parijat; Khanna, Tanya; Sajid, Andaleeb; Misra, Richa; Joshi, Jayadev; Yadav, Vikas; Samanta, Sintu; Saini, Neeru; Pandey, Amit K; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Hentschker, Christian; Becher, Dörte; Gerth, Ulf; Singh, Yogendra

    2015-10-23

    Protein lysine acetylation is known to regulate multiple aspects of bacterial metabolism. However, its presence in mycobacterial signal transduction and virulence-associated proteins has not been studied. In this study, analysis of mycobacterial proteins from different cellular fractions indicated dynamic and widespread occurrence of lysine acetylation. Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins regulating diverse physiological processes were then selected and expressed in the surrogate host Mycobacterium smegmatis. The purified proteins were analyzed for the presence of lysine acetylation, leading to the identification of 24 acetylated proteins. In addition, novel lysine succinylation and propionylation events were found to co-occur with acetylation on several proteins. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase B (PtpB), a secretory phosphatase that regulates phosphorylation of host proteins and plays a critical role in Mycobacterium infection, is modified by acetylation and succinylation at Lys-224. This residue is situated in a lid region that covers the enzyme's active site. Consequently, acetylation and succinylation negatively regulate the activity of PtpB.

  5. Humoral response to mycobacterial heat shock proteins in patients with constrictive pericarditis caused by tuberculosis and its implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, T T; Strang, J I; Wilkins, E G

    1994-01-01

    Tuberculous pericarditis is one of the commonest causes of cardiac failure in Transkei and the surrounding regions in southeast Africa. About 20% of patients with clinically diagnosed tuberculous pericardial effusion go on to develop pericardial fibrosis (i.e., construction), a complication which is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. The pathological mechanisms underlying this aberrant inflammatory response are poorly understood, and there is a lack of reliable pointers (clinical or laboratory) in predicting the likelihood of development of constriction. We studied the humoral response to mycobacterial heat shock proteins (65 and 71 kDa) in 25 patients with culture-positive tuberculous pericardial effusion and found a significant correlation between high anti-mycobacterial hsp60 antibody titers (before treatment) and subsequent development of fibrosis (P = 0.035 by logistic regression), which is independent of the effect of the use of prednisolone as adjuvant therapy. Possible mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of pericardial constriction in tuberculosis are postulated. PMID:8556500

  6. The uniqueness of subunit α of mycobacterial F-ATP synthases: An evolutionary variant for niche adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ragunathan, Priya; Sielaff, Hendrik; Sundararaman, Lavanya; Biuković, Goran; Subramanian Manimekalai, Malathy Sony; Singh, Dhirendra; Kundu, Subhashri; Wohland, Thorsten; Frasch, Wayne; Dick, Thomas; Grüber, Gerhard

    2017-07-07

    The F1F0 -ATP (F-ATP) synthase is essential for growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). In addition to their synthase function most F-ATP synthases possess an ATP-hydrolase activity, which is coupled to proton-pumping activity. However, the mycobacterial enzyme lacks this reverse activity, but the reason for this deficiency is unclear. Here, we report that a Mycobacterium-specific, 36-amino acid long C-terminal domain in the nucleotide-binding subunit α (Mtα) of F-ATP synthase suppresses its ATPase activity and determined the mechanism of suppression. First, we employed vesicles to show that in intact membrane-embedded mycobacterial F-ATP synthases deletion of the C-terminal domain enabled ATPase and proton-pumping activity. We then generated a heterologous F-ATP synthase model system, which demonstrated that transfer of the mycobacterial C-terminal domain to a standard F-ATP synthase α subunit suppresses ATPase activity. Single-molecule rotation assays indicated that the introduction of this Mycobacterium-specific domain decreased the angular velocity of the power-stroke after ATP binding. Solution X-ray scattering data and NMR results revealed the solution shape of Mtα and the 3D structure of the subunit α C-terminal peptide (521)PDEHVEALDEDKLAKEAVKV(540) of M. tubercolosis (Mtα(521-540)), respectively. Together with cross-linking studies, the solution structural data lead to a model, in which Mtα(521-540) comes in close proximity with subunit γ residues 104-109, whose interaction may influence the rotation of the camshaft-like subunit γ. Finally, we propose that the unique segment Mtα(514-549), which is accessible at the C terminus of mycobacterial subunit α, is a promising drug epitope. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Limited clonal heterogeneity of antigen-specific T cells localizing in the pleural space during mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Manca, F; Rossi, G; Valle, M T; Lantero, S; Li Pira, G; Fenoglio, D; De Bruin, J; Costantini, M; Damiani, G; Balbi, B

    1991-01-01

    To detect possible differences in phenotype and fine specificity for mycobacterial antigens between CD4-positive T cells from peripheral blood (PB) and from inflammatory sites, we identified four patients presenting with a mycobacterial pleural exudate (PE) rich in PPD-specific lymphocytes and with a negative skin test to tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) and a negative proliferative response of PB lymphocytes to PPD at the same time. Several weeks after chemotherapy, these patients converted to PPD responsiveness in the periphery, and PPD-specific clones could be generated from PB at this stage. The phenotypic comparison of PE lymphocytes and concomitant PB lymphocytes obtained before treatment showed an increase of CD8 cells and a high frequency of HLA-DR-positive activated T cells in PE. The frequency of tetanus toxoid-specific and Candida albicans-specific proliferating T cells was lower than that of PPD-specific cells in PE but not in PB. PPD-specific clones were derived initially from PE and from PB once the patients had converted to PPD responsiveness. The two sets of clones from each patient were compared for proliferative response to mycobacterial antigen clusters of defined molecular weight ranges. A large number of PE-derived clones (36%) responded to a fraction of 27 to 35 kDa, whereas only one clone from PB responded to the same fraction. The purified antigen P32 (32 kDa), a soluble mycobacterial protein, stimulated PE-derived clones that were responsive to the 37- to 27-kDa fraction but did not stimulate PB-derived clones. The data demonstrate that PE- and PB-derived lymphocytes differ both in phenotype and in fine specificity, suggesting a limited clonal heterogeneity of T cells localizing at the inflammatory site in tuberculous patients without a PPD response in the periphery. Therefore T cells compartmentalized at inflammatory sites provide information that is different from that provided by T cells in the periphery. PMID:1898906

  8. Expression of a long pentraxin, PTX3, by monocytes exposed to the mycobacterial cell wall component lipoarabinomannan.

    PubMed Central

    Vouret-Craviari, V; Matteucci, C; Peri, G; Poli, G; Introna, M; Mantovani, A

    1997-01-01

    PTX3 is a prototypic long pentraxin composed of a C-terminal domain similar to those of classical pentraxins (e.g., C reactive protein) and an unrelated N-terminal portion. PTX3 is expressed in a variety of cell types, notably mononuclear phagocytes and endothelial cells, after exposure to the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). The present study was designed to assess whether mycobacterial components were able to induce expression and production of PTX3. Mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan (LAM) induced expression of PTX3 mRNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The non-mannose-capped version of lipoarabinomannan (AraLAM) was considerably more potent than the mannose-capped version ManLAM or the simpler version phosphatidylinositol mannoside. Among mononuclear cells, monocytes were responsible for LAM-induced PTX3 mRNA expression. Whole mycobacteria (Mycobacterium bovis BCG) strongly induced PTX3 expression. Pretreatment with actinomycin D abolished LAM-induced PTX3 expression, whereas cycloheximide only partially reduced the expression. LAM-induced PTX3 expression was associated with the production of immunoreactive PTX3. IL-10 and IL-13 did not inhibit the induction of PTX3 by LAM. Under the same conditions, these anti-inflammatory cytokines inhibited MCP-1 expression. In contrast, gamma interferon inhibited LAM-induced PTX3 expression. Thus, in addition to IL-1, TNF, and lipopolysaccharide, mycobacterial cell wall components also induce expression and production of the long pentraxin PTX3. The significance of PTX3 in the immunobiology of mycobacterial infection and its relevance in relation to clinical involvement remain to be determined. PMID:9119472

  9. Structure of the mycobacterial ATP synthase Fo rotor ring in complex with the anti-TB drug bedaquiline

    PubMed Central

    Preiss, Laura; Langer, Julian D.; Yildiz, Özkan; Eckhardt-Strelau, Luise; Guillemont, Jérôme E. G.; Koul, Anil; Meier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is more prevalent today than at any other time in human history. Bedaquiline (BDQ), a novel Mycobacterium-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase inhibitor, is the first drug in the last 40 years to be approved for the treatment of MDR-TB. This bactericidal compound targets the membrane-embedded rotor (c-ring) of the mycobacterial ATP synthase, a key metabolic enzyme required for ATP generation. We report the x-ray crystal structures of a mycobacterial c9 ring without and with BDQ bound at 1.55- and 1.7-Å resolution, respectively. The structures and supporting functional assays reveal how BDQ specifically interacts with the rotor ring via numerous interactions and thereby completely covers the c-ring’s ion-binding sites. This prevents the rotor ring from acting as an ion shuttle and stalls ATP synthase operation. The structures explain how diarylquinoline chemicals specifically inhibit the mycobacterial ATP synthase and thus enable structure-based drug design of next-generation ATP synthase inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacterial pathogens. PMID:26601184

  10. Exploring the potential of T7 bacteriophage protein Gp2 as a novel inhibitor of mycobacterial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, J; Cloete, R; Burchell, L; Sarkar, P; Warren, R M; Christoffels, A; Wigneshweraraj, S; Sampson, S L

    2017-09-01

    Over the past six decades, there has been a decline in novel therapies to treat tuberculosis, while the causative agent of this disease has become increasingly resistant to current treatment regimens. Bacteriophages (phages) are able to kill bacterial cells and understanding this process could lead to novel insights for the treatment of mycobacterial infections. Phages inhibit bacterial gene transcription through phage-encoded proteins which bind to RNA polymerase (RNAP), thereby preventing bacterial transcription. Gp2, a T7 phage protein which binds to the beta prime (β') subunit of RNAP in Escherichia coli, has been well characterized in this regard. Here, we aimed to determine whether Gp2 is able to inhibit RNAP in Mycobacterium tuberculosis as this may provide new possibilities for inhibiting the growth of this deadly pathogen. Results from an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in vitro transcription assay revealed that Gp2 binds to mycobacterial RNAP and inhibits transcription; however to a much lesser degree than in E. coli. To further understand the molecular basis of these results, a series of in silico techniques were used to assess the interaction between mycobacterial RNAP and Gp2, providing valuable insight into the characteristics of this protein-protein interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In vivo induction of apoptosis in the thymus by administration of mycobacterial cord factor (trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate).

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Y; Kaneda, K; Fujiwara, N; Morimoto, M; Oka, S; Yano, I

    1997-01-01

    It is reported that some bacteria or bacterial components cause thymic atrophy via the apoptotic process. The present study demonstrated for the first time in vivo induction of apoptosis in the mouse thymus by mycobacterial cord factor (CF) (trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate). When 300 microg of purified CF from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was intravenously administered to BALB/c mice in the form of water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) emulsion, thymic atrophy and pulmonary granulomas were induced with a peak on day 7, whereas, in the form of liposomes, CF induced thymic atrophy on days 14 to 21 in parallel with the development of hepatic granulomas. Thymic atrophy resulted from the depletion of cortical lymphocytes via apoptosis as revealed by DNA fragmentation and karyorrhectic changes. In contrast, mycobacterial sulfatide (2,3,6,6'-tetraacyl trehalose 2'-sulfate) caused neither thymic atrophy nor granuloma formation. Compared to lipopolysaccharide-induced thymocyte apoptosis, CF (w/o/w)-induced thymocyte apoptosis developed more slowly, reached a maximum later, and lasted longer but was less intense. Although serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) levels in CF-treated mice were not significantly elevated, administration of anti-TNF-alpha antibody almost completely inhibited thymic atrophy and granuloma formation. Serum corticosterone levels were only slightly elevated by CF administration. The present results indicate that mycobacterial CF induces thymic atrophy via apoptosis, which is closely linked with granuloma formation. PMID:9125563

  12. Structure of the mycobacterial ATP synthase Fo rotor ring in complex with the anti-TB drug bedaquiline.

    PubMed

    Preiss, Laura; Langer, Julian D; Yildiz, Özkan; Eckhardt-Strelau, Luise; Guillemont, Jérôme E G; Koul, Anil; Meier, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is more prevalent today than at any other time in human history. Bedaquiline (BDQ), a novel Mycobacterium-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase inhibitor, is the first drug in the last 40 years to be approved for the treatment of MDR-TB. This bactericidal compound targets the membrane-embedded rotor (c-ring) of the mycobacterial ATP synthase, a key metabolic enzyme required for ATP generation. We report the x-ray crystal structures of a mycobacterial c9 ring without and with BDQ bound at 1.55- and 1.7-Å resolution, respectively. The structures and supporting functional assays reveal how BDQ specifically interacts with the rotor ring via numerous interactions and thereby completely covers the c-ring's ion-binding sites. This prevents the rotor ring from acting as an ion shuttle and stalls ATP synthase operation. The structures explain how diarylquinoline chemicals specifically inhibit the mycobacterial ATP synthase and thus enable structure-based drug design of next-generation ATP synthase inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacterial pathogens.

  13. Clinical Usefulness of PCR for Differential Diagnosis of Tuberculosis and Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection in Paraffin-Embedded Lung Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yo Na; Kim, Kyoung Min; Choi, Ha Na; Lee, Ju Hyung; Park, Ho Sung; Jang, Kyu Yun; Moon, Woo Sung; Kang, Myoung Jae; Lee, Dong Geun; Chung, Myoung Ja

    2015-09-01

    The need for isolation of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from clinical specimens has increased in recent years. Our aim was to determine the clinical usefulness of PCR for differential diagnosis of tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in lung tissue that show chronic granulomatous inflammation. A total of 199 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens, including 137 Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), 17 NTM cases, and 45 other than mycobacterial cases were collected. We performed acid-fast staining, MTB and NTM nested PCRs, and MTB and NTM real-time PCRs. No histologic difference between MTB and NTM infections was observed. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting MTB were 70.1% and 95.1% by nested PCR, respectively, and 70.8% and 100.0% by real-time PCR, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting NTM were 52.9% and 96.15% by nested PCR, respectively, and 35.3% and 100.0% by real-time PCR, respectively. Mycobacteria were identified by acid-fast staining in 50 of 154 cases (32.5%). All 50 acid-fast staining-positive cases showed positive nested and real-time PCR results (n = 47 MTB PCR positive; n = 3 NTM PCR positive), and results agreed with final diagnosis. PCR will be useful for the rapid diagnosis of mycobacterial infection and differentiation of MTB from NTM in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens, especially in acid-fast staining-positive specimens.

  14. Mycobacterial Caseinolytic Protease Gene Regulator ClgR Is a Substrate of Caseinolytic Protease

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mycobacterial caseinolytic protease ClpP1P2 is a degradative protease that recently gained interest as a genetically and pharmacologically validated drug target for tuberculosis. The first whole-cell active ClpP1P2 inhibitor, the human proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, is currently undergoing lead optimization to introduce selectivity for the bacterial target. How inhibition of ClpP1P2 translates into whole-cell antimicrobial activity is little understood. Previous work has shown that the caseinolytic protease gene regulator ClgR is an activator of the clpP1P2 genes and also suggested that this transcription factor may be a substrate of the protease. Here, we employ promoter activity reporters and direct mRNA level measurements showing that bortezomib treatment of Mycobacterium bovis BCG increased transcription of clpP1P2 and other ClgR-dependent promoters, suggesting that inhibition of ClpP1P2 increases cellular ClgR levels. Then, we carried out red fluorescent protein-ClgR fusion analyses to show that ClgR is indeed a substrate of ClpP1P2 and to identify ClgR’s C-terminal nonapeptide APVVSLAVA as the signal sufficient for recognition and efficient protein degradation by ClpP1P2. Interestingly, accumulation of ClgR appears to be toxic for bacilli, suggesting a mechanism for how pharmacological inhibition of ClpP1P2 protease activity by bortezomib translates into whole-cell antibacterial activity. IMPORTANCE With 9 million new cases and more than 1 million deaths per year, tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the biggest infectious disease killer globally. New drugs for the treatment of the drug-resistant forms of the disease are needed. Recently, a new target-lead couple, the mycobacterial protease ClpP1P2 and the human anticancer drug bortezomib, was identified. However, we know little about how expression of this protease is regulated, which proteins in the bacterium it degrades, how the protease recognizes its target proteins

  15. Factors associated with acquired Anti IFN- γ autoantibody in patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Phoompoung, Pakpoom; Ankasekwinai, Nasikarn; Pithukpakorn, Manop; Foongladda, Suporn; Umrod, Pinklow; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Suputtamongkol, Yupin

    2017-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection in patients who were previously healthy is now well recognized to be associated with an acquired autoantibody to Interferon gamma (Anti IFN- γ autoantibody). However, the risk factors of this syndrome remain unknown. We performed an unmatched case control study among patients with NTM diseases who were diagnosed and treated at Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Anti-IFN autoantibody was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Cases were patients with NTM diseases and detectable anti IFN- γ autoantibody. Controls were randomly selected from those with undetectable anti IFN- γ autoantibody. Data from both groups including demographic data, clinical presentation, laboratory results, other risk factors and HLA genotypes were collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent risk factors for this syndrome. 70 cases (mean age 50 ± 11 years) and 70 controls (mean age 58 ± 18 years) were enrolled into the study. Mycobacterial abscessus was the most common NTM pathogen found in both groups (72.9% in cases and 41.4% in controls respectively). However, disseminated NTM disease was significantly more common in cases (92.9%) than in the controls (14.3%, p<0.001). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that previous OIs (adjusted OR14.87, 95% CI 2.36-93.86), birthplace outside Central region (adjusted OR 19.19, 95% CI 3.86-95.35), lack of comorbidities lead to immunosuppression, such as HIV infection or diabetes mellitus (adjusted OR 23.68, 95% CI 4.01-139.94), and presence of HLA DRB1*15/16 (adjusted OR 153.28, 95% CI 16.87-139.88) were independent factors associated with this syndrome. Patients with NTM disease associated with anti IFN- γ autoantibody are almost always previously healthy and HIV negative. Most of these patients presented with disseminated NTM disease with generalized lymphadenitis and often with reactive skin

  16. Infection Sources of a Common Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogen, Mycobacterium avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Maruyama, Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed a continuous increase in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases, especially pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) diseases. Although it is not clear why NTM diseases have been increasing, one possibility is an increase of mycobacterial infection sources in the environment. Thus, in this review, we focused on the infection sources of pathogenic NTM, especially MAC. The environmental niches for MAC include water, soil, and dust. The formation of aerosols containing NTM arising from shower water, soil, and pool water implies that these niches can be infection sources. Furthermore, genotyping has shown that clinical isolates are identical to environmental ones from household tap water, bathrooms, potting soil, and garden soil. Therefore, to prevent and treat MAC diseases, it is essential to identify the infection sources for these organisms, because patients with these diseases often suffer from reinfections and recurrent infections with them. In the environmental sources, MAC and other NTM organisms can form biofilms, survive within amoebae, and exist in a free-living state. Mycobacterial communities are also likely to occur in these infection sources in households. Water distribution systems are a transmission route from natural water reservoirs to household tap water. Other infection sources include areas with frequent human contact, such as soil and bathrooms, indicating that individuals may carry NTM organisms that concomitantly attach to their household belongings. To explore the mechanisms associated with the global spread of infection and MAC transmission routes, an epidemiological population-wide genotyping survey would be very useful. A good example of the power of genotyping comes from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, where close genetic relatedness was found between isolates of it from European patients and pigs in Japan and Europe, implying global transmission of this bacterium

  17. Infection Sources of a Common Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogen, Mycobacterium avium Complex.

    PubMed

    Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Maruyama, Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed a continuous increase in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases, especially pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) diseases. Although it is not clear why NTM diseases have been increasing, one possibility is an increase of mycobacterial infection sources in the environment. Thus, in this review, we focused on the infection sources of pathogenic NTM, especially MAC. The environmental niches for MAC include water, soil, and dust. The formation of aerosols containing NTM arising from shower water, soil, and pool water implies that these niches can be infection sources. Furthermore, genotyping has shown that clinical isolates are identical to environmental ones from household tap water, bathrooms, potting soil, and garden soil. Therefore, to prevent and treat MAC diseases, it is essential to identify the infection sources for these organisms, because patients with these diseases often suffer from reinfections and recurrent infections with them. In the environmental sources, MAC and other NTM organisms can form biofilms, survive within amoebae, and exist in a free-living state. Mycobacterial communities are also likely to occur in these infection sources in households. Water distribution systems are a transmission route from natural water reservoirs to household tap water. Other infection sources include areas with frequent human contact, such as soil and bathrooms, indicating that individuals may carry NTM organisms that concomitantly attach to their household belongings. To explore the mechanisms associated with the global spread of infection and MAC transmission routes, an epidemiological population-wide genotyping survey would be very useful. A good example of the power of genotyping comes from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, where close genetic relatedness was found between isolates of it from European patients and pigs in Japan and Europe, implying global transmission of this bacterium

  18. Differentiation-induced replication-timing changes are restricted to AT-rich/long interspersed nuclear element (LINE)-rich isochores

    PubMed Central

    Hiratani, Ichiro; Leskovar, Amanda; Gilbert, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The replication timing of some genes is developmentally regulated, but the significance of replication timing to cellular differentiation has been difficult to substantiate. Studies have largely been restricted to the comparison of a few genes in established cell lines derived from different tissues, and most of these genes do not change replication timing. Hence, it has not been possible to predict how many or what types of genes might be subject to such control. Here, we have evaluated the replication timing of 54 tissue-specific genes in mouse embryonic stem cells before and after differentiation to neural precursors. Strikingly, genes residing within isochores rich in GC and poor in long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) did not change their replication timing, whereas half of genes within isochores rich in AT and long interspersed nuclear elements displayed programmed changes in replication timing that accompanied changes in gene expression. Our results provide direct evidence that differentiation-induced autosomal replication-timing changes are a significant part of mammalian development, provide a means to predict genes subject to such regulation, and suggest that replication timing may be more related to the evolution of metazoan genomes than to gene function or expression pattern. PMID:15557005