Science.gov

Sample records for mycobacterium arosiense sp

  1. Mycobacterium marseillense sp. nov., Mycobacterium timonense sp. nov. and Mycobacterium bouchedurhonense sp. nov., members of the Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Iskandar; Cayrou, Caroline; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2009-11-01

    An rpoB sequence-based evaluation of 100 Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) clinical isolates led to the identification of five respiratory tract isolates that were potential representatives of three novel MAC species. Distinctive phenotypic features of isolates 62863 and 5356591(T) included a pseudomycelium morphology and both esterase and acid phosphatase activities. These two isolates exhibited sequence similarities of 99.8 % for the 16S rRNA gene, 86.3 and 86.1 % for 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) sequence, 96.7 and 97.8 % for rpoB and 97.6 and 97.4 % for hsp65, respectively, with the type strain of Mycobacterium chimaera, the most closely related species. Isolates 3256799 and 5351974(T) lacked alpha-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase activities. They exhibited sequence similarities of 99.6 % for the 16S rRNA gene, 90.1 and 90.4 % for ITS-1, 97.8 % for rpoB and 98.0 and 98.1 % for hsp65, respectively, with the type strain of M. chimaera, the most closely related species. Isolate 4355387(T) lacked urease and alpha-glucosidase activities, but it exhibited valine arylamidase, cystine arylamidase and acid phosphatase activities. It had sequence similarities of 99.3 % for the 16S rRNA gene, 51.8 % for ITS-1, 97.1 % for rpoB and 97.8 % for hsp65 with the type strain of Mycobacterium colombiense, the most closely related species. A phylogenetic tree based on concatenated 16S rRNA gene, ITS-1, rpoB and hsp65 sequences showed the uniqueness of these five isolates as representatives of three novel species, with bootstrap values >/=95 % in all nodes. On the basis of these phenotypic and genetic characteristics, these five isolates are proposed as representatives of three novel MAC species: Mycobacterium marseillense sp. nov., with strain 5356591(T) (=CCUG 56325(T) =CIP 109828(T) =CSUR P30(T)) as the type strain; Mycobacterium timonense sp. nov., with strain 5351974(T) (=CCUG 56329(T) =CIP 109830(T) =CSUR P32(T)) as the type strain; and Mycobacterium

  2. Taxonomic variation in the Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex: description of Mycobacterium boenickei sp. nov., Mycobacterium houstonense sp. nov., Mycobacterium neworleansense sp. nov. and Mycobacterium brisbanense sp. nov. and recognition of Mycobacterium porcinum from human clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Schinsky, Mark F; Morey, Roger E; Steigerwalt, Arnold G; Douglas, Michael P; Wilson, Rebecca W; Floyd, Margaret M; Butler, W Ray; Daneshvar, Maryam I; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Wallace, Richard J; McNeil, Michael M; Brenner, Don J; Brown, June M

    2004-09-01

    The Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex (sorbitol-negative and sorbitol-positive) contains unnamed taxa first characterized in 1991. These organisms can cause respiratory infections, a spectrum of soft tissue and skeletal infections, bacteraemia and disseminated disease. To evaluate this group of organisms, clinical reference isolates and the type strains of M. fortuitum third biovariant complex sorbitol-negative (n = 21), M. fortuitum third biovariant complex sorbitol-positive (n = 3), M. fortuitum (n = 3), Mycobacterium peregrinum (pipemidic acid-susceptible) (n = 1), Mycobacterium porcinum (n = 1), Mycobacterium senegalense (n = 2) and Mycobacterium septicum (n = 1) were characterized by using conventional phenotypic (morphological, physiological and antimicrobial susceptibilities), chemotaxonomic (HPLC and cellular fatty acids) and genotypic [RFLP of the rRNA gene (ribotyping), PCR-RFLP of a 439 bp segment of the 65 kDa hsp gene (PCR restriction analysis) and 16S rRNA gene sequence] analysis, DNA G + C content and DNA-DNA relatedness analyses. The results of these studies indicated that the strains comprised M. porcinum (n = 13), M. septicum (n = 1) and four novel closely related genetic groups within the M. fortuitum third biovariant complex: Mycobacterium boenickei sp. nov. (n = 6), Mycobacterium houstonense sp. nov. (n = 2), Mycobacterium neworleansense sp. nov. (n = 1) and Mycobacterium brisbanense sp. nov. (n = 1), with type strains ATCC 49935T (= W5998T = DSM 44677T), ATCC 49403T (= W5198T = DSM 44676T) ATCC 49404T (= W6705T = DSM 44679T) and ATCC 49938T (= W6743T = DSM 44680T), respectively.

  3. Occurrence and Clinical Relevance of Mycobacterium chimaera sp. nov., Germany

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Oliver; Richter, Elvira; Göbel, Ulf B.; Petrich, Annette; Buchholz, Petra; Moter, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Retrospective molecular genetic analysis of 166 Mycobacterium intracellulare isolates showed that 143 (86%) strains could be assigned to Mycobacterium chimaera sp. nov. Of 97 patients from whom M. chimaera sp. nov. was isolated, only 3.3% exhibited mycobacterial lung disease, whereas all M. intracellulare isolates caused severe pulmonary infections. PMID:18760016

  4. Occurrence and clinical relevance of Mycobacterium chimaera sp. nov., Germany.

    PubMed

    Schweickert, Birgitta; Goldenberg, Oliver; Richter, Elvira; Göbel, Ulf B; Petrich, Annette; Buchholz, Petra; Moter, Annette

    2008-09-01

    Retrospective molecular genetic analysis of 166 Mycobacterium intracellulare isolates showed that 143 (86%) strains could be assigned to Mycobacterium chimaera sp. nov. Of 97 patients from whom M. chimaera sp. nov. was isolated, only 3.3% exhibited mycobacterial lung disease, whereas all M. intracellulare isolates caused severe pulmonary infections.

  5. Mycobacterium sediminis sp. nov. and Mycobacterium arabiense sp. nov., two rapidly growing members of the genus Mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dao-Feng; Chen, Xiu; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Yao, Ji-Cheng; Jiang, Yi; Xiong, Zhi; Li, Wen-jun

    2013-11-01

    Two novel isolates of rapidly growing, Gram-stain-positive, non-chromogenic species of the genus Mycobacterium, strain YIM M13028(T) from a sediment sample collected from the South China Sea (19° 30.261' N 111° 0.247' E) at a depth of 42 m and strain YIM 121001(T) from a coastal zone sand sample collected in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, were obtained in our laboratory. Their taxonomic positions were determined by a polyphasic approach. Good growth of the two strains was observed at 28 °C and pH 7.0 with 0-2 % NaCl on tryptic soy agar medium. Both strains formed round orange-red colonies, strain YIM M13028(T) had a rough surface, while YIM 121001(T) was smooth. Cellular fatty acids, whole-cell protein profiles and TLC analysis of their mycolic acids show significant differences from reference stains. Phenotypic characteristics and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of 16S rRNA gene, hsp65, rpoB and 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences indicated that both strains YIM M13028(T) and YIM 121001(T) belong to the genus Mycobacterium. DNA-DNA hybridization values revealed a low relatedness (<70 %) of the two isolates with the type strains Mycobacterium neoaurum DSM 44074(T) and Mycobacterium hodleri DSM 44183(T). The low DNA-DNA hybridization values (40.4±3.5 %) between strains YIM M13028(T) and YIM 121001(T) and phenotypic distinctiveness indicated that the two strains were representatives of different novel species of the genus Mycobacterium. The names proposed for these novel species are Mycobacterium sediminis sp. nov. and Mycobacterium arabiense sp. nov., and the type strains are YIM M13028(T) ( = DSM 45643(T) = KCTC 19999(T)) and YIM 121001(T) ( = DSM 45768(T) = JCM 18538(T)), respectively.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading species isolated from Hawaiian soils: Mycobacterium crocinum sp. nov., Mycobacterium pallens sp. nov., Mycobacterium rutilum sp. nov., Mycobacterium rufum sp. nov. and Mycobacterium aromaticivorans sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Hennessee, Christiane T; Seo, Jong-Su; Alvarez, Anne M; Li, Qing X

    2009-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental contaminants. In this study, both pristine and contaminated soils were sampled as a source of PAH-degrading organisms. Nine strains isolated from these soils were identified as rapidly growing members of the genus Mycobacterium through basic phenotypic characteristics and through sequence similarity of three genes. Because the sequence similarity of the 16S rRNA gene is relatively high among members of this genus, additional conserved genes encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) and a heat-shock protein (hsp65) were sequenced. Several analyses were completed to differentiate the strains from one another and to determine their species-level taxonomy, including fatty acid methyl ester analysis, biochemical tests and substrate-utilization profiling. A phylogenetic tree incorporating sequences for all three genes was constructed with the isolates and their close described relatives. Results for biochemical tests, substrate-utilization tests and DNA sequencing were compared with those of the phylogenetically similar organisms to establish the isolated strains as representatives of novel species with characteristics unlike those of previously described species of Mycobacterium. Finally, DNA-DNA hybridization was performed between strains and their close relatives to confirm their position within novel species. Our results demonstrated that the isolates represent five novel species, which were named Mycobacterium crocinum sp. nov. (type strain czh-42(T) =ATCC BAA-1373(T) =CIP 109262(T); reference strains czh-1A =ATCC BAA-1370 =CIP 109266 and czh-3 =ATCC BAA-1371=CIP 109267), Mycobacterium pallens sp. nov. (type strain czh-8(T) =ATCC BAA-1372(T) =CIP 109268(T)), Mycobacterium rutilum sp. nov. (type strain czh-117(T) =ATCC BAA-1375(T) =CIP 109271(T); reference strains czh-107 =ATCC BAA-1374 =CIP 109270 and czh-132 =ATCC BAA-1376 =CIP 109272), Mycobacterium rufum sp. nov. (type strain JS14(T

  7. Mycobacterium sarraceniae sp. nov. and Mycobacterium helvum sp. nov., isolated from the pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong M; Dahl, John L

    2016-11-01

    Several fast- to intermediate-growing, acid-fast, scotochromogenic bacteria were isolated from Sarracenia purpurea pitcher waters in Minnesota sphagnum peat bogs. Two strains (DL734T and DL739T) were among these isolates. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, the phylogenetic positions of both strains is in the genus Mycobacterium with no obvious relation to any characterized type strains of mycobacteria. Phenotypic characterization revealed that neither strain was similar to the type strains of known species of the genus Mycobacterium in the collective properties of growth, pigmentation or fatty acid composition. Strain DL734T grew at temperatures between 28 and 32 °C, was positive for 3-day arylsulfatase production, and was negative for Tween 80 hydrolysis, urease and nitrate reduction. Strain DL739T grew at temperatures between 28 and 37 °C, and was positive for Tween 80 hydrolysis, urea, nitrate reduction and 3-day arylsulfatase production. Both strains were catalase-negative while only DL739T grew with 5 % NaCl. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles were unique for each strain. DL739T showed an ability to survive at 8 °C with little to no cellular replication and is thus considered to be psychrotolerant. Therefore, strains DL734T and DL739T represent two novel species of the genus Mycobacterium with the proposed names Mycobacterium sarraceniae sp. nov. and Mycobacterium helvum sp. nov., respectively. The type strains are DL734T (=JCM 30395T=NCCB 100519T) and DL739T (=JCM 30396T=NCCB 100520T), respectively.

  8. Mineralization of phenanthrene by a Mycobacterium sp

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, W.F.; Jones, G.E.

    1988-04-01

    A Mycobacterium sp., designated strain BG1, able to utilize the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon phenanthrene as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from estuarine sediment following enrichment with the hydrocarbon. Unlike other phenanthrene degraders, this bacterium degraded phenanthrene via 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid without accumulating this or other aromatic intermediates, as shown by high-performance liquid chromatography. Degradation proceeded via meta cleavage of protocatechuic acid. Different nonionic surfactants (Tween compounds) solubilized the phenanthrene to different degrees and enhanced phenanthrene utilization. The order of enhancement, however, did not correlate perfectly with increased solubility, suggesting physiological as well as physicochemical effects of the surfactants. Plasmids of approximately 21, 58, and 77 megadaltons were detected in cells grown with phenanthrene but not in those which, after growth on nutrient media, lost the phenanthrene-degrading phenotype. Given that plasmid-mediated degradations of aromatic hydrocarbons generally occur via meta cleavages, it is of interest that the addition of pyruvate, a product of meta cleavage, supported rapid mineralization of phenanthrene in broth culture; succinate, a product of ortho cleavage, supported growth but completely repressed the utilization of phenanthrene. The involvement of plasmids may have given rise to the unusual degradation pattern that was observed.

  9. Mycobacterium saopaulense sp. nov., a rapidly growing mycobacterium closely related to members of the Mycobacterium chelonae–Mycobacterium abscessus group

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Whipps, Christopher M.; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Chimara, Erica; Droz, Sara; Tortoli, Enrico; de Freitas, Denise; Cnockaert, Margo; Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Five isolates of non-pigmented, rapidly growing mycobacteria were isolated from three patients and, in an earlier study, from zebrafish. Phenotypic and molecular tests confirmed that these isolates belong to the Mycobacterium chelonae–Mycobacterium abscessus group, but they could not be confidently assigned to any known species of this group. Phenotypic analysis and biochemical tests were not helpful for distinguishing these isolates from other members of the M. chelonae–M. abscessus group. The isolates presented higher drug resistance in comparison with other members of the group, showing susceptibility only to clarithromycin. The five isolates showed a unique PCR restriction analysis pattern of the hsp65 gene, 100 % similarity in 16S rRNA gene and hsp65 sequences and 1–2 nt differences in rpoB and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of a concatenated dataset including 16S rRNA gene, hsp65, and rpoB sequences from type strains of more closely related species placed the five isolates together, as a distinct lineage from previously described species, suggesting a sister relationship to a group consisting of M. chelonae, Mycobacterium salmoniphilum, Mycobacterium franklinii and Mycobacterium immunogenum. DNA–DNA hybridization values >70 % confirmed that the five isolates belong to the same species, while values < 70 % between one of the isolates and the type strains of M. chelonae and M. abscessus confirmed that the isolates belong to a distinct species. The polyphasic characterization of these isolates, supported by DNA–DNA hybridization results, demonstrated that they share characteristics with M. chelonae–M. abscessus members, but constitute a different species, for which the name Mycobacterium saopaulense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is EPM 10906T ( = CCUG 66554T = LMG 28586T = INCQS 0733T). PMID:26358475

  10. Proposal to elevate Mycobacterium avium complex ITS sequevar MAC-Q to Mycobacterium vulneris sp. nov.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, J; Boeree, M J; Kösters, K; Wieland, A; Tortoli, E; Dekhuijzen, P N R; van Soolingen, D

    2009-09-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) consists of four recognized species, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium colombiense, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium chimaera, and a variety of other strains that may be members of undescribed taxa. We report on two isolates of a scotochromogenic, slowly growing, non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species within the M. avium complex from a lymph node and an infected wound after a dogbite of separate patients in The Netherlands. The extrapulmonary infections in immunocompetent patients suggested a high level of virulence. These isolates were characterized by a unique nucleotide sequence in the 16S rRNA gene, 99% similar to Mycobacterium colombiense, and the MAC-Q 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence. Sequence analyses of the hsp65 gene revealed 97% similarity to M. avium. The rpoB gene sequence was 98% similar to M. colombiense. Phenotypically, the scotochromogenicity, positive semi-quantitative catalase and heat-stable catalase tests, negative tellurite reductase and urease tests and susceptibility to hydroxylamine and oleic acid set these isolates apart from related species. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of cell-wall mycolic acid content revealed a unique pattern, related to that of M. avium and M. colombiense. Together, these findings supported a separate species status within the Mycobacterium avium complex. We propose elevation of scotochromogenic M. avium complex strains sharing this 16S gene and MAC-Q ITS sequence to separate species status, for which the name Mycobacterium vulneris sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NLA000700772T (=DSM 45247T=CIP 109859T).

  11. Mycobacterium frederiksbergense sp. nov., a novel polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading Mycobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Willumsen, P; Karlson, U; Stackebrandt, E; Kroppenstedt, R M

    2001-09-01

    A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium isolated from coal tar-contaminated soil in Denmark was characterized by a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetically and chemotaxonomically, it was related to members of the genus Mycobacterium. The isolate contains chemotaxonomic markers that are diagnostic for the genus Mycobacterium; i.e. the meso isomer of 2,6-diaminopimelic acid, arabinose and galactose as diagnostic whole-cell sugars, MK-9(H2) as the principal isoprenoid quinone, a mycolic acid pattern of alpha-mycolates, ketomycolates and wax-ester mycolates, unbranched saturated and unsaturated fatty acids plus a small amount of tuberculostearic acid and a significant amount of a C18:0 secondary alcohol. Based on the unique combination of chemical markers among mycobacteria, it is proposed that the isolate should be assigned to a new species, Mycobacterium frederiksbergense sp. nov. This novel species is phylogenetically closely related to Mycobacterium diernhoferi, Mycobacterium neoaurum and Mycobacterium hodleri. The type strain of M. frederiksbergense is strain FAn9T (= DSM 44346T = NRRL B-24126T).

  12. Mycobacterium mantenii sp. nov., a pathogenic, slowly growing, scotochromogenic species.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko; Lindeboom, Jerome A; Hartwig, Nico G; de Zwaan, Rina; Tortoli, Enrico; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Boeree, Martin J; van Soolingen, Dick

    2009-11-01

    Slowly growing, scotochromogenic bacteria of a novel Mycobacterium species were isolated from lymph node samples in two children and pulmonary samples in two elderly patients from different regions in the Netherlands as well as from a surface water sample in Zambia. Its 16S rRNA gene, 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS), hsp65 and rpoB gene sequences are unique in comparison with other mycobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that these micro-organisms are most closely related to Mycobacterium scrofulaceum ATCC 19981(T) (8 differences; 0.6 % divergence). The hsp65 sequence shows 96 % similarity to that of Mycobacterium saskatchewanense MB54784 and the rpoB sequence shows 95 % similarity to that of Mycobacterium chimaera CIP 107892(T). The 16S-23S ITS sequence places these micro-organisms within the Mycobacterium avium complex, as a novel ITS sequevar. This is not supported by analysis of the 16S rRNA, hsp65 or rpoB gene sequences. Their scotochromogenicity, combined with mostly positive urease, positive semiquantitative catalase and negative tellurite reduction tests, set these isolates apart from related species. The mycolic acid patterns, obtained by HPLC, are similar to that of Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, though the peak heights and distribution present minor differences. We propose the name Mycobacterium mantenii sp. nov. for this novel species. The type strain, isolated from a lymph node biopsy sample, is strain 04-1474(T) (=NLA000401474(T) =CIP 109863(T) =DSM 45255(T)).

  13. Mycobacterium talmoniae sp. nov., a slowly growing mycobacterium isolated from human respiratory samples.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Rebecca M; DeGroote, Mary Ann; Marola, Jamie L; Buss, Sarah; Jones, Victoria; McNeil, Michael R; Freifeld, Alison G; Elaine Epperson, L; Hasan, Nabeeh A; Jackson, Mary; Iwen, Peter C; Salfinger, Max; Strong, Michael

    2017-08-01

    A novel slowly growing, non-chromogenic species of the class Actinobacteria was isolated from a human respiratory sample in Nebraska, USA, in 2012. Analysis of the internal transcribed spacer sequence supported placement into the genus Mycobacterium with high sequence similarity to a previously undescribed strain isolated from a patient respiratory sample from Oregon, USA, held in a collection in Colorado, USA, in 2000. The two isolates were subjected to phenotypic testing and whole genome sequencing and found to be indistinguishable. The bacteria were acid-fast stain-positive, rod-shaped and exhibited growth after 7-10 days on solid media at temperatures ranging from 25 to 42°C. Colonies were non-pigmented, rough and slightly raised. Analyses of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight profiles showed no matches against a reference library of 130 mycobacterial species. Full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were identical for the two isolates, the average nucleotide identity (ANI) between their genomes was 99.7 % and phylogenetic comparisons classified the novel mycobacteria as the basal most species in the slowly growing Mycobacterium clade. Mycobacterium avium is the most closely related species based on rpoB gene sequence similarity (92 %), but the ANI between the genomes was 81.5 %, below the suggested cut-off for differentiating two species (95 %). Mycolic acid profiles were more similar to M. avium than to Mycobacterium simiae or Mycobacterium abscessus. The phenotypic and genomic data support the conclusion that the two related isolates represent a novel Mycobacterium species for which the name Mycobacterium talmoniae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NE-TNMC-100812T (=ATCC BAA-2683T=DSM 46873T).

  14. Solvent-Augmented Mineralization of Pyrene by a Mycobacterium sp

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, I. Y.; Bartha, R.

    1996-01-01

    The biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pollutants is constrained, in part, by their solid physical state and very low water solubility. Searching for ways to overcome these limitations, we isolated from soil a bacterium capable of growing on pyrene as a sole source of carbon and energy. Acid-fast stain, morphology, and fatty acid profile identified it as a Mycobacterium sp. In a mineral salts solution, the isolate mineralized 50% of a 250-(mu)g/ml concentration of [(sup14)C]pyrene in 2 to 3 days. Detergent below the critical micelle concentration increased the pyrene mineralization rate to 154%, but above the critical micelle concentration, the detergent severely inhibited pyrene mineralization. The water-miscible solvent polyethylene glycol was inhibitory. The hydrophobic solvents heptamethylnonane, decalin, phenyldecane, and diphenylmethane were also inhibitory at several concentrations tested, but the addition of paraffin oil, squalene, squalane, tridecylcyclohexane, and cis-9-tricosene at 0.8% (vol/vol) doubled pyrene mineralization rates by the Mycobacterium sp. without being utilized themselves. The Mycobacterium sp. was found to have high cell surface hydrophobicity and adhered to the emulsified solvent droplets that also contained the dissolved pyrene, facilitating its mass transfer to the degrading bacteria. Cells physically adhering to solvent droplets metabolized pyrene 8.5 times as fast as cells suspended in the aqueous medium. An enhanced mass transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds to microorganisms by suitable hydrophobic solvents might allow the development of solvent-augmented biodegradation techniques for use in aqueous or slurry-type bioreactors. PMID:16535350

  15. Mycobacterium pyrenivorans sp. nov., a novel polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading species.

    PubMed

    Derz, Kerstin; Klinner, Ulrich; Schuphan, Ingolf; Stackebrandt, Erko; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M

    2004-11-01

    The taxonomic position of a polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium, strain 17A3(T), isolated from contaminated soil was determined using a combination of phenotypic and genotypic properties. The isolate showed phenotypic properties that were diagnostic for species of the genus Mycobacterium. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis assigned 17A3(T) to the 16S rRNA gene subgroup that contains Mycobacterium aurum, Mycobacterium austroafricanum, Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium vanbaalenii, but it could clearly be distinguished from these species using a combination of physiological, chemotaxonomic markers and internal rRNA gene spacer analyses. The data showed that strain 17A3(T) (=DSM 44605(T)=NRRL B-24244(T)) merits recognition as the type strain of a novel species of the genus Mycobacterium. The name Mycobacterium pyrenivorans sp. nov. is proposed for the species because of its ability to use pyrene as a sole source of carbon and energy.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Carbendazim-Degrading Mycobacterium sp. Strain djl-10

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qiaoyun; Yang, Wei; Wang, Xinfeng

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium sp. strain djl-10, an efficient degrader of carbendazim, was isolated from a carbendazim manufacturing wastewater treatment system. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of djl-10, which consists of a chromosome and three plasmids. PMID:28232422

  17. Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium complex organisms using multispacer sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Cayrou, Caroline; Turenne, Christine; Behr, Marcel A; Drancourt, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) currently comprises eight species of environmental and animal-associated, slowly-growing mycobacteria: Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium chimaera, Mycobacterium colombiense, Mycobacterium arosiense , Mycobacterium bouchedurhonense, Mycobacterium marseillense and Mycobacterium timonense. In humans, MAC organisms are responsible for opportunistic infections whose unique epidemiology remains poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a genotyping method applicable to all eight MAC species. In this study we developed multispacer sequence typing (MST), a sequencing-based method, for the genotyping of MAC organisms. An alignment of the genome sequence of M. avium subsp. hominissuis strain 104 and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain K-10 revealed 621 intergenic spacers <1000 bp. From these, 16 spacers were selected that ranged from 300 to 800 bp and contained a number of variable bases, <50 within each of the 16 spacers. Four spacers were successfully PCR-amplified and sequenced in 11 reference strains. Combining the sequence of these four spacers in 106 MAC organisms, including 83 M. avium, 11 M. intracellulare , six M. chimaera, two M. colombiense and one each of M. arosiense, M. bouchedurhonense, M. marseillense and M. timonense, yielded a total of 45 spacer types, with an index of discrimination of 0.94. Each spacer type was specific for a species and certain spacer types were specific for subspecies of M. avium. MST is a new method for genotyping of organisms belonging to any one of the eight MAC species tested in this study.

  18. Mycobacterium yongonense sp. nov., a slow-growing non-chromogenic species closely related to Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung-Jun; Math, Renukaradhya K; Jeon, Che Ok; Yu, Hee-Kyung; Park, Young-Gil; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2013-01-01

    A slow-growing non-chromogenic mycobacterium was isolated from a patient with pulmonary disease. Phenotypically, strain 05-1390(T) was similar to Mycobacterium intracellulare ATCC 13950(T). The 16S rRNA gene sequence (1385 bp) of strain 05-1390(T) showed a high degree of similarity to those of the M. intracellulare complex, namely Mycobacterium marseillense 5351974(T) (100 %), M. intracellulare ATCC 13950(T) (99.8 %) and Mycobacterium chimaera DSM 44623(T) (99.9 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and the hsp65 gene indicated that strain 05-1390(T) was closely related to M. intracellulare ATCC 13950(T), but that it was a distinct phylogenetic entity. Of particular interest, an analysis based on the rpoB gene (701 bp) showed that it is closely related to Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum ATCC BAA-614(T) (99.4 %), a scotochromogenic strain, rather than to the M. intracellulare-related strains. Unique MALDI-TOF MS profiles also supported the taxonomic status of this strain as a distinct species. These data support the conclusion that strain 05-1390(T) represents a novel mycobacterial species, for which the name Mycobacterium yongonense sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is 05-1390(T) ( = DSM 45126(T) = KCTC 19555(T)).

  19. Mycobacterium setense sp. nov., a Mycobacterium fortuitum-group organism isolated from a patient with soft tissue infection and osteitis.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Brigitte; Marchandin, Hélène; Hamitouche, Kamel; Laurent, Frédéric

    2008-02-01

    A Gram-positive, rod-shaped acid-fast bacterium was isolated from a patient with a post-traumatic chronic skin abscess associated with osteitis. Morphological analysis, 16S rRNA, hsp65, sodA and rpoB gene sequence analysis, cell-wall fatty acid and mycolic acid composition analyses and biochemical tests showed that the isolate, designated ABO-M06(T), belonged to the genus Mycobacterium. Its phenotype was unique and genetic and phylogenetic findings suggest that strain ABO-M06(T) represents a novel species within the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The name Mycobacterium setense sp. nov. is proposed for this novel species, with the type strain ABO-M06(T) (=CIP 109395(T)=DSM 45070(T)).

  20. Mycobacterium eburneum sp. nov., a non-chromogenic, fast-growing strain isolated from sputum.

    PubMed

    Nouioui, Imen; Carro, Lorena; Teramoto, Kanae; Igual, José M; Jando, Marlen; Del Carmen Montero-Calasanz, Maria; Sutcliffe, Iain; Sangal, Vartul; Goodfellow, Michael; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2017-09-01

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to establish the taxonomic position of a non-chromogenic, rapidly growing Mycobacterium strain that had been isolated from sputum. The strain, CECT 8775T, has chemotaxonomic and cultural properties consistent with its classification in the genus Mycobacterium and was distinguished from the type strains of closely related mycobacterial species, notably from Mycobacterium paraense DSM 46749T, its nearest phylogenetic neighbour, based on 16S rRNA, hsp65 and rpoB gene sequence data. These organisms were also distinguished by a broad range of chemotaxonomic and phenotypic features and by a digital DNA-DNA relatedness value of 22.8 %. Consequently, the strain is considered to represent a novel species of Mycobacterium for which the name Mycobacterium eburneum sp. nov is proposed; the type strain is X82T (CECT 8775T=DSM 44358T).

  1. Identification of metabolites from the degradation of fluoranthene by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, I; Freeman, J P; Evans, F E; Cerniglia, C E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1, previously shown to extensively mineralize high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in pure culture and in sediments, degrades fluoranthene to 9-fluorenone-1-carboxylic acid. In this study, 10 other fluoranthene metabolites were isolated from ethyl acetate extracts of the culture medium by thin-layer and high-performance liquid chromatographic methods. On the basis of comparisons with authentic compounds by UV spectrophotometry and thin-layer chromatography as well as gas chromatography-mass spectral and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses, the metabolites were identified as 8-hydroxy-7-methoxyfluoranthene, 9-hydroxyfluorene, 9-fluorenone, 1-acenaphthenone, 9-hydroxy-1-fluorenecarboxylic acid, phthalic acid, 2-carboxybenzaldehyde, benzoic acid, phenylacetic acid, and adipic acid. Authentic 9-hydroxyfluorene and 9-fluorenone were metabolized by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1. A pathway for the catabolism of fluoranthene by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 is proposed. PMID:8481006

  2. Tuberculosis in seals caused by a novel member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex: Mycobacterium pinnipedii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Debby V; Bastida, Ricardo; Cataldi, Angel; Quse, Viviana; Redrobe, Sharon; Dow, Sue; Duignan, Padraig; Murray, Alan; Dupont, Christine; Ahmed, Niyaz; Collins, Des M; Butler, W Ray; Dawson, David; Rodríguez, Diego; Loureiro, Julio; Romano, Maria Isabel; Alito, A; Zumarraga, M; Bernardelli, Amelia

    2003-09-01

    A comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates from seals (pinnipeds) in Australia, Argentina, Uruguay, Great Britain and New Zealand was undertaken to determine their relationships to each other and their taxonomic position within the complex. Isolates from 30 cases of tuberculosis in six species of pinniped and seven related isolates were compared to representative and standard strains of the M. tuberculosis complex. The seal isolates could be distinguished from other members of the M. tuberculosis complex, including the recently defined 'Mycobacterium canettii' and 'Mycobacterium caprae', on the basis of host preference and phenotypic and genetic tests. Pinnipeds appear to be the natural host for this 'seal bacillus', although the organism is also pathogenic in guinea pigs, rabbits, humans, Brazilian tapir (Tapirus terrestris) and, possibly, cattle. Infection caused by the seal bacillus is predominantly associated with granulomatous lesions in the peripheral lymph nodes, lungs, pleura, spleen and peritoneum. Cases of disseminated disease have been found. As with other members of the M. tuberculosis complex, aerosols are the most likely route of transmission. The name Mycobacterium pinnipedii sp. nov. is proposed for this novel member of the M. tuberculosis complex (the type strain is 6482(T)=ATCC BAA-688(T)=NCTC 13288(T)).

  3. Mycobacterium angelicum sp. nov., a non-chromogenic, slow-growing species isolated from fish and related to Mycobacterium szulgai.

    PubMed

    Pourahmad, Fazel; Pate, Mateja; Ocepek, Matjaž; Borroni, Emanuele; Cabibbe, Andrea M; Capitolo, Eleonora; Cittaro, Davide; Frizzera, Eliana; Jenčič, Vlasta; Mariottini, Alessandro; Marumo, Kenji; Vaggelli, Guendalina; Cirillo, Daniela M; Tortoli, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    The name 'Mycobacterium angelicum' dates back to 2003 when it was suggested for a slowly growing mycobacterium isolated from freshwater angelfish. This name is revived here and the novel species is proposed on the basis of the polyphasic characterization of four strains including the original one. The four strains presented 100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Mycobacterium szulgai but clearly differed from M. szulgai for the milky white aspect of the colonies. The sequence similarity with the type strain of M. szulgai ranged, in eight additionally investigated genetic targets, from 78.9 to 94.3 %, an evident contrast with the close relatedness that emerged at the level of 16S rRNA gene. The average nucleotide identity between the genomes of M. szulgai DSM 44166T and strain 126/5/03T (type strain of the novel species) was 92.92 %, and supported the status of independent species. The confirmation of the name Mycobacterium angelicum sp. nov. is proposed, with strain 126/5/03T ( = CIP 109313T = DSM 45057T) as the type strain.

  4. Description of Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov., a Mycobacterium fortuitum group organism isolated from a posttraumatic osteitis inflammation.

    PubMed

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Stein, Andréas; Carvajal, Joseph; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2006-04-01

    A nonpigmented rapidly growing mycobacterium was isolated from wound liquid outflow, bone tissue biopsy, and excised skin tissue from a 31-year-old woman who suffered an accidental open right tibia fracture and prolonged stay in a river. The three isolates grew in 3 days at 24 to 37 degrees C. 16S rRNA sequence analyses over 1,483 bp showed that they were identical and shared 99.7% (4-bp difference) sequence similarity with that of Mycobacterium porcinum, the most closely related species. Partial rpoB (723 bp) sequence analyses showed that the isolates shared 97.0% sequence similarity with that of M. porcinum. Further polyphasic approaches, including biochemical tests, antimicrobial susceptibility analyses, and hsp65, sodA, and recA gene sequence analysis, as well as % G+C determination and cell wall fatty acid composition analysis supported the evidence that these isolates were representative of a new species. Phylogenetic analyses showed the close relationship with M. porcinum in the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The isolates were susceptible to most antibiotics and exhibited evidence for penicillinase activity, in contrast to M. porcinum. We propose the name Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov. for this new species associated with posttraumatic osteitis. The type strain is D16(T) (equivalent to CIP 108544(T) and CCUG 50187(T)).

  5. Description of Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov., a Mycobacterium fortuitum Group Organism Isolated from a Posttraumatic Osteitis Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Stein, Andréas; Carvajal, Joseph; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2006-01-01

    A nonpigmented rapidly growing mycobacterium was isolated from wound liquid outflow, bone tissue biopsy, and excised skin tissue from a 31-year-old woman who suffered an accidental open right tibia fracture and prolonged stay in a river. The three isolates grew in 3 days at 24 to 37°C. 16S rRNA sequence analyses over 1,483 bp showed that they were identical and shared 99.7% (4-bp difference) sequence similarity with that of Mycobacterium porcinum, the most closely related species. Partial rpoB (723 bp) sequence analyses showed that the isolates shared 97.0% sequence similarity with that of M. porcinum. Further polyphasic approaches, including biochemical tests, antimicrobial susceptibility analyses, and hsp65, sodA, and recA gene sequence analysis, as well as % G+C determination and cell wall fatty acid composition analysis supported the evidence that these isolates were representative of a new species. Phylogenetic analyses showed the close relationship with M. porcinum in the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The isolates were susceptible to most antibiotics and exhibited evidence for penicillinase activity, in contrast to M. porcinum. We propose the name Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov. for this new species associated with posttraumatic osteitis. The type strain is D16T (equivalent to CIP 108544T and CCUG 50187T). PMID:16597850

  6. Study of Biochemical Pathways and Enzymes Involved in Pyrene Degradation by Mycobacterium sp. Strain KMS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pyrene degradation is known in bacteria. In this study, Mycobacterium sp. Strain KMS was used to study the metabolites produced during, and enzymes involved in, pyrene degradation. Several key metabolites, including pyrene-4,5-dione, cis-4,5-pyrene-dihydrodiol, phenanthrene-4,5-dicarboxylic acid, ...

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by a Mycobacterium sp. in microcosms containing sediment and water from a pristine ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Heitkamp, M.A.; Cerniglia, C.E. )

    1989-08-01

    Microcosm studies were conducted to evaluate the survival and performance of a recently discovered polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading Mycobacterium sp. when this organism was added to sediment and water from a pristine ecosystem. Microcosms inoculated with the Mycobacterium sp. showed enhanced mineralization, singly and as components in a mixture, of 2-methylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Studies utilizing pyrene as the sole added PAH showed that the Mycobacterium sp. survived in microcosms for 6 weeks both with and without preexposure to PAH and mineralized multiple doses of pyrene. Pyrene mineralization rates for sterilized microcosms inoculated with the Mycobacterium sp. showed that competition with indigenous microorganisms did not adversely affect survival of or pyrene degradation by the Mycobacterium sp. Pyrene mineralization by the Mycobacterium sp. was not enhanced by inorganic nutrient enrichment and was hindered by organic nutrient enrichment, which appeared to result from overgrowth of indigenous bacteria. This study demonstrates the versatility of the PAH-degrading Mycobacterium sp. and expands its potential applications to include the degradation of two-, three-, four-, and five-ringed PAHs in sediments.

  8. Ecotoxicological assessment of PAHs and their dead-end metabolites after degradation by Mycobacterium sp. strain SNP11.

    PubMed

    Pagnout, Christophe; Rast, Claudine; Veber, Anne-Marie; Poupin, Pascal; Férard, Jean-François

    2006-10-01

    Mycobacterium sp. SNP11 has a high PAH biodegradation potential. In this paper, the toxicity of pyrene, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, and their dead-end metabolites, accumulated in the media after biodegradation by Mycobacterium sp. SNP11, were evaluated by a screening battery of acute, chronic, and genotoxic tests. According to the bioassays, performed on bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, Salmonella typhimurium strains TA1535/pSK1002, TA97a, TA98, TA100), algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and crustaceans (Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia), total disappearance or a very significant reduction of the (geno)toxic potential was observed after PAH degradation by Mycobacterium sp. SNP11.

  9. Mycobacterium massilipolynesiensis” sp. nov., a rapidly-growing mycobacterium of medical interest related to Mycobacterium phlei

    PubMed Central

    Phelippeau, M.; Asmar, S.; Osman, D. Aboubaker; Sassi, M.; Robert, C.; Michelle, C.; Musso, D.; Drancourt, M.

    2017-01-01

    In French Polynesia, respiratory tract clinical isolate M26, displayed unusual phenotype and contradictory phylogenetic affiliations, suggesting a hitherto unidentified rapidly-growing Mycobacterium species. The phenotype of strain M26 was further characterized and its genome sequenced. Strain M26 genome consists in a 5,732,017-bp circular chromosome with a G + C% of 67.54%, comprising 5,500 protein-coding genes and 52 RNA genes (including two copies of the 16 S rRNA gene). One region coding for a putative prophage was also predicted. An intriguing characteristic of strain M26’s genome is the large number of genes encoding polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthases. Phylogenomic analysis showed that strain M26’s genome is closest to the Mycobacterium phlei genome with a 76.6% average nucleotide identity. Comparative genomics of 33 Mycobacterium genomes yielded 361 genes unique to M26 strain which functional annotation revealed 84.21% of unknown function and 3.88% encoding lipid transport and metabolism; while 48.87% of genes absent in M26 strain have unknown function, 9.5% are implicated in transcription and 19% are implicated in transport and metabolism. Strain M26’s unique phenotypic and genomic characteristics indicate it is representative of a new species named “Mycobacterium massilipolynesiensis”. Looking for mycobacteria in remote areas allows for the discovery of new Mycobacterium species. PMID:28074866

  10. Mycobacterium paraintracellulare sp. nov., for the genotype INT-1 of Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Hong; Won, Yu-Seop; Jeon, Che Ok; Jeong, Joseph; Lee, Seon Ho; Lim, Ji-Hun; Lee, Seung-Heon; Kim, Chang Ki; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-08-01

    Three mycobacterial strains, isolated from independent Korean patients with pulmonary infections, belonging to the Mycobacterium intracellulare genotype 1 (INT-1) were characterized using a polyphasic approach. The sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the INT-1 strains were identical to those of Mycobacterium intracellulare ATCC 13950T. However, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis targeting five housekeeping genes (hsp65, rpoB, argG, gnd and pgm) revealed the phylogenetic separation of these strains from M. intracellulare ATCC 13950T. DNA-DNA hybridization values of >70 % confirmed that the three isolates belong to the same species, while the values of <70 % between one of them and the type strains of M. intracellulare and Mycobacterium chimaera confirmed their belonging to a distinct species. In addition, phenotypic characteristics such as positive growth on MacConkey agar and in acidic broth culture, unique matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS profiles of lipids, and unique mycolic acids profiles further supported the taxonomic status of these strains as representatives of a novel species of the Mycobacterium avium complex named Mycobacterium paraintracellulare. The type strain is MOTT64T (=KCTC 29084T=JCM 30622T).

  11. Mycobacterium aquaticum sp. nov., a rapidly growing species isolated from haemodialysis water.

    PubMed

    Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh; Trovato, Alberto; Droz, Sara; Haidarieh, Parvin; Borroni, Emanuele; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Mannino, Roberta; Hashemzadeh, Mohamad; Mariottini, Alessandro; Cirillo, Daniela Maria; Tortoli, Enrico

    2017-09-01

    The characterization of five Iranian isolates, four from hospital haemodialysis water and one from the sputum of a patient, led to the detection of a novel mycobacterium species. The strains were characterized by mucoid colonies developing in 3-5 days at temperatures ranging from 25 to 37 °C. The biochemical test pattern was unremarkable while the HPLC profile of mycolic acids resembled that of Mycobacterium fortuitum. The sequences of three major housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, hsp65 and rpoB) were unique and differed from those of any other mycobacterium. Mycobacterium brisbanense, which is the species that shared the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (99.03 %), was distinct, as shown by the average nucleotide identity and by the genome to genome distance values (91.05 and 43.10 %, respectively). The strains are thus considered to represent a novel species of the genus Mycobacterium, for which the name Mycobacterium aquaticum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RW6T (=DSM 104277T=CIP111198T).

  12. CROSS-INDUCTION OF PYRENE AND PHENANTHRENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM SP. ISOLATED FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED RIVER SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading culture enriched from contaminated river sediments and a Mycobacterium sp. isolated from the enrichment were tested to investigate the possible synergistic and antagonistic interactions affecting the degradation of pyrene in the p...

  13. CROSS-INDUCTION OF PYRENE AND PHENANTHRENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM SP. ISOLATED FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED RIVER SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading culture enriched from contaminated river sediments and a Mycobacterium sp. isolated from the enrichment were tested to investigate the possible synergistic and antagonistic interactions affecting the degradation of pyrene in the p...

  14. Effectiveness of ultrasound for the destruction of Mycobacterium sp. strain (6PY1).

    PubMed

    Al Bsoul, Abeer; Magnin, Jean-Pierre; Commenges-Bernole, Nadine; Gondrexon, Nicolas; Willison, John; Petrier, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound is widely used to disinfect drinking water and wastewater due to its strong physical and chemical effects on microorganisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrasound on the destruction of Mycobacterium strain 6PY1. Ultrasound waves (20 kHz or 612 kHz) were used to treat aqueous suspensions of Mycobacterium at different volumes, initial bacterial concentrations, and power densities. At the same power density and the same exposure time, sonication at high frequency resulted in a lower destruction of Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1 (35.5%) than sonication at low frequency (93%). The percentage of removal was not significantly affected by the volume of the irradiated suspension (150-300 ml) or the initial cell concentration (2.15 x 10(-3)-1.4 x 10(-2)mg protein L(-1)). At low frequency, the removal percentage of Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1 increased with increasing the power density, with a constant level reached after a certain power density. At high frequency, the removal percentage of Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1 increased with increasing the power density. The mechanism of cell killing was investigated by examining the effects of OH() radical scavengers such as sodium carbonate. At high frequency the presence of sodium carbonate suppressed the removal process. However, at low frequency the removal process was not affected, thus indicating that OH() radicals have a negligible role in this case. The latter result was supported by ten time's H(2)O(2) production at high frequency greater than that at low frequency.

  15. Mycobacterium shottsii sp. nov., a slowly growing species isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Kotob, S.; van Berkum, P.; Kaattari, I.; Vogelbein, W.; Quinn, F.; Floyd, M.M.; Butler, W.R.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Slowly growing, non-pigmented mycobacteria were isolated from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) during an epizootic of mycobacteriosis in the Chesapeake Bay. Growth characteristics, acid-fastness and results of 16S rRNA gene sequencing were consistent with those of the genus Mycobacterium. A unique profile of biochemical reactions was observed among the 21 isolates. A single cluster of eight peaks identified by analysis of mycolic acids (HPLC) resembled those of reference patterns but differed in peak elution times from profiles of reference species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. One isolate (M175T) was placed within the slowly growing mycobacteria by analysis of aligned 16S rRNA gene sequences and was proximate in phylogeny to Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium marinum. However, distinct nucleotide differences were detected in the 16S rRNA gene sequence among M175T, M. ulcerans and M. marinum (99.2% similarity). Isolate M175T could be differentiated from other slowly growing, non-pigmented mycobacteria by its inability to grow at 37??C, production of niacin and urease, absence of nitrate reductase and resistance to isoniazid (1 ??g ml-1), thiacetazone and thiophene-2-carboxylic hydrazide. Based upon these genetic and phenotypic differences, isolate M175T (= ATCC 700981T = NCTC 13215T) is proposed as the type strain of a novel species, Mycobacterium shottsii sp. nov.

  16. Localization of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1815D mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Egorova, O V; Nikolayeva, V M; Suzina, N E; Donova, M V

    2005-04-01

    The localization of mycobacterial 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-OH SDH) was studied using cell fractionation and cytochemical investigation. Mycobacterium sp. Et1 mutant strain derived from Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1815D and characterized by increased 17beta-OH SDH activity was used as a model organism. Subcellular distribution study showed both soluble and membrane-bound forms of mycobacterial 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The cytochemical method based on a copper ferrocyanide procedure followed by electron microscopic visualization was applied in order to investigate the intracellular localization of bacterial 17beta-OH SDH in more detail. The enzyme was found to be located in the peripheral cytoplasmic zone adjoining the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). 17beta-OH SDH was loosely membrane bound and easily released into the environment under the cell integrity failure.

  17. Mycobacterium neoaurum and Mycobacterium bacteremicum sp. nov. as Causes of Mycobacteremia ▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Wallace, Richard J.; Petti, Cathy A.; Mann, Linda Bridge; McGlasson, Maria; Chihara, Shingo; Smith, Geremy L.; Painter, Patrick; Hail, Daymon; Wilson, Rebecca; Simmon, Keith E.

    2010-01-01

    Reference isolates of Mycobacterium neoaurum, Mycobacterium aurum, and the nonvalidated species “Mycobacterium lacticola” were the focus of two recent molecular taxonomic studies. On the basis of this grouping, we identified 46 clinical pigmented, rapidly growing mycobacterial isolates. By 16S rRNA gene sequencing, only two major taxa were identified: M. neoaurum and a previously uncharacterized “M. neoaurum-like” group. The M. neoaurum-like group exhibited only 99.7% identity to M. neoaurum by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and 96.5% identity to M. neoaurum by rpoB sequencing and was named M. bacteremicum. No clinical isolates of M. aurum or M. lacticola were identified. Of isolates with known sources, 4/8 (50%) of M. bacteremicum isolates and 22/34 (65%) of M. neoaurum isolates were recovered from blood, and 35% of these were known to be from patients with catheter-related sepsis. MIC and clinical data on these 46 isolates of M. neoaurum and M. bacteremicum along with a review of 16 previously reported cases of infection with the M. neoaurum-M. lacticola group demonstrated that the isolates were highly susceptible to all drugs tested except clarithromycin, and most clinical cases were successfully treated. The clarithromycin resistance suggested the presence of an inducible erm gene reported in other species of rapidly growing mycobacteria. Sequencing studies are currently required to identify these two species. Strain ATCC 25791 (originally submitted as an example of Mycobacterium aurum) is proposed to be the type strain of M. bacteremicum. PMID:20881180

  18. Degradation of phenanthrene, fluorene, fluoranthene, and pyrene by a Mycobacterium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Boldrin, B; Tiehm, A; Fritzsche, C

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain BB1 was isolated from a former coal gasification site. It was able to utilize phenanthrene, pyrene, and fluoranthene as sole sources of carbon and energy and to degrade fluorene cometabolically. Exponential growth with solid phenanthrene, pyrene, and fluoranthene was obtained in fermentor cultures. The growth rates were 0.069, 0.056, and 0.040 h-1, respectively. Several metabolites of phenanthrene and fluorene metabolism were identified. PMID:8328808

  19. Degradation of phenanthrene, fluorene, fluoranthene, and pyrene by a Mycobacterium sp

    SciTech Connect

    Boldrin, B.; Tiehm, A.; Fritzsche, C. )

    1993-06-01

    Contamination of the environment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are considered hazardous so remediation of contaminated sites is of interest. This paper describes the isolation and characterization of a scotochromogenic Mycobacterium sp. that metabolizes pyrene, flouranthene, phenanthrene, and several other aromatic compounds as sole carbon sources. Exponential, non-substrate-limited degradation and growth as characteristic parameters of the bacterium are investigated. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Specific detection of Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA using dual labeled gold nanoparticle based electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Thiruppathiraja, Chinnasamy; Kamatchiammal, Senthilkumar; Adaikkappan, Periyakaruppan; Santhosh, Devakirubakaran Jayakar; Alagar, Muthukaruppan

    2011-10-01

    The present study was aimed at the development and evaluation of a DNA electrochemical biosensor for Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA detection in a clinical specimen using a signal amplifier as dual-labeled AuNPs. The DNA electrochemical biosensors were fabricated using a sandwich detection strategy involving two kinds of DNA probes specific to Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA. The probes of enzyme ALP and the detector probe both conjugated on the AuNPs and subsequently hybridized with target DNA immobilized in a SAM/ITO electrode followed by characterization with CV, EIS, and DPV analysis using the electroactive species para-nitrophenol generated by ALP through hydrolysis of para-nitrophenol phosphate. The effect of enhanced sensitivity was obtained due to the AuNPs carrying numerous ALPs per hybridization and a detection limit of 1.25 ng/ml genomic DNA was determined under optimized conditions. The dual-labeled AuNP-facilitated electrochemical sensor was also evaluated by clinical sputum samples, showing a higher sensitivity and specificity and the outcome was in agreement with the PCR analysis. In conclusion, the developed electrochemical sensor demonstrated unique sensitivity and specificity for both genomic DNA and sputum samples and can be employed as a regular diagnostics tool for Mycobacterium sp. monitoring in clinical samples.

  1. Mycobacterium arupense, Mycobacterium heraklionense, and a Newly Proposed Species, “Mycobacterium virginiense” sp. nov., but Not Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum, as Species of the Mycobacterium terrae Complex Causing Tenosynovitis and Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Vasireddy, Sruthi; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Wengenack, Nancy L.; Eke, Uzoamaka A.; Benwill, Jeana L.; Turenne, Christine; Wallace, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium terrae complex has been recognized as a cause of tenosynovitis, with M. terrae and Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum reported as the primary etiologic pathogens. The molecular taxonomy of the M. terrae complex causing tenosynovitis has not been established despite approximately 50 previously reported cases. We evaluated 26 isolates of the M. terrae complex associated with tenosynovitis or osteomyelitis recovered between 1984 and 2014 from 13 states, including 5 isolates reported in 1991 as M. nonchromogenicum by nonmolecular methods. The isolates belonged to three validated species, one new proposed species, and two novel related strains. The majority of isolates (20/26, or 77%) belonged to two recently described species: Mycobacterium arupense (10 isolates, or 38%) and Mycobacterium heraklionense (10 isolates, or 38%). Three isolates (12%) had 100% sequence identity to each other by 16S rRNA and 99.3 to 100% identity by rpoB gene region V sequencing and represent a previously undescribed species within the M. terrae complex. There were no isolates of M. terrae or M. nonchromogenicum, including among the five isolates reported in 1991. The 26 isolates were susceptible to clarithromycin (100%), rifabutin (100%), ethambutol (92%), and sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (70%). The current study suggests that M. arupense, M. heraklionense, and a newly proposed species (“M. virginiense” sp. nov.; proposed type strain MO-233 [DSM 100883, CIP 110918]) within the M. terrae complex are the major causes of tenosynovitis and osteomyelitis in the United States, with little change over 20 years. Species identification within this complex requires sequencing methods. PMID:26962085

  2. Mycobacterium sherrisii sp. nov., a slow-growing non-chromogenic species

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, Enrico; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Coyle, Marie B.; Crump, John A.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Dekhuijzen, P. N. Richard; Boeree, Martin J.; van Soolingen, Dick

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium sherrisii’ is an undescribed species that appears to be emerging, in particular, among HIV-positive patients originating from Africa. To describe ‘M. sherrisii’, to ensure that the species name is validly published and to define its phylogenetic position, we collected 11 of these strains reported in five previous studies, and subjected them to biochemical identification, cell-wall mycolic acid analysis and sequencing of multiple housekeeping genes. The bacteria formed smooth and generally non-chromogenic colonies after 2–3 weeks of subculture at 24–37 °C; photochromogenic and scotochromogenic pigmentation were exhibited by three and two strains, respectively. The strains were positive for the heat-stable catalase test, but negative in tests for hydrolysis of Tween 80, nitrate reduction, β-glucosidase and 3-day arylsulfatase. Mycolic acid patterns, obtained by HPLC, resembled a trimodal profile similar to those of type strains of Mycobacterium simiae, Mycobacterium lentiflavum, Mycobacterium triplex and Mycobacterium genavense. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the 11 strains differed by 4 bp (99.7 % similarity) from that of the type strain of the closest related species, M. simiae ATCC 25275T. Levels of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and partial hsp65 and rpoB gene sequence similarity between the two taxa were 95.8 % (271/283 bp), 97.5 % (391/401 bp) and 95.2 % (700/735 bp), respectively. On the basis of these results, we propose the formal recognition of Mycobacterium sherrisii sp. nov. The type strain is 4773T ( = ATCC BAA-832T = DSM 45441T). PMID:20639227

  3. Mycobacterium icosiumassiliensis sp. nov., a New Member in the Mycobacterium terrae Complex Isolated from Surface Water in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Djouadi, Lydia N; Levasseur, Anthony; Khalil, Jacques Bou; Blanc-Taileur, Caroline; Asmar, Shady; Ghiloubi, Wassila; Natèche, Farida; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-08-01

    An acid-fast, rapidly growing, rod-shaped microorganism designated 8WA6 was isolated from a lake in Algiers, Algeria. The lake water was characterized by a temperature of 18 °C, a pH of 7.82, a copper concentration of 8.6 µg/L, and a cadmium concentration of 0.6 µg/L. First-line molecular identification confirmed the 8WA6 isolate to be a member of the Mycobacterium terrae complex, sharing 99.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with M. arupense AR-30097, 98.2 % partial hsp65 gene sequence similarity with M. terrae 28K766, and 97.1 % partial rpoB gene sequence similarity with Mycobacterium sp. FI-05396. Its 4.89-Mb genome exhibits a 66.8 GC % and an average nucleotide identity of 64.5 % with M. tuberculosis, 70.5 % with M. arupense, and 75 % with M. asiaticum. In the M. terrae complex, Mycobacterium 8WA6 was unique in exhibiting growth at 42 °C, negative reaction for nitrate reduction, urease activity and Tween 80 hydrolysis, and a positive reaction for α-glucosidase and β-glucosidase. Its protein profile determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed a unique spectrum similar to M. arupense and M. terrae, exhibiting eleven specific peaks at 3787.791, 4578.019, 6349.630, 6855.638, 7202.310, 8149.608, 8775.257, 10,224.588, 10,484.116, 12,226.379, and 12,636.871 m/z. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for antibiotics, determined by microdilution, indicated a broad spectrum resistance, except for rifabutin (MIC, 0.5 g/L) and cefoxitin (MIC, 16 g/L). We concluded that the 8WA6 isolate is a representative isolate of a previously undescribed species in the M. terrae complex, which was named M. icosiumassiliensis sp. nov. with strain 8WA6 (Collection de Souches de l'Unité des Rickettsies, CSUR P1561, Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen, DSM 100711) as the type strain.

  4. Biocatalysis of Steroids with Mycobacterium sp. in Aqueous and Organic Media.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Fernandes, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. can convert steroids such as β-sitosterol, campesterol, and cholesterol into commercially interesting products. In aqueous systems, the biocatalysis is limited by the low solubility of the steroids in water. This may be overcome by the introduction of an organic phase acting as a substrate and/or product reservoir.In this chapter, we describe the biocatalysis of β-sitosterol to 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD) and 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione (ADD) both in aqueous and organic-aqueous systems. In the latter case, both traditional organic solvents and green solvents are proposed.

  5. Mycobacterium minnesotense sp. nov., a photochromogenic bacterium isolated from sphagnum peat bogs.

    PubMed

    Hannigan, Geoffrey D; Krivogorsky, Bogdana; Fordice, Daniel; Welch, Jacqueline B; Dahl, John L

    2013-01-01

    Several intermediate-growing, photochromogenic bacteria were isolated from sphagnum peat bogs in northern Minnesota, USA. Acid-fast staining and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed these environmental isolates in the genus Mycobacterium, and colony morphologies and PCR restriction analysis patterns of the isolates were similar. Partial sequences of hsp65 and dnaJ1 from these isolates showed that Mycobacterium arupense ATCC BAA-1242(T) was the closest mycobacterial relative, and common biochemical characteristics and antibiotic susceptibilities existed between the isolates and M. arupense ATCC BAA-1242(T). However, compared to nonchromogenic M. arupense ATCC BAA-1242(T), the environmental isolates were photochromogenic, had a different mycolic acid profile and had reduced cell-surface hydrophobicity in liquid culture. The data reported here support the conclusion that the isolates are representatives of a novel mycobacterial species, for which the name Mycobacterium minnesotense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DL49(T) (=DSM 45633(T) = JCM 17932(T) = NCCB 100399(T)).

  6. Characterization of a Novel Group of Mycobacteria and Proposal of Mycobacterium sherrisii sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Wu, Whei-Kuo; Nguyen, Trang T.; Carlson, La Donna C.; Wallis, Carolyn K.; Stiglich, Susan K.; Chen, Yi-Ching; Jost, Kenneth C.; Prentice, Jennifer L.; Wallace, Richard J.; Rassoulian Barrett, Sara L.; Cookson, Brad T.; Coyle, Marie B.

    2004-01-01

    We describe here the characterization of five isolates of Mycobacterium simiae-like organisms representing a novel group based on whole-cell fatty acid analysis and genotypic evaluation. Two of the five isolates in this study, W55 and W58, were previously considered to belong to M. simiae serotype 2. Analysis of cellular fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography indicated a close clustering of this group, which was well differentiated from the other M. simiae-like species. Molecular characterization was performed by nucleic acid sequencing of the small subunit rRNA gene and the gene encoding the 65-kDa heat shock protein and genomic DNA hybridization. Sequence analysis of the entire 16S rRNA gene showed a unique sequence most closely related to those of M. triplex and M. simiae. The hsp65 partial gene sequence was identical for the five isolates, with 97% identity to the M. simiae type strain. However, qualitative whole genomic DNA hybridization analysis confirmed that this group is genetically distinct from M. simiae and M. triplex. Antimicrobial susceptibilities for this group resemble those of M. simiae and M. lentiflavum. We conclude that this group represents a unique Mycobacterium species for which we propose the name Mycobacterium sherrisii sp. nov. PMID:14715731

  7. Adhesion of a Mycobacterium sp. to cellulose diacetate membranes used in reverse osmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ridgway, H F; Rigby, M G; Argo, D G

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of adhesion of a Mycobacterium sp. to cellulose diacetate reverse-osmosis membranes is described. This Mycobacterium sp. (strain BT2-4) was previously implicated in the initial stages of reverse-osmosis membrane biofouling at a wastewater reclamation facility. Adhesion of BT2-4 cells to the cellulose diacetate membrane surfaces occurred within 1 to 2 h at 30 degrees C and exhibited saturation-type kinetics which conformed closely to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm (Pearson r correlation coefficient = 0.977), a mathematical expression describing the partitioning of substances between a solution and solid-liquid interface. This suggests that the cellulose diacetate membrane surfaces may possess a finite number of available binding sites to which the mycobacteria can adhere. Treatment of the attached mycobacteria with different enzymes suggested that cell surface polypeptides, alpha-1, 4- or alpha-1,6-linked glucan polymers, and carboxyl ester bond-containing substances (possibly peptidoglycolipids) may be involved in mycobacterial adhesion. The possible implication of these findings for reverse-osmosis membrane biofouling are discussed. Images PMID:6696424

  8. An antibody against the surfactant protein A (SP-A)-binding domain of the SP-A receptor inhibits T cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Samten, Buka; Townsend, James C; Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Barnes, Peter F; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2008-07-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) suppresses lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 secretion, in part, by binding to its receptor, SP-R210. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. Here, we studied the effect of antibodies against the SP-A-binding (neck) domain (alpha-SP-R210n) or nonbinding C-terminal domain (alpha-SP-R210ct) of SP-R210 on human peripheral blood T cell immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We demonstrated that both antibodies bind to more than 90% of monocytes and 5-10% of CD3+ T cells in freshly isolated PBMC. Stimulation of PBMC from healthy tuberculin reactors [purified protein derivative-positive (PPD+)] with heat-killed M. tuberculosis induced increased antibody binding to CD3+ cells. Increased antibody binding suggested enhanced expression of SP-R210, and this was confirmed by Western blotting. The antibodies (alpha-SP-R210n) cross-linking the SP-R210 through the SP-A-binding domain markedly inhibited cell proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion by PBMC from PPD+ donors in response to heat-killed M. tuberculosis, whereas preimmune IgG and antibodies (alpha-SP-R210ct) cross-linking SP-R210 through the non-SP-A-binding, C-terminal domain had no effect. Anti-SP-R210n also decreased M. tuberculosis-induced production of TNF-alpha but increased production of IL-10. Inhibition of IFN-gamma production by alpha-SP-R210n was abrogated by the combination of neutralizing antibodies to IL-10 and TGF-beta1. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that SP-A, via SP-R210, suppresses cell-mediated immunity against M. tuberculosis via a mechanism that up-regulates secretion of IL-10 and TGF-beta1.

  9. Mycobacterium hippocampi sp. nov., a rapidly growing scotochromogenic species isolated from a seahorse with tail rot.

    PubMed

    Balcázar, José Luis; Planas, Miquel; Pintado, José

    2014-09-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile, non-sporulating, acid-fast, and rod-shaped bacterium (BFLP-6(T)), previously isolated from a seahorse (Hippocampus guttulatus) with tail rot, was studied using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Growth occurred at 15-35 °C (optimum 25 °C), at pH 5.0-10.0 (optimum pH 7.0) and at NaCl concentrations between 0 and 6 % (w/v). The G+C content of DNA was 66.7 mol%. The predominant fatty acids were C(18:1) ω9c, C(16:0) and C(16:1) ω6c. A mycolic acid pattern of alpha-mycolates and keto-mycolates was detected. Analysis of concatenated sequences (16S rRNA, rpoB, ssrA and tuf genes), and chemotaxonomic and phenotypic features indicated that strain BFLP-6(T) represents a novel species within the genus Mycobacterium, for which the name Mycobacterium hippocampi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BFLP-6(T) (=DSM 45391(T) =LMG 25372(T)).

  10. Mycobacterium conspicuum sp. nov., a new species isolated from patients with disseminated infections.

    PubMed Central

    Springer, B; Tortoli, E; Richter, I; Grünewald, R; Rüsch-Gerdes, S; Uschmann, K; Suter, F; Collins, M D; Kroppenstedt, R M; Böttger, E C

    1995-01-01

    A new type of slowly growing, nonphotochromogenic mycobacterium was recovered from two patients with disseminated disease. The growth characteristics, acid fastness, acids were consistent with those for Mycobacterium species. The results of biochemical investigations, lipid analyses, and comparative 16S rRNA sequencing showed that these isolates represent a new slowly growing Mycobacterium species which is named Mycobacterium conspicuum. PMID:8576323

  11. Identification of a Carboxylic Acid Metabolite from the Catabolism of Fluoranthene by a Mycobacterium sp

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Ingrid; Freeman, James P.; Evans, Frederick E.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    1991-01-01

    A Mycobacterium sp. previously isolated from oil-contaminated estuarine sediments was capable of extensively mineralizing the high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fluoranthene. A carboxylic acid metabolite accumulated and was isolated by thin-layer and high-pressure liquid chromatographic analyses of ethyl acetate extracts from acidified culture media. The metabolite reached a maximum concentration of approximately 0.65% after 24 h of incubation. On the basis of comparisons with authentic compound in which we used UV and fluorescence spectrophotometry and Rf values, as well as mass spectral and proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses, the metabolite was identified as 9-fluorenone-1-carboxylic acid. This is the first report in a microbial system of a fluoranthene metabolite in which significant degradation of one of the aromatic rings has occurred. PMID:16348429

  12. Physiological characterization of Mycobacterium sp. strain 1B isolated from a bacterial culture able to degrade high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Dandie, C E; Thomas, S M; Bentham, R H; McClure, N C

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to further characterize a bacterial culture (VUN 10,010) capable of benzo[a]pyrene cometabolism. The bacterial culture, previously characterized as a pure culture of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (VUN 10,010), was found to also contain another bacterial species (Mycobacterium sp. strain 1B), capable of degrading a similar range of PAH substrates. Analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence and growth characteristics revealed the strain to be a fast-growing Mycobacterium sp., closely related to other previously isolated PAH and xenobiotic-degrading mycobacterial strains. Comparison of the PAH-degrading characteristics of Mycobacterium sp. strain 1B with those of S. maltophilia indicated some similarities (ability to degrade phenanthrene and pyrene), but some differences were also noted (S. maltophilia able to degrade fluorene, but not fluoranthene, whereas Mycobacterium sp. strain 1B can degrade fluoranthene, but not fluorene). Unlike the S. maltophilia culture, there was no evidence of benzo[a]pyrene degradation by Mycobacterium sp. strain 1B, even in the presence of other PAHs (ie pyrene) as co-metabolic substrates. Growth of Mycobacterium sp. strain 1B on other organic carbon sources was also limited compared with the S. maltophilia culture. This study isolated a Mycobacterium strain from a bacterial culture capable of benzo[a]pyrene cometabolism. The Mycobacterium strain displays different PAH-degrading characteristics to those described previously for the PAH-degrading bacterial culture. It is unclear what role the two bacterial strains play in benzo[a]pyrene cometabolism, as the Mycobacterium strain does not appear to have endogenous benzo[a]pyrene degrading ability. This study describes the isolation and characterization of a novel PAH-degrading Mycobacterium strain from a PAH-degrading culture. Further studies utilizing this strain alone, and in combination with other members of the consortium, will provide insight into the diverse roles

  13. Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii sp. nov., a slowly growing chromogenic species isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; McNabb, A.; Deshayes, C.; Reyrat, J.-M.; Brown-Elliott, B. A.; Wallace, R.; Trott, K.A.; Parker, J.M.; Lifland, B.; Osterhout, G.; Kaattari, I.; Reece, K.; Vogelbein, W.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    A group of slowly growing photochromogenic mycobacteria was isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis) during an epizootic of mycobacteriosis. Growth characteristics, acid-fastness and 16S rRNA gene sequencing results were consistent with those of the genus Mycobacterium. Biochemical reactions, growth characteristics and mycolic acid profiles (HPLC) resembled those of Mycobacterium shottsii, a non-pigmented mycobacterium also isolated during the same epizootic. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes, the gene encoding the exported repeated protein (erp) and the gene encoding the 65 kDa heat-shock protein (hsp65) and restriction enzyme analysis of the hsp65 gene demonstrated that this group of isolates is unique. Insertion sequences associated with Mycobacterium ulcerans, IS2404 and IS2606, were detected by PCR. These isolates could be differentiated from other slowly growing pigmented mycobacteria by their inability to grow at 37 ??C, production of niacin and urease, absence of nitrate reductase, negative Tween 80 hydrolysis and resistance to isoniazid (1 ??g ml-1), p-nitrobenzoic acid, thiacetazone and thiophene-2-carboxylic hydrazide. On the basis of this polyphasic study, it is proposed that these isolates represent a novel species, Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii sp. nov. The type strain, L15T, has been deposited in the American Type Culture Collection as ATCC BAA-883T and the National Collection of Type Cultures (UK) as NCTC 13318T. ?? 2005 IUMS.

  14. Molecular Cloning, Nucleotide Sequence, and Expression of Genes Encoding a Polycyclic Aromatic Ring Dioxygenase from Mycobacterium sp. Strain PYR-1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ashraf A.; Wang, Rong-Fu; Cao, Wei-Wen; Doerge, Daniel R.; Wennerstrom, David; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 degrades high-molecular-weight polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAHs) primarily through the introduction of both atoms of molecular oxygen by a dioxygenase. To clone the dioxygenase genes involved in PAH degradation, two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis of PAH-induced proteins from cultures of Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 was used to detect proteins that increased after phenanthrene, dibenzothiophene, and pyrene exposure. Comparison of proteins from induced and uninduced cultures on 2D gels indicated that at least six major proteins were expressed (105, 81, 52, 50, 43, and 13 kDa). The N-terminal sequence of the 50-kDa protein was similar to those of other dioxygenases. A digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probe designed from this protein sequence was used to screen dioxygenase-positive clones from a genomic library of Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1. Three clones, each containing a 5,288-bp DNA insert with three genes of the dioxygenase system, were obtained. The genes in the DNA insert, from the 5′ to the 3′ direction, were a dehydrogenase, the dioxygenase small (β)-subunit, and the dioxygenase large (α)-subunit genes, arranged in a sequence different from those of genes encoding other bacterial dioxygenase systems. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the large α subunit did not cluster with most of the known α-subunit sequences but rather with three newly described α subunits of dioxygenases from Rhodococcus spp. and Nocardioides spp. The genes from Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 were subcloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with the pBAD/ThioFusion system. The functionality of the genes for PAH degradation was confirmed in a phagemid clone containing all three genes, as well as in plasmid subclones containing the two genes encoding the dioxygenase subunits. PMID:11472934

  15. Mycobacterium colombiense sp. nov., a novel member of the Mycobacterium avium complex and description of MAC-X as a new ITS genetic variant.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Martha I; Tortoli, Enrico; Menendez, M Carmen; Palenque, Elia; Garcia, Maria J

    2006-09-01

    Forty-five mycobacterial strains isolated from 23 Colombian HIV-positive patients were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and were characterized using different molecular approaches. Seven of the isolates showed characteristic features that allowed them to be differentiated from other members of the complex. The isolates had a novel 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS 1) gene sequence which is described as a new sequevar, MAC-X. All of the seven novel isolates gave a positive result with the MAC-specific AccuProbe (Gen-Probe), but tested negative for Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare species-specific probes (64 and 100 % of the isolates, respectively). The novel isolates could be differentiated phenotypically from other members of the MAC on the basis of the production of urease and by a consistent mycolic acid pattern. The novel isolates shared some characteristics with M. avium, such as the avium variant I (av-I) pattern of the hsp65 gene as determined by PCR restriction analysis and a positive PCR result for the mig (macrophage-induced) gene. However, the novel isolates showed a unique 16S rRNA gene sequence. DNA-DNA relatedness values, from 24 to 44 %, confirmed the distinction of the novel isolates from other members of the MAC at the genetic level and their status as members of a separate species. The novel isolates are proposed as representatives of a novel species, Mycobacterium colombiense sp. nov., that is closely related to M. avium within the MAC. The type strain is 10B(T) (=CIP 108962(T)=CECT 3035(T)).

  16. Degradation of pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, and benzo[a]pyrene by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135, isolated from a former coal gasification site.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J; Grosser, R; Jayasimhulu, K; Xue, W; Warshawsky, D

    1996-01-01

    The degradation of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), pyrene (PYR), benz[a]anthracene (BAA), and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135 was studied. The bacterium was isolated from an abandoned coal gasification site soil by analog enrichment techniques and found to mineralize [14C]PYR. Further degradation studies with PYR showed three metabolites formed by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135, including 4,5-phenanthrene-dicarboxylic acid not previously isolated, 4-phenanthrene-carboxylic acid, and 4,5-pyrene-dihydrodiol. At least two dihydrodiols, 5,6-BAA-dihydrodiol and 10,11-BAA-dihydrodiol, were confirmed by high-resolution mass spectral and fluorescence analyses as products of the biodegradation of BAA by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135. Additionally, a cleavage product of BAA was also isolated. Mass spectra and fluorescence data support two different routes for the degradation of BaP by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135. The 7,8-BaP-dihydrodiol and three cleavage products of BaP, including 4,5-chrysene-dicarboxylic acid and a dihydro-pyrene-carboxylic acid metabolite, have been isolated and identified as degradation products formed by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135. These latter results represent the first example of the isolation of BaP ring fission products formed by a bacterial isolate. We propose that while this bacterium appears to attack only one site of the PYR molecule, it is capable of degrading different sites of the BAA and BaP molecules, and although the sites of attack may be different, the ability of this bacterium to degrade these PAH is well supported. The proposed pathways for biodegradation of these compounds by this Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135 support the dioxygenase enzymatic processes reported previously for other bacteria. Microorganisms like Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135 will be invaluable in attaining the goal of remediation of sites containing mixtures of these PAH.

  17. Identifying and sequencing a Mycobacterium sp. strain F4 as a potential bioremediation agent for quinclorac.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingying; Chen, Wu; Wang, Yunsheng; Luo, Kun; Li, Yue; Bai, Lianyang; Luo, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Quinclorac is a widely used herbicide in rice filed. Unfortunately, quinclorac residues are phytotoxic to many crops/vegetables. The degradation of quinclorac in nature is very slow. On the other hand, degradation of quinclorac using bacteria can be an effective and efficient method to reduce its contamination. In this study, we isolated a quinclorac bioremediation bacterium strain F4 from quinclorac contaminated soils. Based on morphological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, we identified strain F4 as Mycobacterium sp. We investigated the effects of temperature, pH, inoculation size and initial quinclorac concentration on growth and degrading efficiency of F4 and determined the optimal quinclorac degrading condition of F4. Under optimal degrading conditions, F4 degraded 97.38% of quinclorac from an initial concentration of 50 mg/L in seven days. Our indoor pot experiment demonstrated that the degradation products were non-phytotoxic to tobacco. After analyzing the quinclorac degradation products of F4, we proposed that F4 could employ two pathways to degrade quinclorac: one is through methylation, the other is through dechlorination. Furthermore, we reconstructed the whole genome of F4 through single molecular sequencing and de novo assembly. We identified 77 methyltransferases and eight dehalogenases in the F4 genome to support our hypothesized degradation path.

  18. Pyrene degradation by a Mycobacterium sp.: identification of ring oxidation and ring fission products.

    PubMed Central

    Heitkamp, M A; Freeman, J P; Miller, D W; Cerniglia, C E

    1988-01-01

    The degradation of pyrene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon containing four aromatic rings, by pure cultures of a Mycobacterium sp. was studied. Over 60% of [14C]pyrene was mineralized to CO2 after 96 h of incubation at 24 degrees C. High-pressure liquid chromatography analyses showed the presence of one major and at least six other metabolites that accounted for 95% of the total organic-extractable 14C-labeled residues. Analyses by UV, infrared, mass, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry and gas chromatography identified both pyrene cis- and trans-4,5-dihydrodiols and pyrenol as initial microbial ring-oxidation products of pyrene. The major metabolite, 4-phenanthroic acid, and 4-hydroxyperinaphthenone and cinnamic and phthalic acids were identified as ring fission products. 18O2 studies showed that the formation of cis- and trans-4,5-dihydrodiols were catalyzed by dioxygenase and monooxygenase enzymes, respectively. This is the first report of the chemical pathway for the microbial catabolism of pyrene. PMID:3202634

  19. Proposal to elevate the genetic variant MAC-A, included in the Mycobacterium avium complex, to species rank as Mycobacterium chimaera sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Tortoli, Enrico; Rindi, Laura; Garcia, Maria J; Chiaradonna, Patrizia; Dei, Rosanna; Garzelli, Carlo; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Lari, Nicoletta; Mattei, Romano; Mariottini, Alessandro; Mazzarelli, Gianna; Murcia, Martha I; Nanetti, Anna; Piccoli, Paola; Scarparo, Claudio

    2004-07-01

    The possibility that the strains included within the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), but not belonging either to M. avium or to Mycobacterium intracellulare, may be members of undescribed taxa, has already been questioned by several taxonomists. A very homogeneous cluster of 12 strains characterized by identical nucleotide sequences both in the 16S rDNA and in the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer was investigated. Similar strains, previously reported in the literature, had been assigned either to the species M. intracellulare on the basis of the 16S rDNA similarity or to the group of MAC intermediates. However, several phenotypical and epidemiological characteristics seem to distinguish these strains from all other MAC organisms. The unique mycolic acid pattern obtained by HPLC is striking as it is characterized by two clusters of peaks, instead of the three presented by all other MAC organisms. All of the strains have been isolated from humans and all but one came from the respiratory tract of elderly people. The clinical significance of these strains, ascertained for seven patients, seems to suggest an unusually high virulence. The characteristics of all the strains reported in the literature, genotypically identical to the ones described here, seem to confirm our data, without reports of isolations from animals or the environment or, among humans, from AIDS patients. Therefore, an elevation of the MAC variant was proposed and characterized here, with the name Mycobacterium chimaera sp. nov.; this increases the number of species included in the M. avium complex. The type strain is FI-01069T (=CIP 107892T=DSM 44623T).

  20. Metabolism of 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) by the aerobic bacterium Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1.

    PubMed

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth; Hyman, Michael

    2015-03-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h(-1)) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene(-1). Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates.

  1. Metabolism of 2-Methylpropene (Isobutylene) by the Aerobic Bacterium Mycobacterium sp. Strain ELW1

    PubMed Central

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h−1) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene−1. Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates. PMID:25576605

  2. The effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on the degradation of benzo[a]pyrene by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Sandra L; Warshawsky, David; Shann, Jodi R

    2002-02-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135 is capable of degrading a wide range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). In this study, critical aspects of degradation were investigated, including compound uptake, relative rates of PAH degradation, and the effects of co-occurring PAH substrates on BaP degradation and mineralization to CO2. Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135 was capable of degrading phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene at a 10- to 20-fold greater rate than benz[a]anthracene (BaA) and BaP. A significant amount of phenanthrene and pyrene, 30% and 10%, respectively, was completely mineralized, whereas less than 4% of anthracene, BaA, and BaP was mineralized. The PAH uptake assays demonstrated that high amounts of BaP and BaA, 81% and 75% of added compound, respectively, could be recovered from bacterial cell fractions after a 4-h incubation compared with pyrene (61%), anthracene (53%), and phenanthrene (47%). The half-saturation constant (Km) for pyrene was threefold lower for pyrene over BaP, suggesting that the degradation system in Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135 has a higher affinity for pyrene, reaching maximal degradative activity at lower concentrations. No hybridization to dioxygenase gene probes nahAc, bphA1, or tolC1C2 was detected. Studies to investigate competition between different PAH substrates demonstrated that the rate of BaP metabolism was influenced by the presence of a second PAH substrate. The BaP metabolism was inhibited when coincubated with BaA, pyrene, and anthracene. Phenanthrene did not inhibit but enhanced BaP metabolism sixfold. These data suggest that induction effects of components of complex mixtures may be as important as competitive metabolism when assessing the ability of bacteria to effectively degrade high-molecular-weight PAHs in the environment.

  3. Degradation of pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, and benzo[a]pyrene by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135, isolated from a former coal gasification site.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, J; Grosser, R; Jayasimhulu, K; Xue, W; Warshawsky, D

    1996-01-01

    The degradation of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), pyrene (PYR), benz[a]anthracene (BAA), and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135 was studied. The bacterium was isolated from an abandoned coal gasification site soil by analog enrichment techniques and found to mineralize [14C]PYR. Further degradation studies with PYR showed three metabolites formed by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135, including 4,5-phenanthrene-dicarboxylic acid not previously isolated, 4-phenanthrene-carboxylic acid, and 4,5-pyrene-dihydrodiol. At least two dihydrodiols, 5,6-BAA-dihydrodiol and 10,11-BAA-dihydrodiol, were confirmed by high-resolution mass spectral and fluorescence analyses as products of the biodegradation of BAA by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135. Additionally, a cleavage product of BAA was also isolated. Mass spectra and fluorescence data support two different routes for the degradation of BaP by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135. The 7,8-BaP-dihydrodiol and three cleavage products of BaP, including 4,5-chrysene-dicarboxylic acid and a dihydro-pyrene-carboxylic acid metabolite, have been isolated and identified as degradation products formed by Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135. These latter results represent the first example of the isolation of BaP ring fission products formed by a bacterial isolate. We propose that while this bacterium appears to attack only one site of the PYR molecule, it is capable of degrading different sites of the BAA and BaP molecules, and although the sites of attack may be different, the ability of this bacterium to degrade these PAH is well supported. The proposed pathways for biodegradation of these compounds by this Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135 support the dioxygenase enzymatic processes reported previously for other bacteria. Microorganisms like Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135 will be invaluable in attaining the goal of remediation of sites containing mixtures of these PAH. PMID:8572690

  4. Isolation and characterization of a unique group of slowly growing mycobacteria: description of Mycobacterium lentiflavum sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Springer, B; Wu, W K; Bodmer, T; Haase, G; Pfyffer, G E; Kroppenstedt, R M; Schröder, K H; Emler, S; Kilburn, J O; Kirschner, P; Telenti, A; Coyle, M B; Böttger, E C

    1996-01-01

    A distinct group of slowly growing mycobacteria was identified on the basis of growth characteristics, biochemical and lipid profiles, and nucleic acid analyses. The isolates showed growth at 22 to 37 degrees C, yellow pigmentation, and negative tests for Tween 80 hydrolysis, nicotinic acid, nitrate reductase, and urease; tests for arylsulfatase, pyrazinamidase, and heat-stable catalase were variable. Analysis of cellular fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography and mycolic acids by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography indicated a distinctive pattern which was unlike those of other species. Determination of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed a unique sequence closely related to Mycobacterium simiae and M. genavense. On the basis of DNA homology studies, we suggest that these organisms are representatives of a novel species, for which the name M. lentiflavum sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:8727884

  5. Mycobacterium sp. as a possible cause of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in machine workers.

    PubMed

    Shelton, B G; Flanders, W D; Morris, G K

    1999-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) in workers exposed to metal removal fluids (MRFs) is increasing. This study supports the hypothesis that aerosolized mycobacteria colonizing the MRFs likely cause the disease. Three case studies of HP outbreaks among metal workers showed potentially high exposures to a rare and newly proposed Mycobacterium species. Retrospective review of samples submitted to our laboratory showed an association between presence of mycobacteria and HP.

  6. A new agent of mycobacterial lymphadenitis in children: Mycobacterium heidelbergense sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, W H; Butler, W R; Kirschner, P; Plikaytis, B B; Coyle, M B; Amthor, B; Steigerwalt, A G; Brenner, D J; Salfinger, M; Crawford, J T; Böttger, E C; Bremer, H J

    1997-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial lymphadenitis presents an increasing clinical problem in immunocompetent young children. A slowly growing, nonphotochromogenic mycobacterium was recovered twice (isolates 2553/91 and 2554/91) from the lymphatic tissue of a child with recurrent cervical lymphadenitis. It could be differentiated biochemically from described Mycobacterium species, although it most closely resembled Mycobacterium malmoense by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography of mycolic acids. A striking characteristic of the isolate was its high degree of susceptibility to antituberculous drugs in vitro, including isoniazid. Direct determination of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed a unique sequence and positioned the strain phylogenetically on a branch separate from M. malmoense within a group of slowly growing mycobacteria that show a high degree of similarity to M. simiae at the 16S rRNA gene level. Despite 99.6% sequence identity with M. simiae at the 16S rRNA gene level, DNA-DNA hybridization studies (hydroxyapatite method) demonstrated DNA relatedness of less than 40%. We conclude that this organism is a new species for which we propose the name M. heidelbergense. A culture of the type strain, strain 2554/91, has been deposited in the American Type Culture Collection as strain ATCC 51253. PMID:9399520

  7. Identification of Pyrene-Induced Proteins in Mycobacterium sp. Strain 6PY1: Evidence for Two Ring-Hydroxylating Dioxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Krivobok, Serge; Kuony, Sylvain; Meyer, Christine; Louwagie, Mathilde; Willison, John C.; Jouanneau, Yves

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the enzymes involved in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation were investigated in the pyrene-degrading Mycobacterium sp. strain 6PY1. [14C]pyrene mineralization experiments showed that bacteria grown with either pyrene or phenanthrene produced high levels of pyrene-catabolic activity but that acetate-grown cells had no activity. As a means of identifying specific catabolic enzymes, protein extracts from bacteria grown on pyrene or on other carbon sources were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Pyrene-induced proteins were tentatively identified by peptide sequence analysis. Half of them resembled enzymes known to be involved in phenanthrene degradation, with closest similarity to the corresponding enzymes from Nocardioides sp. strain KP7. The genes encoding the terminal components of two distinct ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases were cloned. Sequence analysis revealed that the two enzymes, designated Pdo1 and Pdo2, belong to a subfamily of dioxygenases found exclusively in gram-positive bacteria. When overproduced in Escherichia coli, Pdo1 and Pdo2 showed distinctive selectivities towards PAH substrates, with the former enzyme catalyzing the dihydroxylation of both pyrene and phenanthrene and the latter preferentially oxidizing phenanthrene. The catalytic activity of the Pdo2 enzyme was dramatically enhanced when electron carrier proteins of the phenanthrene dioxygenase from strain KP7 were coexpressed in recombinant cells. The Pdo2 enzyme was purified as a brown protein consisting of two types of subunits with Mrs of about 52,000 and 20,000. Immunoblot analysis of cell extracts from strain 6PY1 revealed that Pdo1 was present in cells grown on benzoate, phenanthrene, or pyrene and absent in acetate-grown cells. In contrast, Pdo2 could be detected only in PAH-grown cells. These results indicated that the two enzymes were differentially regulated depending on the carbon source used for growth. PMID:12813077

  8. Carbamidocyclophanes F and G with Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis Activity from the Cultured Freshwater Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shangwen; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Krunic, Aleksej; Chlipala, George E; Cai, Geping; Chen, Wei-Lun; Franzblau, Scott G; Swanson, Steven M; Orjala, Jimmy

    2014-01-15

    Two new (1 and 2) and three known (3-5) carbamidocyclophanes were isolated from a cultured freshwater cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. (UIC 10274) obtained from a sample collected at Des Plaines, Illinois. Their planar structures and stereoconfigurations were determined by extensive spectroscopic analysis including 1D/2D NMR experiments, HRESIMS as well as CD spectroscopy. Carbamidocyclophane F (1) showed potent anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity in the microplate Alamar blue assay and low-oxygen-recovery assay with MIC values of 0.8 and 5.4 µM, respectively. Carbamidocyclophane F (1) also displayed antimicrobial activities against the gram positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis with MIC values of 0.1 and 0.2 µM, respectively. Carbamidocyclophane F (1) and Carbamidocyclophane G (2) both showed antiproliferative activity against MDA-MB-435 and HT-29 human cancer cell lines with IC50 values in the range from 0.5 to 0.7 µM.

  9. Selective cleavage of 10-methyl benzo[b]naphtho[2,1-d]thiophene by recombinant Mycobacterium sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kimiko; Noda, Ken-ichi; Maruhashi, Kenji

    2003-05-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium sp. strain MR65 carrying dszABCD genes was used for desulfurization of 10-methylbenzo[b]naphtho[2,1-d]thiophene (10-methyl BNT) in the hexadecane phase. The specific activity was 25% of that of dibenzothiophene (DBT). One of two major metabolites of 10-methyl BNT produced by strain MR65 was identified as 1-methoxy-2-(3-methylphenyl)naphthalene by 1H and 13C NMR. The other major metabolite and two minor metabolites were determined as 1-hydroxy-2-(3-methylphenyl)naphthalene, 2-(2-methoxy-3-methylphenyl)naphthalene and 2-(2-hydroxy-3-methylphenyl)naphthalene, respectively, by HPLC and GC-MS. The production ratio of the two desulfurization metabolite isomers was 0.99:0.01, calculated on the basis of peak GC areas. These results indicated that the C-S bond adjacent to the naphthalene skeleton was selectively cleaved to form the two major compounds.

  10. Functional characterization of the cutI gene for the transcription of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase genes in Mycobacterium sp. strain JC1 DSM 3803.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Sae Woong; Kim, Young Min; Oh, Jeong-Il

    2017-01-01

    Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO-DH) in Mycobacterium sp. strain JC1 is a key enzyme for the carboxydotrophic growth, when carbon monoxide (CO) is supplied as a sole source of carbon and energy. This enzyme is also known to act as nitric oxide dehydrogenase (NO-DH) for the detoxification of NO. Several accessory genes such as cutD, cutE, cutF, cutG, cutH, and cutI, are clustered together with two copies of the CO-DH structural genes (cutB1C1A1 and cutB2C2A2) in Mycobacterium sp. strain JC1 and are well conserved in carboxydotrophic mycobacteria. Transcription of the CO-DH structural and accessory genes was demonstrated to be increased significantly by acidified sodium nitrate as a source of NO. A cutI deletion (ΔcutI) mutant of Mycobacterium sp. strain JC1 was generated to identity the function of CutI. Lithoautotrophic growth of the ΔcutI mutant was severely affected in mineral medium supplemented with CO, while the mutant grew normally with glucose. Western blotting, CO-DH activity staining, and CO-DH-specific enzyme assay revealed a significant decrease in the cellular level of CO-DH in the ΔcutI mutant. Northern blot analysis and promoter assay showed that expression of the cutB1 and cutB2 genes was significantly reduced at the transcriptional level in the ΔcutI mutant, compared to that of the wildtype strain. The ΔcutI mutant was much more susceptible to NO than was the wild type.

  11. Actions of Mycobacterium sp. strain AP1 on the saturated- and aromatic-hydrocarbon fractions of fuel oil in a marine medium.

    PubMed

    Vila, Joaquim; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2009-10-01

    The pyrene-degrading Mycobacterium sp. strain AP1 grew in nutrient-supplemented artificial seawater with a heavy fuel oil as the sole carbon source, causing the complete removal of all linear (C(12) to C(40)) and branched alkanes from the aliphatic fraction, as well as an extensive degradation of the three- and four-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) phenanthrene (95%), anthracene (80%), fluoranthene (80%), pyrene (75%), and benzo(a)anthracene (30%). Alkylated PAHs, which are more abundant in crude oils than the nonsubstituted compounds, were selectively attacked at extents that varied from more than 90% for dimethylnaphthalenes, methylphenanthrenes, methylfluorenes, and methyldibenzothiophenes to about 30% for monomethylated fluoranthenes/pyrenes and trimethylated phenanthrenes and dibenzothiophenes. Identification of key metabolites indicated the utilization of phenanthrene, pyrene, and fluoranthene by known assimilatory metabolic routes, while other components were cooxidized. Detection of mono- and dimethylated phthalic acids demonstrated ring cleavage and further oxidation of alkyl PAHs. The extensive degradation of the alkanes, the two-, three-, and four-ring PAHs, and their 1-, 2-, and 3-methyl derivatives from a complex mixture of hydrocarbons by Mycobacterium sp. strain AP1 illustrates the great substrate versatility of alkane- and PAH-degrading mycobacteria.

  12. [Micronecta sp (Corixidae) and Diplonychus sp (Belostomatidae), two aquatic Hemiptera hosts and/or potential vectors of Mycobacterium ulcerans (pathogenic agent of Buruli ulcer) in Cote d'Ivoire].

    PubMed

    Doannio, J M C; Konan, K L; Dosso, F N; Koné, A B; Konan, Y L; Sankaré, Y; Ekaza, E; Coulibaly, N D; Odéhouri, K P; Dosso, M; Sess, E D; Marsollier, L; Aubry, J

    2011-02-01

    Buruli ulcer is currently a major public health problem in Côte d'Ivoire. It is a neglected tropical disease closely associated with aquatic environments. Aquatic insects of the Hemiptera order have been implicated in human transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the pathogenic agent of Buruli ulcer. The purpose of this preliminary study using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was to evaluate aquatic insects in Sokrogbo, a village in the Tiassalé sanitary district where Buruli ulcer is endemic. Findings identified two water bugs hosting Mycobacterium ulcerans, i.e., one of the Micronecta genus in the Corixidae family and another of the Diplonychus genus in the Belostomatidae family. The PCR technique used revealed the molecular signatures of M. ulcerans in tissue from these two insects. Based on these findings, these two water bugs can be considered as potential hosts and/or vectors of M. ulcerans in the study zone. Unlike Diplonychus sp., this is the first report to describe Micronecta sp as a host of M. ulcerans. Further investigation will be needed to assess the role of these two water bugs in human transmission of M. ulcerans in Côte d'Ivoire.

  13. Regioselective ω-hydroxylation of medium-chain n-alkanes and primary alcohols by CYP153 enzymes from Mycobacterium marinum and Polaromonas sp. strain JS666.

    PubMed

    Scheps, Daniel; Malca, Sumire Honda; Hoffmann, Helen; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard

    2011-10-07

    The oxofunctionalization of saturated hydrocarbons is an important goal in basic and applied chemistry. Biocatalysts like cytochrome P450 enzymes can introduce oxygen into a wide variety of molecules in a very selective manner, which can be used for the synthesis of fine and bulk chemicals. Cytochrome P450 enzymes from the CYP153A subfamily have been described as alkane hydroxylases with high terminal regioselectivity. Here we report the product yields resulting from C(5)-C(12) alkane and alcohol oxidation catalyzed by CYP153A enzymes from Mycobacterium marinum (CYP153A16) and Polaromonas sp. (CYP153A P. sp.). For all reactions, byproduct formation is described in detail. Following cloning and expression in Escherichia coli, the activity of the purified monooxygenases was reconstituted with putidaredoxin (CamA) and putidaredoxin reductase (CamB). Although both enzyme systems yielded primary alcohols and α,ω-alkanediols, each one displayed a different oxidation pattern towards alkanes. For CYP153A P. sp. a predominant ω-hydroxylation activity was observed, while CYP153A16 possessed the ability to catalyze both ω-hydroxylation and α,ω-dihydroxylation reactions.

  14. Degradation of aflatoxin B(1) by cell-free extracts of Rhodococcus erythropolis and Mycobacterium fluoranthenivorans sp. nov. DSM44556(T).

    PubMed

    Teniola, O D; Addo, P A; Brost, I M; Färber, P; Jany, K-D; Alberts, J F; van Zyl, W H; Steyn, P S; Holzapfel, W H

    2005-11-25

    Biological degradation of aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) by Rhodococcus erythropolis was examined in liquid cultures and in cell-free extracts. Dramatic reduction of AFB(1) was observed during incubation in the presence of R. erythropolis cells (17% residual AFB(1) after 48 h and only 3-6% residual AFB(1) after 72 h). Cell-free extracts of four bacterial strains, R. erythropolis DSM 14,303, Nocardia corynebacterioides DSM 12,676, N. corynebacterioides DSM 20,151, and Mycobacterium fluoranthenivorans sp. nov. DSM 44,556(T) were produced by disrupting cells in a French pressure cell. The ability of crude cell-free extracts to degrade AFB(1) was studied under different incubation conditions. Aflatoxin B(1) was effectively degraded by cell free extracts of all four bacterial strains. N. corynebacterioides DSM 12,676 (formerly erroneously classified as Flavobacterium aurantiacum) showed the lowest degradation ability (60%) after 24 h, while >90% degradation was observed with N. corynebacterioides DSM 20,151 over the same time. R. erythropolis and M. fluoranthenivorans sp. nov. DSM 44,556(T) have shown more than 90% degradation of AFB(1) within 4 h at 30 degrees C, whilst after 8 h AFB(1) was practicably not detectable. The high degradation rate and wide temperature range for degradation by R. erythropolis DSM 14,303 and M. fluoranthenivorans sp. nov. DSM 44,556(T) indicate potential for application in food and feed processing.

  15. Biodegradation of phthalic acid esters by a newly isolated Mycobacterium sp. YC-RL4 and the bioprocess with environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lei; Jia, Yang; Ruth, Nahurira; Qiao, Cheng; Wang, Junhuan; Zhao, Baisuo; Yan, Yanchun

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial strain YC-RL4, capable of utilizing phthalic acid esters (PAEs) as the sole carbon source for growth, was isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil. Strain YC-RL4 was identified as Mycobacterium sp. by 16S rRNA gene analysis and Biolog tests. Mycobacterium sp. YC-RL4 could rapidly degrade dibutyl phthalate (DBP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), dicyclohexyl phthalate (DCHP), and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) under both individual and mixed conditions, and all the degradation rates were above 85.0 % within 5 days. The effects of environmental factors which might affect the degrading process were optimized as 30 °C and pH 8.0. The DEHP metabolites were detected by HPLC-MS and the degradation pathway was deduced tentatively. DEHP was transformed into phthalic acid (PA) via mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and PA was further utilized for growth via benzoic acid (BA) degradation pathway. Cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) assays illuminated that the strain YC-RL4 was of higher hydrophobicity while grown on DEHP and CSH increased with the higher DEHP concentration. The degradation rates of DEHP by strain YC-RL4 in different environmental samples was around 62.0 to 83.3 % and strain YC-RL4 survived well in the soil sample. These results suggested that the strain YC-RL4 could be used as a potential and efficient PAE degrader for the bioremediation of contaminated sites.

  16. Amoebal Coculture of “Mycobacterium massiliense” sp. nov. from the Sputum of a Patient with Hemoptoic Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Greub, Gilbert; Gevaudan, Marie-José; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2004-01-01

    A nonphotochromogenic, rapidly growing Mycobacterium strain was isolated in pure culture from the sputum and the bronchoalveolar fluid of a patient with hemoptoic pneumonia by using axenic media and an amoebal coculture system. Both isolates grew in less than 7 days at 24 to 37°C with an optimal growth temperature of 30°C. The isolates exhibited biochemical and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles overlapping those of Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium chelonae, and Mycobacterium immunogenum, indicating that they belonged to M. chelonae-M. abscessus group. They differed from M. abscessus in β-galactosidase, β-N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, and β-glucuronidase activities and by the lack of nitrate reductase and indole production activities, as well as in their in vitro susceptibilities to minocycline and doxycycline. These isolates and M. abscessus differed from M. chelonae and M. immunogenum by exhibiting gelatinase and tryptophane desaminase activities. Their 16S rRNA genes had complete sequence identity with that of M. abscessus and >99.6% similarity with those of M. chelonae and M. immunogenum. Further molecular investigations showed that partial hsp65 and sodA gene sequences differed from that of M. abscessus by five and three positions over 441 bp, respectively. Partial rpoB and recA gene sequence analyses showed 96 and 98% similarities with M. abscessus, respectively. Similarly, 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequence of the isolates differed from that of M. abscessus by a A→G substitution at position 60 and a C insertion at position 102. Phenotypic and genotypic features of these two isolates indicated that they were representative of a new mycobacterial species within the M. chelonae-M. abscessus group. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that these isolates were perhaps recently derived from M. abscessus. We propose the name of “Mycobacterium massiliense” for this new species. The type strain has been deposited in the Collection

  17. The fibroblast growth factor-2 arrests Mycobacterium avium sp. paratuberculosis growth and immunomodulates host response in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Zeyou; Yao, Yongliang; Wu, Jianhong; Tang, Xin; Gu, Tao; Li, Guangxin

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosisis (M. tb) epidemic is one of the most severe health problem worldwide, while mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis and host immune responses remain unclear. Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a mycobacterial species related to M. tb, shares similarities with M. tb in many ways. In this study, using M. avium infection of macrophages as a model, we systematically studied the effect of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) on M. avium infection of macrophages. Our results showed that M. avium infection could increase FGF-2 expression on both mRNA and protein levels. M. avium infection elevated TNF-α and IFN-γ production while the addition of FGF-2 could further increase TNF-α but not IFN-γ level. M. avium infection could increase the expression of oxygen/nitrogen metabolism proteins iNOS and SOD-1, and FGF-2 had additive effect on the expression of these two proteins. M. avium infection had inhibitive effect on actin expression while FGF-2 could partly counteract such inhibition. Moreover, FGF-2 could inhibit M. avium proliferation in macrophages. Our results together indicate that macrophage-secreted FGF-2 upon M. avium infection could suppress M. avium proliferation through various ways including cytokine production, enhancement of phagocytosis as well as oxygen/nitrogen metabolism.

  18. Degradation of 2,3-Diethyl-5-Methylpyrazine by a Newly Discovered Bacterium, Mycobacterium sp. Strain DM-11†

    PubMed Central

    Rappert, Sugima; Botsch, Kathrin Caroline; Nagorny, Stephanie; Francke, Wittko; Müller, Rudolf

    2006-01-01

    A bacterium was isolated from the waste gas treatment plant at a fishmeal processing company on the basis of its capacity to use 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine (DM) as a sole carbon and energy source. The strain, designated strain DM-11, grew optimally at 25°C and had a doubling time of 29.2 h. The strain did not grow on complex media like tryptic soy broth, Luria-Bertani broth, or nutrient broth or on simple carbon sources like glucose, acetate, oxoglutarate, succinate, or citrate. Only on Löwenstein-Jensen medium was growth observed. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain DM-11 showed the highest similarity (96.2%) to Mycobacterium poriferae strain ATCC 35087T. Therefore, strain DM-11 merits recognition as a novel species within the genus Mycobacterium. DM also served as a sole nitrogen source for the growth of strain DM-11. The degradation of DM by strain DM-11 requires molecular oxygen. The first intermediate was identified as 5,6-diethyl-2-hydroxy-3-methylpyrazine (DHM). Its disappearance was accompanied by the release of ammonium into the culture medium. No other metabolite was detected. We conclude that ring fission occurred directly after the formation of DHM and ammonium was eliminated after ring cleavage. Molecular oxygen was essential for the degradation of DHM. The expression of enzymes involved in the degradation of DM and DHM was regulated. Only cells induced by DM or DHM converted these compounds. Strain DM-11 also grew on 2-ethyl-5(6)-methylpyrazine (EMP) and 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine (TMP) as a sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In addition, the strain converted many pyrazines found in the waste gases of food industries cometabolically. PMID:16461697

  19. Identification of a Novel Metabolite in the Degradation of Pyrene by Mycobacterium sp. Strain AP1: Actions of the Isolate on Two- and Three-Ring Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Joaquim; López, Zaira; Sabaté, Jordi; Minguillón, Cristina; Solanas, Anna M.; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain AP1 grew with pyrene as a sole source of carbon and energy. The identification of metabolites accumulating during growth suggests that this strain initiates its attack on pyrene by either monooxygenation or dioxygenation at its C-4, C-5 positions to give trans- or cis-4,5-dihydroxy-4,5-dihydropyrene, respectively. Dehydrogenation of the latter, ortho cleavage of the resulting diol to form phenanthrene 4,5-dicarboxylic acid, and subsequent decarboxylation to phenanthrene 4-carboxylic acid lead to degradation of the phenanthrene 4-carboxylic acid via phthalate. A novel metabolite identified as 6,6′-dihydroxy-2,2′-biphenyl dicarboxylic acid demonstrates a new branch in the pathway that involves the cleavage of both central rings of pyrene. In addition to pyrene, strain AP1 utilized hexadecane, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene for growth. Pyrene-grown cells oxidized the methylenic groups of fluorene and acenaphthene and catalyzed the dihydroxylation and ortho cleavage of one of the rings of naphthalene and phenanthrene to give 2-carboxycinnamic and diphenic acids, respectively. The catabolic versatility of strain AP1 and its use of ortho cleavage mechanisms during the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) give new insight into the role that pyrene-degrading bacterial strains may play in the environmental fate of PAH mixtures. PMID:11722898

  20. Novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex pathogen, M. mungi.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kathleen A; Laver, Pete N; Michel, Anita L; Williams, Mark; van Helden, Paul D; Warren, Robin M; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C

    2010-08-01

    Seven outbreaks involving increasing numbers of banded mongoose troops and high death rates have been documented. We identified a Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex pathogen, M. mungi sp. nov., as the causative agent among banded mongooses that live near humans in Chobe District, Botswana. Host spectrum and transmission dynamics remain unknown.

  1. Mycobacterium riyadhense infections.

    PubMed

    Saad, Mustafa M; Alshukairi, Abeer N; Qutub, Mohammed O; Elkhizzi, Noura A; Hilluru, Haris M; Omrani, Ali S

    2015-05-01

    Mycobacterium riyadhense is a newly described slowly growing, non-tuberculous mycobacterium species. We describe 2 new cases of Mycobacterium riyadhense infections presenting with extra-pulmonary involvement, and reviewed all previously reported cases in the literature. We also describe the spectrum of the disease and explore treatment options based on the experience with the current and previously reported cases.

  2. Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Biofilms on Livestock Watering Trough Materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite the ubiquitous occurrence of Mycobacterium sp. in nature and the fact that Johne’s disease has been reported worldwide, little research has been done to assess the survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) in agricultural environments. The goal of this stu...

  3. Immune Responses in Cattle Inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle were inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii to compare antigen-specific immune responses to varied patterns of mycobacterial disease. Disease expression ranged from colonization with associated pathology (M. bovis), colonization without path...

  4. Mycobacteriosis in ostriches (Struthio camelus) due to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Pamela; Jahns, Hanne; Power, Eugene; Bainbridge, John; Kenny, Kevin; Corpa, Juan M; Cassidy, Joseph P; Callanan, John J

    2013-12-01

    Avian tuberculosis rarely affects ratites compared to other bird species and is typically caused by Mycobacterium avium species. This study describes the pathological and microbiological findings in three adult ostriches with mycobacteriosis, in one of which Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from the lesions. Post mortem examinations on ostriches from two different zoological collections in Ireland revealed multifocal caseous granulomas affecting the spleen and liver in all cases, with additional involvement of intestines in two cases. In one case, granulomas were present within the pharynx, at the thoracic inlet and multifocally on the pleural surface. Acid-fast bacilli were observed in all lesions. Mycobacterium sp. of the M. avium complex was isolated from the intestinal lesions in the two cases with intestinal involvement, and M. bovis sp. oligotype SB0140 was cultured from the liver of the third ostrich. This represents the first reported case of M. bovis infection in an ostrich. Avian tuberculosis due to M. bovis is rare and to date has been reported in only parrots and experimentally inoculated birds. Mycobacterium bovis needs to be considered as a possible cause of tuberculosis in ostriches because the lesions are similar to those observed with M. avium complex infection.

  5. Mycobacterium marinum infection.

    PubMed

    Cassetty, Christopher T; Sanchez, Miguel

    2004-11-30

    A 49-year-old man presented with nodules on his right hand after a history of Mycobacterium marinum infection recently treated with rifampin and clarithromycin. The patient has an aquarium with Betta fish (Siamese fighting fish).

  6. SmoXYB1C1Z of Mycobacterium sp. strain NBB4: a soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO)-like enzyme, active on C2 to C4 alkanes and alkenes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kiri E; Ozsvar, Jazmin; Coleman, Nicholas V

    2014-09-01

    Monooxygenase (MO) enzymes initiate the aerobic oxidation of alkanes and alkenes in bacteria. A cluster of MO genes (smoXYB1C1Z) of thus-far-unknown function was found previously in the genomes of two Mycobacterium strains (NBB3 and NBB4) which grow on hydrocarbons. The predicted Smo enzymes have only moderate amino acid identity (30 to 60%) to their closest homologs, the soluble methane and butane MOs (sMMO and sBMO), and the smo gene cluster has a different organization from those of sMMO and sBMO. The smoXYB1C1Z genes of NBB4 were cloned into pMycoFos to make pSmo, which was transformed into Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)-155. Cells of mc(2)-155(pSmo) metabolized C2 to C4 alkanes, alkenes, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The activities of mc(2)-155(pSmo) cells were 0.94, 0.57, 0.12, and 0.04 nmol/min/mg of protein with ethene, ethane, propane, and butane as substrates, respectively. The mc(2)-155(pSmo) cells made epoxides from ethene, propene, and 1-butene, confirming that Smo was an oxygenase. Epoxides were not produced from larger alkenes (1-octene and styrene). Vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane were biodegraded by cells expressing Smo, with production of inorganic chloride. This study shows that Smo is a functional oxygenase which is active against small hydrocarbons. M. smegmatis mc(2)-155(pSmo) provides a new model for studying sMMO-like monooxygenases.

  7. SmoXYB1C1Z of Mycobacterium sp. Strain NBB4: a Soluble Methane Monooxygenase (sMMO)-Like Enzyme, Active on C2 to C4 Alkanes and Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kiri E.; Ozsvar, Jazmin

    2014-01-01

    Monooxygenase (MO) enzymes initiate the aerobic oxidation of alkanes and alkenes in bacteria. A cluster of MO genes (smoXYB1C1Z) of thus-far-unknown function was found previously in the genomes of two Mycobacterium strains (NBB3 and NBB4) which grow on hydrocarbons. The predicted Smo enzymes have only moderate amino acid identity (30 to 60%) to their closest homologs, the soluble methane and butane MOs (sMMO and sBMO), and the smo gene cluster has a different organization from those of sMMO and sBMO. The smoXYB1C1Z genes of NBB4 were cloned into pMycoFos to make pSmo, which was transformed into Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2-155. Cells of mc2-155(pSmo) metabolized C2 to C4 alkanes, alkenes, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The activities of mc2-155(pSmo) cells were 0.94, 0.57, 0.12, and 0.04 nmol/min/mg of protein with ethene, ethane, propane, and butane as substrates, respectively. The mc2-155(pSmo) cells made epoxides from ethene, propene, and 1-butene, confirming that Smo was an oxygenase. Epoxides were not produced from larger alkenes (1-octene and styrene). Vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane were biodegraded by cells expressing Smo, with production of inorganic chloride. This study shows that Smo is a functional oxygenase which is active against small hydrocarbons. M. smegmatis mc2-155(pSmo) provides a new model for studying sMMO-like monooxygenases. PMID:25015887

  8. Mycobacterium Diversity and Pyrene Mineralization in Petroleum-Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Pui-Yi; Kinkle, Brian K.

    2001-01-01

    Degradative strains of fast-growing Mycobacterium spp. are commonly isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils. Little is known, however, about the ecology and diversity of indigenous populations of these fast-growing mycobacteria in contaminated environments. In the present study 16S rRNA genes were PCR amplified using Mycobacterium-specific primers and separated by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE), and prominent bands were sequenced to compare the indigenous Mycobacterium community structures in four pairs of soil samples taken from heavily contaminated and less contaminated areas at four different sites. Overall, TGGE profiles obtained from heavily contaminated soils were less diverse than those from less contaminated soils. This decrease in diversity may be due to toxicity, since significantly fewer Mycobacterium phylotypes were detected in soils determined to be toxic by the Microtox assay than in nontoxic soils. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of prominent TGGE bands indicated that novel strains dominated the soil Mycobacterium community. Mineralization studies using [14C]pyrene added to four petroleum-contaminated soils, with and without the addition of the known pyrene degrader Mycobacterium sp. strain RJGII-135, indicated that inoculation increased the level of degradation in three of the four soils. Mineralization results obtained from a sterilized soil inoculated with strain RJGII-135 suggested that competition with indigenous microorganisms may be a significant factor affecting biodegradation of PAHs. Pyrene-amended soils, with and without inoculation with strain RJGII-135, experienced both increases and decreases in the population sizes of the inoculated strain and indigenous Mycobacterium populations during incubation. PMID:11319104

  9. Use of the INNO-LiPA-MYCOBACTERIA assay (version 2) for identification of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare-Mycobacterium scrofulaceum complex isolates.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Léa; Weill, François-Xavier; Lafendi, Leila; Houriez, Florence; Casanova, François; Gutierrez, M Cristina; Ingrand, Didier; Lagrange, Philippe; Vincent, Véronique; Herrmann, Jean Louis

    2005-06-01

    Using INNO-LiPA-MYCOBACTERIA (Lipav1; Innogenetics) and the AccuProbe (Gen-Probe Inc./bioMérieux) techniques, 35 Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare-Mycobacterium scrofulaceum (MAC/MAIS) complex strains were identified between January 2000 and December 2002. Thirty-four of 35 isolates were positive only for the MAIS complex probe by Lipav1 and were further analyzed by INNO-LiPA-MYCOBACTERIA version 2 (Lipav2), hsp65 PCR restriction pattern analysis (PRA), and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS), hsp65, and 16S rRNA sequences. Lipav2 identified 14 of 34 strains at the species level, including 11 isolates positive for the newly specific MAC sequevar Mac-A probe (MIN-2 probe). Ten of these 11 isolates corresponded to sequevar Mac-A, which was recently defined as Mycobacterium chimerae sp. nov. Among the last 20 of the 34 MAIS isolates, 17 (by hsp65 PRA) and 18 (by hsp65 sequence) were characterized as M. avium. Ten of the 20 were identified as Mac-U sequevar. All these 20 isolates were identified as M. intracellulare by 16S rRNA sequence except one isolate identified as Mycobacterium paraffinicum by 16S rRNA and ITS sequencing. One isolate out of 35 isolates that was positive for M. avium by AccuProbe and that was Mycobacterium genus probe positive and MAIS probe negative by Lipav1 and Lipav2 might be considered a new species. In conclusion, the new INNO-LiPA-MYCOBACTERIA allowed the identification of 40% of the previously unidentified MAIS isolates at the species level. The results of the Lipav2 assay on the MAIS isolates confirm the great heterogeneity of this group and suggest the use of hsp65 or ITS sequencing for precise identification of such isolates.

  10. Identification and pathogenicity analysis of a novel non-tuberculous mycobacterium clinical isolate with nine-antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z-Y; Sun, Z-Q; Wang, Z-L; Hu, H-R; Wen, Z-L; Song, Y-Z; Zhao, J-W; Wang, H-H; Guo, X-K; Zhang, S-L

    2013-01-01

    With mycobacteriosis increasing, the study of non-tuberculous mycobacteria is imperative for clinical therapy and management. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria are naturally resistant to most anti-tuberculosis drugs. Accordingly, it is important to decipher the biology of the novel non-tuberculous mycobacteria through complete genomic analysis of novel pathogenic mycobacteria. We describe Mycobacterium sinense JDM601, a novel, slow-growing mycobacterium of the Mycobacterium terrae complex resistant to nine antibiotics, by clinical presentation, cultural and biochemical characteristics, minimal inhibitory concentrations, and genome-sequencing analysis. JDM601 is closest to Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum according to mycolic acid composition, but closest to Mycobacterium algericum sp. nov according to 16S rDNA. JDM601 is resistant to isoniazid, streptomycin, rifampin, euteropas, protionamide, capromycin, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and levofloxacin but not ethambutol. The clinical information, mycolic acid composition, and virulence genes indicate that JDM601 is an opportunistic pathogen.

  11. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals a Possible Novel Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium Species with High Pathogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; Dutta, Avirup; Wong, Guat Jah; Wee, Wei Yee; Ang, Mia Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been reported to cause a wide range of human diseases. We present the first whole-genome study of a Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium, Mycobacterium sp. UM_CSW (referred to hereafter as UM_CSW), isolated from a patient diagnosed with bronchiectasis. Our data suggest that this clinical isolate is likely a novel mycobacterial species, supported by clear evidence from molecular phylogenetic, comparative genomic, ANI and AAI analyses. UM_CSW is closely related to the Mycobacterium avium complex. While it has characteristic features of an environmental bacterium, it also shows a high pathogenic potential with the presence of a wide variety of putative genes related to bacterial virulence and shares very similar pathogenomic profiles with the known pathogenic mycobacterial species. Thus, we conclude that this possible novel Mycobacterium species should be tightly monitored for its possible causative role in human infections. PMID:27035710

  12. Tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae in sheep.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Mendoza, Marta; Juan, Lucía de; Menéndez, Santiago; Ocampo, Antón; Mourelo, Jorge; Sáez, José L; Domínguez, Lucas; Gortázar, Christian; García Marín, Juan F; Balseiro, Ana

    2012-02-01

    Tuberculosis was diagnosed in three flocks of sheep in Galicia, Spain, in 2009 and 2010. Two flocks were infected with Mycobacterium bovis and one flock was infected with Mycobacterium caprae. Infection was confirmed by the comparative intradermal tuberculin test, bacteriology, molecular analysis and histopathology. Sheep have the potential to act as a reservoir for tuberculosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies in the gut associated lymphoid tissue of slaughtered rabbits.

    PubMed

    Arrazuria, Rakel; Sevilla, Iker A; Molina, Elena; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A; Elguezabal, Natalia

    2015-06-11

    Rabbits are susceptible to infection by different species of the genus Mycobacterium. Particularly, development of specific lesions and isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, both subspecies of the M. avium complex, has been reported in wildlife conditions. Although, rabbit meat production worldwide is 200 million tons per year, microbiological data on this source of meat is lacking and more specifically reports of mycobacterial presence in industrially reared rabbit for human consumption have not been published. To this end, we sought mycobacteria by microbiological and histopathological methods paying special attention to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in rabbits from commercial rabbitries from the North East of Spain. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was not detected either by culture or PCR. However, Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium was detected in 15.15% (10/66) and Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis was detected in 1.51% (1/66) of gut associated lymphoid tissue of sampled animals by PCR, whereas caecal contents were negative. 9% (6/66) of the animals presented gross lesions suggestive of lymphoid activation, 6% (4/66) presented granulomatous lesions and 3% (2/66) contained acid fast bacilli. Mycobacterial isolation from samples was not achieved, although colonies of Thermoactinomycetes sp. were identified by 16s rRNA sequencing in 6% (4/66) of sampled animals. Apparently healthy farmed rabbits that go to slaughter may carry M. avium subspecies in gut associated lymphoid tissue.

  14. Cervical lymphadenitis caused by a fastidious mycobacterium closely related to Mycobacterium genavense in an apparently immunocompetent woman: diagnosis by culture-free microbiological methods.

    PubMed

    Bosquée, L; Böttger, E C; De Beenhouwer, H; Fonteyne, P A; Hirschel, B; Larsson, L; Meyers, W M; Palomino, J C; Realini, L; Rigouts, L

    1995-10-01

    Fastidious mycobacteria usually infect immunocompromised hosts (human immunodeficiency virus-infected or otherwise immunosuppressed patients). We here describe severe lymphadenitis, caused by a fastidious mycobacterium closely related to Mycobacterium genavense, in an apparently immunocompetent woman, whose brother had died from an unidentified mycobacterial infection in 1969. A variety of techniques, including inoculation of nude mice, histopathology, electron microscopy, lipid analysis, ATP measurements, and molecular biology, were used to characterize this mycobacterium. All attempts to culture the etiological agent on many different media failed. The organism multiplied only in congenitally athymic nude mice. Although phenotypically similar to M. genavense, the mycobacterium differs from M. genavense by three nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene sequence. Various antimycobacterial drugs were administered, including gamma interferon, but multiple relapses occurred. Finally, therapy with a combined regimen of clarithromycin, clofazimine, rifabutin, and ethambutol was curative. To our knowledge, this is the first report of lymphadenitis in an apparently immunocompetent patient, caused by a noncultivable Mycobacterium sp. closely related to M. genavense. This study emphasizes the importance of employing a variety of diagnostic approaches such as the inoculation of laboratory animals, histopathology, electron microscopy, lipid analysis, ATP measurements, and molecular biology to characterize novel microorganisms that cannot be cultured in vitro.

  15. Mycobacterium ulcerans disease.

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Johnson, R. Christian; Phillips, Richard; Adjei, Ohene; Fleischer, Bernhard; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark H.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Portaels, Françoise; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Asiedu, Kingsley

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer) is an important health problem in several west African countries. It is prevalent in scattered foci around the world, predominantly in riverine areas with a humid, hot climate. We review the epidemiology, bacteriology, transmission, immunology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of infections. M. ulcerans is an ubiquitous micro-organism and is harboured by fish, snails, and water insects. The mode of transmission is unknown. Lesions are most common on exposed parts of the body, particularly on the limbs. Spontaneous healing may occur. Many patients in endemic areas present late with advanced, severe lesions. BCG vaccination yields a limited, relatively short-lived, immune protection. Recommended treatment consists of surgical debridement, followed by skin grafting if necessary. Many patients have functional limitations after healing. Better understanding of disease transmission and pathogenesis is needed for improved control and prevention of Buruli ulcer. PMID:16283056

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Digby F.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism underpins the physiology and pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, although experimental mycobacteriology has provided key insights into the metabolic pathways that are essential for survival and pathogenesis, determining the metabolic status of bacilli during different stages of infection and in different cellular compartments remains challenging. Recent advances—in particular, the development of systems biology tools such as metabolomics—have enabled key insights into the biochemical state of M. tuberculosis in experimental models of infection. In addition, their use to elucidate mechanisms of action of new and existing antituberculosis drugs is critical for the development of improved interventions to counter tuberculosis. This review provides a broad summary of mycobacterial metabolism, highlighting the adaptation of M. tuberculosis as specialist human pathogen, and discusses recent insights into the strategies used by the host and infecting bacillus to influence the outcomes of the host–pathogen interaction through modulation of metabolic functions. PMID:25502746

  17. Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium Phage Waterfoul

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Paige N.; Embry, Ella K.; Johnson, Christa O.; Watson, Tiara L.; Weast, Sayre K.; DeGraw, Caroline J.; Douglas, Jessica R.; Sellers, J. Michael; D’Angelo, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Waterfoul is a newly isolated temperate siphovirus of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155. It was identified as a member of the K5 cluster of Mycobacterium phages and has a 61,248-bp genome with 95 predicted genes. PMID:27856585

  18. A New 4-Nitrotoluene Degradation Pathway in a Mycobacterium Strain

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, Tilmann; Desiere, Frank; Fischer, Peter; Spain, Jim C.; Knackmuss, Hans-Joachim; Lenke, Hiltrud

    1998-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain HL 4-NT-1, isolated from a mixed soil sample from the Stuttgart area, utilized 4-nitrotoluene as the sole source of nitrogen, carbon, and energy. Under aerobic conditions, resting cells of the Mycobacterium strain metabolized 4-nitrotoluene with concomitant release of small amounts of ammonia; under anaerobic conditions, 4-nitrotoluene was completely converted to 6-amino-m-cresol. 4-Hydroxylaminotoluene was converted to 6-amino-m-cresol by cell extracts and thus could be confirmed as the initial metabolite in the degradative pathway. This enzymatic equivalent to the acid-catalyzed Bamberger rearrangement requires neither cofactors nor oxygen. In the same crucial enzymatic step, the homologous substrate hydroxylaminobenzene was rearranged to 2-aminophenol. Abiotic oxidative dimerization of 6-amino-m-cresol, observed during growth of the Mycobacterium strain, yielded a yellow dihydrophenoxazinone. Another yellow metabolite (λmax, 385 nm) was tentatively identified as 2-amino-5-methylmuconic semialdehyde, formed from 6-amino-m-cresol by meta ring cleavage. PMID:9464378

  19. Degradation of ambient carbonyl sulfide by Mycobacterium spp. in soil.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiromi; Saito, Masahiko; Nagahata, Yoshiko; Katayama, Yoko

    2008-01-01

    The ability to degrade carbonyl sulfide (COS) was confirmed in seven bacterial strains that were isolated from soil, without the addition of COS. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that these isolates belonged to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia and Cupriavidus. For example, Mycobacterium sp. strain THI401, grown on PYG agar medium, was able to degrade an initial level of 30 parts per million by volume COS within 1 h, while 60 % of the initial COS was decreased by abiotic conversion in 30 h. Considering natural COS flux between soil and the atmosphere, COS degradation by these bacteria was confirmed at an ambient level of 500 parts per trillion by volume (p.p.t.v.), using sterilized soil to cultivate the bacterium. Autoclave sterilization of soil resulted in a small amount of COS emission, while Mycobacterium spp. degraded COS at a faster rate than it was emitted from the soil, and reduced the COS mixing ratio to a level that was lower than the ambient level: THI401 degraded COS from an initial level of 530 p.p.t.v. to a level of 330 p.p.t.v. in 30 h. These results provide experimental evidence of microbial activity in soil as a sink for atmospheric COS.

  20. Mycobacterium caprae infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Prodinger, Wolfgang M; Indra, Alexandra; Koksalan, Orhan K; Kilicaslan, Zeki; Richter, Elvira

    2014-12-01

    Mycobacterium caprae, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, causes tuberculosis (TB) in man and animals. Some features distinguish M. caprae from its epidemiological twin, Mycobacterium bovis: M. caprae is evolutionarily older, accounts for a smaller burden of zoonotic TB and is not globally distributed, but primarily restricted to European countries. M. caprae occurs only in a low proportion of human TB cases and this proportion may even decrease, if progress toward eradication of animal TB in Europe continues. So why bother, if M. caprae is not an enigma for diagnostic TB tests and if resistance against first-line drugs is a rarity with M. caprae? This 'European' pathogen of zoonotic TB asks interesting questions regarding the definition of a species. The latter, seemingly only an academic question, particularly requires and challenges the collaboration between human and veterinary medicine.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kethireddy, Shravan; Light, R Bruce; Mirzanejad, Yazdan; Maki, Dennis; Arabi, Yaseen; Lapinsky, Stephen; Simon, David; Kumar, Aseem; Parrillo, Joseph E; Kumar, Anand

    2013-08-01

    Septic shock due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is an uncommon but well-recognized clinical syndrome. The objective of this study was to describe the unique clinical characteristics, epidemiologic risk factors, and covariates of survival of patients with MTB septic shock in comparison with other bacterial septic shock. A retrospective nested cohort study was conducted of patients given a diagnosis of MTB septic shock derived from a trinational, 8,670-patient database of patients with septic shock between 1996 and 2007. In the database, 53 patients had been given a diagnosis of MTB shock compared with 5,419 with septic shock associated with isolation of more common bacterial pathogens. Patients with MTB and other bacterial septic shock had in-hospital mortality rates of 79.2% and 49.7%, respectively (P < .0001). Of the cases of MTB shock, all but five patients had recognized respiratory tract involvement. Fifty-five percent of patients (29 of 53) were documented (by direct culture or stain) as having disseminated extrapulmonary involvement. Inappropriate and appropriate initial empirical therapy was delivered in 28 patients (52.8%) and 25 patients (47.2%); survival was 7.1% and 36.0%, respectively (P = .0114). Ten patients (18.9%) did not receive anti-MTB therapy; all died. The median time to appropriate antimicrobial therapy for MTB septic shock was 31.0 h (interquartile range, 18.9-71.9 h). Only 11 patients received anti-MTB therapy within 24 h of documentation of hypotension; six of these (54.5%) survived. Only one of 21 patients (4.8%) who started anti-MTB therapy after 24 h survived (P = .0003 vs < 24 h). Survival differences between these time intervals are not significantly different from those seen with bacterial septic shock due to more common bacterial pathogens. MTB septic shock behaves similarly to bacterial septic shock. As with bacterial septic shock, early appropriate antimicrobial therapy appears to improve mortality.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis volatiles for diagnosis of tuberculosis by Cricetomys rats.

    PubMed

    Mgode, Georgies F; Weetjens, Bart J; Nawrath, Thorben; Lazar, Doris; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Mahoney, Amanda; Kuipers, Dian; Machang'u, Robert S; Weiner, January; Schulz, Stefan; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2012-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in regions with limited resources depends on microscopy with insufficient sensitivity. Rapid diagnostic tests of low cost but high sensitivity and specificity are needed for better point-of-care management of TB. Trained African giant pouched rats (Cricetomys sp.) can diagnose pulmonary TB in sputum but the relevant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific volatile compounds remain unknown. We investigated the odour volatiles of Mtb detected by rats in reference Mtb, nontuberculous mycobacteria, Nocardia sp., Streptomyces sp., Rhodococcus sp., and other respiratory tract microorganisms spiked into Mtb-negative sputum. Thirteen compounds were specific to Mtb and 13 were shared with other microorganisms. Rats discriminated a blend of Mtb-specific volatiles from individual, and blends of shared, compounds (P = 0.001). The rats' sensitivity for typical TB-positive sputa was 99.15% with 92.23% specificity and 93.14% accuracy. These findings underline the potential of trained Cricetomys rats for rapid TB diagnosis in resource-limited settings, particularly in Africa where Cricetomys rats occur widely and the burden of TB is high. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anti-dormant mycobacterial activity and target analysis of nybomycin produced by a marine-derived Streptomyces sp.

    PubMed

    Arai, Masayoshi; Kamiya, Kentaro; Pruksakorn, Patamaporn; Sumii, Yuji; Kotoku, Naoyuki; Joubert, Jean-Pierre; Moodley, Prashini; Han, Chisu; Shin, Dayoung; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2015-07-01

    In the course of our search for anti-dormant Mycobacterial substances, nybomycin (1) was re-discovered from the culture broth of a marine-derived Streptomyces sp. on the bioassay-guided separation. Compound 1 showed anti-microbial activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG with the MIC of 1.0μg/mL under both actively growing aerobic conditions and dormancy inducing hypoxic conditions. Compound 1 is also effective to Mycobacterium tuberculosis including the clinically isolated strains. The mechanistic analysis indicated that 1 bound to DNA and induces a unique morphological change to mycobacterial bacilli leading the bacterial cell death.

  4. Mycobacterium bovis in Panama, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Fermín; Chernyaeva, Ekatherina; Mendoza, Libardo; Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Rotkevich, Mikhail; Tarté, Miroslava; Hernández, Humberto; Velazco, Bredio; de Escobar, Cecilia; de Waard, Jacobus H.

    2015-01-01

    Panama remains free of zoonotic tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, DNA fingerprinting of 7 M. bovis isolates from a 2013 bovine tuberculosis outbreak indicated minimal homology with strains previously circulating in Panama. M. bovis dispersion into Panama highlights the need for enhanced genotype testing to track zoonotic infections. PMID:25988479

  5. Ectoine biosynthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Ofer, Naomi; Wishkautzan, Marina; Meijler, Michael; Wang, Ying; Speer, Alexander; Niederweis, Michael; Gur, Eyal

    2012-10-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis is a commonly used mycobacterial model system. Here, we show that M. smegmatis protects itself against elevated salinity by synthesizing ectoine and hydroxyectoine and characterize the phenotype of a nonproducing mutant. This is the first analysis of M. smegmatis halotolerance and of the molecular mechanism that supports it.

  6. Pulmonary collectins play distinct roles in host defense against Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Ariki, Shigeru; Kojima, Takashi; Gasa, Shinsei; Saito, Atsushi; Nishitani, Chiaki; Takahashi, Motoko; Shimizu, Takeyuki; Kurimura, Yuichiro; Sawada, Norimasa; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary collectins, surfactant protein A (SP-A) and surfactant protein D (SP-D), play important roles in the innate immunity of the lung. Mycobacterium avium is one of the well-known opportunistic pathogens that can replicate within macrophages. We examined the effects of pulmonary collectins in host defense against M. avium infection achieved via direct interaction between bacteria and collectins. Although both pulmonary collectins bound to M. avium in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, these collectins revealed distinct ligand-binding specificity and biological activities. SP-A and SP-D bound to a methoxy group containing lipid and lipoarabinomannan, respectively. Binding of SP-D but not SP-A resulted in agglutination of M. avium. A chimeric protein with the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D, which chimera revealed a bouquet-like arrangement similar to SP-A, also agglutinated M. avium. The ligand specificity of the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D seems to be necessary for agglutination activity. The binding of SP-A strongly inhibited the growth of M. avium in culture media. Although pulmonary collectins did not increase membrane permeability of M. avium, they attenuated the metabolic rate of the bacteria. Observations under a scanning electron microscope revealed that SP-A almost completely covers bacterial surfaces, whereas SP-D binds to certain areas like scattered dots. These observations suggest that a distinct binding pattern of collectins correlates with the difference of their biological activities. Furthermore, the number of bacteria phagocytosed by macrophages was significantly increased in the presence of SP-D. These data indicate that pulmonary collectins play critical roles in host defense against M. avium.

  7. Isolation, identification, and structural analysis of the mycobactins of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, and Mycobacterium paratuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, R; Ewing, D F; Ratledge, C

    1985-01-01

    Methods were devised to purify the cell-associated, iron-binding compounds known as mycobactins from the closely related species Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum (i.e., the MAIS complex of organisms). The mycobactins from these three species showed a structure that is common to the mycobactins from all the mycobacteria examined to date. However, these mycobactins were unique in that they had more than one alkyl chain. The M. scrofulaceum mycobactins differed from other MAIS mycobactins by a shift in the position of the double bond in the R1 alkyl chain. Traces of other mycobactin types were observed in ethanol extracts of the three species, and examination of the chromatographic properties of these mycobactins showed that each species produced five mycobactin types. Each mycobactin could be subdivided further by the length of its R1 alkyl chain. No differences in the production of these novel mycobactin were observed among species. Mycobactins from three strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and two wood pigeon strains of Mycobacterium avium which had lost their original growth requirements for mycobactin after repeated subculturing in laboratory growth media were examined by thin-layer chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Each organism produced a mycobactin with similar chromatographic properties to those synthesized by MAIS organisms. M. paratuberculosis NADC 18 produced at least two components in our laboratory, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the major component showed this mycobactin to be identical to that produced by M. intracellulare M12. However, a sample of mycobactin J isolated by Merkal and McCullough (Curr. Microbiol. 7:333-335, 1982) from M. paratuberculosis NADC 18 was different from our isolates and appeared to correspond to a minor mycobactin component we had seen by thin-layer chromatography. No reason for this difference could be evinced. Our findings indicate that

  8. Complete genome sequence of 'Mycobacterium neoaurum' NRRL B-3805, an androstenedione (AD) producer for industrial biotransformation of sterols.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Fernández-Alegre, Estela; Morales, Alejandro; Sola-Landa, Alberto; Lorraine, Jess; Macdonald, Sandy; Dovbnya, Dmitry; Smith, Margaret C M; Donova, Marina; Barreiro, Carlos

    2016-04-20

    Microbial bioconversion of sterols into high value steroid precursors, such as 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD), is an industrial challenge. Genes and enzymes involved in sterol degradation have been proposed, although the complete pathway is not yet known. The genome sequencing of the AD producer strain 'Mycobacterium neoaurum' NRRL B-3805 (formerly Mycobacterium sp. NRRL B-3805) will serve to elucidate the critical steps for industrial processes and will provide the basis for further genetic engineering. The genome comprises a circular chromosome (5 421 338bp), is devoid of plasmids and contains 4844 protein-coding genes.

  9. The Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Inderlied, C B; Kemper, C A; Bermudez, L E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease emerged early in the epidemic of AIDS as one of the common opportunistic infections afflicting human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. However, only over the past few years has a consensus developed about its significance to the morbidity and mortality of AIDS. M. avium was well known to mycobacteriologists decades before AIDS, and the MAC was known to cause disease, albeit uncommon, in humans and animals. The early interest in the MAC provided a basis for an explosion of studies over the past 10 years largely in response to the role of the MAC in AIDS opportunistic infection. Molecular techniques have been applied to the epidemiology of MAC disease as well as to a better understanding of the genetics of antimicrobial resistance. The interaction of the MAC with the immune system is complex, and putative MAC virulence factors appear to have a direct effect on the components of cellular immunity, including the regulation of cytokine expression and function. There now is compelling evidence that disseminated MAC disease in humans contributes to both a decrease in the quality of life and survival. Disseminated disease most commonly develops late in the course of AIDS as the CD4 cells are depleted below a critical threshold, but new therapies for prophylaxis and treatment offer considerable promise. These new therapeutic modalities are likely to be useful in the treatment of other forms of MAC disease in patients without AIDS. The laboratory diagnosis of MAC disease has focused on the detection of mycobacteria in the blood and tissues, and although the existing methods are largely adequate, there is need for improvement. Indeed, the successful treatment of MAC disease clearly will require an early and rapid detection of the MAC in clinical specimens long before the establishment of the characteristic overwhelming infection of bone marrow, liver, spleen, and other tissue. Also, a standard method of susceptibility testing

  10. Adherence and biofilm formation of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium abscessus to household plumbing materials.

    PubMed

    Mullis, S N; Falkinham, J O

    2013-09-01

    Measure adherence and biofilm formation by cells of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium abscessus on common household plumbing materials namely stainless steel, glass, zinc-galvanized steel, copper and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Coupons in a CDC biofilm reactor were exposed to cell suspensions containing 10(5) NTM colony forming units (CFU) per ml and adherence measured for 6 h. Biofilm formation (increased numbers of adherent CFU) was measured weekly to 21 days in the absence of substantial numbers of suspended mycobacterial cells. Adherence was rapid and substantial with 2000-15 000 CFU cm(-2) adhering within 1-6 h at room temperature. Biofilm numbers reached as high as 10(7)  CFU cm(-2) . Biofilm-grown cells of Myco. avium were more adherent compared with suspension-grown cells. Mycobacterium avium, Myco. intracellulare and Myco. abscessus readily adhered and formed biofilms on all types of plumbing materials. Factors influencing adherence and biofilm formation were species, plumbing material and prior growth. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Polymorphisms of twenty regulatory proteins between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis are responsible for tuberculosis in humans or animals, respectively. Both species are closely related and belong to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. tuberculosis is the most ancient species from which M. bovis and the other members o...

  12. Antitubercular Lanostane Triterpenes from Cultures of the Basidiomycete Ganoderma sp. BCC 16642.

    PubMed

    Isaka, Masahiko; Chinthanom, Panida; Sappan, Malipan; Danwisetkanjana, Kannawat; Boonpratuang, Thitiya; Choeyklin, Rattaket

    2016-01-22

    Sixteen new lanostane triterpenoids (1-16), together with 26 known compounds (17-42), were isolated from cultures of the basidiomycete Ganoderma sp. BCC 16642. Antitubercular activities of these Ganoderma lanostanoids against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra were evaluated, and structure-activity relationships are proposed.

  13. Disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera Presenting as Vertebral Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Moutsoglou, Daphne M; Merritt, Frank; Cumbler, Ethan

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium chimaera, a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex, is a slow-growing, nontuberculous mycobacterium associated with outbreaks in cardiac-surgery patients supported on heart-lung machines. We report a case of an elderly woman on chronic prednisone who presented with a six-month history of worsening chronic back pain, recurrent low-grade fevers, and weight loss. Imaging identified multilevel vertebral osteomyelitis and lumbar soft-tissue abscess. Abscess culture identified M. chimaera.

  14. [Infections due to Mycobacterium simiae].

    PubMed

    García-Martos, Pedro; García-Agudo, Lidia; González-Moya, Enrique; Galán, Fátima; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium simiae is a slow-growing photochromogenic environmental mycobacterium, first described in 1965. Rarely associated with human infections, possibly due to its limited pathogenicity, it mainly produces lung infection in immunocompetent elderly patients with underlying lung disease, and in disseminated infections in immunosuppressed young patients with AIDS. A microbiological culture is needed to confirm the clinical suspicion, and genetic sequencing techniques are essential to correctly identify the species. Treating M. simiae infections is complicated, owing to the multiple resistance to tuberculous drugs and the lack of correlation between in vitro susceptibility data and in vivo response. Proper treatment is yet to be defined, but must include clarithromycin combined with other antimicrobials such as moxifloxacin and cotrimoxazole. It is possible that M. simiae infections are undiagnosed.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium colombiense

    PubMed Central

    Bouam, Amar; Robert, Catherine; Levasseur, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium colombiense is a rapidly growing mycobacterium initially isolated from the blood of an HIV-positive patient in Colombia. Its 5,854,893-bp draft genome exhibits a G+C content of 67.64%, 5,233 protein-coding genes, and 54 predicted RNA genes. PMID:28385843

  16. Human Infections Due to Mycobacterium lentiflavum

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, Enrico; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Erba, Maria Luigia; Levrè, Egle; Lombardi, Natalia; Mantella, Antonia; Mecocci, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Three cases of human disease due to Mycobacterium lentiflavum are reported. In the first, the mycobacterium was responsible for chronic pulmonary disease in an elderly woman; in the second, it gave rise to cervical lymphadenitis in a child; and in the third, it caused a liver abscess in a young AIDS patient. PMID:11826009

  17. Propionibacterium, Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium and Lepra bacilli.

    PubMed

    Barksdale, L; Kim, K S

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is presented which suggests that certain key markers of lepra bacilli reside collectively in Proprionibacterium acnes, Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum and Mycobacterium leprae. The unrestricted replication of Mycobacterium leprae depends most probably upon the presence of an immune-deficiency-inducing viral agent or possibly on the combined effects of the organisms considered.

  18. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Maureen; Taylor, Judith; Woods, Paul

    2002-01-01

    A domestic shorthair cat was presented for lethargy and ataxia. Clinical findings included an abdominal mass, lumbosacral pain, ataxia. Aspirates from the liver and lymph nodes revealed intracellular, negative-staining rods. Treatment for presumptive mycobacterium infection was unsuccessful and the cat was euthanized. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium was confirmed on culture. PMID:12001504

  19. Preseptal cellulitis due to Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Benton, J; Karkanevatos, A

    2007-06-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is an atypical mycobacterium found in both salt and fresh water. It occasionally causes soft tissue infections after minor trauma, principally affecting the limbs. A 17-year-old male aquarium worker presented with preseptal cellulitis of his right eye, after attempting to lance a hordeolum some days previously. The condition failed to respond to antibiotics and a necrotic area developed, which subsequently required debridement. Histology of the debrided area demonstrated granulomatous inflammation which when considered with his occupation led to the diagnosis of Mycobacterium marinum--'fish-tank granuloma'. A Medline search did not demonstrate any previous cases of Mycobacterium marinum infection occurring peri-orbitally. The current literature regarding diagnosis and management is reviewed. Although infection with Mycobacterium marinum is rare in the general population, this case demonstrates the importance of considering the diagnosis when dealing with patients frequently exposed to fresh or salt water.

  20. Beta-lactamases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium kansasii.

    PubMed

    Segura, C; Salvadó, M

    1997-09-01

    Re-emergence of infectious diseases caused by mycobacteria as well as the emergence of multiresistant strains of Mycobacterium has promoted the research on the use of beta-lactames in the treatment of such diseases. Mycobacteria produce beta-lactamases: M. tuberculosis produces a wide-spectrum beta-lactamase whose behaviour mimicks those of Gram-negative bacteria. M. kansasii produces also beta-lactamase which can be inhibited by clavulanic acid. An overview on beta-lactamases from both species is reported.

  1. Accumulation of Norfloxacin by Mycobacterium aurum and Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kerstin J.; Chung, Gavin A. C.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    1998-01-01

    The modified fluorescence method was used to determine the accumulation of norfloxacin by Mycobacterium aurum A+ and Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155. By using an exogenous norfloxacin concentration of 10 μg/ml, a steady-state concentration (SSC) of 160 to 180 ng of norfloxacin/mg of cells was obtained for M. aurum, and an SSC of 120 to 140 ng of norfloxacin/mg of cells obtained for M. smegmatis. For both species of mycobacteria, the SSC was achieved within 5 min. The silicon oil method was investigated and gave higher SSCs than the modified fluorescence method. Further studies on the mechanism of norfloxacin accumulation by M. aurum were performed. An increase in the pH of the wash buffer from 7.0 to 9.0 did not significantly affect the final SSC obtained. Accumulation was nonsaturated over a norfloxacin concentration range of 0 to 100 μg/ml, and the proton motive force inhibitor 2,4-dinitrophenol (1 and 2 mM), whether it was added before or after norfloxacin was added, had no effect on the final SSC obtained. 2,4-Dinitrophenol also had no effect on norfloxacin accumulation by M. smegmatis. Furthermore, norfloxacin accumulation by M. aurum was unaffected by the presence of either Tween 80 or subinhibitory concentrations of ethambutol in the growth medium. Therefore, it is proposed that norfloxacin accumulation by mycobacteria occurs by simple, energy-independent diffusion. PMID:9559785

  2. [Frontier of mycobacterium research--host vs. mycobacterium].

    PubMed

    Okada, Masaji; Shirakawa, Taro

    2005-09-01

    During the past decade, we have observed advance in tuberculosis research including novel vaccines, innate immunity (TLR), SNIP analysis and molecular mechanism of drug resistance. Worldwide genome project enabled the whole genome sequence of host resistant against tuberculosis as well as the whole genome sequence of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. DNA technology has also provided a great impact on the development of novel vaccine against TB. In this symposium, we have invited leading researchers in the field of the frontier study of Mycobacterium research in order to provide general overview of the cutting edge of frontier research. Molecular mechanism of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis has been clarified. On the other hand, molecular mechanism of host-defence (insusceptibility of host) against M. tuberculosis has not yet elucidated. Dr. Taro Shirakawa (Kyoto University) reviewed the susceptibility genes of host in TB infection and presented candidate genes associated with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. Dr. Naoto Keicho (International Medical Center of Japan) tried to identify host genetic factors involved in susceptibility to pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection by candidate gene approach and genome-wide approach. In Japan, Dr. Masaji Okada (National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center) has been engaged actively in the development of new tuberculosis vaccines (HVJ-liposome/Hsp65 DNA + IL-12 DNA vaccine and recombinant 72f BCG vaccine). He showed basic strategy for construction of new candidate vaccines and also showed significant efficacy on the protection of tuberculosis infection using cynomolgus monkeys, which are very similar to human tuberculosis. Dr. Hatsumi Taniguchi (University of Occupational and Environmental Health) presented that M. tuberculosis mIHF and the neighbor genes went into a dormacy-like state of M. smegmatis in J774 macrophage cells. This study might provide a weapon for elucidating the mechanism of dormacy

  3. Isolation of (-)-avenaciolide as the antifungal and antimycobacterial constituent of a Seimatosporium sp. Endophyte from the medicinal plant Hypericum perforatum .

    PubMed

    Clark, Trevor N; Bishop, Amanda I; McLaughlin, Mark; Calhoun, Larry A; Johnson, John A; Gray, Christopher A

    2014-10-01

    An extract of Seimatosporium sp., an endophyte from the Canadian medicinal plant Hypericum perforatum, exhibited significant antifungal and antimycobacterial activity against Candida albicans and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra. Bioassay guided fractionation led to the isolation of (-)-avenaciolide as the only bioactive constituent of the extract. This is the first report of both the antimycobacterial activity of avenaciolide and its isolation from a Seimatosporium sp. fungus.

  4. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium infections in a tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) herd.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Graham C; Ziccardi, Michael H; Gonzales, Ben J; Woods, Leslie M; Fischer, Jon K; Manning, Elizabeth J B; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2006-10-01

    Between 2 August and 22 September 2000, 37 hunter-killed tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) were evaluated at the Grizzly Island Wildlife Area, California, USA, for evidence of paratuberculosis. Elk were examined post-mortem, and tissue and fecal samples were submitted for radiometric mycobacterial culture. Acid-fast isolates were identified by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that discriminates among members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Histopathologic evaluations were completed, and animals were tested for antibodies using a Johne's enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel immunodiffusion. In addition, 104 fecal samples from tule elk remaining in the herd were collected from the ground and submitted for radiometric mycobacterial culture. No gross lesions were detected in any of the hunter-killed animals. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) was cultured once from ileocecal tissue of one adult elk and was determined to be a strain (A18) found commonly in infected cattle. One or more isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) were isolated from tissues of five additional adult elk. Gastrointestinal tract and lymph node tissues from 17 of the 37 elk (46%) examined had histopathologic lesions commonly seen with mycobacterial infection; however, acid-fast bacteria were not observed. All MAC infections were detected from adult elk (P = 0.023). In adult elk, a statistically significant association was found between MAA infection and ELISA sample-to-positive ratio (S/P) > or = 0.25 (P=0.021); four of five MAA culture-positive elk tested positive by ELISA. Sensitivity and specificity of ELISA S/P > or = 0.25 for detection of MAA in adult elk were 50% and 93%, respectively. No significant associations were found between MAC infection and sex or histopathologic lesions. Bacteriologic culture confirmed infection with MAP and MAA in this asymptomatic tule elk herd. The Johne's ELISA was useful in signaling

  5. Whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium suricattae.

    PubMed

    Dippenaar, Anzaan; Parsons, Sven David Charles; Sampson, Samantha Leigh; van der Merwe, Ruben Gerhard; Drewe, Julian Ashley; Abdallah, Abdallah Musa; Siame, Kabengele Keith; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas Claudius; van Helden, Paul David; Pain, Arnab; Warren, Robin Mark

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis occurs in various mammalian hosts and is caused by a range of different lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). A recently described member, Mycobacterium suricattae, causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Southern Africa and preliminary genetic analysis showed this organism to be closely related to an MTBC pathogen of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the dassie bacillus. Here we make use of whole genome sequencing to describe the evolution of the genome of M. suricattae, including known and novel regions of difference, SNPs and IS6110 insertion sites. We used genome-wide phylogenetic analysis to show that M. suricattae clusters with the chimpanzee bacillus, previously isolated from a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in West Africa. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 complex, showing the evolutionary relationship of M. africanum and chimpanzee bacillus, and the closely related members M. suricattae, dassie bacillus and Mycobacterium mungi.

  6. Mycobacterium marinum infection on the hand (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This bacterial infection is caused by Mycobacterium marinum . Marinum is a relative of the organism which causes tuberculosis. This lesion is often referred to as a swimming pool granuloma. Atypical mycobacterial ...

  7. The Leprosy Agents Mycobacterium lepromatosis and Mycobacterium leprae in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiang Y.; Sizer, Kurt Clement; Velarde-Félix, Jesús S.; Frias-Castro, Luis O.; Vargas-Ocampo, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Mycobacterium leprae was the only known cause of leprosy until 2008, when a new species, named Mycobacterium lepromatosis, was found to cause diffuse lepromatous leprosy (DLL), a unique form of leprosy endemic in Mexico. Methods We sought to differentiate the leprosy agents among 120 Mexican patients with various clinical forms of leprosy and to compare their relative prevalence and disease features. Archived skin biopsy specimens from these patients were tested for both M. leprae and M. lepromatosis using polymerase chain reaction-based species-specific assays. Results Eighty-seven (72.5%) patients were confirmed for etiologic species, including 55 with M. lepromatosis, 18 with M. leprae, and 14 with both organisms. The endemic regions of each agent differed but overlapped. Patients with M. lepromatosis were younger and from more states, and their clinical diagnoses included 13 DLL, 34 lepromatous leprosy (LL), and eight other forms of leprosy. By contrast, the diagnoses of patients with M. leprae included none DLL, 15 LL and three other forms. Thus, M. lepromatosis caused DLL specifically (p=0.023). Patients with M. lepromatosis also showed more variable skin lesions and the extremities were the commonest biopsy sites. Finally, patients with dual infections manifested all clinical forms and accounted for 16.1% of all species-confirmed cases. Conclusions M. lepromatosis is another cause of leprosy and is probably more prevalent than M. leprae in Mexico. It mainly causes LL and also specifically DLL. Dual infections caused by both species may occur in endemic area. PMID:22788812

  8. Mycobacterium ulcerans in wild animals.

    PubMed

    Portaels, F; Chemlal, K; Elsen, P; Johnson, P D; Hayman, J A; Hibble, J; Kirkwood, R; Meyers, W M

    2001-04-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans infection, or Buruli ulcer, is the third most frequent mycobacterial disease in humans, often causing serious deformities and disability. The disease is most closely associated with tropical wetlands, especially in west and central Africa. Most investigators believe that the aetiological agent proliferates in mud beneath stagnant waters. Modes of transmission may involve direct contact with the contaminated environment, aerosols from water surfaces, and water-dwelling fauna (e.g. insects). Person-to-person transmission is rare. Trauma at the site of skin contamination by M. ulcerans appears to play an important role in initiating disease. Once introduced into the skin or subcutaneous tissue, M. ulcerans multiplies and produces a toxin that causes necrosis. However, the type of disease induced varies from a localised nodule or ulcer, to widespread ulcerative or non-ulcerative disease and osteomyelitis. Although culture of M. ulcerans from a patient was first reported in 1948, attempts to culture the mycobacterium from many specimens of flora and fauna have been unsuccessful. Failure to cultivate this organism from nature may be attributable to inadequate sampling, conditions of transport, decontamination and culture of this fastidious heat-sensitive organism, and to a long generation time relative to that of other environmental mycobacteria. Nevertheless, recent molecular studies using specific primers have revealed M. ulcerans in water, mud, fish and insects. Although no natural reservoir has been found, the possibility that M. ulcerans may colonise microfauna such as free-living amoebae has not been investigated. The host range of experimental infection by M. ulcerans includes lizards, amphibians, chick embryos, possums, armadillos, rats, mice and cattle. Natural infections have been observed only in Australia, in koalas, ringtail possums and a captive alpaca. The lesions were clinically identical to those observed in humans. Mycobacterium

  9. Complete Genome Sequences of Field Isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Vicente, Joaquín; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Manrique, Marina; Tobes, Raquel; López, Vladimir; Romero, Beatriz; Domínguez, Lucas; Garrido, Joseba M.; Gortazar, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the complete genome sequences of field isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and the related mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium caprae. The genomes of three M. bovis (MB1, MB3, MB4) and one M. caprae (MB2) field isolates with different virulence, prevalence, and host distribution phenotypes were sequenced. PMID:26112781

  10. Complete Genome Sequences of Field Isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, José; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Vicente, Joaquín; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Manrique, Marina; Tobes, Raquel; López, Vladimir; Romero, Beatriz; Domínguez, Lucas; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón; Gortazar, Christian

    2015-06-25

    Here we report the complete genome sequences of field isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and the related mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium caprae. The genomes of three M. bovis (MB1, MB3, MB4) and one M. caprae (MB2) field isolates with different virulence, prevalence, and host distribution phenotypes were sequenced. Copyright © 2015 de la Fuente et al.

  11. Structure of a New Glycolipid from the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare Complex

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Motoko; Ohta, Akihiro; Sasaki, Shun-ichi; Minnikin, David E.

    1999-01-01

    From the lipid fraction of a freeze-dried cell mass of a strain of the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex, a new glycolipid was isolated and was characterized as 5-mycoloyl-α-arabinofuranosyl (1→1′)-glycerol, mainly on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies. PMID:10094713

  12. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  13. Copper Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoshan; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a trace element essential for the growth and development of almost all organisms, including bacteria. However, Cu overload in most systems is toxic. Studies show Cu accumulates in macrophage phagosomes infected with bacteria, suggesting Cu provides an innate immune mechanism to combat invading pathogens. To counteract the host-supplied Cu, increasing evidence suggests that bacteria have evolved Cu resistance mechanisms to facilitate their pathogenesis. In particular, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, has evolved multiple pathways to respond to Cu. Here, we summarize what is currently known about Cu homeostasis in Mtb and discuss potential sources of Cu encountered by this and other pathogens in a mammalian host. PMID:25614981

  14. A new ascochlorin derivative from Cylindrocarpon sp. FKI-4602.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Mio; Fukuda, Takashi; Uchida, Ryuji; Nonaka, Kenichi; Masuma, Rokuro; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Cylindrol A₅, a new ascochlorin congener, was isolated along with 14 known compounds from the culture broth of Cylindrocarpon sp. FKI-4602 by solvent extraction, octadecylsilane column chromatography and HPLC. The structure of cylindrol A₅ was elucidated by spectral analyses, including NMR. The compound has an ascochlorin skeleton consisting of a resorcin aldehyde and a cyclohexanone moieties. Cylindrol A₅ showed moderate antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Kocuria rhizophila, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Acholeplasma laidlawii. The biosynthetic pathway to cylindrol A₅ was deduced from the 14 isolated metabolites of the fungal strain.

  15. An outbreak of Mycobacterium genavense infection in a flock of captive diamond doves (Geopelia cuneata).

    PubMed

    Haridy, Mohie; Fukuta, Mayumi; Mori, Yasuyuki; Ito, Hideyuki; Kubo, Masahito; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

    2014-09-01

    Two diamond doves (Geopelia cuneata) in a flock of 23 birds housed in an aviary in a zoo in central Japan were found dead as a result of mycobacteriosis. Fecal samples of the remaining doves were positive for mycobacterial infection, and thus they were euthanatized. Clinical signs and gross pathology, including weight loss and sudden death and slight enlargement of the liver and intestine, were observed in a small number of birds (3/23). Disseminated histiocytic infiltration of either aggregates or sheets of epithelioid cells containing acid-fast bacilli, in the absence of caseous necrosis, were observed in different organs of the infected doves, especially lungs (23/23), intestines (9/23), livers (7/23), and hearts (6/23). Mycobacterium sp. was isolated from the livers of three birds (3/23). DNA extracted from frozen liver and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues (5/23) were used for amplification of the gene encoding mycobacterial 65-kDa heat shock protein (hsp65). The causative Mycobacterium species was identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Mycobacterium genavense infection was confirmed in three of the diamond doves. Moreover, partial 16S rDNA gene sequencing revealed 100% identity across the three samples tested, and 99.77% nucleotide homology of the isolate sequence to M. genavense. The main route of M. genavense infection in the diamond doves was most likely airborne, suggesting a potential zoonotic risk of airborne transmission between humans and birds.

  16. Actinobacteria associated with the marine sponges Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp. and their culturability.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-ya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria associated with 3 marine sponges, Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp., were investigated. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that actinobacterial diversity varied greatly and that Ulosa sp. was most diverse, while Cinachyra sp. was least diverse. Culture-based approaches failed to isolate actinobacteria from Petrosia sp. or Ulosa sp., but strains belonging to 10 different genera and 3 novel species were isolated from Cinachyra sp.

  17. Actinobacteria Associated with the Marine Sponges Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp. and Their Culturability

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-ya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria associated with 3 marine sponges, Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp., were investigated. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that actinobacterial diversity varied greatly and that Ulosa sp. was most diverse, while Cinachyra sp. was least diverse. Culture-based approaches failed to isolate actinobacteria from Petrosia sp. or Ulosa sp., but strains belonging to 10 different genera and 3 novel species were isolated from Cinachyra sp. PMID:22214828

  18. The draft genome of Mycobacterium aurum, a potential model organism for investigating drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Jody; Maitra, Arundhati; McNerney, Ruth; Nair, Mridul; Gupta, Antima; Coll, Francesc; Pain, Arnab; Bhakta, Sanjib; Clark, Taane G

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium aurum (M. aurum) is an environmental mycobacteria that has previously been used in studies of anti-mycobacterial drugs due to its fast growth rate and low pathogenicity. The M. aurum genome has been sequenced and assembled into 46 contigs, with a total length of 6.02Mb containing 5684 annotated protein-coding genes. A phylogenetic analysis using whole genome alignments positioned M. aurum close to Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium vanbaalenii, within a clade related to fast-growing mycobacteria. Large-scale genomic rearrangements were identified by comparing the M. aurum genome to those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. M. aurum orthologous genes implicated in resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs in M. tuberculosis were observed. The sequence identity at the DNA level varied from 68.6% for pncA (pyrazinamide drug-related) to 96.2% for rrs (streptomycin, capreomycin). We observed two homologous genes encoding the catalase-peroxidase enzyme (katG) that is associated with resistance to isoniazid. Similarly, two embB homologues were identified in the M. aurum genome. In addition to describing for the first time the genome of M. aurum, this work provides a resource to aid the use of M. aurum in studies to develop improved drugs for the pathogenic mycobacteria M. tuberculosis and M. leprae.

  19. Disseminated folliculitis by Mycobacterium fortuitum in an immunocompetent woman*

    PubMed Central

    Macente, Sara; Helbel, Cesar; Souza, Simone Felizardo Rocha; Siqueira, Vera Lúcia Dias; Padua, Rubia Andreia Falleiros; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a non-tuberculous fast-growing mycobacterium which is frequently acquired from environmental sources such as soil and water. Since it is an opportunist pathogen, it is associated with trauma, surgery or immunodeficiency. The current report describes a case of Mycobacterium fortuitum-caused disseminated lesions on the skin of an immunocompetent patient. PMID:23539012

  20. Disseminated folliculitis by Mycobacterium fortuitum in an immunocompetent woman.

    PubMed

    Macente, Sara; Helbel, Cesar; Souza, Simone Felizardo Rocha; Siqueira, Vera Lúcia Dias; Padua, Rubia Andreia Falleiros; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a non-tuberculous fast-growing mycobacterium which is frequently acquired from environmental sources such as soil and water. Since it is an opportunist pathogen, it is associated with trauma, surgery or immunodeficiency. The current report describes a case of Mycobacterium fortuitum-caused disseminated lesions on the skin of an immunocompetent patient.

  1. Mycobacterium chimaera and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Stewardson, Andrew J; Stuart, Rhonda L; Cheng, Allen C; Johnson, Paul Dr

    2017-02-20

    There is an ongoing investigation into infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria associated with contaminated heater-cooler units used in cardiac surgery. The overall risk is low, but surgical site and disseminated infections have been reported, including one possible case in Australia, mainly with surgery involving implantation of prosthetic material. Mycobacterium chimaera infection should be considered in patients who have previously undergone surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and who present with cardiac or disseminated infection or sternal wound infection unresponsive to standard antibiotic therapy. Where cases are suspected, patients should be investigated and managed in consultation with an infectious diseases physician and/or clinical microbiologist. If cases are confirmed or heater-cooler devices are found to be contaminated, details should be reported to the hospital infection control team, the jurisdictional health department, the Therapeutic Goods Administration and the Australian distributor of the affected heater-cooler unit(s). Measures to manage risk should include communicating with relevant hospital departments, ensuring that the manufacturer's updated instructions for use are followed, regular testing of machines, and reviewing the location of machines when in use.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis prevents inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Master, Sharon S; Rampini, Silvana K; Davis, Alexander S; Keller, Christine; Ehlers, Stefan; Springer, Burkhard; Timmins, Graham S; Sander, Peter; Deretic, Vojo

    2008-04-17

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) parasitizes host macrophages and subverts host innate and adaptive immunity. Several cytokines elicited by Mtb are mediators of mycobacterial clearance or are involved in tuberculosis pathology. Surprisingly, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), a major proinflammatory cytokine, has not been implicated in host-Mtb interactions. IL-1beta is activated by processing upon assembly of the inflammasome, a specialized inflammatory caspase-activating protein complex. Here, we show that Mtb prevents inflammasome activation and IL-1beta processing. An Mtb gene, zmp1, which encodes a putative Zn(2+) metalloprotease, is required for this process. Infection of macrophages with zmp1-deleted Mtb triggered activation of the inflammasome, resulting in increased IL-1beta secretion, enhanced maturation of Mtb containing phagosomes, improved mycobacterial clearance by macrophages, and lower bacterial burden in the lungs of aerosol-infected mice. Thus, we uncovered a previously masked role for IL-1beta in the control of Mtb and a mycobacterial system that prevents inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1beta activation.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Success through dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Gengenbacher, Martin; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health threat, killing near to 2 million individuals around this globe, annually. The sole vaccine developed almost a century ago, provides limited protection only during childhood. After decades without the introduction of new antibiotics, several candidates are currently undergoing clinical investigation. Curing TB requires prolonged combination chemotherapy with several drugs. Moreover, monitoring the success of therapy is questionable due to the lack of reliable biomarkers. To substantially improve the situation, a detailed understanding of the crosstalk between human host and the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is vital. Principally, Mtb’s enormous success is based on three capacities: First, reprogramming of macrophages after primary infection/phagocytosis in order to prevent its own destruction; second, initiating the formation of well-organized granulomas, comprising different immune cells to create a confined environment for the host–pathogen standoff; third, the capability to shut down its own central metabolism, terminate replication and thereby transit into a stage of dormancy rendering itself extremely resistant to host defense and drug treatment. Here we review the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, draw conclusions in a working model of mycobacterial dormancy and highlight gaps in our understanding to be addressed in future research. PMID:22320122

  4. Mycobacterium haemophilum and Lymphadenitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, Lesla E.S.; Lindeboom, Jerome A.; Prins, Jan M.; Claas, Eric C. J.

    2005-01-01

    Infections associated with Mycobacterium haemophilum are underdiagnosed because specific culture methods required for its recovery are not applied routinely. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology on fine needle aspirates and biopsied specimens from 89 children with cervicofacial lymphadenitis, we assessed the importance of M. haemophilum. Application of a Mycobacterium genus–specific real-time PCR in combination with amplicon sequencing and a M. haemophilum–specific PCR resulted in the recognition of M. haemophilum as the causative agent in 16 (18%) children with cervicofacial lymphadenitis. Mycobacterium avium was the most frequently found species (56%), and M. haemophilum was the second most commonly recognized pathogen. Real-time PCR results were superior to culture because only 9 (56%) of the 16 diagnosed M. haemophilum infections were positive by culture. PMID:15705324

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Type ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We report the draft genome sequence of the type strain Mycobacterium chimaera Fl-0169T, a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). M. chimaera Fl-0169T was isolated from a patient in Italy and is highly similar to strains of M. chimaera isolated in Ireland, though Fl-0169T possesses unique virulence genes. Evidence suggests that M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. chimaera are differently virulent and a comparative genomic analysis is critically needed to identify diagnostic targets that reliably differentiate species of MAC. With treatment costs for Mycobacterium infections estimated to be >$1.8 B annually in the U.S., correct species identification will result in improved treatment selection, lower costs, and improved patient outcomes.

  6. Mycobacterium fortuitum cutaneous infection from amateur tattoo.

    PubMed

    Suvanasuthi, Saroj; Wongpraparut, Chanisada; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas

    2012-06-01

    A case of cutaneous Mycobacterium fortuitum infection after receiving an amateur tattoo is reported. A few days after tattooing, an otherwise healthy 25-year-old Thai male presented with multiple discrete erythematous papules confined to the tattoo area. He was initially treated with topical steroid and oral antihistamine without improvement. Skin biopsy was carried out, and the histopathology showed mixed cell granuloma with a foreign body reaction (tattoo color pigments). The acid-fast bacilli stain was positive. The tissue culture grew M. fortuitum two weeks later. He was treated with clarithromycin 1,000 mg/day and ciprofloxacin 1,000 mg/day for 10 months with complete response. From the clinical aspect, tattoo-associated rapidly growing mycobacterium infection might be difficult to differentiate from the pigment-based skin reactions. Skin biopsy for histopathology and tissue culture for Mycobacterium probably will be needed in arriving at the diagnosis.

  7. The pathology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, K

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an old enemy of the human race, with evidence of infection observed as early as 5000 years ago. Although more host-restricted than Mycobacterium bovis, which can infect all warm-blooded vertebrates, M. tuberculosis can infect, and cause morbidity and mortality in, several veterinary species as well. As M. tuberculosis is one of the earliest described bacterial pathogens, the literature describing this organism is vast and overwhelming. This review strives to distill what is currently known about this bacterium and the disease it causes for the veterinary pathologist.

  8. Whole chromosomal DNA probes for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, M C; McMillan, C; Coyle, M B

    1987-01-01

    Whole chromosomal DNA probes were used to identify clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium gordonae. The probe for M. tuberculosis was prepared from Mycobacterium bovis BCG, which has been shown to be closely related to M. tuberculosis. A probe for the M. avium complex was prepared from three strains representing each of the three DNA homology groups in the M. avium complex. The probes were used in dot blot assays to identify clinical isolates of mycobacteria. The dot blot test correctly identified 57 of the 61 (93%) cultures grown on solid media, and 100% of antibiotic-treated broth-grown cells were correctly identified. Identification by dot blot required a maximum of 48 h. When the probes were tested against 63 positive BACTEC (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) cultures of clinical specimens, 59% were correctly identified. However, of the 14 BACTEC cultures that had been treated with antibiotics before being lysed, 13 (93%) were correctly identified. PMID:3112180

  9. Photodynamic inactivation of the models Mycobacterium phlei and Mycobacterium smegmatis in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce-Micah, R.; Gamm, U.; Hüttenberger, D.; Cullum, J.; Foth, H.-J.

    2009-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of bacterial strains presents an attractive potential alternative to antibiotic therapies. Success is dependent on the effective accumulation in bacterial cells of photochemical substances called photosensitizers, which are usually porphyrins or their derivatives. The kinetics of porphyrin synthesis after treatment with the precursor ALA and the accumulation of the Chlorin e6 and the following illumination were studied. The goal was to estimate effectivity of the destructive power of these PS in vitro in respect of the physiological states of Mycobacteria. So the present results examine the cell destruction by PDI using ALA-induced Porphyrins and Chlorin e6 accumulated in Mycobacterium phlei and Mycobacterium smegmatis, which serve as models for the important pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium bovis. We could show that both Mycobacterium after ALA and Chlorin e6 application were killed by illumination with light of about 662 nm. A reduction of about 97% could be reached by using a lightdose of 70 mW/cm2.

  10. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  11. Pathway Profiling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne T.; VanderVen, Brian C.; Sherman, David R.; Russell, David G.; Sampson, Nicole S.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, imports and metabolizes host cholesterol during infection. This ability is important in the chronic phase of infection. Here we investigate the role of the intracellular growth operon (igr), which has previously been identified as having a cholesterol-sensitive phenotype in vitro and which is important for intracellular growth of the mycobacteria. We have employed isotopically labeled low density lipoproteins containing either [1,7,15,22,26-14C]cholesterol or [1,7,15,22,26-13C]cholesterol and high resolution LC/MS as tools to profile the cholesterol-derived metabolome of an igr operon-disrupted mutant (Δigr) of M. tuberculosis. A partially metabolized cholesterol species accumulated in the Δigr knock-out strain that was absent in the complemented and parental wild-type strains. Structural elucidation by multidimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the accumulated metabolite to be methyl 1β-(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α-(3′-propanoic acid)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone. Heterologously expressed and purified FadE28-FadE29, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase encoded by the igr operon, catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 2′-propanoyl-CoA ester side chains in substrates with structures analogous to the characterized metabolite. Based on the structure of the isolated metabolite, enzyme activity, and bioinformatic annotations, we assign the primary function of the igr operon to be degradation of the 2′-propanoate side chain. Therefore, the igr operon is necessary to completely metabolize the side chain of cholesterol metabolites. PMID:22045806

  12. DNA Replication in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    DITSE, ZANELE; LAMERS, MEINDERT H.; WARNER, DIGBY F.

    2017-01-01

    Faithful replication and maintenance of the genome are essential to the ability of any organism to survive and propagate. For an obligate pathogen such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis that has to complete successive cycles of transmission, infection, and disease in order to retain a foothold in the human population, this requires that genome replication and maintenance must be accomplished under the metabolic, immune, and antibiotic stresses encountered during passage through variable host environments. Comparative genomic analyses have established that chromosomal mutations enable M. tuberculosis to adapt to these stresses: the emergence of drug-resistant isolates provides direct evidence of this capacity, so too the well-documented genetic diversity among M. tuberculosis lineages across geographic loci, as well as the microvariation within individual patients that is increasingly observed as whole-genome sequencing methodologies are applied to clinical samples and tuberculosis (TB) disease models. However, the precise mutagenic mechanisms responsible for M. tuberculosis evolution and adaptation are poorly understood. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the machinery responsible for DNA replication in M. tuberculosis, and discuss the potential contribution of the expanded complement of mycobacterial DNA polymerases to mutagenesis. We also consider briefly the possible role of DNA replication—in particular, its regulation and coordination with cell division—in the ability of M. tuberculosis to withstand antibacterial stresses, including host immune effectors and antibiotics, through the generation at the population level of a tolerant state, or through the formation of a subpopulation of persister bacilli—both of which might be relevant to the emergence and fixation of genetic drug resistance. PMID:28361736

  13. Mycobacterium abscessus multispacer sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium abscessus group includes antibiotic-resistant, opportunistic mycobacteria that are responsible for sporadic cases and outbreaks of cutaneous, pulmonary and disseminated infections. However, because of their close genetic relationships, accurate discrimination between the various strains of these mycobacteria remains difficult. In this report, we describe the development of a multispacer sequence typing (MST) analysis for the simultaneous identification and typing of M. abscessus mycobacteria. We also compared MST with the reference multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) typing method. Results Based on the M. abscessus CIP104536T genome, eight intergenic spacers were selected, PCR amplified and sequenced in 21 M. abscessus isolates and analysed in 48 available M. abscessus genomes. MST and MLSA grouped 37 M. abscessus organisms into 12 and nine types, respectively; four formerly “M. bolletii” organisms and M. abscessus M139 into three and four types, respectively; and 27 formerly “M. massiliense” organisms grouped into nine and five types, respectively. The Hunter-Gaston index was off 0.912 for MST and of 0.903 for MLSA. The MST-derived tree was similar to that based on MLSA and rpoB gene sequencing and yielded three main clusters comprising each the type strain of the respective M. abscessus sub-species. Two isolates exhibited discordant MLSA- and rpoB gene sequence-derived position, one isolate exhibited discordant MST- and rpoB gene sequence-derived position and one isolate exhibited discordant MST- and MLSA-derived position. MST spacer n°2 sequencing alone allowed for the accurate identification of the different isolates at the sub-species level. Conclusions MST is a new sequencing-based approach for both identifying and genotyping M. abscessus mycobacteria that clearly differentiates formerly “M. massiliense” organisms from other M. abscessus subsp. bolletii organisms. PMID:23294800

  14. Comparative analysis of genes encoding key steroid core oxidation enzymes in fast-growing Mycobacterium spp. strains.

    PubMed

    Bragin, E Yu; Shtratnikova, V Yu; Dovbnya, D V; Schelkunov, M I; Pekov, Yu A; Malakho, S G; Egorova, O V; Ivashina, T V; Sokolov, S L; Ashapkin, V V; Donova, M V

    2013-11-01

    A comparative genome analysis of Mycobacterium spp. VKM Ac-1815D, 1816D and 1817D strains used for efficient production of key steroid intermediates (androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, AD, androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione, ADD, 9α-hydroxy androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, 9-OH-AD) from phytosterol has been carried out by deep sequencing. The assembled contig sequences were analyzed for the presence putative genes of steroid catabolism pathways. Since 3-ketosteroid-9α-hydroxylases (KSH) and 3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase (Δ(1) KSTD) play key role in steroid core oxidation, special attention was paid to the genes encoding these enzymes. At least three genes of Δ(1) KSTD (kstD), five genes of KSH subunit A (kshA), and one gene of KSH subunit B of 3-ketosteroid-9α-hydroxylases (kshB) have been found in Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1817D. Strains of Mycobacterium spp. VKM Ac-1815D and 1816D were found to possess at least one kstD, one kshB and two kshA genes. The assembled genome sequence of Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1817D differs from those of 1815D and 1816D strains, whereas these last two are nearly identical, differing by 13 single nucleotide substitutions (SNPs). One of these SNPs is located in the coding region of a kstD gene and corresponds to an amino acid substitution Lys (135) in 1816D for Ser (135) in 1815D. The findings may be useful for targeted genetic engineering of the biocatalysts for biotechnological application.

  15. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  16. Granulomatous lobular mastitis secondary to Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Kamyab, Armin

    2016-12-16

    Granulomatous lobular mastitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the breast of unknown etiology. Most present as breast masses in women of child-bearing age. A 29-year-old female presented with a swollen, firm and tender right breast, initially misdiagnosed as mastitis. Core needle biopsy revealed findings consistent with granulomatous lobular mastitis, and cultures were all negative for an infectious etiology. She was started on steroid therapy to which she initially responded well. A few weeks later she deteriorated and was found to have multiple breast abscesses. She underwent operative drainage and cultures grew Mycobacterium fortuitum. Granulomatous lobular mastitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the breast. The definitive diagnose entails a biopsy. Other causes of chronic or granulomatous mastitis should be ruled out, including atypical or rare bacteria such as Mycobacterium fortuitum. This is the first reported case of granulomatous mastitis secondary to Mycobacterium fortuitum. With pathologic confirmation of granulomatous mastitis, an infectious etiology must be ruled out. Atypical bacteria such as Mycobacterium fortuitum may not readily grow on cultures, as with our case. Medical management is appropriate, with surgical excision reserved for refractory cases or for drainage of abscesses.

  17. Disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera Infection After Cardiothoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nicholas; Sampath, Rahul; Abu Saleh, Omar M; Tweet, Marysia S; Jevremovic, Dragan; Alniemi, Saba; Wengenack, Nancy L; Sampathkumar, Priya; Badley, Andrew D

    2016-09-01

    Ten case reports of disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with cardiovascular surgery were published from Europe. We report 3 cases of disseminated M chimaera infections with histories of aortic graft and/or valvular surgery within the United States. Two of 3 patients demonstrated ocular involvement, a potentially important clinical finding.

  18. Disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera Infection After Cardiothoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Nicholas; Sampath, Rahul; Abu Saleh, Omar M.; Tweet, Marysia S.; Jevremovic, Dragan; Alniemi, Saba; Wengenack, Nancy L.; Sampathkumar, Priya; Badley, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Ten case reports of disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with cardiovascular surgery were published from Europe. We report 3 cases of disseminated M chimaera infections with histories of aortic graft and/or valvular surgery within the United States. Two of 3 patients demonstrated ocular involvement, a potentially important clinical finding. PMID:27703994

  19. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  20. Mycobacteriophage-drived diversification of Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging opportunistic pathogen which diversity was acknowledged by the recent description of two subspecies accommodating M. abscessus, Mycobacterium bolletii and Mycobacterium massiliense isolates. Results Here, genome analysis found 1–8 prophage regions in 47/48 M. abscessus genomes ranging from small prophage-like elements to complete prophages. A total of 20,304 viral and phage proteins clustered into 853 orthologous groups. Phylogenomic and phylogenetic analyses based on prophage region homology found three main clusters corresponding to M. abscessus, M. bolletii and M. massiliense. Analysing 135 annotated Tape Measure Proteins found thirteen clusters and four singletons, suggesting that at least 17 mycobacteriophages had infected M. abscessus during its evolution. The evolutionary history of phages differed from that of their mycobacterial hosts. In particular, 33 phage-related proteins have been horizontally transferred within M. abscessus genomes. They comprise of an integrase, specific mycobacteriophage proteins, hypothetical proteins and DNA replication and metabolism proteins. Gene exchanges, loss and gains which occurred in M. abscessus genomes have been driven by several mycobacteriophages. Conclusions This analysis of phage-mycobacterium co-evolution suggests that mycobacteriophages are playing a key-role in the on-going diversification of M. abscessus. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eric Bapteste, Patrick Forterre and Eugene Koonin. PMID:25224692

  1. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  2. The Mycobacterium phlei Genome: Expectations and Surprises

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sarbashis; Pettersson, B. M. Fredrik; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Ramesh, Malavika; Dasgupta, Santanu; Bhattacharya, Alok; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium phlei, a nontuberculosis mycobacterial species, was first described in 1898–1899. We present the complete genome sequence for the M. phlei CCUG21000T type strain and the draft genomes for four additional strains. The genome size for all fiveis 5.3 Mb with 69.4% Guanine-Cytosine content. This is ≈0.35 Mbp smaller than the previously reported M. phlei RIVM draft genome. The size difference is attributed partly to large bacteriophage sequence fragments in the M. phlei RIVM genome. Comparative analysis revealed the following: 1) A CRISPR system similar to Type 1E (cas3) in M. phlei RIVM; 2) genes involved in polyamine metabolism and transport (potAD, potF) that are absent in other mycobacteria, and 3) strain-specific variations in the number of σ-factor genes. Moreover, M. phlei has as many as 82 mce (mammalian cell entry) homologs and many of the horizontally acquired genes in M. phlei are present in other environmental bacteria including mycobacteria that share similar habitat. Phylogenetic analysis based on 693 Mycobacterium core genes present in all complete mycobacterial genomes suggested that its closest neighbor is Mycobacterium smegmatis JS623 and Mycobacterium rhodesiae NBB3, while it is more distant to M. smegmatis mc2 155. PMID:26941228

  3. Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Southwestern Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Luisa Maria; Rozo, Juan C.; Forero, Liliana; van Soolingen, Dick

    2011-01-01

    Using spoligotyping, we identified 13 genotypes and 17 orphan types among 160 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients in Valle del Cauca, Colombia. The Beijing genotype represented 15.6% of the isolates and was correlated with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, female sex of the patients, and residence in Buenaventura and may represent a new public health threat. PMID:21762581

  4. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the host response

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Cole, Stewart T.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Rubin, Eric; Nathan, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances reported at a recent international meeting highlight insights and controversies in the genetics of M. tuberculosis and the infected host, the nature of protective immune responses, adaptation of the bacillus to host-imposed stresses, animal models, and new techniques. PMID:15939785

  6. Mycobacterium marinum infection from sea monkeys

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Jaclyn; Webster, Duncan; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Chiu, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    A case of cutaneous Mycobacterium marinum infection acquired from Artemia nyos (sea monkeys) is presented. The infection was unresponsive to initial antimicrobial therapies. A biopsy of a lesion revealed granulomatous inflammation with cultures that subsequently grew M marinum. A three-month course of clarithromycin provided complete resolution. PMID:24294280

  7. Mycobacterium chelonei infection of a corneal graft.

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, G. W.; Stacey, A. R.; Marsh, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    We present a case of Mycobacterium chelonei infection in a corneal graft. The chronic ulceration and stromal infiltration followed a well defined course and eventually responded to topical amikacin, though a further graft was required. Previous cases of keratitis due to the M. fortuitum complex are reviewed. Images PMID:3311141

  8. Iron-chelating compound from Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, W G; Merkal, R S

    1976-01-01

    A iron-chelating monohydroxamate was isolated from cultures of Mycobacterium avium grown on an iron-limiting medium. The hydroxyamate metabolite was characterized by chemical degradation and spectral measurements as L-alpha-asparaginyl-L-alpha-(N-hydroxy)-asparagine. PMID:185194

  9. Granulomatous lobular mastitis secondary to Mycobacterium fortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Kamyab, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatous lobular mastitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the breast of unknown etiology. Most present as breast masses in women of child-bearing age. A 29-year-old female presented with a swollen, firm and tender right breast, initially misdiagnosed as mastitis. Core needle biopsy revealed findings consistent with granulomatous lobular mastitis, and cultures were all negative for an infectious etiology. She was started on steroid therapy to which she initially responded well. A few weeks later she deteriorated and was found to have multiple breast abscesses. She underwent operative drainage and cultures grew Mycobacterium fortuitum. Granulomatous lobular mastitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the breast. The definitive diagnose entails a biopsy. Other causes of chronic or granulomatous mastitis should be ruled out, including atypical or rare bacteria such as Mycobacterium fortuitum. This is the first reported case of granulomatous mastitis secondary to Mycobacterium fortuitum. With pathologic confirmation of granulomatous mastitis, an infectious etiology must be ruled out. Atypical bacteria such as Mycobacterium fortuitum may not readily grow on cultures, as with our case. Medical management is appropriate, with surgical excision reserved for refractory cases or for drainage of abscesses. PMID:28035314

  10. Immunopathogenesis of Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aerosol and intratracheal inoculation routes are commonly used for experimental biology purposes to infect cattle with virulent Mycobacterium bovis, each resulting primarily in a respiratory tract infection including lungs and lung-associated lymph nodes. Disease severity is dose and time dependent...

  11. Identification of mycobacterium spp. and nocardia spp. from solid and liquid cultures by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Girard, Victoria; Mailler, Sandrine; Welker, Martin; Arsac, Maud; Cellière, Béatrice; Cotte-Pattat, Pierre-Jean; Chatellier, Sonia; Durand, Géraldine; Béni, Anne-Marie; Schrenzel, Jacques; Miller, Elizabeth; Dussoulier, Rahima; Dunne, W Michael; Butler-Wu, Susan; Saubolle, Michael A; Sussland, Den; Bell, Melissa; van Belkum, Alex; Deol, Parampal

    2016-11-01

    Identification of microorganisms by MALDI-TOF MS has been widely accepted in clinical microbiology. However, for Mycobacterium spp. and Nocardia spp. such identification has not yet reached the optimal level of routine testing. Here we describe the development of an identification tool for 49 and 15 species of Mycobacterium spp. and Nocardia spp., respectively. During database construction, a number of ambiguous reference identifications were revealed and corrected via molecular analyses. Eventually, more than 2000 individual mass spectra acquired from 494 strains were included in a reference database and subjected to bio-statistical analyses. This led to correct species identification and correct combination of species into several complexes or groups, such as the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. With the Advanced Spectrum Classifier algorithm, class-specific bin weights were determined and tested by cross-validation experiments with good results. When challenged with independent isolates, overall identification performance was 90% for identification of Mycobacterium spp. and 88% for Nocardia spp. However, for a number of Mycobacterium sp. isolates, no identification could be achieved and in most cases, this could be attributed to the production of polymers that masked the species-specific protein peak patterns. For the species where >20 isolates were tested, correct identification reached 95% or higher. With the current spectral database, the identification of Mycobacterium spp. and Nocardia spp. by MALDI-TOF MS can be performed in routine clinical diagnostics although in some complicated cases verification by sequencing remains mandatory.

  12. Stenotrophomonas, Mycobacterium, and Streptomyces in home dust and air: Associations with moldiness and other home/family characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kettleson, Eric; Kumar, Sudhir; Reponen, Tiina; Vesper, Stephen; Méheust, Delphine; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Adhikari, Atin

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory illnesses have been linked to children’s exposures to water-damaged homes. Therefore, understanding the microbiome in water-damaged homes is critical to preventing these illnesses. Few studies have quantified bacterial contamination, especially specific species, in water-damaged homes. We collected air and dust samples in twenty-one low-mold homes and twenty-one high-mold homes. The concentrations of three bacteria/genera, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Streptomyces sp. and Mycobacterium sp., were measured in air and dust samples using quantitative PCR (QPCR). The concentrations of the bacteria measured in the air samples were not associated with any specific home characteristic based on multiple regression models. However, higher concentrations of S. maltophilia in the dust samples were associated with water damage, i.e. with higher floor surface moisture and higher concentrations of moisture-related mold species. The concentrations of Streptomyces and Mycobacterium sp. had similar patterns and may be partially determined by human and animal occupants and outdoor sources of these bacteria. PMID:23397905

  13. Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., Pasteurella bettii sp. nov., Pasteurella lymphangitidis sp. nov., Pasteurella mairi sp. nov., and Pasteurella trehalosi sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Sneath, P H; Stevens, M

    1990-04-01

    Evidence from numerical taxonomic analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization supports the proposal of new species in the genera Actinobacillus and Pasteurella. The following new species are proposed: Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., from the vaginas of postparturient sows; Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., associated with epididymitis of sheep; Pasteurella bettii sp. nov., associated with human Bartholin gland abscess and finger infections; Pasteurella lymphangitidis sp. nov. (the BLG group), which causes bovine lymphangitis; Pasteurella mairi sp. nov., which causes abortion in sows; and Pasteurella trehalosi sp. nov., formerly biovar T of Pasteurella haemolytica, which causes septicemia in older lambs.

  14. Bone marrow infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Satti, Luqman; Abbasi, Shahid; Sattar, Abdul; Ikram, Aamer; Manzar, Muhammad Adnan; Khalid, Malik Muhammad

    2011-08-01

    Incidence and prevalence of Mycobacterium fortuitum infection vary greatly by location and death is very rare except in disseminated disease in immunocompromised individuals. We present what we believe is the first case of bone marrow infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum in an HIV negative patient. Bone marrow examination revealed presence of numerous acid fast bacilli which were confirmed as Mycobacterium fortuitum on culture and by molecular analysis. Patient was managed successfully with amikacin and ciprofloxacin.

  15. Mycobacterium Xenopi Found Incidentally on MRI of the Cervical Spine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium Xenopi Found Incidentally on MRI of the Cervical Spine Military Medicine Radiology Corner, Vol. 175. January, 2010 Radiology Corner...Mycobacterium Xenopi Found Incidentally on MRI of the Cervical Spine Guarantor: Chris Walker1 Contributors: Chris Walker; 1 Col Les Folio...Mycobacterium xenopi in her lung. A mass was incidentally noted in the right upper apex on an MRI ordered to evaluate a subluxation seen in her cervical

  16. Insights from the complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium marinum on the evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Stinear, Timothy P.; Seemann, Torsten; Harrison, Paul F.; Jenkin, Grant A.; Davies, John K.; Johnson, Paul D.R.; Abdellah, Zahra; Arrowsmith, Claire; Chillingworth, Tracey; Churcher, Carol; Clarke, Kay; Cronin, Ann; Davis, Paul; Goodhead, Ian; Holroyd, Nancy; Jagels, Kay; Lord, Angela; Moule, Sharon; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Quail, Michael A.; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Walker, Danielle; White, Brian; Whitehead, Sally; Small, Pamela L.C.; Brosch, Roland; Ramakrishnan, Lalita; Fischbach, Michael A.; Parkhill, Julian; Cole, Stewart T.

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum, a ubiquitous pathogen of fish and amphibia, is a near relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis in humans. The genome of the M strain of M. marinum comprises a 6,636,827-bp circular chromosome with 5424 CDS, 10 prophages, and a 23-kb mercury-resistance plasmid. Prominent features are the very large number of genes (57) encoding polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthases (NRPSs) and the most extensive repertoire yet reported of the mycobacteria-restricted PE and PPE proteins, and related-ESX secretion systems. Some of the NRPS genes comprise a novel family and seem to have been acquired horizontally. M. marinum is used widely as a model organism to study M. tuberculosis pathogenesis, and genome comparisons confirmed the close genetic relationship between these two species, as they share 3000 orthologs with an average amino acid identity of 85%. Comparisons with the more distantly related Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis reveal how an ancestral generalist mycobacterium evolved into M. tuberculosis and M. marinum. M. tuberculosis has undergone genome downsizing and extensive lateral gene transfer to become a specialized pathogen of humans and other primates without retaining an environmental niche. M. marinum has maintained a large genome so as to retain the capacity for environmental survival while becoming a broad host range pathogen that produces disease strikingly similar to M. tuberculosis. The work described herein provides a foundation for using M. marinum to better understand the determinants of pathogenesis of tuberculosis. PMID:18403782

  17. Identification of genetic markers for Mycobacterium pinnipedii through genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Bigi, Fabiana; Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Nuñez-García, Javier; Peralta, Andrea; Caimi, Karina C; Golby, Paul; Hinds, Jason; Cataldi, Angel; Gordon, Stephen V; Romano, Maria I

    2005-07-15

    Tuberculosis in seals is caused by Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. In this study, we evaluated the extent of genetic variability among Mycobacterium bovis and M. pinnipedii by microarray-based comparative genomics. We identified two deletions that are exclusive to M. pinnipedii: PiD1 that removes the orthologues of the M. tuberculosis genes Rv3530c and Rv3531c, and PiD2 that encompasses genes Rv1977 and Rv1978. Interestingly, a deletion overlapping the previously described RD2 region was identified in some isolates of Mycobacterium microti and further characterised.

  18. Membranous glomerulonephritis associated with Mycobacterium shimoidei pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Kushida, Yoshio; Bandoh, Shuji; Ishii, Tomoya; Haba, Reiji; Tadokoro, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Takahama, Takayuki; Kita, Nobuyuki; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    Male, 83 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Membranous glomerulonephritis Symptoms: Producting cough Medication: - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: Nephrology. Rare disease. Membranous glomerulonephritis can occur secondarily from infectious diseases. There are no reports describing membranous glomerulonephritis caused by non-tuberculous mycobacterium infection. However, several cases with membranous glomerulonephritis due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been reported. Mycobacterium shimoidei is an uncommon pathogen, and less than 20 cases with this species have been reported. A therapeutic regimen for this infection has not been established yet. An 83-year-old Japanese man presented with productive cough for 6 months. Computed tomography scan showed multiple cavities in the bilateral pulmonary fields. Acid-fast bacilli were evident in his sputum by Ziehl-Neelsen staining (Gaffky 3). PCR amplifications for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, and Mycobacterium intracellulare were all negative. Finally, Mycobacterium shimoidei was identified by rpoB sequencing and 16S rRNA sequencing. Urine examination showed a sub-nephrotic range of proteinuria and histology of the kidney showed membranous glomerulonephritis. Antimycobacterial treatment with clarithromycin, rifampicin, and ethambutol dramatically improved not only the pulmonary disease, but also the proteinuria. To the best of our knowledge, the presented case is the first report showing non-tuberculous mycobacterium-induced secondary membranous glomerulonephritis. A combination with clarithromycin, ethambutol, and rifampicin might be effective for treatment of Mycobacterium shimoidei infection.

  19. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in the diagnosis of tuberculosis and provides epidemiological information on this disease. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the common causative organism in human tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... in the diagnosis of tuberculosis and provides epidemiological information on this disease. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the common causative organism in human tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in the diagnosis of tuberculosis and provides epidemiological information on this disease. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the common causative organism in human tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease...

  2. Nasal infection due to Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D-Q; Righini, C; Darouassi, Y; Schmerber, S

    2011-09-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, a rapidly growing non-tuberculous atypical mycobacterium, is commonly found in soil and water. This organism generally causes skin, bone, and soft tissue infections following local trauma or surgical procedures, and in immunodeficient patients. The case reported here is, to our knowledge, the first published report of M. fortuitum nasal infection. The authors report the case of a 3-year-old girl with intranasal tumour-like swelling associated with cervical lymph nodes due to M. fortuitum infection. A combination of radical surgical debridement and prolonged therapy with several antimicrobial agents was required to completely eradicate the infection. This case report indicates that non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections should be considered after failure of conventional antibiotic therapy or when classical microbiological tests fail to identify the pathogen responsible for sinonasal and cervical infections. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection of ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Midani, S; Rathore, M H

    1999-07-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is one of the rapidly growing mycobacteria found in soil, dust, and water. It can be isolated as a normal colonizing organism, but as a pathogen this organism causes mainly skin and soft tissue infection preceded by trauma. A wide variety of infections can occur in individuals with predisposing conditions. Central nervous system infection with M fortuitum is rare, and meningitis occurs after surgery or trauma. We believe that ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt infection with this organism has not been reported in the literature. Practitioners should be aware of this rare entity and should suspect it in the presence of cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis with sterile culture, and after trauma, surgery, or manipulation of the VP shunt hardware. Mycobacterium fortuitum is resistant to most first-line and second-line antituberculous drugs, and treatment should include surgical debridement in addition to prolonged antimicrobial therapy.

  4. Fatal pulmonary infection due to Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed Central

    Lessing, M P; Walker, M M

    1993-01-01

    Environmental (atypical, opportunist, other) mycobacteria were first isolated nearly a century ago. The classification of these "other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis" organisms was initially chaotic until Runyon proposed a scheme of four groups in 1959. Mycobacterium fortuitum is a member of group IV: Rapid growers. These ubiquitous terrestrial and aquatic forms contaminate water supplies, reagents, and clinical samples. They may colonise the respiratory systems of patients whose local defence mechanisms have been impaired or those with congenital and acquired immune defects. They can also cause disease in immunocompetent individuals. There have been fewer than 20 published cases of pulmonary infection caused by M fortuitum. A further case is reported of fatal pulmonary infection in an elderly patient with long standing chronic obstructive airways disease (COAD). He had left upper zone shadowing on chest radiography and lung abscesses at post mortem examination yielded only M fortuitum. PMID:8463423

  5. Mycobacterium lentiflavum in drinking water supplies, Australia.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Henry M; Carter, Robyn; Torbey, Matthew J; Minion, Sharri; Tolson, Carla; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Huygens, Flavia; Hargreaves, Megan; Thomson, Rachel M

    2011-03-01

    Mycobacterium lentiflavum, a slow-growing nontuberculous mycobacterium, is a rare cause of human disease. It has been isolated from environmental samples worldwide. To assess the clinical significance of M. lentiflavum isolates reported to the Queensland Tuberculosis Control Centre, Australia, during 2001-2008, we explored the genotypic similarity and geographic relationship between isolates from humans and potable water in the Brisbane metropolitan area. A total of 47 isolates from 36 patients were reported; 4 patients had clinically significant disease. M. lentiflavum was cultured from 13 of 206 drinking water sites. These sites overlapped geographically with home addresses of the patients who had clinically significant disease. Automated repetitive sequence-based PCR genotyping showed a dominant environmental clone closely related to clinical strains. This finding suggests potable water as a possible source of M. lentiflavum infection in humans.

  6. Mycobacterium goodii: An Emerging Nosocomial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Natalie Mariam; Klein, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium goodii, a rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium, is an emerging pathogen in nosocomial infections. Its inherent resistance patterns make it a challenging organism to treat, and delays in identification can lead to poor outcomes. We present a case of cardiac device pocket infection with M. goodii, complicated by both antibiotic resistance and drug reactions that highlight the challenges faced by clinicians trying to eradicate these infections. We also present a brief review of the English literature surrounding this disease, including a table of all reported cases of M. goodii infections and their outcomes to act as guide for clinicians formulating treatment plans for these infections. A clear understanding of diagnostic methods and treatment caveats is essential to curing infections caused by these organisms.

  7. Mycobacterium fortuitum lipoid pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, M K; Garber, J B; Fowlkes, N; Grooters, A M; Royal, A B; Gaunt, S D

    2015-03-01

    A 1-year old female spayed German Shepherd dog was evaluated for acute onset of dyspnea. Pyogranulomatous inflammation and green globoid structures were present on aspirates of the affected lung. Impression smears and histopathology confirmed pyogranulomatous pneumonia, with large amounts of lipid corresponding to the green structures noted cytologically, and identified poorly staining bacterial rods within lipid vacuoles. Special stains confirmed the presence of acid-fast bacterial rods, and polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing identified the organism as Mycobacterium fortuitum. M. fortuitum pneumonia is well described in humans and has previously been reported in 4 dogs and 1 cat. Lipid was a prominent cytologic and histologic feature, as is often described in humans and in the single feline case report. Additionally, this case highlights the variable cytologic appearance of lipid, as well as Mycobacterium spp, which are classically nonstaining with Wright-Giemsa.

  8. Nitazoxanide is active against Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Mai Ann; Na, Hana; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Gillis, Thomas P.; Lahiri, Ramanuj

    2017-01-01

    Nitazoxanide (NTZ) is an anti-parasitic drug that also has activity against bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our data using both radiorespirometry and live-dead staining in vitro demonstrate that NTZ similarly has bactericidal against M. leprae. Further, gavage of M. leprae-infected mice with NTZ at 25mg/kg provided anti-mycobacterial activity equivalent to rifampicin (RIF) at 10 mg/kg. This suggests that NTZ could be considered for leprosy treatment. PMID:28850614

  9. Mycobacterium chelonae in a tectonic corneal graft.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Haziq Raees; Comyn, Oliver; Jones, Gill; Nanavaty, Mayank A

    2016-01-01

    Atypical mycobacterial infections of the cornea can present with nonspecific inflammatory changes and graft rejection, with no obvious focus to culture and a subsequent delay to diagnosis. These pathogens are well documented in the literature following laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis but have rarely been described following corneal transplant surgery. We report a single case of Mycobacterium chelonae keratitis 1 year after tectonic keratoplasty.

  10. Myeloperoxidase Exerts Microbicidal Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Borelli, Violetta; Banfi, Elena; Perrotta, Maria Giovanna; Zabucchi, Giuliano

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the antimycobacterial role of myeloperoxidase (MPO), one of the most abundant granule proteins in human neutrophils. Our data indicate that purified MPO, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, exerts a consistent killing activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and against a clinical isolate. The activity is time and dose dependent and requires the presence of chloride ions in the assay medium. PMID:10417186

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Manipulator of Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Korb, Vanessa C.; Chuturgoon, Anil A.; Moodley, Devapregasan

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is one of the most successful pathogens in human history and remains a global health challenge. MTB has evolved a plethora of strategies to evade the immune response sufficiently to survive within the macrophage in a bacterial-immunological equilibrium, yet causes sufficient immunopathology to facilitate its transmission. This review highlights MTB as the driver of disease pathogenesis and presents evidence of the mechanisms by which MTB manipulates the protective immune response into a pathological productive infection. PMID:26927066

  12. Comparative Mycobacterium tuberculosis spoligotype distribution in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Ramos-Alvarez, Jessica; Molina-Torres, Carmen A; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Rendón, Adrian; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, we studied the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from patients according to their gender, age, and geographic location in Mexico. We did not observe any statistically significant differences in regard to age or gender. We found that spoligo international type 53 (SIT53) is more frequent in the northern states and that SIT119 predominates in central Mexico. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Aquarium-borne Mycobacterium marinum granulomas.

    PubMed

    Engbaek, H C; Thormann, J; Vergmann, B

    1980-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum was isolated for the first time in Denmark from skin granuloma of a 37-year-old man. The skin lesion was provoked by an injury from the broken glass of an aquarium used for tropical fish. Treatment with rifampicin and ethambutol was successful. At the time of diagnosis, M. marinum was also isolated from a dead fish; but in no case was skin granuloma found among purchasers of fish supplied by the patient.

  14. Comparative Mycobacterium tuberculosis Spoligotype Distribution in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Alvarez, Jessica; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Rendón, Adrian; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from patients according to their gender, age, and geographic location in Mexico. We did not observe any statistically significant differences in regard to age or gender. We found that spoligo international type 53 (SIT53) is more frequent in the northern states and that SIT119 predominates in central Mexico. PMID:24850349

  15. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging.

  16. Mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yujiao, Zhang; Xiaojing, Li; Kaixia, Mi

    2016-10-20

    Tuberculosis, caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest bacterial infectious disease. It is still a global-health threat, particularly because of the drug-resistant forms. Fluoroquinolones, with target of gyrase, are among the drugs used to treat tuberculosis. However, their widespread use has led to bacterial resistance. The molecular mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in mycobacterium tuberculosis have been reported, such as DNA gyrase mutations, drug efflux pumps system, bacterial cell wall thickness and pentapeptide proteins (MfpA) mediated regulation of gyrase. Mutations in gyrase conferring quinolone resistance play important roles and have been extensively studied. Recent studies have shown that the regulation of DNA gyrase affects mycobacterial drug resistance, but the mechanisms, especially by post-translational modification and regulatory proteins, are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the fluoroquinolone drug development, and the molecular genetics of fluoroquinolone resistance in mycobacteria. Comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis will open a new view on understanding drug resistance in mycobacteria and lead to novel strategies to develop new accurate diagnosis methods.

  17. Microaerophilic Conditions Promote Growth of Mycobacterium genavense

    PubMed Central

    Realini, L.; De Ridder, K.; Palomino, J.-C.; Hirschel, B.; Portaels, F.

    1998-01-01

    Our studies show that microaerophilic conditions promote the growth of Mycobacterium genavense in semisolid medium. The growth of M. genavense at 2.5 or 5% oxygen was superior to that obtained at 21% oxygen in BACTEC primary cultures (Middlebrook 7H12, pH 6.0, without additives). By using nondecontaminated specimens, it was possible to detect growth with very small inocula (25 bacilli/ml) of 12 different M. genavense strains (from nude mice) within 6 weeks of incubation under low oxygen tension; conversely, with 21% oxygen, no growth of 8 of 12 (66.7%) M. genavense strains was detected (growth index, <10). The same beneficial effect of 2.5 or 5% oxygen was observed in primary cultures of a decontaminated clinical specimen. Low oxygen tension (2.5 or 5%) is recommended for the primary isolation of M. genavense. Microaerophilic cultivation of other atypical mycobacteria, especially slow-growing (e.g., Mycobacterium avium) and difficult-to-grow (e.g., Mycobacterium ulcerans) species, is discussed. PMID:9705393

  18. Collagen degrading activity associated with Mycobacterium species

    PubMed Central

    Masso, F; Paez, A; Varela, E; d Diaz; Zenteno, E; Montano, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis penetration into tissues is poorly understood but it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution from proteases capable of disrupting the extracellular matrix of the pulmonary epithelium and the blood vessels. A study was undertaken to identify and characterise collagen degrading activity of M tuberculosis.
METHODS—Culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) was obtained from reference mycobacterial strains and mycobacteria isolated from patients with tuberculosis. The collagen degrading activity of CFPE was determined according to the method of Johnson-Wint using 3H-type I collagen. The enzyme was identified by the Birkedal-Hansen and Taylor method and its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration chromatography using an electroelution purified enzyme.
RESULTS—CFPE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv showed collagenolytic activity that was four times higher than that of the avirulent strain H37Ra. The 75 kDa enzyme responsible was divalent cation dependent. Other mycobacterial species and those isolated from patients with tuberculosis also had collagen degrading activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Mycobacterium species possess a metalloprotease with collagen degrading activity. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the virulent reference strain H37Rv.

 PMID:10212111

  19. The complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Thierry; Eiglmeier, Karin; Camus, Jean-Christophe; Medina, Nadine; Mansoor, Huma; Pryor, Melinda; Duthoy, Stephanie; Grondin, Sophie; Lacroix, Celine; Monsempe, Christel; Simon, Sylvie; Harris, Barbara; Atkin, Rebecca; Doggett, Jon; Mayes, Rebecca; Keating, Lisa; Wheeler, Paul R.; Parkhill, Julian; Barrell, Bart G.; Cole, Stewart T.; Gordon, Stephen V.; Hewinson, R. Glyn

    2003-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in a range of animal species and man, with worldwide annual losses to agriculture of $3 billion. The human burden of tuberculosis caused by the bovine tubercle bacillus is still largely unknown. M. bovis was also the progenitor for the M. bovis bacillus Calmette–Guérin vaccine strain, the most widely used human vaccine. Here we describe the 4,345,492-bp genome sequence of M. bovis AF2122/97 and its comparison with the genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. Strikingly, the genome sequence of M. bovis is >99.95% identical to that of M. tuberculosis, but deletion of genetic information has led to a reduced genome size. Comparison with M. leprae reveals a number of common gene losses, suggesting the removal of functional redundancy. Cell wall components and secreted proteins show the greatest variation, indicating their potential role in host–bacillus interactions or immune evasion. Furthermore, there are no genes unique to M. bovis, implying that differential gene expression may be the key to the host tropisms of human and bovine bacilli. The genome sequence therefore offers major insight on the evolution, host preference, and pathobiology of M. bovis. PMID:12788972

  20. A Dermal Piercing Complicated by Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Patel, Trisha; Scroggins-Markle, Leslie; Kelly, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dermal piercings have recently become a fashion symbol. Common complications include hypertrophic scarring, rejection, local infection, contact allergy, and traumatic tearing. We report a rare case of Mycobacterium fortuitum following a dermal piercing and discuss its medical implications and treatments. Case. A previously healthy 19-year-old woman presented complaining of erythema and edema at the site of a dermal piercing on the right fourth dorsal finger. She was treated with a 10-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and one course of cephalexin by her primary care physician with incomplete resolution. The patient stated that she had been swimming at a local water park daily. A punch biopsy around the dermal stud was performed, and cultures with sensitivities revealed Mycobacterium fortuitum. The patient was treated with clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin for two months receiving full resolution. Discussion. Mycobacterium fortuitum is an infrequent human pathogen. This organism is a Runyon group IV, rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria, often found in water,soil, and dust. Treatment options vary due to the size of the lesion. Small lesions are typically excised, while larger lesions require treatment for 2-6 months with antibiotics. We recommend a high level of suspicion for atypical mycobacterial infections in a piercing resistant to other therapies.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degrading gene islands in five pyrene-degrading Mycobacterium isolates from different geographic locations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Anderson, Anne J

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain KMS utilizes pyrene, a high-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), as a sole carbon source. Bioinformatic analysis of the genome of isolate KMS predicted 25 genes with the potential to encode 17 pyrene-induced proteins identified by proteomics; these genes were clustered on both the chromosome and a circular plasmid. RT-PCR analysis of total RNA isolated from KMS cells grown with or without pyrene showed that the presence of pyrene increased the transcript accumulation of 20 of the predicted chromosome- and plasmid-located genes encoding pyrene-induced proteins. The transcribed genes from both the chromosome and a circular plasmid were within larger regions containing genes required for PAH degradation constituting PAH-degrading gene islands. Genes encoding integrases and transposases were found within and outside the PAH-degrading gene islands. The lower GC content of the genes within the gene island (61%-64%) compared with the average genome content (68%) suggested that these mycobacteria initially acquired these genes by horizontal gene transfer. Synteny was detected for the PAH-degrading islands in the genomes of two additional Mycobacterium isolates from the same PAH-polluted site and of two other pyrene-degrading Mycobacterium from different sites in the United States of America. Consequently, the gene islands have been conserved from a common ancestral strain.

  2. In vitro activity of TP-271 against Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Nocardia species.

    PubMed

    Cynamon, Michael; Jureller, Jeff; Desai, Balaji; Ramachandran, Krithika; Sklaney, Mary; Grossman, Trudy H

    2012-07-01

    The in vitro activities of TP-271, a novel fluorocycline antimicrobial, against 22 isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus, 22 isolates of Mycobacterium fortuitum, and 19 isolates of Nocardia spp. were studied by a microtiter broth dilution method. The MIC(90)s for M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, and Nocardia spp. were 0.5 μg/ml, 0.03 μg/ml, and 8 μg/ml, respectively. TP-271 was significantly more active than the respective control drug in virtually all tests.

  3. A Mycobacterium strain with extended capacities for degradation of gasoline hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Solano-Serena, F; Marchal, R; Casarégola, S; Vasnier, C; Lebeault, J M; Vandecasteele, J P

    2000-06-01

    A bacterial strain (strain IFP 2173) was selected from a gasoline-polluted aquifer on the basis of its capacity to use 2,2, 4-trimethylpentane (isooctane) as a sole carbon and energy source. This isolate, the first isolate with this capacity to be characterized, was identified by 16S ribosomal DNA analysis, and 100% sequence identity with a reference strain of Mycobacterium austroafricanum was found. Mycobacterium sp. strain IFP 2173 used an unusually wide spectrum of hydrocarbons as growth substrates, including n-alkanes and multimethyl-substituted isoalkanes with chains ranging from 5 to 16 carbon atoms long, as well as substituted monoaromatic hydrocarbons. It also attacked ethers, such as methyl t-butyl ether. During growth on gasoline, it degraded 86% of the substrate. Our results indicated that strain IFP 2173 was capable of degrading 3-methyl groups, possibly by a carboxylation and deacetylation mechanism. Evidence that it attacked the quaternary carbon atom structure by an as-yet-undefined mechanism during growth on 2,2,4-trimethylpentane and 2,2-dimethylpentane was also obtained.

  4. Expression, purification and functional characterization of AmiA of acetamidase operon of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Sundararaman, Balaji; Palaniyandi, Kannan; Venkatesan, Arunkumar; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2014-11-01

    Regulation of gene expression is one of the mechanisms of virulence in pathogenic organisms. In this context, we would like to understand the gene regulation of acetamidase enzyme of Mycobacterium smegmatis, which is the first reported inducible enzyme in mycobacteria. The acetamidase is highly inducible and the expression of this enzyme is increased 100-fold when the substrate acetamide is added. The acetamidase structural gene (amiE) is found immediately downstream of three predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Three of these genes along with a divergently expressed ORF are predicted to form an operon and involved in the regulation of acetamidase enzyme. Here we report expression, purification and functional characterization of AmiA which is one of these predicted ORFs. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that AmiA binds to the region between the amiA and amiD near the predicted promoter (P2). Over-expression of AmiA significantly lowered the expression of acetamidase compared to the wild type as demonstrated by qRT-PCR and SDS-PAGE. We conclude that AmiA binds near P2 promoter and acts as a repressor in the regulation of acetamidase operon. The described work is a further step forward toward broadening the knowledge on understanding of the complex gene regulatory mechanism of Mycobacterium sp.

  5. A Mycobacterium Strain with Extended Capacities for Degradation of Gasoline Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Solano-Serena, Floriane; Marchal, Rémy; Casarégola, Serge; Vasnier, Christelle; Lebeault, Jean-Michel; Vandecasteele, Jean-Paul

    2000-01-01

    A bacterial strain (strain IFP 2173) was selected from a gasoline-polluted aquifer on the basis of its capacity to use 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane) as a sole carbon and energy source. This isolate, the first isolate with this capacity to be characterized, was identified by 16S ribosomal DNA analysis, and 100% sequence identity with a reference strain of Mycobacterium austroafricanum was found. Mycobacterium sp. strain IFP 2173 used an unusually wide spectrum of hydrocarbons as growth substrates, including n-alkanes and multimethyl-substituted isoalkanes with chains ranging from 5 to 16 carbon atoms long, as well as substituted monoaromatic hydrocarbons. It also attacked ethers, such as methyl t-butyl ether. During growth on gasoline, it degraded 86% of the substrate. Our results indicated that strain IFP 2173 was capable of degrading 3-methyl groups, possibly by a carboxylation and deacetylation mechanism. Evidence that it attacked the quaternary carbon atom structure by an as-yet-undefined mechanism during growth on 2,2,4-trimethylpentane and 2,2-dimethylpentane was also obtained. PMID:10831416

  6. Mycobacterium smegmatis synthesizes in vitro androgens and estrogens from different steroid precursors.

    PubMed

    Dlugovitzky, Diana G; Fontela, María Sol; Martinel Lamas, Diego J; Valdez, Ricardo A; Romano, Marta C

    2015-07-01

    Fast-growing mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium sp. and Mycobacterium smegmatis degrade natural sterols. They are a model to study tuberculosis. Interestingly, M. smegmatis has been found in river effluents derived from paper production, and therefore, it would be important to gain further insight into its capacity to synthesize steroids that are potential endocrine disruptors affecting the development and reproduction of fishes. To our knowledge, the capacity of M. smegmatis to synthesize estrogens and even testosterone has not been previously reported. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the capacity of M. smegmatis to synthesize in vitro testosterone and estrogens from tritiated precursors and to investigate the metabolic pathways involved. Results obtained by thin-layer chromatography showed that (3)H-progesterone was transformed to 17OH-progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, estrone, and estradiol after 6, 12, or 24 h of incubation. (3)H-androstenedione was transformed into testosterone and estrogens, mainly estrone, and (3)H-testosterone was transformed to estrone and androstenedione. Incubation with (3)H-dehydroepiandrosterone rendered androstenediol, testosterone, and estrogens. This ability to transform less potent sex steroids like androstenedione and estrone into other more active steroids like testosterone and estradiol or vice versa suggests that M. smegmatis can influence the amount of self-synthesized strong androgens and estrogens and can transform those found in the environment.

  7. Treatment of Mycobacterium intracellulare Infected Mice with Walter Reed Compound H

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-25

    including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae , Staphylococcusaureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, enterococ----ci, Neissr•~n...97 SAD "Treatment of Mycobacterium intracellulare Infected Mice with Walter Reed Compound H" Final Comprehensive Report J. Kenneth McClatchy, Ph.D...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED "TREATMENT OF MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE - Final Comprehensive Report INFECTED MICE WITH WALTER REED COMPOUND H"li G

  8. Mycobacterium chimaera - a new threat for cardiac surgical patients?

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Radosław; Naumiuk, Łukasz; Paczkowski, Konrad; Formella, Danuta; Pek, Renata; Zieliński, Jacek; Haponiuk, Ireneusz

    2017-03-01

    An outbreak of invasive Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with "heater-cooler" devices in patients treated with cardiac surgery has been described worldwide. The authors summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the epidemiology, diagnostics, treatment, and prevention of Mycobacterium chimaera infections in patients after cardiothoracic surgery.

  9. 59 FR- Method Development for Airborne Mycobacterium Tuberculosis; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-03-07

    ... Tuberculosis; Meeting The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for... Airborne Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. Time and Date: 1 p.m.-5 p.m., March 29, 1994. Place: Alice Hamilton... peer review of a NIOSH project entitled ``Method Development For Airborne Mycobacterium...

  10. Isolation of an unusual mycobacterium from an AIDS patient.

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, E; Kirschner, P; Bartoloni, A; Burrini, C; Manfrin, V; Mantella, A; Scagnelli, M; Scarparo, C; Simonetti, M T; Böttger, E C

    1996-01-01

    A mycobacterium isolated from a clinical sample of an AIDS patient was identified as Mycobacterium interjectum by direct 16S rRNA sequence determination. High-performance liquid chromatography, however, revealed a mycolic acid pattern which was different from the one shared by the previously analyzed strains of this species. PMID:8862610

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Type Strain Fl-0169

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome sequence of the type strain Mycobacterium chimaera Fl-0169T, a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). M. chimaera Fl-0169T was isolated from a patient in Italy and is highly similar to strains of M. chimaera isolated in Ireland, though Fl-016...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Type Strain Fl-0169

    PubMed Central

    Tokarev, Vasily; Kessler, Collin; McLimans, Christopher; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Wright, Justin; King, Dawn; Lamendella, Regina

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the draft genome sequence of the type strain Mycobacterium chimaera Fl-0169, a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). M. chimaera Fl-0169T was isolated from a patient in Italy and is highly similar to strains of M. chimaera isolated in Ireland, although Fl-0169T possesses unique virulence genes. PMID:28232435

  13. Copper bioaccumulation by the actinobacterium Amycolatopsis sp. AB0.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Virginia Helena; Winik, Beatriz; Kothe, Erika; Amoroso, María Julia; Abate, Carlos Mauricio

    2008-10-01

    Amycolatopsis sp. AB0, a copper resistant actinobacterium isolated from polluted sediments, has shown high copper specific biopsortion ability (25 mg g(-1)). Two approaches were used to confirm metal accumulation in growing cells of Amycolatopsis sp. AB0; we performed subcellular fractioning assays which showed that the retained copper was associated with the extra-cellular fraction (exopolymer, 40%), but mainly within the cells. Intracellular distribution of copper was: 86% in the cytosolic fraction, 11% at the cell wall and 3% associated with the ribosome/membrane fraction. Its copper bioaccumulation ability was corroborated by using silver enhanced staining of copper with the Timm's reagent technique, which has not been used to detect metal deposits in bacteria before. In addition, we constructed specific oligonucleotides for targeting genes coding for copper P-Type ATPases that could be involved in the copper uptake ability of this strain. A 607 bp DNA fragment was amplified and sequenced from Amycolatopsis sp AB0. BLAST search analysis showed 71% protein homology of the deduced sequence with a putative cation-transporting ATPase of Nocardia farcinica and 65% with a copper translocating ATPase of Mycobacterium flavescens. To our knowledge this is the first report of the presence of copper P-type ATPase genes in the Amycolotopsis genus.

  14. Enhanced recovery, enrichment and detection of Mycobacterium marinum with the Portable Microbe Enrichment Unit (PMEU).

    PubMed

    Hakalehto, Elias; Heitto, Anneli; Heitto, Lauri; Rissanen, Kari; Pesola, Ilkka; Pesola, Jouni

    2014-09-01

    The use of PMEU significantly accelerated the growth of otherwise slowly growing Mycobacterium sp. Compared to the static reference cultures, M. marinum was detected after 24-48h of cultivation in the PMEU Spectrion(®) equipped with infrared (IR) sensors. Parallel static cultures did not exhibit or indicate mycobacterial growth within these time limits, and essentially no growth was found in them. The PMEU approach could provide a powerful tool for the rapid diagnosis and determination of environmental and clinical isolates of slow-growing species of mycobacteria. This approach also provides a method for improving diagnostics for M. tuberculosis and other pathogenic mycobacteria, including their antibiotic resistant forms, which represents a significant health problem worldwide and in Africa in particular.

  15. Update on Medicinal Plants with Potency on Mycobacterium ulcerans

    PubMed Central

    Tsouh Fokou, Patrick Valere; Nyarko, Alexander Kwadwo; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Tchokouaha Yamthe, Lauve Rachel; Ofosuhene, Mark; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans disease has been a serious threat for people living in rural remote areas. Due to poverty or availability of traditional medicine these populations rely on herbal remedies. Currently, data on the anti-Mycobacterium ulcerans activity of plants, so far considered community-based knowledge, have been scientifically confirmed, concomitantly with some medicinal plants used to treat infectious diseases in general. Products derived from plants usually responsible for the biological properties may potentially control Mycobacterium ulcerans disease; numerous studies have aimed to describe the chemical composition of these plant antimicrobials. Thus, the present work provides the first compilation of medicinal plants that demonstrated inhibitory potential on Mycobacterium ulcerans. This work shows that the natural products represent potential alternatives to standard therapies for use as curative medicine for Mycobacterium ulcerans disease. PMID:26779539

  16. First isolation of Mycobacterium spp. in Mullus spp. in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sevim, P; Ozer, S; Rad, F

    2015-01-01

    Ichthyozoonotic Mycobacterium spp. poses health risks both to fish and humans. In this study, the presence of ichthyozoonotic Mycobacterium spp. was investigated in red mullet (Mullus barbatus barbatus) and surmullet (Mullus surmuletus), widely caught species in the Mediterranean and the Aegean Sea. A total of 208 fish samples, provided from fishermen of Mersin province (Turkey) were studied. Using conventional methods, Mycobacterium spp. was isolated and identified at the genus level by PCR and at the species level by PCR-RFLP. Thirteen Mycobacterium spp. were detected in 13 (6.25%) fish samples. Four mycobacteria were identified as M. genavense, three as M. fortuitum, three as M. scrofulaceum, one as M. marinum, one as M. vaccae and one as M. aurum. No signs of mycobacteriosis were observed in fish samples. Findings of this study can contribute to future studies of onichthyozoonotic Mycobacterium spp. in seafood. PMID:27175166

  17. Culture and molecular method for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Messelhäusser, U; Kämpf, P; Hörmansdorfer, S; Wagner, B; Schalch, B; Busch, U; Höller, C; Wallner, P; Barth, G; Rampp, A

    2012-01-01

    A combined molecular and cultural method for the detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was developed and tested with artificially contaminated milk and dairy products. Results indicate that the method can be used for a reliable detection as a basis for first risk assessments.

  18. Lack of protection afforded by ribonucleic acid preparations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis against Mycobacterium leprae infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, C C; Youmans, A Y; Youmans, G P

    1977-01-01

    Mycobacterial ribonucleic acid preparations from H37Ra, an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, provide their usual marked protection against M. tuberculosis challenge; however, they provided no protection against Mycobacterium leprae challenge. Suspensions of intact H37Ra were not effective against M. leprae. Suspensions of BCG gave their usual distinct protection against M. leprae challenge. PMID:404242

  19. Noncanonical SMC protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis restricts maintenance of Mycobacterium fortuitum plasmids.

    PubMed

    Panas, Michael W; Jain, Paras; Yang, Hui; Mitra, Shimontini; Biswas, Debasis; Wattam, Alice Rebecca; Letvin, Norman L; Jacobs, William R

    2014-09-16

    Research on tuberculosis and leprosy was revolutionized by the development of a plasmid transformation system in the fast-growing surrogate, Mycobacterium smegmatis. This transformation system was made possible by the successful isolation of a M. smegmatis mutant strain mc(2)155, whose efficient plasmid transformation (ept) phenotype supported the replication of Mycobacterium fortuitum pAL5000 plasmids. In this report, we identified the EptC gene, the loss of which confers the ept phenotype. EptC shares significant amino acid sequence homology and domain structure with the MukB protein of Escherichia coli, a structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein. Surprisingly, M. smegmatis has three paralogs of SMC proteins: EptC and MSMEG_0370 both share homology with Gram-negative bacterial MukB; and MSMEG_2423 shares homology with Gram-positive bacterial SMCs, including the single SMC protein predicted for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. Purified EptC was shown to bind ssDNA and stabilize negative supercoils in plasmid DNA. Moreover, an EptC-mCherry fusion protein was constructed and shown to bind to DNA in live mycobacteria, and to prevent segregation of plasmid DNA to daughter cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of impaired plasmid maintenance caused by a SMC homolog, which has been canonically known to assist the segregation of genetic materials.

  20. Carbapenems and Rifampin Exhibit Synergy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Amit; Makkar, Nayani; Pandey, Pooja; Parrish, Nicole; Singh, Urvashi; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2015-10-01

    An effective regimen for treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is comprised of multiple drugs that inhibit a range of essential cellular activities in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The effectiveness of a regimen is further enhanced if constituent drugs act with synergy. Here, we report that faropenem (a penem) or biapenem, doripenem, or meropenem (carbapenems), which belong to the β-lactam class of antibiotics, and rifampin, one of the drugs that forms the backbone of TB treatment, act with synergy when combined. One of the reasons (carba)penems are seldom used for treatment of TB is the high dosage levels required, often at the therapeutic limits. The synergistic combination of rifampin and these (carba)penems indicates that (carba)penems can be administered at dosages that are therapeutically relevant. The combination of faropenem and rifampin also limits the frequency of resistant mutants, as we were unable to obtain spontaneous mutants in the presence of these two drugs. The combinations of rifampin and (carba)penems were effective not only against drug-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis but also against drug-resistant clinical isolates that are otherwise resistant to rifampin. A combination of doripenem or biapenem and rifampin also exhibited synergistic activity against Mycobacterium abscessus. Although the MICs of these three drugs alone against M. abscessus are too high to be of clinical relevance, their concentrations in combinations are therapeutically relevant; therefore, they warrant further evaluation for clinical utility to treat Mycobacterium abscessus infection, especially in cystic fibrosis patients.

  1. Test performance of three serological assays for the detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection in common warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus).

    PubMed

    Roos, Eduard O; Buss, Peter; de Klerk-Lorist, Lin-Mari; Hewlett, Jennie; Hausler, Guy A; Rossouw, Leana; McCall, Alicia J; Cooper, David; van Helden, Paul D; Parsons, Sven D C; Miller, Michele A

    2016-12-01

    Sporadic cases of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) have been reported in warthogs in Southern Africa and confirmed through mycobacterial culture. However, there are no validated ante-mortem tests currently available for bTB in warthogs. In this study, we evaluated the use of three serological assays for the detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection in warthogs; an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using bovine purified protein derivative (PPDb) as a capture antigen (indirect PPD ELISA), as well as two commercial assays, the TB ELISA-VK(®) and DPP(®) VetTB Assay. Test performance of these assays was compared using sera from 35 warthogs of known Mycobacterium bovis infection status. All three assays were able to distinguish M. bovis-infected from uninfected individuals with high sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) (indirect PPD ELISA Se: 88%, Sp: 89%; TB ELISA-VK(®) 88%, 79%; DPP(®) VetTB Assay 75%, 89%, respectively). The assays performed very similarly and the ELISA assays showed the greatest agreement (κ=0.89). These results indicate that M. bovis-infected warthogs develop measurable pathogen-specific humoral responses which can be used to distinguish them from uninfected animals. Therefore, serological assays have value as ante-mortem bTB diagnostic tests in warthogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This is a submission to the list of microorganisms with standing in nomenclature maintained by the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. We wish to have Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov. added to the list as a valid species belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Three str...

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis effectors interfering host apoptosis signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minqiang; Li, Wu; Xiang, Xiaohong; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis remains a serious human public health concern. The coevolution between its pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human host complicated the way to prevent and cure TB. Apoptosis plays subtle role in this interaction. The pathogen endeavors to manipulate the apoptosis via diverse effectors targeting key signaling nodes. In this paper, we summarized the effectors pathogen used to subvert the apoptosis, such as LpqH, ESAT-6/CFP-10, LAMs. The interplay between different forms of cell deaths, such as apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis, is also discussed with a focus on the modes of action of effectors, and implications for better TB control.

  4. Urinary mycobacterium avium presenting as sterile pyuria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Samplaski, Mary; Mazzulli, Tony; Lo, Kirk; Grober, Ethan; Jarvi, Keith Allen

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old healthy woman presented with persistent, asymptomatic sterile pyuria detected by her family physician. While she did not have symptoms, the patient recounts that she has had cloudy urine for years. Cultures of the urine for bacteria showed no growth and no fungi were identified. First-morning urine samples were sent for both tuberculosis and nontuberculosis mycobacterium species testing. The culture grew genotypically identified Mycobaterium avium complex (MAC). Mantoux skin testing was positive. No urological abnormalities were detected by ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the urinary tract. PMID:27790302

  5. Global Distribution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Spoligotypes

    PubMed Central

    Filliol, Ingrid; Driscoll, Jeffrey R.; van Soolingen, Dick; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Kremer, Kristin; Valétudie, Georges; Anh, Dang Duc; Barlow, Rachael; Banerjee, Dilip; Bifani, Pablo J.; Brudey, Karin; Cataldi, Angel; Cooksey, Robert C.; Cousins, Debby V.; Dale, Jeremy W.; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Drobniewski, Francis; Engelmann, Guido; Ferdinand, Séverine; Gascoyne-Binzi, Deborah; Gordon, Max; Gutierrez, M. Cristina; Haas, Walter H.; Heersma, Herre; Källenius, Gunilla; Kassa-Kelembho, Eric; Koivula, Tuija; Ly, Ho Minh; Makristathis, Athanasios; Mammina, Caterina; Martin, Gerald; Moström, Peter; Mokrousov, Igor; Narbonne, Valérie; Narvskaya, Olga; Nastasi, Antonino; Niobe-Eyangoh, Sara Ngo; Pape, Jean W; Rasolofo-Razanamparany, Voahangy; Ridell, Malin; Rossetti, M. Lucia; Stauffer, Fritz; Suffys, Philip N.; Takiff, Howard; Texier-Maugein, Jeanne; Vincent, Véronique; de Waard, Jacobus H.

    2002-01-01

    We present a short summary of recent observations on the global distribution of the major clades of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, the causative agent of tuberculosis. This global distribution was defined by data-mining of an international spoligotyping database, SpolDB3. This database contains 11,708 patterns from as many clinical isolates originating from more than 90 countries. The 11,708 spoligotypes were clustered into 813 shared types. A total of 1,300 orphan patterns (clinical isolates showing a unique spoligotype) were also detected. PMID:12453368

  6. Mycobacterium chimaera left ventricular assist device infections.

    PubMed

    Balsam, Leora B; Louie, Eddie; Hill, Fred; Levine, Jamie; Phillips, Michael S

    2017-06-01

    A global outbreak of invasive Mycobacterium chimaera infections after cardiac surgery has recently been linked to bioaerosols from contaminated heater-cooler units. The majority of cases have occurred after valvular surgery or aortic graft surgery and nearly half have resulted in death. To date, infections in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have not been characterized in the literature. We report two cases of device-associated M. chimaera infection in patients with continuous-flow LVADs and describe challenges related to diagnosis and management in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis wears what it eats.

    PubMed

    Russell, David G; VanderVen, Brian C; Lee, Wonsik; Abramovitch, Robert B; Kim, Mi-jeong; Homolka, Susanne; Niemann, Stefan; Rohde, Kyle H

    2010-07-22

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the most pernicious of human pathogens. Current vaccines are ineffective, and drugs, although efficacious, require prolonged treatment with constant medical oversight. Overcoming these problems requires a greater appreciation of M. tuberculosis in the context of its host. Upon infection of either macrophages in culture or animal models, the bacterium realigns its metabolism in response to the new environments it encounters. Understanding these environments, and the stresses that they place on M. tuberculosis, should provide insights invaluable for the development of new chemo- and immunotherapeutic strategies.

  9. Aquatic snails, passive hosts of Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Laurent; Sévérin, Tchibozo; Aubry, Jacques; Merritt, Richard W; Saint André, Jean-Paul; Legras, Pierre; Manceau, Anne-Lise; Chauty, Annick; Carbonnelle, Bernard; Cole, Stewart T

    2004-10-01

    Accumulative indirect evidence of the epidemiology of Mycobacterium ulcerans infections causing chronic skin ulcers (i.e., Buruli ulcer disease) suggests that the development of this pathogen and its transmission to humans are related predominantly to aquatic environments. We report that snails could transitorily harbor M. ulcerans without offering favorable conditions for its growth and replication. A novel intermediate link in the transmission chain of M. ulcerans becomes likely with predator aquatic insects in addition to phytophage insects. Water bugs, such as Naucoris cimicoides, a potential vector of M. ulcerans, were shown to be infected specifically by this bacterium after feeding on snails experimentally exposed to M. ulcerans.

  10. Bacteremia with an Unusual Pathogen: Mycobacterium neoaurum

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Munthir

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium neoaurum (M. neoaurum) is an infrequently encountered cause of infection in humans. It is a member of the rapidly growing mycobacteria family. It predominately afflicts those with a compromised immune status and a chronically indwelling vascular access. Isolation of this organism is challenging yet the advent of 16s ribosomal sequencing paved the way for more sensitive detection. No treatment guidelines are available and treatment largely depends on the experience of the treating physician and nature of the isolate. We report a case of M. neoaurum bacteremia in an immune competent host, with a chronically placed peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC line). PMID:27807489

  11. Plakinamine M, a steroidal alkaloid from the marine sponge Corticium sp.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenyu; Koch, Michael; Harper, Mary Kay; Matainaho, Teatulohi K; Barrows, Louis R; Van Wagoner, Ryan M; Ireland, Chris M

    2013-11-22

    By means of bioassay-guided fractionation, a new steroidal alkaloid, plakinamine M (1), and the known compound, plakinamine L (2), with a unique acyclic side chain, were isolated from the marine sponge Corticium sp. collected from New Britain, Papua New Guinea. The structures were determined on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS. The two compounds showed inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with MIC values of 15.8 and 3.6 μg/mL, respectively.

  12. Antimicrobial and Antimycobacterial Activity of Cyclostellettamine Alkaloids from Sponge Pachychalina sp.

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Jaine H. H. L.; Seleghim, Mirna H. R.; Timm, Christoph; Grube, Achim; Köck, Matthias; Nascimento, Gislene G.F.; Martins, Ana Claudia T.; Silva, Elissa G. O.; de Souza, Ana Olívia; Minarini, Paulo R. R.; Galetti, Fabio C. S.; Silva, Célio L.; Hajdu, Eduardo; Berlinck, Roberto G. S.

    2006-01-01

    Cyclostellettamines A – F (1 – 6) isolated from the sponge Pachychalina sp. and cyclostellettamines G - I, K and L (7 – 11) obtained by synthesis were evaluated in bioassays of antimicrobial activity against susceptible and antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and antibiotic-susceptible Escherichia coli and Candida albicans, as well as in antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv bioassays. The results obtained indicated that cyclostellettamines display different antimicrobial activity depending on the alkyl-chain size, suggesting that, if a mechanism-of action is implied, it is dependent on the distance between the two pyridinium moieties of cyclostellettamines.

  13. Plakinamine M, a Steroidal Alkaloid from the Marine Sponge Corticium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhenyu; Koch, Michael; Harper, Mary Kay; Matainaho, Teatulohi K.; Barrows, Louis R.; Van Wagoner, Ryan M.; Ireland, Chris M.

    2013-01-01

    Using bioassay-guided fractionation, a new steroidal alkaloid, plakinamine M (1), and the known compound, plakinamine L (2), with a unique acyclic side chain, were isolated from the marine sponge Corticium sp. collected from New Britain, Papua New Guinea. The structures were determined on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS. The two compounds showed inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with MIC values of 15.8 and 3.6 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:24195491

  14. Mycobacterium other than tubercle bacilli in various environments in Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Imwidthaya, P; Suthiravitayavaniz, K; Phongpanich, S

    1989-06-01

    This research was designed to isolate Mycobacterium other than tubercle bacilli in various environments in the Bangkok area, in 1987. The results were as follows, one hundred samples of soil yielded 1 Mycobacterium gordonae, 2 M. chelonei, 57 M. fortuitum, 1 Nocardia asteroides, one hundred samples of natural water from the Chao Phraya River and the canals of Chao Phraya River yielded 2 M. chelonei, 18 M. fortuitum, 1 N. asteroides and 1 N. brasiliensis, thirty samples of tap water yielded 3 M. gordonae. But thirty samples of water from swimming pools were negative for Mycobacterium.

  15. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hod, T; Kushnir, R; Paitan, Y; Korzets, Z

    2008-12-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum group species is an atypical rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium. It has been increasingly recognized as a potential pathogen mostly encountered in skin and soft tissue infections. Rarely, however, it has been associated with catheter-related infections, either central venous lines or peritoneal dialysis catheters. In this report we describe 2 patients maintained on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis who developed Mycobacterium fortuitum peritonitis and a catheter tunnel abscess, respectively. Molecular biology identification of the isolates was performed in both cases. The literature is reviewed regarding all similar cases.

  16. [Case of pneumothorax associated with pulmonary Mycobacterium fortuitum infection].

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Eri; Sekine, Akimasa; Sato, Tomohide; Baba, Tomohisa; Shinohara, Takeshi; Endo, Takahiro; Sogo, Yoko; Nishihira, Ryuichi; Komatsu, Shigeru; Matsumoto, Yutaka; Ogura, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    A 39-year-old man with dyspnea was revealed to have severe pneumothorax and received partial resection of the left upper lobe after unsuccessful drainage. Necrotizing epitheloid granuloma was found in the resected lung and Mycobacterium fortuitum was detected from the lesion. Chemotherapy with levofloxacin and clarithromycin was started one year after surgery because of the newly found nodular shadow near the lesion. The case experienced pyothorax due to pulmonary tuberculosis three years before and Mycobacterium avium pleuritis one year before this episode. Three-time mycobacterial pleural infection in three years seems to be uncommon. Furthermore this is the first report of pneumothorax associated with pulmonary Mycobacterium fortuitum infection.

  17. Rifabutin Is Active Against Mycobacterium abscessus Complex.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Dinah Binte; Low, Jian Liang; Wu, Mu-Lu; Gengenbacher, Martin; Teo, Jeanette W P; Dartois, Véronique; Dick, Thomas

    2017-04-10

    Lung infections with Mycobacterium abscessus are emerging as a global threat to individuals with cystic fibrosis and other patient groups. Recent evidence for human-to-human transmission worsens the situation. M. abscessus is an intrinsically multidrug resistant pathogen showing resistance even against standard anti tuberculosis drugs such as rifampicin. Here, our objective was to identify existing drugs that may be employed for the treatment of M. abscessus lung disease. A collection of more than 2700 approved drugs was screened at a single point concentration against an M. abscessus clinical isolate. Hits were confirmed with fresh solids in dose response experiments. For the most attractive hit, growth inhibition and bactericidal activities against reference strains of the three M. abscessus subspecies and a collection of clinical isolates were determined. Surprisingly, the rifampicin derivative rifabutin had an MIC of 3 ± 2 μM (3 μg/mL) against the screening strain, the reference strains M. abscessus subsp. abscessus ATCC 19977, M. abscessus subsp. bolletii CCUG 50184-T and M. abscesuss subsp. massiliense CCUG 48898-T, as well as a collection of clinical isolates. Furthermore, rifabutin was active against clarithromycin resistant strains. In conclusion, rifabutin - in contrast to rifampicin - is active against the Mycobacterium abscessus complex bacteria in vitro and may be considered for treatment of M. abscessus lung disease.

  18. Porins Increase Copper Susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Speer, Alexander; Rowland, Jennifer L.; Haeili, Mehri; Niederweis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Copper resistance mechanisms are crucial for many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, during infection because the innate immune system utilizes copper ions to kill bacterial intruders. Despite several studies detailing responses of mycobacteria to copper, the pathways by which copper ions cross the mycobacterial cell envelope are unknown. Deletion of porin genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis leads to a severe growth defect on trace copper medium but simultaneously increases tolerance for copper at elevated concentrations, indicating that porins mediate copper uptake across the outer membrane. Heterologous expression of the mycobacterial porin gene mspA reduced growth of M. tuberculosis in the presence of 2.5 μM copper by 40% and completely suppressed growth at 15 μM copper, while wild-type M. tuberculosis reached its normal cell density at that copper concentration. Moreover, the polyamine spermine, a known inhibitor of porin activity in Gram-negative bacteria, enhanced tolerance of M. tuberculosis for copper, suggesting that copper ions utilize endogenous outer membrane channel proteins of M. tuberculosis to gain access to interior cellular compartments. In summary, these findings highlight the outer membrane as the first barrier against copper ions and the role of porins in mediating copper uptake in M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis. PMID:24013632

  19. Porins increase copper susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Speer, Alexander; Rowland, Jennifer L; Haeili, Mehri; Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Copper resistance mechanisms are crucial for many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, during infection because the innate immune system utilizes copper ions to kill bacterial intruders. Despite several studies detailing responses of mycobacteria to copper, the pathways by which copper ions cross the mycobacterial cell envelope are unknown. Deletion of porin genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis leads to a severe growth defect on trace copper medium but simultaneously increases tolerance for copper at elevated concentrations, indicating that porins mediate copper uptake across the outer membrane. Heterologous expression of the mycobacterial porin gene mspA reduced growth of M. tuberculosis in the presence of 2.5 μM copper by 40% and completely suppressed growth at 15 μM copper, while wild-type M. tuberculosis reached its normal cell density at that copper concentration. Moreover, the polyamine spermine, a known inhibitor of porin activity in Gram-negative bacteria, enhanced tolerance of M. tuberculosis for copper, suggesting that copper ions utilize endogenous outer membrane channel proteins of M. tuberculosis to gain access to interior cellular compartments. In summary, these findings highlight the outer membrane as the first barrier against copper ions and the role of porins in mediating copper uptake in M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis.

  20. Mycobacterium abscessus and Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Pierre-Audigier, Catherine; Offredo, Catherine; Guillemot, Didier; Halley, Sophie; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Vincent, Véronique; Sivadon-Tardy, Valérie; Ferroni, Agnès; Berche, Patrick; Scheinmann, Pierre; Lenoir, Gérard

    2003-01-01

    We prospectively studied 298 patients with cystic fibrosis (mean age 11.3 years; range 2 months to 32 years; sex ratio, 0.47) for nontuberculous mycobacteria in respiratory samples from January 1, 1996, to December 31, 1999. Mycobacterium abscessus was by far the most prevalent nontuberculous mycobacterium: 15 patients (6 male, 9 female; mean age 11.9 years; range 2.5–22 years) had at least one positive sample for this microorganism (versus 6 patients positive for M. avium complex), including 10 with >3 positive samples (versus 3 patients for M. avium complex). The M. abscessus isolates from 14 patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: each of the 14 patients harbored a unique strain, ruling out a common environmental reservoir or person-to-person transmission. Water samples collected in the cystic fibrosis center were negative for M. abscessus. This major mycobacterial pathogen in children and teenagers with cystic fibrosis does not appear to be acquired nosocomially. PMID:14720400

  1. Tsukamurella inchonensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Yassin, A F; Rainey, F A; Brzezinka, H; Burghardt, J; Lee, H J; Schaal, K P

    1995-07-01

    Chemotaxonomic and genomic 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analyses of two isolates obtained from two different clinical materials clearly delineated a new species of the genus Tsukamurella. This new species can be identified by its 16S ribosomal DNA similarity values, as well as its physiological characteristics. The name Tsukamurella inchonensis sp. nov. is proposed for these isolates, which are represented by strain IMMIB D-771T (= DSM 44067T) (T = type strain). This strain exhibits only 45% DNA relatedness to Tsukamurella paurometabola.

  2. [Aspergillus insulicola Sp. Nov].

    PubMed

    de Montemayor, L; Santiago, A R

    1975-04-30

    A strain of Aspergillus sp. is described and proposed as a new species under the name "Aspergillus insulicola sp. nov." Montemayor & Santiago, 1973. This strain was isolated from soil samples taken in "Aves Island" during a scientific expedition.--Aves Island, situated at 15 degrees, 40 feet, 42 inches N and 63 degrees, 36 feet, 47 inches W, about 665 Km of the coast of Venezuela, has very special ecological conditions. Due to its smallness: 550 m long and 40 to 120 m across and to its low profile only 3 m over sea level, it is swept by the sea during the periodical storms and hurricanes in the area. It has thus a very interesting fauna and flora. We took a series of soil samples to study its mycological flora. Forty samples were inoculated by dilution method. In this first paper a species is described and proposed as a new species because of its macroscopic and microscopic characteristics, as well as by its biological properties, under the name "Aspergillus insulicola sp. nov.". In its study we have tried to follow as closely as possible the methods recommended by Kennet B. Raper & Dorothy Fenell, world authorities on the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium. The strain is being kept in USB under the number T1, and has been sent to ATCC & CBSC to be incorporated in their collections.

  3. Infection of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex in Spain.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Ana; Rodríguez, Oscar; González-Quirós, Pablo; Merediz, Isabel; Sevilla, Iker A; Davé, Dipesh; Dalley, Deanna J; Lesellier, Sandrine; Chambers, Mark A; Bezos, Javier; Muñoz, Marta; Delahay, Richard J; Gortázar, Christian; Prieto, José M

    2011-11-01

    The prevalence, distribution and pathology related to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and other mycobacteria were determined in trapped (n=36) and road-killed (n=121) badgers in Spain from 2006 to 2010. The prevalence of M. bovis based on bacteriological culture from road-killed badgers was 8/121 (6.6%) and from trapped badgers was 0/36 (0%). Tuberculosis/M. bovis infection was evident in 15/121 (12.4%) road-killed badgers when bacteriology and histopathology were combined. Mycobacterium avium complex was isolated by culture from the tracheal aspirate of 1/36 (2.8%) trapped badgers and from tissue pools from 8/121 (6.6%) road-killed badgers.

  4. Mixed Infection of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sungmin; Wang, Sungho; Shi, Hyejin; Park, Sungrock; Lee, Sangki; Park, Kyoung Taek

    2017-01-01

    A mixed infection of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus (Mab) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in the lung is an unusual clinical manifestation and has not yet been reported. A 61-year-old woman had been treated for Mab lung disease and concomitant pneumonia, and was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Despite both anti-PTB and anti-Mab therapy, her entire left lung was destroyed and collapsed. She underwent left pneumonectomy and received medical therapy. We were able to successfully treat her mixed infection by pneumonectomy followed by inhaled amikacin therapy. To the best of our knowledge, thus far, this is the first description of a mixed Mab and MTB lung infection. PMID:28180105

  5. A Case of False-Positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium celatum

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Zaid; Sengupta, Ruchira; Johnson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium celatum is a nontuberculous mycobacterium shown to cause symptoms similar to pulmonary M. tuberculosis. Certain strains have been shown to cross-react with the probes used to detect M. tuberculosis, making this a diagnostic challenge. We present a 56-year-old gentleman who developed signs and symptoms of lung infection with computed tomography scan of the chest showing right lung apex cavitation. Serial sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli and nucleic acid amplification testing identified M. tuberculosis ribosomal RNA, resulting in treatment initiation. Further testing with high performance liquid chromatography showed a pattern consistent with M. celatum. This case illustrates the potential for M. celatum to mimic M. tuberculosis in both its clinical history and laboratory testing due to the identical oligonucleotide sequence contained in both. An increasing number of case reports suggest that early reliable differentiation could reduce unnecessary treatment and public health intervention associated with misdiagnosed tuberculosis. PMID:27895946

  6. [In vitro interferon gamma production in mice vaccinated with 'Mycobacterium habana' against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens].

    PubMed

    Valdés Hernández, Iliana; Montoro Cardoso, C Ernesto; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2012-01-01

    development of new antituberculosis vaccines requires the characterization of the cell-mediated immune responses induced by mycobacterial antigens. to determine the immunogenic potential of 'Mycobacterium habana' TMC-5135 when using subcutaneous vaccine in Balb/c mice. in this study, Balb/c mice were inoculated subcutaneously with live 'Mycobacterium habana' TMC-5135. The production of IFN gamma in cell suspensions obtained from the lungs, the spleen and the lymph nodes after stimulation with mycobacterial antigens Ag85b or culture filtrate antigens (CFA) was recorded. the production of IFN gamma after stimulation with CFA and Ag85b was higher in mice vaccinated with 'M. habana' than in animals immunized with BCG. these results encourage new research on 'M. habana' as vaccinal candidate against tuberculosis.

  7. Heat inactivation of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex organisms in meat products.

    PubMed Central

    Merkal, R S; Crawford, J A; Whipple, D L

    1979-01-01

    Wieners and sausages were prepared which contained the most heat-tolerant representative of the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex we were able to obtain. They also were prepared with infected tissues obtained from tuberculous swine. Processing conditions were as varied as possible. Neither incorporation of sodium nitrite in the emulsion nor presence of smoke during processing altered the heat susceptibility of the organisms. Substantial killing of the organisms occurred as wieners reached the upper processing temperatures, but hot oil or radiant heating of the "precooked" sausages allowed very short times within the killing range; hence, higher peak internal temperatures were necessary. The lethalities for these organisms of reaching and maintaining various processing temperatures are given. PMID:575610

  8. Radiometric selective inhibition tests for differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis, and other mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, W M; Hawkins, J E

    1985-01-01

    In the context of a busy reference laboratory, radiometric selective inhibition tests were evaluated for rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis and of the M. tuberculosis complex from other mycobacteria. p-Nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta-hydroxypropiophenone at 5 micrograms and hydroxylamine hydrochloride at 62.5 and 125 micrograms per ml of 7H12 medium were used to separate the M. tuberculosis complex from other mycobacteria (MOTT bacilli). Since it is important epidemiologically to distinguish M. tuberculosis from M. bovis, susceptibility to 1 microgram of thiophene-2-carboxylic acid per ml was also determined radiometrically. By using these three agents as selective inhibitors, M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, and MOTT bacilli were differentiated with a high degree of specificity by a BACTEC radiometric procedure. Results of tests performed on clinical isolates submitted on solid medium to our reference laboratory were available within 5 days. PMID:3921561

  9. Multiplex-PCR for differentiation of Mycobacterium bovis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Spositto, F L E; Campanerut, P A Z; Ghiraldi, L D; Leite, C Q F; Hirata, M H; Hirata, R D C; Siqueira, V L D; Cardoso, R Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a multiplex-PCR to differentiate Mycobacterium bovis from M. tuberculosis Complex (MTC) by one step amplification based on simultaneous detection of pncA 169 C > G change in M. bovis and the IS6110 present in MTC species. Our findings showed the proposed multiplex-PCR is a very useful tool for complementation in differentiating M. bovis from other cultured MTC species.

  10. Potential of Ca(2+) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv Pathogenesis and Survival.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Somya; Meena, Laxman S

    2017-02-01

    The host-pathogen interaction and involvement of calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling in tuberculosis infection is crucial and plays a significant role in pathogenesis. Ca(2+) is known as a ubiquitous second messenger that could control multiple processes and is included in cellular activities like division, motility, stress response, and signaling. However, Ca(2+) is thought to be a regulative molecule in terms of TB infection but its binding relation with proteins/substrates molecules which are influenced with Ca(2+) concentrations in host-pathogen interaction requires attention. So, in this review, our primary goal is to focus on some Ca(2+) substrates/proteins and their imperative involvement in pathogenesis, which is unclear. We have discussed several Ca(2+)-binding substrate and protein that affect intracellular mechanism of infected host cell. The major involvement of these proteins/substrates including calmodulin (CaM), calpain, annexin, surfactant protein A (SP-A), surfactant protein D (SP-D), calprotectin (MRP8/14), and PE_PGRS family protein are considered to be significant; however, their detailed understanding in mycobacterium infection is limited. In this aspect, this study will help in adding up our understanding in TB biology and additionally in the development of new therapeutic approach to reduce TB pandemic worldwide.

  11. Molecular Analysis of Sarcoidosis Tissues for Mycobacterium Species DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zhiheng; Pride, David T.; Collins, Robert D.; Cover, Timothy L.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2002-01-01

    We performed polymerase chain reaction analysis, for Mycobacterium species 16S rRNA, rpoB, and IS6110 sequences, on 25 tissue specimens from patients with sarcoidosis and on 25 control tissue specimens consisting of mediastinal or cervical lymph nodes and lung biopsies. Mycobacterium species 16S rRNA sequences were amplified from 12 (48%) rpoB sequences from 6 (24%) of the sarcoidosis specimens. In total, 16S rRNA or rpoB sequences were amplified from 15 sarcoidosis specimens (60%) but were not detected in any of the control tissues (p=0.00002, Chi square). In three specimens, the sequences resembled Mycobacterium species other than M. tuberculosis. All specimens with sequences consistent with M. tuberculosis were negative for IS6110. We provide evidence that one of a variety of Mycobacterium species, especially organisms resembling M. tuberculosis, is found in most patients with sarcoidosis. PMID:12453366

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Mycobacterium chimaera Respiratory Isolates.

    PubMed

    Mac Aogáin, Micheál; Roycroft, Emma; Raftery, Philomena; Mok, Simone; Fitzgibbon, Margaret; Rogers, Thomas R

    2015-12-03

    Mycobacterium chimaera is an opportunistic human pathogen implicated in both pulmonary and cardiovascular infections. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of three strains isolated from human respiratory specimens. Copyright © 2015 Mac Aogáin et al.

  13. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  14. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  15. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Mycobacterium chimaera Respiratory Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Roycroft, Emma; Raftery, Philomena; Mok, Simone; Fitzgibbon, Margaret; Rogers, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium chimaera is an opportunistic human pathogen implicated in both pulmonary and cardiovascular infections. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of three strains isolated from human respiratory specimens. PMID:26634757

  16. Inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Hesham M.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of gamma irradiation on the inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese that prepared from artificially inoculated milk samples was studied. Irradiation at dose of 2 kGy was sufficient for the complete inactivation of these mycobacteria as they were not detected in the treated samples during storage at 4±1 °C for 15 days. Moreover, irradiation of cheese samples, that were prepared from un-inoculated milk, at this effective dose had no significant effects on their gross composition and contents from riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid, while significant decreases in vitamin A and thiamin were observed. In addition, irradiation of cheese samples had no significant effects on their pH and nitrogen fractions contents, except for the contents of ammonia, which showed a slight, but significant, increases due to irradiation. The analysis of cheese fats indicated that irradiation treatment induced significant increase in their oxidation parameters and contents from free fatty acids; however, the observed increases were relatively low. On the other hand, irradiation of cheese samples induced no significant alterations on their sensory properties. Thus, irradiation dose of 2 kGy can be effectively applied to ensure the safety of soft cheese with regards to these harmful mycobacteria.

  17. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection interference with Mycobacterium bovis diagnostics: natural infection cases and a pilot experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anita L

    2008-07-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum and at least 1 unidentified species of soil mycobacteria were isolated from lymph nodes from 4 of 5 African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) that had been culled because of positive test results using the Bovigam assay. The buffalo were part of a group of 16 free-ranging buffalo captured in the far north of the Kruger National Park (South Africa) assumed to be free of bovine tuberculosis. No Mycobacterium bovis was isolated. To investigate the possible cause of the apparent false-positive diagnosis, the Mycobacterium isolates were inoculated into 4 experimental cattle and their immune responses monitored over a 13-week period, using the gamma interferon assay. The immune reactivity was predominantly directed toward avian tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) and lasted for approximately 8 weeks. During that period 3 of 4 cattle yielded positive test results on 1 or 2 occasions. The immune responsiveness was boosted when the inoculations were repeated after 15 weeks, which led to 2 subsequent positive reactions in the experimental animal that did not react previously. Including an additional stimulatory antigen, sensitin prepared from M. fortuitum in the gamma interferon assay, showed that it was able to elicit a detectable gamma interferon response in all 4 experimentally inoculated cattle when applied in parallel with bovine and avian tuberculin PPD for the stimulation of blood samples. The implications of occasional cross-reactive responses in natural cases of infection with environmental mycobacteria in the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis in African buffalo and cattle in South Africa are discussed.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Type Strain Fl-0169.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Stacy; Tokarev, Vasily; Kessler, Collin; McLimans, Christopher; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Wright, Justin; King, Dawn; Lamendella, Regina

    2017-02-23

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the type strain Mycobacterium chimaera Fl-0169, a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). M. chimaera Fl-0169(T) was isolated from a patient in Italy and is highly similar to strains of M. chimaera isolated in Ireland, although Fl-0169(T) possesses unique virulence genes. Copyright © 2017 Pfaller et al.

  19. A Mutant of Mycobacterium smegmatis Defective in Dipeptide Transport

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Achal; Green, Renee; Coles, Roswell; Condon, Michael; Connell, Nancy D.

    1998-01-01

    A mutant of Mycobacterium smegmatis unable to use the dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-l-histidine) as a sole carbon or nitrogen source was isolated. Carnosinase activity and the ability to grow on β-Ala and/or l-His were similar in the mutant and the wild type. However, the mutant showed significant impairment in the uptake of carnosine. This study is the first description of a peptide utilization mutant of a mycobacterium. PMID:9852030

  20. Treatment of Mycobacterium marinum with lymecycline: new therapeutic alternative?

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Maria Gertrudes Fernandes Pereira; Neugebauer, Samuel Antônio; Almeida Junior, Hiram Larangeira; Mota, Laís Marques

    2015-01-01

    Skin infections by Mycobacterium marinum are quite rare in our environment and, therefore, little studied. The majority of the lesions appear three weeks after traumas in aquariums, beaches and fish tanks. Lymph node drainage and systematization of the disease are rare and most lesions disappear in about three years. This case aims to show the effectiveness of the treatment used (lymecycline 150 mg/orally/day). This medication may be a new therapeutic option for the treatment of Mycobacterium marinum.

  1. Treatment of Mycobacterium marinum with lymecycline: new therapeutic alternative?*

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Maria Gertrudes Fernandes Pereira; Neugebauer, Samuel Antônio; Almeida Junior, Hiram Larangeira; Mota, Laís Marques

    2015-01-01

    Skin infections by Mycobacterium marinum are quite rare in our environment and, therefore, little studied. The majority of the lesions appear three weeks after traumas in aquariums, beaches and fish tanks. Lymph node drainage and systematization of the disease are rare and most lesions disappear in about three years. This case aims to show the effectiveness of the treatment used (lymecycline 150 mg/orally/day). This medication may be a new therapeutic option for the treatment of Mycobacterium marinum. PMID:25672310

  2. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection of the scalp after a skin graft.

    PubMed

    Smith, Blaine D; Liras, Ioannis N; De Cicco, Ignacio A; Aisenberg, Gabriel Marcelo

    2016-10-19

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a non-tuberculous mycobacterium found in the soil and water of most regions of the world, and it can cause disease in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. We present a 52-year-old man who developed a scalp abscess under a free flap for cranium coverage after a motor vehicle accident. Culture of material drained from the abscess grew M. fortuitum.

  3. TALE nickase-mediated SP110 knockin endows cattle with increased resistance to tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haibo; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Mingqi; Lv, Jiaxing; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated genome modification has been applied successfully to create transgenic animals in various species, such as mouse, pig, and even monkey. However, transgenic cattle with gene knockin have yet to be created using TALENs. Here, we report site-specific knockin of the transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nickase-mediated SP110 nuclear body protein gene (SP110) via homologous recombination to produce tuberculosis-resistant cattle. In vitro and in vivo challenge and transmission experiments proved that the transgenic cattle are able to control the growth and multiplication of Mycobacterium bovis, turn on the apoptotic pathway of cell death instead of necrosis after infection, and efficiently resist the low dose of M. bovis transmitted from tuberculous cattle in nature. In this study, we developed TALE nickases to modify the genome of Holstein–Friesian cattle, thereby engineering a heritable genome modification that facilitates resistance to tuberculosis. PMID:25733846

  4. Tsukamurella pulmonis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Yassin, A F; Rainey, F A; Brzezinka, H; Burghardt, J; Rifai, M; Seifert, P; Feldmann, K; Schaal, K P

    1996-04-01

    Chemotaxonomic and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analyses of an isolate from the sputum of a patient with a mycobacterial lung infection clearly delineated a new species of the genus Tsukamurella. This new species can be defined on the basis of genotypic and phenotypic data. The name Tsukamurella pulmonis sp. nov. is proposed for this organism; the type strain is IMMIB D-1321T (= DSM 44142T). This isolate shows 44.2 and 36.2% DNA relatedness to Tsukamurella paurometabola DSM 20162T (T = type strain) and Tsukamurella inchonensis DSM 44067T, respectively.

  5. SP-100 program developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnyer, A. D.; Sholtis, J. A., Jr.; Wahlquist, E. J.; Verga, R. L.; Wiley, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    An update is provided on the status of the Sp-100 Space Reactor Power Program. The historical background that led to the program is reviewed and the overall program objectives and development approach are discussed. The results of the mission studies identify applications for which space nuclear power is desirable and even essential. Results of a series of technology feasibility experiments are expected to significantly improve the earlier technology data base for engineering development. The conclusion is reached that a nuclear reactor space power system can be developed by the early 1990s to meet emerging mission performance requirements.

  6. Coffee (Coffea sp.).

    PubMed

    Leroy, Thierry; Alpizar, Edgardo; Dufour, Magali; Etienne, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Coffee (Coffea sp.) is a perennial plant widely cultivated in many tropical countries. It is a cash crop for millions of small farmers in these areas. As compared with other tree species, coffee has long breeding cycles that make conventional breeding programs time consuming. For that matter, genetic transformation can be an effective technique to introduce a desired trait in an already "elite" variety, or to study a gene function and expression. In this chapter, we describe two Agrobacterium-mediated transformation techniques; the first with A. tumefaciens to introduce an insect resistance gene and the second with A. rhizogenes to study candidate gene expression for nematode resistance in transformed roots.

  7. Mycobacterium leprae: genes, pseudogenes and genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy, which has afflicted human populations for millenia, results from infection with Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with an exceptionally long generation time. Considerable insight into the biology and drug resistance of the leprosy bacillus has been obtained from genomics. M. leprae has undergone reductive evolution and pseudogenes now occupy half of its genome. Comparative genomics of four different strains revealed remarkable conservation of the genome (99.995% identity) yet uncovered 215 polymorphic sites, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms, and a handful of new pseudogenes. Mapping these polymorphisms in a large panel of strains defined 16 single nucleotide polymorphism-subtypes that showed strong geographical associations and helped retrace the evolution of M. leprae. PMID:21162636

  8. Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Yee Man Tracy; Pillinger, Toby; Luqmani, Asad; Cooper, Nichola

    2015-01-01

    Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare, potentially fatal condition that can be primary or secondary. Secondary HLH can occur in association with infections, most commonly viral infections, but has also been reported in association with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). Prompt identification of the underlying cause of HLH is important as it guides treatment decisions. Early initiation of appropriate treatment (eg, anti-TB treatment) reduces morbidity and mortality. We present a case of HLH associated with TB infection. Initial TB investigations were negative and standard combination chemoimmunotherapy for HLH resulted in a limited clinical response. On apparent relapse of HLH, further investigation revealed TB with changes on CT chest, granuloma on bone marrow and eventual positive TB culture on bronchoalveolar lavage. Subsequent treatment with quadruple anti-TB treatment resulted in rapid clinical response and disease remission. We advocate continued monitoring for TB infection in patients with HLH, and prophylaxis or full treatment for those at high risk. PMID:25870214

  9. Rapid radiometric susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kertcher, J A; Chen, M F; Charache, P; Hwangbo, C C; Camargo, E E; McIntyre, P A; Wagner, H N

    1978-04-01

    A 48-hour radiometric test for determining the drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been developed. The test is based on the measurement of 14CO2 produced by the oxidation of formate labeled with carbon-14. The test system uses 5 X 10(7) organisms in 1 ml of Middlebrook 7H9 medium plus albumin-dextrose-catalase enrichment and 1 muCi of [14C]formate. The 14CO2 produced is measured in an ionization chamber at 24-, 48-, and 72-hour intervals, with and without the addition of antituberculous drugs. Isoniazid, streptomycin, rifampin, and ethambutol were each tested at 3 concentrations by the radiometric method and the reference (agar dilution) method. Six standard strains and 21 patient isolates were compared by both methods. Production of 14CO2 was quantitatively decreased in the presence of drugs that inhibit the organism. The radiometric method requires 2 days; the agar dilution, 14 to 21 days.

  10. Cytokinins beyond plants: synthesis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Samanovic, Marie I.; Darwin, K. H.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) resides mainly inside macrophages, which produce nitric oxide (NO) to combat microbial infections. Earlier studies revealed that proteasome-associated genes are required for M. tuberculosis to resist NO via a previously uncharacterized mechanism. Twelve years later, we elucidated the link between proteasome function and NO resistance in M. tuberculosis in Molecular Cell, 57 (2015), pp. 984-994. In a proteasome degradation-defective mutant, Rv1205, a homologue of the plant enzyme LONELY GUY (LOG) that is involved in the synthesis of phytohormones called cytokinins, accumulates and as a consequence results in the overproduction of cytokinins. Cytokinins break down into aldehydes that kill mycobacteria in the presence of NO. Importantly, this new discovery reveals for the first time that a mammalian bacterial pathogen produces cytokinins and leaves us with the question: why is M. tuberculosis, an exclusively human pathogen, producing cytokinins? PMID:28357289

  11. Interference of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with macrophage responses.

    PubMed

    Scherr, Nicole; Jayachandran, Rajesh; Mueller, Philipp; Pieters, Jean

    2009-06-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has become an important health and economic burden, with more than four thousand people succumbing to the disease every day. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the molecular basis of this pathogen's success in causing disease in humans, in order to develop new drugs superior to conventional drugs available at present. One reason why M. tuberculosis is such a dangerous microbe lies within its ability to survive within infected hosts, thereby efficiently circumventing host immune responses. Over the past few years, a number of mechanisms have been unravelled that are utilized by M. tuberculosis to survive within hosts and to avoid immune defence mechanisms. Several of these mechanisms have been described in this communication that may be useful for the development of novel compounds to treat tuberculosis.

  12. [Mycobacterium lentiflavum lymphadenitis: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Del Olmo Izuzquiza, Ignacio; Monforte Cirac, María L; Bustillo Alonso, Matilde; Burgués Prades, Pedro; Guerrero Laleona, Carmelo

    2016-10-01

    Lymphadenitis is the most common clinical feature in nontuberculous mycobacterium infection in immunocompetent children. We present two case reports of M. lentiflavum lymphadenitis diagnosed in a tertiary hospital in the last 10 years. Routine tests were performed after persistent adenopathy, and a sample for culture was obtained, being positive for this microorganism. Both patients received oral antibiotics during several weeks. Case 1 needed complete excision after five months of treatment, whilst Case 2 was cured by medical therapy. M. lentiflavum is considered, among the newly described nontuberculous mycobacterial species, an emergent pathogen in our environment. It has its own microbiological and clinical characteristics, different from the rest of nontuberculous mycobacteria. Case reports are limited in the literature since the infection was described for the first time in 1997.

  13. Isolation of DNA from Mycobacterium tubercolosis.

    PubMed

    van Helden, P D; Victor, T C; Warren, R M; van Helden, E G

    2001-01-01

    Research into and identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis can take on a number of facets, many of which involve the use of DNA at one stage or another. The quality and quantity of DNA required will depend on the end-use requirement. For example, good yields of pure, high-molecular-weight DNA uncontaminated by DNA from other sources (i.e., homogeneous) are optimal for the generation of cosmid libraries and sequencing (1), Southern hybridization (2-6), or microarray analysis (7) for genome studies, whereas relatively crude DNA (fragmented DNA or DNA from multiple sources [i.e., heterogeneous]) may be adequate for PCR-based diagnosis (8-12) or amplification of regions of the genome for other purposes, e.g., identification of mutations conferring drug resistance (13,14).

  14. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torrey, Heather L.; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E.; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  15. Advances in Proteomics of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Parkash, O; Singh, B P

    2012-04-01

    Although Mycobacterium leprae was the first bacterial pathogen identified causing human disease, it remains one of the few that is non-cultivable. Understanding the biology of M. leprae is one of the primary challenges in current leprosy research. Genomics has been extremely valuable, nonetheless, functional proteins are ultimately responsible for controlling most aspects of cellular functions, which in turn could facilitate parasitizing the host. Furthermore, bacterial proteins provide targets for most of the vaccines and immunodiagnostic tools. Better understanding of the proteomics of M. leprae could also help in developing new drugs against M. leprae. During the past nearly 15 years, there have been several developments towards the identification of M. leprae proteins employing contemporary proteomics tools. In this review, we discuss the knowledge gained on the biology and pathogenesis of M. leprae from current proteomic studies.

  16. Mycobacterium bovis in coyotes from Michigan.

    PubMed

    Bruning-Fann, C S; Schmitt, S M; Fitzgerald, S D; Payeur, J B; Whipple, D L; Cooley, T M; Carlson, T; Friedrich, P

    1998-07-01

    During a survey for tuberculosis in wild carnivores and omnivores, Mycobacterium bovis was cultured from pooled lymph nodes of three adult female coyotes (Canis latrans) harvested by hunters in Michigan (USA). No gross or histologic lesions suggestive of tuberculosis were seen in these animals. One coyote was taken from Montmorency county and two coyotes from Alcona county located in the north-eastern portion of Michigan's Lower Peninsula where free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) have been found infected with bovine tuberculosis. It is thought that these coyotes became infected with M. bovis through the consumption of tuberculous deer. Other species included in the survey were the opossum (Didelphis virginiana), raccoon (Procyon lotor), red fox (Vulpes vulpes), bobcat (Felis rufus), and badger (Taxidea taxus).

  17. New Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Sublineage, Brazzaville, Congo

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Sven; Linguissi, Laure S. Ghoma; Tekwu, Emmanuel M.; Vouvoungui, Jeannhey C.; Kohl, Thomas A.; Beckert, Patrick; Sidibe, Anissa; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Madzou-Laboum, Igor K.; Kwedi, Sylvie; Penlap Beng, Véronique; Frank, Matthias; Ntoumi, Francine

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of illness and death in Congo. No data are available about the population structure and transmission dynamics of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains prevalent in this central Africa country. On the basis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by whole-genome sequencing, we phylogenetically characterized 74 MTBC isolates from Brazzaville, the capital of Congo. The diversity of the study population was high; most strains belonged to the Euro-American lineage, which split into Latin American Mediterranean, Uganda I, Uganda II, Haarlem, X type, and a new dominant sublineage named Congo type (n = 26). Thirty strains were grouped in 5 clusters (each within 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms), from which 23 belonged to the Congo type. High cluster rates and low genomic diversity indicate recent emergence and transmission of the Congo type, a new Euro-American sublineage of MTBC. PMID:28221129

  18. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Veterinary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Harris, N. Beth; Barletta, Raúl G.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (basonym M. paratuberculosis) is the etiologic agent of a severe gastroenteritis in ruminants known as Johne's disease. Economic losses to the cattle industry in the United States are staggering, reaching $1.5 billion annually. A potential pathogenic role in humans in the etiology of Crohn's disease is under investigation. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, and disease control measures of this important veterinary pathogen. We emphasize molecular genetic aspects including the description of markers used for strain identification, diagnostics, and phylogenetic analysis. Recent important advances in the development of animal models and genetic systems to study M. paratuberculosis virulence determinants are also discussed. We conclude with proposals for the applications of these models and recombinant technology to the development of diagnostic, control, and therapeutic measures. PMID:11432810

  19. Severe leprosy reactions due to Mycobacterium lepromatosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiang Y; Jessurun, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is caused by the well-known Mycobacterium leprae and the newly discovered M lepromatosis. Here, the authors describe 2 cases of leprosy with unusual clinical presentation caused by M lepromatosis. The patients, a 32-year-old man and a 50-year-old woman, both of Mexican origin, manifested high fever, lymphadenopathy and florid skin lesions in the form of erythema nodosum and Lucio's phenomenon as the first clinical presentation. Heavy infiltration of acid-fast bacilli was identified in the tissues that led to the diagnosis of lepromatous leprosy or diffuse leprosy. The patients were treated with multidrug regimen and responded appropriately. From the lymph node tissue, the authors showed the bacillus to be M lepromatosis, not M leprae as presumed previously, by differential polymerase chain reactions and analysis of gene sequences. These cases add to the growing studies on this organism, expand its endemic regions in Mexico and provide more clinical insight.

  20. Osteoarticular manifestations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Zychowicz, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has affected humans for much of our existence. The incidence of global tuberculosis infection continues to rise, especially in concert with HIV coinfection. Many disease processes, such as diabetes, increase the likelihood of tuberculosis infection. Tuberculosis bacteria can infect any bone, joint, tendon, or bursa; however, the most common musculoskeletal site for infection includes the spine and weight-bearing joints of the hip and knee. Many patients who present with osteoarticular tuberculosis infection will have a gradual onset of pain at the site of infection. Many patients who develop a musculoskeletal tuberculosis infection will have no evidence of a pulmonary tuberculosis infection on x-ray film and many will have very mild symptoms with the initial infection. Healthcare providers must remember that many patients who develop tuberculosis infection do not progress to active tuberculosis disease; however, the latent infection may become active with immune compromise.

  1. A replication clock for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Wendy P; Harik, Nada S; Whiddon, Molly R; Liao, Reiling P; Mittler, John E; Sherman, David R

    2009-01-01

    Few tools exist to assess replication of chronic pathogens during infection. This has been a considerable barrier to understanding latent tuberculosis, and efforts to develop new therapies generally assume that the bacteria are very slowly replicating or nonreplicating during latency1–3. To monitor Mycobacterium tuberculosis replication within hosts, we exploit an unstable plasmid that is lost at a steady, quantifiable rate from dividing cells in the absence of antibiotic selection. By applying a mathematical model, we calculate bacterial growth and death rates during infection of mice. We show that during chronic infection the cumulative bacterial burden—enumerating total live, dead and removed organisms encountered by the mouse lung—is substantially higher than estimates from colony forming units. Our data show that M. tuberculosis replicates throughout the course of chronic infection of mice and is restrained by the host immune system. This approach may also shed light on the replication dynamics of other chronic pathogens. PMID:19182798

  2. Biochemical characteristics among Mycobacterium bovis BCG substrains.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Takii, Takemasa; Mukai, Tetsu; Makino, Masahiko; Yasuda, Emi; Horita, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Fujiwara, Akiko; Kanai, Keita; Kondo, Maki; Kawarazaki, Aya; Yano, Ikuya; Yamamoto, Saburo; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2010-05-01

    In order to evaluate the biochemical characteristics of 14 substrains of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) - Russia, Moreau, Japan, Sweden, Birkhaug, Danish, Glaxo, Mexico, Tice, Connaught, Montreal, Phipps, Australia and Pasteur - we performed eight different biochemical tests, including those for nitrate reduction, catalase, niacin accumulation, urease, Tween 80 hydrolysis, pyrazinamidase, p-amino salicylate degradation and resistance to thiophene 2-carboxylic acid hydrazide. Catalase activities of the substrains were all low. Data for nitrate reduction, niacin accumulation, Tween 80 hydrolysis, susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide and nitrate, and optimal pH for growth were all variable among these substrains. These findings suggest that the heterogeneities of biochemical characteristics are relevant to the differences in resistance of BCG substrains to environmental stress. The study also contributes to the re-evaluation of BCG substrains for use as vaccines.

  3. Drosophila melanogaster model for Mycobacterium abscessus infection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chun-Taek; Moon, Cheol; Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Jang, Jichan

    2013-11-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a human pathogen that is responsible for a broad spectrum of tissue infections and disseminated infections in immunodeficient patients. This pathogen is one of the most resistant organisms to chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a genetically tractable model host for M. abscessus. In this context, we infected D. melanogaster with M. abscessus. This M. abscessus infection results in dissemination in the fly body, followed by death, which is accompanied by severe indirect flight muscle and brain damage. Our data show that M. abscessus can grow and replicate in D. melanogaster w(1118) and that it elicited a humoral immune response, especially of the Toll antimicrobial peptide pathway. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that mycobacteria induce the production of antimicrobial peptides in D. melanogaster.

  4. Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Infections in Humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Hung, Chien-Ching; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus complex comprises a group of rapidly growing, multidrug-resistant, nontuberculous mycobacteria that are responsible for a wide spectrum of skin and soft tissue diseases, central nervous system infections, bacteremia, and ocular and other infections. M. abscessus complex is differentiated into 3 subspecies: M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. The 2 major subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, have different erm(41) gene patterns. This gene provides intrinsic resistance to macrolides, so the different patterns lead to different treatment outcomes. M. abscessus complex outbreaks associated with cosmetic procedures and nosocomial transmissions are not uncommon. Clarithromycin, amikacin, and cefoxitin are the current antimicrobial drugs of choice for treatment. However, new treatment regimens are urgently needed, as are rapid and inexpensive identification methods and measures to contain nosocomial transmission and outbreaks.

  5. Diversity and disease pathogenesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Warner, Digby F; Koch, Anastasia; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    The increasing availability of whole-genome sequence (WGS) data for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), suggests that circulating genotypes have been molded by three dominant evolutionary forces: long-term persistence within the human population, which requires a core programme of infection, disease, and transmission; selective pressure on specific genomic loci, which provides evidence of lineage-specific adaptation to host populations; and drug exposure, which has driven the rapid emergence of resistant isolates following the global implementation of anti-TB chemotherapy. Here, we provide an overview of these factors in considering the implications of genotypic diversity for disease pathogenesis, vaccine efficacy, and drug treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Virulence factors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Forrellad, Marina A.; Klepp, Laura I.; Gioffré, Andrea; Sabio y García, Julia; Morbidoni, Hector R.; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) consists of closely related species that cause tuberculosis in both humans and animals. This illness, still today, remains to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The mycobacteria enter the host by air, and, once in the lungs, are phagocytated by macrophages. This may lead to the rapid elimination of the bacillus or to the triggering of an active tuberculosis infection. A large number of different virulence factors have evolved in MTBC members as a response to the host immune reaction. The aim of this review is to describe the bacterial genes/proteins that are essential for the virulence of MTBC species, and that have been demonstrated in an in vivo model of infection. Knowledge of MTBC virulence factors is essential for the development of new vaccines and drugs to help manage the disease toward an increasingly more tuberculosis-free world. PMID:23076359

  7. Tenosynovitis caused by a novel nontuberculous Mycobacterium species initially misidentified as a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Simner, Patricia J; Hyle, Emily P; Buckwalter, Seanne P; Branda, John A; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Franklin, Jameelah; Toney, Nadege C; de Man, Tom J B; Wallace, Richard J; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Wengenack, Nancy L

    2014-12-01

    We present a case of tenosynovitis caused by a novel, slowly growing, nonchromogenic, nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM). Originally misidentified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, the NTM cross-reacts with the M. tuberculosis complex nucleic acid hybridization probe, a M. tuberculosis gamma interferon release assay, and is closely related to M. tuberculosis by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Clarithromycin-ciprofloxacin-amikacin for therapy of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare bacteremia in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    de Lalla, F; Maserati, R; Scarpellini, P; Marone, P; Nicolin, R; Caccamo, F; Rigoli, R

    1992-01-01

    A combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin for the treatment of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare bacteremia was evaluated in 12 AIDS patients. Mycobacteremia cleared in all patients by 2 to 8 weeks of treatment, and symptoms resolved. Four patients died; all had negative blood cultures until death, and disseminated M. avium-M. intracellulare complex infection was not considered the primary cause of death. PMID:1387303

  9. Role of Porins in the Susceptibility of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium chelonae to Aldehyde-Based Disinfectants and Drugs ▿

    PubMed Central

    Svetlíková, Zuzana; Škovierová, Henrieta; Niederweis, Michael; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; McDonnell, Gerald; Jackson, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Nosocomial outbreaks attributable to glutaraldehyde-resistant, rapidly growing mycobacteria are increasing. Here, evidence is provided that defects in porin expression dramatically increase the resistance of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium chelonae to glutaraldehyde and another aldehyde disinfectant, ortho-phthalaldehyde. Since defects in porin activity also dramatically increased the resistance of M. chelonae to drugs, there is thus some concern that the widespread use of glutaraldehyde and ortho-phthalaldehyde in clinical settings may select for drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:19581465

  10. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium abscessus in a prosthetic knee joint: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Xiang; Yang, Chang-Jen; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Lay, Chorng-Jang; Tsai, Chen-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) is an infrequent cause of prosthetic knee joint infections. Simultaneous infection with different NTM species in a prosthetic knee joint has not been previously reported. A case of prosthetic knee joint infection caused by Mycobacterium abscessus and M. fortuitum is described in this report. The patient was successfully treated with adequate antibiotics and surgery. The clinical features of sixteen previously reported cases of prosthetic knee joint infection caused by NTM are reviewed.

  11. [15 cases of pulmonary Mycobacterium scrofulaceum infection].

    PubMed

    Emori, Mikiko; Kajiki, Akira; Ikedo, Yukari; Ochiai, Sanae; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Harada, Yasuko; Kitahara, Yoshinari

    2007-03-01

    We described clinical features of pulmonary Mycobacterium scofulaceum disease. We described 15 cases of pulmonary Mycobacterium scrofulaceum infection admitted to National Hospital Organization Omuta National Hospital from 1989 to 2003 and reviewed the clinical feature, the findings of chest radiograph, and clinical course. Sex ratio was 8 male cases and 7 female cases, and the average age was 65.9 years old. Smoking history was found in 8 patients and occupational history of the dust inhalation was found in 7 patients with pulmonary M. scrofulaceum infection. There were 11 cases of tuberculosis-like form and 4 cases of nodular-bronchiectasis form according to the NTM Research society classification based on the findings of chest radiography. Improvement of the findings of chest radiography was seen in 4 patients by therapy, while no change or aggravation in 11 patients. Five patients died and among them, 3 died due to aggravation of pulmonary M. scrofulaceum infection. Cases showing tuberculosis-like form were dominant, and most of them showed extensive lesions when they were diagnosed, and these facts were considered to be major factors of difficulty in the treatment of this infection. The facts that 7 cases had occupational exposure to the dust, obstructive pulmonary disease in 3 cases, and 6 cases showed sputum culture positive for other nontuberculous mycobacteriosis, suggest that local resistance of lung might be attenuated, and this could be one of factors of onset and development of this infection. Only 4 cases showed improvement, while 5 cases died (primary disease death in 3 cases) and it was thought that the prognosis of the disease was in general poor.

  12. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium africanum in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Asante-Poku, Adwoa; Otchere, Isaac Darko; Osei-Wusu, Stephen; Sarpong, Esther; Baddoo, Akosua; Forson, Audrey; Laryea, Clement; Borrell, Sonia; Bonsu, Frank; Hattendorf, Jan; Ahorlu, Collins; Koram, Kwadwo A; Gagneux, Sebastien; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2016-08-09

    Mycobacterium africanum comprises two phylogenetic lineages within the M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and is an important cause of human tuberculosis (TB) in West Africa. The reasons for this geographic restriction of M. africanum remain unclear. Here, we performed a prospective study to explore associations between the characteristics of TB patients and the MTBC lineages circulating in Ghana. We genotyped 1,211 MTBC isolates recovered from pulmonary TB patients recruited between 2012 and 2014 using single nucleotide polymorphism typing and spoligotyping. Associations between patient and pathogen variables were assessed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Of the 1,211 MTBC isolates analysed, 71.9 % (871) belonged to Lineage 4; 12.6 % (152) to Lineage 5 (also known as M. africanum West-Africa 1), 9.2 % (112) to Lineage 6 (also known as M. africanum West-Africa 2) and 0.6 % (7) to Mycobacterium bovis. Univariate analysis revealed that Lineage 6 strains were less likely to be isoniazid resistant compared to other strains (odds ratio = 0.25, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.05-0.77, P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis showed that Lineage 5 was significantly more common in patients from the Ewe ethnic group (adjusted odds ratio (adjOR): 2.79; 95 % CI: 1.47-5.29, P < 0.001) and Lineage 6 more likely to be found among HIV-co-infected TB patients (adjOR = 2.2; 95 % confidence interval (CI: 1.32-3.7, P < 0.001). Our findings confirm the importance of M. africanum in Ghana and highlight the need to differentiate between Lineage 5 and Lineage 6, as these lineages differ in associated patient variables.

  13. Fatty Acyl Chains of Mycobacterium marinum Lipooligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Yoann; Alibaud, Laeticia; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Maes, Emmanuel; Tokarski, Caroline; Elass, Elisabeth; Kremer, Laurent; Guérardel, Yann

    2011-01-01

    We have recently established the fine structure of the glycan backbone of lipooligosaccharides (LOS-I to LOS-IV) isolated from Mycobacterium marinum, a close relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These studies culminated with the description of an unusual terminal N-acylated monosaccharide that confers important biological functions to LOS-IV, such as macrophage activation, that may be relevant to granuloma formation. It was, however, also suggested that the lipid moiety was required for LOSs to exert their immunomodulatory activity. Herein, using highly purified LOSs from M. marinum, we have determined through a combination of mass spectrometric and NMR techniques, the structure and localization of the fatty acids composing the lipid moiety. The occurrence of two distinct polymethyl-branched fatty acids presenting specific localizations is consistent with the presence of two highly related polyketide synthases (Pks5 and Pks5.1) in M. marinum and presumably involved in the synthesis of these fatty acyl chains. In addition, a bioinformatic search permitted us to identify a set of enzymes potentially involved in the biosynthesis or transfer of these lipids to the LOS trehalose unit. These include MMAR_2343, a member of the Pap (polyketide-associated protein) family, that acylates trehalose-based glycolipids in M. marinum. The participation of MMAR_2343 to LOS assembly was demonstrated using a M. marinum mutant carrying a transposon insertion in the MMAR_2343 gene. Disruption of MMAR_2343 resulted in a severe LOS breakdown, indicating that MMAR_2343, hereafter designated PapA4, fulfills the requirements for LOS acylation and assembly. PMID:21803773

  14. SP mountain data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawson, R. F.; Hamilton, R. E.; Liskow, C. L.; Dias, A. R.; Jackson, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of synthetic aperture radar data of SP Mountain was undertaken to demonstrate the use of digital image processing techniques to aid in geologic interpretation of SAR data. These data were collected with the ERIM X- and L-band airborne SAR using like- and cross-polarizations. The resulting signal films were used to produce computer compatible tapes, from which four-channel imagery was generated. Slant range-to-ground range and range-azimuth-scale corrections were made in order to facilitate image registration; intensity corrections were also made. Manual interpretation of the imagery showed that L-band represented the geology of the area better than X-band. Several differences between the various images were also noted. Further digital analysis of the corrected data was done for enhancement purposes. This analysis included application of an MSS differencing routine and development of a routine for removal of relief displacement. It was found that accurate registration of the SAR channels is critical to the effectiveness of the differencing routine. Use of the relief displacement algorithm on the SP Mountain data demonstrated the feasibility of the technique.

  15. Multinucleated giant cell cytokine expression in pulmonary granulomas of cattle experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pathogenic mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex such as Mycobacterium bovis, induce a characteristic lesion known as a granulomas. Granulomas represent a specific host response to chronic antigenic stimuli, such as foreign bodies, certain bacterial components, or persistent pathoge...

  16. In-vitro evaluation of Perasafe compared with 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde against Mycobacterium spp.

    PubMed

    Hernández, A; Martró, E; Matas, L; Ausina, V

    2003-05-01

    Quantitative suspension and carrier tests were used to compare the activity of Perasafe and Cidex against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Mycobacterium chelonae. The interference of an organic load, and of hard water was also considered. Both agents achieved reductions exceeding 10(5)-fold within 20 and 30 min for all the strains tested. Perasafe is thus mycobactericidal and a viable alternative to Cidex for intermediate or high-level disinfection.

  17. Isolation of the newly described species Mycobacterium celatum from AIDS patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, E; Piersimoni, C; Bacosi, D; Bartoloni, A; Betti, F; Bono, L; Burrini, C; De Sio, G; Lacchini, C; Mantella, A

    1995-01-01

    Mycobacterium celatum is a recently described species which, on the basis of conventional tests, may be misidentified as Mycobacterium xenopi or as belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex. Only genomic sequencing or high-performance liquid chromatography of cell wall mycolic acids can presently allow a correct identification of this mycobacterium. Two cases of infection due to M. celatum, in AIDS patients, are described here. The quantitative susceptibility pattern of the isolates to a wide spectrum of drugs is also reported. PMID:7699029

  18. Evaluation of Vitek MS for rapid classification of clinical isolates belonging to Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Daniel P; Zembower, Teresa R; Qi, Chao

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of the Vitek MS system to classify clinical pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex isolates compared to multilocus sequence analysis. Vitek MS accurately identified 55% of the isolates as M. avium and 18% as M. intracellulare, but misidentified 24 (27%) Mycobacterium chimaera isolates as Mycobacterium intracellulare.

  19. Severe Enteropathy and Hypogammaglobulinemia Complicating Refractory Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Disseminated Disease in a Child with IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Arias, Andrés Augusto; Perez-Velez, Carlos M; Orrego, Julio César; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Rojas, Jessica Lineth; Wilches, Alejandra; Restrepo, Andrea; Trujillo, Mónica; Garcés, Carlos; Arango-Ferreira, Catalina; González, Natalia; Oleaga-Quintas, Carmen; Fernández, Diana; Isaza-Correa, Johana Marcela; Gongóra, Diego Eduardo; Gonzalez-Loaiza, Daniel; Sierra, Juan Esteban; Casanova, Jean Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta; Franco, José Luis

    2017-09-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease is a rare clinical condition characterized by a predisposition to infectious diseases caused by poorly virulent mycobacteria. Other infections such as salmonellosis and candidiasis are also reported. The purpose of this article is to describe a young boy affected with various infectious diseases caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Salmonella sp, Klebsiella pneumonie, Citrobacter sp., and Candida sp, complicated with severe enteropathy and transient hypogammaglobulinemia. We reviewed medical records and performed flow cytometry staining for lymphocyte populations, lymphocyte proliferation in response to PHA, and intracellular IFN-γ production in T cell PHA blasts in the patient and a healthy control. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the genetic variants in the patient and relatives. Genetic analysis revealed a bi-allelic mutation in IL12RB1 (C291Y) resulting in complete IL-12Rβ1 deficiency. Functional analysis demonstrated the lack of intracellular production of IFN-γ in CD3+ T lymphocytes from the patient in response to rhIL-12p70. To our knowledge, this is the third patient with MSMD due to IL-12Rβ1 deficiency complicated with enteropathy and hypogammaglobulinemia and the first case of this disease to be described in Colombia.

  20. Wildlife disease reservoirs: the epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis infection in the European badger (Meles meles) and other British mammals.

    PubMed

    Delahay, R J; Cheeseman, C L; Clifton-Hadley, R S

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis infection has been confirmed in a wide range of mammals hosts throughout the world. The European badger (Meles meles) and the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) are implicated as significant sources of infection for domestic cattle in the UK and New Zealand respectively. The risk of transmission of infection between a wildlife population and domestic animals will be determined by both the epidemiology of the disease and the ecology of the host. In the UK, surveys by the UK Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) have identified M. bovis infection in deer (Cervus sp., Capreolus sp., Dama sp.), red fox (Vulpes vulpes), mink (Mustela vison), feral ferret (Mustela furo), mole (Talpa europaea), brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) and feral cat (Felis catus). However, the potential contribution to cattle herd breakdowns, of reservoirs of M. bovis infection in mammals other than the badger is poorly understood and is the subject of current research. In contrast, M. bovis infection in the badger has been the subject of a long term ecological and epidemiological study at Woodchester Park in South-West England, where the prevalence and distribution of infection in a wild population has been intensively monitored. The pattern of infection in the population and potential risks to cattle, are profoundly influenced by badger social organization and behaviour. The pattern of land use and cattle farming practices in the UK brings badgers into close contact with domestic animals and provides conditions that may enhance the likelihood of disease transfer.

  1. Generation of a Novel Nucleic Acid-Based Reporter System To Detect Phenotypic Susceptibility to Antibiotics in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, Matthew C.; Sacksteder, Katherine A.; Einck, Leo; Nacy, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT We designed, constructed, and evaluated a prototype novel reporter system comprised of two functional cassettes: (i) the SP6 RNA polymerase gene under transcriptional control of a promoter active in mycobacteria and (ii) the consensus SP6 polymerase promoter that directs expression of an otherwise unexpressed sequence. We incorporated the reporter system into a mycobacteriophage for delivery into viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and introduction led to synthesis of an SP6 polymerase-dependent surrogate marker RNA that we detected by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). The reporter confirmed the susceptibility profile of both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains exposed to first-line antitubercular drugs and required as little as 16 h of exposure to antibacterial agents targeting bacterial metabolic processes to accurately read the reaction. The reporter system translated the bacterial phenotype into a language interpretable by rapid and sensitive nucleic acid detection. As a phenotypic assay that works only on viable M. tuberculosis, it could be used to rapidly assess resistance to any drug, including drugs for which the mechanism of resistance is unknown or which result from many potential known (and unknown) genetic alterations. PMID:22415006

  2. The RD1 virulence locus of Mycobacterium tuberculosis regulates DNA transfer in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Jessica L.; Kowalski, Joseph C.; Karnati, Pavan K.; Derbyshire, Keith M.

    2004-01-01

    Conjugal DNA transfer occurs by an atypical mechanism in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The transfer system is chromosomally encoded and requires recipient recombination functions for both chromosome and plasmid transfer. Cis-acting sequences have been identified that confer mobility on nontransferable plasmids, but these are larger and have different properties to canonical oriT sites found in bacterial plasmids. To identify trans-acting factors required for mediating DNA transfer, a library of transposon insertion mutants was generated in the donor strain, and individual mutants were screened for their effect on transfer. From this screen, a collection of insertion mutants was isolated that increased conjugation frequencies relative to wild type. Remarkably, the mutations map to a 25-kb region of the M. smegmatis chromosome that is syntenous with the RD1 region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is considered to be the primary attenuating deletion in the related vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guérin. The genes of the RD1 region encode a secretory apparatus responsible for exporting Cfp10- and Esat-6, both potent antigens and virulence factors. In crosses using two M. smegmatis donors, we show that wild-type cells can suppress the elevated transfer phenotype of mutant donors, which is consistent with the secretion of a factor that suppresses conjugation. Most importantly, the RD1 region of M. tuberculosis complements the conjugation phenotype of the RD1 mutants in M. smegmatis. Our results indicate that the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis RD1 regions are functionally equivalent and provide a unique perspective on the role of this critical secretion apparatus. PMID:15314236

  3. Comparative sequence analysis of Mycobacterium leprae and the new leprosy-causing Mycobacterium lepromatosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiang Y; Sizer, Kurt C; Thompson, Erika J; Kabanja, Juma; Li, Jun; Hu, Peter; Gómez-Valero, Laura; Silva, Francisco J

    2009-10-01

    Mycobacterium lepromatosis is a newly discovered leprosy-causing organism. Preliminary phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rRNA gene and a few other gene segments revealed significant divergence from Mycobacterium leprae, a well-known cause of leprosy, that justifies the status of M. lepromatosis as a new species. In this study we analyzed the sequences of 20 genes and pseudogenes (22,814 nucleotides). Overall, the level of matching of these sequences with M. leprae sequences was 90.9%, which substantiated the species-level difference; the levels of matching for the 16S rRNA genes and 14 protein-encoding genes were 98.0% and 93.1%, respectively, but the level of matching for five pseudogenes was only 79.1%. Five conserved protein-encoding genes were selected to construct phylogenetic trees and to calculate the numbers of synonymous substitutions (dS values) and nonsynonymous substitutions (dN values) in the two species. Robust phylogenetic trees constructed using concatenated alignment of these genes placed M. lepromatosis and M. leprae in a tight cluster with long terminal branches, implying that the divergence occurred long ago. The dS and dN values were also much higher than those for other closest pairs of mycobacteria. The dS values were 14 to 28% of the dS values for M. leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a more divergent pair of species. These results thus indicate that M. lepromatosis and M. leprae diverged approximately 10 million years ago. The M. lepromatosis pseudogenes analyzed that were also pseudogenes in M. leprae showed nearly neutral evolution, and their relative ages were similar to those of M. leprae pseudogenes, suggesting that they were pseudogenes before divergence. Taken together, the results described above indicate that M. lepromatosis and M. leprae diverged from a common ancestor after the massive gene inactivation event described previously for M. leprae.

  4. Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Yassin, A F; Rainey, F A; Burghardt, J; Brzezinka, H; Schmitt, S; Seifert, P; Zimmermann, O; Mauch, H; Gierth, D; Lux, I; Schaal, K P

    1997-07-01

    Chemotaxonomic and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analyses of four bacterial isolates from blood cultures from patients with cardiac pacemaker implants and sputa of patients with chronic lung infections clearly demonstrated that these bacteria belong to the genus Tsukamurella. DNA-DNA hybridization data, as well as the physiological characteristics of the isolates, indicate that they are closely related and belong to a single species that differs from previously described members of the genus Tsukamurella. The name Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens sp. nov. is proposed for these isolates, and the new species is represented by strain IMMIB D-1397T (= DSM 44234T). Strain IMMIB D-1397T exhibits 53.4, 53.5, and 54.7% DNA-DNA relatedness to Tsukamurella paurometabola DSM 20162T, Tsukamurella inchonensis DSM 44067T, and Tsukamurella pulmonis DSM 44142T, respectively.

  5. Acetobacter intermedius, sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Boesch, C; Trcek, J; Sievers, M; Teuber, M

    1998-03-01

    Strains of a new species in the genus Acetobacter, for which we propose the name A. intermedius sp. nov., were isolated and characterized in pure culture from different sources (Kombucha beverage, cider vinegar, spirit vinegar) and different countries (Switzerland, Slovenia). The isolated strains grow in media with 3% acetic acid and 3% ethanol as does A. europaeus, do, however, not require acetic acid for growth. These characteristics phenotypically position A. intermedius between A. europaeus and A. xylinus, DNA-DNA hybridizations of A. intermedius-DNA with DNA of the type strains of Acetobacter europaeus, A. xylinus, A. aceti, A. hansenii, A. liquefaciens, A. methanolicus, A. pasteurianus, A. diazotrophicus, Gluconobacter oxydans and Escherichia coli HB 101 indicated less than 60% DNA similarity. The important features of the new species are described. Acetobacter intermedius strain TF2 (DSM11804) isolated from the liquid phase of a tea fungus beverage (Kombucha) is the type strain.

  6. DADiSP processing guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    A guide for DADiSP software, intended for use by the Lambda Point Experiment (LPE) Team during and after the United States Microgravity Payload (USMP)-1 mission, is presented. DADiSP is a Data Analysis and Display Software developed and marketed by DSP Development Corporation, Cambridge, Massachusetts. This guide is intended to be used in addition to the DADiSP Worksheet User Manual and Reference Manual which are supplied by the company with the software. Technical support for DADiSP is available from DSP at (617) 577-1133. Access to DADiSP on Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) EGSE is being provided to the LPE team during USMP-1 for off-line processing of SAMS data.

  7. Combating highly resistant emerging pathogen Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis with novel salicylanilide esters and carbamates.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsuzsa; Krátký, Martin; Vinšová, Jarmila; Szabó, Nóra; Senoner, Zsuzsanna; Horváti, Kata; Stolaříková, Jiřina; Dávid, Sándor; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-08-28

    In the Mycobacterium genus over one hundred species are already described and new ones are periodically reported. Species that form colonies in a week are classified as rapid growers, those requiring longer periods (up to three months) are the mostly pathogenic slow growers. More recently, new emerging species have been identified to lengthen the list, all rapid growers. Of these, Mycobacterium abscessus is also an intracellular pathogen and it is the most chemotherapy-resistant rapid-growing mycobacterium. In addition, the cases of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection are also increasing. Therefore there is an urgent need to find new active molecules against these threatening strains. Based on previous results, a series of salicylanilides, salicylanilide 5-chloropyrazinoates and carbamates was designed, synthesized and characterised. The compounds were evaluated for their in vitro activity on M. abscessus, susceptible M. tuberculosis H37Rv, multidrug-resistant (MDR) M. tuberculosis MDR A8, M. tuberculosis MDR 9449/2006 and on the extremely-resistant Praha 131 (XDR) strains. All derivatives exhibited a significant activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in the low micromolar range. Eight salicylanilide carbamates and two salicylanilide esters exhibited an excellent in vitro activity on M. abscessus with MICs from 0.2 to 2.1 μM, thus being more effective than ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. This finding is potentially promising, particularly, as M. abscessus is a threateningly chemotherapy-resistant species. M. tuberculosis H37Rv was inhibited with MICs from 0.2 μM, and eleven compounds have lower MICs than isoniazid. Salicylanilide esters and carbamates were found that they were effective also on MDR and XDR M. tuberculosis strains with MICs ≥1.0 μM. The in vitro cytotoxicity (IC50) was also determined on human MonoMac-6 cells, and selectivity index (SI) of the compounds was established. In general, salicylanilide

  8. Mycobacterium marinum dermatitis and panniculitis with chronic pleuritis in a captive white whale (Delphinapterus leucas) with aortic rupture.

    PubMed

    Bowenkamp, K E; Frasca, S; Draghi, A; Tsongalis, G J; Koerting, C; Hinckley, L; De Guise, S; Montali, R J; Goertz, C E; St Aubin, D J; Dunn, J L

    2001-11-01

    A 16-year-old female white whale, Delphinapterus leucas, died after nearly 18 months of chronic lymphopenia and pyogranulomatous dermatitis. Necropsy revealed rupture of the aorta with hemorrhage into the cranial mediastinum and between fascial planes of the ventral neck musculature. Multiple foci of ulcerative dermatitis and panniculitis were present across the thorax and abdomen and surrounded the genital folds. In addition, there was a chronic proliferative pleuritis with over 20 liters of histiocytic exudate in the thoracic cavity. Acid-fast bacteria consistent with Mycobacterium sp. were identified in sections of skin lesions and in cytospins of pleural exudate. Cultures of pleura and 1 skin lesion collected at necropsy yielded sparse growth of an acid-fast bacillus with colony characteristics and morphology consistent with Mycobacterium marinum. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis confirmed the presence of M. marinum DNA in samples of skin. This is the first documented occurrence of mycobacteriosis in a white whale and is a unique presentation of mycobacterial dermatitis and panniculitis with chronic pleuritis in a cetacean. The improved PCR-RFLP protocol utilized in this case unifies techniques from several protocols to differentiate between species of Nocardia and rapidly growing mycobacteria clinically relevant to aquatic animals.

  9. Validation of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium spp., Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex, and Mycobacterium avium Complex Directly from Clinical Samples by Use of the BD Max Open System.

    PubMed

    Rocchetti, Talita T; Silbert, Suzane; Gostnell, Alicia; Kubasek, Carly; Widen, Raymond

    2016-06-01

    A multiplex real-time PCR was validated on the BD Max open system to detect different Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium spp. directly from clinical samples. The PCR results were compared to those with traditional cultures. The multiplex PCR assay was found to be a specific and sensitive method for the rapid detection of mycobacteria directly from clinical specimens. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Evidences for anti-mycobacterium activities of lipids and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Afzal; Singh, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most widespread and deadly airborne disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The two-pronged lethal effect on the bacteria using lipids/surfactants and anti-tubercular drugs may render the miniaturization of dose owing to synergistic and tandem effect of both. The current research has been focused on screening and evaluating various lipids/surfactants possessing inherent anti-mycobacterium activity that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. In vitro anti-mycobacterium activity was evaluated using agar well diffusion method. Furthermore, time-concentration dependent killing and DNA/RNA content release studies were performed to correlate the findings. The exact mechanism of bacterial killing was further elucidated by electron/atomic force microscopy studies. Finally, to negate any toxicity, in vitro hemolysis and toxicity studies were performed. The study revealed that capmul MCM C-8, labrasol and acconon C-80 possessed highest in vitro anti-mycobacterium activity. Electron/atomic force microscopy results confirmed in vitro studies and verified the killing of Mycobacterium owing to the release of cytoplasmic content after cell wall fragmentation and disruption. Moreover, the least hemolysis and hundred percent survivals rate of mice using the excipients demonstrated the safety aspects of explored excipients that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. The present study concluded the safe, efficient and synergistic activity of the explored excipients and anti-tubercular drugs in controlling the menace of tuberculosis.

  11. [Pulmonary infection with Mycobacterium malmoense. Difficulties in diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Huet, D; Godbert, B; Hermann, J; Zordan, J-M; Chabot, F; Andréjak, C

    2017-03-01

    Pulmonary infection due to Mycobacterium malmoense can be difficult to diagnose. These difficulties can be responsible for a delay in the implementation of optimal treatment. Moreover, the treatment is not standardized. We report the case of a 56-year-old patient who developed a Mycobacterium malmoense pulmonary infection whose diagnosis was delayed due to initial suspicion of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Once the diagnosis was confirmed, the patient was treated empirically with rifampicin, ethambutol, and clarithromycin for 12 months after culture conversion, giving a total of 15 months. The clinical and radiological outcomes were favorable. This clinical case highlights the difficulties of diagnosing pulmonary atypical mycobacterial infection according to the American Thoracic Society criteria, particularly Mycobacterium malmoense, a non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) quite uncommon in France. Currently, there are new diagnostic techniques such as GenoType Mycobacteria Direct(®). The second issue is the poorly standardized treatment of this NTM and many others, that are based on the recommendations of the British Thoracic Society. A national register has been set up by the MycoMed network, based essentially on the work of microbiologists but this register is unfortunately not exhaustive. A more systematic reporting strategy could allow cohort studies and therefore provide us with data on the most efficient drugs in the treatment of the rarest NTM infections. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron Acquisition in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joyce; Moolji, Jalal; Dufort, Alex; Staffa, Alfredo; Domenech, Pilar; Reed, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a host-adapted pathogen that evolved from the environmental bacterium M. avium subsp. hominissuis through gene loss and gene acquisition. Growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the laboratory is enhanced by supplementation of the media with the iron-binding siderophore mycobactin J. Here we examined the production of mycobactins by related organisms and searched for an alternative iron uptake system in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Through thin-layer chromatography and radiolabeled iron-uptake studies, we showed that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is impaired for both mycobactin synthesis and iron acquisition. Consistent with these observations, we identified several mutations, including deletions, in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genes coding for mycobactin synthesis. Using a transposon-mediated mutagenesis screen conditional on growth without myobactin, we identified a potential mycobactin-independent iron uptake system on a M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genomic island, LSPP15. We obtained a transposon (Tn) mutant with a disruption in the LSPP15 gene MAP3776c for targeted study. The mutant manifests increased iron uptake as well as intracellular iron content, with genes downstream of the transposon insertion (MAP3775c to MAP3772c [MAP3775-2c]) upregulated as the result of a polar effect. As an independent confirmation, we observed the same iron uptake phenotypes by overexpressing MAP3775-2c in wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. These data indicate that the horizontally acquired LSPP15 genes contribute to iron acquisition by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, potentially allowing the subsequent loss of siderophore production by this pathogen. IMPORTANCE Many microbes are able to scavenge iron from their surroundings by producing iron-chelating siderophores. One exception is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a fastidious, slow-growing animal pathogen whose growth

  13. Mycolactone-producing Mycobacterium marinum infection in captive Hong Kong warty newts and pathological evidence of impaired host immune function.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Ta; Chang, Hui-Wen; Pang, Victor Fei; Wang, Fun-In; Liu, Chen-Hsuan; Chen, Ting-Yu; Guo, Jun-Cheng; Wada, Takayuki; Jeng, Chian-Ren

    2017-03-21

    A mass mortality event of captive Hong Kong warty newts Paramesotriton hongkongensis with non-granulomatous necrotic lesions occurred in Taipei Zoo, Taiwan, in 2014. Clinically, the sick newts were lethargic and often covered with water mold Saprolegnia sp. on the skin of the body trunk or extremities. Predominant pathological findings were multifocal non-granulomatous necrotic lesions in the liver, spleen, and kidneys and severe skin infection with Saprolegnia sp., with deep invasion and involvement of underlying muscles. The possibility of ranavirus infection was ruled out by negative PCR results. Unexpectedly, abundant intralesional acid-fast positive bacilli were found in the necrotic lesions of the liver, spleen, and kidney in all 14 sick newts. PCR targeting the hsp65, ITS region, and partial 16S rRNA genes was performed, and the sequence identity from amplified amplicons of hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes was 100% identical to that of the corresponding gene fragment of Mycobacterium marinum. Further molecular investigations demonstrated that the current M. marinum was a mycolactone-producing mycobacterium with the presence of esxA/esxB genes. Mycolactone is a plasmid-encoded, immunosuppressive, and cytotoxic toxin. The possible immunosuppression phenomenon characterized by systemic non-granulomatous necrotic lesions caused by M. marinum and the unusual deep invasive infection caused by water mold might be associated with the immunosuppressive effect of mycolactone. Therefore, it should be noted that non-granulomatous necrotic lesions in amphibians can be caused not only by ranavirus infection but also by mycobacteriosis.

  14. A human challenge model for Mycobacterium tuberculosis using Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin.

    PubMed

    Minassian, Angela M; Satti, Iman; Poulton, Ian D; Meyer, Joel; Hill, Adrian V S; McShane, Helen

    2012-04-01

    There is currently no safe human challenge model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to enable proof-of-concept efficacy evaluation of candidate vaccines against tuberculosis. In vivo antimycobacterial immunity could be assessed using intradermal Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination as a surrogate for M. tuberculosis infection. Healthy BCG-naive and BCG-vaccinated volunteers were challenged with intradermal BCG. BCG load was quantified from skin biopsy specimens by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture colony-forming units. Cellular infiltrate was isolated by suction blisters and examined by flow cytometry. Prechallenge immune readouts were correlated with BCG load after challenge. In BCG-naive volunteers, live BCG was detected at the challenge site for up to 4 weeks and peaked at 2 weeks. Infiltration of mainly CD15(+) neutrophils was observed in blister fluid. In previously BCG-vaccinated individuals, PCR analysis of skin biopsy specimens reflected a degree of mycobacterial immunity. There was no significant correlation between BCG load after challenge and mycobacterial-specific memory T cells measured before challenge by cultured enzyme-linked immunospot assay. This novel experimental human challenge model provides a platform for the identification of correlates of antimycobacterial immunity and will greatly facilitate the rational down-selection of candidate tuberculosis vaccines. Further evaluation of this model with BCG and new vaccine candidates is warranted.

  15. Accurate differentiation of Mycobacterium chimaera from Mycobacterium intracellulare by MALDI-TOF MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Pranada, Arthur B; Witt, Ellen; Bienia, Michael; Kostrzewa, Markus; Timke, Markus

    2017-05-01

    The increasing number of infections caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has prompted the need for rapid and precise identification methods of these pathogens. Several studies report the applicability of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) for identification of NTM. However, some closely related species have very similar spectral mass fingerprints, and until recently, Mycobacterium chimaera and M. intracellulare could not be separated from each other by MALDI-TOF MS. The conventional identification methods used in routine diagnostics have similar limitations. Recently, the differentiation of these two species within the Mycobacterium avium complex has become increasingly important due to reports of M. chimaera infections related to open heart surgery in Europe and in the USA. In this report, a method for the distinct differentiation of M. chimaera and M. intracellulare using a more detailed analysis of MALDI-TOF mass spectra is presented. Species-specific peaks could be identified and it was possible to assign all isolates (100 %) from reference strain collections as well as clinical isolates to the correct species. We have developed a model for the accurate identification of M. chimaera and M. intracellulare by MALDI-TOF MS. This approach has the potential for routine use in microbiology laboratories, as the model itself can be easily implemented into the software of the currently available systems by MALDI-TOF MS manufacturers.

  16. A Genomic View of Sugar Transport in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Titgemeyer, Fritz; Amon, Johannes; Parche, Stephan; Mahfoud, Maysa; Bail, Johannes; Schlicht, Maximilian; Rehm, Nadine; Hillmann, Dietmar; Stephan, Joachim; Walter, Britta; Burkovski, Andreas; Niederweis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of carbohydrate uptake systems of the soil bacterium Mycobacterium smegmatis and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our results show that M. smegmatis has 28 putative carbohydrate transporters. The majority of sugar transport systems (19/28) in M. smegmatis belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. In contrast to previous reports, we identified genes encoding all components of the phosphotransferase system (PTS), including permeases for fructose, glucose, and dihydroxyacetone, in M. smegmatis. It is anticipated that the PTS of M. smegmatis plays an important role in the global control of carbon metabolism similar to those of other bacteria. M. smegmatis further possesses one putative glycerol facilitator of the major intrinsic protein family, four sugar permeases of the major facilitator superfamily, one of which was assigned as a glucose transporter, and one galactose permease of the sodium solute superfamily. Our predictions were validated by gene expression, growth, and sugar transport analyses. Strikingly, we detected only five sugar permeases in the slow-growing species M. tuberculosis, two of which occur in M. smegmatis. Genes for a PTS are missing in M. tuberculosis. Our analysis thus brings the diversity of carbohydrate uptake systems of fast- and a slow-growing mycobacteria to light, which reflects the lifestyles of M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis in their natural habitats, the soil and the human body, respectively. PMID:17557815

  17. A genomic view of sugar transport in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Titgemeyer, Fritz; Amon, Johannes; Parche, Stephan; Mahfoud, Maysa; Bail, Johannes; Schlicht, Maximilian; Rehm, Nadine; Hillmann, Dietmar; Stephan, Joachim; Walter, Britta; Burkovski, Andreas; Niederweis, Michael

    2007-08-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of carbohydrate uptake systems of the soil bacterium Mycobacterium smegmatis and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our results show that M. smegmatis has 28 putative carbohydrate transporters. The majority of sugar transport systems (19/28) in M. smegmatis belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. In contrast to previous reports, we identified genes encoding all components of the phosphotransferase system (PTS), including permeases for fructose, glucose, and dihydroxyacetone, in M. smegmatis. It is anticipated that the PTS of M. smegmatis plays an important role in the global control of carbon metabolism similar to those of other bacteria. M. smegmatis further possesses one putative glycerol facilitator of the major intrinsic protein family, four sugar permeases of the major facilitator superfamily, one of which was assigned as a glucose transporter, and one galactose permease of the sodium solute superfamily. Our predictions were validated by gene expression, growth, and sugar transport analyses. Strikingly, we detected only five sugar permeases in the slow-growing species M. tuberculosis, two of which occur in M. smegmatis. Genes for a PTS are missing in M. tuberculosis. Our analysis thus brings the diversity of carbohydrate uptake systems of fast- and a slow-growing mycobacteria to light, which reflects the lifestyles of M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis in their natural habitats, the soil and the human body, respectively.

  18. A photoelectrocatalytic process that disinfects water contaminated with Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Brugnera, Michelle Fernanda; Miyata, Marcelo; Zocolo, Guilherme Julião; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin

    2013-11-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are resistant to conventional water treatment; indeed, they have been recovered from a wide variety of environmental sources. Here, we applied the photoelectrocatalytic technique using a Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanode to inactivate mycobacteria. For a mycobacteria population of 5 × 10(8) CFU mL(-1), we achieved 99.9 and 99.8% inactivation of Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium with rate constant of 6.2 × 10(-3) and 4.2 × 10(-3) min(-1), respectively, after 240 min. We compared the proposed method with the photolytic and photocatalytic methods. Using a mycobacteria population of 7.5 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1), the proposed Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanode elicited total mycobacteria inactivation within 3 min of treatment; the presence of Ag nanoparticles in the electrode provided 1.5 larger degradation rate constant as compared with the Ti/TiO2 anode (1.75 × 10(-2) for M. kansassi and 1.98 × 10(-2) for M. avium). We monitored the degradation of the metabolites released during cellular lysis by TOC removal, sugar release, chromatography, and mass spectrometry measurements; photoelectrocatalysis and Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanodes furnished the best results.

  19. Comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Youm, Jiwon; Saier, Milton H

    2012-03-01

    The co-emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacterial strains and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus pandemic has made tuberculosis a leading public health threat. The causative agent is Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtu), a facultative intracellular parasite. Mycobacterium leprae (Mle), a related organism that causes leprosy, is an obligate intracellular parasite. Given that different transporters are required for bacterial growth and persistence under a variety of growth conditions, we conducted comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of these two organisms. A minimal set of genes required for intracellular and extracellular life was identified. Drug efflux systems utilizing primary active transport mechanisms have been preferentially retained in Mle and still others preferentially lost. Transporters associated with environmental adaptation found in Mtu were mostly lost in Mle. These findings provide starting points for experimental studies that may elucidate the dependencies of pathogenesis on transport for these two pathogenic mycobacteria. They also lead to suggestions regarding transporters that function in intra- versus extra-cellular growth.

  20. Granulomatous Skin Lesions in Moray Eels Caused by a Novel Mycobacterium Species Related to Mycobacterium triplex

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Lawrence H.; Costa, Sylvia F.; Weiss, Louis M.; Johnson, Linda K.; Bartell, John; Davis, Raymond; Walsh, Michael; Levi, Michael

    2001-01-01

    An outbreak of granulomatous dermatitis was investigated in a captive population of moray eels. The affected eels had florid skin nodules concentrated around the head and trunk. Histopathological examination revealed extensive granulomatous inflammation within the dermis and subcutaneous fascial plane between the fat and axial musculature. Acid-fast rods were detected within the smallest lesions, which were presumably the ones that had developed earliest. Eventually, after several months of incubation at room temperature, a very slowly growing acid-fast organism was isolated. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified it as a Mycobacterium species closely related (0.59% divergence) to M. triplex, an SAV mycobacterium. Intradermal inoculation of healthy green moray eels with this organism reliably reproduced the lesion. Experimentally induced granulomatous dermatitis appeared within 2 weeks of inoculation and slowly but progressively expanded during the 2 months of the experiment. Live organisms were recovered from these lesions at all time points, fulfilling Koch's postulates for this bacterium. In a retrospective study of tissues collected between 1993 and 1999 from five spontaneous disease cases, acid-fast rods were consistently found within lesions, and a nested PCR for the rRNA gene also demonstrated the presence of mycobacteria within affected tissues. PMID:11402008

  1. Factors Influencing Numbers of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Other Mycobacteria in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Falkinham, Joseph O.; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2001-01-01

    Eight water distribution systems were sampled over an 18-month period (528 water and 55 biofilm samples) to measure the frequency of recovery and number of mycobacteria, particularly Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare, in raw source waters before and after treatment and within the distribution system. The systems were chosen to assess the influence of source water, treatment, and assimilable organic carbon levels on mycobacterial numbers. Overall, mycobacterial recovery from the systems was low (15% of samples). Numbers of mycobacteria ranged from 10 to 700,000 CFU liter−1. The number of M. avium in raw waters was correlated with turbidity. Water treatment substantially reduced the number of mycobacteria in raw waters by 2 to 4 log units. Mycobacterial numbers were substantially higher in the distribution system samples (average, 25,000-fold) than in those collected immediately downstream from the treatment facilities, indicating that mycobacteria grow in the distribution system. The increase in mycobacterial numbers was correlated with assimilable organic carbon and biodegradable organic carbon levels (r2 = 0.65, P = 0.03). Although M. intracellulare was seldom recovered from water samples, it was frequently recovered (six of eight systems) in high numbers from biofilms (average, 600 CFU/cm2). Evidently, the ecological niches of M. avium and M. intracellulare are distinct. PMID:11229914

  2. Identification of proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis missing in attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains.

    PubMed

    Mattow, J; Jungblut, P R; Schaible, U E; Mollenkopf, H J; Lamer, S; Zimny-Arndt, U; Hagens, K; Müller, E C; Kaufmann, S H

    2001-08-01

    A proteome approach, combining high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) with mass spectrometry, was used to compare the cellular protein composition of two virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with two attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), in order to identify unique proteins of these strains. Emphasis was given to the identification of M. tuberculosis specific proteins, because we consider these proteins to represent putative virulence factors and interesting candidates for vaccination and diagnosis of tuberculosis. The genome of M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv comprises nearly 4000 predicted open reading frames. In contrast, the separation of proteins from whole mycobacterial cells by 2-DE resulted in silver-stained patterns comprising about 1800 distinct protein spots. Amongst these, 96 spots were exclusively detected either in the virulent (56 spots) or in the attenuated (40 spots) mycobacterial strains. Fifty-three of these spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry, of which 41 were identified, including 32 M. tuberculosis specific spots. Twelve M. tuberculosis specific spots were identified as proteins, encoded by genes previously reported to be deleted in M. bovis BCG. The remaining 20 spots unique for M. tuberculosis were identified as proteins encoded by genes that are not known to be missing in M. bovis BCG.

  3. Comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Jiwon; Saier, Milton H.

    2012-01-01

    The co-emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacterial strains and the HIV pandemic has made tuberculosis a leading public health threat. The causative agent is Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtu), a facultative intracellular parasite. Mycobacterium leprae (Mle), a related organism that causes leprosy, is an obligate intracellular parasite. Given that different transporters are required for bacterial growth and persistence under a variety of growth conditions, we conducted comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of these two organisms. A minimal set of genes required for intracellular and extracellular life were identified. Drug efflux systems utilizing primary active transport mechanisms have been preferentially retained in Mle and still others preferentially lost. Transporters associated with environmental adaptation found in Mtu were mostly lost in Mle. These findings provide starting points for experimental studies that may elucidate the dependencies of pathogenesis on transport for these two pathogenic mycobacteria. They also lead to suggestions regarding transporters that function in intra- versus extra-cellular growth. PMID:22179038

  4. Differences in T-cell responses between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium africanum-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Tientcheu, Leopold D; Sutherland, Jayne S; de Jong, Bouke C; Kampmann, Beate; Jafali, James; Adetifa, Ifedayo M; Antonio, Martin; Dockrell, Hazel M; Ota, Martin O

    2014-05-01

    In The Gambia, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Mycobacterium africanum (Maf) are major causes of tuberculosis (TB). Maf is more likely to cause TB in immune suppressed individuals, implying differences in virulence. Despite this, few studies have assessed the underlying immunity to the two pathogens in human. In this study, we analyzed T-cell responses from 19 Maf- and 29 Mtb-infected HIV-negative patients before and after TB chemotherapy following overnight stimulation of whole blood with TB-specific antigens. Before treatment, percentages of early secreted antigenic target-6(ESAT-6)/culture filtrate protein-10(CFP-10) and purified protein derivative-specific single-TNF-α-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were significantly higher while single-IL-2-producing T cells were significantly lower in Maf- compared with Mtb-infected patients. Purified protein derivative-specific polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells frequencies were significantly higher before than after treatment, but there was no difference between the groups at both time points. Furthermore, the proportion of CD3(+) CD11b(+) T cells was similar in both groups pretreatment, but was significantly lower with higher TNF-α, IL-2, and IFN-γ production in Mtb- compared with that of Maf-infected patients posttreatment. Our data provide evidence of differences in T-cell responses to two mycobacterial strains with differing virulence, providing some insight into TB pathogenesis with different Mtb strains that could be prospectively explored as biomarkers for TB protection or susceptibility.

  5. Characterization of Novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis Mutants Hypersusceptible to β-Lactam Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Anthony R.; Parsons, Linda M.; Pavelka, Martin S.

    2005-01-01

    Our laboratory previously constructed mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis with deletions in the genes for their major β-lactamases, BlaC and BlaS, respectively, and showed that the mutants have increased susceptibilities to most β-lactam antibiotics, particularly the penicillins. However, there is still a basal level of resistance in the mutants to certain penicillins, and the susceptibilities of the mutants to some cephalosporin-based β-lactams are essentially the same as those of the wild types. We hypothesized that characterizing additional mutants (derived from β-lactamase deletion mutants) that are hypersusceptible to β-lactam antibiotics might reveal novel genes involved with other mechanisms of β-lactam resistance, peptidoglycan assembly, and cell envelope physiology. We report here the isolation and characterization of nine β-lactam antibiotic-hypersusceptible transposon mutants, two of which have insertions in genes known to be involved with peptidoglycan biosynthesis (ponA2 and dapB); the other seven mutants have insertions which affect novel genes. These genes can be classified into three groups: those involved with peptidoglycan biosynthesis, cell division, and other cell envelope processes. Two of the peptidoglycan-biosynthetic genes (ponA2 and pbpX) may encode β-lactam antibiotic-resistant enzymes proposed to be involved with the synthesis of the unusual diaminopimelyl linkages within the mycobacterial peptidoglycan. PMID:15743935

  6. igr Genes and Mycobacterium tuberculosis cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer C; Miner, Maurine D; Pandey, Amit K; Gill, Wendy P; Harik, Nada S; Sassetti, Christopher M; Sherman, David R

    2009-08-01

    Recently, cholesterol was identified as a physiologically important nutrient for Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival in chronically infected mice. However, it remained unclear precisely when cholesterol is available to the bacterium and what additional bacterial functions are required for its metabolism. Here, we show that the igr locus, which we previously found to be essential for intracellular growth and virulence of M. tuberculosis, is required for cholesterol metabolism. While igr-deficient strains grow identically to the wild type in the presence of short- and long-chain fatty acids, the growth of these bacteria is completely inhibited in the presence of cholesterol. Interestingly, this mutant is still able to respire under cholesterol-dependent growth inhibition, suggesting that the bacteria can metabolize other carbon sources during cholesterol toxicity. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that the growth-inhibitory effect of cholesterol in vitro depends on cholesterol import, as mutation of the mce4 sterol uptake system partially suppresses this effect. In addition, the Delta igr mutant growth defect during the early phase of disease is completely suppressed by mutating mce4, implicating cholesterol intoxication as the primary mechanism of attenuation. We conclude that M. tuberculosis metabolizes cholesterol throughout infection.

  7. Role of cholesterol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Miner, Maurine D; Chang, Jennifer C; Pandey, Amit K; Sassetti, Christopher M; Sherman, David R

    2009-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) acquisition and utilization of nutrients within the host cell is poorly understood, although it has been hypothesized that host lipids probably play an important role in MTB survival. Cholesterol has recently been identified as an important lipid for mycobacterial infection. The mce4 transport system is required for cholesterol import into bacterial cells, and deletion of mce4 locus resulted in severe attenuation in a chronic mouse model of infection. However, it has remained unclear what additional bacterial functions were required for utilization of this sterol. We have found that the igr locus, which was previously found essential for intracellular growth and virulence of MTB, is required for cholesterol metabolism: igr-deficient bacteria cannot grow using cholesterol as a primary carbon source. The growth-inhibitory effect of cholesterol in vitro depends on cholesterol import, as the delta igr mutant growth defect during the early phase of disease is completely suppressed by mutating mce4, implicating cholesterol intoxication as the primary mechanism of attenuation. We conclude that M. tuberculosis metabolizes cholesterol throughout the course of infection, and that degradation of this sterol is crucial for bacterial persistence.

  8. Neurons Are Host Cells for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Philippa J.; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Lang, Dirk; Cooper, Susan; Sebesho, Boipelo; Allie, Nasiema; Keeton, Roanne; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M.; Salie, Sumayah; Labuschagné, Antoinette; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kellaway, Lauriston

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of the central nervous system is thought to be initiated once the bacilli have breached the blood brain barrier and are phagocytosed, primarily by microglial cells. In this study, the interactions of M. tuberculosis with neurons in vitro and in vivo were investigated. The data obtained demonstrate that neurons can act as host cells for M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis bacilli were internalized by murine neuronal cultured cells in a time-dependent manner after exposure, with superior uptake by HT22 cells compared to Neuro-2a cells (17.7% versus 9.8%). Internalization of M. tuberculosis bacilli by human SK-N-SH cultured neurons suggested the clinical relevance of the findings. Moreover, primary murine hippocampus-derived neuronal cultures could similarly internalize M. tuberculosis. Internalized M. tuberculosis bacilli represented a productive infection with retention of bacterial viability and replicative potential, increasing 2- to 4-fold within 48 h. M. tuberculosis bacillus infection of neurons was confirmed in vivo in the brains of C57BL/6 mice after intracerebral challenge. This study, therefore, demonstrates neurons as potential new target cells for M. tuberculosis within the central nervous system. PMID:24566619

  9. Neurons are host cells for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Randall, Philippa J; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Lang, Dirk; Cooper, Susan; Sebesho, Boipelo; Allie, Nasiema; Keeton, Roanne; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M; Salie, Sumayah; Labuschagné, Antoinette; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kellaway, Lauriston; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2014-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of the central nervous system is thought to be initiated once the bacilli have breached the blood brain barrier and are phagocytosed, primarily by microglial cells. In this study, the interactions of M. tuberculosis with neurons in vitro and in vivo were investigated. The data obtained demonstrate that neurons can act as host cells for M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis bacilli were internalized by murine neuronal cultured cells in a time-dependent manner after exposure, with superior uptake by HT22 cells compared to Neuro-2a cells (17.7% versus 9.8%). Internalization of M. tuberculosis bacilli by human SK-N-SH cultured neurons suggested the clinical relevance of the findings. Moreover, primary murine hippocampus-derived neuronal cultures could similarly internalize M. tuberculosis. Internalized M. tuberculosis bacilli represented a productive infection with retention of bacterial viability and replicative potential, increasing 2- to 4-fold within 48 h. M. tuberculosis bacillus infection of neurons was confirmed in vivo in the brains of C57BL/6 mice after intracerebral challenge. This study, therefore, demonstrates neurons as potential new target cells for M. tuberculosis within the central nervous system.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  11. Cytokines and Chemokines in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Gonzalez, Racquel; Prince, Oliver; Cooper, Andrea; Khader, Shabaana A

    2016-10-01

    Chemokines and cytokines are critical for initiating and coordinating the organized and sequential recruitment and activation of cells into Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected lungs. Correct mononuclear cellular recruitment and localization are essential to ensure control of bacterial growth without the development of diffuse and damaging granulocytic inflammation. An important block to our understanding of TB pathogenesis lies in dissecting the critical aspects of the cytokine/chemokine interplay in light of the conditional role these molecules play throughout infection and disease development. Much of the data highlighted in this review appears at first glance to be contradictory, but it is the balance between the cytokines and chemokines that is critical, and the "goldilocks" (not too much and not too little) phenomenon is paramount in any discussion of the role of these molecules in TB. Determination of how the key chemokines/cytokines and their receptors are balanced and how the loss of that balance can promote disease is vital to understanding TB pathogenesis and to identifying novel therapies for effective eradication of this disease.

  12. Complex multifractal nature in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Saurav; Roychowdhury, Tanmoy; Chirom, Keilash; Bhattacharya, Alok; Brojen Singh, R. K.

    2017-04-01

    The mutifractal and long range correlation (C(r)) properties of strings, such as nucleotide sequence can be a useful parameter for identification of underlying patterns and variations. In this study C(r) and multifractal singularity function f(α) have been used to study variations in the genomes of a pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Genomic sequences of M. tuberculosis isolates displayed significant variations in C(r) and f(α) reflecting inherent differences in sequences among isolates. M. tuberculosis isolates can be categorised into different subgroups based on sensitivity to drugs, these are DS (drug sensitive isolates), MDR (multi-drug resistant isolates) and XDR (extremely drug resistant isolates). C(r) follows significantly different scaling rules in different subgroups of isolates, but all the isolates follow one parameter scaling law. The richness in complexity of each subgroup can be quantified by the measures of multifractal parameters displaying a pattern in which XDR isolates have highest value and lowest for drug sensitive isolates. Therefore C(r) and multifractal functions can be useful parameters for analysis of genomic sequences.

  13. Complex multifractal nature in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Saurav; Roychowdhury, Tanmoy; Chirom, Keilash; Bhattacharya, Alok; Brojen Singh, R. K.

    2017-01-01

    The mutifractal and long range correlation (C(r)) properties of strings, such as nucleotide sequence can be a useful parameter for identification of underlying patterns and variations. In this study C(r) and multifractal singularity function f(α) have been used to study variations in the genomes of a pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Genomic sequences of M. tuberculosis isolates displayed significant variations in C(r) and f(α) reflecting inherent differences in sequences among isolates. M. tuberculosis isolates can be categorised into different subgroups based on sensitivity to drugs, these are DS (drug sensitive isolates), MDR (multi-drug resistant isolates) and XDR (extremely drug resistant isolates). C(r) follows significantly different scaling rules in different subgroups of isolates, but all the isolates follow one parameter scaling law. The richness in complexity of each subgroup can be quantified by the measures of multifractal parameters displaying a pattern in which XDR isolates have highest value and lowest for drug sensitive isolates. Therefore C(r) and multifractal functions can be useful parameters for analysis of genomic sequences. PMID:28440326

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    PRISIC, SLADJANA; HUSSON, ROBERT N.

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs). A similar number of two-component systems are also present, indicating that these two signal transduction mechanisms are both important in the adaptation of this bacterial pathogen to its environment. The M. tuberculosis phosphoproteome includes hundreds of Ser- and Thr-phosphorylated proteins that participate in all aspects of M. tuberculosis biology, supporting a critical role for the STPKs in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. Nine of the STPKs are receptor type kinases, with an extracytoplasmic sensor domain and an intracellular kinase domain, indicating that these kinases transduce external signals. Two other STPKs are cytoplasmic and have regulatory domains that sense changes within the cell. Structural analysis of some of the STPKs has led to advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which these STPKs are activated and regulated. Functional analysis has provided insights into the effects of phosphorylation on the activity of several proteins, but for most phosphoproteins the role of phosphorylation in regulating function is unknown. Major future challenges include characterizing the functional effects of phosphorylation for this large number of phosphoproteins, identifying the cognate STPKs for these phosphoproteins, and determining the signals that the STPKs sense. Ultimately, combining these STPK-regulated processes into larger, integrated regulatory networks will provide deeper insight into M. tuberculosis adaptive mechanisms that contribute to tuberculosis pathogenesis. Finally, the STPKs offer attractive targets for inhibitor development that may lead to new therapies for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25429354

  15. Amino Acid Transport in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Yabu, Kunihiko

    1970-01-01

    The transport of d-alanine, d-glutamic acid, and d-valine in Mycobacterium smegmatis was compared quantitatively with that of their l-isomers. It appeared that the uptake of d-alanine was mediated by an active process displaying saturation kinetics characteristic of enzyme function, whereas the uptake of d-glutamic acid was accomplished by a passive process showing diffusion kinetics. Both processes were involved in the uptake of l-alanine, l-glutamic acid, d-valine, and l-valine. d-Valine competed with l-valine for entry into the cell through a single active process. d-Alanine and l-alanine also utilized the same active process, but the d-isomer could not enter the cell through the passive process. The passive process exhibited characteristics of diffusion, but was sensitive to sulfhydryl-blocking reagents and showed competition among structurally related amino acids. These last findings suggested that the passive process is a facilitated diffusion. PMID:5437732

  16. Revisiting the Evolution of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Serge; Inwald, Jackie; Gordon, Steve; Martin, Carlos; Warren, Rob; Kremer, Kristin; Cousins, Debby; Behr, Marcel A.

    2005-01-01

    Though careful consideration has been placed towards genetic characterization of tubercle bacillus isolates causing disease in humans, those causing disease predominantly among wild and domesticated mammals have received less attention. In contrast to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whose host range is largely specific to humans, M. bovis and “M bovis-like” organisms infect a broad range of animal species beyond their most prominent host in cattle. To determine whether strains of variable genomic content are associated with distinct distributions of disease, the DNA contents of M. bovis or M. bovis-like isolates from a variety of hosts were investigated via Affymetrix GeneChip. Consistent with previous genomic analysis of the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC), large sequence polymorphisms of putative diagnostic and biological consequence were able to unambiguously distinguish interrogated isolates. The distribution of deleted regions indicates organisms genomically removed from M. bovis and also points to structured genomic variability within M. bovis. Certain genomic profiles spanned a variety of hosts but were clustered by geography, while others associated primarily with host type. In contrast to the prevailing assumption that M. bovis has broad host capacity, genomic profiles suggest that distinct MTC lineages differentially infect a variety of mammals. From this, a phylogenetic stratification of genotypes offers a predictive framework upon which to base future genetic and phenotypic studies of the MTC. PMID:16159772

  17. Genetic engineering of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Lamrabet, Otmane; Drancourt, Michel

    2012-09-01

    Genetic engineering has been used for decades to mutate and delete genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome with the translational goal of producing attenuated mutants with conserved susceptibility to antituberculous antibiotics. The development of plasmids and mycobacteriophages that can transfer DNA into the M. tuberculosis chromosome has effectively overcome M. tuberculosis slow growth rate and the capsule and mycolic acid wall, which limit DNA uptake. The use of genetic engineering techniques has shed light on many aspects of pathogenesis mechanisms, including cellular growth, mycolic acid biosynthesis, metabolism, drug resistance and virulence. Moreover, such research gave clues to the development of new vaccines or new drugs for routine clinical practice. The use of genetic engineering tools is mainly based on the underlying concept that altering or reducing the M. tuberculosis genome could decrease its virulence. A contrario, recent post-genomic analyses indicated that reduced bacterial genomes are often associated with increased bacterial virulence and that M. tuberculosis acquired genes by lateral genetic exchange during its evolution. Therefore, ancestors utilizing genetic engineering to add genes to the M. tuberculosis genome may lead to new vaccines and the availability of M. tuberculosis isolates with increased susceptibility to antituberculous antibiotics.

  18. [Buruli ulcer or Mycobacterium ulcerans infection].

    PubMed

    Abgueguen, P; Pichard, E; Aubry, J

    2010-02-01

    Buruli ulcer is a severe necrotizing cutaneous infection due to Mycobacterium ulcerans. The disease is currently expanding, especially in West Africa, and the WHO is supporting a vast research program to better understand the modes of transmission, to develop diagnostic methods, and to define specific treatment protocols. The disease transmission could be linked to environment and especially water striders. After M. ulcerans inoculation, cutaneous lesions appear, as broad painless ulcers, and thus ignored by patients. The production of mycolactone, a toxin, only virulence factor known at this time, is responsible for the cytotoxic effect on skin tissues. Complications may occur, especially super infections and more rarely bone involvement responsible for osteomyelitis. The prognosis is usually functional with sometimes severe sequels, and skin and tendinous retraction as well as amputation are frequent. The diagnosis is usually made on PCR but this is difficult in developing countries, direct examination is not very reliable, and culture is long and difficult. The disease often remains ignored and undiagnosed, leading to evolved clinical presentations and sequels. The treatment is not defined yet. It is often surgical exeresis with skin graft, not always efficient. Antibiotic combination protocols are under evaluation.

  19. Intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Corti, S; Chevalier, J; Cremieux, A

    1995-11-01

    To evaluate the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin in mycobacteria, two methods were used with Mycobacterium smegmatis. A radiometric method (K. V. Cundy, C. E. Fasching, K. E. Willard, and L. R. Peterson, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 28:491-497, 1991) was used without great modification, but the fluorometric method (P. G. S. Mortimer and L. J. V. Piddock, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 28:639-653, 1991) was changed considerably. Indeed, adsorption of the quinolone to the bacterial surface was characterized by measuring the level of accumulation of 0 degree C. Taking into account the adsorption, the pH of the washing buffer was increased from 7.0 to 9.0 to improve the desorption of norfloxacin from the cell surface. Both the fluorometric method, with the technical improvement, and the radiometric method could be used to estimate the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin, which resulted from the difference between the whole uptake measured at 37 degrees C and the adsorption measured at 0 degrees C. A total of 35 ng of norfloxacin per mg of cells (dry weight) penetrated into the M. smegmatis cell, and the steady state was achieved in 5 min. Use of inhibitors of the proton motive force revealed that transport of norfloxacin was energy independent. Thus, the same mechanisms of quinolone accumulation that occur in eubacteria seem to occur in mycobacteria, at least in M. smegmatis.

  20. Mycobacterium bovis: characteristics of wildlife reservoir hosts.

    PubMed

    Palmer, M V

    2013-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in animals and sometimes humans. Many developed nations have long-standing programmes to eradicate tuberculosis in livestock, principally cattle. As disease prevalence in cattle decreases these efforts are sometimes impeded by passage of M. bovis from wildlife to cattle. In epidemiological terms, disease can persist in some wildlife species, creating disease reservoirs, if the basic reproduction rate (R0) and critical community size (CCS) thresholds are achieved. Recognized wildlife reservoir hosts of M. bovis include the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand, European badger (Meles meles) in Great Britain and Ireland, African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in South Africa, wild boar (Sus scrofa) in the Iberian Peninsula and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Michigan, USA. The epidemiological concepts of R0 and CCS are related to more tangible disease/pathogen characteristics such as prevalence, pathogen-induced pathology, host behaviour and ecology. An understanding of both epidemiological and disease/pathogen characteristics is necessary to identify wildlife reservoirs of M. bovis. In some cases, there is a single wildlife reservoir host involved in transmission of M. bovis to cattle. Complexity increases, however, in multihost systems where multiple potential reservoir hosts exist. Bovine tuberculosis eradication efforts require elimination of M. bovis transmission between wildlife reservoirs and cattle. For successful eradication identification of true wildlife reservoirs is critical, as disease control efforts are most effective when directed towards true reservoirs.

  1. The Biology of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Delogu, Giovanni; Sali, Michela; Fadda, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still poses a major threat to mankind and during the last thirty years we have seen a recrudescence of the disease even in countries where TB was thought to be conquered. It is common opinion that more effective control tools such as new diagnostics, a new vaccine and new drugs are urgently needed to control the global pandemic, though the so far insufficient understanding of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) mechanism of pathogenesis is a major obstacle for the development of these control tools. In this review, we will summarize the recent advancement in the understanding of Mtb biology and on the pathogenesis of Mtb infection with emphasis on latent infection, with the change in paradigm of the last few years where the dichotomy between latent and active disease has been reconsidered in favor of a dynamic equilibrium between the host and the bacilli, encompassing a continuous spectrum of conditions that has been named TB spectrum. Implications for the diagnosis and control of disease in certain population will also be discussed. PMID:24363885

  2. Mycobacterium avium subspecies impair dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Basler, Tina; Brumshagen, Christina; Beineke, Andreas; Goethe, Ralph; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic, granulomatous enteritis of ruminants. Dendritic cells (DC) of the gut are ideally placed to combat invading mycobacteria; however, little is known about their interaction with MAP. Here, we investigated the interaction of MAP and the closely related M. avium ssp. avium (MAA) with murine DC and the effect of infected macrophages on DC maturation. The infection of DC with MAP or MAA induced DC maturation, which differed to that of LPS as maturation was accompanied by higher production of IL-10 and lower production of IL-12. Treatment of maturing DC with supernatants from mycobacteria-infected macrophages resulted in impaired DC maturation, leading to a semi-mature, tolerogenic DC phenotype expressing low levels of MHCII, CD86 and TNF-α after LPS stimulation. Though the cells were not completely differentiated they responded with an increased IL-10 and a decreased IL-12 production. Using recombinant cytokines we provide evidence that the semi-mature DC phenotype results from a combination of secreted cytokines and released antigenic mycobacterial components of the infected macrophage. Our results indicate that MAP and MAA are able to subvert DC function directly by infecting and indirectly via the milieu created by infected macrophages.

  3. Intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed Central

    Corti, S; Chevalier, J; Cremieux, A

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin in mycobacteria, two methods were used with Mycobacterium smegmatis. A radiometric method (K. V. Cundy, C. E. Fasching, K. E. Willard, and L. R. Peterson, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 28:491-497, 1991) was used without great modification, but the fluorometric method (P. G. S. Mortimer and L. J. V. Piddock, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 28:639-653, 1991) was changed considerably. Indeed, adsorption of the quinolone to the bacterial surface was characterized by measuring the level of accumulation of 0 degree C. Taking into account the adsorption, the pH of the washing buffer was increased from 7.0 to 9.0 to improve the desorption of norfloxacin from the cell surface. Both the fluorometric method, with the technical improvement, and the radiometric method could be used to estimate the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin, which resulted from the difference between the whole uptake measured at 37 degrees C and the adsorption measured at 0 degrees C. A total of 35 ng of norfloxacin per mg of cells (dry weight) penetrated into the M. smegmatis cell, and the steady state was achieved in 5 min. Use of inhibitors of the proton motive force revealed that transport of norfloxacin was energy independent. Thus, the same mechanisms of quinolone accumulation that occur in eubacteria seem to occur in mycobacteria, at least in M. smegmatis. PMID:8585727

  4. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection following organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Haas, Charles; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2006-11-01

    In transplant recipients, immunosuppressive treatment affects cell-mediated immunity and increases the risk of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis may be transmitted by the donor organ or occur de novo, but such cases are rare. The vast majority of cases of active tuberculosis in transplant recipients result from reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The incidence varies from one region of the globe to another, from 0.5-1.0% in North America, to 0.36-5.5% in Europe and 7.0-11.8% in India. The incidence of tuberculosis among transplant recipients is much higher than in the general population. Diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic liver disease and AIDS all increase the risk of post-transplant tuberculosis. Extrapulmonary and disseminated forms are frequent in this setting. The diagnosis of tuberculosis in transplant recipients is often difficult, and treatment is frequently delayed. Tuberculosis can be life-threatening in such cases. Treatment is difficult because rifampicin is a cytochrome P450 inducer (leading to reduced levels of cyclosporine), and because the hepatotoxicity of isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide is frequently increased in transplant recipients. Treatment of latent tuberculosis before transplantation markedly reduces the risk of developing active tuberculosis after transplantation.

  5. The cell envelope glycoconjugates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Angala, Shiva Kumar; Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Huc-Claustre, Emilie; Wheat, William H.; Jackson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the second most common cause of death due to a single infectious agent. The cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of the disease in humans, is a source of unique glycoconjugates and the most distinctive feature of the biology of this organism. It is the basis of much of Mtb pathogenesis and one of the major causes of its intrinsic resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. At the same time, the unique structures of Mtb cell envelope glycoconjugates, their antigenicity and essentiality for mycobacterial growth provide opportunities for drug, vaccine, diagnostic and biomarker development, as clearly illustrated by recent advances in all of these translational aspects. This review focuses on our current understanding of the structure and biogenesis of Mtb glycoconjugates with particular emphasis on one of most intriguing and least understood aspect of the physiology of mycobacteria: the translocation of these complex macromolecules across the different layers of the cell envelope. It further reviews the rather impressive progress made in the last ten years in the discovery and development of novel inhibitors targeting their biogenesis. PMID:24915502

  6. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed. PMID:15560754

  7. Disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Martinho, Anna Paula Vitirito; Franco, Marília Masello Junqueira; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Perrotti, Isabella Belletti Mutt; Mangia, Simone Henriques; Megid, Jane; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Carvalho Sanches, Osimar; Paes, Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    An uncommon disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is described in a 12-year-old female dog presenting with fever, dyspnea, cough, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, melena, epistaxis, and emesis. The dog had a history of close contact with its owner, who died of pulmonary tuberculosis. Radiographic examination revealed diffuse radio-opaque images in both lung lobes, diffuse visible masses in abdominal organs, and hilar and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Bronchial washing samples and feces were negative for acid-fast organisms. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based species identification of bronchial washing samples, feces, and urine revealed M. tuberculosis using PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis-PRA. Because of public health concerns, which were worsened by the physical condition of the dog, euthanasia of the animal was recommended. Rough and tough colonies suggestive of M. tuberculosis were observed after microbiological culture of lung, liver, spleen, heart, and lymph node fragments in Löwenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media. The PRA analysis enabled diagnosis of M. tuberculosis strains isolated from organs. PMID:23339199

  8. Human Lung Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwander, Stephan; Dheda, Keertan

    2011-01-01

    The study of human pulmonary immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) provides a unique window into the biological interactions between the human host and M.tb within the broncho-alveolar microenvironment, the site of natural infection. Studies of bronchoalveolar cells (BACs) and lung tissue evaluate innate, adaptive, and regulatory immune mechanisms that collectively contribute to immunological protection or its failure. In aerogenically M.tb–exposed healthy persons lung immune responses reflect early host pathogen interactions that may contribute to sterilization, the development of latent M.tb infection, or progression to active disease. Studies in these persons may allow the identification of biomarkers of protective immunity before the initiation of inflammatory and disease-associated immunopathological changes. In healthy close contacts of patients with tuberculosis (TB) and during active pulmonary TB, immune responses are compartmentalized to the lungs and characterized by an exuberant helper T-cell type 1 response, which as suggested by recent evidence is counteracted by local suppressive immune mechanisms. Here we discuss how exploring human lung immunity may provide insights into disease progression and mechanisms of failure of immunological protection at the site of the initial host–pathogen interaction. These findings may also aid in the identification of new biomarkers of protective immunity that are urgently needed for the development of new and the improvement of current TB vaccines, adjuvant immunotherapies, and diagnostic technologies. To facilitate further work in this area, methodological and procedural approaches for bronchoalveolar lavage studies and their limitations are also discussed. PMID:21075901

  9. Mycobacterium salmoniphilum infection in burbot Lota lota.

    PubMed

    Zerihun, Mulualem Adam; Berg, Vidar; Lyche, Jan L; Colquhoun, Duncan J; Poppe, Trygve T

    2011-05-24

    Burbot Lota lota sampled from lakes Mjosa and Losna in southeastern Norway between 2005 and 2008 were found to be infected with Mycobacterium salmoniphilum at a culture-positive prevalence of 18.6 and 3.3%, respectively. The condition factor (CF) of mycobacteria-affected fish sampled from Mjøsa in 2008 was lower than the average CF of total sampled fish the same year. Externally visible pathological changes included skin ulceration, petechiae, exopthalmia and cataract. Internally, the infections were associated with capsulated, centrally necrotic granulomas, containing large numbers of acid-fast bacilli, found mainly in the mesenteries, spleen, heart and swim bladder. Mycobacterial isolates recovered on Middlebrook 7H10 agar were confirmed as M. salmoniphilum by phenotypical investigation and by partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB and Hsp65genes as well as the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) locus. This study adds burbot to the list of fish species susceptible to piscine mycobacteriosis and describes M. salmoniphilum infection in a non-salmonid fish for the first time.

  10. Fish Tank Granuloma Caused by Mycobacterium marinum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting-Shu; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Huang, Ching-Tai; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Chang, Pi-Yueh; Su, Lin-Hui; Kuo, An-Jing; Chia, Ju-Hsin; Lu, Chia-Chen; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mycobacterium marinum causes skin and soft tissue, bone and joint, and rare disseminated infections. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between treatment outcome and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. A total of 27 patients with M. marinum infections were enrolled. Methods Data on clinical characteristics and therapeutic methods were collected and analyzed. We also determined the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 7 antibiotics against 30 isolates from these patients. Results Twenty-seven patients received antimycobacterial agents with or without surgical debridement. Eighteen patients were cured, 8 failed to respond to treatment, and one was lost to follow-up. The duration of clarithromycin (147 vs. 28; p = 0.0297), and rifampicin (201 vs. 91; p = 0.0266) treatment in the cured patients was longer than that in the others. Surgical debridement was performed in 10 out of the 18 cured patients, and in 1 of another group (p = 0.0417). All the 30 isolates were susceptible to clarithromycin, amikacin, and linezolid; 29 (96.7%) were susceptible to ethambutol; 28 (93.3%) were susceptible to sulfamethoxazole; and 26 (86.7%) were susceptible to rifampicin. However, only 1 (3.3%) isolate was susceptible to doxycycline. Discussion Early diagnosis of the infection and appropriate antimicrobial therapy with surgical debridement are the mainstays of successful treatment. Clarithromycin and rifampin are supposed to be more effective agents. PMID:22911774

  11. Biosynthesis of Glycosyldiglycerides in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, John C.; Elbein, Alan D.

    1974-01-01

    A particulate enzyme preparation from Mycobacterium smegmatis catalyzes the transfer of [14C]galactose from uridine 5′-diphosphate (UDP)-[14C]galactose and of [14C]glucose from UDP-[14C]glucose into chloroform-soluble products. The radioactive neutral lipids were purified by passage through diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, followed by thin-layer chromatography. When UDP-glucose was used as substrate, two major radioactive lipids were obtained; one had a hexose-glucose-glycerol ratio of 1:1:1. The second product had a hexose-glycerol ratio of 2:1 and, in addition to glucose, contained lesser amounts of mannose and galactose. With UDP-galactose as substrate, two radioactive products were observed that were chromatographically indistinguishable from the [14C]glucosyl-labeled mono- and diglycosyldiglyceride. Palmitate and oleate were the predominant fatty acid constituents in these lipids and were present in equimolar amounts in all of the products examined. The products have thus been identified as monoglycosyldiglyceride and a diglycosyldiglyceride containing glucose as the major hexose along with mannose and galactose. Properties of the galactosyl and glucosyl transferases are described. Images PMID:4808895

  12. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis regulatory network and hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Galagan, James E.; Minch, Kyle; Peterson, Matthew; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Azizi, Elham; Sweet, Linsday; Gomes, Antonio; Rustad, Tige; Dolganov, Gregory; Glotova, Irina; Abeel, Thomas; Mahwinney, Chris; Kennedy, Adam D.; Allard, René; Brabant, William; Krueger, Andrew; Jaini, Suma; Honda, Brent; Yu, Wen-Han; Hickey, Mark J.; Zucker, Jeremy; Garay, Christopher; Weiner, Brian; Sisk, Peter; Stolte, Christian; Winkler, Jessica K.; Van de Peer, Yves; Iazzetti, Paul; Camacho, Diogo; Dreyfuss, Jonathan; Liu, Yang; Dorhoi, Anca; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Drogaris, Paul; Lamontagne, Julie; Zhou, Yiyong; Piquenot, Julie; Park, Sang Tae; Raman, Sahadevan; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Mohney, Robert P.; Chelsky, Daniel; Moody, D. Branch; Sherman, David R.; Schoolnik, Gary K.

    2014-01-01

    We have taken the first steps towards a complete reconstruction of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis regulatory network based on ChIP-Seq and combined this reconstruction with system-wide profiling of messenger RNAs, proteins, metabolites and lipids during hypoxia and re-aeration. Adaptations to hypoxia are thought to have a prominent role in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Using ChIP-Seq combined with expression data from the induction of the same factors, we have reconstructed a draft regulatory network based on 50 transcription factors. This network model revealed a direct interconnection between the hypoxic response, lipid catabolism, lipid anabolism and the production of cell wall lipids. As a validation of this model, in response to oxygen availability we observe substantial alterations in lipid content and changes in gene expression and metabolites in corresponding metabolic pathways. The regulatory network reveals transcription factors underlying these changes, allows us to computationally predict expression changes, and indicates that Rv0081 is a regulatory hub. PMID:23823726

  13. [Ecology and transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans].

    PubMed

    Marsollier, L; Aubry, J; Saint-André, J-P; Robert, R; Legras, P; Manceau, A-L; Bourdon, S; Audrain, C; Carbonnelle, B

    2003-10-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans is an environmental pathogen concerning mainly the tropical countries; it is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, which has become the third most important mycobacterial disease. In spite of water-linked epidemiological studies to identify the sources of M. ulcerans, the reservoir and the mode of transmission of this organism remain elusive. To determine the ecology and the mode of transmission of M. ulcerans we have set up an experimental model. This experimental model demonstrated that water bugs were able to transmit M. ulcerans by bites. In insects, the bacilli were localized exclusively within salivary glands, where it could both multiply contrary to other mycobacteria species. In another experimental study, we report that the crude extracts from aquatic plants stimulate in vitro the growth of M. ulcerans as much as the biofilm formation by M. ulcerans has been observed on aquatic plants. Given that the water bugs are essentially carnivorous, it is difficult to imagine a direct contact in the contamination of aquatic bugs and plants. It seems very likely that an intermediate host exists. In an endemic area of Daloa in Côte d'Ivoire, our observations were confirmed.

  14. Epidemiologic Consequences of Microvariation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mathema, Barun; Kurepina, Natalia; Yang, Guibin; Shashkina, Elena; Manca, Claudia; Mehaffy, Carolina; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Ahuja, Shama; Fallows, Dorothy A.; Izzo, Angelo; Bifani, Pablo; Dobos, Karen; Kaplan, Gilla

    2012-01-01

    Background. Evidence from genotype-phenotype studies suggests that genetic diversity in pathogens have clinically relevant manifestations that can impact outcome of infection and epidemiologic success. We studied 5 closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains that collectively caused extensive disease (n = 862), particularly among US-born tuberculosis patients. Methods. Representative isolates were selected using population-based genotyping data from New York City and New Jersey. Growth and cytokine/chemokine response were measured in infected human monocytes. Survival was determined in aerosol-infected guinea pigs. Results. Multiple genotyping methods and phylogenetically informative synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms showed that all strains were related by descent. In axenic culture, all strains grew similarly. However, infection of monocytes revealed 2 growth phenotypes, slower (doubling ∼55 hours) and faster (∼25 hours). The faster growing strains elicited more tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β than the slower growing strains, even after heat killing, and caused accelerated death of infected guinea pigs (∼9 weeks vs 24 weeks) associated with increased lung inflammation/pathology. Epidemiologically, the faster growing strains were associated with human immunodeficiency virus and more limited in spread, possibly related to their inherent ability to induce a strong protective innate immune response in immune competent hosts. Conclusions. Natural variation, with detectable phenotypic changes, among closely related clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis may alter epidemiologic patterns in human populations. PMID:22315279

  15. Multiple lumps in the breast due to Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Chandanwale, Shirish S; Gulati, Ishita; Baravkar, Dadaso S; Shinde, Sumedha P; Mishra, Neha

    2016-04-01

    Although breast tissue is the most resistant to tuberculosis, its incidence is increasing worldwide. High incidence of breast tuberculosis is presumed in India. The rapidly growing nontubercular mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae, are of increasing clinical importance because infections due to these organisms are often hospital acquired. The true incidence of M. fortuitum is unknown but it has been estimated to be between 4 and 6 cases per one million people. It causes skin or soft tissue infections following trauma or surgery. Breast infection with M. fortuitum is very uncommon. The most common clinical presentation of breast tuberculosis is a painless lump. Multiple lumps are rarely reported. The culture and molecular studies are the keystone for differentiation of various mycobacterium species. We report one such case of a 25-year-old female presenting with multiple painless lumps due to M. fortuitum infection in the left breast.

  16. MYCOBACTERIUM GENAVENSE IN AN AFRICAN PENGUIN (SPHENISCUS DEMERSUS).

    PubMed

    Krause, Kristian J; Reavill, Drury; Weldy, Scott H; Bradway, Daniel S

    2015-12-01

    A 19-yr-old female African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) presented with labored breathing and anorexia. Radiographs revealed soft-tissue density lesions in the left lung fields and fluid in the right. The penguin died during the night. Postmortem examination demonstrated multiple granulomas in the lungs and air sacs. The right coelom was filled with opaque fluid. Histopathology of the lung, liver, kidney, and spleen identified Mycobacterium as a primary disease etiology. Large numbers of acid fast-positive, rod-shaped bacteria were recognized on tissue staining. Mycobacterium genavense was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for the species. Further confirmation of M. genavense was accomplished using PCR with universal Mycobacterium spp. primers followed by sequencing of the amplicon obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of mycobacteriosis-and specifically M. genavense -in an African penguin. This case also demonstrates the similarities of presentation between the more commonly suspected and encountered aspergillosis and mycobacteriosis.

  17. Therapeutic keratectomy for Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis after LASIK.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Chen; Wang, I-Jong; Chen, Wei-Li; Hu, Fung-Rong

    2003-11-01

    We report successful treatment of a case of Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with therapeutic lamellar keratectomy. A 34-year-old woman developed a 2 x 2 mm feathery infiltration within the interface inferior to the pupil margin with mild inflammation of the conjunctiva in her left eye 40 days after LASIK surgery. Bacterial culture from the infiltrates of the interface of the stromal bed revealed Mycobacterium abscessus. After combination antibiotic therapy including amikacin and ciprofoxacin was given for 6 weeks, infiltration persisted despite the development of necrosis in the flap tissue. Therapeutic lamellar keratectomy combined with flap removal was performed. No recurrence was found 1 year after the surgery. Therapeutic lamellar keratectomy with flap removal can provide an effective treatment modality for the management of post-LASIK Mycobacterium abscessus keratitis that is unresponsive to medical treatment.

  18. Deciphering the virulence factors of the opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium colombiense.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Perez, M N; Murcia, M I; Parra-Lopez, C; Blom, J; Tauch, A

    2016-11-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) contains clinically important nontuberculous mycobacteria worldwide and is the second largest medical complex in the Mycobacterium genus after the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. MAC comprises several species that are closely phylogenetically related but diverse regarding their host preference, course of disease, virulence and immune response. In this study we provided immunologic and virulence-related insights into the M. colombiense genome as a model of an opportunistic pathogen in the MAC. By using bioinformatic tools we found that M. colombiense has deletions in the genes involved in p-HBA/PDIM/PGL, PLC, SL-1 and HspX production, and loss of the ESX-1 locus. This information not only sheds light on our understanding the virulence mechanisms used by opportunistic MAC pathogens but also has great potential for the designing of species-specific diagnostic tools.

  19. Pulmonary Mycobacterium marinum infection: 'fish tank granuloma' of the lung.

    PubMed

    Velu, Prasad Palani; Fernandes, Susan E; Laurenson, Ian F; Noble, Donald D

    2016-11-01

    A 65-year-old man presented with a six-month history of lethargy, weight loss and dry cough. He had a background of mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chest radiograph showed new right upper lobe cavitary opacification. Sputum cultures were acid-fast bacilli smear positive and yielded Mycobacterium marinum - a non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) often found in aquatic environments and rarely associated with respiratory disease. The suspected source was silent aspiration of contaminated water, likely due to his initiating the siphon of his fish-tank by mouth. He completed a one-year course of rifampicin, ethambutol and clarithromycin, with negative repeat sputum mycobacteria cultures and radiological improvement. This case report demonstrates a successful approach to investigation and further management of Mycobacterium marinum pulmonary disease - a rare condition, particularly in immunocompetent individuals, with limited treatment guidelines. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. [Sporotrichoid cutaneous infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum in an AIDS patient].

    PubMed

    Cameselle, D; Hernández, J; Francès, A; Montenegro, T; Cañas, F; Borrego, L

    2007-04-01

    We report a case of primary cutaneous infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum after the bite of an aquarium fish in a severely immunodepressed AIDS patient. Clinical features consisted in nodular and ulcerative lesions that followed a sporotrichoid pattern. Histological study of nodular lesions showed a granulomatous dermatitis with numerous acid-fast bacilli. The mycobacterium was identified 3 months later by genetic hybridization from a cultive in solid medium. Combined therapy with isoniazid, rifampin, clarithromycin, ethambutol, amikacin and ciprofloxacin resulted in complete resolution of the lesions. Infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum is a rare mycobacteriosis that usually affects immunodepressed patients. The most common clinical manifestations are cutaneous lesions but the development of sporotrichoid nodular lymphangitis is exceptional.

  1. Bilateral parotitis caused by Mycobacterium chelonae in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Shyur, Shyh Dar; Chu, Szu Hung; Wu, Yi Lei; Chang, Kuo Ming; Lee, Huei Chung

    2009-12-01

    This report is of a healthy 3-year-old boy with bilateral parotitis caused by Mycobacterium chelonae. He was treated with antibiotics, but the symptoms did not improve. The biopsy pathology report revealed chronic caseating granulomatous inflammation. After 2 weeks, Mycobacterium chelonae was identified from the biopsy specimen culture. The antibiotics were changed to amikacin and clarithromycin, according to the susceptibility test. Two weeks later, he underwent debridement surgery. Only partial excision of the infected tissue was performed because of the possibility of facial nerve injury. After another 2 weeks of treatment with amikacin and clarithromycin, parotidectomy was performed. The patient then received a 6-month course of oral clarithromycin. At the 1-year follow up, he was well and without residual mass. His immunologic examinations were all within normal limits. This is the first report of bilateral parotitis caused by Mycobacterium chelonae in an immunocompetent boy in the English-language literature.

  2. SP-100 space reactor safety

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    The SP-100 space reactor power system is being developed to meet the large electrical power requirements of civilian and military missions planned for the 1990's and beyond. It will remove the restrictions on electrical power generation that have tended to limit missions and will enable the fuller exploration and utilization of space. This booklet describes the SP-100 space reactor power system and its development. Particular emphasis is given to safety. The design aand operational features as well as the design and safety review process that will assure that the SP-100 can be launched nd operated safely are described.

  3. [Radiographic findings of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteriosis other than Mycobacterium avium complex].

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Atsuyuki

    2009-08-01

    Almost all nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) cause opportunistic infection. Therefore, the radiographic findings of NTM have a tendency of nonspecific patterns modifying the predisposing conditions or diseases and we could not extract species specific radiographic characterizations in that situations. In this review, the NTM cases without predisposing conditions or diseases are submitted essentially. Mycobacterium kansasii cases show more or less the same patterns with TB cases. Mycobacterium fortuitum case shows nonspecific consolidations. Mycobacterium xenopi case shows solitary cavity in the upper lobe area. Mycobacterium gordonae case shows the same cavitary pattern. Mycobacterium abscessus case shows widely scattered tree-in-bud appearance foci. Weak virulence NTM like as Mycobacterium xenopi or Mycobacterium gordonae may form solitary cavity without predisposing conditions. The pattern of bronchial wall thickening seems to be one of the specific findings with NTM pulmonary infection.

  4. Yersinia nurmii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Murros-Kontiainen, Anna; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria; Korkeala, Hannu; Johansson, Per; Rahkila, Riitta; Björkroth, Johanna

    2011-10-01

    This study was set up to identify three Gram-negative, rod-shaped strains originating from broiler meat packaged under a modified atmosphere. A polyphasic taxonomic approach, including multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of five genes (16S rRNA, glnA, gyrB, recA and HSP60), DNA-DNA reassociation between the closest phylogenetic neighbours and determination of relevant phenotypic properties, was applied. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences grouped these strains together and within the genus Yersinia. MLSA of the 16S rRNA gene and four housekeeping genes showed that the strains formed a monophyletic group separate from other Yersinia species in all phylogenetic trees constructed. The strains had a phenotypic profile different from those of other representatives of the genus Yersinia, but most similar to that of Yersinia ruckeri. Typical virulence markers for pathogenic Yersinia were not detected. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and DNA-DNA reassociation data, a novel species, Yersinia nurmii sp. nov., is proposed for the isolated strains. The type strain is APN3a-c(T) ( = DSM 22296(T)  = LMG 25213(T)).

  5. Mycobacterium microti infection in two meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Palgrave, C J; Benato, L; Eatwell, K; Laurenson, I F; Smith, N H

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium microti is a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. microti is generally considered a pathogen of small rodents, although sporadic infections in a range of other mammals, including domestic animals and man, have been reported. While many human infections have been associated with immunosuppression, an increasing number of cases are being reported in immunocompetent patients. Two cases of M. microti infection in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) are reported. These are the first cases of mycobacterial disease to be described in meerkats outside Africa.

  6. Characterization of the Secreted MPT53 Antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sadie; Brusasca, PierNatale; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Spencer, John S.; Wiker, Harald G.; Bifani, Pablo; Shashkina, Elena; Kreiswirth, Barry; Harboe, Morten; Schluger, Neil; Gomez, Manuel; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2001-01-01

    MPT53 is a secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Southern transfer and hybridization showed mpt53 to be conserved in the M. tuberculosis complex and to have homology with DNA from Mycobacterium avium and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. However, anti-MPT53 polyclonal antibodies detected no antigen in the culture filtrates of M. avium and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. MPT53 of M. tuberculosis induced strong, tuberculosis-specific antibody responses in guinea pigs but induced no delayed-type hypersensitivity. Involvement in immune responses during human tuberculosis was very modest. PMID:11500477

  7. MTBreg: The Database of Conditionally Regulated Proteins in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kaufman, Markus; Pal, Debnath; Eisenberg, David

    Proteins up- and down- regulated in Mycobacterium tuberculosis grown under conditions mimicking infection are included in this database. It also includes information on proteins that are regulated by selected transcription factors or other regulatory proteins. The literature data provided here is complimentary to the databases provided by Michael Strong that include recent TB computational functional linkages and the Prolinks Database by Peter Bowers. The experimental condition, the experimental dataset and a literature reference will be displayed, including links to the computationally linked proteins in the Prolinks Database and the entry in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Structural Genomics Database.[Copied from information at http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/Services/MTBreg/

  8. Culture-independent nested PCR method reveals high diversity of actinobacteria associated with the marine sponges Hymeniacidon perleve and Sponge sp.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yanjuan; Huang, Jianyu; Deng, Maicun; Zhang, Wei

    2008-11-01

    A culture-independent nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to investigate the diversity of actinobacteria communities associated with the sponges Hymeniacidon perleve and Sponge sp. The phylogenetic affiliation of sponge-derived actinobacteria was then assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing of cloned DNA fragments. A total of 196 positive clones were screened by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis; 48 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were selected for sequencing. Rarefaction analysis indicated that the clone libraries represented 93% and 94% of the total estimated diversity for the two species, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of sequence data revealed representatives of various phylogenetic divisions, which were related to the following ten actinobacterial genera: Acidimicrobium, Corynebacterium, Propionibacterium, Actinomyces, Micrococcus, Microbacterium, Streptomyces, Mycobacterium, Cellulosimicrobium, Sporichthya, and unidentified actinobacterial clones. A sponge-specific, previously uncultured actinobacteria community grouped within the subclass Acidimicrobidae was discovered from both H. perleve and Sponge sp. Sequences belonging to Acidimicrobium in the H. perleve and the Sponge sp. clone libraries represented 33% and 24% of the clones, respectively. In the Sponge sp. clone library Mycobacterium dominated, accounting for 70% of all clones. The presence of Acidimicrobium and mycobacteria within two sponges can lay the groundwork for attempts to culture these interesting bacteria for industrial applications.

  9. Mycobacterium heckeshornense lung infection that was diagnosed as Mycobacterium xenopi disease by DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH).

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kozo; Kazumi, Yuko; Maeda, Shinji; Yoshimori, Kozo; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Ogata, Hideo; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Kudoh, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    The DNA sequencing analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, rpoB and hsp65 were conducted to characterize six strains that had been identified as Mycobacterium xenopi by DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) for past ten years in our hospital. The results revealed Mycobacterium heckeshornense infection in one of the six cases. A 47-year-old man, who had been treated for pneumonia, had pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. The sputa from the patient were culture positive for mycobacterium in three times. And it was diagnosed as M. xenopiby DDH method. Chest X-ray showed fibrocavitary lesion in right upper lobe was successfully treated with clarithromycin for four weeks.

  10. Actinoplanes couchii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Kämpfer, Peter; Huber, Birgit; Thummes, Kathrin; Grün-Wollny, Iris; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    A Gram-positive bacterium, strain GW8-1761(T), was isolated from soil close to the Marmore waterfalls, Terni, Italy. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity studies showed that strain GW8-1761(T) belonged to the genus Actinoplanes, being most closely related to Actinoplanes italicus JCM 3165(T) (98.9 %), A. rectilineatus IFO 13941(T) (98.5 %), A. palleronii JCM 7626(T) (97.8 %), A. utahensis IFO 13244(T) (97.6 %) and A. cyaneus DSM 46137(T) (97.6 %). Strain GW8-1761(T) could be distinguished from any other Actinoplanes species with validly published names by 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of less than 97.5 %. Chemotaxonomic data [major menaquinone MK-9(H(4)); major polar lipids diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol, with phosphatidylcholine and aminoglycolipids absent; major fatty acids C(15 : 0), C(16 : 0), C(16 : 0) iso, C(17 : 1)omega8c and summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or C(15 : 0) iso 2-OH)] supported the affiliation of strain GW8-1761(T) to the genus Actinoplanes. The results of DNA-DNA hybridizations and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain GW8-1761(T) from the most closely related species. Strain GW8-1761(T) therefore merits species status, and we propose the name Actinoplanes couchii sp. nov., with the type strain GW8-1761(T) (=DSM 45050(T)=CIP 109316(T)).

  11. Dynamics of specific anti-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibody response through age.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Toft, Nils; Okura, Hisako

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a chronic infection in cattle. MAP infected cattle with humoral immune (HI) reactions with IgG antibodies are usually those where latency of infection has ceased and their infection is progressing towards reduced milk yield, weight loss and significant bacterial excretion in feces. The proportion of detectable infections among all infected animals that will develop disease is often referred to as 'the tip of the iceberg'. The purpose of this study was to estimate this proportion. Test-records from 18,972 Danish dairy cows with MAP specific IgG antibodies on their final test-record were used to estimate age-specific sensitivities (Se). These cows were the infected ones considered to develop disease in a population with a representative age-distribution and were defined as cases. The specificity (Sp) of the test was estimated based on test-results from 166,905 cows, which had no MAP IgG antibodies in their final four test-records. The Sp, age-specific Se and maximum Se were used to estimate the probability of having HI at a given age resulting in the proportion of infected cows with HI at a given age. For cows 2 years of age, the proportion of detectable cases was 0.33, while it was 0.94 for cows 5 years of age. Thus, there was a significant shift in the tip of the iceberg with aging. This study provided a model for estimating the proportion of latent chronic infections that would progress to disease, and the results can be used to model infection dynamics.

  12. Multispacer Sequence Typing for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Djelouadji, Zoheira; Arnold, Catherine; Gharbia, Saheer; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Background Genotyping methods developed to survey the transmission dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis currently rely on the interpretation of restriction and amplification profiles. Multispacer sequence typing (MST) genotyping is based on the sequencing of several intergenic regions selected after complete genome sequence analysis. It has been applied to various pathogens, but not to M. tuberculosis. Methods and Findings In M. tuberculosis, the MST approach yielded eight variable intergenic spacers which included four previously described variable number tandem repeat loci, one single nucleotide polymorphism locus and three newly evaluated spacers. Spacer sequence stability was evaluated by serial subculture. The eight spacers were sequenced in a collection of 101 M. tuberculosis strains from five phylogeographical lineages, and yielded 29 genetic events including 13 tandem repeat number variations (44.82%), 11 single nucleotide mutations (37.93%) and 5 deletions (17.24%). These 29 genetic events yielded 32 spacer alleles or spacer-types (ST) with an index of discrimination of 0.95. The distribution of M. tuberculosis isolates into ST profiles correlated with their assignment into phylogeographical lineages. Blind comparison of a further 93 M. tuberculosis strains by MST and restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 fingerprinting and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units typing, yielded an index of discrimination of 0.961 and 0.992, respectively. MST yielded 41 different profiles delineating 16 related groups and proved to be more discriminatory than IS6110-based typing for isolates containing <8 IS6110 copies (P<0.0003). MST was successfully applied to 7/10 clinical specimens exhibiting a Cts ≤ 42 cycles in internal transcribed spacer-real time PCR. Conclusions These results support MST as an alternative, sequencing-based method for genotyping low IS6110 copy-number M. tuberculosis strains. The M. tuberculosis MST database is freely available

  13. Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium with monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Luh, Jeanne; Tong, Ning; Raskin, Lutgarde; Mariñas, Benito J

    2008-11-01

    Batch experiments were performed to study the inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium in the presence of monochloramine at 5-30 degrees C, pH 6-10, and 0.30-42.3 mg Cl2/ L. For each temperature and pH investigated, limiting high and low inactivation rates were observed for high and low disinfectant concentrations, respectively, within the range investigated. The rate of inactivation transitioned from high to low over a relatively narrow range of intermediate monochloramine concentrations. The observed temperature dependence of inactivation was consistent with an Arrhenius expression with activation energies of 58.0 and 71.7 kJ/mol for the high and low concentration ranges, respectively. The rate of inactivation increased with decreasing pH, consistent with trends reported for the reaction of monochloramine with protein thiols. Experiments performed at pH approximately 3.5 showed that dichloramine was a weaker disinfectant than monochloramine, and that its contribution to the overall inactivation of M. avium with combined chlorine was negligible at pH 6-10. A kinetic model incorporating disinfectant concentration, temperature, and pH effects was used to illustrate that monochloramine efficiency to inactivate M. avium in water could vary broadly from adequate (e.g., 99.9% inactivation efficiency in 32 min at 5 mg Cl2/L, pH 6, 30 degrees C) to impractical (e.g., 99.9% inactivation efficiency in 9 d at 1 mg Cl2/L, pH 9, 5 degrees C).

  14. Nicotine Impairs Macrophage Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Stitzel, Jerry A; Bai, An; Zambrano, Cristian A; Phillips, Matthew; Marrack, Philippa; Chan, Edward D

    2017-09-01

    Pure nicotine impairs macrophage killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), but it is not known whether the nicotine component in cigarette smoke (CS) plays a role. Moreover, the mechanisms by which nicotine impairs macrophage immunity against MTB have not been explored. To neutralize the effects of nicotine in CS extract, we used a competitive inhibitor to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mecamylamine-as well as macrophages derived from mice with genetic disruption of specific subunits of nAChR. We also determined whether nicotine impaired macrophage autophagy and whether nicotine-exposed T regulatory cells (Tregs) could subvert macrophage anti-MTB immunity. Mecamylamine reduced the CS extract increase in MTB burden by 43%. CS extract increase in MTB was also significantly attenuated in macrophages from mice with genetic disruption of either the α7, β2, or β4 subunit of nAChR. Nicotine inhibited autophagosome formation in MTB-infected THP-1 cells and primary murine alveolar macrophages, as well as increased the intracellular MTB burden. Nicotine increased migration of THP-1 cells, consistent with the increased number of macrophages found in the lungs of smokers. Nicotine induced Tregs to produce transforming growth factor-β. Naive mouse macrophages co-cultured with nicotine-exposed Tregs had significantly greater numbers of viable MTB recovered with increased IL-10 production and urea production, but no difference in secreted nitric oxide as compared with macrophages cocultured with unexposed Tregs. We conclude that nicotine in CS plays an important role in subverting macrophage control of MTB infection.

  15. Molecular identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sweetline Anne, N; Ronald, B S M; Kumar, T M A Senthil; Kannan, P; Thangavelu, A

    2017-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis continued to be a re-emerging problem in some countries especially in endemic areas due to the fact that human and animal health surveillance system is not adopted to diagnose the infection. This crisis can be attributed due to sharing of the same habitat especially in rural areas. In the present study, a total of 148 samples were collected from cattle for isolation over a period of 3 years from cattle with and without lesions, of which 67 isolates were obtained by culture. Fifty one isolates were identified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) by IS6110 PCR of which 43 (84.3%) were identified as M. tuberculosis and 08 (15.6%) were identified as M. bovis by using 12.7kb fragment multiplex PCR. Among this, 31 isolates which were positive for IS6110 PCR were subjected to spoligotyping and revealed 28 isolates belonging to MANU1 strain of M. tuberculosis. This study clearly indicates that high prevalence of M. tuberculosis than M. bovis in bovine was identified by means of culture and by molecular methods M. tuberculosis can affect cattle producing lesion in contradiction to the earlier thoughts. This study speculates that M. tuberculosis MANU1 strain infection in cattle could be due to spill over from human or other non specific hosts in tuberculosis endemic areas. Though bovine tuberculosis due to M. tuberculosis in cattle is not considered a serious threat worldwide, in countries where human TB is endemic, M. tuberculosis infection of cattle needs to be considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genomic signal analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Paul Dan; Banica, Dorina; Tuduce, Rodica

    2007-02-01

    As previously shown the conversion of nucleotide sequences into digital signals offers the possibility to apply signal processing methods for the analysis of genomic data. Genomic Signal Analysis (GSA) has been used to analyze large scale features of DNA sequences, at the scale of whole chromosomes, including both coding and non-coding regions. The striking regularities of genomic signals reveal restrictions in the way nucleotides and pairs of nucleotides are distributed along nucleotide sequences. Structurally, a chromosome appears to be less of a "plain text", corresponding to certain semantic and grammar rules, but more of a "poem", satisfying additional symmetry restrictions that evoke the "rhythm" and "rhyme". Recurrent patterns in nucleotide sequences are reflected in simple mathematical regularities observed in genomic signals. GSA has also been used to track pathogen variability, especially concerning their resistance to drugs. Previous work has been dedicated to the study of HIV-1, Clade F and Avian Flu. The present paper applies GSA methodology to study Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) rpoB gene variability, relevant to its resistance to antibiotics. Isolates from 50 Romanian patients have been studied both by rapid LightCycler PCR and by sequencing of a segment of 190-250 nucleotides covering the region of interest. The variability is caused by SNPs occurring at specific sites along the gene strand, as well as by inclusions. Because of the mentioned symmetry restrictions, the GS variations tend to compensate. An important result is that MT can act as a vector for HIV virus, which is able to retrotranscribe its specific genes both into human and MT genomes.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Spoligotypes in Monterrey, Mexico▿

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Moreno-Torres, Elisa; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Rendon, Adrian; Blackwood, Kym; Kremer, Kristin; Rastogi, Nalin; Welsh, Oliverio; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio

    2010-01-01

    Although tuberculosis is still a public health problem in Mexico, there is little information about the genetic characteristics of the isolates. In the present study, we analyzed by spoligotyping 180 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from the urban area of Monterrey, Mexico, including drug-susceptible and drug-resistant isolates. The spoligotype patterns were compared with those in the international SITVIT2 spoligotyping database. Four isolates presented spoligotype patterns not found in the database (orphan types); the rest were distributed among 44 spoligo international types (SITs). SIT53 (clade T1) and SIT119 (clade X1) were predominant and included 43 (23.8%) and 28 (15.5%) of the isolates, respectively. In order to determine if there was a dominant spoligotype in the group of multidrug-resistant isolates, 37 of them were analyzed by IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, and scarce clustering of strains with more than five bands was observed. Fourteen isolates of this multidrug-resistant group presented four bands or less and were distributed in four SITs: SIT53 (n = 8), SIT92 (n = 3), SIT70 (n = 2), and SIT3038 (n = 1). When the molecular detection of mutations in the katG and rpoB genes were analyzed in these isolates with low copy numbers of IS6110, only two isolates shared the same IS6110, spoligotyping, and mutations patterns. When the distribution of the spoligotypes was analyzed by age cohort, SIT119 was predominantly found in patients 0 to 20 years old, especially in males, accounting for up to 40% of the isolates. In contrast, SIT53 was more prevalent in older females. This analysis demonstrates the variability of M. tuberculosis isolates in Monterrey and the partial dominance of SIT53 and SIT119 in that area of Mexico. PMID:19940048

  18. Surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-D as antimicrobial and immunotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Shanjana

    2010-06-01

    Surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-D belong to the "Soluble C-type Lectin" family of proteins and are collectively known as "Collectins". Based on their ability to recognize pathogens and to regulate the host defense, SP-A and SP-D have been recently categorized as "Secretory Pathogen Recognition Receptors". SP-A and SP-D were first identified in the lung; the expression of SP-A and SP-D has also been observed at other mucosal surfaces, such as lacrimal glands, gastrointestinal mucosa, genitourinary epithelium and periodontal surfaces. Since the role of these proteins is not fully elucidated at other mucosal surfaces, the focus of this article is on lung-SP-A and SP-D. It has become clear from research studies performed over a number of years that SP-A and SP-D are critical for the maintenance of lung homeostasis and the regulation of host defense and inflammation. However, none of the surfactant preparations available for clinical use have SP-A or SP-D. A review is presented here on SP-A- and SP-D-deficiencies in lung diseases, the importance of the administration of SP-A and SP-D, and recent patents and research directions that may lead to the design of novel SP-A- or SP-D-based therapeutics and surfactants.

  19. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from AIDS patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhople, Arvind M.

    1994-01-01

    In ominous projections issued by both U.S. Public Health Service and the World Health Organization, the epidemic of HIV infection will continue to rise more rapidly worldwide than predicted earlier. The AIDS patients are susceptible to diseases called opportunistic infections of which tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection are most common. This has created an urgent need to uncover new drugs for the treatment of these infections. In the seventies, NASA scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, had adopted a biochemical indicator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to detect presence of life in extraterrestrial space. We proposed to develop ATP assay technique to determine sensitivity of antibacterial compounds against MAC and M. tuberculosis.

  20. Simultaneous biodegradation of creosote-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a pyrene-degrading Mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    López, Zaira; Vila, Joaquim; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2008-02-01

    When incubated with a creosote-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mixture, the pyrene-degrading strain Mycobacterium sp. AP1 acted on three- and four-ring components, causing the simultaneous depletion of 25% of the total PAHs in 30 days. The kinetics of disappearance of individual PAHs was consistent with differences in aqueous solubility. During the incubation, a number of acid metabolites indicative of distinctive reactions carried out by high-molecular-weight PAH-degrading mycobacteria accumulated in the medium. Most of these metabolites were dicarboxylic aromatic acids formed as a result of the utilization of growth substrates (phenanthrene, pyrene, or fluoranthene) by multibranched pathways including meta- and ortho-ring-cleavage reactions: phthalic acid, naphthalene-1,8-dicarboxylic acid, phenanthrene-4,5-dicarboxylic acid, diphenic acid, Z-9-carboxymethylenefluorene-1-carboxylic acid, and 6,6'-dihydroxy-2,2'-biphenyl dicarboxylic acid. Others were dead-end products resulting from cometabolic oxidations on nongrowth substrates (fluorene meta-cleavage product). These results contribute to the general knowledge of the biochemical processes that determine the fate of the individual components of PAH mixtures in polluted soils. The identification of the partially oxidized compounds will facilitate to develop analytical methods to determine their potential formation and accumulation in contaminated sites.

  1. Insights on the Emergence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Analysis of Mycobacterium kansasii

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joyce; McIntosh, Fiona; Radomski, Nicolas; Dewar, Ken; Simeone, Roxane; Enninga, Jost; Brosch, Roland; Rocha, Eduardo P.; Veyrier, Frédéric J.; Behr, Marcel A.

    2015-01-01

    By phylogenetic analysis, Mycobacterium kansasii is closely related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Yet, although both organisms cause pulmonary disease, M. tuberculosis is a global health menace, whereas M. kansasii is an opportunistic pathogen. To illuminate the differences between these organisms, we have sequenced the genome of M. kansasii ATCC 12478 and its plasmid (pMK12478) and conducted side-by-side in vitro and in vivo investigations of these two organisms. The M. kansasii genome is 6,432,277 bp, more than 2 Mb longer than that of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, and the plasmid contains 144,951 bp. Pairwise comparisons reveal conserved and discordant genes and genomic regions. A notable example of genomic conservation is the virulence locus ESX-1, which is intact and functional in the low-virulence M. kansasii, potentially mediating phagosomal disruption. Differences between these organisms include a decreased predicted metabolic capacity, an increased proportion of toxin–antitoxin genes, and the acquisition of M. tuberculosis-specific genes in the pathogen since their common ancestor. Consistent with their distinct epidemiologic profiles, following infection of C57BL/6 mice, M. kansasii counts increased by less than 10-fold over 6 weeks, whereas M. tuberculosis counts increased by over 10,000-fold in just 3 weeks. Together, these data suggest that M. kansasii can serve as an image of the environmental ancestor of M. tuberculosis before its emergence as a professional pathogen, and can be used as a model organism to study the switch from an environmental opportunistic pathogen to a professional host-restricted pathogen. PMID:25716827

  2. Activities of Moxifloxacin in Combination with Macrolides against Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium massiliense

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Go-Eun; Min, Ki-Nam; Won, Choul-Jae; Jeon, Kyeongman

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium massiliense are on the rise among humans. Although macrolides, including clarithromycin (CLR) and azithromycin (AZM), are key antibiotics for the treatment of M. abscessus and M. massiliense infections, treatment regimens for these infections are still largely undefined. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo activities of moxifloxacin (MXF) in combination with macrolides against clinically isolated M. abscessus and M. massiliense strains. Overall, CLR, AZM, and MXF alone showed activity against both species in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. When MXF was combined with a macrolide against M. abscessus isolates, antagonism was observed in 65.4% (17/26) of the strains with CLR and 46.2% (12/26) of the strains with AZM in vitro as well as in 66.7% (10/15) of the strains with CLR and 40.0% (6/15) of the strains with AZM in macrophages as determined by the fractional inhibitory concentration index. In contrast, either indifferent or synergistic effects of the MXF-macrolide combinations were observed against only M. massiliense strains. Moreover, a murine infection model showed similar results. Antagonism between the MXF and macrolide combinations was observed in five out of seven M. abscessus strains, while indifferent and synergistic effects for these combinations were observed for three of the six M. massiliense strains tested, respectively. In conclusion, the activity of MXF in combination with a macrolide differed for M. abscessus and M. massiliense infections and the addition of MXF to macrolide therapy had no benefit for the treatment of M. abscessus infections. PMID:22564831

  3. High throughput phenotypic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis strains' metabolism using biolog phenotype microarrays.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Bhagwati; Fielder, Mark; Jones, Gareth; Newell, William; Abu-Oun, Manal; Wheeler, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major human and animal disease of major importance worldwide. Genetically, the closely related strains within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex which cause disease are well-characterized but there is an urgent need better to understand their phenotypes. To search rapidly for metabolic differences, a working method using Biolog Phenotype MicroArray analysis was developed. Of 380 substrates surveyed, 71 permitted tetrazolium dye reduction, the readout over 7 days in the method. By looking for ≥5-fold differences in dye reduction, 12 substrates differentiated M. tuberculosis H37Rv and Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97. H37Rv and a Beijing strain of M. tuberculosis could also be distinguished in this way, as could field strains of M. bovis; even pairs of strains within one spoligotype could be distinguished by 2 to 3 substrates. Cluster analysis gave three clear groups: H37Rv, Beijing, and all the M. bovis strains. The substrates used agreed well with prior knowledge, though an unexpected finding that AF2122/97 gave greater dye reduction than H37Rv with hexoses was investigated further, in culture flasks, revealing that hexoses and Tween 80 were synergistic for growth and used simultaneously rather than in a diauxic fashion. Potential new substrates for growth media were revealed, too, most promisingly N-acetyl glucosamine. Osmotic and pH arrays divided the mycobacteria into two groups with different salt tolerance, though in contrast to the substrate arrays the groups did not entirely correlate with taxonomic differences. More interestingly, these arrays suggested differences between the amines used by the M. tuberculosis complex and enteric bacteria in acid tolerance, with some hydrophobic amino acids being highly effective. In contrast, γ-aminobutyrate, used in the enteric bacteria, had no effect in the mycobacteria. This study proved principle that Phenotype MicroArrays can be used with slow-growing pathogenic mycobacteria and already has

  4. High Throughput Phenotypic Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis Strains' Metabolism Using Biolog Phenotype Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Bhagwati; Fielder, Mark; Jones, Gareth; Newell, William; Abu-Oun, Manal; Wheeler, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major human and animal disease of major importance worldwide. Genetically, the closely related strains within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex which cause disease are well-characterized but there is an urgent need better to understand their phenotypes. To search rapidly for metabolic differences, a working method using Biolog Phenotype MicroArray analysis was developed. Of 380 substrates surveyed, 71 permitted tetrazolium dye reduction, the readout over 7 days in the method. By looking for ≥5-fold differences in dye reduction, 12 substrates differentiated M. tuberculosis H37Rv and Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97. H37Rv and a Beijing strain of M. tuberculosis could also be distinguished in this way, as could field strains of M. bovis; even pairs of strains within one spoligotype could be distinguished by 2 to 3 substrates. Cluster analysis gave three clear groups: H37Rv, Beijing, and all the M. bovis strains. The substrates used agreed well with prior knowledge, though an unexpected finding that AF2122/97 gave greater dye reduction than H37Rv with hexoses was investigated further, in culture flasks, revealing that hexoses and Tween 80 were synergistic for growth and used simultaneously rather than in a diauxic fashion. Potential new substrates for growth media were revealed, too, most promisingly N-acetyl glucosamine. Osmotic and pH arrays divided the mycobacteria into two groups with different salt tolerance, though in contrast to the substrate arrays the groups did not entirely correlate with taxonomic differences. More interestingly, these arrays suggested differences between the amines used by the M. tuberculosis complex and enteric bacteria in acid tolerance, with some hydrophobic amino acids being highly effective. In contrast, γ-aminobutyrate, used in the enteric bacteria, had no effect in the mycobacteria. This study proved principle that Phenotype MicroArrays can be used with slow-growing pathogenic mycobacteria and already has

  5. Extrapulmonary infections caused by a dominant strain of Mycobacterium massiliense (Mycobacterium abscessus subspecies bolletii).

    PubMed

    Cheng, A; Liu, Y-C; Chen, M-L; Hung, C-C; Tsai, Y-T; Sheng, W-H; Liao, C-H; Hsueh, P-R; Chen, Y-C; Chang, S-C

    2013-10-01

    A single strain of Mycobacterium massiliense (BRA 100), a subspecies of the Mycobacterium abscessus complex, has been responsible for an epidemic of post-surgical infections in Brazil. Outside Brazil, this is the first report to describe a single emerging strain of M. massiliense (TPE 101) associated with extrapulmonary infections. This phenomenon may be underestimated because sophisticated molecular typing of M. abscessus is not routinely performed. Our molecular epidemiology study was triggered by an outbreak investigation. Nine case isolates were grown from the surgical sites of nine mostly paediatric patients receiving operations from 2010 to 2011. All available non-duplicated isolates of M. abscessus during this period were obtained for comparison. Mycobacteria were characterized by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), repetitive sequence PCR (rep-PCR) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Of 58 isolates of M. abscessus overall, 56 were clinical isolates. MLSA identified 36 of the isolates as M. massiliense. All case isolates were indistinguishable by PFGE and named the TPE 101 pulsotype. Of the stored strains of M. abscessus, TPE 101 strains were over-represented among the control surgical wound (7/7, 100%) and subcutaneous tissue isolates (4/5, 80%) but rare among the respiratory isolates (1/16, 6%) and absent from external skin, ocular and environmental samples. In conclusion, a unique strain of M. massiliense has emerged as a distinctive pathogen causing soft tissue infections in Taiwan. Further study to identify whether this is due to an occult common source or to specific virulence factors dictating tissue tropism is warranted.

  6. Infection with Mycobacterium microti in animals in France.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Lorraine; de Cruz, Krystel; Zanella, Gina; Aaziz, Rachid; Bulach, Tabatha; Karoui, Claudine; Hénault, Sylvie; Joncour, Guy; Boschiroli, Maria Laura

    2015-03-01

    We describe here 35 animal cases of tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium microti in France (2002-2014). Recently, molecular tools that overcome the difficulty of confirming infection by this potentially zoonotic agent have revealed an increasing number of cases, suggesting that its prevalence may have been underestimated.

  7. Mycobacterium abscessus ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Montero, Jose A; Alrabaa, Sally F; Wills, Todd S

    2016-04-01

    A 30-year-old man with history of neonatal hydrocephalus requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement presented with Mycobacterium abscessus shunt infection despite no shunt manipulation over 10 years prior to presentation. Cure was not achieved until complete removal of all CNS shunt foreign body was performed despite initial adequate antimicrobial therapy.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Free-Roaming Wild Asian Elephant

    PubMed Central

    Shivashankar, Beechagondahalli Papanna; Umashankar, Kunigal Srinivasa; Nandini, Poojappa; Giridhar, Papanna; Byregowda, Somenahalli Munivenkatappa; Shrinivasa, Basavegowdanadoddi Marinaik

    2017-01-01

    Postmortem examination of a wild Asian elephant at Rajiv Gandhi National Park, India, revealed nodular lesions, granulomas with central caseation, and acid-fast bacilli in the lungs. PCR and nucleotide sequencing confirmed the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This study indicates that wild elephants can harbor M. tuberculosis that can become fatal. PMID:28221114

  9. Mycobacterium bovis hip bursitis in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Dan, J M; Crespo, M; Silveira, F P; Kaplan, R; Aslam, S

    2016-02-01

    We present a report of extrapulmonary Mycobacterium bovis infection in a lung transplant recipient. M. bovis is acquired predominantly by zoonotic transmission, particularly from consumption of unpasteurized foods. We discuss epidemiologic exposure, especially as relates to the Mexico-US border, clinical characteristics, resistance profile, and treatment.

  10. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

  11. First identification of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis sheep strain in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Travería, G E; Zumarraga, M; Etchechoury, I; Romano, M I; Cataldi, A; Pinedo, M F Alvarado; Pavlik, I; Pribylova, R; Romero, J R

    2013-01-01

    We here identified for the first time the presence of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) sheep (S) strain in Argentina. IS900 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive. The S strain was compared with MAP cattle (C) strains by using IS1311 PCR-restriction endonuclease analysis (PCR-REA), multiplex PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.

  12. Cellular Interactions in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Noted as one of the more fastidious mycobacteria, infection with MAP is often chara...

  13. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, immunology and pathology of livestock

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in ruminants leads to a chronic and progressive enteric disease (Johne’s disease) that results in loss of intestinal function, poor body condition, and eventual death. Transmission is primarily through a fecal-oral route in neonates but con...

  14. Mycobacterium caprae Infection in Livestock and Wildlife, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Sabrina; Bezos, Javier; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Álvarez, Julio; Castellanos, Elena; Moya, Nuria; Lozano, Francisco; Javed, M. Tariq; Sáez-Llorente, José L.; Liébana, Ernesto; Mateos, Ana; Domínguez, Lucas; Tuberculosis, Monitoring of Animal

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium caprae is a pathogen that can infect animals and humans. To better understand the epidemiology of M. caprae, we spoligotyped 791 animal isolates. Results suggest infection is widespread in Spain, affecting 6 domestic and wild animal species. The epidemiology is driven by infections in caprids, although the organism has emerged in cattle. PMID:21392452

  15. Decontamination of an Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenator Contaminated With Mycobacterium chimaera.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Mark I; Phillips, Natalie; Bradley, Craig W; Holden, Elisabeth

    2017-10-01

    Water samples taken from extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO) devices used at University Hospitals Birmingham yielded high total viable counts (TVCs) containing a variety of microorganisms, including M. chimaera. Disinfection resulted in the reduction of TVCs and eradication of Mycobacterium chimaera. Weekly disinfection and water sampling are required to manage the water quality in these devices. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:1244-1246.

  16. Characterization of a novel variant of Mycobacterium chimaera.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, J; Hoefsloot, W; Buijtels, P C A M; Tortoli, E; Supply, P; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Boeree, M J; van Soolingen, D

    2012-09-01

    In this study, nonchromogenic mycobacteria were isolated from pulmonary samples of three patients in the Netherlands. All isolates had identical, unique 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S ITS sequences, which were closely related to those of Mycobacterium chimaera and Mycobacterium marseillense. The biochemical features of the isolates differed slightly from those of M. chimaera, suggesting that the isolates may represent a possible separate species within the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). However, the cell-wall mycolic acid pattern, analysed by HPLC, and the partial sequences of the hsp65 and rpoB genes were identical to those of M. chimaera. We concluded that the isolates represent a novel variant of M. chimaera. The results of this analysis have led us to question the currently used methods of species definition for members of the genus Mycobacterium, which are based largely on 16S rRNA or rpoB gene sequencing. Definitions based on a single genetic target are likely to be insufficient. Genetic divergence, especially in the MAC, yields strains that cannot be confidently assigned to a specific species based on the analysis of a single genetic target.

  17. MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM AND DRINKING WATER WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Human Mycobacterium avium infections are only known to be acquired from environmental sources such as water and soil. We compared M. avium isolates from clinical and drinking water sources using molecular tools. Methods: M. avium was isolated from water samples colle...

  18. Plasmid-encoded copper resistance and precipitation by Mycobacterium scrofulaceum.

    PubMed Central

    Erardi, F X; Failla, M L; Falkinham, J O

    1987-01-01

    A copper-tolerant Mycobacterium scrofulaceum strain was able to remove copper from culture medium by sulfate-dependent precipitation as copper sulfide. Such precipitation of copper sulfide was not observed in a derivative that lacks a 173-kilobase plasmid. In addition, the plasmid-carrying strain has a sulfate-independent copper resistance mechanism. PMID:3662522

  19. Tuberculosis in Alpacas (Lama pacos) Caused by Mycobacterium bovis▿

    PubMed Central

    García-Bocanegra, I.; Barranco, I.; Rodríguez-Gómez, I. M.; Pérez, B.; Gómez-Laguna, J.; Rodríguez, S.; Ruiz-Villamayor, E.; Perea, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report three cases of tuberculosis in alpacas from Spain caused by Mycobacterium bovis. The animals revealed two different lesional patterns. Mycobacterial culture and PCR assay yielded positive results for M. bovis. Molecular typing of the isolates identified spoligotype SB0295 and identical variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) allele sizes. PMID:20237097

  20. A new antituberculosis drug that selectively kills nonmultiplying Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mitchison, Denis A

    2008-03-13

    An important report by Bryk et al. in this issue of Cell Host & Microbe describes the properties of a rhodanine prodrug active against nonmultiplying Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Considering the tolerance of nonreplicating Mtb to most currently available agents, such a drug could be a major addition to our antituberculosis arsenal and would greatly benefit control of the disease.

  1. Infection with Mycobacterium microti in Animals in France

    PubMed Central

    Michelet, Lorraine; de Cruz, Krystel; Zanella, Gina; Aaziz, Rachid; Bulach, Tabatha; Karoui, Claudine; Hénault, Sylvie; Joncour, Guy

    2014-01-01

    We describe here 35 animal cases of tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium microti in France (2002–2014). Recently, molecular tools that overcome the difficulty of confirming infection by this potentially zoonotic agent have revealed an increasing number of cases, suggesting that its prevalence may have been underestimated. PMID:25540404

  2. MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM AND DRINKING WATER WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Human Mycobacterium avium infections are only known to be acquired from environmental sources such as water and soil. We compared M. avium isolates from clinical and drinking water sources using molecular tools. Methods: M. avium was isolated from water samples colle...

  3. Mycobacterium avium Complex Cervical Lymphadenitis in an Immunocompetent Adult▿

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Joshua B.; Koeppe, John

    2010-01-01

    Nontuberculosis mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis is a relatively common disease in immunocompetent children but a rare disease in immunocompetent adults. We report the diagnosis and treatment of Mycobacterium avium complex cervical lymphadenitis in an adult female. Our evaluation of immune competence, including gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) signaling, found no evidence of deficiency. PMID:20668140

  4. Tuberculosis in alpacas (Lama pacos) caused by Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    García-Bocanegra, I; Barranco, I; Rodríguez-Gómez, I M; Pérez, B; Gómez-Laguna, J; Rodríguez, S; Ruiz-Villamayor, E; Perea, A

    2010-05-01

    We report three cases of tuberculosis in alpacas from Spain caused by Mycobacterium bovis. The animals revealed two different lesional patterns. Mycobacterial culture and PCR assay yielded positive results for M. bovis. Molecular typing of the isolates identified spoligotype SB0295 and identical variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) allele sizes.

  5. Disseminated Mycobacterium kansasii in an HIV-negative patient.

    PubMed

    Tabarsi, Payam; Baghaei, Parvaneh; Kashani, Babak Sharif; Adimi, Parisa; Novin, Atieh; Mansouri, Davood

    2012-03-01

    Disseminated Mycobacterium kansasii infection is a rare infection in non-HIV patients. This research has uncovered a very rare manifestation of disseminated M. kansasii infection in a non-HIV patient with lung and pericardial involvement. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

  7. Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum in acidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ricardo; Fernandes, João; Fernandes, Nuno; Oliveira, Fernanda; Cadete, Manuela

    2007-08-01

    Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum was found in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, in a system composed of two acidic (pH 3.0) springs with temperatures between 56 degrees C at the source and 40 degrees C at the confluence of both springs. Growth and survival assays at 56 degrees C for 60 days were performed, confirming the origin of the strain.

  8. Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium leprae from Patients with Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shinji; Matsuoka, Masanori; Nakata, Noboru; Kai, Masanori; Maeda, Yumi; Hashimoto, Ken; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Kashiwabara, Yoshiko

    2001-01-01

    Sequences of the folP1, rpoB, and gyrA genes were analyzed for 88 isolates of Mycobacterium leprae from leprosy patients in Japan, Haiti, Indonesia, Pakistan, and the Philippines. Thirteen isolates (14.8%) showed representative mutations in more than two genes, suggesting the emergence of multidrug-resistant M. leprae. PMID:11709358

  9. Palaeogenomics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: epidemic bursts with a degrading genome.

    PubMed

    Djelouadji, Zoheira; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2011-08-01

    Genome-scale analysis suggests that the last common ancestor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Mycobacterium leprae diverged 36 million years ago, and members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex differentiated 40,000 years ago. Analysis of palaeomicrobiological data from a 17,000-year-old sample from a bison and a 9000-year-old sample from a human being suggested that M tuberculosis preceded Mycobacterium bovis and related species. Whole-genome comparisons show that members of the M tuberculosis complex form a unique bacterial species with distinct ecotypes that are transmissible from any infected mammalian species to several others. Genomic deletions identified several M tuberculosis lineages that could be placed on a phylogeographical map, suggesting adaptation to local host populations. The degrees of transmissibility and virulence vary between M tuberculosis clones, with increased virulence mainly linked to gene loss in regulatory pathways. Such data suggest that most M tuberculosis clones have a restricted spreading capacity between the host population, allowing unpredictable bursts of highly transmissible, virulent, and successful clones, such as the east Asian (Beijing) clone. Advances in genomics have helped the development of molecular techniques for accurate identification of species and clones in the M tuberculosis complex, which is essential for tracing the source of infections.

  10. Pulmonary Tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis in Captive Siberian Tiger

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Ákos; Niemann, Stefan; Mezősi, László; Sós, Endre; Erdélyi, Károly; Dávid, Sándor; Parsons, Linda M.; Kubica, Tanja; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    We report the first case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis subsp. caprae in a captive Siberian tiger, an endangered feline. The pathogen was isolated from a tracheal aspirate obtained by bronchoscopy. This procedure provided a reliable in vivo diagnostic method in conjunction with conventional and molecular tests for the detection of mycobacteria. PMID:14718093

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection among Asian Elephants in Captivity

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Gary; Zimmerman, Ralph; Shashkina, Elena; Chen, Liang; Richard, Michael; Bradford, Carol M.; Dragoo, Gwen A.; Saiers, Rhonda L.; Peloquin, Charles A.; Daley, Charles L.; Planet, Paul; Narachenia, Apurva; Mathema, Barun

    2017-01-01

    Although awareness of tuberculosis among captive elephants is increasing, antituberculosis therapy for these animals is not standardized. We describe Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission between captive elephants based on whole genome analysis and report a successful combination treatment. Infection control protocols and careful monitoring of treatment of captive elephants with tuberculosis are warranted. PMID:28221115

  12. Mycobacterium marinum Infection After Exposure to Coal Mine Water

    PubMed Central

    Huaman, Moises A.; Ribes, Julie A.; Lohr, Kristine M.; Evans, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum infection has been historically associated with exposure to aquariums, swimming pools, fish, or other marine fauna. We present a case of M marinum left wrist tenosynovitis and elbow bursitis associated with a puncture injury and exposure to coal mine water in Illinois. PMID:26835478

  13. Mycobacterium marinum Infection After Exposure to Coal Mine Water.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Moises A; Ribes, Julie A; Lohr, Kristine M; Evans, Martin E

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum infection has been historically associated with exposure to aquariums, swimming pools, fish, or other marine fauna. We present a case of M marinum left wrist tenosynovitis and elbow bursitis associated with a puncture injury and exposure to coal mine water in Illinois.

  14. Mycobacterium goodii Infections Associated with Surgical Implants at Colorado Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gershman, Ken; Jensen, Bette; Arduino, Matthew J.; Yakrus, Mitchell A.; Cooksey, Robert C.; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2004-01-01

    From February to October 2003, Mycobacterium goodii wound infections were identified among three patients who received surgical implants at a Colorado hospital. This report summarizes the investigation of the first reported nosocomial outbreak of M. goodii. Increased awareness is needed about the potential for nontuberculous mycobacteria to cause postoperative wound infections. PMID:15504281

  15. Mycobacterium chelonae abscesses associated with biomesotherapy, Australia, 2008.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Mihaela; Dancer, Craig; Koehler, Ann P; Hobby, Michaela; Lease, Chris

    2013-01-01

    An outbreak of skin abscesses occurred in Adelaide, Australia, in association with biomesotherapy, an alternative therapy practice. Mycobacterium chelonae was identified in 8 patient and 3 environmental samples. Our findings show M. chelonae infection can be associated with alternative therapies when infection-control breaches occur. Tighter regulations of alternative therapy practices are needed.

  16. The dUTPase Enzyme Is Essential in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Pecsi, Ildiko; Hirmondo, Rita; Brown, Amanda C.; Lopata, Anna; Parish, Tanya; Vertessy, Beata G.; Tóth, Judit

    2012-01-01

    Thymidine biosynthesis is essential in all cells. Inhibitors of the enzymes involved in this pathway (e.g. methotrexate) are thus frequently used as cytostatics. Due to its pivotal role in mycobacterial thymidylate synthesis dUTPase, which hydrolyzes dUTP into the dTTP precursor dUMP, has been suggested as a target for new antitubercular agents. All mycobacterial genomes encode dUTPase with a mycobacteria-specific surface loop absent in the human dUTPase. Using Mycobacterium smegmatis as a fast growing model for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we demonstrate that dUTPase knock-out results in lethality that can be reverted by complementation with wild-type dUTPase. Interestingly, a mutant dUTPase gene lacking the genus-specific loop was unable to complement the knock-out phenotype. We also show that deletion of the mycobacteria-specific loop has no major effect on dUTPase enzymatic properties in vitro and thus a yet to be identified loop-specific function seems to be essential within the bacterial cell context. In addition, here we demonstrated that Mycobacterium tuberculosis dUTPase is fully functional in Mycobacterium smegmatis as it rescues the lethal knock-out phenotype. Our results indicate the potential of dUTPase as a target for antitubercular drugs and identify a genus-specific surface loop on the enzyme as a selective target. PMID:22655049

  17. Identification of Mycobacterium bovis Isolates by a multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Figueiredo, Eduardo Eustáquio; Silvestre, Flávia Galindo; Campos, Wilma Neres; Furlanetto, Leone Vinícius; Medeiros, Luciana; Lilenbaum, Walter; Fonseca, Leila Sousa; Silva, Joab Trajano; Paschoalin, Vânia Margaret Flosi

    2009-01-01

    Isolates from suggestive bovine tuberculosis lesions were tested by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) targeting for RvD1Rv2031c and IS6110 sequences, specific for M. bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex respectively. The m-PCR successfully identified as M. bovis 88.24% of the isolates. PMID:24031349

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Wild Asian Elephants, Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Arun; Pandiyan, Jeganathan; Madhavilatha, G.K.; Mundayoor, Sathish; Chandramohan, Bathrachalam; Sajesh, P.K.; Santhosh, Sam

    2017-01-01

    We tested 3 ild Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in southern India and confirmed infection in 3 animals with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an obligate human pathogen, by PCR and genetic sequencing. Our results indicate that tuberculosis may be spilling over from humans (reverse zoonosis) and emerging in wild elephants. PMID:28221104

  19. Deep brain stimulator infection by a novel rapid growing mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Donna C; Harrington, Amanda T; Slavin, Konstantin; Gomez, Christy; Jarrett, Olamide D

    2017-09-20

    Devise-related infections after deep brain stimulator implantation are not uncommon. However, infections due to mycobacteria have not been reported in the medical literature. We describe the first reported case of DBS infection due to a novel rapidly growing mycobacteria, most closely resembling Mycobacterium goodii, by rpoB gene sequencing.

  20. A strip array for spoligotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yiling; Zeng, Xiaohong; Li, Hui; Zheng, Rongrong; Xu, Ye; Li, Qingge

    2016-03-01

    A novel strip array was developed for a nine-spacer spoligotyping scheme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). The new method was evaluated using 211 MTBC isolates and the results were fully concordant with the traditional spoligotyping approach. The strip array proved to be rapid and convenient for spoligotyping of MTBC.

  1. Mycobacterium lepromatosis Infections in Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia S.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Avanzi, Charlotte; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of infection caused by the recently described pathogen Mycobacterium lepromatosis is unknown. Here, we describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic outcomes of five lepromatous leprosy patients suffering from M. lepromatosis infection in Nuevo Léon, Mexico. Diagnosis was facilitated by a new highly specific PCR procedure. PMID:25809978

  2. High resolution melting analysis for the differentiation of Mycobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Issa, Rahizan; Abdul, Hatijah; Hashim, Siti Hasmah; Seradja, Valentinus H; Shaili, Nurul 'Aishah; Hassan, Nurul Akma Mohd

    2014-10-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) followed by high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed for the differentiation of Mycobacterium species. Rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium species is necessary for the effective diagnosis and management of tuberculosis. In this study, the 16S rRNA gene was tested as the target since this has been identified as a suitable target for the identification of mycobacteria species. During the temperature gradient and primer optimization process, the melting peak (Tm) analysis was determined at a concentration of 50 ng DNA template and 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 µM primer. The qPCR assay for the detection of other mycobacterial species was done at the Tm and primer concentration of 62 °C and 0.4 µM, respectively. The HRM analysis generated cluster patterns that were specific and sensitive to distinguished small sequence differences of the Mycobacterium species. This study suggests that the 16S rRNA-based real-time PCR followed by HRM analysis produced unique cluster patterns for species of Mycobacterium and could differentiate the closely related mycobacteria species. © 2014 The Authors.

  3. [Cutaneous atypical mycobacteriosis due to Mycobacterium massiliense in a cat].

    PubMed

    Albini, S; Mueller, S; Bornand, V; Gutzwiller, M E Ricklin; Burnand, C; Hüssy, D; Abril, C; Reitt, K; Korczak, B M; Miserez, R

    2007-12-01

    Fast growing mycobacteria are saprophytic bacteria that prevail in water and soil. They are opportunistic pathogens and may cause various infections if gaining entry into the body through a trauma. We herein describe the clinical presentation, pathology and diagnosis of the first case of cutaneous atypical mycobacteriosis due to Mycobacterium massiliense in a cat.

  4. [A case of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteriosis caused by Mycobacterium branderi].

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Masami; Takahashi, Ryuji

    2014-06-01

    The patient was a 56-year-old man, who was found to have a cavitary lesion surrounded by small nodules in the left upper lobe (S(1+2)) on the chest computed tomography (CT) scan prior to surgery for oropharyngeal cancer. Both sputum and bronchial lavage smears for acid-fast bacilli were positive, but a polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex failed to identify the isolates. Mycobacterium species were cultured in 4 weeks. Mycobacterium branderi was identified by determining the nucleic acid sequences of the 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) and RNA polymerase B (rpoB) genes. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy for esophageal cancer were started 5 months after the surgery for oropharyngeal cancer. The patient developed fever during the second round of chemotherapy. After chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the wall of the cavitary lesion thickened and a consolidation shadow was noted in the lower portion of the cavitary lesion on the chest CT scan. Combined therapy with clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and ethionamide improved the clinical symptoms; further, the abnormal chest shadows disappeared, and the sputum smears and cultures for acid-fast bacilli were negative. Although, currently, there are no recommended therapeutic regimens for pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteriosis caused by M. branderi, combined therapy including the drugs used in this case may have a beneficial effect on this disease.

  5. Occurrence of Mycobacterium spp. in ornamental fish in Italy.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, R G; Florio, D; Fioravanti, M L; Rossi, M; Prearo, M

    2008-06-01

    The occurrence of Mycobacterium spp. in freshwater and marine ornamental fish was studied in Italy from June 2002 to May 2005. Two surveys were carried out, one of aquarium fish sent to the Laboratory for diagnosis, and the other of prevalence of infection by mycobacteria in ornamental fish imported into Italy. Bacterial isolation was carried out from the spleen, kidney and liver, and the isolates were subsequently identified by biochemical tests. In the first survey, 387 fish were examined and Mycobacterium spp. were isolated from 181 (46.8%) fish. In the second survey 127 batches of ornamental fish from different countries were examined. Mycobacterium spp. were isolated from 38 (29.9%) batches. The following species were found: M. fortuitum, M. peregrinum, M. chelonae, M. abscessus, M. marinum, M. gordonae, M. nonchromogenicum and M. interjectum. There was a high prevalence of infection independent of the presence of macroscopic lesions. Mycobacterium fortuitum and M. chelonae were more prevalent than M. marinum in the samples examined.

  6. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents...

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Wild Asian Elephants, Southern India.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, Arun; Pandiyan, Jeganathan; Madhavilatha, G K; Mundayoor, Sathish; Chandramohan, Bathrachalam; Sajesh, P K; Santhosh, Sam; Mikota, Susan K

    2017-03-01

    We tested 3 ild Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in southern India and confirmed infection in 3 animals with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an obligate human pathogen, by PCR and genetic sequencing. Our results indicate that tuberculosis may be spilling over from humans (reverse zoonosis) and emerging in wild elephants.

  9. [A case of pulmonary multiresistant Mycobacterium bovis tuberculosis in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Ramarokoto, H; Andrianasolo, D; Rasolonavalona, T; Ramaroson, F; Razafitsiarovana, I; Vincent, V; Ratsimba, L; Rasolofo Razanamparany, V

    2003-01-01

    We report a chronic case of pulmonary tuberculosis in a Malagasy citizen from Antsohihy (West of Madagascar), who was infected with a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium bovis strain. This is the first case reported of the isolation of such a strain in Madagascar.

  10. Sensitivity of Mycobacterium bovis to common beef processing interventions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction. Cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis and a relevant zoonosis to humans, may be sent to slaughter before diagnosis of infection because of slow multiplication of the pathogen. Purpose. This study evaluates multiple processing interventi...

  11. Sensitivity of Mycobacterium bovis to common beef processing interventions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective. Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, a relevant zoonosis that can spread to humans through inhalation or by ingestion. M. bovis multiplies slowly, so infected animals may be sent to slaughter during the early stages of the disease before diagnosis and when ...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium acapulcensis Strain CSURP1424

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, Shady; Rascovan, Nicolás; Robert, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium acapulcensis is a rapidly growing scotochromogenic acid-fast bacillus. The draft genome of M. acapulcensis CSURP1424 comprises 5,290,974 bp, exhibiting a 66.67% G+C content, 4,870 protein-coding genes, and 71 predicted RNA genes. PMID:27516522

  13. [Mycobacterium fortuitum: two patients and the same surgeon].

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Joaquín; Pascale, María Laura; Borda, Noemí; Notario, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    We describe two cases of surgical site infections due to Mycobacterium fortuitum after plastic surgery. Both patients were assisted by the same surgeon on differents hospitals. Both patients received combined antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement or multiple aspirative punctures. The final evolutions were satisfactory.

  14. Absence of Mycobacterium intracellulare and presence of Mycobacterium chimaera in household water and biofilm samples of patients in the United States with Mycobacterium avium complex respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Richard J; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Williams, Myra D; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Lande, Leah; Peterson, Donald D; Sawicki, Janet; Kwait, Rebecca; Tichenor, Wellington S; Turenne, Christine; Falkinham, Joseph O

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that respiratory isolates from pulmonary disease patients and household water/biofilm isolates of Mycobacterium avium could be matched by DNA fingerprinting. To determine if this is true for Mycobacterium intracellulare, household water sources for 36 patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease were evaluated. MAC household water isolates from three published studies that included 37 additional MAC respiratory disease patients were also evaluated. Species identification was done initially using nonsequencing methods with confirmation by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. M. intracellulare was identified by nonsequencing methods in 54 respiratory cultures and 41 household water/biofilm samples. By ITS sequencing, 49 (90.7%) respiratory isolates were M. intracellulare and 4 (7.4%) were Mycobacterium chimaera. In contrast, 30 (73%) household water samples were M. chimaera, 8 (20%) were other MAC X species (i.e., isolates positive with a MAC probe but negative with species-specific M. avium and M. intracellulare probes), and 3 (7%) were M. avium; none were M. intracellulare. In comparison, M. avium was recovered from 141 water/biofilm samples. These results indicate that M. intracellulare lung disease in the United States is acquired from environmental sources other than household water. Nonsequencing methods for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (including those of the MAC) might fail to distinguish closely related species (such as M. intracellulare and M. chimaera). This is the first report of M. chimaera recovery from household water. The study underscores the importance of taxonomy and distinguishing the many species and subspecies of the MAC.

  15. Absence of Mycobacterium intracellulare and Presence of Mycobacterium chimaera in Household Water and Biofilm Samples of Patients in the United States with Mycobacterium avium Complex Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Iakhiaeva, Elena; Williams, Myra D.; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Lande, Leah; Peterson, Donald D.; Sawicki, Janet; Kwait, Rebecca; Tichenor, Wellington S.; Turenne, Christine; Falkinham, Joseph O.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that respiratory isolates from pulmonary disease patients and household water/biofilm isolates of Mycobacterium avium could be matched by DNA fingerprinting. To determine if this is true for Mycobacterium intracellulare, household water sources for 36 patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease were evaluated. MAC household water isolates from three published studies that included 37 additional MAC respiratory disease patients were also evaluated. Species identification was done initially using nonsequencing methods with confirmation by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. M. intracellulare was identified by nonsequencing methods in 54 respiratory cultures and 41 household water/biofilm samples. By ITS sequencing, 49 (90.7%) respiratory isolates were M. intracellulare and 4 (7.4%) were Mycobacterium chimaera. In contrast, 30 (73%) household water samples were M. chimaera, 8 (20%) were other MAC X species (i.e., isolates positive with a MAC probe but negative with species-specific M. avium and M. intracellulare probes), and 3 (7%) were M. avium; none were M. intracellulare. In comparison, M. avium was recovered from 141 water/biofilm samples. These results indicate that M. intracellulare lung disease in the United States is acquired from environmental sources other than household water. Nonsequencing methods for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (including those of the MAC) might fail to distinguish closely related species (such as M. intracellulare and M. chimaera). This is the first report of M. chimaera recovery from household water. The study underscores the importance of taxonomy and distinguishing the many species and subspecies of the MAC. PMID:23536397

  16. Detection of Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium abscessus Group, and Mycobacterium fortuitum Complex by a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Directly from Clinical Samples Using the BD MAX System.

    PubMed

    Rocchetti, Talita T; Silbert, Suzane; Gostnell, Alicia; Kubasek, Carly; Campos Pignatari, Antonio C; Widen, Raymond

    2017-03-01

    A new multiplex PCR test was designed to detect Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium abscessus group, and Mycobacterium fortuitum complex on the BD MAX System. A total of 197 clinical samples previously submitted for mycobacterial culture were tested using the new protocol. Samples were first treated with proteinase K, and then each sample was inoculated into the BD MAX Sample Buffer Tube. Extraction and multiplex PCR were performed by the BD MAX System, using the BD MAX ExK TNA-3 extraction kit and BD TNA Master Mix, along with specific in-house designed primers and probes for each target. The limit of detection of each target, as well as specificity, was evaluated. Of 197 clinical samples included in this study, 133 were positive and 60 were negative for mycobacteria by culture, and another 4 negative samples were spiked with M. chelonae ATCC 35752. The new multiplex PCR on the BD MAX had 97% concordant results with culture for M. abscessus group detection, 99% for M. chelonae, and 100% for M. fortuitum complex. The new multiplex PCR test performed on the BD MAX System proved to be a sensitive and specific test to detect M. chelonae, M. abscessus group, and M. fortuitum complex by real-time PCR on an automated sample-in results-out platform. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluorescent acid-fast microscopy for measuring phagocytosis of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum by Tetrahymena pyriformis and their intracellular growth.

    PubMed

    Strahl, E D; Gillaspy, G E; Falkinham, J O

    2001-10-01

    Fluorescent acid-fast microscopy (FAM) was used to enumerate intracellular Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum in the ciliated phagocytic protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis. There was a linear relationship between FAM and colony counts of M. avium cells both from cultures and within protozoa. The Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast stain could not be used to enumerate intracellular mycobacteria because uninfected protozoa contained acid-fast, bacterium-like particles. Starved, 7-day-old cultures of T. pyriformis transferred into fresh medium readily phagocytized M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum. Phagocytosis was rapid and reached a maximum in 30 min. M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum grew within T. pyriformis, increasing by factors of 4- to 40-fold after 5 days at 30 degrees C. Intracellular M. avium numbers remained constant over a 25-day period of growth (by transfer) of T. pyriformis. Intracellular M. avium cells also survived protozoan encystment and germination. The growth and viability of T. pyriformis were not affected by mycobacterial infection. The results suggest that free-living phagocytic protozoa may be natural hosts and reservoirs for M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum.

  18. A new evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, R.; Gordon, S. V.; Marmiesse, M.; Brodin, P.; Buchrieser, C.; Eiglmeier, K.; Garnier, T.; Gutierrez, C.; Hewinson, G.; Kremer, K.; Parsons, L. M.; Pym, A. S.; Samper, S.; van Soolingen, D.; Cole, S. T.

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of 20 variable regions resulting from insertion-deletion events in the genomes of the tubercle bacilli has been evaluated in a total of 100 strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium africanum, Mycobacterium canettii, Mycobacterium microti, and Mycobacterium bovis. This approach showed that the majority of these polymorphisms did not occur independently in the different strains of the M. tuberculosis complex but, rather, resulted from ancient, irreversible genetic events in common progenitor strains. Based on the presence or absence of an M. tuberculosis specific deletion (TbD1), M. tuberculosis strains can be divided into ancestral and “modern” strains, the latter comprising representatives of major epidemics like the Beijing, Haarlem, and African M. tuberculosis clusters. Furthermore, successive loss of DNA, reflected by region of difference 9 and other subsequent deletions, was identified for an evolutionary lineage represented by M. africanum, M. microti, and M. bovis that diverged from the progenitor of the present M. tuberculosis strains before TbD1 occurred. These findings contradict the often-presented hypothesis that M. tuberculosis, the etiological agent of human tuberculosis evolved from M. bovis, the agent of bovine disease. M. canettii and ancestral M. tuberculosis strains lack none of these deleted regions, and, therefore, seem to be direct descendants of tubercle bacilli that existed before the M. africanum→M. bovis lineage separated from the M. tuberculosis lineage. This observation suggests that the common ancestor of the tubercle bacilli resembled M. tuberculosis or M. canettii and could well have been a human pathogen already. PMID:11891304

  19. How does a Mycobacterium change its spots? Applying molecular tools to track diverse strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Defining genetic diversity in the wake of the release of several Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) genome sequences has become a major emphasis in the molecular biology and epidemiology of Johne’s disease research. These data can now be used to define the extent of strain diversity ...

  20. In silico interaction of methyl isocyanate with immune protein responsible for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection using molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Rahul; Yasir, Mohammad; Tripathi, Manish; Singh, Pushpendra

    2016-01-01

    This article reports in silico analysis of methyl isocyanate (MIC) on different key immune proteins against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The analysis shows that MIC is released in the Bhopal gas tragedy in 1984, which is highly toxic and extremely hazardous to human health. In this study, we have selected immune proteins to perform molecular docking with the help of Autodock 4.0. Results show that the CD40 ligand and alpha5beta1 integrin have higher inhibition compared to plasminogen activator urokinase, human glutathione synthetase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38 MAPK 14), surfactant protein-B, -D (SP-D), and pulmonary SP-D. MIC interacted with His-125, Try-146 residue of CD40 ligand and Ala-149, and Arg-152 residue of alpha5beta1 integrin and affects the proteins functioning by binding on their active sites. These inhibitory conformations were energetically and statistically favored and supported the evidence from wet laboratory experiments reported in the literature. We can conclude that MIC directly or indirectly affects these proteins, which shows that survivals of the disaster suffer from the diseases like tuberculosis infection and lung cancer.

  1. Polymorphisms of SP110 Are Associated with both Pulmonary and Extra-Pulmonary Tuberculosis among the Vietnamese

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Gregory J.; Sy, Dinh Ngoc; Nhung, Nguyen Viet; Yu, Bing; Ellis, Magda K.; Van Hung, Nguyen; Cuong, Nguyen Kim; Thi Lien, Luu; Marks, Guy B.; Saunders, Bernadette M.; Britton, Warwick J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet the reasons why only 10% of people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis go on to develop clinical disease are poorly understood. Genetically determined variation in the host immune response is one factor influencing the response to M. tuberculosis. SP110 is an interferon-responsive nuclear body protein with critical roles in cell cycling, apoptosis and immunity to infection. However association studies of the gene with clinical TB in different populations have produced conflicting results. Methods To examine the importance of the SP110 gene in immunity to TB in the Vietnamese we conducted a case-control genetic association study of 24 SP110 variants, in 663 patients with microbiologically proven TB and 566 unaffected control subjects from three tertiary hospitals in northern Vietnam. Results Five SNPs within SP110 were associated with all forms of TB, including four SNPs at the C terminus (rs10208770, rs10498244, rs16826860, rs11678451) under a dominant model and one SNP under a recessive model, rs7601176. Two of these SNPs were associated with pulmonary TB (rs10208770 and rs16826860) and one with extra-pulmonary TB (rs10498244). Conclusion SP110 variants were associated with increased susceptibility to both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB in the Vietnamese. Genetic variants in SP110 may influence macrophage signaling responses and apoptosis during M. tuberculosis infection, however further research is required to establish the mechanism by which SP110 influences immunity to tuberculosis infection. PMID:25006821

  2. Thermostabilization of desulfurization enzymes from Rhodococcos sp. IGTS8. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    John J. Kilbane II

    2000-12-15

    The objective of this project was to develop thermophilic cultures capable of expressing the desulfurization (dsz) operon of Rhodococcus sp. IGTS8. The approaches taken in this project included the development of plasmid and integrative expression vectors that function well in Thermus thermophilus, the cloning of Rhodococcus dsz genes in Thermus expression vectors, and the isolation of bacterial cultures that express the dsz operon at thermophilic temperatures. This project has resulted in the development of plasmid and integrative expression vectors for use in T. thermophilus. The dsz genes have been expressed at moderately thermophilic temperatures (52 C) in Mycobacterium phlei and at temperatures as high as 72 C in T. thermophilus. The tools and methods developed in this project will be generally useful for the expression of heterologous genes in Thermus. Key developments in the project have been the isolation of a Mycobacterium phlei culture capable of expressing the desulfurization operon at 52 C, development of plasmid and integrative expression vectors for Thermus thermophilus, and the development of a host-vector system based on the malate dehydrogenase gene that allows plasmids to be stably maintained in T. thermophilus and provides a convenient reporter gene for the accurate quantification of gene expression. Publications have been prepared regarding each of these topics; these preprints are included.

  3. Anti-mycobacterial alkaloids, cyclic 3-alkyl pyridinium dimers, from the Indonesian marine sponge Haliclona sp.

    PubMed

    Maarisit, Wilmar; Abdjul, Delfly B; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hajime; Rotinsulu, Henki; Wewengkang, Defny S; Sumilat, Deiske A; Kapojos, Magie M; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2017-08-01

    Three new dimeric 3-alkyl pyridinium alkaloids, named haliclocyclamines A-C (1-3), were isolated together with five known congeners, cyclostellettamines A (4), B (5), C (6), E (7), and F (8), from the Indonesian marine sponge Haliclona sp. The structures of 1-3 were assigned based on their spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR, HRFABMS, ESIMS/MS, UV, and IR). Compounds 1-8 exhibited antimicrobial activities against Mycobacterium smegmatis with inhibition zones of 17, 10, 13, 14, 8, 8, 12, and 12mm, respectively, at 10μg/disc. Compounds 3 and 8 also modestly inhibited the activity of vaccinia H-1-related phosphatase (VHR), a dual-specificity phosphatase, at 17-18μM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Structure and activity of lobophorins from a turrid mollusk-associated Streptomyces sp.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhenjian; Koch, Michael; Pond, Christopher D; Mabeza, Gaiselle; Seronay, Romell A; Concepcion, Gisela P; Barrows, Louis R; Olivera, Baldomero M; Schmidt, Eric W

    2014-01-01

    A novel lumun-lumun sampling methodology was used to obtain a large diversity of micromollusks, including the new species Lienardia totopotens. In turn, from L. totopotens we cultivated a Streptomyces sp. strain that contained new and known spirotetronate polyketides, lobophorins (1-5). The structures were elucidated using spectroscopy, and the compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity to human cells and activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia. Compounds 2-5 showed varying degrees of activity against human cells, M. tuberculosis and B. subtilis in the low μM to mid nM range but were inactive against the other strains, while 1 lacking digitoxose was inactive. Very slight structural changes in 2-5 led to varying antibacterial:cytotoxicity ratios, providing a possible basis to synthesize more selective derivatives.

  5. Lobophorins with antimycobacterial activity from a turrid mollusk-associated Streptomyces sp

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhenjian; Koch, Michael; Pond, Christopher D.; Mabeza, Gaiselle; Seronay, Romell A.; Concepcion, Gisela P.; Barrows, Louis R.; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    A novel lumun-lumun sampling methodology was used to obtain a large diversity of micromollusks, including the new species Lienardia totopotens. In turn, from L. totopotens we cultivated a Streptomyces sp. strain that contained new and known spirotetronate polyketides, lobophorins (1–5). The structures were elucidated using spectroscopy, and the compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity to human cells and activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A structure-activity relationship was discerned, wherein the lack of digitoxose in 1 led to lack of both cytotoxic and antibacterial activity. For compounds 2–5 both activities were in the low μM to mid nM range. Although this likely precludes their direct application in tuberculosis therapy due to possible poor therapeutic index, very slight changes in structure led to widely varying antibacterial:cytotoxicity ratios, providing a possible basis to synthesize more selective derivatives. PMID:24220110

  6. Aranciamycins I and J, Antimycobacterial Anthracyclines from an Australian Marine-Derived Streptomyces sp.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Zeinab G; Raju, Ritesh; Piggott, Andrew M; Salim, Angela A; Blumenthal, Antje; Capon, Robert J

    2015-04-24

    Chemical analysis of an Australian marine-derived Streptomyces sp. (CMB-M0150) yielded two new anthracycline antibiotics, aranciamycins I (1) and J (2), as well as the previously reported aranciamycin A (3) and aranciamycin (4). The aranciamycins 1-4, identified by detailed spectroscopic analysis, were noncytotoxic when tested against selected Gram-negative bacteria and fungi (IC50 >30 μM) and exhibited moderate and selective cytotoxicity against Gram-positive bacteria (IC50 >1.1 μM) and a panel of human cancer cell lines (IC50 > 7.5 μM). Significantly, 1-4 were cytotoxic (IC50 0.7-1.7 μM) against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis surrogate M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin.

  7. [Drug sensitivity analysis of Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium abscessus and evaluation of Etest for susceptibility testing].

    PubMed

    Gui, Jing; Wang, Feng; Hong, Chuang-yue; Li, Jin-li; Liang, Jing

    2013-08-01

    To study the drug resistance profile of Mycobacterium(M.) chelonae and M.abscessus and to evaluate the clinical application of Etest(epsilometer test) for susceptibility testing. Twenty clinical isolates of M.abscessus and 16 clinical isolates of M.chelonae from clinical specimens were collected.Strain identification was carried out by GenoType Mycobacterium CM assay(Hain Lifescience, Germany). The accuracy was evaluated by comparing Etest results to those obtained by broth microdilution. Thirty-six isolates were tested against amikacin, cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, imipenem, linezolid, sulfamethoxazole and tobramycin. The agreement among MICs and interpretive category was evaluated. Chi-squared test was used to compare observed frequency of each of the 2 examples. All of the isolates(36/36) were sensitive to amikacin and cefoxitin, and only 1 isolate(1/36) was resistant to clarithromycin, but more isolates(29/36) were resistant to ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, imipenem and sulfamethoxazole.For M.chelonae, only 2/16 were resistant to linezolid, and 7/16 resistant to tobramycin.For M.abscessus, more than 12/20 were resistant to linezolid and 16/20 resistant to tobramycin. The agreement between broth microdilution MICs and Etest MICs for 9 drugs was 149/324.With amikacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline and imipenem, the agreement for interpretive category was excellent(35/36), followed by sulfamethoxazole(34/36), which corresponded to rarely very major error of 2/36.With ciprofloxacin and tobramycin, agreement for interpretive category was 31/36 and 26/36.With cefoxitin and linezolid, the agreement of Etest MICs was the lowest(14/36), resulting in the resistant category. Isolates of M.chelonae and M.abscessus exhibit far more susceptibility to amikacin, cefoxitin and clarithromycin than any other antimicrobial agents.Linezolid and tobramycin showed sensitivity to some isolates of M.chelonae.It is suitable for the Etest method as a simple reliable

  8. Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov., isolated from the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Alsterfjord, Magnus; Nilson, Bo; Butler, Èile; Vásquez, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    We previously discovered a symbiotic lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota in the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera. The microbiota was composed of several phylotypes of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and phenotypic and genetic characteristics revealed that the phylotypes isolated represent seven novel species. One grouped with Lactobacillus kunkeei and the others belong to the Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus delbrueckiisubgroups of Lactobacillus. We propose the names Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov. for these novel species, with the respective type strains being Fhon13NT ( = DSM 26257T = CCUG 63287T), Bin4NT ( = DSM 26254T = CCUG 63291T), Hon2NT ( = DSM 26255T = CCUG 63289T), Hma8NT ( = DSM 26256T = CCUG 63629T), Hma2NT ( = DSM 26263T = CCUG 63633T), Bma5NT ( = DSM 26265T = CCUG 63301T) and Biut2NT ( = DSM 26262T = CCUG 63631T). PMID:24944337

  9. The role of Sp1 and Sp3 in the constitutive DPYD gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Li, Lin; Fourie, Jeanne; Davie, James R; Guarcello, Vincenzo; Diasio, Robert B

    2006-05-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) catabolic pathway, has been implicated as one of the factors determining the efficacy and toxicity of the anticancer agent 5-FU. Studies have attributed variation in DPD activity partially to alterations at the transcriptional level of DPYD gene. We investigated the transcription factors implicated in the constitutive expression of DPYD by utilizing a 174-bp fragment of the DPYD promoter region in which three consensus Sp protein binding sites (SpA, SpB and SpC) were predicted. The binding of Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors to this region was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. By ectopically expressing human Sp1 and Sp3 in Sp-deficient Drosophila S2 cells, we demonstrated that Sp1 is a strong activator, while Sp3 by its own is a weak activator of the DPYD promoter. Moreover, Sp3 may serve as a competitor of Sp1, thus decreasing the Sp1 induced promoter activity. SpA, SpB and SpC sites are all Sp1 inducible. In the full activation of the DPYD promoter in human cell lines, the SpB site is essential; the SpC site works cooperatively with SpB, while SpA has minor promoter activity. These studies provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the heterogeneity of DPD activity, and may facilitate the efficacy and safety of 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

  10. Pantoea vagans sp. nov., Pantoea eucalypti sp. nov., Pantoea deleyi sp. nov. and Pantoea anthophila sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Brady, Carrie L; Venter, Stephanus N; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Engelbeen, Katrien; Vancanneyt, Marc; Swings, Jean; Coutinho, Teresa A

    2009-09-01

    Bacteria isolated from eucalyptus leaves and shoots showing symptoms of blight and die-back collected in Uganda, Uruguay and Argentina and from maize displaying brown stalk rot symptoms in South Africa were tentatively placed in the genus Pantoea on the basis of phenotypic and biochemical tests. These isolates, together with two strains (LMG 2558 and LMG 2560) previously assigned to Pantoea agglomerans based on protein electrophoregrams but later excluded from this species, were further investigated using molecular techniques. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and multilocus sequence analyses (MLSA) revealed that the strains were phylogenetically closely related to Pantoea agglomerans, Pantoea stewartii and Pantoea ananatis. MLSA and amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis placed the strains into four separate clusters, not containing any of the type strains of species of the genus Pantoea. DNA-DNA hybridization confirmed the classification of the isolates into four novel species, for which the names Pantoea vagans sp. nov. (type strain R-21566T=LMG 24199T=BCC 105T=BD 765T), Pantoea eucalypti sp. nov. (type strain R-25678T=LMG 24197T=BCC 076T=BD 769T), Pantoea deleyi sp. nov. (type strain R-31523T=LMG 24200T=BCC 109T=BD 767T) and Pantoea anthophila sp. nov. (type strain LMG 2558T=BD 871T=NCPPB 1682T) are proposed.

  11. Argonne's SpEC Module

    ScienceCinema

    Harper, Jason

    2016-07-12

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  12. SP-100 control system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, R. A.; Halfen, F. J.; Alley, A. D.

    1987-01-01

    SP-100 Control Systems modeling was done using a thermal hydraulic transient analysis model called ARIES-S. The ARIES-S Computer Simulation provides a basis for design, integration and analysis of the reactor including the control and protection systems. It is a modular digital computer simulation written in FORTRAN that operates interactively in real time on a VAX minicomputer.

  13. Argonne's SpEC Module

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Jason

    2014-05-05

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  14. Tuberculous Granuloma Formation Is Enhanced by a Mycobacterium Virulence Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jennifer C. W; Sherman, David R

    2004-01-01

    Granulomas are organized host immune structures composed of tightly interposed macrophages and other cells that form in response to a variety of persistent stimuli, both infectious and noninfectious. The tuberculous granuloma is essential for host containment of mycobacterial infection, although it does not always eradicate it. Therefore, it is considered a host-beneficial, if incompletely efficacious, immune response. The Mycobacterium RD1 locus encodes a specialized secretion system that promotes mycobacterial virulence by an unknown mechanism. Using transparent zebrafish embryos to monitor the infection process in real time, we found that RD1-deficient bacteria fail to elicit efficient granuloma formation despite their ability to grow inside of infected macrophages. We showed that macrophages infected with virulent mycobacteria produce an RD1-dependent signal that directs macrophages to aggregate into granulomas. This Mycobacterium-induced macrophage aggregation in turn is tightly linked to intercellular bacterial dissemination and increased bacterial numbers. Thus, mycobacteria co-opt host granulomas for their virulence. PMID:15510227

  15. Analysis of Mycobacterium leprae gene expression using DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Akama, Takeshi; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Kawashima, Akira; Wu, Huhehasi; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, does not grow under in vitro condition, making molecular analysis of this bacterium difficult. For this reason, bacteriological information regarding M. leprae gene function is limited compared with other mycobacterium species. In this study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to clarify the RNA expression profile of the Thai53 strain of M. leprae grown in footpads of hypertensive nude rats (SHR/NCrj-rnu). Of 1605 M. leprae genes, 315 showed signal intensity twofold higher than the median. These genes include Acyl-CoA metabolic enzymes and drug metabolic enzymes, which might be related to the virulence of M. leprae. In addition, consecutive RNA expression profile and in silico analyses enabled identification of possible operons within the M. leprae genome. The present results will shed light on M. leprae gene function and further our understanding of the pathogenesis of leprosy.

  16. The methyl-branched fortifications of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Minnikin, David E; Kremer, Laurent; Dover, Lynn G; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2002-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to be the predominant global infectious agent, annually killing over three million people. Recommended drug regimens have the potential to control tuberculosis, but lack of adherence to such regimens has resulted in the emergence of resistant strains. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has an unusual cell envelope, rich in unique long-chain lipids, that provides a very hydrophobic barrier to antibiotic access. Such lipids, however, can be drug targets, as exemplified by the action of the front-line drug isoniazid on mycolic acid biosynthesis. A number of these lipids are potential key virulence factors and their structures are based on very characteristic methyl-branched long-chain acids and alcohols. This review details the history, structure, and genetic aspects of the biosynthesis of these methyl-branched components, good examples of which are the phthiocerols and the mycocerosic and mycolipenic acids.

  17. Adhesion of Mycobacterium smegmatis to Charged Surfaces and Diagnostics Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorse, Diane; Dhinojwala, Ali; Moore, Francisco

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) causes more than 1 million deaths annually. Smear microscopy is a primary rapid detection tool in areas where 95 % of PTB cases occur. This technique, in which the sputum of a symptomatic patient is stained and examined using a light microscope for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) shows sensitivity between 20 and 60 %. Insufficient bacterial isolation during sample preparation may be a reason for low sensitivity. We are optimizing a system to capture bacteria on the basis of electrostatic interactions to more thoroughly isolate bacteria from suspension and facilitate more accurate detection. Silica supports coated with positively-charged polyelectrolyte, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), captured approximately 4.1 times more Mycobacterium smegmatis, a model organism for MTB, than was captured on negatively-charged silica substrates. Future experimentation will employ branched polymer systems and seek to justify the use of colloidal stability theories to describe initial capture. Supported by University of Akron, Department of Polymer Science, Department of Biology; LORD Corporation.

  18. Reconstitution of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis pupylation pathway in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cerda-Maira, Francisca A; McAllister, Fiona; Bode, Nadine J; Burns, Kristin E; Gygi, Steven P; Darwin, K Heran

    2011-01-01

    Prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) is a post-translational modifier that attaches to more than 50 proteins in Mycobacteria. Proteasome accessory factor A (PafA) is responsible for Pup conjugation to substrates, but the manner in which proteins are selected for pupylation is unknown. To address this issue, we reconstituted the pupylation of model Mycobacterium proteasome substrates in Escherichia coli, which does not encode Pup or PafA. Surprisingly, Pup and PafA were sufficient to pupylate at least 51 E. coli proteins in addition to the mycobacterial proteins. These data suggest that pupylation signals are intrinsic to targeted proteins and might not require Mycobacterium-specific cofactors for substrate recognition by PafA in vivo. PMID:21738222

  19. Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium bovis in a Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Mol, J P S; Carvalho, T F; Fonseca, A A; Sales, E B; Issa, M A; Rezende, L C; Hodon, M A; Tinoco, H P; Malta, M C C; Pessanha, A T; Pierezan, F; Mota, P M P C; Paixão, T A; Santos, R L

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis, associated with Mycobacterium bovis, was diagnosed post mortem in an adult female capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), kept at the Pampulha Ecological Park, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in a large metropolitan area. On post-mortem examination, there were numerous firm white nodules scattered throughout all lobes of both lungs. Tissue samples were collected for histological and microbiological examination. Microscopically, the pulmonary nodules were multifocal to coalescing granulomas and intralesional acid-fast bacilli were evident in Ziehl-Neelsen-stained sections of the lung and spleen. Colonies with morphological features of Mycobacterium spp. were isolated from lung samples and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with genomic DNA from the isolates was positive for M. bovis; sequencing indicated 100% identity with the region of difference 4 (RD4) of M. bovis. In addition, M. bovis DNA was detected in the lung by quantitative PCR. The finding of M. bovis in a capybara indicates a potential public health risk in a zoological collection.

  20. Biochemical and structural investigations on phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Donini, Stefano; Garavaglia, Silvia; Ferraris, Davide M.; Miggiano, Riccardo; Mori, Shigetarou; Shibayama, Keigo

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis represents one model for studying the biology of its pathogenic relative Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structural characterization of a M. tuberculosis ortholog protein can serve as a valid tool for the development of molecules active against the M. tuberculosis target. In this context, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of M. smegmatis phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (PrsA), the ortholog of M. tuberculosis PrsA, the unique enzyme responsible for the synthesis of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). PRPP is a key metabolite involved in several biosynthetic pathways including those for histidine, tryptophan, nucleotides and decaprenylphosphoryl-arabinose, an essential precursor for the mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Since M. tuberculosis PrsA has been validated as a drug target for the development of antitubercular agents, the data presented here will add to the knowledge of the mycobacterial enzyme and could contribute to the development of M. tuberculosis PrsA inhibitors of potential pharmacological interest. PMID:28419153

  1. Structural definition of arabinomannans from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Nigou, J; Gilleron, M; Brando, T; Vercellone, A; Puzo, G

    1999-06-01

    The structures of the hydrophilic parietal and cellular arabinomannans isolated from Mycobacterium bovis BCG cell wall [Nigou et al. (1997) J Biol Chem 272: 23094-103] were investigated. Their molecular mass as determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was around 16 kDa. Concerning cap structure, capillary electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that dimannoside (Manpalpha1-->2Manp) was the most abundant motif (65-75%). Using two-dimensional 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy, the mannan core was unambiguously demonstrated to be composed of -->6Manpalpha1--> backbone substituted at some O-2 by a single Manp unit. The branching degree was determined as 84%. Finally, arabinomannans were found to be devoid of the phosphatidyl-myo-inositol anchor and, by aminonaphthalene disulfonate tagging, the mannan core was shown to contain a reducing end. This constitutes the main difference between arabinomannans and lipoarabinomannans from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

  2. Mycobacterium marinum: ubiquitous agent of waterborne granulomatous skin infections.

    PubMed

    Petrini, B

    2006-10-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is a waterborne mycobacterium that commonly infects fish and amphibians worldwide. Infection in humans occurs occasionally, in most cases as a granulomatous infection localized in the skin, typically following minor trauma on the hands. For this reason, infection is especially common among aquarium keepers. Such local infection may-though infrequently-spread to tendon sheaths or joints. Disseminated disease, which is rare, can occur in immunosuppressed patients. In order to obtain a definitive diagnosis, culture and histopathological examination of biopsies from skin or other tissues are recommended. Infections sometimes heal spontaneously, but drug treatment is usually necessary for several months in order to cure the infection. Doxycycline or clarithromycin is used most commonly, although in severe cases, a combination of rifampicin and ethambutol is recommended.

  3. Sporotrichoid atypical cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Tigges, Frauke; Bauer, Andrea; Hochauf, Kristina; Meurer, Michael

    2009-03-01

    A case of a sporotrichoid cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium marinum is reported. A 53- year-old male patient presented with red, partly purulent nodular lesions on the back of his left hand, forearm, and upper medial arm that had developed consecutively during the past 4 weeks. A mycobacterial infection with M. marinum was confirmed by molecular methods in a lesional skin biopsy. The patient was treated systemically with rifampicin (750 mg/day) and clarithromycine (1,000 mg/day), and topically with sulmycin (gentamicin sulfate). After 12 weeks of treatment the nodules regressed, leaving behind erythematous patches. M. marinum is a waterborne mycobacterium that commonly infects fish and amphibians worldwide. Transmissions to humans occur occasionally, in most cases as a granulomatous infection localized to the skin, typically following minor trauma to the hands. For this reason, infections are especially common among aquarium keepers.

  4. Choreography of the Mycobacterium Replication Machinery during the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Trojanowski, Damian; Ginda, Katarzyna; Pióro, Monika; Hołówka, Joanna; Skut, Partycja; Jakimowicz, Dagmara

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has recently been demonstrated that bacterial chromosomes are highly organized, with specific positioning of the replication initiation region. Moreover, the positioning of the replication machinery (replisome) has been shown to be variable and dependent on species-specific cell cycle features. Here, we analyzed replisome positions in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a slow-growing bacterium that exhibits characteristic asymmetric polar cell extension. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy analyses revealed that the replisome is slightly off-center in mycobacterial cells, a feature that is likely correlated with the asymmetric growth of Mycobacterium cell poles. Estimates of the timing of chromosome replication in relation to the cell cycle, as well as cell division and chromosome segregation events, revealed that chromosomal origin-of-replication (oriC) regions segregate soon after the start of replication. Moreover, our data demonstrate that organization of the chromosome by ParB determines the replisome choreography. PMID:25691599

  5. [Buruli ulcer: hypothetical modes of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans].

    PubMed

    Rodhain, François

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, has been increasingly rapidly over the past thirty years, particularly in Africa. These extensive necrotic lesions are due to mycolactone, a toxin produced by the bacterium. The mode of Mycobacterium ulcerans transmission is still controversial, and several insect species have been incriminated. Several infected mosquito species have been identified in Australia, while predatory water bugs, particularly belostomatids and naucorids, have been implicated in Africa. Indeed, the bacterium has been detected in these insects' salivary glands, and experimental transmission to mice has been demonstrated, raising the possibility of human transmission by water bug bites. Interestingly, individuals highly exposed to water bug bites tend to be less often infected, indicating that frequent bites by non infected bugs might have a protective effect. Insect-borne transmission would be a minor route of transmission compared to direct transmission via skin trauma.

  6. Mycobacterium fortuitum complex endocarditis-case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Olalla, J; Pombo, M; Aguado, J M; Rodríguez, E; Palenque, E; Costa, J R; Riopérez, E

    2002-02-01

    Endocarditis due to Mycobacterium fortuitum complex is a rare entity generally linked to the hospital environment. Only 18 cases have been published since 1966. Here we present a case of a female who developed an endocarditis due to Mycobacterium chelonae after valve replacement as well as a review of the literature. The course of this kind of endocarditis is generally subacute and the outcome is usually fatal. Blood cultures were positive in 75% of cases of metallic valve endocarditis, versus 20% in bioprostheses. The treatment must include antibiotics that have shown activity against these mycobacteria, such as amikacin, imipenem, cefoxitin, fluorinated quinolones and macrolides (especially clarithromycin). Surgical removal is recommended. Although the prognosis for the patient is poor, we should expect better outcomes with the use of new antibiotic regimens.

  7. Characterization of a Mycobacterium intracellulare Variant Strain by Molecular Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, M. C.; Palenque, E.; Navarro, M. C.; Nuñez, M. C.; Rebollo, M. J.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain causing an unusual infection. Several isolates obtained from an immunocompromised patient were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by the commercial AccuProbe system and biochemical standard identification. Further molecular approaches were undertaken for a more accurate characterization of the bacteria. Up to seven different genomic sequences were analyzed, ranging from conserved mycobacterial genes such as 16S ribosomal DNA to MAC-specific genes such as mig (macrophage-induced gene). The results obtained identify the isolates as a variant of M. intracellulare, an example of the internal variability described for members of the MAC, particularly within that species. The application of other molecular approaches is recommended for more accurate identification of bacteria described as MAC members. PMID:11724827

  8. Characterization of a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain by molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Menendez, M C; Palenque, E; Navarro, M C; Nuñez, M C; Rebollo, M J; Garcia, M J

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain causing an unusual infection. Several isolates obtained from an immunocompromised patient were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by the commercial AccuProbe system and biochemical standard identification. Further molecular approaches were undertaken for a more accurate characterization of the bacteria. Up to seven different genomic sequences were analyzed, ranging from conserved mycobacterial genes such as 16S ribosomal DNA to MAC-specific genes such as mig (macrophage-induced gene). The results obtained identify the isolates as a variant of M. intracellulare, an example of the internal variability described for members of the MAC, particularly within that species. The application of other molecular approaches is recommended for more accurate identification of bacteria described as MAC members.

  9. Pleural effusion in an immunocompetent woman caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Fabbian, Fabio; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Pala, M; Fratti, Daniela; Contini, Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a non-tuberculous mycobacterium that can cause pneumonia, abscess and empyema in subjects with predisposing lung diseases. However, pleurisy with effusion is rare. Herein, we report the case of a 74-year-old immunocompetent female patient without apparent risk factors, who suffered haemorrhagic pleural effusion as the main clinical manifestation. Pleural nodules were detected by computed tomography scan, and microbiological analysis revealed M. fortuitum in the absence of other pathogens. The patient was treated with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin, and full recovery ensued in 4 weeks. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of haemorrhagic pleural effusion in an immunocompetent patient without underlying diseases. Although non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections are rarely accompanied by pleural involvement, M. fortuitum should be considered in such cases, especially when microbiology fails to detect the usual pathogens, and when the clinical picture is unclear.

  10. Mycobacterium fortuitum Complex Skin Infection in a Healthy Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Rebecca; Khatami, Ameneh

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum complex skin infection is described in a previously healthy adolescent girl in Sydney, Australia. Mycobacterium fortuitum typically causes superficial skin infections following trauma to the skin and in our patient may have been related to prior leg "waxing". This case highlights common causes for a delay in diagnosis: lack of clinician awareness and inadequate microbiological and histopathological investigations of tissue samples. Due to the size and number of lesions, surgical excision was felt to be a less desirable therapeutic option due to the potential risk of poor cosmetic outcome for our patient. The standard chemotherapeutic approach to M. fortuitum infections involves the use of a combination of at least two antimicrobial agents to which the isolate is susceptible. Despite in vitro susceptibility testing that suggested that the isolate from our patient was resistant to most oral anti-microbial agents, our patient was treated successfully with a 10-week course of oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and moxifloxacin.

  11. Mycobacterium llatzerense, a waterborne Mycobacterium, that resists phagocytosis by Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Delafont, Vincent; Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Bouchon, Didier; Moulin, Laurent; Héchard, Yann

    2017-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are environmental bacteria increasingly associated to public health problems. In water systems, free-living amoebae (FLA) feed on bacteria by phagocytosis, but several bacteria, including many NTM, are resistant to this predation. Thus, FLA can be seen as a training ground for pathogenic bacteria. Mycobacterium llatzerense was previously described as frequently associated with FLA in a drinking water network. The present study aimed to characterize the interactions between M. llatzerense and FLA. M. llatzerense was internalised by phagocytosis and featured lipid inclusions, suggesting a subversion of host resources. Moreover, M. llatzerense survived and even multiplied in presence of A. castellanii. Using a genomic-based comparative approach, twelve genes involved in phagocytosis interference, described in M. tuberculosis, were identified in the M. llatzerense genome sequenced in this study. Transcriptomic analyses showed that ten genes were significantly upregulated during the first hours of the infection, which could partly explain M. llatzerense resistance. Additionally, M. llatzerense was shown to actively inhibit phagosome acidification. In conclusion, M. llatzerense presents a high degree of resistance to phagocytosis, likely explaining its frequent occurrence within FLA in drinking water networks. It underscores that NTM should be carefully monitored in water networks to prevent human health concerns. PMID:28393860

  12. Current Perspectives on Mycobacterium farcinogenes and Mycobacterium senegalense, the Causal Agents of Bovine Farcy

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Mohamed E.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium farcinogenes and M. senegalense are the causal agents of bovine farcy, a chronic, progressive disease of the skin and lymphatics of zebu cattle. The disease, which is prevalent mainly in sub-Saharan Africa, was in earlier times thought to be caused by Nocardia farcinica and can be described as one of the neglected diseases in cattle. Some aspects of the disease have been investigated during the last five decades but the major development had been in the bacteriological, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic aspects. Molecular analyses confirmed that M. farcinogenes and M. senegalense fall in a subclade together with M. houstonense and M. fortuitum. This subclade is closely related to the one accommodating M. peregrinum, M. porcinum, M. septicum, M. neworleansense, and M. alvei. DNA probes were designed from 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer and could be used for the rapid diagnosis of bovine farcy. An ELISA assay has been evaluated for the serodiagnosis of the disease. The zoonotic potentials of M. farcinogenes and M. senegalense are unknown; few studies reported the isolation of M. senegalense and M. farcinogenes from human clinical sources but not from environmental sources or from other domestic or wild animals. PMID:24876989

  13. Detection of a novel catalase in extracts of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, L G; Diaz, G A

    1988-01-01

    A novel class of catalase, which differs from the previously described M- and T-catalases of mycobacteria, was detected in strains of Mycobacterium avium and M. intracellulare. Designated A-catalase, this enzyme resisted inactivation at 68 degrees C, was inactivated by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (aminotriazole), and exhibited no peroxidase activity. All of these properties distinguished the enzyme from T-catalase. The A-catalase exhibited a Km of 70 mM H2O2, which is between the upper and lower extremes of the ranges reported for T- and M-catalases, respectively. The A-catalase appeared to be more hydrophobic than M-catalase and did not react with antiserum to a representative sample of this class. The banding patterns of T- and M-catalases seen by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were essentially unaffected by the incorporation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) into the PAGE system, whereas the single band of A-catalase seen by PAGE without SDS resolved into as many as five bands in the presence of SDS; these bands were all of slower mobility than the original band. The banding pattern seen with SDS appeared to be related more to counterion charge effects than to molecular size increases that could be attributed to SDS complexed to the protein. It remains to be determined whether the multiple A-catalase bands reflect different proteins or different SDS micellar complexes of a single protein. Images PMID:3346077

  14. Genetic basis for clarithromycin resistance among isolates of Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, R J; Meier, A; Brown, B A; Zhang, Y; Sander, P; Onyi, G O; Böttger, E C

    1996-01-01

    Resistance to clarithromycin among isolates of Mycobacterium chelonae and M. abscessus was observed in 18 of 800 (2.3%) patients tested between 1990 and 1995. Patients whose isolates were resistant had either disseminated disease or chronic lung disease, and the resistant isolates were recovered after clarithromycin monotherapy. Sequencing of the gene coding for the 23S rRNA peptidyltransferase region revealed a point mutation involving adenine at position 2058 (38%) or adenine at position 2059 (62%) in 20 of 20 relapse isolates from the first 13 patients identified. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis or random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR, initial and relapse isolates were shown to have identical DNA patterns. M. chelonae and M. abscessus isolates were found to have only a single chromosomal copy of the rRNA operon, thus making them susceptible to single-step mutations. Thus, clarithromycin resistance in these species of rapidly growing mycobacteria relates to a point mutation in the gene coding for 23S rRNA and occurs in limited clinical situations, but was identified in almost 5% of isolates tested in 1995. PMID:8807061

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1987 induces Th2 immune responses and enhances Mycobacterium smegmatis survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Sha, Shanshan; Shi, Xiaoxia; Deng, Guoying; Chen, Lina; Xin, Yi; Ma, Yufang

    2017-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can interfere with host immune response and escape clearance through its specific antigens. M. tuberculosis Rv1987 encoded by region of difference (RD)-2 gene is a secretory protein with immunogenic potency. Here, we investigated the impact of Rv1987 on host cytokine responses and T cell polarization in mouse aerosol model. A recombinant M. smegmatis mc(2)155 strain that overexpressed Rv1987 protein (named MS1987) was constructed and used to infect C57BL/6 mice. The mc(2)155 harbored the empty vector (named MSVec) was as a control. The results showed that MS1987 challenged mice promoted Th2-biased cytokine responses with lower secretion of IFN-γ but higher production of IL-4 and Rv1987-specific IgG antibody compared to MSVec infected mice. Neutrophilic inflammation and high bacterial burden were observed in the lung tissues of MS1987 infected mice probably own to the failed Th1 cell immunity. Besides, subcutaneous injection of Rv1987 protein could mediate the Th1 cytokine responses caused by M. bovis BCG in mice. These results indicated that M. tuberculosis Rv1987 protein could modulate host immune response towards Th2 profile, which probably contributed to the immune evasion of bacteria from host elimination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of activity and expression of isocitrate lyase in Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Höner Zu Bentrup, K; Miczak, A; Swenson, D L; Russell, D G

    1999-12-01

    Analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that Mycobacterium avium expresses several proteins unique to an intracellular infection. One abundant protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa was isolated, and the N-terminal sequence was determined. It matches a sequence in the M. tuberculosis database (Sanger) with similarity to the enzyme isocitrate lyase of both Corynebacterium glutamicum and Rhodococcus fascians. Only marginal similarity was observed between this open reading frame (ORF) (termed icl) and a second distinct ORF (named aceA) which exhibits a low similarity to other isocitrate lyases. Both ORFs can be found as distinct genes in the various mycobacterial databases recently published. Isocitrate lyase is a key enzyme in the glyoxylate cycle and is essential as an anapleurotic enzyme for growth on acetate and certain fatty acids as carbon source. In this study we express and purify Icl, as well as AceA proteins, and show that both exhibit isocitrate lyase activity. Various known inhibitors for isocitrate lyase were effective. Furthermore, we present evidence that in both M. avium and M. tuberculosis the production and activity of the isocitrate lyase is enhanced under minimal growth conditions when supplemented with acetate or palmitate.

  17. Uptake of sulfate but not phosphate by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is slower than that for Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Song, Houhui; Niederweis, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Knowledge of the metabolic pathways used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis during infection is important for understanding its nutrient requirements and host adaptation. However, uptake, the first step in the utilization of nutrients, is poorly understood for many essential nutrients, such as inorganic anions. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis utilizes nitrate as the sole nitrogen source, albeit at lower efficiency than asparagine, glutamate, and arginine. The growth of the porin triple mutant M. smegmatis ML16 in media with limiting amounts of nitrate and sulfate as sole nitrogen and sulfur sources, respectively, was delayed compared to that of the wild-type strain. The uptake of sulfate was 40-fold slower than that of the wild-type strain, indicating that the efficient uptake of these anions is dependent on porins. The uptake by M. tuberculosis of sulfate and phosphate was approximately 40- and 10-fold slower than that of M. smegmatis, respectively, which is consistent with the slower growth of M. tuberculosis. However, the uptake of these anions by M. tuberculosis is orders of magnitude faster than diffusion through lipid membranes, indicating that unknown outer membrane proteins are required to facilitate this process.

  18. Testing of susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to isoniazid and rifampin by mycobacterium growth indicator tube method.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, S B; Hanna, B A

    1996-01-01

    We tested isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis recovered from 117 patients for their susceptibilities to isoniazid (INH) and rifampin (RIF) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's disk modification of the indirect method of proportions (MOP) test and a three-tube mycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT; BBL) antimycobacterial susceptibility test (AST). Sixty-seven of the M. tuberculosis isolates were recovered from Lowenstein-Jensen (BBL) subcultures, and 50 of the isolates were recovered from MGIT cultures of samples from various body sites. For the MGIT AST method, 0.5 ml of test organism suspension was inoculated into an MGIT with 0.1 micrograms of INH per ml, an MGIT with 1.0 micrograms of RIF per ml, and growth control MGIT. The tubes were incubated at 37 degrees C and were examined daily. The MGIT AST results were interpreted as follows: susceptible if the tubes containing INH or RIF did not fluoresce within 2 days of the time that the positive growth control fluoresced and resistant if the tubes containing INH or RIF did fluoresce within 2 days of the time that the positive growth control fluoresced. The mean time fluorescence for the positive growth control was 5.5 days. The two methods were in agreement for 114 of the 117 isolates from patients, while for 3 isolates there were minor discordant results. PMID:8735121

  19. Selective targeting of Mycobacterium smegmatis with trehalose-functionalized nanoparticles†

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardana, Kalana W.; Jayawardena, H. Surangi N.; Wijesundera, Samurdhi A.; De Zoysa, Thareendra; Sundhoro, Madanodaya

    2015-01-01

    Silica and iron oxide nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 6 to 40 nm were functionalized with trehalose. The trehalose-conjugated nanoparticles showed strong interactions with Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and minimal interactions with macrophage (RAW 264.7) or A549 cells. In addition, trehalose-conjugated silica nanoparticles selectively interacted with M. smegmatis on M. smegmatis-treated A549 cells, demonstrating high potential of trehalose in developing targeted therapy for treating mycobacterial infection. PMID:26121049

  20. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum: a rare offending organism.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Gilbert; Wiedeman, Jean; Boggan, James E

    2014-12-01

    Postsurgical infection is one of the greatest potential morbidities of ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery. The majority of infections can be linked to contamination with skin flora at the time of surgery, a phenomenon that has been well described. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria. The authors report a case of postoperative ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum and review the available neurosurgical literature and treatment strategies.

  1. Prosthetic valve endocarditis and bloodstream infection due to Mycobacterium chimaera.

    PubMed

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R; Bloemberg, Guido; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Strain AH16.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nabeeh A; Honda, Jennifer R; Davidson, Rebecca M; Epperson, L Elaine; Bankowski, Matthew J; Chan, Edward D; Strong, Michael

    2016-11-23

    Mycobacterium chimaera is a nontuberculous mycobacterial species that causes cardiovascular, pulmonary, and postsurgical infections. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of M. chimaera This genome is 6.33 Mbp, with a G+C content of 67.56%, and encodes 4,926 protein-coding genes, as well as 74 tRNAs, one ncRNA, and three rRNA genes. Copyright © 2016 Hasan et al.

  3. Cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Associated with Mesotherapy Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wongkitisophon, Pranee; Rattanakaemakorn, Ploysyne; Tanrattanakorn, Somsak; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2011-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial skin infections have an increasing incidence. In immunocompetent patients, they usually follow local trauma. We present a case of cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus infection following mesotherapy. The lesions were successfully treated with a combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline. Atypical mycobacterial infection should be suspected in patients who develop late-onset skin and soft tissue infection after cutaneous injury, injection, and surgical intervention, particularly if they do not respond to conventional antibiotic treatment. PMID:21487459

  4. Radiometric detection of the metabolic activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cummings, D M; Ristroph, D; Camargo, E E; Larson, S M; Wagner, H N

    1975-12-01

    A radiometric test capable of detecting the metabolic rate of M. tuberculosis within 18 hr after inoculation has been developed. The technique is based on the measurement of 14CO2 produced by the bacterial metabolism of 14C-U-glycerol of 14C-U-acetate. The test is an important first step in the development of rapid radiometric techniques for clinical study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  5. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare: a rare cause of subacromial bursitis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Raj; Tuckett, John; Hide, Geoff; Dildey, Petra; Karsandas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Septic subacromial bursitis is an uncommon disorder with only a few reported cases in the literature. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We report the case of a 61-year-old female with a septic subacromial bursitis where the causative organism was found to be Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The diagnosis was only made following a biopsy, and we use this case to highlight the importance of recognising the need to consider a biopsy and aspiration in atypical situations.

  6. Mycobacterium xenopi infection in an immunosuppressed patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Majoor, C; Schreurs, A; Weers-Pothoff, G

    2004-01-01

    A 48 year old patient with active Crohn's disease presented with bilateral nodules over his lungs resembling malignant metastasis. Bronchoscopic and pathological examination of the airways and sputum did not show any malignancy. After 6 weeks Mycobacterium xenopi was cultured from his bronchial washings while all other cultures remained negative. Treatment was started with rifampicin, ethambutol, and clarithromycin and, after 9 months of treatment, there was an almost complete resolution of his chest radiograph. PMID:15223876

  7. Mycobacterium marinum Hand Infection in a “Sushi Chef”

    PubMed Central

    Cennimo, David J.; Agag, Richard; Fleegler, Earl; Lardizabal, Alfred; Klein, Kenneth M.; Wenokor, Cornelia; Swaminathan, Shobha

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We present the case of a sushi chef with pain and swelling of his index finger and wrist for a year, unresponsive to antibiotics. Methods: Biopsy showed a xanthogranulomatous reaction and positive culture results for Mycobacterium marinum. Results: He was treated with minocycline, clarithromycin, and ethambutol. In addition, he underwent radical synovectomy of the lesion. Conclusion: The combined medical and surgical approach resulted in a positive outcome. PMID:19915656

  8. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium from waterfowl with polycystic livers.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    An unusual gross appearance of avian tuberculosis, where fluid-filled thin-walled cysts are produced and grossly apparent in preference to granulomas, is presented. Histopathology confirmed the granulomatous nature of the lesions and the presence of intracellular acid-fast organisms. Mycobacterium avium complex was cultured from affected organs. The unusual gross presentation in these cases indicates the need to consider tuberculosis in the differential of cystic diseases of avian livers.

  9. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: application in epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Kato-Maeda, Midori; Metcalfe, John Z.; Flores, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping is used to track specific isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a community. It has been successfully used in epidemiologic research (termed ‘molecular epidemiology’) to study the transmission dynamics of TB. In this article, we review the genetic markers used in molecular epidemiologic studies including the use of whole-genome sequencing technology. We also review the public health application of molecular epidemiologic tools. PMID:21366420

  10. Mycobacterium avium in a shower linked to pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O; Iseman, Michael D; de Haas, Petra; van Soolingen, Dick

    2008-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium was isolated from hot and cold water samples and from sediment (biofilm) collected from the showerhead in the home of a woman with M. avium pulmonary disease lacking known M. avium risk factors. IS1245/IS1311 DNA fingerprinting demonstrated that M. avium isolates from the hot and cold water and showerhead sediment demonstrated a clonal relationship with the patient's M. avium isolate. The data provide evidence that showers may serve as sources of infection by waterborne M. avium.

  11. Game of 'Somes: Protein Destruction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Samanovic, Marie I.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    The proteasome system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is required for causing disease. Proteasomes are multi-subunit chambered proteases and, until recently, were only known to participate in adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent proteolysis in bacteria. In this review, we discuss the latest advances in understanding how both ATP-dependent and ATP-independent proteasome-regulated pathways contribute to M. tuberculosis virulence. PMID:26526503

  12. Mycobacterium intracellulare infection in a capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Pezzone, Natalia; Eberhardt, Ayelen T; Fernández, Analia; Garbaccio, Sergio; Zumárraga, Martín; Gioffré, Andrea; Magni, Carolina; Beldomenico, Pablo M; Marini, M Rocío; Canal, Ana M

    2013-12-01

    This report describes the first case of Mycobacterium intracellulare infection with typical granulomatous lesions of mycobacteriosis in a capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris). The individual was a captive-bred young female, part of the control group of an experimental study on stress. Multiple granulomatous lesions were detected in a mesenteric lymph node of this young female. Mycobacterial infection was confirmed by bacteriologic culture and molecular identification methods. Clinical lesions were characterized by histopathology.

  13. Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium Phage CrystalP.

    PubMed

    Fleischacker, Christine L; Segura-Totten, Miriam; Garlena, Rebecca A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Pope, Welkin H; Russell, Daniel A; Hatfull, Graham F

    2017-07-13

    Mycobacteriophage CrystalP is a newly isolated phage infecting Mycobacterium smegmatis strain mc(2)155. CrystalP has a 76,483-bp genome and is predicted to contain 143 protein-coding and 2 tRNA genes, including repressor and integrase genes consistent with a temperate lifestyle. CrystalP is related to the mycobacteriophages Toto and Kostya and to other Cluster E phages. Copyright © 2017 Fleischacker et al.

  14. Asymmetric cell division in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its unique features.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Nagaraja, Mukkayyan; Sebastian, Jees; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2014-03-01

    Recently, several reports showed that about 80 % of mid-log phase Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium marinum, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG cells divide symmetrically with 5-10 % deviation in the septum position from the median. However, the mode of cell division of the pathogenic mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remained unclear. Therefore, in the present study, using electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy of septum- and nucleoid-stained live and fixed cells, and live cell time-lapse imaging, we show the occurrence of asymmetric cell division with unusually deviated septum/constriction in 20 % of the 15 % septating M. tuberculosis cells in the mid-log phase population. The remaining 80 % of the 15 % septating cells divided symmetrically but with 2-5 % deviation in the septum/constriction position, as reported for M. smegmatis, M. marinum, and M. bovis BCG cells. Both the long and the short portions of the asymmetrically dividing M. tuberculosis cells with unusually deviated septum contained nucleoids, thereby generating viable short and long cells from each asymmetric division. M. tuberculosis short cells were acid fast positive and, like the long cells, further readily underwent growth and division to generate micro-colony, thereby showing that they were neither mini cells, spores nor dormant forms of mycobacteria. The freshly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients' sputum samples, which are known for the prevalence of oxidative stress conditions, also contained short cells at the same proportion as that in the mid-log phase population. The probable physiological significance of the generation of the short cells through unusually deviated asymmetric cell division is discussed.

  15. Efflux inhibition with verapamil potentiates bedaquiline in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shashank; Cohen, Keira A; Winglee, Kathryn; Maiga, Mamoudou; Diarra, Bassirou; Bishai, William R

    2014-01-01

    Drug efflux is an important resistance mechanism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We found that verapamil, an efflux inhibitor, profoundly decreases the MIC of bedaquiline and clofazimine to M. tuberculosis by 8- to 16-fold. This exquisite susceptibility was noted among drug-susceptible and drug-resistant clinical isolates. Thus, efflux inhibition is an important sensitizer of bedaquiline and clofazimine, and efflux may emerge as a resistance mechanism to these drugs.

  16. Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Marc; March, Francesca; Garrigó, Montserrat; Moreno, Carmen; Español, Montserrat; Coll, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clarithromycin was considered the cornerstone for the treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus complex infections. Genetic resistance mechanisms have been described and many experts propose amikacin as an alternative. Nevertheless, clarithromycin has several advantages; therefore, it is necessary to identify the non-functional erm(41) allele to determine the most suitable treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the molecular mechanisms of clarithromycin resistance in a collection of Mycobacterium abscessus complex isolates and to verify the relationship between these mechanisms and the antibiogram. Materials and Methods Clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex (n = 22) from 16 patients were identified using four housekeeping genes (rpoB, secA1, sodA and hsp65), and their genetic resistance was characterized by studying erm(41) and rrl genes. Nine strains were recovered from the clinical isolates and subjected to E-test and microdilution clarithromycin susceptibility tests, with readings at 3, 7 and 14 days. Results We classified 11/16 (68.8%) M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, 4/16 (25.0%) M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, and 1/16 (6.3%) M. abscessus subsp. massiliense. T28 erm(41) allele was observed in 8 Mycobacterium abscessus subps. abscessus and 3 Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii. One strain of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii had an erm(41) gene truncated and was susceptible to clarithromycin. No mutations were observed in rrl gene first isolates. In three patients, follow-up of initial rrl wild-type strains showed acquired resistance. Conclusions Most clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex had inducible resistance to clarithromycin and total absence of constitutive resistance. Our findings showed that the acquisition of resistance mutations in rrl gene was associated with functional and non-functional erm(41) gene. Caution is needed when using erm(41) sequencing alone to identify M. abscessus subspecies. This study reports an acquired

  17. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection Due to Mycobacterium chimaera

    PubMed Central

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R.; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected. PMID:23536407

  18. Mycobacteriosis, Mycobacterium chelonae, in a captive yellow stingray (Urobatis jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Clarke, Elsburgh O; Dorn, Brian; Boone, Allison; Risatti, Guillermo; Gilbert-Marcheterre, Kelly; Harms, Craig A

    2013-06-01

    An adult yellow stingray (Urobatis jamaicensis) from a touch-tank exhibit developed a large abscess on the dorsal aspect of the calvarium and swollen soft tissue surrounding the left spiracle. A large amount of fluid exudate was drained from the abscess. Mycobacterium chelonae was diagnosed by cytology of the exudate and by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. The animal was euthanized and disseminated mycobacteriosis was confirmed with histology.

  19. In vitro susceptibilities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to 10 antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, S K; Crawford, C E; Geddes, G L; Black, W A

    1988-01-01

    After preliminary in vitro screening of 10 antimicrobial agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the MICs of the 6 most promising agents against 27 clinical isolates were determined by agar dilution. The two quinolone compounds tested (difloxacin and A-56620) were the most active, each inhibiting 50% of the strains at concentrations of 4 micrograms/ml. M. tuberculosis strains previously shown to be resistant to isoniazid, streptomycin, rifampin, or ethambutol were as susceptible to these quinolone compounds as susceptible strains. PMID:3143305

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Strain AH16

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Jennifer R.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; Epperson, L. Elaine; Bankowski, Matthew J.; Chan, Edward D.; Strong, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium chimaera is a nontuberculous mycobacterial species that causes cardiovascular, pulmonary, and postsurgical infections. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of M. chimaera. This genome is 6.33 Mbp, with a G+C content of 67.56%, and encodes 4,926 protein-coding genes, as well as 74 tRNAs, one ncRNA, and three rRNA genes. PMID:27881537